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Sample records for middle cranial fossa

  1. Piezosurgery for the repair of middle cranial fossa meningoencephaloceles.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Aanand N; Rajan, Gunesh P

    2015-03-01

    To describe the use of a piezosurgery medical device to perform a craniotomy and produce a split calvarial graft for the repair of middle cranial fossa meningoencephaloceles. Retrospective case review. Tertiary referral hospital. Ten consecutive patients undergoing middle cranial fossa approach for the repair of meningoencephaloceles. Therapeutic. Intraoperative and postoperative complications, success rate as defined by the ability to fashion a split calvarial graft that achieves complete closure of the tegmen defect. As a secondary outcome measure, evidence of integration of the split calvarial bone graft with the adjacent skull base was assessed. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. An appropriately sized calvarial bone graft was produced, and complete closure of the tegmen defect was achieved in all 10 cases. Computed tomography demonstrated evidence of integration of the bone graft in eight cases between 4 and 9 months after surgery. The piezosurgery medical device provides a safe and effective means by which the middle fossa craniotomy and split calvarial bone graft can be produced to repair defects of the middle fossa tegmen, with integration of the bone graft in the majority of cases.

  2. Surgical Anatomy of the Extended Middle Cranial Fossa Approach

    PubMed Central

    Arìstegui, Miguel; Cokkeser, Yasar; Saleh, Essam; Naguib, Maged; Landolfi, Mauro; Taibah, Abdel; Sanna, Mario

    1994-01-01

    The extended middle cranial fossa approach includes removal of the petrous bone from its subtemporal surface in order to expose widely the internal auditory canal and the posterior fossa dura around its porus while preserving all the important and closely related anatomical structures. We have dissected 25 temporal bones and five fresh cadavers in order to define the limits of this approach. Measurements were obtained between the different structures to find reliable angles and distances that could guide working in this area. A new method of identification of the internal auditory canal is discussed based on the measurements taken. The results of the present work showed wide variations in the different structures. The arcuate eminence was coincident with the superior semicircular canal in only 48% of bones. Dehiscence of the geniculate ganglion and of the internal carotid artery was noted in 16% and 20% of specimens, respectively. The angles measured between the different structures showed great variations. However, the angle between the internal auditory canal and superior petrosal sinus was constant. Though the extended middle cranial fossa is a versatile approach, it affords a limited access to the cerebellopontine angle. A thorough understanding of the complex and variable anatomy of this area is necessary should this approach be utilized. ImagesFigure 1p183-bFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171170

  3. Interconnecting the posterior and middle cranial fossae for tumors that traverse Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Cheung, S W; Jackler, R K; Pitts, L H; Gutin, P H

    1995-03-01

    Meckel's cave is an avenue for tumor to spread between the posterior and middle cranial fossae. The most common neoplasms that traverse this channel are trigeminal schwannomas and meningiomas. The classic approach to address disease in both cranial fossae involves separate craniotomies. Recent innovations in skull base surgery have made it possible to perform a single opening with simultaneous exposure of the posterior and middle fossae, without undue brain retraction. Tumors with a large middle fossa component and a smaller posterior fossa portion are exposed via subtemporal craniotomy with petrosectomy and tentorium division. However, tumors with a large posterior fossa component and a smaller middle fossa portion in the setting of serviceable hearing are addressed with retrosigmoid craniotomy and petrosectomy. For bilobed tumors with substantial components in both fossae, subtemporal craniotomy combined with varying degrees of transtemporal petrosectomy and tentorium division is employed. The evolution of techniques to address tumors that traverse Meckel's cave is reviewed and a treatment algorithm is proposed.

  4. Arachnoid Cyst in the Middle Cranial Fossa Presenting with Pulsatile Exophthalmos: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Atsushi; KON, Hiroyuki; HARYU, Shinya; MINO, Masaki; SASAKI, Tatsuya; NISHIJIMA, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman suffered gradual progression of right pulsatile exophthalmos and slight headache. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated outward and downward displacement of the right globe and an arachnoid cyst in the right middle cranial fossa associated with thinned and anterior protrusion of a bony orbit. Microscopic cystocisternotomy was performed and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inside of the cyst communicated into the carotid cistern and cistern in the posterior cranial fossa. Pulsatile exophthalmos improved immediately after surgery. Arachnoid cyst in the middle cranial fossa presenting with exophthalmos is rare. Microscopic cystocisternotomy might successfully improve CSF flow and relieve exophthalmos. PMID:24305013

  5. Wound breakdown after middle cranial fossa craniotomy: an unusual complication after rhytidectomy.

    PubMed

    Moberly, Aaron C; Tweel, Benjamin C; Welling, D Bradley

    2014-02-01

    Wound complications after middle cranial fossa craniotomy are rare. We describe a patient who underwent a left middle fossa craniotomy for resection of a small internal auditory canal tumor with subsequent development of wound breakdown and infection 1 week postoperatively. Prompting of the patient elicited a history of bilateral rhytidectomies. Wound debridement, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, dermal regeneration template placement, and prolonged antibiotic treatment were performed. Complete secondary intention healing occurred with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Prior rhytidectomy scars must be identified and incorporated into the surgical planning prior to performing middle fossa craniotomy incisions.

  6. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to the Middle Cranial Fossa through the Cavernous Sinus Triangles: Anatomical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    KOMATSU, Fuminari; ODA, Shinri; SHIMODA, Masami; IMAI, Masaaki; SHIGEMATSU, Hideaki; KOMATSU, Mika; TSCHABITSCHER, Manfred; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    The lateral limit of endoscopic endonasal surgery has yet to be defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the lateral limit of endoscopic endonasal surgery at the level of the sphenoid sinus. Access from the sphenoid sinus to the middle cranial fossa through the cavernous sinus triangles was evaluated by cadaver dissection. Anatomical analysis demonstrated that the medial temporal dura mater was exposed through the anterior area of the clinoidal triangle, anteromedial triangle, and superior area of the anterolateral triangle, indicating potential corridors to the middle cranial fossa. This study suggests that the cavernous sinus triangles are applicable in selected cases to manage middle cranial fossa lesions by endoscopic endonasal surgery. PMID:25446385

  7. A Middle Cranial Fossa Dermoid Cyst Treated by an Endonasal Endoscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Abdullah; Yildizoğlu, Üzeyir; Polat, Bahtiyar; Binar, Murat

    2015-06-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare, benign, congenital ectodermal inclusion cysts in the skull base, comprising skin supplements surrounded by squamous epithelium. In the period of embryological development, the cysts originate from ectodermal cells left behind in the cranial region by the closure of the neural tube and are primarily located at the midline, especially in the subarachnoid spaces. These lesions are usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally. When the cysts reach large sizes, they can be symptomatic due to infection, rupture, or mass effect around neurovascular tissue. The cysts typically demonstrate accurate radiological diagnostic features. In this case report, we present a rare dermoid cyst in the middle cranial fossa, treated by an endonasal endoscopic approach. The endonasal endoscopic management of appropriate middle cranial fossa is discussed as a recent advance in the extended applications of endoscopic sinus surgery.

  8. Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa causing an epidural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Struewer, Johannes; Kiriazidis, Ilias; Figiel, Jens; Dukatz, Thomas; Frangen, Thomas; Ziring, Ewgeni

    2012-07-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is a rare complication of mandibular trauma due to anatomical and biomechanical factors. Owing to the proximity of the temporal glenoid fossa to the middle meningeal artery, there is the risk of serious sequelae in case of trauma. The authors report the case of a 36-year-old male patient, who was beaten up in a family dispute and presented with complex mandibular and maxillofacial fractures, including mandibular condyle intrusion into the middle cranial fossa causing extensive meningeal bleeding. The patient underwent immediate surgery, with evacuation of the epidural haematoma via a temporal approach. In addition open reduction and reconstruction of the temporal glenoid fossa via anatomic reduction of the fragments was performed. A functional occlusion was re-established via miniplate reconstruction of the complex mandibular body and ramus fractures. Prompt diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach are essential to minimize the complications. Advanced imaging modalities of computed tomography are indicated. Treatment options should be individualized in particular in case of suspected neurological injury.

  9. Middle cranial fossa approach for the repair of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks to the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Altuna, Xabier; Navarro, Juan José; García, Leire; Ugarte, Ane; Thomas, Izaskun

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks to the middle ear due to tegmen tympani defects can result in hearing loss or hypoacusis and predispose to meningitis as well as other neurological complications. Surgical repair of the defect can be performed through a middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach or a transmastoid approach. We conducted a retrospective study of the patients in our Department due to a spontaneous CSF leak to the middle ear treated using a MCF approach during a 6-year period (2009-2014). Thirteen patients with spontaneous CSF leak to the middle ear were treated with this approach. The primary and first symptom in all of them was conductive hearing loss. In all cases, the defect or defects were closed in a multilayer manner using muscle, temporalis fascia and cortical bone. Minimum follow-up in this series was 14 months, with successful closure in all but one patient (who required reintervention). We found no intra- or postoperative complications due to the craniotomy, and the audiometry improved and normalised in all cases except for the failed case. The MCF approach with a multilayer closure of the defect is an effective technique for repairing spontaneous CSF leaks to the middle ear and for restoring hearing in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  10. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis after condylar dislocation into the middle cranial fossa: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zamorano, G M; Nuñez, L F; Alvarez, L A; Otayza, F A; Fernández, M A; Donoso-Hofer, F

    2016-11-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa after a trauma is a rare event. The lack of appropriate treatment can lead to ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We report about a case of TMJ ankylosis following intracranial dislocation of the mandibular condyle through the roof of the articular fossa. A 9-year-old patient was referred for a severe limitation of mouth opening that began progressively one year before. A history of chin injury due to an accidental fall was found. Preoperative CT scan showed a TMJ ankylosis on the right side combined with a dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa. Treatment consisted in an intracranial resection of the mandibular condyle, partial removal of the ankylosis block and TMJ arthroplasty. Our case is the second case of TMJ ankylosis following intracranial dislocation of the mandibular condyle and treated with arthroplasty alone published in the English literature. There is no consensus regarding the pathophysiology of TMJ ankylosis and regarding the attitude towards the ankylosis block. In our case, no recurrence was noticed after a one-year follow-up. An interdisciplinary approach is needed, including maxillofacial surgeon, neurosurgeon, physiotherapist and orthodontist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Embolization of dural arteriovenous fistula of the anterior cranial fossa through the middle meningeal artery with Onyx.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jian-Ping; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Tao; Yu, Jia; Zhao, Zhen-Wei; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2014-02-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) of the anterior cranial fossa is usually treated by surgical disconnection or endovascular embolization via the ophthalmic artery. The middle meningeal artery is a rarely used approach. This study investigated the safety and efficacy of embolization of DAVF of the anterior cranial fossa with Onyx through the middle meningeal artery. A retrospective review of a prospective cerebral vascular disease database was performed. Patients with DAVF of the anterior cranial fossa managed with embolization through the middle meningeal artery with Onyx were selected. Information on demography, symptoms and signs, angiographic examinations, interventional treatments, angiographic and clinical results, and follow-up was collected and analyzed. Five patients were included in this study, four of whom had hemorrhage. All fistulas were fed by the bilateral ethmoidal arteries arising from the ophthalmic artery and by the anterior branch of the middle meningeal artery. The abnormal shunt unilaterally drained into the superior sagittal sinus with interposition of the cortical veins all five patients. All endovascular treatments were successful with evidence of an angiographic cure. No complications occurred, and all patients recovered uneventfully without neurologic deficits. There were nearly no symptoms among the patients during follow-up. Embolization of DAVF of the anterior cranial fossa via the middle meningeal artery with Onyx is safe, effective, and a good choice for management of DAVF. More cases are needed to verify these findings. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Cine-magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of communication between middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts and cisterns.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, T; Taoka, T; Nikaido, Y; Shiomi, K; Fujimoto, T; Otsuka, H; Takeuchi, H

    1996-06-01

    Cine-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations were performed in 10 patients with middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts to evaluate communication between the cysts and the normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space. Eight of 10 patients were evaluated by time of flight cine-MR imaging, and two by phase contrast cine-MR imaging. Two patients underwent membranectomy of the cysts, and were evaluated both pre- and postoperatively. Computed tomography cisternography was used to confirm communication between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns. Pulsatile fluid motion within the cysts was present in all patients. However, marked fluid motion and jet flow between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns were only observed in communicating cysts. In the two patients who underwent membranectomy, postoperative examination found greater fluid motion and jet flow not previously present. Cine-MR imaging demonstration of marked pulsatile fluid motion accompanied by jet flow suggests that a cyst communicates with the normal CSF space.

  13. Unusual foramen in the middle cranial fossae of adult black South African skull specimens.

    PubMed

    Mazengenya, Pedzisai; Ekpo, Okobi

    2017-07-01

    Variations of the skull base foramina are quite common and often cause surgical confusion during surgical intervention of the region. The unusual foramen was observed in five (0.98%) adult skulls of black South Africans obtained from the Raymond A Dart collection of human specimens housed in the School of Anatomical Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand. Three of the five specimens were females while the remaining two were males. In four of the five skulls, the unusual foramen was located anterolateral to the foramen rotundum both on the left and right sides. In the fifth specimen, the foramen was located posterolateral to the foramen rotundum on the left half of the middle cranial fossa. On radiographs, two specimens with unusual foramen on the right showed that the foramen opened into a canal directed inferomedially towards the pterygopalatine fossa. In the remaining three specimens, the canals were blind and shallow. This information is vital during interpretation of CT scans at the base of the skull, as any less well-known foramen may be mistaken for abnormalities leading to surgical complications.

  14. Subtemporal-anterior transtentoral approach to middle cranial fossa microsurgical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiming; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Wei; Feng, Yugong; Li, Gang

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to describe the topography of inferior and external dura mater of the middle cranial fossa through subtemporal-anterior transpetrosal approach and discuss the feasibility of improving the approach. Eight formalin-fixed adult cadaveric heads were studied, with the bones milled away in the lateral triangle region of the petrous bone, Kawase rhombus region, and inner triangle region of the petrous apex. The distances between the targets in these regions, as well as the angles after the dissection of zygomatic arch, were measured, and then the exposed petroclival and retrochiasmatic areas were observed under the microscope. There were significant variations in the distances between targets in the 3 milled regions among the specimens. After the dissection of zygomatic arch, the surgical view got an average increase of 12 degrees. The subtemporal anterior transpetrosal approach, as an improved subtemporal approach, can expose the lesions optimally, causing no injury to the hearing and reducing injuries to temporal lobe. On the other hand, the lateral bone of the petrous parts of the temporal bone is removed so as to improve the view to the retrochiasmatic area and expand the operative field.

  15. Management of CSF leakage after microsurgery for vestibular schwannoma via the middle cranial fossa approach.

    PubMed

    Scheich, Matthias; Ginzkey, Christian; Ehrmann-Müller, Desiree; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa; Hagen, Rudolf

    2016-10-01

    Microsurgery is one of the primary current standard options for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Especially the middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach is a safe and efficacious technique for the preservation of hearing and facial nerve function in small VS. Postoperative complications are rare, although a leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is common. The aim of this study was to analyze postoperative CSF leaks and to describe strategies for postoperative treatment. Between October 2005 and May 2012, 148 patients suffering from VS and selected for microsurgery via the MCF approach were treated in our department. Postoperative CSF leakage occurred in 19 patients. We found a leakage via the Eustachian tube into the nasopharynx in 18 patients and one case of incisional leakage. In 13 cases leaking stopped within 5 days by conservative management including bed rest and intravenous (i.v) antibiotics. Five patients needed lumbar drainage (LD) and only two patients had to undergo revision surgery to seal and pack the mastoid. Analyzed risk factors were age, gender, tumor size and pneumatization of the mastoid. Only the latter showed a significant influence on CSF leakage. We could demonstrate that a stepwise strategy is needed for successful treatment of CSF leaks.

  16. Penetration of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa: report of a case in a 6-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    DeFabianis, P

    2001-01-01

    Reported cases of dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa are rare. Treatment of this injury should be individualized and should take in account the age of the patient, growth potential, the degree of glenoid fossa destruction, the risk of ankylosis and the risk of further cranial injury. In children, functional therapy is aimed at helping the restoration of posterior facial height, good occlusal relations and function. Long-term follow-up is mandatory. Surgery may be required later to correct asymmetrical growth or developing ankylosis. This article describes a case of condylar penetration into the middle cranial fossa in a six-year-old child and the treatment performed to minimize consequences on occlusion and facial development.

  17. Anterior and middle cranial fossa skull base reconstruction using microvascular free tissue techniques: surgical complications and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ernest S; Kraus, Dennis; Bui, Duc T; Mehrara, Babak J; Disa, Joseph J; Bilsky, Mark; Shah, Jatin P; Cordeiro, Peter G

    2008-05-01

    Surgical ablation for oncologic disease requiring skull base resection can result in both facial disfigurement and a complex wound defect with exposed orbital content, oral cavity, bone, and dural lining. Inadequate reconstruction can result in brain abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, visual disturbances, speech impairment, and altered oral intake. This study assesses the functional outcomes of patients who undergo anterior and middle cranial fossa skull base reconstruction using microsurgical free tissue transfer techniques. Using a prospectively maintained database, a 10-year, single institution retrospective chart review was performed on patients who had surgery for anterior and middle cranial base tumor resections. The type of resection, reconstruction method, complication rate, and functional outcomes were reviewed. From 1992 to 2003, 70 patients (49 men, 21 women) with a mean age of 54 (age 6-78) underwent anterior and middle cranial skull base tumor resection and reconstruction. The patients were divided into the following groups: maxillectomy with orbital content preservation (n = 21), orbitomaxillectomy with palatal preservation (n = 26), and orbitomaxillectomy with palatal resection (n = 23). The average length of hospital stay was 12.6 days. The vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was used in the majority of cases to correct midface defects. Two flaps required emergent re-exploration; however, there were no flap failures. Early and late postoperative complications were investigated. Cerebrospinal fluid was observed infrequently (7%) and did not require additional surgical intervention. Intracranial abscesses were encountered rarely (1.4%). Patients who had maxillectomy with orbital preservation and reconstruction had minor ophthalmologic eyelid changes that occurred frequently. Patients who required palatal reconstruction had a normal or intelligible speech (93%) and unrestricted or soft diet (88%). Using a multidisciplinary surgical team

  18. Use of flexible CO₂ laser fiber in microsurgery for vestibular schwannoma via the middle cranial fossa approach.

    PubMed

    Scheich, Matthias; Ginzkey, Christian; Harnisch, Wilma; Ehrmann, Desiree; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa; Hagen, Rudolf

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the results of microsurgery in vestibular schwannomas (VS) with assistance of a flexible CO(2) laser fiber (Omniguide(®)) using the middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach. For that purpose we performed a prospective non-randomized clinical trial. In 20 consecutive patients suffering from VS and elected for microsurgery via the MCF approach, tumor resection was performed with the aid of the flexible CO(2) laser ("laser group", LG). Twenty patients with similar tumor volume and pre-operative hearing status out of a cohort of 76 patients previously treated by the same surgeon without laser were used as comparison group ("conventional group", CG) (matched-pair-technique). Facial weakness (House-Brackmann (HB) 2-4) was seen in early postoperative (p.o.) days in six patients in each group and all recovered completely by 3 months p.o., except one patient with HB 2 in CG. Facial nerve preservation rate (HB 1 + 2) was 100% in both groups. Hearing preservation rate (Gardner/Robertson class 1 + 2 or AAO-HNS A + B, pre- and postoperatively) was 72% in LG and 82% in CG, without significant difference. Overall time from incision to skin suture was 157 min (SD 55.9) in CG and 160 min (SD 39.7) in LG. Tumor preparation time was 23.2 min (SD 19.7) in CG and 36.1 min (SD 33.8) in LG. The use of a handheld flexible CO(2) laser fiber in VS-microsurgery is safe and subjectively facilitates tumor resection especially in "difficult" (e.g., highly vascularized) tumors. However, in this limited prospective trial the excellent functional outcome following conventional microsurgery could not be further improved, nor the surgical time reduced by means of the non-contact laser-tool. Focusing the use of the flexible CO(2) laser on "difficult" tumors may lead to different results in future.

  19. Outcome on hearing and facial nerve function in microsurgical treatment of small vestibular schwannoma via the middle cranial fossa approach.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Scheich, Matthias; Harnisch, Wilma; Bonn, Verena; Ehrmann-Müller, Desiree; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa; Mlynski, Robert; Hagen, Rudolf

    2013-03-01

    Encouraging results regarding hearing preservation and facial nerve function as well as increasing understanding of the natural behaviour of vestibular schwannomas have led to the recommendation of an early treatment in small VS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate current data on functional outcome of patients with small VS treated by middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach. A retrospective chart study of all cases treated by MCF approach between October 2007 and September 2011 was performed. Records were analyzed regarding demographical data, tumor size, hearing status, vestibular function and facial nerve function. Facial nerve function was classified according to the House-Brackmann scale (HB). Hearing status was classified according to the American Association of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and a modified classification of Gardner and Robertson (GR). Eighty-nine patients were included in the study; 41 % of VS was classified as intracanalicular (stage 1) and 59 % as stage 2. From 65 patients with a preoperative hearing status according to AAO-HNS A or B, 74 % still presented with A or B after surgery. Using a modified GR classification, from 70 patients categorized as class I or II prior to surgery, 70 % were still class I or II. Looking to the facial nerve function 1 week after surgery, 82 % of patients presented with HB 1 or 2. Three to twelve months later, 96 % demonstrated HB 1 or 2. A persisting facial palsy was recorded in four patients. Preoperative hearing status was evaluated as a prognostic factor for postoperative hearing, whereas no influence was detected in ABR, vestibular function and tumor length. Early diagnosis of small VS due to high-sensitive MRI requires the management of this tumor entity. Natural behaviour of VS in many cases demonstrates an increase of tumor size over time with deterioration of hearing status. The presented data underline the recommendation of an early surgical treatment in small VS as a valuable

  20. Decompression of the tympanic and labyrinthine segments of the facial nerve by middle cranial fossa approach: an anatomic study.

    PubMed

    da Franca Pereira, Marcos Alexandre; Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; de Andrade, Emerson Magno; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Brito, Rubens

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral facial palsy is characterized by the permanent or temporary interruption of facial muscle function. The middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach has been used to decompress the facial nerve (FN) when hearing needs to be preserved. In this work, we describe a technique for decompressing the FN through the MCF approach, which allows the direct exposure of the labyrinthine and entire tympanic segment of the FN, with preservation of inner ear function. Twenty cadavers heads were used in this study. The reference landmarks used were the middle meningeal artery, greater superficial petrosal nerve, arcuate eminence, inferior petrosal sinus and meatal plane following the petrous apex from its most anterior and medial portion. The tympanic segment of the FN presented, on average, a total length of 11 ± 0.67 mm to the right and 11.5 ± 0.60 mm to the left. The longitudinal lengths of the bone window in the tegmen tympani were 16.8 ± 1.67 mm to the right and 16.8 ± 1.20 mm to the left. The cross-sectional lengths of the bone window in the tegmen tympani were 5.5 ± 1.20 mm and 5.0 ± 1.75 mm to the right and left sides, respectively. The average value of the elliptical area formed by the longitudinal and transversal lengths of the bone window made in the tegmen tympani was 72.5 ± 22.5 mm(2) to the right and 65.9 ± 30.3 mm(2) to the left. The proposed technique can be used for the surgical decompression of the tympanic, labyrinthine and meatal segments of the FN through the MCF in addition to reducing the surgical time and the risk to patients.

  1. Spontaneous defects between the mastoid and posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Rereddy, Shruthi K; Mattox, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions Spontaneous defects between the mastoid and the posterior cranial fossa are exceedingly rare. Patients with these lesions may have a lower BMI compared to those with middle cranial fossa encephaloceles, but are otherwise demographically similar. This study recommends repair via a transtemporal approach to allow for examination of the entire posterior face of the temporal bone. Objective To describe cases of spontaneous posterior cranial fossa defects. Methods This study reviewed all cases of spontaneous posterior fossa defects presenting to a tertiary referral center over the last decade and described clinical presentation, imaging, operative findings, and outcomes. We also compared these lesions to those previously reported in the literature as well as the more common spontaneous encephaloceles of the middle cranial fossa. Results This study identified five cases with a mean age of 61.4 years, female-to-male ratio of 4:1, and a mean BMI of 31. Three cases presented with spontaneous pneumocephalus, one with CSF otorrhea, and one as an incidental imaging finding. Four defects were found medial to the sigmoid sinus and one was in the lateral retrosigmoid air cells.

  2. Synovial chondromatosis of the right side temporomandibular joint extending to the middle cranial fossa: A case report with 7-year postoperative follow up and expression of a biomarker of cell proliferative activity

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Hiroyuki; Kayamori, Kou; Wake, So; Sato, Fumiaki; Kino, Koji; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with cranial extension is rare. Here, we report 7-year follow-up of a case with immunohistochemical examination of cell proliferative activity. Presentation of case The patient was a 72-year-old man. Severe bone resorption of the glenoid fossa was apparent on CT images. Pathological findings by biopsy led to diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis of the right side TMJ. Extirpation of the tumor was performed via temporopreauricular incision under general anesthesia. PCNA expression was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The lesion had penetrated into the middle cranial fossa, but the cranial dura mater was intact. Expression of PCNA was confirmed. Discussion The PCNA expression suggested that growth activity caused expansion of the lesion to the skull base. Conclusion We were able to follow up this case for a long period without recurrence postoperatively. PMID:26855075

  3. Applied anatomy of the anterior cranial fossa: what can fracture patterns tell us?

    PubMed

    Stephens, J R; Holmes, S; Evans, B T

    2016-03-01

    The skull base is uniquely placed to absorb anteriorly directed forces imparted either via the midfacial skeleton or cranial vault. A variety of skull base fracture classifications exist. Less well understood, however, is fracture extension beyond the anterior cranial fossa (ACF) into the middle and posterior cranial fossae. The cases of 81 patients from two UK major trauma centres were studied to examine the distribution of fractures across the skull base and any relationship between the vector of force and extent of skull base injury. It was found that predominantly lateral force to the craniofacial skeleton produced a fracture that propagated beyond the ACF into the middle cranial fossa in 77.4% of cases, significantly more (P<0.001) than for predominantly anterior force (12.0%). Fractures were significantly more likely to propagate into the posterior fossa with a lateral vector of impact compared to an anterior vector (P=0.049). This difference in energy transfer across the skull base may, in part, be explained by the local anatomy. The more delicate central ACF acts as a 'crumple zone' in order to absorb force. Conversely, no collapsible interface exists in the lateral aspect of the ACF, thus the lateral ACF behaves like a 'buttress', resulting in increased energy transfer. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior cranial fossa].

    PubMed

    Kachkov, I A; Rusinov, A I; Stashuk, G A

    1999-01-01

    The 41-year-old patient experienced a trauma in childhood. Her examination revealed the hypertensive syndrome, truncal and cerebellar symptoms, suboccipital pain. Computed tomography indicated that in the posterior cranial fossa was a 48 x 78 x 37-mm spreading from the tentorium of the cerebellum to the foramen magnum and descending along the clivus. At surgery, chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior cranial fossa was totally removed, the total volume of liquid and dense fractions was as high as 100 ml. After surgery, the patient recovered working capacity. The interest of this clinical case is due to a rare traumatic pathology, long disease, problematic preoperative diagnosis of chronic hematoma, a large formation, fair postoperative outcome.

  5. [Craniological basis of operative approaches to the structures of posterior cranial fossa using endovideo-monitoring].

    PubMed

    Gaĭvoronskiĭ, A I

    2007-01-01

    Cranioscopic and craniometric characteristics of posterior cranial fossa and correlations between them were studied using 127 skulls with different cranial shape (dolicho-, meso- and brachicraniums). It was found that most of the craniometric characteristics were independent on gender and shape of the skull, while each characteristic had some individual peculiarities. Endovideomonitoring was used to assess the optimality of suboccipital paramedial and retrosigmoid approaches to posterior cranial fossa using 20 heads of the corpses belonging to adult individuals. It was demonstrated that retrosigmoid approach was optimal for the accessibility of major anatomical structures of posterior cranial fossa.

  6. [Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach].

    PubMed

    Szyfter, W; Colletti, V; Pruszewicz, A; Kopeć, T; Szymiec, E; Kawczyński, M; Karlik, M

    2001-01-01

    The inner part of cochlear implant is inserted into inner ear during surgery through mastoid and middle ear. It is a classical method, used in the majority cochlear centers in the world. This is not a suitable method in case of chronic otitis media and middle ear malformation. In these cases Colletti proposed the middle fossa approach and cochlear implant insertion omitting middle ear structures. In patient with bilateral chronic otitis media underwent a few ears operations without obtaining dry postoperative cavity. Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach was performed in this patient. The bone fenster was cut, temporal lobe was bent and petrosus pyramid upper surface was exposed. When the superficial petrosal greater nerve, facial nerve and arcuate eminence were localised, the cochlear was open in the basal turn and electrode were inserted. The patient achieves good results in the postoperative speech rehabilitation. It confirmed Colletti tesis that deeper electrode insertion in the cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach enable use of low and middle frequencies, which are very important in speech understanding.

  7. Costello syndrome: Analysis of the posterior cranial fossa in children with posterior fossa crowding.

    PubMed

    Calandrelli, Rosalinda; D'Apolito, Gabriella; Marco, Panfili; Zampino, Giuseppe; Tartaglione, Tommaso; Colosimo, Cesare

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to assess changes in the posterior cranial fossa (PCF) to shed light on the mechanism of cerebellar herniation in children with Costello syndrome (CS) and posterior fossa crowding. We performed a morphovolumetric PCF analysis on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in seven children with CS (mean age 31 ± 16 months) comparing the MRI scans with those of seven age-matched healthy subjects.PCF volume (PCFV), PCF brain volume (PCFBV) and cerebellar volume (CeV) were assessed on axial T2-weighted MRI. Morphometric parameters (diameters of the foramen magnum, tentorial angle, basiocciput, supraocciput, basisphenoid and exocciput lengths) were measured on sagittal T1-weighted MRI. The volume of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces was calculated as PCFV minus PCFBV.Five out of seven CS children showed tonsillar herniation in the upper cervical canal; no child had hydrocephalus but three out of seven children showed ventriculomegaly. In addition, the PCFV/PCFBV ratio, PCFV, CSF spaces volume, basiocciput, basisphenoid and exocciput lengths and latero-lateral and antero-posterior diameters of the foramen magnum were significantly reduced, whereas no significant changes were found in supraocciput length, PCFBV, CeV or hindbrain volume. The volumetric reduction of the PCF due to bony posterior fossa hypoplasia is a predisposing factor for developing cerebellar tonsillar herniation through the foramen magnum in children with CS. The altered anatomy of the foramen magnum and upward expansion of the PCF secondary to an increased tentorial slope serves to explain the possible mechanism of cerebellar herniation in patients with CS.

  8. Costello syndrome: Analysis of the posterior cranial fossa in children with posterior fossa crowding

    PubMed Central

    D’Apolito, Gabriella; Panfili, Marco; Zampino, Giuseppe; Tartaglione, Tommaso; Colosimo, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess changes in the posterior cranial fossa (PCF) to shed light on the mechanism of cerebellar herniation in children with Costello syndrome (CS) and posterior fossa crowding. We performed a morphovolumetric PCF analysis on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in seven children with CS (mean age 31 ± 16 months) comparing the MRI scans with those of seven age-matched healthy subjects. PCF volume (PCFV), PCF brain volume (PCFBV) and cerebellar volume (CeV) were assessed on axial T2-weighted MRI. Morphometric parameters (diameters of the foramen magnum, tentorial angle, basiocciput, supraocciput, basisphenoid and exocciput lengths) were measured on sagittal T1-weighted MRI. The volume of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces was calculated as PCFV minus PCFBV. Five out of seven CS children showed tonsillar herniation in the upper cervical canal; no child had hydrocephalus but three out of seven children showed ventriculomegaly. In addition, the PCFV/PCFBV ratio, PCFV, CSF spaces volume, basiocciput, basisphenoid and exocciput lengths and latero-lateral and antero-posterior diameters of the foramen magnum were significantly reduced, whereas no significant changes were found in supraocciput length, PCFBV, CeV or hindbrain volume The volumetric reduction of the PCF due to bony posterior fossa hypoplasia is a predisposing factor for developing cerebellar tonsillar herniation through the foramen magnum in children with CS. The altered anatomy of the foramen magnum and upward expansion of the PCF secondary to an increased tentorial slope serves to explain the possible mechanism of cerebellar herniation in patients with CS. PMID:26246091

  9. Chondroblastoma of the temporal bone: consistent middle fossa involvement.

    PubMed

    Selesnick, S H; Levine, J M

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the presentation and clinical course of two patients with temporal bone chondroblastoma, and to review the literature on temporal bone chondroblastoma to identify characteristic clinical and radiological presentations, and optimal treatment regimens. MEDLINE literature searches covering the period from 1966 to January 1998, in all languages, were performed as well as a review of the bibliographies of the identified studies. Strict inclusion criteria were upheld, In total 18 studies had patients whose data could be analyzed. From the 18 studies, 34 patients were identified, but only 21 cases met the inclusion criteria. Demographic, clinical presentation, radiological, operative and treatment parameters were analyzed in this cohort of patients. Ninety-five percent of patients were found to have invasion of the middle cranial fossa and 76% were found to have erosion into the superior aspect of the external auditory canal by temporal bone chondroblastoma. The characteristic growth pattern of temporal bone chondroblastoma may result from embryonal or cartilagenous rests entrapped in the tympanosquamous suture line in the middle fossa floor. Temporal bone chondroblastoma represents a pathology that does not arise from, or have a growth pattern resembling other pathologies in the temporal bone.

  10. Arterial relationships to the nerves and some rigid structures in the posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Surchev, N

    2008-09-01

    The close relationships between the cranial nerves and the arterial vessels in the posterior cranial fossa are one of the predisposing factors for artery-nerve compression. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to some skull and dural structures and the nerves in the posterior cranial fossa. For this purpose, the skull bases and brains of 70 cadavers were studied. The topographic relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to the cranial nerves in the posterior cranial fossa were studied and the distances between the arteries and some osseous formations were measured. The most significant variations in arterial position were registered in the lower half of the basilar artery. Direct contact with an artery was established for the hypoglossal canal, jugular tubercle, and jugular foramen. The results reveal additional information about the relationships of the nerves and arteries to the skull and dural formations in the posterior cranial fossa. New quantitative information is given to illustrate them. The conditions for possible artery-nerve compression due to arterial dislocation are discussed and two groups (lines) of compression points are suggested. The medial line comprises of the brain stem points, usually the nerve root entry/exit zone. The lateral line includes the skull eminences, on which the nerves lie, or skull and dural foramina through which they exit the cranial cavity. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. [Arachnoid cysts of the middle cranial fossa in children. A review of 75 cases, 47 of which have been operated in a comparative study between membranectomy with opening of cisterns and cystoperitoneal shunt].

    PubMed

    Lena, G; Erdincler, P; Van Calenberg, F; Genitori, L; Choux, M

    1996-01-01

    The authors report their experience concerning 75 cases of middle fossa arachnoid cysts observed in children during the period 1975-1993, 47 of which (62.6%) were operated upon. The aim of this study was to study the clinical presentation of these cysts, to discuss the surgical indications and to compare the results of the various techniques used to treat these malformations. Head injury was revealing in 17 cases (22.6%) and among these, 12 patients presented intracranial complications (subdural effusions; 6 cases, subdural hematomas: 4 cases and intracystic hematomas: 2 cases). The most usual signs and symptoms were: intracranial hypertension (25.3%), epilepsy (16%) and temporal bulging (24%). Twenty-one patients (44.7%) underwent a cystoperitoneal shunt; 20 patients (42.5%) were treated by membranectomy with opening of the basal cisterns and removal of intracystic (2 cases) or subdural hematoma (4 cases); 2 patients (4.3%) were treated using membranectomy, opening of the cisterns and cystoperitoneal shunt and 4 patients (8.4%) underwent a subduroperitoneal shunt. The long-term results were good regardless of the surgical procedure; nevertheless, only one patient among 20 cases treated by membranectomy and opening of the cisterns developped complications (5%), while multiple shunt revisions were necessary in 11 children (40.7%) out of 27 where a shunt was inserted. The authors conclude that membranectomy and opening of the basal cisterns is the procedure of choice to treat middle fossa arachnoid cysts in children.

  12. Cranial nerve assessment in posterior fossa tumors with fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA).

    PubMed

    Mikami, Takeshi; Minamida, Yoshihiro; Yamaki, Toshiaki; Koyanagi, Izumi; Nonaka, Tadashi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2005-10-01

    Steady-state free precession is widely used for ultra-fast cardiac or abdominal imaging. The purpose of this work was to assess fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and to evaluate its efficacy for depiction of the cranial nerve affected by the tumor. Twenty-three consecutive patients with posterior fossa tumors underwent FIESTA sequence after contrast agent administration, and then displacement of the cranial nerve was evaluated. The 23 patients with posterior fossa tumor consisted of 12 schwannomas, eight meningiomas, and three cases of epidermoid. Except in the cases of epidermoid, intensity of all tumors increased on FIESTA imaging of the contrast enhancement. In the schwannoma cases, visualization of the nerve became poorer as the tumor increased in size. In cases of encapsulated meningioma, all the cranial nerves of the posterior fossa were depicted regardless of location. The ability to depict the nerves was also significantly higher in meningioma patients than in schwannoma patients (P<0.05). In cases of epidermoid, extension of the tumors was depicted clearly. Although the FIESTA sequence offers similar contrast to other heavily T2-weighted sequences, it facilitated a superior assessment of the effect of tumors on cranial nerve anatomy. FIESTA sequence was useful for preoperative simulations of posterior fossa tumors.

  13. Facial translocation approach to infratemporal fossa and cranial base in extensive angiofibroma: A review of 7 cases.

    PubMed

    Das, Udaya Chand; Stephen, A; Ross, Anitha; Chary, Geetha; Chand, Ashis K

    2005-01-01

    Angiofibroma extending to infratemporal fossa, orbit and middle cranial fossa is a difficult problem for a surgeon to tackle. Traditional extracranial excision with radiotherapy for the intracranial extension was practiced for a long time with variable results. Different approaches to remove such a tumour are described but most of them are not free from resultant morbidity in the form of facial asymmetry and incomplete tumour removal. Facial translocation approach facilitates complete tumour removal without cutting through the tumour thereby reducing per-operative blood loss. It also avoids facial asymmetry as the zygomatico-orbito-maxillary bony complex is replaced after the tumour removal. We present a review of seven cases with the results. The surgical steps, advantages, disadvantages and the complications are discussed.

  14. Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak following Posterior Cranial Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Altaf, Imran; Vohra, Anjum Habib; Shams, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cerebrospinal fluid leakage remains a significant cause of morbidity following posterior fossa surgery, and its treatment remains a difficult problem. The aim of the study was to propose a treatment algorithm for its management. Methods: A retrospective, single-center study was conducted on 147 patients who underwent elective posterior fossa surgery for a variety of diseases. Patients with post operative CSF leakage had either been treated initially with conservative measures including re-suturing of the wound, with CSF lumbar drainage to be employed in case the CSF leakage didn’t stop, or the initial intervention was the institution of CSF lumbar drainage simultaneously with conservative measures. VP (ventriculo-peritoneal) shunt was done in patients with gross hydrocephalus on postoperative CT brain. Results: There were 25 (17%) cases of CSF leakage, including 24 incisional CSF leaks and one case of CSF otorrhea. In eight patients with incisional CSF leakage treated initially with conservative measures including re-suturing of the wound, CSF leakage stopped in only two cases. CSF lumbar drainage instituted later on in six cases with persistent leakage stopped the CSF leakage. In fourteen patients managed initially with re-suturing of the wound and concomitant CSF lumbar drainage, CSF leakage settled in all the cases. Two patients with gross hydrocephalus on post operative CT were managed successfully with VP shunt. Re-suturing of the wound with concomitant CSF lumbar drainage was found to be significantly associated (p=0.003) with the stoppage of CSF leakage, and the settlement of meningitis (p= 0.014). Conclusion: Incisional CSF leaks after posterior fossa surgery should be managed with re-suturing of the wound and concomitant CSF lumbar drainage, instead of an initial trial of conservative therapy alone. PMID:28083041

  15. [Reconstruction of postburn popliteal fossa contractures using popliteal fossa middle artery pedicled flaps in children].

    PubMed

    Wei, Zairong; Sun, Guangfeng; Tang, Xiujun; Deng, Chengliang; Jin, Wenhu; Wang, Dali; Wang, Bo

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the characteristics of blood supply of popliteal fossa middle artery pedicled flaps and the feasibility of reconstruction of postburn popliteal fossa contractures using the flaps in children. Between January 2008 and October 2010, 6 cases of postburn popliteal fossa contractures were recontructed using popliteal fossa middle artery pedicled flaps. Of them, 2 were boys and 4 were girls, aged from 2 years and 2 months to 10 years. All burns were caused by hot water. The wound ranged from 5 cm x 4 cm to 10 cm x 8 cm after scar relaxation. The size of the flap ranged from 6 cm x 4 cm to 11 cm x 9 cm. Donor sites were covered with split-thickness skin graft in 5 cases, and sutured directly in 1 case. All the flaps and the skingraft survived; no vascular crisis or flap necrosis occurred. All incisions at donors and wounds healed by first intention. All patients were followed up 12-24 months. The color, texture, and appearance of the flaps were good. Hyperplastic scar was found at incision of popliteal fossa in 1 case at 6 months after operation; the range of motion (ROM) of the knee joint was 0-175 degrees, and no obvious change was observed at 15 months after operation. The others had no functional disturbance of the knee joints or claudication; the ROM of the knee joint was 0-180 degrees. The popliteal fossa middle artery pedicled flap has reliable blood supply, simple operative procedure, and good results in reconstruction of popliteal fossa contracture.

  16. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiation treatment of patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Golanov, A V; Cherekaev, V A; Serova, N K; Pronin, I N; Gorlachev, G E; Kotel'nikova, T M; Podoprigora, A E; Kudriavtseva, P A; Galkin, M V

    2010-01-01

    Medial middle fossa meningiomas are challenging for neurosurgical treatment. Invasion of cranial nerves and vessels leads to high risk of complications after removal of such meningiomas. Currently methods of conformal stereotactic radiation treatment are applied wider and wider for the discussed lesions. During a 3.5-year period 80 patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas were treated in Burdenko Moscow Neurosurgical Institute using linear accelerator "Novalis". In 31 case radiation treatment was preceded by surgical resection. In majority of patients symptoms included cranial nerve dysfunction: oculomotor disturbances in 62.5%, trigeminal impairment--in 37.5%, visual deficit--in 43.8%, facial nerve palsy--in 1.25%. 74 patients underwent radiotherapy with classical fractioning, 2--in hypofractionated mode and 4 received radiosurgery. In cases of classical fractioning mean marginal dose reached 46.3 Gy during 28-33 fractions, in hypofractioning (7 fractions)--31.5 Gy, in radiosurgery--16.25 Gy. Mean follow-up period was 18.4 months (6-42 months). Control of tumor growth was achieved in 97.5% of cases (78 patients): in 42 (52.5%) lesion shrinked, in 36 (45%) stabilization was observed. Clinical examination revealed improvement of visual function in 15 patients (18%) and deterioration in 2 (2.5%). No new neuropathies were found. Stereotactic radiation treatment is the method of choice for medial anterior and middle fossa meningiomas due to effective control of tumor progression and minimal rate of complications.

  17. Minimally Invasive Supraorbital Key-hole Approach for the Treatment of Anterior Cranial Fossa Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    IACOANGELI, Maurizio; NOCCHI, Niccolò; NASI, Davide; DI RIENZO, Alessandro; DOBRAN, Mauro; GLADI, Maurizio; COLASANTI, Roberto; ALVARO, Lorenzo; POLONARA, Gabriele; SCERRATI, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The most important target of minimally invasive surgery is to obtain the best therapeutic effect with the least iatrogenic injury. In this background, a pivotal role in contemporary neurosurgery is played by the supraorbital key-hole approach proposed by Perneczky for anterior cranial base surgery. In this article, it is presented as a possible valid alternative to the traditional craniotomies in anterior cranial fossa meningiomas removal. From January 2008 to January 2012 at our department 56 patients underwent anterior cranial base meningiomas removal. Thirty-three patients were submitted to traditional approaches while 23 to supraorbital key-hole technique. A clinical and neuroradiological pre- and postoperative evaluation were performed, with attention to eventual complications, length of surgical procedure, and hospitalization. Compared to traditional approaches the supraorbital key-hole approach was associated neither to a greater range of postoperative complications nor to a longer surgical procedure and hospitalization while permitting the same lesion control. With this technique, minimization of brain exposition and manipulation with reduction of unwanted iatrogenic injuries, neurovascular structures preservation, and a better aesthetic result are possible. The supraorbital key-hole approach according to Perneckzy could represent a valid alternative to traditional approaches in anterior cranial base meningiomas surgery. PMID:26804334

  18. Minimally Invasive Supraorbital Key-hole Approach for the Treatment of Anterior Cranial Fossa Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Nocchi, Niccolò; Nasi, Davide; DI Rienzo, Alessandro; Dobran, Mauro; Gladi, Maurizio; Colasanti, Roberto; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Polonara, Gabriele; Scerrati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The most important target of minimally invasive surgery is to obtain the best therapeutic effect with the least iatrogenic injury. In this background, a pivotal role in contemporary neurosurgery is played by the supraorbital key-hole approach proposed by Perneczky for anterior cranial base surgery. In this article, it is presented as a possible valid alternative to the traditional craniotomies in anterior cranial fossa meningiomas removal. From January 2008 to January 2012 at our department 56 patients underwent anterior cranial base meningiomas removal. Thirty-three patients were submitted to traditional approaches while 23 to supraorbital key-hole technique. A clinical and neuroradiological pre- and postoperative evaluation were performed, with attention to eventual complications, length of surgical procedure, and hospitalization. Compared to traditional approaches the supraorbital key-hole approach was associated neither to a greater range of postoperative complications nor to a longer surgical procedure and hospitalization while permitting the same lesion control. With this technique, minimization of brain exposition and manipulation with reduction of unwanted iatrogenic injuries, neurovascular structures preservation, and a better aesthetic result are possible. The supraorbital key-hole approach according to Perneckzy could represent a valid alternative to traditional approaches in anterior cranial base meningiomas surgery.

  19. Transarterial treatment with Onyx of Cognard type IV anterior cranial fossa dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanhui; Wu, Zhongxue; Yang, Xinjian; Li, Youxiang; Jiang, Chuhan; He, Hongwei

    2014-03-01

    Cognard type IV anterior cranial fossa dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are rare lesions with a high risk of intracranial hemorrhage. We present our experience with the use of Onyx via the arterial route in these aggressive lesions. Between October 2009 and October 2011, six consecutive patients diagnosed with Cognard type IV anterior cranial fossa DAVFs were treated transarterially with Onyx in our department. All patients were male; mean age was 55 years (range 38-68). Four patients presented with intracranial hemorrhage as the initial manifestation; one patient presented with seizures at the time of diagnosis and experienced intracranial hemorrhage during the antiepileptic therapy; and the other patient was asymptomatic. In five patients, complete obliteration was achieved with transarterial Onyx injection in a single treatment session; in the remaining patient, subtotal occlusion was achieved and gamma knife treatment was followed. The average time of injection was 19 min (range 5-28) for every pedicle catheterized and the average amount of Onyx was 3.2 ml (range 0.4-6.3) for each lesion. All patients recovered uneventfully after embolization. No mortality or permanent morbidity was observed in this series. Follow-up digital subtraction or MR angiography confirmed durable obliteration of the fistulas in five cured cases. No patients suffered intracranial hemorrhage during the follow-up period. In this small series, our experience with the use of Onyx for arterial embolization of Cognard type IV DAVFs is encouraging, with durable complete cure in most lesions without severe complications.

  20. Middle fossa approach: Applications in temporal bone lesions.

    PubMed

    Domenech Juan, Iván; Cruz Toro, Paula; Callejo Castillo, Ángela; Moya, Rafael; Merán Gil, Jorge L; Bartel, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The middle fossa approach is a surgical technique that is very useful for lateral skull base surgery. However, it is true that it has limited surgical indications and implementation due to its technical complexity. We present our experience in 10 patients in whom the middle fossa approach was the treatment of choice because of the extent of the injury and complexity of the lesion or process. Despite the complexity of the cases, there was no mortality associated with surgery. Postoperative complications were found in 2 patients who presented an epidural hematoma and a cortico-subcortical hematoma. Hearing function was preserved in 5 patients out of the 7 who had adequate hearing at the time of surgery. House/Brackmann I-II facial nerve function was achieved in 8 patients; the remaining 2 had no deterioration of the nerve function. In 9 out of 10 patients, the surgery achieved complete solution of the lesion. The middle fossa approach is a safe and reliable surgical technique. It gives us great control and exposure of different skull base processes. We consider its knowledge of great importance, because it may be the only viable surgical alternative in some specific patients. That is the reason why it is important to learn this approach and know about it in our specialty. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  1. Therapeutic strategy and long-term outcome of meningiomas located in the posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru

    2012-01-01

    The clinical and surgical findings of 41 consecutive cases of posterior cranial fossa meningiomas operated on between January 1987 and December 2011 at Saitama Medical Center/Saitama Medical University were reviewed. The 31 female and 10 male patients were aged from 19 to 74 years (mean 54 years). The tumors were located in the petroclival (N=15), craniovertebral junction (N=6), lateral tentorial (N=12), and cerebellopontine angle (N=8) regions. Mean tumor equivalent diameter was 4.3 cm (range 2-9 cm). Head pain (46.3%) and gait disturbance (26.8%) were the most common presenting symptoms, and cranial neuropathies were the most common neurological signs on admission. Mean preoperative performance status (Karnofsky scale) was 83% (range 40-100%). Surgical approaches to these tumors included presigmoidal transpetrosal, retrosigmoidal, transcondylar, and combined approaches. In 4 cases, a staged procedure was performed. Gross total resection was achieved in 85.4% of patients, and subtotal/partial resection in 12.2%. Surgical mortality was 2.4% and complications were encountered in 11 patients (26.8%) including temporary neurological deficits in 4 patients. The mean follow-up period was 8.2 years, ranging from 1 to 24 years, and the mean performance status of patients at 12 months after the last surgery was 92% (range 0-100%). Recurrence or progression of disease was found in 9.8% of cases. Postoperative adjuvant therapy was performed in 6 cases. My experience suggests that although posterior cranial fossa meningiomas represent a continuing challenge for contemporary neurosurgeons, such tumors may be completely or subtotally removed with low rate of mortality and acceptable morbidity, allowing most of these patients to achieve good outcome in long-term follow up.

  2. Giant cyst of the cavum septi pellucidi and cavum Vergae with posterior cranial fossa extension: case report.

    PubMed

    Bayar, M A; Gökçek, C; Gökçek, A; Edebali, N; Buharali, Z

    1996-05-01

    The cavum septi pellucidi (CSP) and cavum Vergae (CV) are frequently seen in premature and term infants. These cavities rarely enlarge and become symptomatic we describe a giant CSP and CV cyst in an 18-month-old boy, extending to the posterior cranial fossa and causing hydrocephalus. The literature is reviewed, and the MRI and CT findings of the case are reported.

  3. Lateral Skull Base Attenuation in Patients with Anterior Cranial Fossa Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Brendan P; Stevens, Shawn M; Xiao, Christopher C; Meyer, Ted A; Schlosser, Rodney J

    2016-06-01

    (1) Determine if patients with anterior fossa spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (SCSF) leaks demonstrate lateral skull base bone attenuation. (2) Examine the relation between body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)) and skull base thickness. Retrospective cohort study. Tertiary care hospital. Retrospective review from 2004 to 2013 identified 96 patients with anterior cranial fossa SCSF leaks. A control group was identified from a consecutive series of clinic patients. Controls had no history of chronic sinonasal or temporal bone pathology and were divided according to BMI into nonobese (<30 kg/m(2)) and obese (≥30 kg/m(2)) groups. Composite skull base thickness was calculated for lateral and anterior subsites through predefined points according to previously published protocols. Thirty-two patients were included in each group. Composite lateral skull base thickness was less in patients with SCSF leaks(0.7 ± 0.1 mm) when compared with nonobese controls (0.8 ± 0.1 mm, P = .004); no differences were apparent when SCSF leaks were compared with obese controls (0.7 ± 0.1 mm, P = .99). A direct relation was observed between anterior skull base and lateral skull base thickness (r = 0.48, P < .0001). An inverse correlation was noted between BMI and lateral skull base (r =-0.40, P < .0001). Patients with anterior fossa SCSF leaks demonstrate attenuation of the lateral skull base. A significant correlation between anterior skull base thickness and lateral skull base thickness was observed. BMI was inversely related to lateral skull base thickness. Taken together, SCSF leaks are associated with obesity, which appears to be partly responsible for diffuse skull base erosion observed in patients with this condition. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  4. [Fracture of the glenoid fossa without mandibular condylar dislocation or fracture: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Şahan, Murat; Derin, Serhan; Beydilli, Halil; Çullu, Neşet

    2014-01-01

    The mandibular condyle region which protects the middle cranial fossa from facial and jaw traumas has an excellent osteomuscular structure. Condylar structures reduce or limit the force of trauma. Most importantly, the condylar neck is the weakest part of the mandible and is easily fractured without dislocation. Generally, this mechanism prevents condylar penetration into the middle cranial fossa; however, there are condylar penetration into the middle cranial fossa can be rarely. Glenoid fossa fractures without mandibular condylar fracture and dislocation can be made. In this article, we present two cases to assess the isolated glenoid fossa fractures of the temporal bone.

  5. [Ethmoid sinus mucocele penetrating to the orbit and anterior cranial fossa - case report].

    PubMed

    Paradowska-Opałka, Beata; Kawczyński, Maciej; Jaworowska, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Paranasal sinus mucocele is the cystic formation lined by inflammatory changed mucoperiosteum. This is slow-growing pathology with a tendency to bone erosion. The symptoms are dependent on the direction of the penetration, and are as follows: increasing headaches, deformations of frontal or orbital region, ophthalmic manifestations such as lacrimation, decreased visual acuity, exophthalmos, ocular movement limitation, diplopia. The most common location of the mucocele is fronto-ethmoid region. The most useful diagnostic tests are a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a computed tomography (CT) which show the progress of the disease and bone destructions. Surgery is the only method of treatment (external approach or FESS). This paper reports the case of a 74-year-old woman with ethmoid mucocele penetrating into the orbit, frontal sinus and anterior cranial fossa with compression of frontal lobe of the brain. The patient underwent CT and MRI and was treated with endoscopic intranasal marsupialization of the cyst. There are no clinical signs of disease recurrence 7 months after surgery. The endoscopic surgical management in treatment of sinus mucocele is a good alternative to the operation from external approach because of its low invasiveness, low complication risk, rapid healing and good therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2012 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  6. Medial Cranial Fossa Meningioma Diagnosed as Mixed Anxiety Disorder with Dissociative Symptoms and Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Emin Mehmet; Evrensel, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are mostly benign tumors of the meninges that may stay clinically silent or present first with psychiatric symptoms only. We present a case of medial cranial fossa meningioma that was first diagnosed as mixed anxiety disorder with dissociative symptoms and vertigo. In light of the intact neurological and vestibular system examination, our patient's vertigo and depersonalization were firstly addressed as psychosomatic symptoms of the psychiatric syndrome. Despite decreased anxiety and improved mood, dissociative symptoms and vertigo were resistant to treatment which prompted further research yielding a left hemisphere localized meningioma. Resection of meningioma resulted in full remission of the patient proving it to be responsible for the etiology of the psychiatric syndrome and vertigo. We suggest that brain imaging should be performed for patients with late-onset (>50 years) psychiatric symptoms and those with treatment resistance. It is important to keep in mind always that medically unexplained symptoms may become explicable with detailed assessment and regular follow-up of the patient. PMID:27651969

  7. Middle fossa approach: microsurgical anatomy and surgical technique from the neurosurgical perspective.

    PubMed

    Tanriover, Necmettin; Sanus, Galip Zihni; Ulu, Mustafa Onur; Tanriverdi, Taner; Akar, Ziya; Rubino, Pablo A; Rhoton, Albert L

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to call attention to the subtemporal approach directed through the petrous apex to the IAM. We studied the microsurgical anatomy of the middle floor to delineate a reliable angle between the GSPN and the IAM to precisely localize and expose the IAM from above. A new technique for the elevation of middle fossa floor in an anterior-to-posterior direction has also been examined in cadaveric dissections and performed in surgery. The microsurgical anatomy of the middle fossa floor was studied in 10 adult cadaveric heads (20 sides) after meatal drilling on the middle fossa. Five latex-injected specimens were dissected in a stepwise manner to further define the microsurgical anatomy of the middle fossa approach. The middle fossa approach is illustrated in a patient for the decompression of the facial nerve to demonstrate the surgical technique and limitations of bone removal. Elevation of middle fossa dura in an anterior-to-posterior direction leads to early identification of the GSPN, where the nerve passes under V3. The most reliable and easily appreciated angle to be used in localizing the IAM is between the IAM and the long axis of the GSPN, which is approximately 61 degrees . Beginning drilling the meatus medially at the petrous ridge is safer than beginning laterally, where the facial and vestibulocochlear nerves become more superficial. The cochlea anteromedially, vestibule posterolaterally, and superior semicircular canal posteriorly significantly limit the bone removal at the lateral part of the IAM. The surgical technique for the middle fossa approach which includes an anterior-to-posterior elevation of middle fossa dura starting from the foramen ovale and uses the angle between the IAM and the long axis of the GSPN to localize the meatus from above may be an alternative to previously proposed surgical methods.

  8. Iatrogenic traumatic brain injury: penetration of Kirschner's knitting needle into the middle cranial cavity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lee Wei; Molchanov, Victor Ivanovich; Volkodav, Oleg Vladimirovich

    2007-05-01

    Traumatic penetrations of foreign objects into the craniocerebral cavity are often encountered in the department of emergency and traumatology. A 5-year-old child was brought to the department of pediatric neurosurgery with a severe headache and fatigue. On admission, the patient had initial neurologic examinations and radiologic scans. The consciousness assessment by Glasgow Coma Scale was 13. Neuroradiologic studies revealed a long hyperdense object extending from the extracranial cavity into the middle cranial fossa. A thorough history was obtained with attention to how and when the injury was sustained. Two weeks before the incident, the child had a blunt trauma of mandibular fractures with dislocation of the temporomandibular joint. Maxillomandibular surgery was performed with a Kirschner's knitting needle to fixate the temporomandibular articulation and simple interdental ligatures for mandibular fracture stabilization. The present radiologic film suggested that the mandibular fracture was not properly fixated allowing the mobilization of Kirschner's needle moving either externally or internally. A standard pterional access with frontotemporosphenoidal approach was performed according to the method of Yasargil and Oikawa-Miyazawa followed by an extradural approach method of Dolenc to the middle cranial structure at the skull base. Several stages of hemostasis were carried out with electrohemocoagulation on the penetrated Kirschner's needle during the needle extracting process at the extradural space of the middle cranial fossa. Two weeks postoperatively, computed tomography scan revealed the supratentorial and middle craniocerebral structures were in symmetric localization. The patient was free of neurologic deficits with no signs of excessive cerebrospinal fluid volume formation. In conclusion, the method of fixation requires appropriate application techniques to ensure adequate fracture fixation during the healing cascade. The neurosurgical approach also

  9. Contrecoup fractures of the anterior cranial fossae as a consequence of blunt force caused by a fall.

    PubMed

    Hein, P M; Schulz, E

    1990-01-01

    Contrecoup fractures of the base of the skull are regarded as rare in the clinical literature. In our material (n = 171 falls on the same level and on or from stairs), the overall frequency of contrecoup fractures of the anterior cranial fossa in fatal cranio-cerebral trauma due to falls was 12%, as compared to 24% with occipital point of impact of the head. The relationships between the impact site on the head, form of fracture at the point of impact with involvement of the skull cap and/or the base of the skull, coup and contrecoup injuries of the brain, localization of contrecoup fractures in the anterior cranial fossa and the occurrence of monocle and spectacle haematomas display a major variability. Fractures occur in the form of simple fractures and as impression fractures (fracture fragments or fracture boundaries displaced to the inside). Clinical diagnosis is difficult because of the concealed position of the anterior skull base. Contrecoup fractures become of forensic medical significance when symptoms of a frontobasal injury occur for the first time after trauma which has occurred some time in the past and when the question arises as to the causal connection with the original trauma. In investigation of living persons, it may be difficult to decide whether haemorrhages in the region of the orbit and its vicinity result from a direct blunt force or derive from fractures of the base of the skull, especially contrecoup fractures.

  10. Hearing preservation after middle fossa vestibular schwannoma removal: are the results durable?

    PubMed

    Quist, Tyler S; Givens, Daniel J; Gurgel, Richard K; Chamoun, Roukoz; Shelton, Clough

    2015-04-01

    To describe 5-year hearing preservation rates following microsurgical excision of vestibular schwannoma (VS) via the middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach. Case series with chart review. This study was performed at a tertiary care academic medical center. Fifty-seven subjects with VS underwent resection via an MCF approach between February 1998 and January 2009. Pure-tone average (PTA) and word recognition score (WRS) were obtained preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at 5-year follow-up. Preoperative serviceable hearing (American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery class A/B) was present in 49 (86%) of the 57 patients, with an average PTA of 23 dB (range, 1-50 dB) and an average WRS of 97% (range, 76%-100%). Immediate postoperative serviceable hearing was maintained in 27 (55%) patients, with an average PTA and WRS of 31 dB (5-50 dB) and 96% (70%-100%), respectively. Five-year follow-up was available for 16 of the 27 patients. Twelve (75%) of the 16 patients maintained serviceable hearing with an average PTA and WRS of 35 dB (4-49 dB) and 95% (84%-100%), respectively. Of the 16 subjects who did maintain class A or B hearing, the mean change in PTA and WRS was 5 dB and 0.4%, respectively. Of the 4 patients who did not maintain class A/B hearing, average change in PTA and WRS was 16 dB (4.5-23 dB) and 16% (0%-40%), respectively. For patients with VS in whom serviceable hearing is preserved following the MCF approach, the long-term hearing outcome remains durable in most patients. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  11. High-resolution MRI of cranial nerves in posterior fossa at 3.0 T.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zi-Yi; Chen, Jing; Liang, Qi-Zhou; Liao, Hai-Yan; Cheng, Qiong-Yue; Fu, Shui-Xi; Chen, Cai-Xiang; Yu, Dan

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of high-resolution imaging obtainable with the higher field strength of 3.0 T on the visualization of the brain nerves in the posterior fossa. In total, 20 nerves were investigated on MRI of 12 volunteers each and selected for comparison, respectively, with the FSE sequences with 5 mm and 2 mm section thicknesses and gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequences acquired with a 3.0-T scanner. The MR images were evaluated by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast with use of a rating scale. In general, decrease of the slice thickness showed a significant increase in the detection of nerves as well as in the image quality characteristics. Comparing FSE and GRE imaging, the course of brain nerves and brainstem vessels was visualized best with use of the three-dimensional (3D) pulse sequence. The comparison revealed the clear advantage of a thin section. The increased resolution enabled immediate identification of all brainstem nerves. GRE sequence most distinctly and confidently depicted pertinent structures and enables 3D reconstruction to illustrate complex relations of the brainstem. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cochlear Implantation through the Middle Fossa Approach: A Review of Related Temporal Bone Studies and Reported Cases.

    PubMed

    Lesser, Juan Carlos Cisneros; Brito Neto, Rubens Vuono de; Martins, Graziela de Souza Queiroz; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Middle fossa approach has been suggested as an alternative for patients in whom other routes of electrode insertion are contraindicated. Even though there are temporal bone studies about the feasibility of introducing the cochlear implant through the middle fossa, until now, very few studies have described results when cochlear implant surgery is done through this approach. Objective The objective of this study is to review a series of temporal bone studies related to cochlear implantation through the middle fossa and the results obtained by different surgical groups after cochlear implantation through this approach. Data Sources PubMed, MD consult and Ovid-SP databases. Data Synthesis A total of 8 human cadaveric temporal bone studies and 6 studies reporting cochlear implant surgery through the middle fossa approach met the inclusion criteria. Temporal bone studies show that it is feasible to perform cochlear implantation through this route. So far, only two surgical groups have performed cochlear implantation through the middle fossa with a total of 15 implanted patients. One group entered the cochlea in the most upper part of the basal turn, inserting the implant in the direction of the middle and apical turns; meanwhile, the other group inserted the implant in the apical turn directed in a retrograde fashion to the middle and basal turns. Results obtained in both groups were similar. Conclusions The middle fossa approach is a good alternative for cochlear implantation when other routes of electrode insertion are contraindicated.

  13. Cochlear Implantation through the Middle Fossa Approach: A Review of Related Temporal Bone Studies and Reported Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lesser, Juan Carlos Cisneros; Brito Neto, Rubens Vuono de; Martins, Graziela de Souza Queiroz; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Middle fossa approach has been suggested as an alternative for patients in whom other routes of electrode insertion are contraindicated. Even though there are temporal bone studies about the feasibility of introducing the cochlear implant through the middle fossa, until now, very few studies have described results when cochlear implant surgery is done through this approach. Objective The objective of this study is to review a series of temporal bone studies related to cochlear implantation through the middle fossa and the results obtained by different surgical groups after cochlear implantation through this approach. Data Sources PubMed, MD consult and Ovid-SP databases. Data Synthesis A total of 8 human cadaveric temporal bone studies and 6 studies reporting cochlear implant surgery through the middle fossa approach met the inclusion criteria. Temporal bone studies show that it is feasible to perform cochlear implantation through this route. So far, only two surgical groups have performed cochlear implantation through the middle fossa with a total of 15 implanted patients. One group entered the cochlea in the most upper part of the basal turn, inserting the implant in the direction of the middle and apical turns; meanwhile, the other group inserted the implant in the apical turn directed in a retrograde fashion to the middle and basal turns. Results obtained in both groups were similar. Conclusions The middle fossa approach is a good alternative for cochlear implantation when other routes of electrode insertion are contraindicated. PMID:28050216

  14. High-resolution STIR for 3-T MRI of the posterior fossa: visualization of the lower cranial nerves and arteriovenous structures related to neurovascular compression.

    PubMed

    Hiwatashi, Akio; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yamashita, Koji; Kamano, Hironori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    Preoperative evaluation of small vessels without contrast material is sometimes difficult in patients with neurovascular compression disease. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate whether 3D STIR MRI could simultaneously depict the lower cranial nerves--fifth through twelfth--and the blood vessels in the posterior fossa. The posterior fossae of 47 adults (26 women, 21 men) without gross pathologic changes were imaged with 3D STIR and turbo spin-echo heavily T2-weighted MRI sequences and with contrast-enhanced turbo field-echo MR angiography (MRA). Visualization of the cranial nerves on STIR images was graded on a 4-point scale and compared with visualization on T2-weighted images. Visualization of the arteries on STIR images was evaluated according to the segments in each artery and compared with that on MRA images. Visualization of the veins on STIR images was also compared with that on MRA images. Statistical analysis was performed with the Mann-Whitney U test. There were no significant differences between STIR and T2-weighted images with respect to visualization of the cranial nerves (p > 0.05). Identified on STIR and MRA images were 94 superior cerebellar arteries, 81 anteroinferior cerebellar arteries, and 79 posteroinferior cerebellar arteries. All veins evaluated were seen on STIR and MRA images. There were no significant differences between STIR and MRA images with respect to visualization of arteries and veins (p > 0.05). High-resolution STIR is a feasible method for simultaneous evaluation of the lower cranial nerves and the vessels in the posterior fossa without the use of contrast material.

  15. Osteolytic clear cell meningioma of the petrous bone occurring 36 years after posterior cranial fossa irradiation: Case report.

    PubMed

    Ben Nsir, A; Ben Hamouda, K; Hammedi, F; Kilani, M; Hattab, N

    2016-01-01

    While bone invasion and hyperostosis are frequent phenomena in meningiomas, primary intraosseous meningiomas are rare and their occurrence in the skull base is an extraordinary exception. Moreover, radiation-induced meningiomas represent a unique clinical dilemma given the fact that patients with these tumors had often received a prior full course of radiotherapy. A 42-year-old man presented with a 3-month history of progressively worsening facial asymmetry. His medical history was consistent for a posterior cranial fossa irradiation at the age of 6 years for a non-confirmed brain stem tumor. On admission his Karnofsky performance status was graded as 50% and his neurological examination showed a complete right facial nerve paralysis and hearing impairment. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an osteolytic tumor invading the whole right petrous bone without intracranial involvement. As the tumor reached the external auditory canal, a tissue sample was obtained locally. Pathological examination of the lesion identified a grade II clear cell meningioma and the patient was consequently addressed for an intensity modulated radiation therapy. His condition remained unchanged till the most recent follow-up examination, 8 months later. To the best of our knowledge, a radiation induced osteolytic clear cell meningioma of the petrous bone has not been previously reported. As little literature exists regarding the use of adjuvant therapies for these tumors, intensity modulated radiation therapy remains an attractive treatment option in case of pervious irradiation and general status alteration. Copyright © 2016 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. The Vulnerability of the Vein of Labbé During Combined Craniotomies of the Middle and Posterior Fossae

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Lawrence R.; Jackler, Robert K.

    1998-01-01

    During combined middle and posterior cranial fossae (“petrosal”) approaches to the skull base, the anastamotic vein of Labbe, which bridges between the inferior surface of the temporal lobe and the transverse sinus is placed at risk. Occlusion of this vein, which may drain a large section of the temporal and parietal lobes, may lead to speech, memory, and/or other cognitive disorders. Labbe may be injured along its course on the inferior aspect of the temporal lobe where it may be laceraed during dural incision or thrombosed due to prolonged or overly vigorous retraction. The anastamotic segment of the vein, which bridges between the temporal lobe and transverse sinus, may be avulsed during elevation of the temporal lobe or injured during tentorial division. Labbé may course in close proximity to the upper surface of the tentorium or even travel within it for a short segment of its course en route to the transverse sinus. This article reviews the anatomy of the vein of Labbé, discusses its clinical significance, and highlights the technical points relevant to the preservation of this important structure. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:17171036

  17. Computational Investigation of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in the Posterior Cranial Fossa and Cervical Subarachnoid Space in Patients with Chiari I Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Støverud, Karen-Helene; Langtangen, Hans Petter; Ringstad, Geir Andre; Eide, Per Kristian; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previous computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies have demonstrated that the Chiari malformation is associated with abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cervical part of the subarachnoid space (SAS), but the flow in the SAS of the posterior cranial fossa has received little attention. This study extends previous modelling efforts by including the cerebellomedullary cistern, pontine cistern, and 4th ventricle in addition to the cervical subarachnoid space. Methods The study included one healthy control, Con1, and two patients with Chiari I malformation, P1 and P2. Meshes were constructed by segmenting images obtained from T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences. CFD simulations were performed with a previously verified and validated code. Patient-specific flow conditions in the aqueduct and the cervical SAS were used. Two patients with the Chiari malformation and one control were modelled. Results The results demonstrated increased maximal flow velocities in the Chiari patients, ranging from factor 5 in P1 to 14.8 in P2, when compared to Con1 at the level of Foramen Magnum (FM). Maximal velocities in the cervical SAS varied by a factor 2.3, while the maximal flow in the aqueduct varied by a factor 3.5. The pressure drop from the pontine cistern to the cervical SAS was similar in Con1 and P1, but a factor two higher in P2. The pressure drop between the aqueduct and the cervical SAS varied by a factor 9.4 where P1 was the one with the lowest pressure jump and P2 and Con1 differed only by a factor 1.6. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates that including the posterior cranial fossa is feasible and suggests that previously found flow differences between Chiari I patients and healthy individuals in the cervical SAS may be present also in the SAS of the posterior cranial fossa. PMID:27727298

  18. Hearing preservation surgery for vestibular schwannoma: experience with the middle fossa approach.

    PubMed

    DeMonte, Franco; Gidley, Paul W

    2012-09-01

    In the early 1960s William F. House developed the middle fossa approach for the removal of small vestibular schwannomas (VSs) with the preservation of hearing. It is the best approach for tumors that extend laterally to the fundus of the internal auditory canal, although it does have the potential disadvantage of increased facial nerve manipulation, especially for tumors arising from the inferior vestibular nerve. The aim of this study was to monitor the hearing preservation and facial nerve outcomes of this approach. A prospective database was constructed, and data were retrospectively reviewed. Between December 2004 and January 2012, 30 patients with small VSs underwent surgery via a middle fossa approach for hearing preservation. The patients consisted of 13 men and 17 women with a mean age of 46 years. Tumor size ranged from 7 to 19 mm. Gross-total resection was accomplished in 25 of 30 patients. Preoperative hearing was American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) Class A in 21 patients, Class B in 5, Class C in 3, and undocumented in 1. Postoperatively, hearing was graded as AAO-HNS Class A in 15 patients, Class B in 7, Class C in 1, Class D in 2, and undocumented in 5. Facial nerve function was House-Brackmann (HB) Grade I in all patients preoperatively. Postoperatively, facial nerve function was HB Grade I in 28 patients, Grade III in 1, and Grade IV in 1. There were 3 complications: CSF leakage in 1 patient, superficial wound infection in 1, and extradural hematoma (asymptomatic) in 1. The overall hearing preservation rate of at least 73% and HB Grade I facial nerve outcome of 93% in this cohort are in keeping with other contemporary reports. The middle fossa approach for the resection of small VSs with hearing preservation is a viable and relatively safe option. It should be considered among the various options available for the management of small, growing VSs.

  19. An unusual and spectacular case of spindle cell lipoma of the posterior neck invading the spinal cervical canal and posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Petit, Damien; Menei, Philippe; Fournier, Henri-Dominique

    2011-11-01

    The authors describe the first case of spindle cell lipoma of the posterior neck invading the upper cervical spinal canal and the posterior cranial fossa. Spindle cell lipoma is an extremely rare variant of benign lipoma. It usually occurs as a solitary subcutaneous well-circumscribed lesion in the posterior neck or shoulders of adult men. Local aggressiveness is unusual. This 61-year-old man presented with an increased left cerebellar syndrome and headaches. He also had a posterior neck tumefaction, which had been known about for a long time. Computed tomography and MR imaging studies revealed a voluminous mass extending to the upper cervical canal and posterior cranial fossa and eroding the neighboring bones. The lesion was well delimited, and contrast enhancement was intense and heterogeneous. The tumor, which had initially developed under the muscles of the posterior neck, was totally resected. Histological assessment revealed numerous fat cells with spindle cells secreting collagen. The large size of the tumor and the submuscular location, bone erosion, and compression of the CNS were unusual in this rare subtype of benign adipose tumor. Its presentation could simulate a sarcoma.

  20. Dermoid Cyst of the Infratemporal Fossa: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, Thomas M.; Griffith, Adam; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Barnett, Samuel L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intracranial dermoid cysts are rare tumors of congenital origin. We report a case of a large dermoid tumor arising in the infratemporal fossa (ITF) with erosion into the middle cranial fossa. After reviewing the literature, we believe this represents the first reported dermoid tumor of the ITF with extension into the middle cranial fossa. Results A 21-year-old women presented with a large cystic mass involving the left infratemporal fossa and middle cranial fossa that was discovered following a motor vehicle collision. Neurologic examination was normal. The mass was resected through a frontotemporal extradural approach with endoscopic assistance. Imaging studies, gross findings, and histopathology were consistent with a dermoid tumor. Conclusion This is the first report of a dermoid cyst arising in the ITF with extension into the middle cranial fossa. We suggest including dermoid tumor in the differential diagnosis of cystic abnormalities in this region. Complete resection of the cyst remains the preferred treatment with surgical approach guided by preoperative imaging. PMID:25083385

  1. Intrapopulational body size variation and cranial capacity variation in Middle Pleistocene humans: the Sima de los Huesos sample (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, C; Carretero, J M; Arsuaga, J L; Gracia, A; Martínez, I

    1998-05-01

    A sexual dimorphism more marked than in living humans has been claimed for European Middle Pleistocene humans, Neandertals and prehistoric modern humans. In this paper, body size and cranial capacity variation are studied in the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene sample. This is the largest sample of non-modern humans found to date from one single site, and with all skeletal elements represented. Since the techniques available to estimate the degree of sexual dimorphism in small palaeontological samples are all unsatisfactory, we have used the bootstraping method to asses the magnitude of the variation in the Sima de los Huesos sample compared to modern human intrapopulational variation. We analyze size variation without attempting to sex the specimens a priori. Anatomical regions investigated are scapular glenoid fossa; acetabulum; humeral proximal and distal epiphyses; ulnar proximal epiphysis; radial neck; proximal femur; humeral, femoral, ulnar and tibial shaft; lumbosacral joint; patella; calcaneum; and talar trochlea. In the Sima de los Huesos sample only the humeral midshaft perimeter shows an unusual high variation (only when it is expressed by the maximum ratio, not by the coefficient of variation). In spite of that the cranial capacity range at Sima de los Huesos almost spans the rest of the European and African Middle Pleistocene range. The maximum ratio is in the central part of the distribution of modern human samples. Thus, the hypothesis of a greater sexual dimorphism in Middle Pleistocene populations than in modern populations is not supported by either cranial or postcranial evidence from Sima de los Huesos.

  2. Medusae Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-05

    This image from NASA Mars Odyssey shows a sample of the middle member of the Medusae Fossae formation. The layers exposed in the southeast-facing scarp suggest that there is a fairly competent unit underlying the mesa in the center of the image.

  3. Fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) MRI to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within dural reflections of posterior fossa cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Noble, David J; Scoffings, Daniel; Ajithkumar, Thankamma; Williams, Michael V; Jefferies, Sarah J

    2016-11-01

    There is no consensus approach to covering skull base meningeal reflections-and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) therein-of the posterior fossa cranial nerves (CNs VII-XII) when planning radiotherapy (RT) for medulloblastoma and ependymoma. We sought to determine whether MRI and specifically fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences can answer this anatomical question and guide RT planning. 96 posterior fossa FIESTA sequences were reviewed. Following exclusions, measurements were made on the following scans for each foramen respectively (left, right); internal acoustic meatus (IAM) (86, 84), jugular foramen (JF) (83, 85) and hypoglossal canal (HC) (42, 45). A protocol describes measurement procedure. Two observers measured distances for five cases and agreement was assessed. One observer measured all the remaining cases. IAM and JF measurement interobserver variability was compared. Mean measurement difference between observers was -0.275 mm (standard deviation 0.557). IAM and JF measurements were normally distributed. Mean IAM distance was 12.2 mm [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.8-15.6]; JF was 7.3 mm (95% CI 4.0-10.6). The HC was difficult to visualize on many images and data followed a bimodal distribution. Dural reflections of posterior fossa CNs are well demonstrated by FIESTA MRI. Measuring CSF extension into these structures is feasible and robust; mean CSF extension into IAM and JF was measured. We plan further work to assess coverage of these structures with photon and proton RT plans. Advances in knowledge: We have described CSF extension beyond the internal table of the skull into the IAM, JF and HC. Oncologists planning RT for patients with medulloblastoma and ependymoma may use these data to guide contouring.

  4. Comparison of FSE T2W and 3D FIESTA sequences in the evaluation of posterior fossa cranial nerves with MR cisternography.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Hatice Gül; Durakoğlugil, Tuğba; Ciliz, Deniz; Yüksel, Enis

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 3D fast imaging with steady state acquisition (3D FIESTA) to fast spin echo T2-weighted (FSE T2W) MRI sequences in the imaging of cisternal parts of cranial nerves V-XII. We retrospectively evaluated the temporal MRI sequences of 50 patients (F:M ratio, 27:23; mean age, 44.5 +/- 15.9 years) who were admitted to our hospital with vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss. In all, we evaluated 800 nerves. Two radiologists, working independently, divided the imaging findings into 3 groups: 0 (not visualized), 1 (partially visualized), and 2 (completely visualized). The rate of visualization of these cranial nerves with FSE T2W and 3D FIESTA sequences, respectively, (partially and completely visualized) were as follows: nerve V (100% and 100%); nerve VI (43% and 98%); nerve VII (100% and 100%); nerve VIII (100% and 100%); nerve IX-XI complex (67% and 100%); nerve XII (2% and 91%). 3D FIESTA sequences are superior to FSE T2W sequences in the imaging of cisternal parts of the posterior fossa nerves. 3D FIESTA sequences may be used for obtaining high-resolution MR cisternography images.

  5. A morphometric study of the atlas occipitalization and coexisted congenital anomalies of the vertebrae and posterior cranial fossa with neurological importance.

    PubMed

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Lyrtzis, Christos; Totlis, Trifon; Anastasopoulos, Nikolaos; Piagkou, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Our study highlights the morphometry of the partial and complete atlas occipitalization (AOZ), its coexistence with fusions of the 2nd and 3rd cervical vertebrae and morphological and morphometric abnormalities of the posterior cranial fossa that are of paramount neurological importance. One hundred and eighty adult dry skulls, the atlas and axis vertebrae were examined. Four skulls (2.2 %) showed AOZ. Two of them (1.1 %) presented a partial AOZ, one male skull (0.6 %) a complete AOZ and a female skull (0.6 %) had a fused left hemiatlas with the occipital bone and a fusion of the 2nd and 3rd cervical vertebrae. The inner anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the foramen magnum (FM) in the control group were 34.6 ± 3.46 and 29.3 ± 3.47 mm. Only the skull with the complete AOZ had a reduced outer anteroposterior diameter of the FM (29.8 mm), while no specimen was found with a reduced transverse diameter. A wide total decrease (range 13.1-50.9 %) in the surface area of the FM in skulls with AOZ was detected. Extracranial, the clivus length in two skulls with AOZ was smaller than the normal range. No skull was detected with a reduction in the intracranial length of the clivus. All skulls with the AOZ had a vermian fossa. The study adds important morphometric details about the partial and complete AOZ and correlates the phenomenon of synostosis with the narrowing of the FM, particularly in the case of complete AOZ. Awareness of the AOZ and other fusions of the upper cervical vertebrae and their topographical relations and attendant problems are of paramount importance to surgeons, when operate to the craniocervical junction, or interpret imaging studies to plan a safe surgery for nerve or spinal tissue decompression.

  6. Middle Fossa Approach for Vestibular Schwannoma: Good Hearing and Facial Nerve Outcomes with Low Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Raheja, Amol; Bowers, Christian A; MacDonald, Joel D; Shelton, Clough; Gurgel, Richard K; Brimley, Cameron; Couldwell, William T

    2016-08-01

    The middle fossa approach (MFA) is not used as frequently as the traditional translabyrinthine and retrosigmoid approaches for accessing vestibular schwannomas (VSs). Here, MFA was used to remove primarily intracanalicular tumors in patients in whom hearing preservation is a goal of surgery. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify consecutive adult patients who underwent MFA for VS. Demographic profile, perioperative complications, pre- and postoperative hearing, and facial nerve outcomes were analyzed with linear regression analysis to identify factors predicting hearing outcome. Among 78 identified patients (mean age, 49 years; 53% female; mean tumor size, 7.5 mm), 78% had functional hearing preoperatively (American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery class A/B). Follow-up audiologic data were available for 60 patients overall (mean follow-up, 15.1 months). The hearing preservation rate was 75.5% (37/49) at last known follow-up for patients with functional hearing preoperatively. Other than preoperative hearing status (P < 0.001), none of the factors assessed, including demographic profile, size of tumor, and fundal fluid cap, predicted hearing preservation (P > 0.05). Good functional preservation of the facial nerve (House-Brackmann class I/II) was achieved in 90% of patients. The only operative complications were 3 wound infections (3.8%). Preliminary results from this single-center retrospective study of patients undergoing MFA for resection of VS showed that good hearing preservation and facial nerve outcomes could be achieved with few complications. These results suggest that resection via the MFA is a rational alternative to watchful waiting or stereotactic radiosurgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid leak after acoustic neuroma surgery: a comparison of the translabyrinthine, middle fossa, and retrosigmoid approaches.

    PubMed

    Becker, Samuel S; Jackler, Robert K; Pitts, Lawrence H

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether the choice of surgical approach affects the rate of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage in patients who have undergone surgical resection of acoustic neuroma. Retrospective chart review. Tertiary referral center. Three hundred patients who underwent surgery for acoustic neuromas were selected by consecutive medical record number until 100 resections via each surgical approach (translabyrinthine, middle fossa, and retrosigmoid) had been gathered. Surgical approach used, cerebrospinal fluid leak incidence, tumor size, patient age. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak of any severity was observed in 13% of translabyrinthine, 10% of middle fossa, and 10% of retrosigmoid patients. These difference in the rate of cerebrospinal fluid leakage were not statistically significant (p = 0.82). The majority of leaks were managed conservatively with fluid and activity restriction, often accompanied by a period of lumbar subarachnoid drainage. There was a need to return to the operating room for a definitive procedure in 4% of translabyrinthine, 2% of middle fossa, and 3% retrosigmoid patients; again not statistically different among the approaches (p = 0.43). Tumor size was not correlated with cerebrospinal fluid leak rate (p = 0.13). Patient age, for patients older than 50 years, was suggestive of increased odds of cerebrospinal fluid leak (p = 0.06). Neither surgical approach nor tumor size affects the rate of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage or the necessity of managing a leak with a return to the operating room. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage rates have remained stable in recent decades despite numerous innovative attempts to improve dural closure, seal transected air cell tracts, and occlude anatomic pathways. The finding that leak rates were similar among three dissimilar surgical techniques suggests that factors other than techniques of wound closure, such as transient postoperative rises in cerebrospinal fluid pressure, may be

  8. [Facial nerve function and hearing preservation experience in middle fossa approach removal of small acoustic tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jue-bo; Wu, Hao; Huang, Qi; Yang, Jun; Wang, Zhao-yan; Lü, Jing-rong

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hearing and facial nerve preservation in the middle fossa approach surgery for the removal of small acoustic tumor (vestibular schwannomas, VS). A prospective database was established, and data were retrospectively reviewed. Between January 2004 and February 2013, 13 patients with acoustic tumor underwent surgery via middle fossa approach for hearing preservation. The patients consisted of six men and seven women with a mean age of 48 years. Tumor size ranged from 0.8 cm to 1.5 cm. Hearing loss was categorized as American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) class A, class B, class C and class D. Facial nerve function was evaluated according to House-Brackmann (HB) Grade I-VI. Gross-total resection was accomplished in 12 of 13 patients. Preoperative hearing as class A in ten, class B in two, and class C in one patient respectively. Postoperatively, hearing was graded as class A in eight patients, class B in 3, and class C in 2 patients. Facial nerve function was House-Brackmann (HB) grade I in twelve patients, grade II in one patient preoperatively. Postoperatively, facial nerve function was HB Grade I in twelve patients and Grade III in one patient. The overall hearing preservation rate was at least 80% (8/10) and HB Grade I facial nerve outcome of 100% (12/12) . All cases were followed up for 0.5 to 5 years, no complications were observed. The middle fossa approach for the resection of small VS with hearing preservation is a viable and relatively option. It should be considered among the various options available for the management of small and growing VS.

  9. Hominid cranial remains from upper Pleistocene deposits at Aduma, Middle Awash, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Haile-Selassie, Y; Asfaw, B; White, T D

    2004-01-01

    The Upper Pleistocene localities of Aduma and Bouri have yielded hominid fossils and extensive Middle Stone Age (MSA) archaeological assemblages. The vertebrate fossils recovered include parts of four hominid crania from Aduma and a complete right parietal from Bouri. Archaeological associations and radiometric techniques suggest an Upper Pleistocene age for these hominids. The more complete cranium from Aduma (ADU-VP-1/3) comprises most of the parietals, the occipital, and part of the frontal. This cranium is compared to late Middle and Upper Pleistocene hominid crania from Africa and the Middle East. The Aduma cranium shows a mosaic of cranial features shared with "premodern" and anatomically modern Homo sapiens. However, the posterior and lateral cranial dimensions, and most of its anatomy, are centered among modern humans and resemble specimens from Omo, Skhul, and Qafzeh. As a result, the Aduma and Bouri Upper Pleistocene hominids are assigned to anatomically modern Homo sapiens.

  10. Endoscopic transpterygoidal repair of a large cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak in a patient with extensive osteoradionecrosis of the skull base: case report and technical note.

    PubMed

    Brand, Y; Lim, E; Waran, V; Prepageran, N

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic endonasal techniques have recently become the method of choice in dealing with cerebrospinal fluid leak involving the anterior cranial fossa. However, most surgeons prefer an intracranial approach when leaks involve the middle cranial fossa. This case report illustrates the possibilities of using endoscopic techniques for cerebrospinal fluid leaks involving the middle fossa. A 37-year-old male patient presented with multiple areas of cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak due to osteoradionecrosis following radiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma 4 years earlier. Clinical examination showed involvement of all cranial nerves except the IInd and XIth nerves on the left side. A prior attempt to repair the cerebrospinal fluid leak with craniotomy was not successful. This case demonstrates the successful endoscopic repair of a large cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak.

  11. Medusae Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Released 31 July 2002) This image crosses the equator at about 155 W longitude and shows a sample of the middle member of the Medusae Fossae formation. The layers exposed in the southeast-facing scarp suggest that there is a fairly competent unit underlying the mesa in the center of the image. Dust-avalanches are apparent in the crater depression near the middle of the image. The mesa of Medusae Fossae material has the geomorphic signatures that are typical of the formation elsewhere on Mars, but the surface is probably heavily mantled with fine dust, masking the small-scale character of the unit. The close proximity of the Medusae Fossae unit to the Tharsis region may suggest that it is an ignimbrite or volcanic airfall deposit, but it's eroded character hasn't preserved the primary depositional features that would give away the secrets of formation. One of the most interesting feature in the image is the high-standing knob at the base of the scarp in the lower portion of the image. This knob or butte is high standing because it is composed of material that is not as easily eroded as the rest of the unit. There are a number of possible explanations for this feature, including volcano, inverted crater, or some localized process that caused once friable material to become cemented. Another interesting set of features are the long troughs on the slope in the lower portion of the image. The fact that the features keep the same width for the entire length suggests that these are not simple landslides.

  12. Utilizing a cranial window to visualize the middle cerebral artery during endothelin-1 induced middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Regenhardt, Robert W; Ansari, Saeed; Azari, Hassan; Caldwell, Kenneth J; Mecca, Adam P

    2013-02-22

    Creation of a cranial window is a method that allows direct visualization of structures on the cortical surface of the brain(1-3). This technique can be performed in many locations overlying the rat cerebrum, but is most easily carried out by creating a craniectomy over the readily accessible frontal or parietal bones. Most frequently, we have used this technique in combination with the endothelin-1 middle cerebral artery occlusion model of ischemic stroke to quantify the changes in middle cerebral artery vessel diameter that occur with injection of endothelin-1 into the brain parenchyma adjacent to the proximal MCA(4, 5). In order to visualize the proximal portion of the MCA during endothelin -1 induced MCAO, we use a technique to create a cranial window through the temporal bone on the lateral aspect of the rat skull (Figure 1). Cerebral arteries can be visualized either with the dura intact or with the dura incised and retracted. Most commonly, we leave the dura intact during visualization since endothelin-1 induced MCAO involves delivery of the vasoconstricting peptide into the brain parenchyma. This bypasses the need to incise the dura directly over the visualized vessels for drug delivery. This protocol will describe how to create a cranial window to visualize cerebral arteries in a step-wise fashion, as well as how to avoid many of the potential pitfalls pertaining to this method.

  13. Middle cerebral artery occlusion 25 years after cranial radiation therapy in acromegaly: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maffei, P; Albano, I; Martini, C; Barban, M; Manara, R; Meneghetti, G; Sicolo, N

    2009-10-01

    We report a case of ischemic stroke in a 43 year-old woman with no traditional cardiovascular risk factors and a history of cranial surgery and cranial radiation therapy (CRT) for a GH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma. The neurological work-up on this patient disclosed several cerebral ischemic lesions and demonstrated the occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery together with the narrowing of the right carotid artery; post-radiation brain damage was also visible by nuclear magnetic resonance. We postulate the existence in this patient of a radiation-induced vascular damage, which is a well recognized process thoroughly described in in vitro studies. We remark that life-long follow-up of acromegalic patients receiving CRT is essential so that early diagnosis of radiation-induced vascular injury can be made.

  14. Concurrent torsion of the right cranial and right middle lung lobes in a whippet.

    PubMed

    White, R N; Corzo-Menendez, N

    2000-12-01

    A four-year-old, entire male whippet was presented with a three-day history of lethargy, inappetence, occasional retching, a soft cough and intermittent episodes of haemoptysis. Clinical and laboratory findings, and thoracic radiographic and ultrasonographic studies suggested a diagnosis of lung lobe torsion. A concurrent lung lobe torsion of the right cranial and right middle lung lobes was confirmed at exploratory thoracotomy. Management included resection of both the affected lung lobes. No obvious underlying aetiology for the condition was apparent. The dog made a full recovery from the procedure and at the time of writing (11 months postoperatively) was reported to be well, exercising normally and showing no breathing abnormalities.

  15. A branching, positive relief network in the middle member of the Medusae Fossae Formation, equatorial Mars—Evidence for sapping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, S. K.; Balme, M. R.; Hagermann, A.; Murray, J. B.; Muller, J.-P.; Wilson, A.

    2013-09-01

    The Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) is a geological formation comprising three geological units (members) spread across five principal lobes. It dominates a quarter of the longitudinal extent of the equatorial region of Mars. Positive relief features referred to as ‘sinuous ridges’ (commonly interpreted as inverted paleoflow channel or valley fills) have been observed in the lowest member of the western MFF, but have not been identified within the central and eastern portions of the formation, in the middle and upper members. This paper presents the identification and analysis of a branching, positive relief system which occurs in the central lobe of the MFF in what appears to be an exposure of the middle member. A simple geomorphological map of the system is presented, from which we have adopted the working hypothesis that this is an inverted fill of a branching fluvial channel or valley system. A suite of morphological and topographic evidence supporting this hypothesis is presented, including analysis of the network using a ∼15 m/pixel digital terrain model derived from a Context Imager (CTX) stereo image pair. The evidence supporting this hypothesis includes: (1) the local slope and topography of the upper surface of the network are consistent with a contributory network; (2) the braided, fan-like form at the termination of the branching network is consistent in morphology with it being a depositional fan at the end of a fluvial system; (3) the terminal fan and surrounding deposits show layering and polygonization; and (4) there is strong association between the lower order branches and amphitheater shaped scarps in the depression walls. We evaluate the possible origins of this fluvial system and suggest that seepage sapping is the most probable. Two possible models for the evolution of the network and related features are presented; both require melt of ice within the MFF to form liquid water. We conclude that at least some portions of the Medusae Fossae

  16. Assessment of fetal midbrain and hindbrain in mid-sagittal cranial plane by three-dimensional multiplanar sonography. Part 2: application of nomograms to fetuses with posterior fossa malformations.

    PubMed

    Leibovitz, Z; Shkolnik, C; Haratz, K Krajden; Malinger, G; Shapiro, I; Lerman-Sagie, T

    2014-11-01

    To apply fetal midbrain (MB) and hindbrain (HB) nomograms, developed using three-dimensional multiplanar sonographic reconstruction (3D-MPR) in the mid-sagittal cranial plane, to fetuses with known posterior fossa malformations. In this retrospective study we examined sonographic volumes obtained by sagittal acquisition in 43 fetuses diagnosed with posterior fossa abnormalities and evaluated in the mid-sagittal cranial plane, using 3D-MPR, the following: MB parameters tectal length (TL) and anteroposterior midbrain diameter (APMD), and HB parameters anteroposterior pons diameter (APPD), superoinferior vermian diameter (SIVD) and anteroposterior vermian diameter (APVD). Fetuses were grouped, according to malformation, into eight categories: cobblestone malformation complex (CMC, n = 3), Chiari-II malformation (C-II, n = 7), pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH, n = 2), rhombencephalosynapsis (RES, n = 4), Dandy-Walker malformation (n = 8), vermian dysgenesis (VD, n = 7), persistent Blake's pouch cyst (n = 6) and megacisterna magna (n = 6). In each case and for each subgroup, the MB-HB biometric parameters and their z-scores were evaluated with reference to our new nomograms. The new MB-HB nomograms were able to identify the brainstem and vermian anomalies and differentiate fetuses with MB-HB malformations from those with isolated enlarged posterior fossa cerebrospinal fluid spaces. Use of the nomograms enabled detection of an elongated tectum in fetuses with CMC, C-II and RES, and a flattened pontine belly in cases of CMC, PCH and VD. In the fetuses with VD, the nomograms enabled division into three distinctive groups: (1) those with small SIVD and APVD, (2) those with normal SIVD but small APVD, and (3) those with small SIVD but normal APVD. Application of our new reference data, that for the first time include the MB, enables accurate diagnosis of brain malformations affecting the MB and HB and makes possible novel characterization of

  17. Mangala Fossa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 29 May 2002) The Science Today's THEMIS release captures Mangala Fossa. Mangala Fossa is a graben, which in geologic terminology translates into a long parallel to semi-parallel fracture or trough. Grabens are dropped or downthrown areas relative to the rocks on either side and these features are generally longer than they are wider. There are numerous dust devil trails seen in this image. In the lower portion of this image several dust devil tracks can be seen cutting across the upper surface then down the short stubby channel and finally back up and over to the adjacent upper surface. Some dust avalanche streaks on slopes are also visible. The rough material in the upper third of the image contains a portion of the rim of a 90 km diameter crater located in Daedalia Planum. The smooth crater floor has a graben (up to 7 km wide) and channel (2 km wide) incised into its surface. In the middle third and right of this image one can see ripples (possibly fossil dunes) on the crater floor material just above the graben. The floor of Mangala Fossa and the southern crater floor surface also have smaller linear ridges trending from the upper left to lower right. These linear ridges could be either erosional (yardangs) or depositional (dunes) landforms. The lower third of the scene contains a short stubby channel (near the right margin) and lava flow front (lower left). The floor of this channel is fairly smooth with some linear crevasses located along its course. One gets the impression that the channel floor is mantled with some type of indurated material that permits cracks to form in its surface. The Story In the Daedalia Plains on Mars, the rim of an old eroded crater rises up, a wreck of its former self (see context image at right). From the rough, choppy crater rim (top of the larger THEMIS image), the terrain descends to the almost smooth crater floor, gouged deeply by a trough, a channel, and the occasional dents of small, scattered craters. The deep

  18. Mangala Fossa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 29 May 2002) The Science Today's THEMIS release captures Mangala Fossa. Mangala Fossa is a graben, which in geologic terminology translates into a long parallel to semi-parallel fracture or trough. Grabens are dropped or downthrown areas relative to the rocks on either side and these features are generally longer than they are wider. There are numerous dust devil trails seen in this image. In the lower portion of this image several dust devil tracks can be seen cutting across the upper surface then down the short stubby channel and finally back up and over to the adjacent upper surface. Some dust avalanche streaks on slopes are also visible. The rough material in the upper third of the image contains a portion of the rim of a 90 km diameter crater located in Daedalia Planum. The smooth crater floor has a graben (up to 7 km wide) and channel (2 km wide) incised into its surface. In the middle third and right of this image one can see ripples (possibly fossil dunes) on the crater floor material just above the graben. The floor of Mangala Fossa and the southern crater floor surface also have smaller linear ridges trending from the upper left to lower right. These linear ridges could be either erosional (yardangs) or depositional (dunes) landforms. The lower third of the scene contains a short stubby channel (near the right margin) and lava flow front (lower left). The floor of this channel is fairly smooth with some linear crevasses located along its course. One gets the impression that the channel floor is mantled with some type of indurated material that permits cracks to form in its surface. The Story In the Daedalia Plains on Mars, the rim of an old eroded crater rises up, a wreck of its former self (see context image at right). From the rough, choppy crater rim (top of the larger THEMIS image), the terrain descends to the almost smooth crater floor, gouged deeply by a trough, a channel, and the occasional dents of small, scattered craters. The deep

  19. Endoscopic assistance in retrosigmoid transmeatal approach to intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas - An alternative for middle fossa approach. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Turek, Grzegorz; Cotúa, Carlos; Zamora, Rocio Evangelista; Tatagiba, Marcos

    Complete surgical removal of intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas with nerve VII and VIII sparing and without worsening patient's status is challenging. Also the choice of an optimal surgical technique, which is usually limited to selection between retrosigmoid transmeatal (RT) and middle fossa (MF) approach, can be a challenge. Although many previous studies documented superiority of RT to MF approach and vice versa, still no consensus has been reached regarding an optimal approach to intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas. In this technical note, we present RT approach with an endoscopic assistance and highlight its advantages over MF approach in surgical management of pure intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas. RT approach with an endoscopic assistance is presented as an optimal surgical treatment for intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas, and its advantages are compared to those offered by MF approach. Under an endoscopic guidance, we found a residual tumor in the fundus of the inner acoustic canal and performed its gross total resection. RT approach is an excellent technique suitable for safe radical surgical treatment of T1 vestibular schwannomas; this technique is associated with lower morbidity risk than MF approach. Copyright © 2017 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Ceraunius Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-06

    The large graben in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is part of a series of graben located on the southern flank of Alba Mons. This collection of graben is called Ceraunius Fossae. The term fossae means long, linear depressions.

  1. Mangala Fossa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-13

    The channel feature in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is called Mangala Fossa. This feature was formed by tectonic activity, with the walls being faults that allowed the central portion to slide downward forming a graben.

  2. Oti Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-06

    This image taken by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey shows lava flows and tectonic features related to the Arsia Mons volcanic system. The tectonic graben downdropped blocks bounded by faults are called Oti Fossae.

  3. Cerberus Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-24

    The fractures in this image are part of a large system of fractures called Cerberus Fossae. Athabasca Valles is visible in the lower right corner of the image as seen by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

  4. [Mini-orbitozygomatic craniotomy in surgery for supratentorial aneurysms and tumors of the anterior and middle cranial fossae].

    PubMed

    Dzhindzhikhadze, R S; Dreval', O N; Lazarev, V A; Kambiev, R L

    Cовершенствование микронейрохирургической техники, нейроанестезиологии и интраоперационной визуализации дает возможность оперировать через маленькие разрезы и краниотомию в соответствии с концепцией keyhole-хирургии. Среди всего многообразия минимально инвазивных доступов супраорбитальная краниотомия приобрела наиболее широкую распространенность. Существует множество модификаций супраорбитальной краниотомии, включая различные разрезы мягких тканей и объем самой краниотомии. Авторы представляют первые результаты использования минимальной орбитозигоматической (МОЗ) краниотомии через разрез по брови при аневризмах переднего отдела виллизиева круга и объемных образованиях передней и средней черепных ямок. Материал и методы. С марта 2014 г. по декабрь 2015 г. с использованием МОЗ-краниотомии оперированы 45 пациентов, средний возраст больных 58,3 года. Проведено клипирование 15 супратенториальных аневризм и удаление 30 объемных образований. У большинства (10 пациентов) были неразорвавшиеся аневризмы. У 5 больных в анамнезе имели место субарахноидальные кровоизлияния (САК). По локализации аневризмы распределялись следующим образом: 8 аневризм передней соединительной артерии; 4 аневризмы внутренней сонной артерии в области устья задней соединительной артерии; 3 офтальмические аневризмы. Состояние больных оценивалось по шкале Hunt—Hess, объем САК — по шкале Fisher. Операцию выполняли в среднем через 14 дней после САК. В группе пациентов с объемными образованиями в пределах передней и средней черепных ямок методом выбора в диагностике была МРТ головного мозга с контрастированием. В ряде случаев пациентам выполняли КТ с реконструкцией для оценки состояния костных структур основания черепа. Результаты. Все аневризмы были полностью выключены из мозгового кровотока. Серьезных осложнений и летальных случаев в группе больных с аневризмами не было. Тотальное удаление опухолей выполнено 28 пациентам. У 2 пациентов с макроаденомами гипофиза с супра- и параселлярным распространением выполнено субтотальное удаление вследствие инвазии кавернозного синуса. Летальность в этой группе составила 3,3% (1 пациент). Послеоперационные осложнения оценивались в сроки через 2 нед и 6 мес. Послеоперационный косметический результат через 3 и 6 мес после операции оценивался пациентами как отличный. Заключение. Минимальная орбитозигоматическая краниотомия является альтернативой классическим доступам и может быть хорошим подспорьем в хирургии аневризм и опухолей основания черепа. Необходима критическая оценка в подборе кандидатов для подобной keyhole-хирургии.

  5. Sacra Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-17

    The steep sided depressions in this image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are fault bounded tectonic features called graben. These depressions are part of a large region of graben called Sacra Fossae. Sacra Fossae is located on the western margin of Lunae Planum. Orbit Number: 60829 Latitude: 18.2961 Longitude: 287.711 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-08-31 10:01 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20094

  6. Reversible dyscognition in patients with a unilateral, middle fossa arachnoid cyst revealed by using a laptop based neuropsychological test battery (CANTAB).

    PubMed

    Torgersen, Johan; Helland, Christian; Flaatten, Hans; Wester, Knut

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and validate the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) in a Norwegian group of patients undergoing surgery for middle fossa arachnoid cysts (AC). We also wanted to assess health related quality of life (HRQOL) in these patients to see if it could be improved by decompression of the AC. Adult patients (>18 years) with unilateral middle fossa AC and no previous history of neurological disease, head injury, or a psychiatric disorder were eligible for inclusion. We used four tests from CANTAB to assess the level of neuropsychological performance: paired associate learning (PAL) and delayed matching to sample (DMS) assessed temporal lobe functions, while Stockings of Cambridge (SOC) and intra-extra dimensional (IED) shift focused on frontal lobe functions. Patients with postoperative cerebral complications were reported, but excluded from neuropsychological follow-up. In addition to the CANTAB data, pre- and postoperative clinical and radiological data were collected. HRQOL was assessed using Short Form 36 (SF-36) pre- and postoperatively. We found significant improvement in the two temporal tests assessing memory, but no improvement in the two frontal tests assessing executive function. HRQOL was significantly reduced preoperatively in two of eight SF-36 domains and improved significantly in four domains postoperatively. CANTAB facilitates detection of cognitive improvements after decompression of the cyst in patients with AC in the middle fossa. The improvements were detected on the tests sensitive to temporal lobe problems only, not on the tests more sensitive to frontal lobe affection. This establishes construct validity for CANTAB for the first time in this population.

  7. The cranial osteology of Tyrannoneustes lythrodectikos (Crocodylomorpha: Metriorhynchidae) from the Middle Jurassic of Europe

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Tyrannoneustes lythrodectikos is one of numerous metriorhynchid crocodylomorph species known from the Oxford Clay Formation of England (Callovian-Oxfordian; Middle-Late Jurassic). This taxon is of evolutionary importance, as it is the oldest and most basal known macrophagous metriorhynchid. It has a mosaic of plesiomorphic and derived feeding related characteristics, including: teeth with microscopic, poorly formed and non-contiguous denticles; increased tooth apicobasal length; ventrally displaced dentary tooth row (increased gape); reduced dentary tooth count; and a proportionally long mandibular symphysis. However the type specimen, and current referred specimens, all lack a preserved cranium. As such, the craniofacial morphology of this taxon, and its potential feeding ecology, remains poorly understood. Here we describe two skulls and two lower jaws which we refer to T. lythrodectikos. Previously these specimens were referred to ‘Metriorhynchus’ brachyrhynchus. They share with the T. lythrodectikos holotype: the in-line reception pits on the dentary, dorsal margin of the surangular is strongly concave in lateral view, and the most of the angular ventral margin is strongly convex. Based on our description of these specimens, the skull of T. lythrodectikos has three autapomorphies: very long posterior processes of the premaxilla terminating in line with the 4th or 5th maxillary alveoli, deep lateral notches on the lateral surface of the maxillary with reception pits for dentary teeth, and the premaxilla forms the anterior margin of the first maxillary alveoli. Our description of the cranial anatomy of Tyrannoneustes lythrodectikos confirms that some macrophagous characteristics evolved during the Middle Jurassic, and were not exclusive to the clade Geosaurini. Moreover, the skulls further highlight the mosaic nature of Tyrannoneustes lythrodectikos and wide-gape macrophagous evolution in Geosaurinae. PMID:25289192

  8. Nili Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-31

    The linear depression in today's VIS image is part of Nili Fossae. Orbit Number: 60318 Latitude: 24.7944 Longitude: 80.7404 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-07-20 08:53 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19763

  9. Mangala Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-22

    The linear wall at the bottom of this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is a fault. The linear depression caused by faulting is part of a long depression called Mangala Fossae. Orbit Number: 58979 Latitude: -17.9823 Longitude: 210.806 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-04-01 00:54 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19468

  10. Hephaestus Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-02

    The intersecting linear depressions in this VIS image are part of Hephaestus Fossae. Orbit Number: 60373 Latitude: 21.9161 Longitude: 122.075 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-07-24 20:50 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19765

  11. Ismenia Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-03

    This image from NASA Mars Odyssey shows a region of Mars northern hemisphere called Ismenia Fossae. Most of the landforms are the degraded remains of impact crater rim and ejecta from an unnamed crater 75 km diameter just north of this scene.

  12. Labeatis Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-10

    The channel-like features in this image captured by NASA Mars Odyssey are fault bounded down-dropped blocks of material. These tectonic features are called Labaetis Fossae and are located on the eastern margin of the Tharsis Volcanic complex.

  13. Elysium Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-15

    Located east of Elysium Mons, Elysium Fossae is a large tectonic graben. This image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows that lava may have flowed in the channel feature. Orbit Number: 61470 Latitude: 23.569 Longitude: 154.765 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-10-23 04:54 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20115

  14. Icaria Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-08

    The channel-like features in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are tectonic graben. The graben called Icaria Fossae are located in Terra Sirenum. Orbit Number: 65846 Latitude: -41.5696 Longitude: 240.567 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2016-10-17 14:57 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21185

  15. Ceraunius Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-07

    The north-south trending fractures and graben block down-dropped between two fractures in this region are called Ceraunius Fossae and are likely related to Alba Mons to the north shown in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

  16. Tantalus Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-27

    Tantalus Fossae, seen in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft, is a set of long valleys on the eastern side of Alba Patera. These valleys are referred to as grabens and are formed by extension of the crust and faulting.

  17. Nili Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-20

    Nili Fossae is a large band of parallel graben located to the northeast of Syrtis Major. The graben in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft were formed by tectonic activity, with faulting that creates the linear depression. Orbit Number: 64105 Latitude: 23.3115 Longitude: 78.6126 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2016-05-27 05:24 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20785

  18. Labeatis Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-13

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows one of the many graben that make up Labeatis Fossae. Graben are tectonic features created when two bounding faults have an central down dropped block of material. Orbit Number: 61740 Latitude: 29.7682 Longitude: 284.222 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-11-14 10:34 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20235

  19. Olympica Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-25

    This VIS image shows a portion of Olympica Fossae. In this image several lava channels are visible, and it appears that lava has flowed in the larger depressions. The streamlined feature in the central part of the image also indicates that volcanic processes were active in this region. Orbit Number: 61654 Latitude: 24.8964 Longitude: 246.128 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-11-07 08:34. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20222

  20. Claritas Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-05

    The linear depressions in this VIS image are some of the numerous graben that make up Claritas Fossae. Graben form when two faults cause a block of material to be dropped to a lower elevation. Orbit Number: 65197 Latitude: -35.7709 Longitude: 251.553 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2016-08-25 03:51 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21004

  1. Jugular fossa meningioma: presentation and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Rutt, Amy L; Chen, Xiaoli; Sataloff, Robert T

    2009-10-01

    Primary jugular fossa meningiomas are among the rarest subtypes of meningioma. They are intimately related to the lower cranial nerves, the jugular bulb and vein, and the temporal bone, and they have a tendency to extend both intra- and extracranially. The most common morbidity associated with jugular fossa lesions is lower cranial nerve deficits. In these cases, the differential diagnosis and preoperative radiographic diagnosis are very important because preoperative management and operative planning for the jugular fossa subtype differ considerably from those of other types of meningioma. Because of the rarity of this condition, our understanding of its treatment, long-term follow-up, and recurrence is limited. As experience with radiosurgical treatment of all meningiomas is accumulating, we may find that radiosurgery of jugular fossa meningiomas is appropriate. In the meantime, cure is still possible with complete surgical resection, and surgical morbidity can be minimized through meticulous planning and surgical technique. We describe a case of primary jugular fossa meningioma in a 45-year-old man who presented with complaints of chronic left aural fullness, hearing loss, and difficulty understanding voices. Imaging revealed the presence of a destructive jugular fossa mass. The patient underwent surgical resection without complication, and he was free of recurrence at 1 year of follow-up.

  2. Claritas Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 20 June 2002) The Science The eastern rim of this unnamed crater in Claritas Fossae is very degraded. This indicates that this crater is very ancient and has been subjected to erosion and subsequent bombardment from other impactors such as asteroids and comets. One of these later (younger) craters is seen in the upper right of this image superimposed upon the older crater rim material. Note that this smaller younger crater rim is sharper and more intact than the older crater rim. This region is also mantled with a blanket of dust. This dust mantle causes the underlying topography to take on a more subdued appearance. The Story Not every crater on Mars has a name. The one in this image doesn't. What would you name it if you could? That's what planetary scientists ask themselves when they come across such features. If they think of a good name, they can submit it for approval to a group of world astronomers who are members of the International Astronomical Union. There are special rules, though, so not any name can be selected. The selection committee especially wants to make sure that all world cultures are represented. While this crater may not have a name, the region it lies in does. It is called Claritas Fossae. 'Claritas' is the Latin word for 'bright.' 'Fossae' are long, narrow, shallow depressions that mark the region. You can see these best in the context image to the right. You can tell just by looking at this crater that it is very ancient. Its rim is very degraded from erosion and bombardment from other impactors such as asteroids and comets. Compare its roughened rim to the smoother outline of the small crater on the rim's edge (upper right). The smoother rim of the small one means that it is considerably younger than its older, choppier neighbor. You know it was certainly created after the large crater because it lies on top of the rim. Other than the old and young generations of craters, the surface looks pretty uniform in hue and perhaps even

  3. Claritas Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 20 June 2002) The Science The eastern rim of this unnamed crater in Claritas Fossae is very degraded. This indicates that this crater is very ancient and has been subjected to erosion and subsequent bombardment from other impactors such as asteroids and comets. One of these later (younger) craters is seen in the upper right of this image superimposed upon the older crater rim material. Note that this smaller younger crater rim is sharper and more intact than the older crater rim. This region is also mantled with a blanket of dust. This dust mantle causes the underlying topography to take on a more subdued appearance. The Story Not every crater on Mars has a name. The one in this image doesn't. What would you name it if you could? That's what planetary scientists ask themselves when they come across such features. If they think of a good name, they can submit it for approval to a group of world astronomers who are members of the International Astronomical Union. There are special rules, though, so not any name can be selected. The selection committee especially wants to make sure that all world cultures are represented. While this crater may not have a name, the region it lies in does. It is called Claritas Fossae. 'Claritas' is the Latin word for 'bright.' 'Fossae' are long, narrow, shallow depressions that mark the region. You can see these best in the context image to the right. You can tell just by looking at this crater that it is very ancient. Its rim is very degraded from erosion and bombardment from other impactors such as asteroids and comets. Compare its roughened rim to the smoother outline of the small crater on the rim's edge (upper right). The smoother rim of the small one means that it is considerably younger than its older, choppier neighbor. You know it was certainly created after the large crater because it lies on top of the rim. Other than the old and young generations of craters, the surface looks pretty uniform in hue and perhaps even

  4. Congenital basis of posterior fossa anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Cotes, Claudia; Bonfante, Eliana; Lazor, Jillian; Jadhav, Siddharth; Caldas, Maria; Swischuk, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    The classification of posterior fossa congenital anomalies has been a controversial topic. Advances in genetics and imaging have allowed a better understanding of the embryologic development of these abnormalities. A new classification schema correlates the embryologic, morphologic, and genetic bases of these anomalies in order to better distinguish and describe them. Although they provide a better understanding of the clinical aspects and genetics of these disorders, it is crucial for the radiologist to be able to diagnose the congenital posterior fossa anomalies based on their morphology, since neuroimaging is usually the initial step when these disorders are suspected. We divide the most common posterior fossa congenital anomalies into two groups: 1) hindbrain malformations, including diseases with cerebellar or vermian agenesis, aplasia or hypoplasia and cystic posterior fossa anomalies; and 2) cranial vault malformations. In addition, we will review the embryologic development of the posterior fossa and, from the perspective of embryonic development, will describe the imaging appearance of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. Knowledge of the developmental bases of these malformations facilitates detection of the morphological changes identified on imaging, allowing accurate differentiation and diagnosis of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. PMID:26246090

  5. Sirenum Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-21

    The linear depression in the center of this image captured by NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft is a graben - a fault bounded block of material. The graben crosses the crater and ejecta in the middle of the image.

  6. Hephaestus Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Released 3 July 2002) Off the western flank of Elysium are the Hephaestus Fossae, including linear arrangements of small, round pits. These features are commonly called 'pit chains' and most likely represent the collapse of lava tubes. Lava tubes allow molten rock to move long distances underground. When the lava drains out it leaves unsupported tunnels, which can collapse and form pits. These particular pit chains are unusual because they change direction abruptly. In the lower portion of the image, pits have collapsed at the bends and allow us to observe the sharp, nearly right angle corners. These direction changes are most likely due to some sort of structural control during the emplacement of the lava tubes. There is an extraordinarily high concentration of small, degraded craters on the plains surface. The size range of these craters is fairly consistent and they all appear to be of similar age. It is unlikely that these were caused by primary impacts (impacts of meteors onto the surface) because both the size and timing distributions of primary impactors vary tremendously. However, the craters in the image could have been created from secondary impacts. Secondaries are impacts of material that is excavated during a large cratering event nearby or from the disintegration of a primary meteor in the atmosphere into many smaller parts that rain onto the surface. In contrast to these older, small craters, there is a relatively young crater in the center of the image. A hummocky ejecta blanket is visible around the crater and has covered some of the smaller craters on the plain around it. The edges of the crater are sharp, formed by rocky material in the crater rim. This material is visible as the layer of rough, grooved material at the top of the inside walls. Small dust avalanches have left dark streaks down the inside walls of the crater.

  7. Hiding inequality beneath prosperity: patterns of cranial injury in middle period San Pedro de Atacama, Northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rouff, Christina

    2011-09-01

    The Middle Period in San Pedro de Atacama (AD 400-1000) stands out as a time of great prosperity that was, in part, associated with high levels of interaction with foreign polities, including the highland state of Tiwanaku. Although previous studies have demonstrated an increase in rates of violence during the subsequent Regional Developments Period (AD 1000-1400), this does not mean that the Middle Period was a time of peace and tranquility. Here, the prevalence of violence in four contemporary cemeteries is analyzed, exploring potential sources of conflict, including social inequality. Cranial trauma was documented through the presence, location, size, and state of healing of all wounds and was found in 14.7% of the sample (61/415; including two cases of perimortem trauma). Skeletal remains were also analyzed for demographic data to investigate differences in patterns of violence related to sex and age. Notably, most of the trauma centered on the anterior portion of the skull, suggesting the prominence of face-to-face confrontations that involved both sexes. Correlations between trauma and items in the mortuary assemblage that may have been associated with prestige or an elevated social standing in two cemeteries from the Solcor ayllu indicate that individuals from the more elite cemetery were subjected to significantly less traumatic injury. These data suggest that people did not share equally in the benefits of this period's affluence and that there were tensions in Atacameño society despite seemingly widespread prosperity. 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Yardangs in Medusa Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-05

    This image from NASA Mars Odyssey covers a portion of the Medusa Fossae formation, near the equator of Mars. The most characteristic feature of the Medusa Fossae formation is the abundance of yardangs, which are erosional landforms carved by wind.

  9. Developmental Changes in Morphology of the Middle and Posterior External Cranial Base in Modern Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Deepal H.; Smith, Heather F.

    2015-01-01

    The basicranium has been described as phylogenetically informative, developmentally stable, and minimally affected by external factors and consequently plays an important role in cranial size and shape in subadult humans. Here basicranial variation of subadults from several modern human populations was investigated and the impact of genetic relatedness on basicranial morphological similarities was investigated. Three-dimensional landmark data were digitized from subadult basicrania from seven populations. Published molecular data on short tandem repeats were statistically compared to morphological data from three ontogenetic stages. Basicranial and temporal bone morphology both reflect genetic distances in childhood and adolescence (5–18 years), but not in infancy (<5 years). The occipital bone reflects genetic distances only in adolescence (13–18 years). The sphenoid bone does not reflect genetic distances at any ontogenetic stage but was the most diagnostic region evaluated, resulting in high rates of correct classification among populations. These results suggest that the ontogenetic processes driving basicranial development are complex and cannot be succinctly summarized across populations or basicranial regions. However, the fact that certain regions reflect genetic distances suggests that the morphology of these regions may be useful in reconstructing population history in specimens for which direct DNA evidence is unavailable, such as archaeological sites. PMID:26413515

  10. Developmental Changes in Morphology of the Middle and Posterior External Cranial Base in Modern Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Deepal H; Smith, Heather F

    2015-01-01

    The basicranium has been described as phylogenetically informative, developmentally stable, and minimally affected by external factors and consequently plays an important role in cranial size and shape in subadult humans. Here basicranial variation of subadults from several modern human populations was investigated and the impact of genetic relatedness on basicranial morphological similarities was investigated. Three-dimensional landmark data were digitized from subadult basicrania from seven populations. Published molecular data on short tandem repeats were statistically compared to morphological data from three ontogenetic stages. Basicranial and temporal bone morphology both reflect genetic distances in childhood and adolescence (5-18 years), but not in infancy (<5 years). The occipital bone reflects genetic distances only in adolescence (13-18 years). The sphenoid bone does not reflect genetic distances at any ontogenetic stage but was the most diagnostic region evaluated, resulting in high rates of correct classification among populations. These results suggest that the ontogenetic processes driving basicranial development are complex and cannot be succinctly summarized across populations or basicranial regions. However, the fact that certain regions reflect genetic distances suggests that the morphology of these regions may be useful in reconstructing population history in specimens for which direct DNA evidence is unavailable, such as archaeological sites.

  11. Tantalus Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 25 June 2002) The Science Tantalus Fossae is a set of long valleys on the eastern side of Alba Patera. These valleys are referred to as grabens and are formed by extension of the crust and faulting. When large amounts of pressure or tension are applied to rocks on timescales that are fast enough that the rock cannot respond by deforming, the rock breaks along faults. In the case of a graben, two parallel faults are formed by extension of the crust and the rock in between the faults drops downward into the space created by the extension. Numerous sets of grabens are visible in this THEMIS image, trending from north-northeast to south-southwest. Because the faults defining the graben are formed parallel to the direction of the applied stress, we know that extensional forces were pulling the crust apart in the west-northwest/east-southeast direction. The large number of grabens around Alba Patera is generally believed to be the result of extensional forces associated with the uplift of Alba Patera. Also visible in this image are a series of linearly aligned pits, called a pit chain. The pits are not the result of impact cratering, but are similar to sinkholes on Earth. Sinkholes are typically formed by the removal of rock (commonly limestone) underground by groundwater -- when enough rock is removed, the overlying rock becomes too heavy to be supported, and it collapses, forming a pit. Unlike sinkholes, however, the pit chains near Alba Patera were likely formed when empty underground lava tubes collapsed, accounting for the presence and alignment of many pits. Numerous channel features are also observed in the image, and follow the local topographic slope, which is downhill to the east-southeast. One of these, a long channel in the center of the image, nicely demonstrates the complex relations possible between geologic features. The geologist's rule of superposition says that a feature on top of (superposing) another feature, or cutting across another

  12. Tantalus Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 25 June 2002) The Science Tantalus Fossae is a set of long valleys on the eastern side of Alba Patera. These valleys are referred to as grabens and are formed by extension of the crust and faulting. When large amounts of pressure or tension are applied to rocks on timescales that are fast enough that the rock cannot respond by deforming, the rock breaks along faults. In the case of a graben, two parallel faults are formed by extension of the crust and the rock in between the faults drops downward into the space created by the extension. Numerous sets of grabens are visible in this THEMIS image, trending from north-northeast to south-southwest. Because the faults defining the graben are formed parallel to the direction of the applied stress, we know that extensional forces were pulling the crust apart in the west-northwest/east-southeast direction. The large number of grabens around Alba Patera is generally believed to be the result of extensional forces associated with the uplift of Alba Patera. Also visible in this image are a series of linearly aligned pits, called a pit chain. The pits are not the result of impact cratering, but are similar to sinkholes on Earth. Sinkholes are typically formed by the removal of rock (commonly limestone) underground by groundwater -- when enough rock is removed, the overlying rock becomes too heavy to be supported, and it collapses, forming a pit. Unlike sinkholes, however, the pit chains near Alba Patera were likely formed when empty underground lava tubes collapsed, accounting for the presence and alignment of many pits. Numerous channel features are also observed in the image, and follow the local topographic slope, which is downhill to the east-southeast. One of these, a long channel in the center of the image, nicely demonstrates the complex relations possible between geologic features. The geologist's rule of superposition says that a feature on top of (superposing) another feature, or cutting across another

  13. Paleopathological evidence of the cranial remains from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain). Description and preliminary inferences.

    PubMed

    Pérez, P J; Gracía, A; Martínez, I; Arsuaga, J L

    1997-01-01

    The large Sima de los Huesos sample provides for the first time the opportunity of performing a paleopathological study of a Middle Pleistocene population. A high frequency of bilateral temporomandibular arthropathy has been observed. We found an ear hyperostosis in Cranium 4, that probably caused deafness that we consider to be of infectious origin. Three osteomata were found in the cranial collection. One severe trauma was evident on the left supraorbital torus of an immature individual. Many cranial vault erosions, mostly restricted to the external table, are found in the sample. Cranium 5 displays thirteen of these. Cranium 5 also shows an extensive maxillary osteitis associated with a dental apical abscess, as well as another dental apical abscess in its mandible. Most of the adult frontal bones show a worm-like pattern of vascular channelling in the orbital roof, also found in modern populations.

  14. More Olympica Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-22

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a different part of Olympica Fossae. In this region lava channels dominate. The complex interaction of volcanic and tectonic processes is illustrated by the central feature in this image.

  15. Faults in Claritas Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-15

    NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured this image of the Claritas Fossae region, characterized by systems of graben. A graben forms when a block of the planet crust drops down between two faults, due to extension, or pulling, of the crust.

  16. Posterior fossa syndrome—a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Salima S.; Hettige, Samantha; Mankad, Kshtij

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa syndrome (PFS), or cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), is a collection of neurological symptoms that occur following surgical resection of a posterior fossa tumour, and is characterised by either a reduction or an absence of speech. Some authors suggest that CM is only one symptom of the CMS complex that also includes ataxia, hypotonia and irritability as well as cranial nerve deficits, neurobehavioral changes and urinary retention or incontinence. It is seen almost exclusively in children. In 1985 Rekate et al. published the first work describing CM as a clinical entity, occurring as a consequence of bilateral cerebellar injury. Other associated symptoms include visual impairment, altered mood, impaired swallowing and significant gross and fine motor deficits. The effects of this can have a devastating impact on both the patient and their carers, posing a significant clinical challenge to neurorehabilitation services. The reported incidence was between 8% and 31% of children undergoing surgery for posterior fossa tumour. The underlying pathologies include vasospasm, oedema, and axonal/neuronal injury. Neuroimaging has contributed to a better understanding of the anatomical location of postoperative injury. There have been a number of suggestions for treatment interventions for PFS. However, apart from some individual reports, there have been no clinical trials indicating possible benefit. Occupational therapy, speech and language therapy, as well as neurocognitive support, contribute to the recovery of these patients. PMID:27942479

  17. Posterior Fossa Tumors.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Lara A; Young Poussaint, Tina

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of death from solid tumors in childhood. The most common posterior fossa tumors in children are medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, and brainstem glioma. Location, and imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and conventional MR (cMR) imaging may provide important clues to the most likely diagnosis. Moreover, information obtained from advanced MR imaging techniques increase diagnostic confidence and help distinguish between different histologic tumor types. Here we discuss the most common posterior fossa tumors in children, including typical imaging findings on CT, cMR imaging, and advanced MR imaging studies.

  18. Memnonia Fossae Enhanced Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-04

    Tharsis-centered volcanic and tectonic activity resulted in the formation of radial grabens of Memnonia Fossae, which cut materials of the ancient cratered highlands and the relatively young, highland-embaying lava flows as seen by NASA's Viking Orbiter 2. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00151

  19. Medusae Fossae #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Extensive wind-swept plains of the Medusae Fossae formation on Mars. This northern subframe image, frame 3104, is of a 3.0 x 4.7 km area centered near 2.4 degrees north, 163.8 degrees west.

    Figure caption from Science Magazine

  20. Medusae Fossae #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Extensive wind-swept plains of the Medusae Fossae formation on Mars. This southern subframe image, frame 3104, is of a 3.0 x 4.7 km area centered near 2.0 degrees north, 163.8 degrees west.

    Figure caption from Science Magazine

  1. Endoscopic versus Open Approach to the Infratemporal Fossa: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Ahmed; Carrau, Ricardo L.; Tantawy, Ahmed; Ibraheim, Ahmed; Solares, Arturo C.; Otto, Bradley A.; Prevedello, Daniel M.; Filho, Leo Ditzel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Various lateral and anterior approaches to access the infratemporal fossa (ITF) have been described. We provide our observations regarding the endoscopic transpterygoid and preauricular subtemporal approaches, listing their respective advantages and limitations through cadaveric dissection. Methods A cadaver study was performed on five adult specimens. An endoscopic transpterygoid approach to the ITF was completed bilaterally in three specimens, and an open preauricular ITF approach was performed bilaterally in two specimens. Results After completing the cadaveric dissections, we studied differences between the endoscopic transpterygoid approach and open preauricular subtemporal approaches in regard to exposure and ease of dissection of different structures in the ITF. Conclusions In comparison with a lateral approach, the endonasal endoscopic transpterygoid approach provides better visualization and more direct exposure of median structures such as the nasopharynx, eustachian tube, sella, and clivus. We concluded that the endoscopic transpterygoid approach can be utilized to resect benign lesions and some select group of malignancies involving the infratemporal and middle cranial fossae. Open approaches continue to play an important role, especially in the resection of extensive malignant tumors extending to these regions. PMID:26401477

  2. Minimally invasive surgery (endonasal) for anterior fossa and sellar tumors.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Timothy; Greenlee, Jeremy D W; Teo, Charles

    2010-10-01

    The primary goal of any surgical approach is to adequately visualize and treat the pathologic condition with minimal disruption to adjacent normal anatomy. The work of several researchers has revealed the promise of minimally invasive endonasal neurosurgery and paved the way for broader applications of the technology. This article discusses the current state of minimally invasive endonasal techniques to address the pathologic conditions of the anterior cranial fossa and parasellar region. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies associated with posterior fossa exploration surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Ayman; Clerkin, James; Mandiwanza, Tafadzwa; Green, Sandra; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Multiple cranial nerves palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment is a rare clinical presentation. This case report describes a young man who developed a unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment. There are different theories to explain this presentation, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We propose that this patient cranial nerve palsies developed following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, potentially as a consequence of rapid change in CSF dynamics. PMID:26951144

  4. Virtual temporal bone: an interactive 3-dimensional learning aid for cranial base surgery.

    PubMed

    Kockro, Ralf A; Hwang, Peter Y K

    2009-05-01

    We have developed an interactive virtual model of the temporal bone for the training and teaching of cranial base surgery. The virtual model was based on the tomographic data of the Visible Human Project. The male Visible Human's computed tomographic data were volumetrically reconstructed as virtual bone tissue, and the individual photographic slices provided the basis for segmentation of the middle and inner ear structures, cranial nerves, vessels, and brainstem. These structures were created by using outlining and tube editing tools, allowing structural modeling either directly on the basis of the photographic data or according to information from textbooks and cadaver dissections. For training and teaching, the virtual model was accessed in the previously described 3-dimensional workspaces of the Dextroscope or Dextrobeam (Volume Interactions Pte, Ltd., Singapore), whose interfaces enable volumetric exploration from any perspective and provide virtual tools for drilling and measuring. We have simulated several cranial base procedures including approaches via the floor of the middle fossa and the lateral petrous bone. The virtual model suitably illustrated the core facts of anatomic spatial relationships while simulating different stages of bone drilling along a variety of surgical corridors. The system was used for teaching during training courses to plan and discuss operative anatomy and strategies. The Virtual Temporal Bone and its surrounding 3-dimensional workspace provide an effective way to study the essential surgical anatomy of this complex region and to teach and train operative strategies, especially when used as an adjunct to cadaver dissections.

  5. Yardangs in Medusa Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Released 29 July 2002) This THEMIS visible image covers a portion of the Medusa Fossae formation, near the equator of Mars. The most characteristic feature of the Medusa Fossae formation is the abundance of 'yardangs', which are erosional landforms carved by the wind. These features usually form in a linear fashion, and can be indicators of prevailing paleowind directions. On Earth, yardangs are typically found in rocks that are easily eroded, such as those that form from consolidated volcanic ash, dust-fall deposits or lake sediments. In this particular area of Medusa Fossae, the size, spacing, and orientation of the yardangs varies throughout the image. The largest form a stripe across the center of the image, while the smallest are found in the top half of the image (look closely). The small yardangs at the very top of the image are oriented NW-SE; however, the orientation changes to NE-SW near the bright ridge in the center of the image. The variation in size and orientation appears to correspond with topographic layers, and may be due either to differences in consolidation or changes in wind strength or direction as the yardangs were formed. Finally, the terrain in the lower third of the image appears etched or pitted, and was probably also formed by wind erosion.

  6. Yardangs in Medusa Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Released 29 July 2002) This THEMIS visible image covers a portion of the Medusa Fossae formation, near the equator of Mars. The most characteristic feature of the Medusa Fossae formation is the abundance of 'yardangs', which are erosional landforms carved by the wind. These features usually form in a linear fashion, and can be indicators of prevailing paleowind directions. On Earth, yardangs are typically found in rocks that are easily eroded, such as those that form from consolidated volcanic ash, dust-fall deposits or lake sediments. In this particular area of Medusa Fossae, the size, spacing, and orientation of the yardangs varies throughout the image. The largest form a stripe across the center of the image, while the smallest are found in the top half of the image (look closely). The small yardangs at the very top of the image are oriented NW-SE; however, the orientation changes to NE-SW near the bright ridge in the center of the image. The variation in size and orientation appears to correspond with topographic layers, and may be due either to differences in consolidation or changes in wind strength or direction as the yardangs were formed. Finally, the terrain in the lower third of the image appears etched or pitted, and was probably also formed by wind erosion.

  7. Pterygopalatine Fossa: Not a Mystery!

    PubMed

    Derinkuyu, Betul Emine; Boyunaga, Oznur; Oztunali, Cigdem; Alimli, Ayse Gul; Ucar, Murat

    2016-12-06

    The pterygopalatine fossa is an important anatomic crossroads that is connected with numerous intra- and extracranial spaces via foramina and fissures. Although this fossa is small, its central location in the skull base and its communications provide clinical, radiological, and anatomical significance. In this pictorial review, we aimed to describe the radiologic anatomy of the pterygopalatine fossa, as well as to give some pathologic examples to better understand this major conduit.

  8. Minimal invasive trans-eyelid approach to anterior and middle skull base meningioma: a preliminary study of Shanghai Huashan hospital

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qing; Wang, Dai-Jun; Sun, Li; Mao, Ying; Zhong, Ping; Zheng, Ming-Zhe; Tang, Hai-Liang; Zhu, Hong-Da; Chen, Xian-Cheng; Zhou, Liang-Fu; Gong, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Transpalpebral or trans-eyelid approach is a modified trans-orbital access to lesions of anterior cranial fossa and sellar region. But whether this approach is also suitable for tumors extending laterally to the temporal lobe or middle cranial fossa is not clarified. We would like to share our experiences from the cadaveric anatomy study to clinical operations. We used 5 cadavers to study trans-eyelid approaches in a step-by-step fashion. And then assisted by an experienced ophthalmologist for incisions, we treated 3 female patients via this approach: One with spheno-orbital meningioma, one with sellar tuberculum meningioma, and the other with medial sphenoidal wing meningioma. After studying the cadavers, we made several revisions to the previously reported approach: 1) move the incision close to the edge of the eyelid, which resembled the double-eyelid incision. 2) A vascularized periosteum flap was dissected for repairing the opened frontal sinus and reconstruction of the skull base. 3) The dura was sutured up with a slice of temporalis muscle. Then we treated 3 patients by this approach. All tumors were totally resected as Simpson Grade I. Complications included orbital apex syndrome and transient oculomotor paralysis because of tumor invasion into orbit and cavernous sinus. No cerebrospinal fluid leakage. We find that trans-eyelid approach is suitable for lesions not only at anterior cranial base or sellar region, but also extending to middle cranial base, especially around sphenoidal wings within 2 cm range or spheno-orbital region. Thus, we propose whether it appropriate to nominate this approach as ‘trans-eyelid pterional approach’, since it may treat some anterior and middle cranial fossa lesions with a mini-craniotomy around pterion. PMID:25550905

  9. Cranial base topology and basic trends in the facial evolution of Homo.

    PubMed

    Bastir, Markus; Rosas, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Facial prognathism and projection are important characteristics in human evolution but their three-dimensional (3D) architectonic relationships to basicranial morphology are not clear. We used geometric morphometrics and measured 51 3D-landmarks in a comparative sample of modern humans (N = 78) and fossil Pleistocene hominins (N = 10) to investigate the spatial features of covariation between basicranial and facial elements. The study reveals complex morphological integration patterns in craniofacial evolution of Middle and Late Pleistocene hominins. A downwards-orientated cranial base correlates with alveolar maxillary prognathism, relatively larger faces, and relatively larger distances between the anterior cranial base and the frontal bone (projection). This upper facial projection correlates with increased overall relative size of the maxillary alveolar process. Vertical facial height is associated with tall nasal cavities and is accommodated by an elevated anterior cranial base, possibly because of relations between the cribriform and the nasal cavity in relation to body size and energetics. Variation in upper- and mid-facial projection can further be produced by basicranial topology in which the midline base and nasal cavity are shifted anteriorly relative to retracted lateral parts of the base and the face. The zygomatics and the middle cranial fossae act together as bilateral vertical systems that are either projected or retracted relative to the midline facial elements, causing either midfacial flatness or midfacial projection correspondingly. We propose that facial flatness and facial projection reflect classical principles of craniofacial growth counterparts, while facial orientation relative to the basicranium as well as facial proportions reflect the complex interplay of head-body integration in the light of encephalization and body size decrease in Middle to Late Pleistocene hominin evolution. Developmental and evolutionary patterns of integration may

  10. Olympica Fossae Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    15 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the enigmatic valley of the Olympica Fossae region. Unknown is whether water, lava, or mud, or some combination of these things, once poured through the valley system.

    Location near: 24.2oN, 115.7oW Image width: 2 km (1.2 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  11. Nili Fossae - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-28

    The THEMIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows part of Nili Fossae. Dark "blue" is interpreted to be basaltic rock/sand. Orbit Number: 17546 Latitude: 24.4543 Longitude: 79.8833 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2005-11-28 02:22. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20223

  12. Medusae Fossae #1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-03-13

    Extensive wind-swept plains of the Medusae Fossae formation on Mars. This northern subframe image, frame 3104, is of a 3.0 x 4.7 km area centered near 2.4 degrees north, 163.8 degrees west. Science Magazine, Volume 279, Number 5357, 13 March 1998, M. C. Malin, et. al., "Early Views of the Martian Surface from the Mars Orbiter Camera of Mars Global Surveyor", pp. 1681-1685 (Fig. 1A) http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00800

  13. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China.

  14. Cranial Neuralgias.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Zahid H; Smith, Sarah S; Khawaja, Shehryar N; Scrivani, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities have improved the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain involving head and face. Recent updates in nomenclature of cranial neuralgias and facial pain have rationalized accurate diagnosis. Clear diagnosis and localization of pain generators are paramount, leading to better use of medical and targeted surgical treatments.

  15. Cranial neuralgias.

    PubMed

    Hupp, Wendy S; Firriolo, F John

    2013-07-01

    This article describes the clinical findings of cranial neuralgias, such as trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, nervus intermedius neuralgia, and others, and postherpetic neuralgia. Pathophysiology of these neuralgias, diagnostic methods, and treatment are also discussed. This information will enable the dentist to diagnose patients who have these rare conditions.

  16. Posterior Fossa Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Essam A.; Taibah, Abdel Kader; Achilli, Vittorio; Aristegui, Miguel; Mazzoni, Antonio; Sanna, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Posterior fossa meningioma is the second most common tumor in the cerebellopontine angle. It has a higher rate of postoperative morbidity and mortality compared to acoustic neuroma. Forty posterior fossa meningioma patients managed in our centers were reviewed. Thirty-nine patients were managed surgically with 42 surgical procedures. The approaches used were the translabyrinthine approach in 18 patients (43%), the modified transcochlear in 11 cases (26%), the petro-occipital transsigmoid in 5 cases (12%), the suboccipital in 4 cases (10%), the petro-occipital trassigmoid transcervical in 2 cases (5%), the petro-occipital transsigmoid transtentorial in 1 case (2%), and a subtemporal transtentorial for another case (2%). Facial nerve anatomical integrity was preserved in 87% of procedures but was interrupted in 5 cases, with 4 of the latter subsequently repaired. Total tumor removal was accomplished in 38 cases. A second-stage total tumor removal is planned for the remaining case. There was only one case of perioperative death and no cases of radiological recurrence so far. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4p206-bFigure 5p207-bFigure 5 PMID:17171173

  17. Cranial discrete traits in the middle pleistocene humans from Sima de los Huesos (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain). Does hypostosis represent any increase in "ontogenetic stress" along the Neanderthal lineage?

    PubMed

    Manzi, G; Gracia, A; Arsuaga, J L

    2000-03-01

    Cranial discrete traits may be regarded as markers of dynamic responses to general and local perturbations of the morphogenetic pattern, particularly when they are viewed and examined in terms of hypostosis vs. hyperostosis. There are indications, in fact, that the variation between these two opposite conditions relates to mechanical stress suffered by the bony structures during early stages of growth and development. In a previous comparison between Neanderthals and modern humans, variable degrees and contrasting distribution patterns of hypostosis were found [Manzi et al. (1996), JHE30: 511-527]. In the present paper, the occurrence, expression and cranial distribution of 20 hypo-hyperostotic traits are examined in the Middle Pleistocene sample from Atapuerca - Sima de los Huesos (Spain), with the principal aim being to test whether or not the degree of cranial hypostosis increases during the evolution of the Neanderthals. Other Middle Pleistocene representatives of the genus Homo (Kabwe and Petralona), the Italian Neanderthals, and a large recent European sample are also considered. A general consistency between the gradual appearance and stabilization of the Neanderthal cranial features and the results of the present analysis is found and is interpreted as an indication that hypostosis does mark the occurrence of "ontogenetic stress". As suggested more than half a century ago by S. Sergi, an increase in "ontogenetic stress" in the Neanderthal lineage could result from the relationship between intracranial pressures and other (heterochronic) effects produced by the growth of a large brain (encephalization) and the ossification of an archaic (platycephalic) cranial vault. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  18. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 7o S, 172o W (188o E) and shows a remarkable martian geologic deposit known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation, seen here as the raised plateau in the upper two-thirds of the image, is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region the deposit has been heavily eroded by the wind to produce a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These parallel ridges point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to sculpt the dry landscape of Mars. The Medusae Fossae Formation has been completely stripped from the surface in the lower third of the image, revealing a harder layer below that is more resistant to wind erosion. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Several ancient craters that were once completely buried by this deposit are being exposed, or exhumed, as the overlying Medusae Formation is removed. Very few impact craters are visible on this Formation, indicating that the surface seen today is relatively young, and that the processes of erosion are likely to be actively occurring. The Story Medusa of Greek mythology fame, the name-giver to this region, had snaky locks of hair that could turn a person to stone. Wild and unruly, this monster of the underworld could certainly wreak havoc on the world of the human imagination. As scary as she was, Medusa would have no advantage over the fierce, masterful winds blowing across Mars, which once carved the streaky, terrain at the top of this image. Wild and whipping, these winds have slowly eroded away the 'topsoil,' revealing ancient craters and other surface features they once covered. The loosely cemented particles of this 'topsoil' are likely made up of dust

  19. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 7o S, 172o W (188o E) and shows a remarkable martian geologic deposit known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation, seen here as the raised plateau in the upper two-thirds of the image, is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region the deposit has been heavily eroded by the wind to produce a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These parallel ridges point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to sculpt the dry landscape of Mars. The Medusae Fossae Formation has been completely stripped from the surface in the lower third of the image, revealing a harder layer below that is more resistant to wind erosion. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Several ancient craters that were once completely buried by this deposit are being exposed, or exhumed, as the overlying Medusae Formation is removed. Very few impact craters are visible on this Formation, indicating that the surface seen today is relatively young, and that the processes of erosion are likely to be actively occurring. The Story Medusa of Greek mythology fame, the name-giver to this region, had snaky locks of hair that could turn a person to stone. Wild and unruly, this monster of the underworld could certainly wreak havoc on the world of the human imagination. As scary as she was, Medusa would have no advantage over the fierce, masterful winds blowing across Mars, which once carved the streaky, terrain at the top of this image. Wild and whipping, these winds have slowly eroded away the 'topsoil,' revealing ancient craters and other surface features they once covered. The loosely cemented particles of this 'topsoil' are likely made up of dust

  20. Temporal fossa bone grafts: a new technique in craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Spear, S L; Wiegering, C E

    1987-04-01

    The calvarium has become an increasingly popular bone-graft donor site. Previously described harvesting techniques are often difficult to perform and may produce unsatisfactory bone fragments. However, full-thickness bone grafts taken from the region of the temporal fossa, beneath the temporaiis muscle, have proven to be of high quality and technically easy to obtain. In our experience with eight patients, temporal fossa bone grafts were used primarily around the orbit, including reconstruction of the orbital floor, frontal bone, and zygoma. The procedure begins with a hemicoronal or bicoronal incision; the temporalis muscle is reflected, and an underlying bone plate up to 4 X 6 cm is removed. The resulting bone graft is consistently 3 to 4 mm in thickness. The cranial defect is packed with bone debris, and the muscle is replaced. This technique has proven to be safe, technically simple, consistently productive of high-quality bone grafts, and within discernible donor-site deformity.

  1. Pathological Location of Cranial Nerves in Petroclival Lesions: How to Avoid Their Injury during Anterior Petrosal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Tomio, Ryosuke; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shibao, Shunsuke; Schick, Uta; Toda, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Numerous surgical approaches have been developed to access the petroclival region. The Kawase approach, through the middle fossa, is a well-described option for addressing cranial base lesions of the petroclival region. Our aim was to gather data about the variation of cranial nerve locations in diverse petroclival pathologies and clarify the most common pathologic variations confirmed during the anterior petrosal approach. Method A retrospective analysis was made of both videos and operative and histologic records of 40 petroclival tumors from January 2009 to September 2013 in which the Kawase approach was used. The anatomical variations of cranial nerves IV–VI related to the tumor were divided into several location categories: superior lateral (SL), inferior lateral (IL), superior medial (SM), inferior medial (IM), and encased (E). These data were then analyzed taking into consideration pathologic subgroups of meningioma, epidermoid, and schwannoma. Results In 41% of meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is encased by the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is in the SL part of the tumor, and it is in 20% of the IL portion of the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trochlear nerve is encased by the tumor. The abducens nerve is not always visible (35%). The pathologic nerve pattern differs from that of meningiomas for epidermoid and trigeminal schwannomas. Conclusion The pattern of cranial nerves IV–VI is linked to the type of petroclival tumor. In a meningioma, tumor origin (cavernous, upper clival, tentorial, and petrous apex) is the most important predictor of the location of cranial nerves IV–VI. Classification of four subtypes of petroclival meningiomas using magnetic resonance imaging is very useful to predict the location of deviated cranial nerves IV–VI intraoperatively. PMID:28035290

  2. Pathological Location of Cranial Nerves in Petroclival Lesions: How to Avoid Their Injury during Anterior Petrosal Approach.

    PubMed

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Tomio, Ryosuke; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shibao, Shunsuke; Schick, Uta; Toda, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Objectives Numerous surgical approaches have been developed to access the petroclival region. The Kawase approach, through the middle fossa, is a well-described option for addressing cranial base lesions of the petroclival region. Our aim was to gather data about the variation of cranial nerve locations in diverse petroclival pathologies and clarify the most common pathologic variations confirmed during the anterior petrosal approach. Method A retrospective analysis was made of both videos and operative and histologic records of 40 petroclival tumors from January 2009 to September 2013 in which the Kawase approach was used. The anatomical variations of cranial nerves IV-VI related to the tumor were divided into several location categories: superior lateral (SL), inferior lateral (IL), superior medial (SM), inferior medial (IM), and encased (E). These data were then analyzed taking into consideration pathologic subgroups of meningioma, epidermoid, and schwannoma. Results In 41% of meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is encased by the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is in the SL part of the tumor, and it is in 20% of the IL portion of the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trochlear nerve is encased by the tumor. The abducens nerve is not always visible (35%). The pathologic nerve pattern differs from that of meningiomas for epidermoid and trigeminal schwannomas. Conclusion The pattern of cranial nerves IV-VI is linked to the type of petroclival tumor. In a meningioma, tumor origin (cavernous, upper clival, tentorial, and petrous apex) is the most important predictor of the location of cranial nerves IV-VI. Classification of four subtypes of petroclival meningiomas using magnetic resonance imaging is very useful to predict the location of deviated cranial nerves IV-VI intraoperatively.

  3. Morphology of the caudal fossa in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Gonzalez, Sofia; Olby, Natasha J; McCullough, Susan; Pease, Anthony P; Broadstone, Richard; Osborne, Jason A

    2009-01-01

    Chiari malformations and syringohydromyelia are an important disease complex in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. Although abnormalities in caudal fossa morphology are considered major contributors to the development of this disease, limited information exists on the range of morphologies in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and on the relationship of these to clinically evident disease. Sixty-four Cavalier King Charles Spaniels were studied. Each underwent a neurologic examination and magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine and brain. T2-weighted sagittal images were used to determine both the morphologic characteristics and volume of the caudal fossa in each dog. This volume was also analyzed as a percentage of total cranial cavity volume. Each attribute was correlated with neurological grade and presence of syringohydromyelia. Fifteen dogs had neurologic signs, and 59 had morphologic abnormalities of the craniocervical junction. While 27 dogs had syringohydromyelia, 13 of these were clinically normal. Cerebellar herniation and occipital dysplasia were common findings but were not associated with syringohydromyelia. Dorsal compressive lesions were noted at the first and second cervical vertebral junction. Factors associated with the presence of neurologic signs included syringohydromyelia and the ratio of caudal fossa/total cranial cavity volume; dogs with signs had significantly larger syringohydromyelia than asymptomatic dogs. Caudal fossa size was not associated with syringohydromyelia. A positive association was identified between foramen magnum size and length of cerebellar herniation. The prevalence of craniocervical junction abnormalities is high in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. While several factors are associated with neurologic signs, occipital hypoplasia appears to be the most important factor.

  4. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 16 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 11o N, 159o W (201o E) and shows examples of the remarkable variations that can be seen in the erosion of the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region, like many others throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, the surface has been eroded by the wind into a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These ridges generally point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to erode the landscape of Mars. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Within this single image it is possible to see differing amounts of erosion and stripping of layers in the Medusae Fossae Formation. Near the bottom (southern) edge of the image a rock layer with a relatively smooth upper surface covers much of the image. Moving upwards (north) in the image this layer becomes more and more eroded. At first there are isolated regions where the smooth unit has been eroded to produce sets of parallel ridges and knobs. Further north these linear knobs increase in number, and only small, isolated patches of the smooth upper surface remain. Finally, at the top of the image, even the ridges have been removed, exposing the remarkably smooth top of hard, resistant layer below. This sequence of layers with differing hardness and resistance to erosion is common on Earth and on Mars, and suggests significant variations in the physical properties, composition, particle size, and/or cementation of these martian layers. As is common throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, very few impact craters are visible, indicating that the surface exposed is relatively young, and that the process of erosion may be active today

  5. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 16 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 11o N, 159o W (201o E) and shows examples of the remarkable variations that can be seen in the erosion of the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region, like many others throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, the surface has been eroded by the wind into a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These ridges generally point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to erode the landscape of Mars. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Within this single image it is possible to see differing amounts of erosion and stripping of layers in the Medusae Fossae Formation. Near the bottom (southern) edge of the image a rock layer with a relatively smooth upper surface covers much of the image. Moving upwards (north) in the image this layer becomes more and more eroded. At first there are isolated regions where the smooth unit has been eroded to produce sets of parallel ridges and knobs. Further north these linear knobs increase in number, and only small, isolated patches of the smooth upper surface remain. Finally, at the top of the image, even the ridges have been removed, exposing the remarkably smooth top of hard, resistant layer below. This sequence of layers with differing hardness and resistance to erosion is common on Earth and on Mars, and suggests significant variations in the physical properties, composition, particle size, and/or cementation of these martian layers. As is common throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, very few impact craters are visible, indicating that the surface exposed is relatively young, and that the process of erosion may be active today

  6. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 16 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 11o N, 159o W (201o E) and shows examples of the remarkable variations that can be seen in the erosion of the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region, like many others throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, the surface has been eroded by the wind into a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These ridges generally point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to erode the landscape of Mars. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Within this single image it is possible to see differing amounts of erosion and stripping of layers in the Medusae Fossae Formation. Near the bottom (southern) edge of the image a rock layer with a relatively smooth upper surface covers much of the image. Moving upwards (north) in the image this layer becomes more and more eroded. At first there are isolated regions where the smooth unit has been eroded to produce sets of parallel ridges and knobs. Further north these linear knobs increase in number, and only small, isolated patches of the smooth upper surface remain. Finally, at the top of the image, even the ridges have been removed, exposing the remarkably smooth top of hard, resistant layer below. This sequence of layers with differing hardness and resistance to erosion is common on Earth and on Mars, and suggests significant variations in the physical properties, composition, particle size, and/or cementation of these martian layers. As is common throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, very few impact craters are visible, indicating that the surface exposed is relatively young, and that the process of erosion may be active today

  7. Sirenum Fossae Trough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) orbits the red planet twelve times each day. The number of pictures that MOC can take varies from orbit to orbit, depending upon whether the data are being stored in MGS's onboard tape recorder for playback at a later time, or whether the data are being sent directly back to Earth via a real-time radio link. More data can be acquired during orbits with real-time downlink.

    During real-time orbits, the MOC team often will take a few random or semi-random pictures in between the carefully-selected, hand-targeted images. On rare occasions, one of these random pictures will surprise the MOC team. The picture shown here is an excellent example, because the high resolution view (top) is centered so nicely on a trough and an adjacent, shallow crater that it is as if someone very carefully selected the target for MOC. The high-resolution view covers an area only 1.1 km (0.7 mi) wide by 2.3 km (1.4 mi) long. Hitting a target such as this with such a small image is very difficult to do, on purpose, because there are small uncertainties in the predicted orbit, the maps used to select targets, and the minor adjustments of spacecraft pointing at any given moment. Nevertheless, a very impressive image was received.

    The high resolution view crosses one of the troughs of the Sirenum Fossae near 31.2oS, 152.3oW. The context image (above) was acquired at the same time as the high resolution view on July 23, 2000. The small white box shows the location of the high resolution picture. The lines running diagonally across the context image from upper right toward lower left are the Sirenum Fossae troughs, formed by faults that are radial to the volcanic region of Tharsis. Both pictures are illuminated from the upper left. The scene shows part of the martian southern hemisphere nearly autumn.

  8. Cranial mononeuropathy III

    MedlinePlus

    Third cranial nerve palsy; Oculomotor palsy; Pupil-involving third cranial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy - compression type ... nerve is affected. This disorder affects the third cranial nerve in the skull. This is one of the ...

  9. Genetically induced abnormal cranial development in human trisomy 18 with holoprosencephaly: comparisons with the normal tempo of osteogenic-neural development.

    PubMed

    Reid, Shaina N; Ziermann, Janine M; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2015-07-01

    Craniofacial malformations are common congenital defects caused by failed midline inductive signals. These midline defects are associated with exposure of the fetus to exogenous teratogens and with inborn genetic errors such as those found in Down, Patau, Edwards' and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndromes. Yet, there are no studies that analyze contributions of synchronous neurocranial and neural development in these disorders. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of malformations of the basicranium of a holoprosencephalic (HPE) trisomy 18 (T18; Edwards' syndrome) fetus with synophthalmic cyclopia and alobar HPE. With a combination of traditional gross dissection and state-of-the-art computed tomography, we demonstrate the deleterious effects of T18 caused by a translocation at 18p11.31. Bony features included a single developmentally unseparated frontal bone, and complete dual absence of the anterior cranial fossa and ethmoid bone. From a superior view with the calvarium plates removed, there was direct visual access to the orbital foramen and hard palate. Both the eyes and the pituitary gland, normally protected by bony structures, were exposed in the cranial cavity and in direct contact with the brain. The middle cranial fossa was shifted anteriorly, and foramina were either missing or displaced to an abnormal location due to the absence or misplacement of its respective cranial nerve (CN). When CN development was conserved in its induction and placement, the respective foramen developed in its normal location albeit with abnormal gross anatomical features, as seen in the facial nerve (CNVII) and the internal acoustic meatus. More anteriorly localized CNs and their foramina were absent or heavily disrupted compared with posterior ones. The severe malformations exhibited in the cranial fossae, orbital region, pituitary gland and sella turcica highlight the crucial involvement of transcription factors such as TGIF, which is located on chromosome 18 and contributes

  10. Genetically induced abnormal cranial development in human trisomy 18 with holoprosencephaly: comparisons with the normal tempo of osteogenic–neural development

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Shaina N; Ziermann, Janine M; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial malformations are common congenital defects caused by failed midline inductive signals. These midline defects are associated with exposure of the fetus to exogenous teratogens and with inborn genetic errors such as those found in Down, Patau, Edwards' and Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndromes. Yet, there are no studies that analyze contributions of synchronous neurocranial and neural development in these disorders. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of malformations of the basicranium of a holoprosencephalic (HPE) trisomy 18 (T18; Edwards' syndrome) fetus with synophthalmic cyclopia and alobar HPE. With a combination of traditional gross dissection and state-of-the-art computed tomography, we demonstrate the deleterious effects of T18 caused by a translocation at 18p11.31. Bony features included a single developmentally unseparated frontal bone, and complete dual absence of the anterior cranial fossa and ethmoid bone. From a superior view with the calvarium plates removed, there was direct visual access to the orbital foramen and hard palate. Both the eyes and the pituitary gland, normally protected by bony structures, were exposed in the cranial cavity and in direct contact with the brain. The middle cranial fossa was shifted anteriorly, and foramina were either missing or displaced to an abnormal location due to the absence or misplacement of its respective cranial nerve (CN). When CN development was conserved in its induction and placement, the respective foramen developed in its normal location albeit with abnormal gross anatomical features, as seen in the facial nerve (CNVII) and the internal acoustic meatus. More anteriorly localized CNs and their foramina were absent or heavily disrupted compared with posterior ones. The severe malformations exhibited in the cranial fossae, orbital region, pituitary gland and sella turcica highlight the crucial involvement of transcription factors such as TGIF, which is located on chromosome 18 and

  11. Cranial neuralgias.

    PubMed

    Cruccu, G; Bonamico, L H; Zakrzewska, J M

    2010-01-01

    After a description of the anatomical-functional organization of the human trigeminal system, this chapter discusses the diagnostic and therapeutic options for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). In about 15% of patients who present with the clinical picture of typical TN, this is secondary to a major neurological disease, i.e., benign tumors of the cerebellopontine angle or multiple sclerosis. Some clinical criteria that were used to distinguish between classic and symptomatic TN, such as age at onset, involvement of the ophthalmic division, and responsiveness to medical treatment, are no longer considered reliable. It is recommended that all patients undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or trigeminal reflex recording. Carbamazepine (CBZ) and oxcarbazepine (OXC) are the first-choice medical treatments. Although other drugs may be effective, these are indicated when the patient cannot reach the therapeutic dosage of CBZ/OXC because of adverse events. Patients unresponsive to CBZ/OXC should be made aware of the available surgical interventions. Surgical procedures (including percutaneous lesions to the ganglion/root, microvascular decompression (MVD) in the posterior fossa, and gamma knife radiosurgery) are extremely efficacious with relatively few complications: each procedure has some advantage and disadvantage with respect to the other. Only MVD is a non-destructive procedure. This chapter also describes management of glossopharyngeal neuralgia, which is often misdiagnosed, and some other chronic pain conditions mediated by the trigeminal system, such as ophthalmic postherpetic neuralgia (PHN).

  12. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings for primary middle-ear carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Sha, Y

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of primary middle-ear carcinoma. In this retrospective study of 13 patients with primary middle-ear carcinoma, we collected pre- and post-contrast magnetic resonance images for all 13 cases, high-resolution computed tomography scans for 11 cases, and conventional computed tomography scans with contrast for 2 cases. Soft-tissue masses were mainly located in the tympanum, tympanic sinus and deep within the external auditory canal, and involved the jugular fossa (9 of 13 patients), middle cranial fossa (5/13), parotid gland (2/13) and temporomandibular joint fossa (1/13). An irregular, 'moth-eaten' bone destruction pattern was seen on high-resolution computed tomography images, most commonly in the eustachian tube (9/13), jugular foramen (9/13) and facial nerve canal (7/13). On non-contrast magnetic resonances images, masses were isointense or slightly hypointense on T1-weighted images, and isointense or slightly hyperintense on T2-weighted images. On post-contrast images, lesions were moderately and homogeneously enhanced in seven cases and inhomogeneously enhanced in six. High-resolution computed tomography precisely detects regions of bone destruction, whereas MRI can better assess soft-tissue tumour margins, intracranial extension and vessel patency. Eustachian tube erosion is an important characteristic of primary middle-ear carcinoma.

  13. Combined simultaneous transcranial and endoscopic endonasal resection of sphenoorbital meningioma extending into the sphenoid sinus, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Masahide; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Shuho; Matsumura, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sphenoorbital meningiomas are surgically challenging because of their nature to extend to adjacent structures. Here, we describe a case of recurrent sphenoorbital meningioma extending into the sphenoid sinus, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa, which was resected using combined simultaneous transcranial and endoscopic endonasal approaches. Case Description: A 62-year-old man who had 15 years earlier undergone partial resection of a left sphenoorbital meningioma presented with a 1-year history of progressive proptosis of the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a Gd-enhancing tumor occupying the left sphenoid wing and orbital lateral wall and extending into extracranial structures such as the sphenoid sinus, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa as well as adjacent structures such as the cavernous sinus and superior orbital fissure (SOF). Based on the MRI findings of tumor extension into the sphenoid sinus with broad continuity, the risk of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage through the large defect in the sphenoid sinus was considered high. Subtotal resection using combined simultaneous transzygomatic and endoscopic endonasal approaches was performed, leaving residual tumor in the cavernous sinus and SOF. The large skull base defect between the middle fossa and sphenoid sinus was covered with a free graft of fascia lata from the transcranial side and with a vascularized nasoseptal flap from the endonasal side. No CSF rhinorrhea and no neurological deficits developed postoperatively. Conclusion: Combined simultaneous transcranial and endoscopic endonasal approaches may become a safe and feasible alternative for sphenoorbital meningioma with a large skull base defect penetrating to the paranasal sinus.

  14. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An exotic terrain of wind-eroded ridges and residual smooth surfaces are seen in one of the highest resolution images ever taken of Mars from orbit. The Medusae Fossae formation is believed to be formed of the fragmental ejecta of huge explosive volcanic eruptions. When subjected to intense wind-blasting over hundreds of millions of years, this material erodes easily once the uppermost tougher crust is breached. In the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shown on the right, the crust, or cap rock, can be seen in the upper right part of the picture. The finely-spaced ridges are similar to features on Earth called yardangs, which are formed by intense winds plucking individual grains from, and by wind-driven sand blasting particles off, sedimentary deposits.

    The MOC image was taken on October 30, 1997 at 11:05 AM PST, shortly after the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft's 31st closest approach to Mars. The image covers an area 3.6 X 21.5 km (2.2 X 13.4 miles) at 3.6 m (12 feet) per picture element--craters only 11 m (36 feet, about the size of a swimming pool) across can be seen. The context image (left; the best Viking view of the area; VO 1 387S34) has a resolution of 240 m/pixel, or 67 times lower resolution than the MOC frame.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  15. Medusae Fossae Yardangs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 15 April 2003

    The Medusae Fossae formation is an enigmatic pile of eroding sediments that spans over 5000 km in discontinuous masses along the martian equator. The yardang ridges, formed from the scouring action of windblown sand, are a characteristic feature of this formation. In this image, there is evidence for a period of erosion when winds scoured the surface at nearly right angles to the prominent yardang direction.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -5.1, Longitude 184.4 East (175.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  16. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An exotic terrain of wind-eroded ridges and residual smooth surfaces are seen in one of the highest resolution images ever taken of Mars from orbit. The Medusae Fossae formation is believed to be formed of the fragmental ejecta of huge explosive volcanic eruptions. When subjected to intense wind-blasting over hundreds of millions of years, this material erodes easily once the uppermost tougher crust is breached. In the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shown on the right, the crust, or cap rock, can be seen in the upper right part of the picture. The finely-spaced ridges are similar to features on Earth called yardangs, which are formed by intense winds plucking individual grains from, and by wind-driven sand blasting particles off, sedimentary deposits.

    The MOC image was taken on October 30, 1997 at 11:05 AM PST, shortly after the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft's 31st closest approach to Mars. The image covers an area 3.6 X 21.5 km (2.2 X 13.4 miles) at 3.6 m (12 feet) per picture element--craters only 11 m (36 feet, about the size of a swimming pool) across can be seen. The context image (left; the best Viking view of the area; VO 1 387S34) has a resolution of 240 m/pixel, or 67 times lower resolution than the MOC frame.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  17. Clay at Nili Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image of the Nili Fossae region of Mars was compiled from separate images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), two instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The images were taken at 0730 UTC (2:30 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 4, 2006, near 20.4 degrees north latitude, 78.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. HiRISE's image was taken in three colors, but its much higher resolution shows features as small as 30 centimeters (1 foot) across.

    CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, discovered that some of the most ancient regions of Mars are rich in clay minerals, formed when water altered the planet's volcanic rocks. From the OMEGA data it was unclear whether the clays formed at the surface during Mars' earliest history of if they formed at depth and were later exposed by impact craters or erosion of the overlying rocks. Clays are an indicator of wet, benign environments possibly suitable for biological processes, making Nili Fossae and comparable regions important targets for both CRISM and HiRISE.

    In this visualization of the combined data from the two instruments, the CRISM data were used to calculate the strengths of spectral absorption bands due to minerals present in the scene. The two major minerals detected by the instrument are olivine, a mineral characteristic of primitive igneous rocks, and clay. Areas rich in olivine are shown in red, and minerals rich in clay are shown in green. The derived colors were then overlayed on the HiRISE image.

    The area where the CRISM and HiRISE data overlap is shown at the upper left, and is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) across. The three boxes outlined in blue are enlarged to show how the different minerals in the scene match up with different landforms. In the image

  18. Clay at Nili Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image of the Nili Fossae region of Mars was compiled from separate images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), two instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The images were taken at 0730 UTC (2:30 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 4, 2006, near 20.4 degrees north latitude, 78.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. HiRISE's image was taken in three colors, but its much higher resolution shows features as small as 30 centimeters (1 foot) across.

    CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, discovered that some of the most ancient regions of Mars are rich in clay minerals, formed when water altered the planet's volcanic rocks. From the OMEGA data it was unclear whether the clays formed at the surface during Mars' earliest history of if they formed at depth and were later exposed by impact craters or erosion of the overlying rocks. Clays are an indicator of wet, benign environments possibly suitable for biological processes, making Nili Fossae and comparable regions important targets for both CRISM and HiRISE.

    In this visualization of the combined data from the two instruments, the CRISM data were used to calculate the strengths of spectral absorption bands due to minerals present in the scene. The two major minerals detected by the instrument are olivine, a mineral characteristic of primitive igneous rocks, and clay. Areas rich in olivine are shown in red, and minerals rich in clay are shown in green. The derived colors were then overlayed on the HiRISE image.

    The area where the CRISM and HiRISE data overlap is shown at the upper left, and is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) across. The three boxes outlined in blue are enlarged to show how the different minerals in the scene match up with different landforms. In the image

  19. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es una Parálisis ...

  20. Western Portion of Acheron Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-16

    Located north of Olympus Mons and west of Alba Patera, Acheron Fossae provides a record of early tectonic activity in the Tharsis region. Acheron Fossae is a relatively high standing region characterized by multiple subparallel graben. As seen in the image, the graben trend generally to the northwest. The entire area predates the Alba Patera flows (which embay the eastern most Acheron grabens) and the Olympus Mons volcano (one of the youngest Tharsis features). The subdued nature of the highstanding hills, the erosion the graben walls, the eroded rims of all the visible craters, and the wind etching of the flat surfaces all help indicate the great age of Acheron Fossae. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04034

  1. Can we safely monitor posterior fossa intracranial pressure? A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Vanaclocha, Vicente; Sáiz-Sapena, Nieves; Rivera-Paz, Marlon; Herrera, Juan Manuel; Ortiz-Criado, José María; Verdu-López, Francisco; Vanaclocha, Leyre

    2017-05-25

    measuring intracranial pressure (ICP) is considered the gold standard of care for brain injury. While supratentorial ICP monitoring has been adopted everywhere, posterior fossa ICP monitoring is rarely performed. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of inserting ICP sensors into the posterior fossa of cadavers, to measure ICP in the posterior fossa. An ICP sensor was transcranially implanted into the posterior fossa of fifteen fresh adult cadavers. An extracranial point was defined in the retroauricular area 2 cm behind the tip of the mastoid process and 2 cm below the transverse sinus, in order to implant an ICP probe. The cranial cavity was opened and measures were taken of the distance that the ICP sensor had penetrated inside the posterior fossa, as well as the distance to nearby venous sinuses (lateral, transverse, sigmoid, inferior petrosal sinus, and jugular bulb). The cerebellar hemisphere was searched for any possible damage. the selected extracranial point (2 cm behind the tip of the mastoid process and 2 cm below the transverse sinus) was a safe location. Intracranial structures such as the brainstem and the cerebellar hemisphere were not damaged. The implanted ICP probe was at least 2 cm away from the venous sinuses, which were not damaged. ICP monitoring is safe and reliable at the described ICP probe placement site of the posterior fossa.

  2. Cranial neuralgias: from physiopathology to pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Roberto; Ranieri, Angelo; Bilo, Leonilda; Fiorillo, Chiara; Bonavita, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    Cranial neuralgias are paroxysmal painful disorders of the head characterised by some shared features such as unilaterality of symptoms, transience and recurrence of attacks, superficial and "shock-like" quality of pain and the presence of triggering factors. Although rare, these disorders must be promptly recognised as they harbour a relatively high risk for underlying compressive or inflammatory disease. Nevertheless, misdiagnosis is frequent. Trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgias are sustained in most cases by a neurovascular conflict in the posterior fossa resulting in a hyperexcitability state of the trigeminal circuitry. If the aetiology of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and other typical neuralgias must be brought back to the peripheral injury, their pathogenesis could involve central allodynic mechanisms, which, in patients with inter-critical pain, also engage the nociceptive neurons at the thalamic-cortical level. Currently available medical treatments for TN and other cranial neuralgias are reviewed.

  3. Facial Translocation Approach to the Cranial Base

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga, Moises A.; Janecka, Ivo P.

    1991-01-01

    Surgical exposure of the nasopharyngeal region of the cranial base is difficult because of its proximity to key anatomic structures. Our laboratory study outlines the anatomic basis for a new approach to this complex topography. Dissections were performed on eight cadaver halves and two fresh specimens injected with intravascular silicone rubber compound. By utilizing facial soft tissue translocation combined with craniofacial osteotomies; a wide surgical field can be obtained at the skull base. The accessible surgical field extends from the contralateral custachian tube to the ipsilateral geniculate ganglion, including the nasopharyax; clivus, sphonoid, and cavernous sinuses, the entire infratemporal fossa, and superior orbital fissure. The facial translocation approach offers previously unavailable wide and direct exposure, with a potential for immediate reconstruction, of this complex region of the cranial base. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:17170817

  4. A Comparison between splenic fossa and subhepatic fossa auxiliary partial heterotopic liver transplantation in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiao; Wang, Zhifei; Shen, Jie; Yu, Feiyan; Xie, Limei; Pan, Yongming; Lin, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To test the alternative possible locations for the placement of a liver graft and the relevant surgical technique issues, we developed a porcine model of auxiliary partial heterotopic liver transplantation (APHLT) and evaluated the difference between 2 styles of liver transplantation, either subhepatic fossa or splenic fossa APHLT, by comparing survival and biochemical indexes. Thirty‐eight miniature pigs were randomly divided into 2 groups. A left hemihepatic graft without the middle hepatic vein (HV) was procured from the living donor. In group A (n = 9), an 8 mm diameter polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft approximately 2.5 cm long was connected to the left HV while another PTFE graft of the same size was connected to the left portal vein (PV). The liver graft was implanted in the right subhepatic fossa following splenectomy and right nephrectomy. In group B (n = 10), a PTFE graft of the same size was connected to the left HV while the liver graft was implanted in the splenic fossa following splenectomy and left nephrectomy. Survival rate and complications were observed at 2 weeks after transplantation. Data were collected from 5 animals in group A and 6 animals in group B that survived longer than 2 weeks. The liver function and renal function of the recipients returned to normal at 1 week after surgery in both groups. Eighty‐eight percent (14/16) of the PTFE grafts remained patent at 2 weeks after surgery, but 44% of the PTFE grafts (7/16) developed mural thrombus. No significant differences in the survival rate and biochemistry were found between the 2 groups. In conclusion, the splenic fossa APHLT can achieve beneficial outcomes similar to the subhepatic fossa APHLT in miniature pigs, although it also has a high morbidity rate due to hepatic artery thrombosis, PV thrombosis, and PTEF graft mural thrombus formation. Liver Transplantation 22 812–821 2016 AASLD. PMID:26785299

  5. Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171056

  6. Piriformis fossa - an anatomical and orthopedics consideration.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, O P; Mittal, P S; Naik, D C

    2014-03-01

    Piriformis fossa is an important anatomical landmark having significant clinical value in orthopedic surgery; but its location and anatomical relationship with surrounding structures are not clearly defined. Hence it is necessary to clearly describe it in respect to anatomical and orthopedic aspect. Fifty Cadaveric dry femoral bones and Dissection of the four hip specimens were used to study the Piriformis fossa in respect to location and its relationship with surrounding structures. Clinical importance of piriformis fossa was determined in reference to antegrade femoral nail insertion. Piriformis muscle and so called piriformis fossa are unrelated entities. Piriformis fossa is anatomical site of insertion of obturator externus. In dry cadaveric femora; fossa was not always located in the direction of femoral shaft. It was located in the direction of femoral shaft in 24% cases only. In 68% cases femoral canal was aligned lateral and in 8% cases, it lies medial to the fossa. Piriformis fossa should be named as Trorchanteric fossa or Obturator fossa for better anatomical description. So called Piriformis fossa does not found to be universally corresponding to femoral shaft hence selection of entry site should be based on variable proximal femur and area on femur which corresponds to femoral shaft.

  7. Occlusal cranial balancing technique.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gerald H

    2007-01-01

    The acronym for Occlusal Cranial Balancing Technique is OCB. The OCB concept is based on the architectural principle of a level foundation. The principles of Occlusal Cranial Balancing are a monumental discovery and if applied will enhance total body function.

  8. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the brain to the back). Viewing the Cranial Nerves Twelve pairs of cranial nerves emerge from the ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often needed. Testing Cranial Nerves Cranial Nerve Number Name Function Test 1st Olfactory ...

  9. The evolution and development of cranial form in Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Daniel E.; McBratney, Brandeis M.; Krovitz, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Despite much data, there is no unanimity over how to define Homo sapiens in the fossil record. Here, we examine cranial variation among Pleistocene and recent human fossils by using a model of cranial growth to identify unique derived features (autapomorphies) that reliably distinguish fossils attributed to “anatomically modern” H. sapiens (AMHS) from those attributed to various taxa of “archaic” Homo spp. (AH) and to test hypotheses about the changes in cranial development that underlie the origin of modern human cranial form. In terms of pattern, AMHS crania are uniquely characterized by two general structural autapomorphies: facial retraction and neurocranial globularity. Morphometric analysis of the ontogeny of these autapomorphies indicates that the developmental changes that led to modern human cranial form derive from a combination of shifts in cranial base angle, cranial fossae length and width, and facial length. These morphological changes, some of which may have occurred because of relative size increases in the temporal and possibly the frontal lobes, occur early in ontogeny, and their effects on facial retraction and neurocranial globularity discriminate AMHS from AH crania. The existence of these autapomorphies supports the hypothesis that AMHS is a distinct species from taxa of “archaic” Homo (e.g., Homo neanderthalensis). PMID:11805284

  10. Internal Maxillary Artery-Middle Cerebral Artery Bypass: Infratemporal Approach for Subcranial-Intracranial (SC-IC) Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nossek, Erez; Costantino, Peter D.; Eisenberg, Mark; Dehdashti, Amir R.; Setton, Avi; Chalif, David J.; Ortiz, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Internal maxillary artery (IMax)–middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass has been recently described as an alternative to cervical extracranial-intracranial bypass. This technique uses a “keyhole” craniectomy in the temporal fossa that requires a technically challenging end-to-side anastomosis. OBJECTIVE: To describe a lateral subtemporal craniectomy of the middle cranial fossa floor to facilitate wide exposure of the IMax to facilitate bypass. METHODS: Orbitozygomatic osteotomy is used followed by frontotemporal craniotomy and subsequently laterotemporal fossa craniectomy, reaching its medial border at a virtual line connecting the foramen rotundum and foramen ovale. The IMax was identified by using established anatomic landmarks, neuronavigation, and micro Doppler probe (Mizuho Inc. Tokyo, Japan). Additionally, we studied the approach in a cadaveric specimen in preparation for microsurgical bypass. RESULTS: There were 4 cases in which the technique was used. One bypass was performed for flow augmentation in a hypoperfused hemisphere. The other 3 were performed as part of treatment paradigms for giant middle cerebral artery aneurysms. Vein grafts were used in all patients. The proximal anastomosis was performed in an end-to-side fashion in 1 patient and end-to-end in 3 patients. Intraoperative graft flow measured with the Transonic flow probe ranged from 20 to 60 mL/min. Postoperative angiography demonstrated good filling of the graft with robust distal flow in all cases. All patients tolerated the procedure well. CONCLUSION: IMax to middle cerebral artery subcranial-intracranial bypass is safe and efficacious. The laterotemporal fossa craniectomy technique resulted in reliable identification and wide exposure of the IMax, facilitating the proximal anastomosis. ABBREVIATIONS: EC-IC, extracranial-intracranial IMax, internal maxillary artery MCA, middle cerebral artery SC-IC, subcranial-intracranial STA, superficial temporal artery PMID:24618804

  11. [Bone dehiscences in the middle ear in patients operated on ear diseases in the Otolaryngology Department of Jagiellonian University, Poland from 2008 to 2012].

    PubMed

    Boroń, Aleksandra; Wiatr, Maciej; Przeklasa, Robert; Składzień, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    We perform the middle ear operation to remove pathological tissue and in the next step present ossicular chain reconstruction. Otosurgeon has to also identify bone dehiscences, as a potential way to develop otogenic intracranial and intratemporal complications. We analyzed the patients with bone defects in the middle and/or posterior cranial fossa who present also defects of the bony wall of the facial nerve canal and lateral semicircular canal. We observed 537 patients who were operated on middle ear for the first time in the Department of Otolaryngology at the Jagiellonian University of Cracow from 2008 to 2012. We used a special questionnaire that includes diagnostics of the ear's disease, method of the operation and short- and long-term effects. We discuss 45 patients with the skull base defects in the middle and/or posterior cranial fossa. Dehiscence of the bony wall of the facial nerve canal was present in 7 patients. In 4 cases semicircular canal fistula coexisted. The most common cause of bone dehiscence was granulation tissue, less frequently cholesteatoma. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Internal maxillary artery-middle cerebral artery bypass: infratemporal approach for subcranial-intracranial (SC-IC) bypass.

    PubMed

    Nossek, Erez; Costantino, Peter D; Eisenberg, Mark; Dehdashti, Amir R; Setton, Avi; Chalif, David J; Ortiz, Rafael A; Langer, David J

    2014-07-01

    Internal maxillary artery (IMax)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass has been recently described as an alternative to cervical extracranial-intracranial bypass. This technique uses a "keyhole" craniectomy in the temporal fossa that requires a technically challenging end-to-side anastomosis. To describe a lateral subtemporal craniectomy of the middle cranial fossa floor to facilitate wide exposure of the IMax to facilitate bypass. Orbitozygomatic osteotomy is used followed by frontotemporal craniotomy and subsequently laterotemporal fossa craniectomy, reaching its medial border at a virtual line connecting the foramen rotundum and foramen ovale. The IMax was identified by using established anatomic landmarks, neuronavigation, and micro Doppler probe (Mizuho Inc. Tokyo, Japan). Additionally, we studied the approach in a cadaveric specimen in preparation for microsurgical bypass. There were 4 cases in which the technique was used. One bypass was performed for flow augmentation in a hypoperfused hemisphere. The other 3 were performed as part of treatment paradigms for giant middle cerebral artery aneurysms. Vein grafts were used in all patients. The proximal anastomosis was performed in an end-to-side fashion in 1 patient and end-to-end in 3 patients. Intraoperative graft flow measured with the Transonic flow probe ranged from 20 to 60 mL/min. Postoperative angiography demonstrated good filling of the graft with robust distal flow in all cases. All patients tolerated the procedure well. IMax to middle cerebral artery subcranial-intracranial bypass is safe and efficacious. The laterotemporal fossa craniectomy technique resulted in reliable identification and wide exposure of the IMax, facilitating the proximal anastomosis.

  13. Cranial suture morphology and its relationship to diet in Cebus.

    PubMed

    Byron, Craig D

    2009-12-01

    Cranial sutures are complex morphological structures. Four Cebus species (C. albifrons, C. apella, C. capucinus, C. olivaceus) are used here to test the hypothesis that sagittal suture complexity is enhanced in animals that eat materially challenging foods. These primates are ideal for such comparative studies because they are closely related and some are known to exhibit differences in the material properties of the foods they ingest and masticate. Specifically, Cebus apella is notable among members of this genus for ingesting food items of high toughness as well as consistently demonstrating a relatively robust cranial morphology. Consistent with previous studies, C. apella demonstrates significantly more robust mandibular and temporal fossa morphology. Also, C. apella possesses sagittal sutures that are more complex than congenerics. These data are used to support the hypothesis that cranial suture complexity is increased in response to consuming diets with more obdurate material properties. One interpretation of this hypothesis is that, compared to non-apelloids, total strain in the apelloid cranial suture connective tissue environment is elevated due to increased jaw muscle activity by increases in either force magnitudes or the number of chewing events. It is argued that greater masticatory function enhances the growth and modeling of cranial suture interdigitation. These data show that cranial suture complexity is one more hard tissue feature from the skull that might be used to inform hypotheses of dietary functional morphology.

  14. Lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acheron Fossae in Visible Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This visible-light image, taken by the thermal emission imaging system's camera on NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, shows the highly fractured, faulted and deformed Acheron Fossae region of Mars. The scarps visible in this image are approximately one kilometer (3,300 feet) high, based on topography derived from the laser altimeter instrument on Mars Global Surveyor.

    Dark streaks only 50 meters (164 feet) across can be seen on some of the cliff faces. These streaks may be formed when the pervasive dust mantle covering this region gives way on steep slopes to create dust avalanches.

    The image also shows impact craters as small as 500 meters (1,640 feet) in diameter, as well as smooth and textured plains.

    Acheron Fossae is located 1,050 kilometers (650 miles) north of the large shield volcano Olympus Mons. This image covers an area about 18 by 9 kilometers (11 by 6 miles) centered at 37 degrees north, 131 degrees west. North is to the top of this image, which was acquired on February 19,2002, at about 3:15 p.m. local Martian time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The thermal emission imaging system was provided by Arizona State University, Tempe. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Treatment implications of posterior fossa ependymoma subgroups.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2016-11-15

    Posterior fossa ependymoma comprises two distinct molecular entities, ependymoma_posterior fossa A (EPN_PFA) and ependymoma_posterior fossa B (EPN_PFB), with differentiable gene expression profiles. As yet, the response of the two entities to treatment is unclear. To determine the relationship between the two molecular subgroups of posterior fossa ependymoma and treatment, we studied a cohort of 820 patients with molecularly profiled, clinically annotated posterior fossa ependymomas. We found that the strongest predictor of poor outcome in patients with posterior fossa ependymoma across the entire age spectrum was molecular subgroup EPN_PFA, which was recently reported in the paper entitled "Therapeutic impact of cytoreductive surgery and irradiation of posterior fossa ependymoma in the molecular era: a retrospective multicohort analysis" in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Patients with incompletely resected EPN_PFA tumors had a very poor outcome despite receiving adjuvant radiation therapy, whereas a substantial proportion of patients with EPN_PFB tumors can be cured with surgery alone.

  17. Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome After Posterior Fossa Surgery: A Report of Two Cases of Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    GÜNDÜZ, Hasan Burak; YASSA, Mustafa İlker Kuntay; OFLUOĞLU, Ali Ender; POSTALCI, Lütfü; EMEL, Erhan

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a type of syndrome including decreased speech, hypotonia, ataxia and emotional instability which occurs after posterior fossa surgery. It has been first reported by Rekate et al. and Yonemasu in 1985. It is well known that long tract signs and lower cranial nerve involvement are not seen with this syndrome and understanding is preserved. However, the pathophysiology of cerebellar mutism has not been well clarified yet. It is mainly seen in patients with medulloblastoma and brainstem involvement. In this report, we present two extraordinary cases of cerebellar mutism after posterior fossa surgery. They were considered extraordinary because their hystopathological analysis results yielded pilocytic astrocytoma which is out of the predefined risk factors. PMID:28360572

  18. Morphometric characteristics of caudal cranial nerves at petroclival region in fetuses.

    PubMed

    Ozdogmus, Omer; Saban, Enis; Ozkan, Mazhar; Yildiz, Sercan Dogukan; Verimli, Ural; Cakmak, Ozgur; Arifoglu, Yasin; Sehirli, Umit

    2016-06-01

    Morphometric measurements of cranial nerves in posterior cranial fossa of fetus cadavers were carried out in an attempt to identify any asymmetry in their openings into the cranium. Twenty-two fetus cadavers (8 females, 14 males) with gestational age ranging between 22 and 38 weeks (mean 30 weeks) were included in this study. The calvaria were removed, the brains were lifted, and the cranial nerves were identified. The distance of each cranial nerve opening to midline and the distances between different cranial nerve openings were measured on the left and right side and compared. The mean clivus length and width were 21.2 ± 4.4 and 13.2 ± 1.5 mm, respectively. The distance of the twelfth cranial nerve opening from midline was shorter on the right side when compared with the left side (6.6 ± 1.1 versus 7.1 ± 0.8 mm, p = 0.038). Openings of other cranial nerves did not show such asymmetry with regard to their distance from midline, and the distances between different cranial nerves were similar on the left and right side. Cranial nerves at petroclival region seem to show minimal asymmetry in fetuses.

  19. Cranial dural arteriovenous shunts. Part 1. Anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins.

    PubMed

    Baltsavias, Gerasimos; Parthasarathi, Venkatraman; Aydin, Emre; Al Schameri, Rahman A; Roth, Peter; Valavanis, Anton

    2015-04-01

    We reviewed the anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins aiming to elucidate aspects related to the cranial dural arteriovenous fistulae. Data from relevant articles on the anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins were identified using one electronic database, supplemented by data from selected reference texts. Persisting fetal pial-arachnoidal veins correspond to the adult bridging veins. Relevant embryologic descriptions are based on the classic scheme of five divisions of the brain (telencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon, metencephalon, myelencephalon). Variation in their exact position and the number of bridging veins is the rule and certain locations, particularly that of the anterior cranial fossa and lower posterior cranial fossa are often neglected in prior descriptions. The distal segment of a bridging vein is part of the dural system and can be primarily involved in cranial dural arteriovenous lesions by constituting the actual site of the shunt. The veins in the lamina cribriformis exhibit a bridging-emissary vein pattern similar to the spinal configuration. The emissary veins connect the dural venous system with the extracranial venous system and are often involved in dural arteriovenous lesions. Cranial dural shunts may develop in three distinct areas of the cranial venous system: the dural sinuses and their interfaces with bridging veins and emissary veins. The exact site of the lesion may dictate the arterial feeders and original venous drainage pattern.

  20. Nili Fossae Trough, Candidate MSL Landing Site

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-20

    This image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows Nili Fossae region of Mars, one of the largest exposures of clay minerals, and a prime candidate landing site for Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity.

  1. Striae in the popliteal fossa (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Striae in the popliteal fossa: Striae or stretch marks result from stretching of the skin, or other influences such as Cushing's syndrome. Most pregnant women experience striae at some point during their ...

  2. Nili Fossae Resource and Science ROIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markle, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    The Nili Fossae region presents multiple resource and science ROIs for establishing a permanent colony on Mars. Water ice appears to cover a large are and multiple geological formations provide opportunity for science missions.

  3. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Dröge, L H; Hinsche, T; Canis, M; Alt-Epping, B; Hess, C F; Wolff, H A

    2014-02-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting.

  4. Tumors of the Infratemporal Fossa

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rammohan; Quak, Jasper; Egeler, Saskia; Smeele, Ludi; Waal, Isaac v.d.; Valk, Paul v.d.; Leemans, Rene

    2000-01-01

    Neoplastic processes involving the infratemporal fossa may originate from the tissues in the region, but more often are the result of extension from neighboring structures. Metastatic lesions located in the region are rarely encountered. Because of its concealed localization, tumors may remain unnoticed for some time. Clinical signs and symptoms often arise late, are insidious, and may be mistakenly attributed to other structures. The close proximity of the area to the intracranial structures, the orbit, the paranasal sinuses, the nasopharynx, and the facial area demands careful planning of surgical excision and combined procedures may be called for. Modern imaging techniques have made three-dimensional visualization of the extent of the pathology possible. Treatment depends on the histopathology and staging of the tumor. Several surgical approaches have been developed over the years. Radical tumor excision with preservation of the quality of life remain the ultimate goal for those tumors where surgery is indicated. Experience over a decade with various pathologies is presented. ImagesFigure 1p6-bFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:17171095

  5. A mistaken identity: rhabdomyosarcoma of the middle ear cleft misdiagnosed as chronic suppurative otitis media with temporal lobe abscess

    PubMed Central

    Muranjan, Mamta; Karande, Sunil; Parikh, Shefali; Sankhe, Shilpa

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year-old girl presented with a 3-month history of left side facial palsy, followed sequentially by purulent ear discharge, complete external ophthalmoplaegia and blurred vision. On clinical examination she was febrile with left-sided conductive hearing loss. She was clinically diagnosed to have chronic suppurative otitis media of the unsafe type with petrous apicitis, middle cranial fossa abscess and cavernous sinus involvement. Preliminary CT scan findings were reported as a large left temporal lobe abscess and left otitis media with cholesteatoma. MRI of the brain obtained later corroborated the abnormalities detected on the CT scan. Ten days after admission, a mass was seen protruding from the external auditory canal. A biopsy of the mass was obtained and sent for histopathological examination. Meanwhile, review of the MRI suggested an aggressive neoplasm such as sarcoma/rhabdomyosarcoma. Histopathology clinched the final diagnosis of an anaplastic type of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the middle ear cleft. PMID:25240007

  6. Fibrous dysplasia of the cranial bones: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Iseri, Pervin K.; Efendi, Husnu; Demirci, Ali; Komsuoglu, Sezer

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a relatively uncommon disorder that affects primarily the cranial region; its occurrence in the cranial base in combination with hindbrain herniation and aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) constitutes an extremely rare condition. We report a case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia with progressive occipital, temporal, and clival involvement. Clinical findings and differential diagnosis with special emphasis on the imaging features were discussed. A small posterior fossa volume has been thought to lead to hind brain herniation. The resultant obstruction to the CSF pathways at the level of the foramen magnum has been implicated in the development and subsequent progression of syringobulbia. PMID:16464312

  7. Trochanteric fossa or piriform fossa of the femur: time for standardised terminology?

    PubMed

    Ansari Moein, C M S; Gerrits, P D; ten Duis, H J

    2013-06-01

    Piriform fossa, trochanteric fossa and greater trochanteric tip have each been described as entry points for antegrade femoral nailing. However, the terminology used for these entry points is confusing. The accuracy of the entry point nomenclature in published text and illustrations was recorded in this review study. The trochanteric fossa, a deep depression at the base of the femoral neck is indicated as 'piriform fossa' in the vast majority of the publications. Other publications indicate the insertion site of the tendon of the piriformis muscle on the greater trochanteric tip as 'piriform fossa'. As a result of recurrent terminology error and consistent reproductions of it, the recommended entry point in literature is confusing and seems to need standardisation. The piriform fossa does not appear to exist in the femoral region. The trochanteric fossa is the standard entry point which most surgeons recommend for facilitating a standard straight intramedullary nail, as is in line with the medullary canal. The greater trochanteric tip is the lateral entry point for intramedullary nails with a proximal lateral bend.

  8. Infratemporal fossa abscess: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Kamath, M Panduranga; Bhojwani, Kiran M; Mahale, Ajit; Meyyappan, Hari; Abhijit, Kumar

    2009-05-01

    An abscess in the infratemporal fossa is a rare complication of dental extraction. Although it is a recognized entity, only a handful of cases have been reported in the literature. We describe a case of abscess in the infratemporal fossa of a 55-year-old woman with noninsulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes who presented with left-sided facial pain and marked trismus. The abscess was managed successfully with external drainage. We have made an attempt to comprehensively review the literature on this rare condition, with special emphasis on its anatomic complexity and varied clinical presentation, and we provide a detailed discussion of the diagnosis and management of this condition.

  9. [VEGETATIVE REACTIONS AS PROGNOSTIC FACTOR IN POSTERIOR FOSSA SURGERY].

    PubMed

    Nazarov, R V; Kondrat'ev, A N

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rate related to posterior fossa tumors resection varies from 1 to 8 percent, according to various authors. It depends on tumor size and its growth characteristics. To determine the physiological acceptability of surgery, physiological significance of vegetative reactions associated with tumors resection has to be assessed. We divide these reactions (centrogenic reactions - CR) into 2 main groups. The first group has a relatively precise morphofunctional structure, similar to the classic reflex arc. They appear due to irritation of local centers or cranial nerves nuclei with mixed motor-vegetative structure. In most cases they are not connected with anatomic damage of CNS structures. The second group of CR is correlated with dysfunction of brain and represents brain s attempt to turn into a new functional state. Their presence should be considered as a functional degradation symptom, which might be even irreversible. Emergence from anesthesia in the operative room is not recommended in this clinical situation. Neurovegetative stabilization should be provided for a period of 6 to 24 hours after tumor resection.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the temporomandibular...

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Change in Intracranial Volume After Posterior Cranial Vault Distraction.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Azusa; Komuro, Yuzo; Shimoji, Kazuaki; Miyajima, Masakazu; Arai, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    Posterior cranial vault distraction is considered to be more effective for increasing intracranial volume than fronto-orbital advancement or anterior cranial vault expansion, but the changes in intracranial volumes after posterior cranial vault distraction remain unclear. The changes in intracranial volume were investigated in patients of premature craniosynostosis treated by this technique. Seven patients, 3 boys and 4 girls aged from 5 months to 3 years 3 months (mean 23 months) at operation, with craniosynostosis underwent posterior cranial vault distraction at Juntendo University Hospital from 2011 to 2014. Patient characteristics, length of distraction, and pre- and postoperative computed tomography findings were reviewed. Total intracranial volume, including the supratentorial space and posterior cranial fossa, was measured using the workstation functions on three-dimensional computed tomography scans. Posterior distraction was performed without severe complications except in 2 patients requiring additional surgeries. The distraction length was 22.3 to 39 mm (mean 31 mm), the intracranial volume change was 144 to 281 mL (mean 192 mL), and the enlargement ratio of intracranial volume was 113% to 134% (mean 121%). The present quantitative analysis of intracranial volume change after posterior distraction showed greater increases in intracranial volume compared with previous reports. Furthermore, intracranial volumes in our patients became nearly normal and were maintained for the follow-up period (maximum 13 months). Posterior cranial vault distraction is very effective to increase cranial volume, so may be the first choice of treatment in patients of craniosynostosis.

  12. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glenoid fossa prosthesis. 872.3950 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glenoid fossa prosthesis. 872.3950 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glenoid fossa prosthesis. 872.3950 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glenoid fossa prosthesis. 872.3950 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the temporomandibular...

  16. Exhumed Layers Near the Nili Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-01-24

    NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows densely fractured light-toned rock in the vicinity of the Nili Fossae. The light-toned material is finely layered; these layers can be seen in cross-section along a scarp face at the bottom of the image.

  17. Increased depth-diameter ratios in the Medusae Fossae Formation deposits of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, N. G.

    1993-01-01

    Depth to diameter ratios for fresh impact craters on Mars are commonly cited as approximately 0.2 for simple craters and 0.1 for complex craters. Recent computation of depth-diameter ratios in the Amazonis-Memnonia region of Mars indicates that craters within the Medusae Fossae Formation deposits found in this region display greater depth-diameter ratios than expected for both simple and complex craters. Photoclinometric and shadow length techniques have been used to obtain depths of craters within the Amazonis-Memnonia region. The 37 craters in the 2 to 29 km diameter range and displaying fresh impact morphologies were identified in the area of study. This region includes the Amazonian aged upper and middle members of the Medusae Fossae Formation and Noachian aged cratered and hilly units. The Medusae Fossae Formation is characterized by extensive, flat to gently undulating deposits of controversial origin. These deposits appear to vary from friable to indurated. Early analysis of crater degradation in the Medusae Fossae region suggested that simple craters excavated to greater depths than expected based on the general depth-diameter relationships derived for Mars. However, too few craters were available in the initial analysis to estimate the actual depth-diameter ratios within this region. Although the analysis is continuing, we are now beginning to see a convergence towards specific values for the depth-diameter ratio depending on geologic unit.

  18. Increased depth-diameter ratios in the Medusae Fossae Formation deposits of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, N. G.

    1993-03-01

    Depth to diameter ratios for fresh impact craters on Mars are commonly cited as approximately 0.2 for simple craters and 0.1 for complex craters. Recent computation of depth-diameter ratios in the Amazonis-Memnonia region of Mars indicates that craters within the Medusae Fossae Formation deposits found in this region display greater depth-diameter ratios than expected for both simple and complex craters. Photoclinometric and shadow length techniques have been used to obtain depths of craters within the Amazonis-Memnonia region. The 37 craters in the 2 to 29 km diameter range and displaying fresh impact morphologies were identified in the area of study. This region includes the Amazonian aged upper and middle members of the Medusae Fossae Formation and Noachian aged cratered and hilly units. The Medusae Fossae Formation is characterized by extensive, flat to gently undulating deposits of controversial origin. These deposits appear to vary from friable to indurated. Early analysis of crater degradation in the Medusae Fossae region suggested that simple craters excavated to greater depths than expected based on the general depth-diameter relationships derived for Mars. However, too few craters were available in the initial analysis to estimate the actual depth-diameter ratios within this region. Although the analysis is continuing, we are now beginning to see a convergence towards specific values for the depth-diameter ratio depending on geologic unit.

  19. Abnormality of the Foramen Spinosum due to a Variation in the Trajectory of the Middle Meningeal Artery: A Case Report in Human

    PubMed Central

    Ellwanger, Joel Henrique; Campos, Deivis de

    2013-01-01

    Originating from the maxillary artery, the middle meningeal artery (MMA) is predominantly periosteal irrigating the bone and dura mater. It enters the floor of the middle cranial fossa through the foramen spinosum, travels laterally through a middle fossa bony ridge, and curves over the previous upper-greater wing of the sphenoid, where it in a variable point is divided into frontal and parietal branches. The complex sequence of the MMA development gives many opportunities for variant anatomy. In a Caucasian cadaver skull of an approximately 35-year-old individual belonging to the didactical collection of the Laboratory of Human Anatomy at the University of Santa Cruz do Sul, Brazil, it was noted that the right foramen spinosum has an abnormal shape. In this report, we discuss an abnormality of the foramen spinosum due to a variation in the trajectory of the MMA. Thus, the present study shall be important for health sciences and those who have some interest in pathologies associated with the MMA. PMID:24294564

  20. [Tuberculous cranial pachymeningitis presenting with long-standing diffuse brain dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Sugita, Toshihisa; Katoh, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Daigo; Ohnaka, Yohei; Nakajima, Masashi; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2011-04-01

    We report a 59-year-old immunocompetent man presenting with slowly progressive gait unsteadiness, dysarthria, and clumsiness in writing over 6 months. There were bilateral pyramidal signs, pseudobulbar palsy, and attention deficits. Cerebrospinal fluid examination showed mild mononuclear pleocytosis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed pachymeningeal pattern of contrast enhancement beneath the calvarium and the posterior cranial fossa. Interferon-gamma release assay in whole blood after stimulation by specific tuberculosis antigens was positive and repeat polymerase chain reaction assay detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome in the cerebrospinal fluid. After combination therapy with anti-tuberculous agents and corticosteroids, the patient's pachymeningitis regressed. Tuberculous cranial pachymeningitis may present with chronic diffuse brain dysfunction without headache, fever, or cranial nerve dysfunction.

  1. [Chondroma adjacent to Meckel's cave mimicking a fifth cranial nerve neurinoma. A case report].

    PubMed

    Narro-Donate, Jose María; Huete-Allut, Antonio; Velasco-Albendea, Francisco J; Escribano-Mesa, Jose A; Mendez-Román, Paddy; Masegosa-González, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Cranial chondromas are tumours arising from chondrocyte embryonic remnants cells that usually appear in the skull base synchondrosis. In contrast to the rest of the organism, where chondroid tumours are the most common primary bone tumour just behind the haematopoietic lineage ones, they are a rarity at cranial level, with an incidence of less than 1% of intracranial tumours. The case is reported on a 42 year-old male referred to our clinic due to the finding of an extra-axial lesion located close to the Meckel's cave region, with extension to the posterior fossa and brainstem compression after progressive paraparesis of 6 months onset. With the diagnosis of trigeminal schwannoma, a subtotal tumour resection was performed using a combined supra-infratentorial pre-sigmoidal approach. The postoperative histopathology report confirmed the diagnosis of cranial chondroma.

  2. Mature posterior fossa teratoma mimicking dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Bohara, Manoj; Yonezawa, Hajime; Karki, Prasanna; Bakhtiar, Yuriz; Hirano, Hirofumi; Kitazono, Ikumi; Matsuyama, Nozomu; Arita, Kazunori

    2013-10-01

    We describe a very rare case of mature posterior fossa teratoma in an adult who presented with clinico-radiological findings consistent with a dermoid cyst. A computed tomography scan showed a hypodense mass in the cistern magna with calcification and a sinus tract in the occipital bone. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a hypo- to hyperintense mass without contrast enhancement. The intraoperative picture showed a dermal sinus and a cyst containing lipid, keratin and hair. Histopathological examination showed a tumor with components of all the three germ layers; thereby, a diagnosis of mature teratoma was made. The histopathological differentiation between teratoma and dermoid cyst is very valuable for ruling out the presence of immature/malignant or germinomatous components that would require further adjuvant therapies. Thus, we here present a rare case of posterior fossa teratoma mimicking dermoid cyst and emphasize the importance of histopathological differentiation between these entities.

  3. Cerberus Fossae: In the Relay Zone

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-18

    The trenches or fossae are found in Athabasca Valles as seen by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. These trenches or "fossae" are about a kilometer (0.62 miles) across. This area shows where two segments have joined up and are close to a third section. The fossae are probably areas where the surface has collapsed down into voids made from faults (huge cracks with movement on either side) that don't extend up to the surface. In structural geology, when multiple faults are closely spaced, we call that a relay zone. These zones have much higher stress built up in the crust and consequently tend to be more fractured. These fractures can serve as "pipes" for fluids (water, lava, gases) to flow through. This area corresponds with the youngest of Mars' giant outflow channels, Athabasca Valles, that is only 2 to 20 million years old and shows geologic evidence of having been formed and modified jointly by water and lava. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19300

  4. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  5. Multiportal robotic access to the anterior cranial fossa: a surgical and engineering feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Bly, Randall A; Su, David; Lendvay, Thomas S; Friedman, Diana; Hannaford, Blake; Ferreira, Manuel; Moe, Kris S

    2013-12-01

    Integration of robotic surgical technology into skull base surgery is limited due to minimum angle requirements between robotic tools (narrow funnel effect), steep angle of approach, and instrumentation size. The objectives of this study were to systematically analyze surgical approach portals using a computer model, determine optimal approaches, and assess feasibility of the derived approaches on robotic surgical systems. Computer analysis on 10 computed tomography scans was performed to determine approach trajectories, angles between robotic tools, and distances to specified skull base target locations for transorbital and transnasal surgical approach portals. Dry laboratory and cadaver laboratory. The optimal combinations were tested on the da Vinci and Raven robotic systems. Multiportal analyses showed the angles between 2 robotic tools were 14.7, 28.3, and 52.0 degrees in the cases of 2 transnasal portals, combined transnasal and medial orbit portals, and bilateral superior orbit portals, respectively, approaching a prechiasmatic target. The addition of medial and superior transorbital portals improved the skull base trajectory angles 21 and 27 degrees, respectively. Two robotic tools required an angle of at least 20 degrees between them to function effectively at skull base targets. Technical feasibility of robotic transorbital and transnasal approaches to access sella and parasellar target locations was demonstrated. This technique addresses the 2 major drawbacks of (1) the narrow funnel effect generated from portals in close proximity and (2) the steep angle of approach to the skull base, as observed in previous studies analyzing transoral, transcervical, transmaxillary, and transhyoid portals.

  6. Automated Posterior Cranial Fossa Volumetry by MRI: Applications to Chiari Malformation Type I

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, A.M.; Lee, S.H.; Nagornaya, N.; Green, B.A.; Alperin, N.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Quantification of PCF volume and the degree of PCF crowdedness were found beneficial for differential diagnosis of tonsillar herniation and prediction of surgical outcome in CMI. However, lack of automated methods limits the clinical use of PCF volumetry. An atlas-based method for automated PCF segmentation tailored for CMI is presented. The method performance is assessed in terms of accuracy and spatial overlap with manual segmentation. The degree of association between PCF volumes and the lengths of previously proposed linear landmarks is reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS T1-weighted volumetric MR imaging data with 1-mm isotropic resolution obtained with the use of a 3T scanner from 14 patients with CMI and 3 healthy subjects were used for the study. Manually delineated PCF from 9 patients was used to establish a CMI-specific reference for an atlas-based automated PCF parcellation approach. Agreement between manual and automated segmentation of 5 different CMI datasets was verified by means of the t test. Measurement reproducibility was established through the use of 2 repeated scans from 3 healthy subjects. Degree of linear association between PCF volume and 6 linear landmarks was determined by means of Pearson correlation. RESULTS PCF volumes measured by use of the automated method and with manual delineation were similar, 196.2 ± 8.7 mL versus 196.9 ± 11.0 mL, respectively. The mean relative difference of −0.3 ± 1.9% was not statistically significant. Low measurement variability, with a mean absolute percentage value of 0.6 ± 0.2%, was achieved. None of the PCF linear landmarks were significantly associated with PCF volume. CONCLUSIONS PCF and tissue content volumes can be reliably measured in patients with CMI by use of an atlas-based automated segmentation method. PMID:23493894

  7. Cranial osteology of meiglyptini (aves: piciformes: picidae).

    PubMed

    Donatelli, Reginaldo José

    2012-01-01

    THE MEIGLYPTINI COMPRISE EIGHT SPECIES GROUPED INTO THREE GENERA: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species.

  8. Cranial Osteology of Meiglyptini (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae)

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Reginaldo José

    2012-01-01

    The Meiglyptini comprise eight species grouped into three genera: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species. PMID:22567317

  9. Pituitary fossa: a correlative anatomic and MR study

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, L.; Pech, P.; Daniels, D.; Charles, C.; Williams, A.; Haughton, V.

    1984-11-01

    This study characterizes the normal appearance of the pituitary fossa in partial saturation magnetic resonance (MR) images. In sagittal images, the pituitary fossa appears inhomogeneous. Correlation of sagittal MR images in normal subjects with sagittal cryomicrotomic images in cadavers suggests that the highest intensity signal from the posterior-inferior pituitary fossa is due to a fat pad. This conclusion was supported by MR images and postmortem cryotome sections obtained in normal subhuman primates.

  10. Pediatric cranial computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of CT in the investigation of intercranial pathology has revolutionized the approach to clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. This book applies the advances of cranial CT to the pediatric patient. The test is divided into two sections. The first portion describes the practical methodology, anatomy and normal and abnormal CT scan appearance, including high or low density lesions, cystic lesions and ventricular or subarachnoid space dilation. The characteristic scans for various neurological diseases are presented and discussed. The author has given special attention to the CT diagnosis of congenital malformations and cerebral neoplasms. Partial Contents: Normal Computed Tomographic Anatomy/ High Density Lesions/Low Density Lesions/Cystic Lesions; Supratentorial/Cystic Lesions; Infratentorial/Increased Head Circumference/Increased Ventricular Size/Small Ventricular Size/Cranial Lesions/Spinal Lesions/CT Cisternography/Part II CT in Neonates/Congenital Craniocerebral Malformations/Hydrocephalus/Craniosynostosis/Head Trauma/Cerebrovascular Lesions/Intracranial Lesions/Seizure Disorders/Intracranial and Other Chronic Neurological Disorders.

  11. Inflammatory pseudotumour of the infratemporal fossa visualized with (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Cabrera Villegas, A; González Juez, B; Llorente Pendás, J L; Albornoz Almada, M C; Santos Holgueras, P; Sanchez Rodriguez, I E

    2017-05-08

    The inflammatory pseudotumour of the head and neck is a benign lesion, extremely rare outside the cranial orbits. A case is presented of an inflammatory pseudotumour not associated with the IgG4-related disease. The pseudotumour was found as a solitary mass in the infratemporal fossa of a young woman who complained of otalgia and hearing loss. A clear image of the lesion was obtained using an (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET. After the histopathological diagnosis, and treatment with corticosteroids, a second (18)F-FDG PET was performed. The metabolic image had returned to normal, and the previously observed mass disappeared. A brief review is presented of the studies examining this type of lesion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical management of posterior fossa metastases.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Geraint J; Jenkinson, Michael D; Zakaria, Rasheed

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis of brain metastases is associated with a poor prognosis reflecting uncontrolled primary disease that has spread to the relative sanctuary of the central nervous system. 20 % of brain metastases occur in the posterior fossa and are associated with significant morbidity. The risk of acute hydrocephalus and potential for sudden death means these metastases are often dealt with as emergency cases. This approach means a full pre-operative assessment and staging of underlying disease may be neglected and a proportion of patients undergo comparatively high risk surgery with little or no survival benefit. This study aimed to assess outcomes in patients to identify factors that may assist in case selection. We report a retrospective case series of 92 consecutive patients operated for posterior fossa metastases between 2007 and 2012. Routine demographic data was collected plus data on performance status, primary cancer site, details of surgery, adjuvant treatment and survival. The only independent positive prognostic factors identified on multivariate analysis were good performance status (if Karnofsky performance score >70, hazard ratio (HR) for death 0.36, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.18-0.69), adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (HR 0.37, 95 % CI 0.21-0.65) and adjuvant chemotherapy where there was extracranial disease and non-synchronous presentation (HR 0.51, 95 % CI 0.31-0.82). Patients presenting with posterior fossa metastases may not be investigated as thoroughly as those with supratentorial tumours. Staging and assessment is essential however, and in the meantime emergencies related to tumour mass effect should be managed with steroids and cerebrospinal fluid diversion as required.

  13. Cochlear implantation in chronic otitis media and previous middle ear surgery: 20 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, V; Pasanisi, E; Bacciu, A; Bacciu, S; Zini, C

    2014-08-01

    Cochlear implantation in the setting of chronic otitis media or previous middle ear surgery poses several problems for the surgeon: possible spread of infection to the cochlea and the subarachnoid spaces with consequent meningitis, risk of electrode array extrusion and possible recurrence of the original disease. Several surgical strategies have been proposed to overcome these problems. In the present study, clinical and functional results of cochlear implantation in 26 patients with chronic otitis media (8 cases) or previous middle ear surgery (18 cases) in the ear most suitable for implantation were retrospectively reviewed. Among the 8 patients with chronic otitis media, in 7 cases a subtotal petrosectomy associated with external auditory canal closure and mastoid and Eustachian tube obliteration was performed, while in the remaining patient cochlear implantation was done 6 months after a myringoplasty. The only complication observed was a reperforation of the tympanic membrane in this latter patient. Among the 18 patients with previous middle ear surgery, 2 had undergone intact canal wall tympanomastoidectomy and were implanted utilising the previous surgical approach. In the remaining 16 patients who had a radical cavity, an open technique was maintained in 3 cases; a cavity revision associated to external auditory canal closure, Eustachian tube and mastoid obliteration was performed in 12 patients, while in one case a middle cranial fossa approach was utilised. Two of the 3 patients in whom an open technique was maintained have experienced electrode array extrusion. The only complication observed in the remaining patients was the breakdown of the external auditory canal closure in one case. No problems were noted in patients who had undergone intact canal wall tympanomastoidectomy as well as in the subject implanted via the middle cranial fossa approach. All patients achieved and maintained good hearing performance over time. Subtotal petrosectomy associated

  14. Bullet removal from the infratemporal fossa

    PubMed Central

    Merza, Ahmed Maki

    2016-01-01

    War injuries are the cornerstone of maxillofacial surgery, and it led to the initiation and development of this specialty, and each case represents a challenge to the surgeon who deals with it. In this article, we present a 30-year-old male patient who was referred to our emergency department complaining of gunshot wound, severe pain, and limitation in mouth opening. Preoperative imaging showed a bullet with a very long path lodged in the infratemporal fossa. Three different approaches with the aid of C-arm imaging system were used for the removal of this bullet; the last approach was the successful one. PMID:28299274

  15. [Synovial sarcoma of the infratemporal fossa].

    PubMed

    Tamarit Conejeros, José Manuel; Estrems Navas, Paloma; Estellés Ferriol, Enrique; Dalmau Galofre, José

    2010-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is the fourth most common type of sarcoma. It is usually found in the knee or ankle joints, and is exceptional in the head and neck. Most cases are diagnosed in men between 20 and 40 years of age. Diagnosis is often casual due to the infrequent nature of this tumour and its non-specific clinical and radiological characteristics. Confirmation is therefore based on immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. We report a case of biphasic sinovial sarcoma located in the infratemporal fossa treated at our hospital and we make a review of the literature. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Cranial remains of an Eocene tarsier

    PubMed Central

    Rossie, James B.; Ni, Xijun; Beard, K. Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of tarsiers relative to anthropoids and Paleogene omomyids remains a subject of lively debate that lies at the center of research into anthropoid origins. Omomyids have long been regarded as the nearest relatives of tarsiers, but a sister group relationship between anthropoids and tarsiers has also been proposed. These conflicting phylogenetic reconstructions rely heavily on comparisons of cranial anatomy, but until now, the fossil record of tarsiers has been limited to a single jaw and several isolated teeth. In this article, we describe cranial material of a fossil tarsiid from the middle-Eocene Shanghuang fissure-fillings in southern Jiangsu Province, China. This facial fragment, which is allocated to Tarsius eocaenus, is virtually identical to the corresponding anatomy in living tarsiers and differs substantially from that of early anthropoids such as Bahinia, Phenacopithecus, and Parapithecus. This new specimen indicates that tarsiers already possessed greatly enlarged orbits and a haplorhine oronasal configuration by the time they are first documented in the fossil record during the middle Eocene. PMID:16537385

  17. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    PubMed

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option.

  18. Functional Outcomes of the Retromaxillary-Infratemporal Fossa Dissection for Advanced Head and Neck/Skull Base Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Terry Y.; Doerr, Timothy D.; Mathog, Robert H.; Burgio, Don L.; Meleca, Robert J.; Yoo, George H.; Guthikonda, Murali

    2000-01-01

    The retromaxillary-infratemporal fossa (RM-ITF) dissection, using a preauricular incision, was initially popularized for the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders, facial fractures, and orbital tumors. This approach has been expanded for the treatment of advanced head and neck and skull base tumors extending into the infratemporal fossa. We studied prospectively eight consecutive patients requiring a RM-ITF dissection. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes measured were mastication, speech, swallowing, cranial nerve function, pain, and cosmesis. A significant reduction in pain was noted postoperatively in all patients studied. Limited changes were identified in mastication, speech, swallowing, vision, hearing, or cosmesis postoperatively. The RM-ITF dissection should be considered when resecting advanced head and neck/skull base lesions that extend into this region. We have found minimal morbidity associated with this dissection. This procedure may have a useful place in palliation of patients with incurable pain caused by tumor invasion into the infratemporal fossa. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171134

  19. BAER suppression during posterior fossa dural opening

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Christopher B.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Jiang, Yi Dan; Yao, Tom; Zhang, Yi Ping; Sun, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative monitoring with brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) provides an early warning signal of potential neurological injury and may avert tissue damage to the auditory pathway or brainstem. Unexplained loss of the BAER signal in the operating room may present a dilemma to the neurosurgeon. Methods: This paper documents two patients who displayed a unique mechanism of suppression of the BAER apparent within minutes following dural opening for resection of a posterior fossa meningioma. Results: In two patients with anterior cerebellopontine angle and clival meningiomas, there was a significant deterioration of the BAER soon after durotomy but prior to cerebellar retraction and tumor removal. Intracranial structures in the posterior fossa lying between the tumor and dural opening were shifted posteriorly after durotomy. Conclusion: We hypothesized that the cochlear nerve and vessels entering the acoustic meatus were compressed or stretched when subjected to tissue shift. This movement caused cochlear nerve dysfunction that resulted in BAER suppression. BAER was partially restored after the tumor was decompressed, dura repaired, and bone replaced. BAER was not suppressed following durotomy for removal of a meningioma lying posterior to the cochlear complex. Insight into the mechanisms of durotomy-induced BAER inhibition would allay the neurosurgeon's anxiety during the operation. PMID:25883849

  20. An unusual foreign body in the infratemporal fossa

    PubMed Central

    Ramdas, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Infratemporal fossa injuries are uncommon and often go undetected presenting later with complications. We present a case of an infratemporal fossa penetrating injury with a ball point spring following a vehicular accident. Post-traumatic trismus even following supposedly trivial injury in the area should raise suspicion of possible injury in this location. PMID:27833297

  1. Moyamoya Syndrome: Post Cranial Irradiation of Pineal Gland Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chiewvit, P.; Janyavanich, V.; Soonthonpong, N.; Churoj, A.; Chawalparit, O.; Suthipongchai, S.

    2001-01-01

    Summary A right-handed eight-year-old boy, with headache, vomiting and positive parinaud (s sign was diagnosed as having a pineal gland tumor which histopathological section from surgical biopsy revealed to be a germinoma. The patient underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt for obstructive hydrocephalus. Thereafter; he received cranial irradiation as definitive treatment. He was well and went back to school until five years later he developed a transient ischemic attack. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete cure of the pineal tumor without any other specific abnormality. Eight months later he had an episode of stroke which was demonstrated by cranial computed tomography as acute left cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory. Cerebral angiography showed Moyamoya syndrome. PMID:20663345

  2. Aetiology and pathogenesis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in cats by histological examination.

    PubMed

    Wessely, Marlis; Reese, Sven; Schnabl-Feichter, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine histologically intact and ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cats, in order to evaluate whether degeneration is a prerequisite for rupture. Methods We performed a histological examination of 50 intact and 19 ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cadaver or client-owned cats, respectively, using light microscopy. Cats with stifle pathology were further divided into five age groups in order to investigate the relationship of changes in the ligament with lifespan. Cats with ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments were divided into two groups according to medical history (with presumed history of trauma or without any known history of trauma) in order to investigate the relationship of ligament rupture with a traumatic event. Data from 200 healthy cats were selected randomly and reviewed to make a statistical comparison of cats with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture (reference group). Results On histological examination, the intact cranial cruciate ligaments showed basic parallel arrangement of the collagen fibres, with no relation to age. While cats of a more advanced age showed fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament - a likely physiological reaction to compression forces over the lifespan - degenerative changes within the fibrocartilage were absent in all cases, regardless of age or rupture status. Cats suffering from cranial cruciate ligament rupture without history of trauma were significantly older than cats in the reference group. Conclusions and relevance This study showed that differentiation of fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament is likely a physiological reaction to compressive forces and not a degenerative change associated with greater risk of rupture in advanced age. This finding in cats is distinct from the known decrease in differentiation of fibrocartilage in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Furthermore, the histological examination

  3. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  4. Clinical studies of photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors: facial nerve palsy after temporal fossa photoillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lilge, Lothar D.; Varma, Abhay; Bogaards, Arjen; Fullagar, Tim; Fenstermaker, Robert; Selker, Robert; Abrams, Judith

    2003-06-01

    In two randomized prospective studies of brain tumor PDT more than 180 patients have been accrued. At the Toronto site we recognized two patients who developed a lower motor neuron (LMN) facial paralysis in the week following the PDT treatment. In both cases a temporal lobectomy was undertaken and the residual tumor cavity was photo-illuminated. The surface illuminated included the temporal fossa floor, thus potentially exposing the facial nerve to the effect of PDT. The number of frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital tumors in this cohort was 39, 24, 12 and 4, respectively. Of the 24 temporal tumors 18 were randomized to Photofrin-PDT. Of these 18 a temporal lobectomy was carried out exposing the middle fossa floor as part of the tumor resection. In two of the 10 patients where the lobectomy was carried out and the fossa floor was exposed to light there occurred a postoperative facial palsy. Both patients recovered facial nerve function in 6 and 12 weeks, respectively. 46 J/cm2 were used in the former and 130 J/cm2 in the latter. We did not encounter a single post-operative LMN facial plasy in the 101 phase 2 patients treated with Photofrin-PDT. Among 688 supratentorial brain tumor operations in the last decade involving all pathologies and all locations no case of early post-operative LMN facial palsy was identified in the absence of PDT. One further patient who had a with post-PDT facial palsy was identified at the Denver site. Although it is possible that these patients had incidental Bell's palsy, we now recommend shielding the temporal fossa floor during PDT.

  5. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetic type of cranial mononeuropathy III is a complication of diabetes . It causes double vision and eyelid drooping . ... Cooper ME, Vinik AI, Plutzky J, Boulton AJM. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  6. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  7. Pin-site epidural hematoma: A catastrophic complication of cranial fixation in a child.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Prasad; Kumar, Soumen Kanti; Kartikueyan, Rajaraman; Patel, Sachinkumar Maheshbhai

    2016-01-01

    Cranial fixation with pins is a routine adjunct in neurosurgery and is usually considered safe. A rarely reported complication is skull fracture at the pin site and consequent epidural hematoma. Usually, these are picked up only postoperatively and rarely, intraoperatively if there is unexplained "brain bulge" in which case the operation should be terminated and urgent imaging has to be done. We describe such a complication that occurred while operating on a 12-year-old child with a posterior fossa tumor and review the available literature dealing with such events.

  8. Time to diagnosis of paediatric posterior fossa tumours: an 11-year West of Scotland experience 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Kameda-Smith, M M; White, M A J; St George, E J; Brown, J I M

    2013-06-01

    Brain tumours are the most common solid childhood malignancy accounting for 20% of all paediatric cancers. Of these, posterior fossa tumours comprise approximately 60-70% of all brain tumours in children. Several studies have estimated the median pre-diagnostic interval (PSI) of paediatric brain tumours as approximately 60 days. The objectives of this retrospective analysis were to (a) identify the common presenting symptoms of posterior fossa tumours, (b) determine the time interval from the first attributable symptom to the radiological diagnosis of a posterior fossa tumour, (c) compare the West of Scotland with other international centres and (d) identify which factors correlate with outcome for these children. A retrospective case note review of 69 children diagnosed with posterior fossa tumours from January 2000 to September 2011. Of the 69 children diagnosed during this period, complete data were available for 66 children (M:F = 31:35, Mean age (SD): 7.50 + 4.53 years). Results. Nausea and vomiting (75.8%), headaches (63.6%) and incoordination (51.5%) were recorded as the most common presenting symptoms followed by lethargy (28.8%), cranial nerve palsy (25.8%) and diplopia (24.2%). Fifty-three of the sixty-six children (i.e., 80.3%) demonstrated radiological evidence of hydrocephalus on their initial scan. The majority of children were assessed by less than three specialists after a median PSI of 43.5 days. The only variable significantly associated with PSI was tumour grade (r = - 0.202, p = 0.036). Neither age at diagnosis, number of specialists seen, nor outcome was significantly correlated with PSI. The only factor associated with outcome was tumour grade (r = 0.337, p = 0.006). Despite recent reports indicating poor performance of the UK with respect to time to diagnosis of paediatric brain tumours, the present data indicate that the experience of this cohort is favourably comparable to international standards.

  9. Asystole during posterior fossa surgery: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Keshav; Philip, Frenny Ann; Rath, Girija Prasad; Mahajan, Charu; Sujatha, M.; Bharti, Sachidanand Jee; Gupta, Nidhi

    2012-01-01

    Asystole during posterior fossa neurosurgical procedures is not uncommon. Various causes have been implicated, especially when surgical manipulation is carried out in the vicinity of the brain stem. The trigemino-cardiac reflex has been attributed as one of the causes. Here, we report two cases who suffered asystole during the resection of posterior fossa tumors. The vago-glossopharyngeal reflex and the direct stimulation of the brainstem were hypothesized as the causes of asytole. These episodes resolved spontaneously following withdrawal of the surgical stimulus emphasizing the importance of anticipation and vigilance during critical moments of tumor dissection during posterior fossa surgery. PMID:22870159

  10. Gallbladder Fossa Abscess Masquerading as Cholecystitis After Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigue, Paul; Fakhri, Asif; Baumgartner, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a 59-y-old woman who had undergone cholecystectomy and was subsequently found to have an abscess within the gallbladder fossa. A hepatobiliary scan using (99m)Tc-diisopropyliminodiacetic acid demonstrated the characteristic rim sign, a photopenic defect surrounded by a rim of mildly increased activity immediately adjacent to the gallbladder fossa. The rim sign was thought to be the result of reactive inflammation in the hepatic tissue adjacent to a postoperative abscess within the gallbladder fossa. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  11. Evaluation of the Predictive Value of Intraoperative Changes in Motor-Evoked Potentials of Caudal Cranial Nerves for the Postoperative Functional Outcome.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Marcel; Tatagiba, Marcos; Liebsch, Marina; Feigl, Guenther C

    2016-11-01

    The predictive value of changes in intraoperatively acquired motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) IX-X (glossopharyngeal-vagus nerve) and CN XII (hypoglossal nerve) on operative outcomes was investigated. MEPs of CN IX-X and CN XII were recorded intraoperatively in 63 patients undergoing surgery of the posterior cranial fossa. We correlated the changes of the MEPs with postoperative nerve function. For CN IX-X, we found a correlation between the amplitude of the MEP ratio and uvula deviation (P = 0.028) and the amplitude duration of the MEP and gag reflex function (P = 0.027). Patients with an MEP ratio of the glossopharyngeal-vagus amplitude ≤1.47 μV had a 3.4 times increased risk of developing a uvula deviation. Patients with a final MEP duration of the CN IX-X ≤11.6 milliseconds had a 3.6 times increased risk for their gag reflex to become extinct. Our study greatly contributes to the current knowledge of intraoperative MEPs as a predictor for postoperative cranial nerve function. We were able to extent previous findings on MEP values of the facial nerve on postoperative nerve function to 3 additional cranial nerves. Finding reliable predictors for postoperative nerve function is of great importance to the overall quality of life for a patient undergoing surgery of the posterior cranial fossa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Condyle-fossa modifications and muscle interactions during herbst treatment, part 1. New technological methods.

    PubMed

    Voudouris, John C; Woodside, Donald G; Altuna, Gurkan; Kuftinec, Mladen M; Angelopoulos, Gerassimos; Bourque, Paul J

    2003-06-01

    Changes in the condyle, the glenoid fossa, and the muscles of mastication were investigated in subjects undergoing continuous orthopedic advancement of the mandible with a Herbst-block appliance. The total sample consisted of 56 subjects and included 15 nonhuman primates (in the middle mixed, early permanent, and permanent dentitions), 17 human Herbst patients in the early permanent dentition, and 24 human controls from the Burlington Growth Center. The 8 nonhuman primates in the middle mixed dentition were the focus of this study. Mandibular advancement was obtained progressively in 5 animals by adding stops to the telescopic arms of fixed functional Herbst appliances with occlusal coverage; activations of 5.0 mm, 7.0 mm, and 8.0 mm were achieved. Two primates served as controls, and the third was a sham control. Two experimental animals and the 2 controls also wore surgically implanted electromyographic electrodes in the superior and inferior heads of the lateral pterygoid muscles and in the superficial masseter and anterior digastric muscles. Changes in condylar growth direction and amount were assessed with the Björk method from measurements made on serial cephalometric tracings superimposed on metallic implants. Undecalcified sections, treated with intravenous tetracycline vital staining, were viewed with fluorescence microscopy to examine histologic changes in the condyle and the glenoid fossa. New bone formation in the fossa associated with continuous mandibular protrusion was quantified by using computerized histomorphometric analysis of decalcified histological sections and polarized light. The unique combination of permanently implanted electromyographic electrodes, tetracycline vital staining, and histomorphometry represents a significant technological advancement in methods and materials. Together, they demonstrated different muscle-bone interaction results for functional appliances than those reported in previous studies. In Part 1 of this study, we

  13. Precraniate origin of cranial motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Héloïse D.; Chettouh, Zoubida; Deyts, Carole; de Rosa, Renaud; Goridis, Christo; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Brunet, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    The craniate head is innervated by cranial sensory and motor neurons. Cranial sensory neurons stem from the neurogenic placodes and neural crest and are seen as evolutionary innovations crucial in fulfilling the feeding and respiratory needs of the craniate “new head.” In contrast, cranial motoneurons that are located in the hindbrain and motorize the head have an unclear phylogenetic status. Here we show that these motoneurons are in fact homologous to the motoneurons of the sessile postmetamorphic form of ascidians. The motoneurons of adult Ciona intestinalis, located in the cerebral ganglion and innervating muscles associated with the huge “branchial basket,” express the transcription factors CiPhox2 and CiTbx20, whose vertebrate orthologues collectively define cranial motoneurons of the branchiovisceral class. Moreover, Ciona's postmetamorphic motoneurons arise from a hindbrain set aside during larval life and defined as such by its position (caudal to the prosensephalic sensory vesicle) and coexpression of CiPhox2 and CiHox1, whose orthologues collectively mark the vertebrate hindbrain. These data unveil that the postmetamorphic ascidian brain, assumed to be a derived feature, in fact corresponds to the vertebrate hindbrain and push back the evolutionary origin of cranial nerves to before the origin of craniates. PMID:16735475

  14. Management of cranial base chondrosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Wanebo, John E; Bristol, Ruth E; Porter, Randall R; Coons, Stephen W; Spetzler, Robert F

    2006-02-01

    Chondrosarcomas are rare, infiltrative, progressive lesions that occur at the cranial base. Their intimate association with cranial nerves and major vessels of the head and neck often precludes complete surgical resection. Between 1983 and 2003, 23 patients (14 females, 9 males) were treated at our institution with the diagnosis of chondrosarcoma of the cranial base (mean age at presentation, 43 yr). A retrospective chart review was performed to evaluate presentation, management, and adjunctive treatment. All living patients were contacted for a current examination and disease status. The 23 patients underwent 43 surgical resections. Follow-up ranged from 8 months to 25 years (mean, 97 mo). Ten patients underwent various adjuvant radiation therapies. Five patients have died. Four patients have no evidence of disease, and 13 have residual tumor. One was lost to follow-up. Of 14 patients with 5 years of follow-up, 13 are living. Therefore, the absolute 5 year survival rate is 93%. The 10 year survival rate is 71%. Because of the intricate nature of the cranial base, a team approach is preferable for managing these challenging lesions. Maximum cytoreductive surgery should be pursued as an initial strategy to minimize neurological injury. Adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery can be used to treat residual disease or small recurrences. This cohort also illustrates that patients with chondrosarcomas have better long-term survival rates than patients with chordomas of the cranial base.

  15. Rippled Surfaces on a Slope in Coloe Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-09

    This observation from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a set of landforms that appears to form a nested chevron pattern on a slope in Coloe Fossae. Interestingly, nearby surfaces on the same slope are all parallel.

  16. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis with extension to the posterior fossa: case report.

    PubMed

    Soloniuk, D S; Moreland, D B

    1988-11-01

    A 25-year-old man with juvenile onset diabetes presented with rhinoorbital mucormycosis. He was treated aggressively with orbital extirpation and amphotericin B. Six months later, he presented with posterior fossa extension of the mucormycosis.

  17. Mineral Spectra from Nili Fossae, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Spectra collected by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) indicate the presence of three distinct minerals. The graphed information comes from an observation of terrain in the Nili Fossae area of northern Mars. CRISM is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

    Iron-magnesium smectite clay is formed through alteration of rocks by liquid water and is characterized by distinctive absorptions at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.3 micrometers due to water (H2O) and OH in the atomic structure of the mineral. Olivine is an iron magnesium silicate and primary igneous mineral, and water is not in its structure. Its spectrum is characterized by a strong and broad absorption at 1.0 micrometer due to ferrous iron (Fe2+). Carbonate is an alteration mineral identified by the distinctive paired absorptions at 2.3 and 2.5 micrometers. The precise band positions at 2.31 and 2.51 micrometers identify the carbonate at this location as magnesium carbonate. The broad 1.0 micrometer band indicates some small amount of ferrous iron is also present and the feature at 1.9 micrometers indicates the presence of water. CRISM researchers believe the magnesium carbonate found in the Nili Fossae region formed from alteration of olivine by water.

    The data come from a CRISM image catalogued as FRT00003E12. The spectra shown here are five-pixel-by-five-pixel averages of CRISM L-detector spectra taken from three different areas within the image that have then been ratioed to a five-pixel-by-five-pixel common denominator spectrum taken from a spectrally unremarkable area with no distinctive mineralogic signatures. This technique highlights the spectral contrasts between regions due to their unique mineralogy. The spectral wavelengths near 2.0 micrometers are affected by atmospheric absorptions and have been removed for clarity.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars

  18. Mineral Spectra from Nili Fossae, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Spectra collected by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) indicate the presence of three distinct minerals. The graphed information comes from an observation of terrain in the Nili Fossae area of northern Mars. CRISM is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

    Iron-magnesium smectite clay is formed through alteration of rocks by liquid water and is characterized by distinctive absorptions at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.3 micrometers due to water (H2O) and OH in the atomic structure of the mineral. Olivine is an iron magnesium silicate and primary igneous mineral, and water is not in its structure. Its spectrum is characterized by a strong and broad absorption at 1.0 micrometer due to ferrous iron (Fe2+). Carbonate is an alteration mineral identified by the distinctive paired absorptions at 2.3 and 2.5 micrometers. The precise band positions at 2.31 and 2.51 micrometers identify the carbonate at this location as magnesium carbonate. The broad 1.0 micrometer band indicates some small amount of ferrous iron is also present and the feature at 1.9 micrometers indicates the presence of water. CRISM researchers believe the magnesium carbonate found in the Nili Fossae region formed from alteration of olivine by water.

    The data come from a CRISM image catalogued as FRT00003E12. The spectra shown here are five-pixel-by-five-pixel averages of CRISM L-detector spectra taken from three different areas within the image that have then been ratioed to a five-pixel-by-five-pixel common denominator spectrum taken from a spectrally unremarkable area with no distinctive mineralogic signatures. This technique highlights the spectral contrasts between regions due to their unique mineralogy. The spectral wavelengths near 2.0 micrometers are affected by atmospheric absorptions and have been removed for clarity.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars

  19. Pituitary apoplexy presenting as isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis : two case reports.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Jin; Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Tae-Sun; Seo, Bo-Ra

    2009-02-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome caused by an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic vascular accident involving a pituitary adenoma or an adjacent pituitary gland. Pituitary apoplexy may be associated with a variety of neurological and endocrinological signs and symptoms. However, isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis as the presenting sign of pituitary apoplexy is very rare. We describe two cases of pituitary apoplexy presenting as sudden-onset unilateral ptosis and diplopia. In one case, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the pituitary fossa with signs of hemorrhage, upward displacement of the optic chiasm, erosion of the sellar floor and invasion of the right cavernous sinus. In the other case, MRI showed a large area of insufficient enhancement in the anterior pituitary consistent with pituitary infarction or Sheehan's syndrome. We performed neurosurgical decompression via a transsphenoidal approach. Both patients showed an uneventful recovery. Both cases of isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis completely resolved during the early postoperative period. We suggest that pituitary apoplexy should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis and that prompt neurosurgical decompression should be considered for the preservation of third cranial nerve function.

  20. Pituitary Apoplexy Presenting as Isolated Third Cranial Nerve Palsy with Ptosis : Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Jin; Kim, Tae-Sun; Seo, Bo-Ra

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome caused by an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic vascular accident involving a pituitary adenoma or an adjacent pituitary gland. Pituitary apoplexy may be associated with a variety of neurological and endocrinological signs and symptoms. However, isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis as the presenting sign of pituitary apoplexy is very rare. We describe two cases of pituitary apoplexy presenting as sudden-onset unilateral ptosis and diplopia. In one case, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the pituitary fossa with signs of hemorrhage, upward displacement of the optic chiasm, erosion of the sellar floor and invasion of the right cavernous sinus. In the other case, MRI showed a large area of insufficient enhancement in the anterior pituitary consistent with pituitary infarction or Sheehan's syndrome. We performed neurosurgical decompression via a transsphenoidal approach. Both patients showed an uneventful recovery. Both cases of isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis completely resolved during the early postoperative period. We suggest that pituitary apoplexy should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis and that prompt neurosurgical decompression should be considered for the preservation of third cranial nerve function. PMID:19274125

  1. Lyme borreliosis and cranial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kindstrand, E

    1995-10-01

    In a 2-year study of 37 consecutive adult patients with isolated cranial nerve affection of primarily unknown origin, seen at a neurological clinic, borrelia infection was identified as the cause in six cases. Four patients had a peripheral facial palsy and two had a sixth nerve palsy. The patients with borreliosis had headaches or other pain considerably more often than patients with other or unknown aetiology. All six patients had accompanying symptoms and/or signs; in five cases these were obvious, and pointed to a borrelia infection. This study indicates that a careful history to elicit other symptoms of Lyme borreliosis will usually identify the cranial nerve affections with borrelial aetiology in adult patients. To verify the diagnosis, both serum and CSF analysis should be performed. Routine testing for borrelia serology in all patients with cranial neuropathy is generally not indicated.

  2. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders--affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate--are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies.

  3. Functional morphology of the Neandertal scapular glenoid fossa.

    PubMed

    Macias, Marisa E; Churchill, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    Neandertals and Homo sapiens are known to differ in scapular glenoid fossa morphology. Functional explanations may be appropriate for certain aspects of glenoid fossa morphology; however, other factors--e.g., allometry, evolutionary development--must be addressed before functional morphology is considered. Using three-dimensional geometric morphometrics, shape of the scapular glenoid fossa was compared among Neandertals, early and recent modern humans, chimpanzees, orangutans, Australopithecus afarensis, and Au. sediba. Permutation analysis revealed that side, sex, and lifestyle did not correlate with shape. Of the features we found to differ between groups, anterior glenoid rim morphology and fossa curvature did not correlate with the aforementioned shape variables; thus, a functional explanation is appropriate for these components of glenoid fossa shape. Shared morphology among recent humans and chimpanzees (to the exclusion of Neandertals and orangutans) suggests independent forces contributing to these morphological configurations. Potential explanations include adaptations to habitual behavior and locomotor adaptations in the scapulae of recent humans and chimpanzees; these explanations are supported by clinical and experimental literature. The absence of these morphological features in Neandertals may support the lack of these selective forces on their scapular glenoid fossa morphology.

  4. Microsurgical anatomy of the posterior fossa cisterns.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, H; Rhoton, A L; Peace, D

    1988-07-01

    The microsurgical anatomy of the posterior fossa cisterns was examined in 15 cadavers using 3X to 40X magnification. Liliequist's membrane was found to split into two arachnoidal sheets as it spreads upward from the dorsum sellae: an upper sheet, called the diencephalic membrane, which attaches to the diencephalon at the posterior edge of the mamillary bodies, and a lower sheet, called the mesencephalic membrane, which attaches along the junction of the midbrain and pons. Several other arachnoidal membranes that separate the cisterns were identified. These include the anterior pontine membrane, which separates the prepontine and cerebellopontine cisterns; the lateral pontomesencephalic membrane, which separates the ambient and cerebellopontine cisterns; the medial pontomedullary membrane, which separates the premedullary and prepontine cisterns; and the lateral pontomedullary membrane, which separates the cerebellopontine and cerebellomedullary cisterns. The three cisterns in which the arachnoid trabeculae and membranes are the most dense and present the greatest obstacle at operation are the interpeduncular and quadrigeminal cisterns and the cisterna magna. Numerous arachnoid membranes were found to intersect the oculomotor nerves. The neural and vascular structures in each cistern are reviewed.

  5. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM, Weill Cornell Medical College; ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  6. Tumors of the cranial base: Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, L.N.; Schramm, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The first section of this book highlights the differences and similarities in the pathology and biology of the various types of neoplasms of the cranial base. The second section covers improvements in radiological diagnosis with the advent of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and a better knowledge of radiological anatomy. It also examines the significance and proper evaluation of minor symptoms to enable earlier diagnosis, as well as the advances in interventional radiology that have produced the balloon occlusion text and tumor embolization. Section three is on advanced neuroanesthetic techniques and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. Section four describes specialized treatment modalities including microsurgical resection with the laser, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Section five reviews the latest techniques for reconstruction of the cranial base following resection, as well as the preservation and reconstruction of cranial nerves and cerebral blood vessels exposed during the surgery. The final three sections examine the lesions and surgical techniques specific to the different anatomical regions, i.e, the anterior, middle and posterior cranial base.

  7. Comparison of permanent hair loss in children with standard risk PNETS of the posterior fossa following radiotherapy alone or chemotherapy and radiotherapy after surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Susanne; Donachie, Paul; Sugden, Elaine; Sharpe, Geoffrey; English, Martin; Robinson, Kath; Saran, Frank

    2011-12-01

    Hair loss was compared between surgery followed by craniospinal radiotherapy (CSRT) or chemotherapy then CSRT (C-CSRT) for medulloblastoma. The proportion of patients exhibiting hair loss in the cranial field was 70.0% (C-CSRT) versus 30.0% (CSRT) (95% CI: 14.7% to 58.9%; P = 0.002). The C-CSRT group also experienced more virtual/complete hair loss over the posterior fossa boost. Age was a significant contributor to hair loss in the cranial field. Persistent significant hair loss is an under-reported late effect of treatment that could influence quality of survival and should be considered in future trial design. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  12. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  13. Medusae Fossae Formation - High Resolution Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An exotic terrain of wind-eroded ridges and residual smooth surfaces are seen in one of the highest resolution images ever taken of Mars from orbit. The Medusae Fossae formation is believed to be formed of the fragmental ejecta of huge explosive volcanic eruptions. When subjected to intense wind-blasting over hundreds of millions of years, this material erodes easily once the uppermost tougher crust is breached. The crust, or cap rock, can be seen in the upper right part of the picture. The finely-spaced ridges are similar to features on Earth called yardangs, which are formed by intense winds plucking individual grains from, and by wind-driven sand blasting particles off, sedimentary deposits.

    The image was taken on October 30, 1997 at 11:05 AM PST, shortly after the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft's 31st closest approach to Mars. The image covers an area 3.6 X 21.5 km (2.2 X 13.4 miles) at 3.6 m (12 feet) per picture element--craters only 11 m (36 feet, about the size of a swimming pool) across can be seen. The best Viking view of the area (VO 1 387S34) has a resolution of 240 m/pixel, or 67 times lower resolution than the MOC frame.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  14. Medusae Fossae Formation - High Resolution Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An exotic terrain of wind-eroded ridges and residual smooth surfaces are seen in one of the highest resolution images ever taken of Mars from orbit. The Medusae Fossae formation is believed to be formed of the fragmental ejecta of huge explosive volcanic eruptions. When subjected to intense wind-blasting over hundreds of millions of years, this material erodes easily once the uppermost tougher crust is breached. The crust, or cap rock, can be seen in the upper right part of the picture. The finely-spaced ridges are similar to features on Earth called yardangs, which are formed by intense winds plucking individual grains from, and by wind-driven sand blasting particles off, sedimentary deposits.

    The image was taken on October 30, 1997 at 11:05 AM PST, shortly after the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft's 31st closest approach to Mars. The image covers an area 3.6 X 21.5 km (2.2 X 13.4 miles) at 3.6 m (12 feet) per picture element--craters only 11 m (36 feet, about the size of a swimming pool) across can be seen. The best Viking view of the area (VO 1 387S34) has a resolution of 240 m/pixel, or 67 times lower resolution than the MOC frame.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  15. The Age of the Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, L.; Head, J. W.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction The Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) is a complicated and discontinuous formation located in the southern parts of Elysium Planitia and Amazonis Planitia (130°-230°E and 12°S-12°N), covering an area of approximately 2.1 x 106 km2 and having an estimated volume of 1.4 x 106 km3 [1]. It is thought to have been deposited during the Amazonian period [2,3]. However, much of the cratering record may have been erased as friable units were eroded and long-buried terrains exhumed [4-6]. The formation is characterized by large accumulations of fine-grained, friable deposits and evidence of large amounts of erosion. There are many theories regarding the emplacement of this formation; recently the literature has focused on three possibilities: ignimbrites, ash fall, and aeolian dust. Some modified and inverted fluvial channels have been found within the deposit [7,8], (Fig. 1), indicating that there was some fluvial activity during or after the emplacement of the MFF. If the MFF is among the youngest surficial deposits on Mars [9], it is implied that meandering, channelized flow must have extended into the Amazonian, a significant constraint when considering the atmospheric evolution of the planet through time. Because of the wide implications that these findings have for the evolution of Mars and the Martian atmosphere, it is instructive to re-examine the evidence for the Amazonian age of the MFF. The initial conclusion comes from two main arguments: the relatively few superposed craters on the unit, and the superposition of the MFF on young lowland lava deposits [1, 9]. Using new high resolution data, we reexamine the relationships both within the MFF and with respect to adjacent units. Cratering Record The cratering record of the MFF and other easily eroded units has often been deemed unreliable [4, 10, 12], but it continues to be cited as evidence for the formation's young age. Throughout the MFF, pedestal craters, inverted craters, and remnant knobs can be

  16. Normobaric Hyperoxia for Treatment of Pneumocephalus after Posterior Fossa Surgery in the Semisitting Position: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bujung; Biertz, Frank; Raab, Peter; Scheinichen, Dirk; Ertl, Philipp; Grosshennig, Anika; Nakamura, Makoto; Hermann, Elvis J.; Lang, Josef M.; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Krauss, Joachim K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Supratentorial pneumocephalus after posterior fossa surgery in the semisitting position may lead to decreased alertness and other symptoms. We here aimed to prove the efficacy of normobaric hyperoxia on the absorption of postoperative pneumocephalus according to a standardized treatment protocol. Methods and Findings We enrolled 44 patients with postoperative supratentorial pneumocephalus (> 30 ml) after posterior fossa surgery in a semisitting position. After randomisation procedure, patients received either normobaric hyperoxia at FiO2 100% over an endotracheal tube for 3 hours (treatment arm) or room air (control arm). Routine cranial CT scans were performed immediately (CT1) and 24 hours (CT2) after completion of surgery and were rated without knowledge of the therapy arm. Two co-primary endpoints were assessed: (i) mean change of pneumocephalus volume, and (ii) air resorption rate in 24 hours. Secondary endpoints were subjective alertness (Stanford Sleepiness Scale) postoperatively and attention (Stroop test), which were evaluated preoperatively and 24 hours after surgery. The mean change in pneumocephalus volume was higher in patients in the treatment arm as compared to patients in the control arm (p = 0.001). The air resorption rate was higher in patients in the treatment arm as compared to patients in the control arm (p = 0.0015). Differences were more pronounced in patients aged 52 years and older. No difference between patients in treatment arm and control arm was observed for the Stroop test. The distribution of scores in the Stanford Sleepiness Scale differed in the treatment arm as compared to the control arm, and there was a difference in mean values (p = 0.015). Conclusions Administration of normobaric hyperoxia at FiO2 100% via an endotracheal tube for 3 hours is safe and efficacious in the treatment of pneumocephalus after posterior fossa surgery in the semisitting position. Largest benefit was found in elderly patients and particularly

  17. The controversy of cranial bone motion.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J S; Witt, P L

    1997-08-01

    Cranial bone motion continues to stimulate controversy. This controversy affects the general acceptance of some intervention methods used by physical therapists, namely, cranial osteopathic and craniosacral therapy techniques. Core to these intervention techniques is the belief that cranial bone mobility provides a compliant system where somatic dysfunction can occur and therapeutic techniques can be applied. Diversity of opinion over the truth of this concept characterizes differing viewpoints on the anatomy and physiology of the cranial complex. Literature on cranial bone motion was reviewed for the purpose of better understanding this topic. Published research overall was scant and inconclusive. Animal and human studies demonstrate a potential for small magnitude motion. Physical therapists should carefully scrutinize the literature presented as evidence for cranial bone motion. Further research is needed to resolve this controversy. Outcomes research, however, is needed to validate cranial bone mobilization as an effective treatment.

  18. Fossa navicularis magna detection on cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mupparapu, Mel

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report and discuss the detection of fossa navicularis magna, a close radiographic anatomic variant of canalis basilaris medianus of the basiocciput, as an incidental finding in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The CBCT data of the patients in question were referred for the evaluation of implant sites and to rule out pathology in the maxilla and mandible. CBCT analysis showed osseous, notch-like defects on the inferior aspect of the clivus in all four cases. The appearance of fossa navicularis magna varied among the cases. In some, it was completely within the basiocciput and mimicked a small rounded, corticated, lytic defect, whereas it appeared as a notch in others. Fossa navicularis magna is an anatomical variant that occurs on the inferior aspect of the clivus. The pertinent literature on the anatomical variations occurring in this region was reviewed. PMID:27051639

  19. Ganglion cyst in the supraspinous fossa: arthroscopically undetectable cases.

    PubMed

    Shimokobe, Hisao; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Eiichiro; Kume, Shinichiro; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Nagata, Kensei; Shiba, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes of arthroscopic decompression for ganglion cyst in the supraspinous fossa; however, little attention has been paid to the difficulty in detecting these cysts during arthroscopy. In this report, we present 2 cases in which ganglion cysts in the supraspinous fossa were undetectable during arthroscopy. The ganglion cysts were not identified in these cases during surgery despite arthroscopic decompression being performed through the area in which the cyst was expected until the suprascapular nerve was entirely exposed. After surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the disappearance of the ganglion cyst and external rotation strength was fully improved, without shoulder pain. We emphasize here that surgeons should be aware of this difficulty when performing arthroscopic decompression of ganglion cysts in the supraspinous fossa.

  20. Cranial kinesis in palaeognathous birds.

    PubMed

    Gussekloo, Sander W S; Bout, Ron G

    2005-09-01

    Cranial kinesis in birds is induced by muscles located caudal on the cranium. These forces are transferred onto the moveable parts of the skull via the Pterygoid-Palatinum Complex (PPC). This bony structure therefore plays an essential role in cranial kinesis. In palaeognathous birds the morphology of the PPC is remarkably different from that of neognathous birds and is thought to be related to the specific type of cranial kinesis in palaeognaths known as central rhynchokinesis. We determined whether clear bending zones as found in neognaths are present in the upper bill of paleognaths, and measured bending forces opposing elevation of the upper bill. A static force model was used to calculate the opening forces that can be produced by some of the palaeognathous species. We found that no clear bending zones are present in the upper bill, and bending is expected to occur over the whole length of the upper bill. Muscle forces are more than sufficient to overcome bending forces and to elevate the upper bill. The resistance against bending by the bony elements alone is very low, which might indicate that bending of bony elements can occur during food handling when muscles are not used to stabilise the upper bill. Model calculations suggest that the large processi basipterygoidei play a role in stabilizing the skull elements, when birds have to resist external opening forces on the upper bill as might occur during tearing leafs from plants. We conclude that the specific morphology of the palaeognathous upper bill and PPC are not designed for active cranial kinesis, but are adapted to resist external forces that might cause unwanted elevation of the upper bill during feeding.

  1. Cranial computed tomography and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book appears to be a hybrid between an atlas and a text. The second edition attempts to depict the current status of both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in neuroradiology. Although only the final chapter of the book is completely devoted to cranial MR imaging, MR images are scattered throughout various other chapters. There is coverage of the major anatomic and pathophysiologic entities. There are 17 chapters with images, tables, and diagrams.

  2. Discovery of Olivine in the Nili Fossae Region of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoefen, T.M.; Clark, R.N.; Bandfield, J.L.; Smith, M.D.; Pearl, J.C.; Christensen, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    We have detected a 30,000-square-kilometer area rich in olivine in the Nili Fossae region of Mars. Nili Fossae has been interpreted as a complex of grabens and fractures related to the formation of the Isidis impact basin. We propose that post-impact faulting of this area has exposed subsurface layers rich in olivine. Linear mixture analysis of Thermal Emission Spectrometer spectra shows surface exposures of 30% olivine, where the composition of the olivine ranges from Fo30 to Fo70.

  3. Endoscopic Removal of a Bullet in Rosenmuller Fossa: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Joshua D.; Glenn, Chad A.; Conner, Andrew K.; Bonney, Phillip A.; Sanclement, Jose A.; Sughrue, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the anterior skull base may occur in gunshot victims and can result in traumatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Less commonly, CSF leaks occur days or even weeks after the trauma occurred. Here, we present the case of a 21-year-old man with a delayed-onset, traumatic CSF leak secondary to a missile injury that left a bullet fragment in the Rosenmuller fossa. The patient was treated successfully with endoscopic, endonasal extraction of the bullet, and repair with a nasal septal flap. Foreign bodies lodged in Rosenmuller fossa can be successfully treated with endoscopic skull base surgery. PMID:27330924

  4. Visualization of the intracisternal angioarchitecture at the posterior fossa by use of image fusion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Maki, Hiroaki; Maeda, Masayuki; Shimizu, Shigetoshi; Trousset, Yves; Taki, Waro

    2005-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images most clearly visualize intracranial tissues but have some limitations in terms of detailed analysis of the intracisternal vasculature. To compensate for these shortcomings, an image fusion of three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and MR images, DSA-MR fusion, has been developed. The goal of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of DSA-MR fusion for the visualization of the intracisternal arteries and veins at the posterior fossa. Ten consecutive patients (five with neurovascular compression syndrome and five with brain tumors) underwent preoperative DSA-MR fusion. The DSA-MR fusion images were compared with intraoperative findings. Image fusion was performed within 20 minutes, and the registration error was insignificant in all cases. Image fusion successfully visualized the clear three-dimensional relationships among the intracisternal arteries and veins, cranial nerves, brain tissues, and a lesion, and a specific vessel was easily identified. The findings of the DSA-MR fusion images were surgically confirmed in all patients. Using this advanced image fusion technique coupled with its reasonable postprocessing time, neurosurgeons may more easily and precisely understand the surgical anatomy before surgery than analyzing three-dimensional DSA and MR images separately.

  5. Diagnosis and management of cranial and caudal nuchal bursitis in four horses.

    PubMed

    García-López, José M; Jenei, Thomas; Chope, Kate; Bubeck, Kirstin A

    2010-10-01

    4 horses with a history of neck pain, abnormal head carriage, and related inability to perform were examined. Cranial nuchal bursitis was diagnosed in 2 horses, and caudal nuchal bursitis was diagnosed in the other 2. All 4 horses had prominent swelling in the region between the frontal bone and temporal fossa (ie, the poll) and abnormal head carriage. Ultrasonographic examination revealed fluid distention and synovial thickening of the cranial or caudal nuchal bursa in all 4 horses. Ultrasonography-guided aspiration of the affected region was performed successfully in 3 horses. Radiography revealed bony remodeling and mineralization over the dorsal aspect of the atlas in 1 horse and a radiolucency at the axis in another. Nuclear scintigraphy revealed an increase in radioisotope uptake at the level of C2 in 1 horse. Although a septic process was considered among the differential diagnoses in all horses, a septic process could only be confirmed in 1 horse. All horses were refractory to conservative management consisting of intrabursal injection of anti-inflammatory medications. Bursoscopic debridement and lavage of the affected bursae resulted in resolution of the clinical signs in all horses, and they all returned to their intended use. Cranial and caudal nuchal bursitis, of nonseptic or septic origin, should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with head and neck pain. Horses undergoing surgical intervention consisting of nuchal bursoscopy have the opportunity to return to their original degree of exercise.

  6. Fretted Terrain Valley in Coloe Fossae Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Click on image for larger version

    The image in figure 1 shows lineated valley fill in one of a series of enclosed, intersecting troughs known as Coloe (Choloe) Fossae. Lineated valley fill consists of rows of material in valley centers that are parallel to the valley walls. It is probably made of ice-rich material and boulders that are left behind when the ice-rich material sublimates. Very distinct rows can be seen near the south (bottom) wall of the valley. Lineated valley fill is thought to result from mass wasting (downslope movement) of ice-rich material from valley walls towards their centers. It is commonly found in valleys near the crustal dichotomy that separates the two hemispheres of Mars. The valley shown here joins four other valleys with lineated fill near the top left corner of this image. Their juncture is a topographic low, suggesting that the lineated valley fill from the different valleys may be flowing or creeping towards the low area (movement towards the upper left of the image). The valley walls appear smooth at first glance but are seen to be speckled with small craters several meters in diameter at HiRISE resolution (see contrast-enhanced subimage). This indicates that at least some of the wall material has been stable to mass wasting for some period of time. Also seen on the valley wall are elongated features shaped like teardrops. These are most likely slightly older craters that have been degraded due to potentially recent downhill creep. It is unknown whether the valley walls are shedding material today. The subimage is approximately 140 x 400 m (450 x 1280 ft).

    Image PSP_001372_2160 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 11, 2006. The complete image is centered at 35.5 degrees latitude, 56.8 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 290.3 km (181

  7. Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma of the nasal fossa.

    PubMed

    González-Lagunas, Javier; Alasà-Caparrós, Cristian; Vendrell-Escofet, Gerard; Huguet-Redecilla, Pere; Raspall-Martin, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    An unusual case of a T4N2CMx polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma located in the nasal fossae and extending to the pterygoid area is presented. The primary tumor was excised through a Lefort I maxillotomy and the neck was managed with a supraomohyoid neck dissection. Adjuntive postoperative radiotherapy was also administered to the patient.

  8. Mandibular fossa morphology in the Ngandong and Sambungmacan fossil hominids.

    PubMed

    Durband, Arthur C

    2008-10-01

    There has been debate in recent years concerning the significance of the mandibular fossa morphology in the Ngandong and Sambungmacan hominids. These fossils lack a postglenoid process and their squamotympanic fissure runs along the apex of the fossa for its entire length. This configuration differs from that seen in other fossil and modern humans, which have a prominent postglenoid process and a squamotympanic fissure that takes a more posterior course that does not lie in the apex of the fossa. Some recent studies have suggested that the Ngandong and Sambungmacan hominids are not unique in their expression of these characteristics, and that they can also be found in other fossil crania from Africa and Indonesia. The present study reexamines these morphologies in an effort to better understand their distribution in the hominid fossil record. The results confirm that the lack of a prominent postglenoid process in combination with a squamotympanic fissure that lies wholly in the apex of the mandibular fossa along its entire length is indeed autapomorphic for the Ngandong and Sambungmacan fossils. This finding, in conjunction with work on other nonmetric features in these hominids, suggests that at least two hominid morphs, possibly representing separate species, were present on Java during the Pleistocene. In addition, if this apparent autapomorphy is confirmed, then it is also unlikely that the Ngandong hominids contributed to the gene pool of modern humans.

  9. Evaluation of lower cranial nerve deficits.

    PubMed

    Syms, M J; Singson, M T; Burgess, L P

    1997-10-01

    Patients with cranial base tumors often present with cranial neuropathies or develop cranial deficits as a consequence of skull base surgery. Deficits involving cranial nerves IX, X, XI, and XII can lead to significant morbidity for patients. A standard evaluation of a patient with a suspected skull base lesion or a postsurgical patient would consist of a complete history and physical examination, including a bedside examination and videofluoroscopy. Other modalities, including fiberoptic endoscopic examination of swallowing safety, ultrasound, and manofluorography, are used less frequently.

  10. Cranial kinesis in the amphibia: a review.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiĭ, N N

    2000-01-01

    All extant orders of amphibians are characterized by kinetic skulls. Main type of intracranial movability in amphibians is pleurokinetism, that is supplemented in different amphibian groups by various types of rhyncho- and prokinetism. The most primitive pattern of cranial kinesis is revealed in the stegocrotaphic gymnophions. More paedomorphic species retain general cranial flexibility that is characteristic of larval skull. That is unfavourable for evolution of well-regulated (adult) cranial kinesis and related feeding adaptations. Kinetism is also reduced in the species with heavily ossified skulls. Adaptive role and evolution of cranial kinesis in amphibians are discussed.

  11. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  12. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  13. Anatomical evidence for the absence of a morphologically distinct cranial root of the accessory nerve in man.

    PubMed

    Lachman, Nirusha; Acland, Robert D; Rosse, Cornelius

    2002-01-01

    The accessory nerve is conventionally described as having a cranial and spinal root. According to standard descriptions the cranial root (or part) is formed by rootlets that emerge from the medulla between the olive and the inferior cerebellar peduncle. These rootlets are considered to join the spinal root, travel with it briefly, then separate within the jugular foramen to become part of the vagus nerve. In 15 fresh specimens we exposed the posterior cranial fossa with a coronal cut through the foramen magnum and explored the course of each posterior medullary rootlet (PMR) arising from within the retro-olivary groove. We chose the caudal end of the olive as the landmark for the caudal end of the medulla. In all specimens every PMR that did not contribute to the glossopharyngeal nerve joined the vagus nerve at the jugular foramen. The distance between the caudal limit of the olive and the origin of the most caudal PMR that contributed to the vagus nerve ranged from 1-21 mm (mean = 8.8 mm). All rootlets that joined the accessory nerve arose caudal to the olive. The distance from the caudal limit of the olive and the most rostral accessory rootlet ranged from 1-15 mm (mean = 5.4 mm). We were unable to demonstrate any connection between the accessory and vagus nerves within the jugular foramen. Our findings indicate that the accessory nerve has no cranial root; it consists only of the structure hitherto referred to as its spinal root.

  14. White matter and information processing speed following treatment with cranial-spinal radiation for pediatric brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Scantlebury, Nadia; Bouffet, Eric; Laughlin, Suzanne; Strother, Douglas; McConnell, Dina; Hukin, Juliette; Fryer, Christopher; Laperriere, Normand; Montour-Proulx, Isabelle; Keene, Daniel; Fleming, Adam; Jabado, Nada; Liu, Fang; Riggs, Lily; Law, Nicole; Mabbott, Donald J

    2016-05-01

    We compared the structure of specific white matter tracts and information processing speed between children treated for posterior fossa tumors with cranial-spinal radiation (n = 30), or with surgery +/- focal radiation (n = 29), and healthy children (n = 37). Probabilistic diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography was used to delineate the inferior longitudinal fasciculi, optic radiation, inferior frontal occipital fasciculi, and uncinate fasciculi bilaterally. Information processing speed was measured using the coding and symbol search subtests of the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, and visual matching, pair cancellation, and rapid picture naming subtests of the Woodcock-Johnson Test of Cognitive Ability, 3rd revision. We examined group differences using repeated measures MANOVAs and path analyses were used to test the relations between treatment, white matter structure of the tracts, and information processing speed. DTI indices of the optic radiations, the inferior longitudinal fasciculi, and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi differed between children treated with cranial-spinal radiation and children treated with surgery +/- focal radiation, and healthy controls (p = .045). Children treated with cranial-spinal radiation also exhibited lower processing speed scores relative to healthy control subjects (p = .002). Notably, we observed that group differences in information processing speed were related to the structure of the right optic radiation (p = .002). We show that cranial-spinal radiation may have a negative impact on information processing speed via insult to the right optic radiations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Size variation in Middle Pleistocene humans.

    PubMed

    Arsuaga, J L; Carretero, J M; Lorenzo, C; Gracia, A; Martínez, I; Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Carbonell, E

    1997-08-22

    It has been suggested that European Middle Pleistocene humans, Neandertals, and prehistoric modern humans had a greater sexual dimorphism than modern humans. Analysis of body size variation and cranial capacity variation in the large sample from the Sima de los Huesos site in Spain showed instead that the sexual dimorphism is comparable in Middle Pleistocene and modern populations.

  16. [Cranial trepanation in primitive cultures].

    PubMed

    González-Darder, José Manuel

    A review is presented on cranial trepanations performed by primitive cultures. The scientific interest in this topic began after the discovery in 1965 by Ephraim G. Squier of a pre-Columbian trepanated skull, and studied by Paul Broca in Paris. Pseudotrepanation and other types of cranial manipulation are reviewed. The techniques, technology, and instruments for every type of trepanation are well known. There are a surprisingly high percentage of cases showing signs of post-trepanation survival. Indications for trepanation are speculative, perhaps magic. Although trepanation in primitive cultures is widespread around the world, and throughout time, the main fields of interest are the Neolithic Period in Europe, the pre-Columbian Period in Andean South America, and some contemporaneous Pacific and African tribes. This particular trepanation procedure has no relationship with modern Neurosurgery, or with trepanations with therapeutic purposes performed since the Greco-Roman period in Europe, and afterwards around the world. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomaterials for reconstruction of cranial defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of cranial defect is commonly performed in neurosurgical operations. Many materials have been employed for repairing cranial defects. In this paper, materials used for cranioplasty, including autografts, allografts, and synthetic biomaterials are comprehensively reviewed. This paper also gives future perspective of the materials and development trend of manufacturing process for cranioplasty implants.

  18. Issues in the Optimal Selection of a Cranial Nerve Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Samuel H.; Goldsmith, Daniel F.

    1993-01-01

    Intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) is a safe technique that is of clear clinical value in the preservation of cranial nerves in skull base surgery and is rapidly becoming the standard of care. Available nerve monitoring systems vary widely in capabilities and costs. A well-informed surgeon may best decide on monitoring needs based on surgical case selection, experience, operating room space, availability of monitoring personnel, and cost. Key system characteristics that should be reviewed in the decision-making process include the monitoring technique (electromyography, pressure transducer, direct nerve monitoring, brainstem auditory evoked potential) and the stimulus technique (stimulating parameters, probe selection). In the past, IONM has been primarily employed in posterior fossa and temporal bone surgery, but the value of IONM is being recognized in more skull base and head and neck surgeries. Suggested IONM strategies for specific surgeries are presented. PMID:17170916

  19. Cranial base evolution within the hominin clade

    PubMed Central

    Nevell, L; Wood, B

    2008-01-01

    The base of the cranium (i.e. the basioccipital, the sphenoid and the temporal bones) is of particular interest because it undergoes significant morphological change within the hominin clade, and because basicranial morphology features in several hominin species diagnoses. We use a parsimony analysis of published cranial and dental data to predict the cranial base morphology expected in the hypothetical last common ancestor of the Pan–Homo clade. We also predict the primitive condition of the cranial base for the hominin clade, and document the evolution of the cranial base within the major subclades within the hominin clade. This analysis suggests that cranial base morphology has continued to evolve in the hominin clade, both before and after the emergence of the genus Homo. PMID:18380865

  20. Anatomical study of the roots of cranial parasympathetic ganglia: a contribution to medical education.

    PubMed

    Lovasova, Kvetuse; Sulla, Igor J; Bolekova, Adriana; Sulla, Igor; Kluchova, Darina

    2013-05-01

    A major key to increasing the safety of cranial surgery is a thorough understanding of anatomy. The anatomy of the head is of fundamental interest to dental and medical students early in their studies. Clinically, it is mostly relevant to surgeons who are performing interventions and reconstruction in the maxillofacial region, skull base, and the orbit. However, the level of appropriate anatomical knowledge necessary for general and special medical and surgical practice is still under discussion. This study maps the significant areas and structures of the head that are not normally accessible during dissection courses because of time and difficulties involved in the preparation. The detailed photodocumentation enriched by diagrams provides a view of structures until now only partially documented. Three parasympathetic ganglia are located in hardly accessible areas of the head - inside the orbit, infratemporal fossa, and in the pterygopalatine fossa. No detailed photographs have been found in current anatomical textbooks and atlases in relation to the morphology of fibers (roots) connected to the ciliary, otic, and pterygopalatine ganglia. Therefore, this study focused on the detailed display of sensory, sympathetic, and parasympathetic roots of ganglia to provide relevant photodocumentation and an improvement in human anatomy teaching. This study also confirms that cadaver dissection provides an excellent opportunity for the integration of anatomy and clinical medicine into the early clinical training of undergraduate dental and medical students. We believe this article, because of the details mentioned above, will be beneficial not only for the future anatomical undergraduate but also for postgraduate education.

  1. Encephalomyelitis by Toxoplasma gondii in a captive fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox).

    PubMed

    Corpa, J M; García-Quirós, A; Casares, M; Gerique, A C; Carbonell, M D; Gómez-Muñoz, M T; Uzal, F A; Ortega, J

    2013-03-31

    Encephalomyelitis due to Toxoplasma gondii was diagnosed in a fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox). The animal had ataxia, atrophy of hind limb muscles and progressive wasting before dying 12 months after the onset of clinical signs. Toxoplasmosis was suspected antemortem based on clinical signs and the detection of T. gondii DNA by PCR on EDTA-blood from live animal. Necropsy revealed necrotizing gastritis and severe emaciation. The main histological lesions included non-suppurative encephalomyelitis, with dilation of myelin sheaths and swollen axons in the spinal cord, and multifocal gliosis in the brain with intralesional protozoan cysts that stained positive for T. gondii immunohistochemistry. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of toxoplasmosis in a fossa, and a new host record. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Actinomyces infection causing acute right iliac fossa pain

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajah, Narendranath; Hameed, Waseem; Middleton, Simon; Booth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This is a case of a 75-year-old man being admitted to the on-call surgical department with acute abdominal pain. On arrival he was clinically dehydrated and shocked with localised pain over McBurney's point and examination findings were suggestive of appendiceal or other colonic pathology. Full blood testing revealed a white cell count of 38×109/L and a C reactive protein (CRP) of 278 mg/L. A CT scan revealed a gallbladder empyema that extended into the right iliac fossa. This case highlights the potential for a hyperdistended gallbladder empyema to present as acute right iliac fossa pain with blood tests suggestive of complicated disease. Further analysis confirmed Actinomyces infection as the underlying aetiology prior to a laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy. This case serves to remind clinicians of this as a rare potential cause of atypical gallbladder pathology. PMID:24872493

  3. Endoscopic approach-routes in the posterior fossa cisterns through the retrosigmoid keyhole craniotomy: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Kurucz, Peter; Baksa, Gabor; Patonay, Lajos; Thaher, Firas; Buchfelder, Michael; Ganslandt, Oliver

    2016-11-10

    Endoscopy in cerebellopontine angle surgery is an increasingly used technique. Despite of its advantages, the shortcomings arising from the complex anatomy of the posterior fossa are still preventing its widespread use. To overcome these drawbacks, the goal of this study was to define the anatomy of different endoscopic approaches through the retrosigmoid craniotomy and their limitations by surgical windows. Anatomical dissections were performed on 25 fresh human cadavers to describe the main approach-routes. Surgical windows are spaces surrounded by neurovascular structures acting as a natural frame and providing access to deeper structures. The approach-routes are trajectories starting at the craniotomy and pointing to the lesion, passing through certain windows. Twelve different windows could be identified along four endoscopic approach-routes. The superior route provides access to the structures of the upper pons, lower mesencephalon, and the upper neurovascular complex through the suprameatal, superior cerebellar, and infratrigeminal windows. The supratentorial route leads to the basilar tip and some of the suprasellar structures via the ipsi- and contralateral oculomotor and dorsum sellae windows. The central endoscopic route provides access to the middle pons and the middle neurovascular complex through the inframeatal, AICA, and basilar windows. The inferior endoscopic route is the pathway to the medulla oblongata and the lower neurovascular complex through the accessory, hypoglossal, and foramen magnum windows. The anatomy and limitations of each surgical windows were described in detail. These informations are essential for safe application of endoscopy in posterior fossa surgery through the retrosigmoid approach.

  4. Surgical treatment of cranial neuralgias.

    PubMed

    Franzini, Angelo; Ferroli, Paolo; Messina, Giuseppe; Broggi, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The most common types of cranial neuralgias amenable to surgical therapeutic options are trigeminal neuralgia and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, the former having an approximate incidence of 5/100000 cases per year and the latter of 0.05/100000 cases per year. Surgical therapy of these pathological conditions encompasses several strategies, going from ablative procedures to neurovascular decompression, to radiosurgery. The choice of the most appropriate surgical option (which must be taken into account when all conservative treatments have proven to be unsuccessful) has to take into account many factors, the most important ones being neuroradiological evidence of a neurovascular conflict, severity of symptoms, the age and clinical history of the patient, and the patient's overall medical condition. In this chapter we report our experience with the treatment of trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, describing the surgical procedures performed and reviewing the most recent aspects on this subject in the past literature.

  5. Extradural Dermoid Cyst of the Anterior Infratemporal Fossa. Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Filomena, Carol A.; Nonaka, Yoichi; Matsuda, Masahide; Zomorodi, Ali R.; Friedman, Allan H.; Fukushima, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare in the skull base. There have been 10 reported cases of dermoid cysts in the cavernous sinus, two in the petrous apex, and one in the extradural Meckel cave. This is the first case report of a dermoid cyst in the anterior infratemporal fossa attached to the anterior dura of the foramen ovale. The clinical presentation, radiologic findings, histologic features, tumor origin, and operative technique are described along with a review of the literature. PMID:26623226

  6. Extradural Dermoid Cyst of the Anterior Infratemporal Fossa. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Filomena, Carol A; Nonaka, Yoichi; Matsuda, Masahide; Zomorodi, Ali R; Friedman, Allan H; Fukushima, Takanori

    2015-11-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare in the skull base. There have been 10 reported cases of dermoid cysts in the cavernous sinus, two in the petrous apex, and one in the extradural Meckel cave. This is the first case report of a dermoid cyst in the anterior infratemporal fossa attached to the anterior dura of the foramen ovale. The clinical presentation, radiologic findings, histologic features, tumor origin, and operative technique are described along with a review of the literature.

  7. Assessing Age-Related Ossification of the Petro-Occipital Fissure: Laying the Foundation for Understanding the Clinicopathologies of the Cranial Base

    PubMed Central

    BALBONI, ARMAND L.; ESTENSON, THOMAS L.; REIDENBERG, JOY S.; BERGEMANN, ANDREW D.; LAITMAN, JEFFREY T.

    2005-01-01

    The petro-occitpital fissure (POF) lies within a critical interface of cranial growth and development in the posterior cranial fossa. The relationships between skeletal and soft tissues make this region especially important for examining biomechanical and basic biologic forces that may mold the cranial base and contribute to significant clinicopathologies associated with the structures located near the POF. Therefore, this study investigates the POF in adults in both preserved human cadavers and dried crania in order to determine if developmental changes can be observed and, if so, their value in age assessment as a model system for describing normal morphogenesis of the POF. This study demonstrates that tissue within the POF undergoes characteristic changes in ossification with age, the onset of which is considerably later than that of other synchondroses of the cranial base. Statistically, there is a moderate to strong correlation between age and stage of ossification within the POF. Further, male crania were observed to reach greater degrees of ossification at a younger age than female crania and that individual asymmetry in ossification of the tissue within the POF was not uncommon. An understanding of the basic temporal biological processes of the POF may yield insight into the development of clinicopathologies in this region of the cranial base. PMID:15584035

  8. Topographical anatomy of superficial veins, cutaneous nerves, and arteries at venipuncture sites in the cubital fossa.

    PubMed

    Mikuni, Yuko; Chiba, Shoji; Tonosaki, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated correlations among the superficial veins, cutaneous nerves, arteries, and venous valves in 128 cadaveric arms in order to choose safe venipuncture sites in the cubital fossa. The running patterns of the superficial veins were classified into four types (I-IV) and two subtypes (a and b). In types I and II, the median cubital vein (MCV) was connected obliquely between the cephalic and basilic veins in an N-shape, while the median antebrachial vein (MAV) opened into the MCV in type I and into the basilic vein in type II. In type III, the MCV did not exist. In type IV, additional superficial veins above the cephalic and basilic veins were developed around the cubital fossa. In types Ib-IVb, the accessory cephalic vein was developed under the same conditions as seen in types Ia-IVa, respectively. The lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm descended deeply along the cephalic vein in 124 cases (97 %), while the medial cutaneous nerve of the forearm descended superficially along the basilic vein in 94 (73 %). A superficial brachial artery was found in 27 cases (21 %) and passed deeply under the ulnar side of the MCV. A median superficial antebrachial artery was found in 1 case (1 %), which passed deeply under the ulnar side of the MCV and ran along the MAV. Venous valves were found at 239 points in 28 cases with superficial veins, with a single valve seen at 79 points (33 %) and double valves at 160 points (67 %). At the time of intravenous injection, caution is needed regarding the locations of cutaneous nerves, brachial and superficial brachial arteries, and venous valves. The area ranging from the middle segment of the MCV to the confluence between the MCV and cephalic vein appears to be a relatively safe venipuncture site.

  9. Three-dimensional assessment of mandibular and glenoid fossa changes after bone-anchored Class III intermaxillary traction

    PubMed Central

    De Clerck, Hugo; Nguyen, Tung; de Paula, Leonardo Koerich; Cevidanes, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Conventional treatment for young Class III patients involves extraoral devices designed to either protract the maxilla or restrain mandibular growth. The use of skeletal anchorage offers a promising alternative to obtain orthopedic results with fewer dental compensations. Our aim was to evaluate 3-dimensional changes in the mandibles and the glenoid fossae of Class III patients treated with bone-anchored maxillary protraction. Methods Twenty-five consecutive skeletal Class III patients between the ages of 9 and 13 years (mean age, 11.10 ± 1.1 year) were treated with Class III intermaxillary elastics and bilateral miniplates (2 in the infrazygomatic crests of the maxilla and 2 in the anterior mandible). The patients had cone-beam computed tomography images taken before initial loading and at the end of active treatment. Three-dimensional models were generated from these images, registered on the anterior cranial base, and analyzed by using color maps. Results Posterior displacement of the mandible at the end of treatment was observed in all subjects (posterior ramus: mean, 2.74 ± 1.36 mm; condyles: mean, 2.07 ± 1.16 mm; chin: mean, −0.13 ± 2.89 mm). Remodeling of the glenoid fossa at the anterior eminence (mean, 1.38 ± 1.03 mm) and bone resorption at the posterior wall (mean, −1.34 ± 0.6 mm) were observed in most patients. Conclusions This new treatment approach offers a promising alternative to restrain mandibular growth for Class III patients with a component of mandibular prognathism or to compensate for maxillary deficiency in patients with hypoplasia of the midface. Future studies with long-term follow-up and comparisons with facemask and chincup therapies are needed to better understand the treatment effects. PMID:22748987

  10. Geology of the Bellona Fossae (V15) Region of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.

    2002-05-01

    A preliminary geologic map of the the Bellona Fossae (V15) quadrangle on Venus was produced as part of the NASA-funded planetary mapping program. Geologic interpretations are based primarily on the basis of morphology, texture, radar reflectance, and relative stratigraphy derived from Magellan Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, based on FMAP mosaics showing SAR data at 75 m/pixel resolution, and compiled on a digital base map at 1:5M scale produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. This quadrangle covers approximately 5 million square kilometers of the northern lowlands of Venus, and it includes the Bellona Fossae and Fee Fossae fracture systems of western Kawelu Planitia and northern Ulfrun Regio, along with an arcuate chain of volcano-tectonic centers called coronae (e.g., Ki and Tituba Coronae). Exposed materials are dominated by relatively featureless regional plains and several centers of lobate plains (e.g., Uzume Fluctus) interpreted to be lava flow fields emplaced by effusion from separate vents. Based on stratigraphic relationships at unit contacts, the oldest exposed material units are isolated patches of complex-faulted tessera terrain, restricted to the eastern and southwestern margins of the quadrangle. Relatively small exposures of lineated plains, mountain belt, ridged plains, and dark plains materials are scattered throughout the quadrangle, with only a few impact craters and their associated ejecta and impact-induced flows (e.g., Mumtaz-Mahal crater) representing the latest materials. The tectonism associated with the coronae appears to predate the regional plains for the most part, but individual coronae are the source for lobate plains volcanism which implies that activity at these structural features encompasses much of the time span portrayed in the regional stratigraphy. Northeast-southwest-oriented lineaments exposed in Bellona Fossae not only are generally coincident with the coronae structures, but also cut patches of the stratigraphically

  11. Acoustic Schwannoma Presenting as Acute Posterior Fossa Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghobashy, Ashraf; Loveren, Harry van

    1993-01-01

    Acoustic schwannomas usually present with gradually progressive unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. As the tumor enlarges, symptoms and signs develop when the adjacent cranial nerves, cerebelhim, and/or brainstem become compressed. Rarely, acoustic tumors present with acute subarachnoid or intratumoral hemorrhage. Of the 12 cases of acoustic schwannoma with tumoral hemorrhage presented in the literature of which we are aware, this is the third such case of a patient presenting with spontaneous pure intratumoral hemorrhage and the first such case presenting with sudden multiple cranial nerve palsies, The purpose of this report is to increase the awareness of this rare form of presentation of acoustic schwannoma in the hope of achieving better preservation of cranial nerves. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17170903

  12. Endoscopic transsphenoidal anterior petrosal approach for locally aggressive tumors involving the internal auditory canal, jugular fossa, and cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Masahiro; Kondo, Kenji; Hanakita, Shunya; Hasegawa, Hirotaka; Yoshino, Masanori; Teranishi, Yu; Kin, Taichi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2017-01-01

    exhibited hearing deterioration, facial palsy, or symptoms of lower cranial nerve palsy after surgery. CONCLUSIONS The ETAP approach can offer a simple, less invasive option for invasive skull base tumors involving petrous regions, including the internal auditory canal, jugular fossa, and cavernous sinus. The ETAP approach can reach more extensive areas in the extradural regions around the petrous bone. The authors' results indicate that the transsphenoidal retrocarotid route is sufficient to approach the petrosal areas in select cases. Further expansion of the surgical field is not always necessary. However, experience with intradural lesions remains limited, and the extent of tumor resection largely depends on tumor characteristics. Application of the ETAP approach should thus be carefully determined in each patient, taking into consideration the size of the retrocarotid window and tumor characteristics.

  13. Application of fossa bone graft to stabilize stock total joint prosthesis in temporomandibular joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Bai, Guo; Yang, Chi; He, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiaohu; Abdelrehem, Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    To describe a new glenoid fossa bone graft technique, and to evaluate its effect on the stability of stock fossa prosthesis implantation in total alloplastic joint replacement surgery. Eight patients who underwent total joint replacement surgery with a Biomet stock prosthesis (Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA) from November 2013 to April 2014 were included in this study. ProPlan CMF 1.4 software (Materialise NV, Leuven, Belgium) was used to choose the prosthesis size and place it in the right position. The depth of the fossa was measured, and the osteotomy line was designed to cut the bone which overlapped the fossa prosthesis. A bone graft, taken from the bottom of the articular eminence or the condylar neck, was used to fill in the fossa and make a flat plane in combination with the residual eminence for the positioning of the fossa prosthesis. The stability of the fossa prosthesis was evaluated both intra-operatively and postoperatively with computed tomography (CT) scanning after at least 6 months of follow-up. The bone contact area of the fossa prosthesis and the volume of the grafted bone were measured. Fossa prostheses were intra-operatively stable after bone grafting. All patients had stable occlusion after surgery and at follow-up. Postoperative measurement showed that the bone contact area with the fossa prosthesis increased from 52.8% to 88.5% after bone grafting. Postoperative CT measurements (at an average of 9 months after surgery) showed that the bone graft volume decreased by 11.1%. Bone grafts in the glenoid fossa help to improve the stability of Biomet stock fossa prosthesis implantation. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-06-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence.

  15. Imaging of Cranial Nerves III, IV, VI in Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Jeong Min

    2017-06-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders are a group of diseases caused by abnormal development of cranial nerve nuclei or their axonal connections, resulting in aberrant innervation of the ocular and facial musculature. Its diagnosis could be facilitated by the development of high resolution thin-section magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this review is to describe the method to visualize cranial nerves III, IV, and VI and to present the imaging findings of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders including congenital oculomotor nerve palsy, congenital trochlear nerve palsy, Duane retraction syndrome, Möbius syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, synergistic divergence, and synergistic convergence. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society.

  16. Cranial trepanation in The Egyptian.

    PubMed

    Collado-Vázquez, S; Carrillo, J M

    2014-09-01

    Medicine and literature have been linked from ancient times; proof of this shown by the many doctors who have made contributions to literature and the many writers who have described medical activities and illnesses in their works. An example is The Egyptian, the book by Mika Waltari that provides a masterly narration of the protagonist's medical activity and describes the trepanation technique. The present work begins with the analysis of trepanations since prehistory and illustrates the practice of the trepanation in The Egyptian. The book mentions trepanation frequently and illustrates how to practice it and which instruments are required to perform it. Trepanation is one of the oldest surgical interventions carried out as treatment for cranial trauma and neurological diseases, but it also had the magical and religious purpose of expelling the evil spirits which caused the mental illness, epilepsy, or migraine symptoms. Trepanation is a surgical practice that has been carried out since prehistory to treat post-traumatic epilepsy, migraine, and psychiatric illness. The Egyptian is a book that illustrates the trepan, the trepanation technique, and the required set of instruments in full detail. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils.

  18. Cranial kinesis in gekkonid lizards

    PubMed

    Herrel; De Vree F; Delheusy; Gans

    1999-12-01

    Cranial kinesis was studied in two species of gekkonid lizard, Gekko gecko and Phelsuma madagascariensis, using cineradiography and electromyography. The skull of these geckoes showed the three types of kinesis described by Versluys at the beginning of this century: streptostyly, mesokinesis and metakinesis. In accordance with the later model of Frazzetta, the skull of these animals can be modelled by a quadratic crank system: when the mouth opens during feeding, the quadrate rotates forward, the palato-maxillary unit is lifted and the occipital unit swings forward. During jaw closing, the inverse movements are observed; during crushing, the system is retracted beyond its resting position. The data gathered here indicate that the coupled kinesis (streptostyly + mesokinesis) is most prominently present during the capture and crushing cycles of feeding and is largely absent during late intraoral transport, swallowing, drinking and breathing. The electromyographic data indicate a consistent pattern of muscular activation, with the jaw opener and pterygoid protractor always active during the fast opening phase, and the jaw closers active during closing and crushing. Our data generally support the model of Frazzetta. Although the data gathered here do not allow speculation on the functional significance of the kinesis, they clearly provide some key elements required for a further investigation of the functional and adaptive basis of the system.

  19. Hydroxyapatite bone cement application for the reconstruction of retrosigmoid craniectomy in the treatment of cranial nerves disorders.

    PubMed

    Aldahak, Nouman; Dupre, Derrick; Ragaee, Mohamed; Froelich, Sebastien; Wilberger, Jack; Aziz, Khaled M

    2017-01-01

    Retromastoid craniectomy (RSC) is a cardinal surgical approach used to access the posterior fossa. Hydroxyapetite bone cement (HBC) is frequently employed for cranioplasty in efforts to prevent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, whilst maintaining low complication rates and good cosmetic satisfaction. The authors aim to determine the safety and effectiveness of HBC for reconstruction RSC used for treatment of various cranial nerves disorders. The authors conducted a retrospective one-center two surgeons review of 113 patients who underwent RSC filled with HBC for the treatment of cranial nerve disorders. The study period extended from January 2011 through April 2016. Charts were reviewed for documentation of descriptors pertinent to the endpoints described above. Revisions and reoperations were excluded from analysis. Ninety-three patients met the inclusion criteria; there was one case of postoperative pseudomeningocele, which was considered as CSF leak (1%), 3 (3,2%) superficial infections, and no deep infections. Cosmetic satisfaction was obtained in all but one case (98.9% satisfaction) and long-term incisional pain was problematic in 1 (1.1%) patient. Other complications (serous drainage, headache, ear pain) accounted for three cases (3.2%). The application of HBC in the reconstruction of RSC for the treatment of cranial nerves disorders is an effective method, yielding good cosmetic results whilst eliminating CSF leak. Additionally, it is safe due to the lack of deep-seated wound infections with low incidence of chronic incisional pain.

  20. Posterior fossa ruptured dermoid cyst presenting with hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Wani, Abrar A; Raswan, Uday S; Malik, Nayil K; Ramzan, Altaf U

    2016-10-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare, benign lesions of embryological origin that represent 0.1-0.7% of all intracranial tumors. They are mainly located in the supra tentorial space, especially in the parasellar region. Their location in the posterior fossa remains uncommon. Rupture of intracranial dermoid cysts is a rare phenomenon. We present a case of dermoid cyst, which had ruptured into ventricular system. Computed Tomography and MRI revealed fat in the fourth ventricle, prepontine cistern, and cerebellomedullary cistern. Hydrocephalus was noted. We performed right ventriculo-peritoneal shunt on which patient improved and he continues to remain asymptomatic one year after.

  1. Hesperian age for western Medusae Fossae Formation, Mars.

    PubMed

    Zimbelman, James R; Scheidt, Stephen P

    2012-06-29

    The Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) on Mars is an intensely eroded deposit north of the cratered highlands. It is widely thought that MFF materials were emplaced through ignimbrite eruptions. Recent geologic mapping of western MFF identified outliers of MFF materials well beyond the previously mapped western extent for the deposit, including outliers close to Gale crater. We report counts of impact craters on the MFF units that have implications for our understanding of the general history of MFF and the uppermost layered materials on the Gale crater mound.

  2. Posterior fossa ruptured dermoid cyst presenting with hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    A. Wani, Abrar; Raswan, Uday S.; Malik, Nayil K.; Ramzan, Altaf U.

    2016-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare, benign lesions of embryological origin that represent 0.1-0.7% of all intracranial tumors. They are mainly located in the supra tentorial space, especially in the parasellar region. Their location in the posterior fossa remains uncommon. Rupture of intracranial dermoid cysts is a rare phenomenon. We present a case of dermoid cyst, which had ruptured into ventricular system. Computed Tomography and MRI revealed fat in the fourth ventricle, prepontine cistern, and cerebellomedullary cistern. Hydrocephalus was noted. We performed right ventriculo-peritoneal shunt on which patient improved and he continues to remain asymptomatic one year after. PMID:27744466

  3. Giant-cell arteritis without cranial manifestations

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Lambert, Marc; Liozon, Eric; Boutemy, Jonathan; Maigné, Gwénola; Ollivier, Yann; Ly, Kim; Manrique, Alain; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is challenging in the absence of cardinal cranial symptoms/signs. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic process, and disease course of GCA patients without cranial symptoms, and to compare them to those of patients with typical cranial presentation. In this retrospective multicenter study, we enrolled patients with GCA who satisfied at least 3 of the 5 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with contributory vascular biopsy other than temporal artery biopsy or with demonstration of large-vessel involvement; underwent iconographic evaluation of large arterial vessels (aortic CT scan or a positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan or cardiac echography combined with a large-vessel Doppler) at diagnosis. We divided the cohort into 2 groups, distinguishing between patients without cranial symptoms/signs (i.e., headaches, clinical temporal artery anomaly, jaw claudication, ophthalmologic symptoms) and those with cranial symptoms/signs. In the entire cohort of 143 patients, all of whom underwent vascular biopsy and vascular imaging, we detected 31 (22%) patients with no cranial symptoms/signs. In the latter, diagnosis was biopsy proven in an arterial sample in 23 cases (74% of patients, on a temporal site in 20 cases and on an extratemporal site in 3). One-third of these 31 patients displayed extracranial symptoms/signs whereas the remaining two-thirds presented only with constitutional symptoms and/or inflammatory laboratory test results. Compared to the 112 patients with cardinal cranial clinical symptoms/signs, patients without cranial manifestations displayed lower levels of inflammatory laboratory parameters (C-reactive level: 68 [9–250] mg/L vs 120 [3–120] mg/L; P < 0.01), highest rate of aorta and aortic branch involvement identified (19/31 (61%) vs 42/112 (38%); P = 0.02) and also

  4. CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalovidouris, A.; Mancuso, A.A.; Dillon, W.

    1984-06-01

    Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented.

  5. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Gilula, Marshall F

    2007-07-01

    Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) is a well-documented neuroelectrical modality that has been proven effective in some good studies of fibromyalgia (FM) patients. CES is no panacea but, for some FM patients, the modality can be valuable. This article discusses aspects of both CES and FM and how they relate to the individual with the condition. FM frequently has many comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, insomnia and a great variety of different rheumatologic and neurological symptoms that often resemble multiple sclerosis, dysautonomias, chronic fatigue syndrome and others. However, despite long-standing criteria from the American College of Rheumatology for FM, some physicians believe there is probably no single homogeneous condition that can be labeled as FM. Whether it is a disease, a syndrome or something else, sufferers feel like they are living one disaster after another. Active self-involvement in care usually enhances the therapeutic results of various treatments and also improves the patient's sense of being in control of the condition. D-ribose supplementation may prove to significantly enhance energy, sleep, mental clarity, pain control and well-being in FM patients. A form of evoked potential biofeedback, the EPFX, is a powerful stress reduction technique which assesses the chief stressors and risk factors for illness that can impede the FM patient's built-in healing abilities. Future healthcare will likely expand the diagnostic criteria of FM and/or illuminate a group of related conditions and the ways in which the conditions relate to each other. Future medicine for FM and related conditions may increasingly involve multimodality treatment that features CES as one significant part of the therapeutic regimen. Future medicine may also include CES as an invaluable, cost-effective add-on to many facets of clinical pharmacology and medical therapeutics.

  6. Concurrent cranial mediastinal Blastomyces granuloma and carcinoma with cranial vena caval syndrome in a dog.

    PubMed

    Evans, Natashia A; Viviano, Katrina R

    2015-11-01

    This report describes an unusual progression of blastomycosis in a dog with concurrent mediastinal carcinoma. The dog was evaluated for respiratory distress. Diagnostic results revealed chylothorax and a cranial vena caval thrombus. Histopathology of the cranial mediastinal mass diagnosed mediastinal carcinoma and fungal granuloma. Intercurrent disease may complicate the clinical presentation and clinical course of blastomycosis.

  7. Malignant schwannoma of the infratemporal fossa: a case report.

    PubMed

    Touati, Mohamed Mliha; Darouassi, Youssef; Chihani, Mehdi; Al Jalil, Abdelfettah; Tourabi, Khalid; Lakouichmi, Mohamed; Essadi, Ismail; Bouaity, Brahim; Ammar, Haddou

    2015-07-04

    Malignant schwannomas or neurofibrosarcomas are rare nerve tumors of unknown etiology. These neoplasms are highly aggressive with a marked propensity for local recurrence and metastatic spread. Their management continues to be a challenge for pathologists and surgeons. Maxillofacial locations are very exceptional. We report the case of a patient with unusual malignant schwannoma of the infratemporal fossa discovered at a late evolving stage. A 56-year-old woman, of Moroccan nationality, presented to our hospital in 2013 with a large right-sided hemifacial swelling that had evolved over the previous 4 months, with a limitation of mouth opening, nasal obstruction and episodes of epistaxis. A CT scan and MRI showed a large and invasive tumor occupying her right infratemporal fossa and maxillary sinus, with sphenoidal, ethmoidonasal, nasopharyngeal and intraorbital extension. A nasal endoscopic biopsy was performed. Immunohistochemical examination concluded a diagnosis of malignant schwannoma, and a palliative radiotherapy was decided; however, our patient died 10 days later. Malignant schwannoma of paranasal sinuses and the anterior skull base is a rare tumor that involves a high rate of local invasion. The prognosis is poorer compared to that occurring in the trunk and extremities.

  8. Posterior Fossa Neurenteric Cysts Can Expand Rapidly: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Priamo, Francesco A.I.; Jimenez, Elpidio D.; Benardete, Ethan A.

    2011-01-01

    Neurenteric cysts are considered congenital lesions that may slowly expand over time. Although more commonly found in the spinal canal, they may be found intracranially, particularly in the posterior fossa. Here, we present an unusual case of a large, rapidly expanding histologically confirmed posterior fossa neurenteric cyst in a 53-year-old woman, who presented with quadriparesis. Computed tomography imaging done ~1.5 years before admission failed to demonstrate any obvious abnormality; however, the lesion had grown to 4 cm in maximal dimension at presentation with significant mass effect. The lesion was resected microsurgically using a retrosigmoid approach. The patient improved postoperatively and was neurologically intact at last follow-up. We could find no other documented case of marked, rapid expansion of a neurenteric cyst in the literature. We conclude that, although neurenteric cysts are thought to be congenital, they can undergo rapid expansion even in adults. The mechanism of expansion is unknown but may involve increased secretion, hemorrhage, or inflammation. We discuss the surgical management and review the literature in view of this surprising finding. PMID:23984213

  9. Incidence of Clavicular Rhomboid Fossa in Northeastern Thais: An Anthropological Study

    PubMed Central

    Sampannang, Apichakan; Tuamsuk, Panya; Kanpittaya, Jaturat

    2016-01-01

    The rhomboid fossa of clavicle is used to determine the age and sex in anthropology and forensic sciences. The variant types of rhomboid fossa on inferior surface have been reported in many races except in Thais. This study therefore was aimed at classifying the types of the rhomboid fossa in Northeastern Thais. The identified 476 Northeastern Thais dried clavicles (270 males and 206 females) were observed and recorded for the types of rhomboid fossa. The results showed that Thai-rhomboid fossa could be classified into 4 types: Type 1: smooth; Type 2: flat; Type 3: elevated; and Type 4: depressed, respectively. The incidences of rhomboid fossa were as follows: Type 1: 0.21%; Type 2: 19.75%; Type 3: 76.26%; and Type 4: 3.78%, respectively. Additionally, it was found that the percentage of Type 4 (11.84%) was much greater than that of female (1.94%) compared to other types. This incidence of rhomboid fossa types especially Type 4 may be a basic knowledge to be used in sex identification. The high incidence of rhomboid fossa in both sexes of Northeastern Thai clavicles was Type 3 (elevated type). PMID:27648305

  10. Reconciling the convergence of supraspinous fossa shape among hominoids in light of locomotor differences.

    PubMed

    Green, David J; Sugiura, Yui; Seitelman, Brielle C; Gunz, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    Differences in scapular morphology between modern humans and the African and lesser apes are associated with the distinct locomotor habits of these groups. However, several traits, particularly aspects of the supraspinous fossa, are convergent between Homo and Pongo-an unexpected result given their divergent locomotor habits. Many morphological assessments of the scapula rely on the limited number of static landmarks available, and traditional approaches like these tend to oversimplify scapular shape. Here, we present the results of two geometric morphometric (GM) analyses of hominoid supraspinous fossa shape-one employing five homologous landmarks and another with 83 sliding semilandmarks-alongside those of traditional methods to evaluate if three-dimensional considerations of fossa shape afford more comprehensive insights into scapular shape and functional morphology. Traditional measures aligned Pongo and Homo with narrow and transversely oriented supraspinous fossae, whereas African ape and Hylobates fossae are broader and more obliquely situated. However, our GM results highlight that much of the convergence between Homo and Pongo is reflective of their more medially positioned superior angles. These approaches offered a more complete assessment of supraspinous shape and revealed that the Homo fossa, with an intermediate superior angle position and moderate superoinferior expansion, is actually reminiscent of the African ape shape. Additionally, both Pongo and Hylobates were shown to have more compressed fossae, something that has not previously been identified through traditional analyses. Thus, the total morphological pattern of the Pongo supraspinous fossa is unique among hominoids, and possibly indicative of its distinctive locomotor habits.

  11. Piriform and trochanteric fossae. A drawing mismatch or a terminology error? A review.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Stamatios A; Shepherd, Lane; Babourda, Eleni C; Papadakis, Stefanos

    2005-08-01

    The current literature indicates that the standard starting point for intramedullary nailing is the piriform fossa. The accuracy of the entry point for anterograde femoral intramedullary nailing between published texts and relevant illustrations was recorded. The piriform fossa is the site of insertion of the piriform tendon and represents a small, shallow depression located on the tip of the greater trochanter. The trochanteric fossa is a deep depression on the inner surface of the greater trochanter, and in the vast majority of the published data is indicated incorrectly as "piriform fossa". As a result of either a recurrent drawing mismatch or a terminology error, the correct entry point for anterograde femoral intramedullary nailing is confusing and should be indicated in the current literature. The trochanteric fossa appears to be the standard entry point that most surgeons recommend.

  12. Posterior fossa decompression and the cerebellum in Chiari type II malformation: a preliminary MRI study.

    PubMed

    Salman, Michael S

    2011-03-01

    Chiari type II malformation (CII) is a congenital deformity of the hindbrain. The posterior fossa and cerebellum are small in CII. The cerebellar atrophy is associated with cognitive and motor deficits. Brainstem compression occurs in some patients with CII for whom posterior fossa decompression may be life saving. The aim was to determine whether posterior fossa decompression can prevent or reduce the cerebellar atrophy in CII. Cerebellar volumes and their tissue types (gray matter, white matter, and CSF volumes) from brain MRI were compared among four CII patients, aged 9.5 to 16.5 years, who had had posterior fossa decompression in infancy, 28 CII patients who had not had posterior fossa decompression, and ten age-matched normal controls. Parametric and non-parametric tests investigated group differences. Compared to controls, mean cerebellar volume was significantly smaller in CII patients (p<0.0001). Mean CSF volume within the cerebellar fissures and fourth ventricle was significantly smaller in patients without posterior fossa decompression compared to the CII patients who had the decompression, p=0.043. Mean CSF volume of the latter group was similar to the controls. Other cerebellar volumetric measurements did not differ between the CII groups. Posterior fossa decompression normalizes CSF spaces within the posterior fossa in CII but does not prevent the cerebellar atrophy. The author proposes that surgical expansion of the posterior fossa should be considered in infants with CII who have a significantly small posterior fossa, to prevent or reduce the deficits associated with the cerebellar atrophy. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  13. Pediatric neuroradiology: Cerebral and cranial diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Diebler, C.; Dulac, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, a neuroradiologist and a neuropediatrician have combined forces to provide the widest possible knowledge in investigating cranial and cerebral disorders in infancy and childhood. Based on more than 20,000 pediatric CT examinations, with a follow-up time often exceeding ten years, the book aims to bridge interdisciplinary gaps and help radiologists, pediatricians and neurosurgeons solve the various problems of pediatric neuroradiology that frequently confront them. For each disease, the etiology, clinical manifestation, pathological lesions and radiological presentations are discussed, supported by extensive illustrations. Malformative, vascular, traumatic, tumoral, infectious and metabolic diseases are reviewed. Miscellaneous conditions presenting particular symptoms or syndromes are also studied, such as hydrocephalus and neurological complications of leukemia. Contents: Cerebral and cranial malformations; neurocutaneous syndromes; inherited metabolic diseases; infectious diseases - vascular disorders; intracranial tumors; cranial trauma - miscellaneous and subject index.

  14. The cranial endoskeleton of Tiktaalik roseae.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jason P; Daeschler, Edward B; Jenkins, Farish A; Shubin, Neil H

    2008-10-16

    Among the morphological changes that occurred during the 'fish-to-tetrapod' transition was a marked reorganization of the cranial endoskeleton. Details of this transition, including the sequence of character acquisition, have not been evident from the fossil record. Here we describe the braincase, palatoquadrate and branchial skeleton of Tiktaalik roseae, the Late Devonian sarcopterygian fish most closely related to tetrapods. Although retaining a primitive configuration in many respects, the cranial endoskeleton of T. roseae shares derived features with tetrapods such as a large basal articulation and a flat, horizontally oriented entopterygoid. Other features in T. roseae, like the short, straight hyomandibula, show morphology intermediate between the condition observed in more primitive fish and that observed in tetrapods. The combination of characters in T. roseae helps to resolve the relative timing of modifications in the cranial endoskeleton. The sequence of modifications suggests changes in head mobility and intracranial kinesis that have ramifications for the origin of vertebrate terrestriality.

  15. Geology of Hebrus Valles and Hephaestus Fossae, Mars: evidence for basement control of fluvial patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Hebrus Valles (HV) and Hephaestus Fossae (HF) are valley systems located SW of Elysium Mons in the low northern plains of Mars. HV share many of their characteristics with other martian outflow channels--widely interpreted as having formed by catastrophic flooding. The NW-trending HV system is 250 km long and begins in an elongate depression. Individual channels are less than 1 km wide; a braided reach is about 10 km wide. Streamlined islands are abundant in the middle reach. HV terminate as a series of narrow distributaries. No sedimentary deposits are obviously related to the development of the channel. HV cut across a broad expanse of older plains dotted by irregular mesas and smaller knobs. HF are a connected series of linear valley segments which branch and cross downslope but have high junction angles. Locally, the channel pattern is polygonal. HF are parallel to HV but are considerably deeper and longer (600 km). HF also originate in a depression, but to the NW they terminate near the gradational boundary between the knobby plains and polygonally fractured terrain of Utopia Planitia. The valley pattern has led some to suggest that HF are tectonic features. It is suggested that like HV, HF are also of fluvial origin. Downcutting to, or subsurface flow at this pre-existing surface red to a channel pattern that was strongly controlled by the polygonal troughs buried beneath the younger knobby plains materials.

  16. The cranial nerve skywalk: A 3D tutorial of cranial nerves in a virtual platform.

    PubMed

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways is difficult using two-dimensional (2D) illustrations alone. Three-dimensional (3D) models aid the teacher in describing intricate and complex anatomical structures and help students visualize them. The study of the cranial nerves can be supplemented with 3D, which permits the students to fully visualize their distribution within the craniofacial complex. This article describes the construction and usage of a virtual anatomy platform in Second Life™, which contains 3D models of the cranial nerves III, V, VII, and IX. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk features select cranial nerves and the associated autonomic pathways in an immersive online environment. This teaching supplement was introduced to groups of pre-healthcare professional students in gross anatomy courses at both institutions and student feedback is included. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  17. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlke, Julia M.; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  18. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution.

    PubMed

    Fahlke, Julia M; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  19. Restoration of large cranial defect for cranioplasty with alloplastic cranial implant material: a case report.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shelly; Goyal, Mukesh Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Cranial defects result either from trauma or after intentional osteocraniotomies or external decompression craniectomies. These defects occur most frequently during wartime, but their incidence during peacetime, as a result of accident or disease, makes knowledge of cranioplasty useful to the interested practitioner. Most cranial defects will have some variable proportion of cosmetic and mechanical aspects, and the decision regarding cranioplasty must be influenced by the patient's age, prognosis, activity level and the specific conditions of the scalp and calvarium. This case report is oriented towards post-traumatic restoration of large cranial defect with alloplastic heat-cure poly methyl methacrylate resin material.

  20. Aseptic meningitis and hydrocephalus after posterior fossa surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, H H; Carmel, P W

    1978-01-01

    In an attempt to define the tissue of origin of substances causing aseptic meningitis and secondary hydrocephalus after posterior fossa surgery, analysis of several marker substances from blood, brain, tumour and muscle in the CSF was performed early in seven postoperative patients. No clear pattern emerged which could relate the substances, CSF reaction, and meningeal scarring. The effects of various factors such as contrast studies, drainage, and steroids were also not clear. Review of the literature reveals that all four tissues can cause inflammation. Certain facts about the anatomy of the basilar cisterns and arachnoid villi probably make them logical sites for problems in CFS circulation. Children, for several reasons, are most susceptible to this complication. The complexity of factors in human cases suggests that the problem should be studied in an animal model.

  1. The Comprehensive AOCMF Classification: Skull Base and Cranial Vault Fractures – Level 2 and 3 Tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Ieva, Antonio Di; Audigé, Laurent; Kellman, Robert M.; Shumrick, Kevin A.; Ringl, Helmut; Prein, Joachim; Matula, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The AOCMF Classification Group developed a hierarchical three-level craniomaxillofacial classification system with increasing level of complexity and details. The highest level 1 system distinguish four major anatomical units, including the mandible (code 91), midface (code 92), skull base (code 93), and cranial vault (code 94). This tutorial presents the level 2 and more detailed level 3 systems for the skull base and cranial vault units. The level 2 system describes fracture location outlining the topographic boundaries of the anatomic regions, considering in particular the endocranial and exocranial skull base surfaces. The endocranial skull base is divided into nine regions; a central skull base adjoining a left and right side are divided into the anterior, middle, and posterior skull base. The exocranial skull base surface and cranial vault are divided in regions defined by the names of the bones involved: frontal, parietal, temporal, sphenoid, and occipital bones. The level 3 system allows assessing fracture morphology described by the presence of fracture fragmentation, displacement, and bone loss. A documentation of associated intracranial diagnostic features is proposed. This tutorial is organized in a sequence of sections dealing with the description of the classification system with illustrations of the topographical skull base and cranial vault regions along with rules for fracture location and coding, a series of case examples with clinical imaging and a general discussion on the design of this classification. PMID:25489394

  2. A Prostate Fossa Contouring Instructional Module: Implementation and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Jillian R; Liauw, Stanley L; Choi, Seungtaek; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Thaker, Nikhil G; Fuller, Clifton D; Stepaniak, Christopher J; Das, Prajnan; Golden, Daniel W

    2016-07-01

    Radiation oncology trainees frequently learn to contour through clinical experience and lectures. A hands-on contouring module was developed to teach delineation of the postoperative prostate clinical target volume (CTV) and improve contouring accuracy. Medical students independently contoured a prostate fossa CTV before and after receiving educational materials and live instruction detailing the RTOG approach to contouring this CTV. Metrics for volume overlap and surface distance (Dice similarity coefficient, Hausdorff distance (HD), and mean distance) determined discordance between student and consensus contours. An evaluation assessed perception of session efficacy (1 = "not at all" to 5 = "extremely"; reported as median[interquartile range]). Non-parametric statistical tests were used. Twenty-four students at two institutions completed the module, and 21 completed the evaluation (88% response). The content was rated as "quite" important (4[3.5-5]). The module improved comfort contouring a prostate fossa (pre 1[1-2] vs. post 4[3-4], p<.01), ability to find references (pre 2[1-3] vs. post 4[3.5-4], p<0.01), knowledge of CT prostate/pelvis anatomy (pre 2[1.5-3] vs. post 3[3-4], p<.01), and ability to use contouring software tools (pre 2[2-3.5] vs. post 3[3-4], p=.01). After intervention, mean DSC increased (0.29 to 0.68, p<0.01) and HD and mean distance both decreased, respectively (42.8 to 30.0, p<.01; 11.5 to 1.9, p<.01). A hands-on module to teach CTV delineation to medical students was developed and implemented. Student and expert contours exhibited near "excellent agreement" (as defined in the literature) after intervention. Additional modules to teach target delineation to all educational levels can be developed using this model. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic resonance properties of hydrogen: imaging the posterior fossa

    SciTech Connect

    Young, I.R.; Burl, M.; Clarke, G.J.

    1981-11-01

    Posterior fossa scans were performed on five healthy volunteers using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) machine constructed by Thorn-EMI Ltd. Three different NMR scanning sequences were used. In the first, a type of saturation-recovery technique was used to produce images strongly dependent on the density of hydrogen nuclei, but with some dependence on the spin-lattice relaxation time (T/sub 1/). In the second, an inversion-recovery technique was used to produce images with a stronger dependence on the spin-lattice relaxation time. In the third, a spin-echo technique was used to obtain images with a dependence on the spin-spin relaxation time (T/sub 2/). All three types of NMR image were unaffected by bone artifact. Visualization of brain adjacent to the skull base was obtained without loss of detail due to partial-volume effect from bone. The saturation-recovery images highlighted arteries and veins that were clearly visible without the use of contrast agents. The inversion-recovery images showed remarkable gray-white matter differentiation enabling internal structure to be seen within the brainstem and cerebellum. The trigeminal nerve and ganglion were also seen outside the brain. Experience with the spin-echo technique is limited, but the images at the base of the brain show considerable soft-tissue detail. The NMR images of the posterior fossa in this study were comparable in quality to those obtained from a new rotate-rotate x-ray computed tomography machine and were superior in several respects.

  4. Dimensions of the temporal glenoid fossa and tooth wear in prehistoric human skeletons.

    PubMed

    Owen, C P; Wilding, R J; Adams, L P

    1992-01-01

    Both the mandibular condyle and the glenoid fossa remodel in response to changes in the dentition during life, although the precise relationship between teeth and joint is not clear. This study was undertaken to ascertain changes, if any, occurring in the glenoid fossae in skeletons with much tooth wear. In a collection of skulls from an excavation site on the South African coast, occlusal wear was measured using the scale devised by Molnar. The dimensions of the glenoid fossae were measured using a reflex microscope. Profiles of the glenoid fossa at right angles to a line through its medial and lateral poles provided estimates of the slope of the articular eminence in three places: centrally, and midway between this slope and each of the poles. The mediolateral profile gave an estimate of the height and gabling of the fossa. Central and lateral slope angles showed weak correlation with molar wear, and the medial but not the lateral angel was significantly different from the central. The fossa appears to remodel in response to patterns of forces generated during function, but compared to the condyle, is not as strongly influenced. This may be accounted for if the relative load-bearing areas of the condyle and fossa are considered.

  5. [Effect of unilateral mastication on the remodeling of the glenoid fossae in Wistar rats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feiyu; Wang, Jianhua; Li, Xiaoqing

    2003-04-20

    To investigate the effect of unilateral mastication on glenoid fossae by means of animal experiment. An animal model of unilateral mastication was established by extracting right mandibular molars of Wistar rats. The rats were sacrificed in different period to examine the location changes of glenoid fossae through sagittal and horizontal plane. The anterior points of glenoid fossae in non-masticatory side of experimental groups were more anterior than those in masticatory sides. The anterior points of the glenoid fossae of non-masticatory sides in experimental groups were more anterior than those of the same sides in the control groups after inducing unilateral mastication for two and four months. After inducing unilateral mastication for two and four months, the anterior and the posterior points of the glenoid fossae of non-masticatory sides in experimental groups became closer to the midline by comparison with masticatory sides as well as the same sides in control groups. Locations of glenoid fossae in masticatory sides showed no changes in comparison with the same side of the control groups. The forward and inward remodeling of the glenoid fossae can be observed after unilateral mastication was induce to the non-masticatory sides of experimental rats. It is concluded that unilateral mastication might be one of the etiologic factor of temporomandibular joint disorders.

  6. Detection of concussion using cranial accelerometry.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Paul S; Baine, Jennifer G; Schott, Megan L; Greenhaw, Amy; Acharya, Monika G; Smith, Wade S

    2015-03-01

    To determine whether skull motion produced by pulsatile cerebral blood flow, as measured by cranial accelerometry, is altered during concussion. In phase 1, to identify a specific pattern indicative of concussion, cranial accelerometry of subjects who sustained a concussion underwent analysis of waveforms, which was compared with accelerometry from subjects without a concussion (baseline). In phase 2, this concussion pattern was tested against prospectively acquired, blinded data. High school tackle football practice and game play. Eighty-four football players. Subjects had accelerometry measurements and concurrent 2-lead electrocardiograms. In players with a concussion, multiple sequential measurements were obtained. Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 was used to assist clinical determination of concussion. Whether a characteristic waveform pattern of cranial accelerometry occurs in subjects with concussion. Phase 1 demonstrated a consistent pattern correlated to concussion. Phase 2 found this pattern in 10 of 13 subjects with concussion (76.9% sensitivity). Seventy-nine of 82 baseline plus nine postseason (total = 91) recordings from nonconcussed subjects did not show the concussion pattern (87% specificity). In subjects with concussion, we observed a unique pattern determined by cranial accelerometry. This may provide a method to noninvasively detect and longitudinally observe concussion. There is no objective, real-time, noninvasive, and easily accessible measure for concussion. If accelerometry is validated, it could provide a critical diagnostic tool for sports medicine physicians.

  7. [Third cranial nerve palsy in sphenoid sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dores, Luís Almeida; Simão, Marco Alveirinho; Marques, Marta Canas; Dias, Éscar

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus disease is particular not only for its clinical presentation, as well as their complications. Although rare, these may present as cranial nerve deficits, so it is important to have a high index of suspicion and be familiar with its diagnosis and management. Symptoms are often nonspecific, but the most common are headache, changes in visual acuity and diplopia due to dysfunction of one or more ocular motor nerves. The authors report a case of a 59 years-old male, who was referred to the ENT emergency department with frontal headaches for one week which had progressively worsened and were associated, since the last 12 hours, with diplopia caused by left third cranial nerve palsy. Neurologic examination was normal aside from the left third cranial nerve palsy. Anterior and posterior rhinoscopy excluded the presence of nasal masses and purulent rhinorrhea. The CT scan revealed a soft tissue component and erosion of the roof of the left sphenoid sinus. Patient was admitted for intravenous antibiotics and steroids treatment without any benefit after 48 hours. He was submitted to endoscopic sinus surgery with resolution of the symptoms 10 days after surgery. The authors present this case for its rarity focusing on the importance of differential diagnosis in patients with headaches and cranial nerves palsies.

  8. Cranial computed tomography and MRI. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 17 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Physics and Instrumentation: CT and MRI; Normal Cranial CT and MRI Anatomy; The Orbit; The ventricles and Subarachnoid Spaces in Children; Primary Tumors in Children; Trauma: Craniocerebral and Craniofacial; Infectious Disease; and Stroke.

  9. How common are cranial sesamoids among squamates?

    PubMed

    Montero, Ricardo; Daza, Juan D; Bauer, Aaron M; Abdala, Virginia

    2017-10-01

    Sesamoids are elements that originate as intratendinous structures due to genetic and epigenetic factors. These elements have been reported frequently in vertebrates, although cranial sesamoids have been recorded almost exclusively in non-tetrapod Osteichthyes. The only tetrapod cranial sesamoids reported until now have been the transiliens cartilage (of crocodiles and turtles), and another one located in the quadrate-mandibular joint of birds. Here, we examined seven squamate species using histological sections, dissections of preserved specimens, dry skeletons, cleared and stained specimens, computed tomographies (CT), and report the presence of other cranial sesamoids. One is attached to the cephalic condyle of the quadrate, embedded in the bodenaponeurosis and jaw adductor muscles of Ophiodes intermedius (Anguidae). The other sesamoid is found at the base of the basicranium of several squamates, capping the sphenoccipital tubercle, on the lateral side of the basioccipital-basisphenoid suture. This bone has previously been reported as "element X." We reinterpret it as a basicranial sesamoid, as it is associated with tendons of the cranio-cervical muscles. This bone seems to have the function of resisting tension-compression forces generated by the muscle during flexion the head. This element was previously known in several squamates, and we confirmed its presence in three additional squamate families: Gymnophthalmidae, Gekkonidae, and Pygopodidae. The evidence suggests that cranial sesamoids are a widespread character in squamates, and it is possible that this feature has been present since the origin of the group. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Post-operative cranial pressure monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fager, C. A., Jr.; Long, L. E.; Trent, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    System for monitoring of fluidic pressures in cranial cavity uses a miniaturized pressure sensing transducer, combined with suitable amplification means, a meter with scale calibrated in terms of pressures between minus 100 and plus 900 millimeters of water, and a miniaturized chart recorder covering similar range of pressures.

  11. Entrainment and the cranial rhythmic impulse.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Mein, E A

    1997-01-01

    Entrainment is the integration or harmonization of oscillators. All organisms pulsate with myriad electrical and mechanical rhythms. Many of these rhythms emanate from synchronized pulsating cells (eg, pacemaker cells, cortical neurons). The cranial rhythmic impulse is an oscillation recognized by many bodywork practitioners, but the functional origin of this impulse remains uncertain. We propose that the cranial rhythmic impulse is the palpable perception of entrainment, a harmonic frequency that incorporates the rhythms of multiple biological oscillators. It is derived primarily from signals between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Entrainment also arises between organisms. The harmonizing of coupled oscillators into a single, dominant frequency is called frequency-selective entrainment. We propose that this phenomenon is the modus operandi of practitioners who use the cranial rhythmic impulse in craniosacral treatment. Dominant entrainment is enhanced by "centering," a technique practiced by many healers, for example, practitioners of Chinese, Tibetan, and Ayurvedic medicine. We explore the connections between centering, the cranial rhythmic impulse, and craniosacral treatment.

  12. Brainstem vascular accidents and cranial arteritis.

    PubMed

    Dick, A D; Millar, A; Johnson, N

    1991-06-01

    Cranial Arteritis (Giant Cell Arteritis) is a clinical diagnosis supported by a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and if required confirmed by a temporal artery biopsy. This case reports on an unusual presentation where a delay in the diagnosis resulted in visual impairment, illustrating the need for awareness of diagnosis in acute strokes in the elderly.

  13. Miniature piezoelectric triaxial accelerometer measures cranial accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Rogallo, V. L.

    1966-01-01

    Tiny triaxial accelerometer whose sensing elements are piezoelectric ceramic beams measures human cranial accelerations when a subject is exposed to a centrifuge or other simulators of g environments. This device could be considered for application in dental, medical, and automotive safety research.

  14. Cranial kinesis in geckoes: functional implications.

    PubMed

    Herrel, A; Aerts, P; De Vree, F

    2000-05-01

    Although it is generally assumed that cranial kinesis is a plesiomorphic characteristic in squamates, experimental data tend to contradict this hypothesis. In particular, coupled kinesis (i.e. streptostyly and mesokinesis) presumably arose independently in only a limited number of highly specialised groups. In this study, we investigated cranial kinesis in one of the most specialised of these groups: geckoes. On the basis of cineradiographic and electromyographic data, the fast opening and the slow closing/power stroke phases were modelled to elucidate possible functions of the observed kinesis. The results of these analyses show that the retraction of the muzzle unit during crushing is a self-reinforcing system that increases bite force and reduces the joint forces; the active protraction of the kinetic system during jaw opening, in contrast, enhances opening speed through the coupling of the intracranial units. It can be argued that cranial kinesis in geckoes is probably not an adaptive trait as such but, instead, a consequence of the 'Bauplan' of the cranial system in these animals. Presumably as a result of constructional constraints on the size of the jaw musculature and eyes, the supratemporal and postorbital bars were lost, which resulted in enormous mobility in the skull. To counteract the potential negative factors associated with this (decrease in bite force, skull damage), the kinetic system may have become coupled, and thus functional.

  15. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used...

  16. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used...

  17. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is used...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is used...

  19. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used...

  20. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is used...

  1. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is used...

  2. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  3. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  4. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  5. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe, incomplete...

  6. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on the...

  7. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on the...

  8. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on the...

  9. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe, incomplete...

  10. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe, incomplete...

  11. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe, incomplete...

  12. [From anatomy to image: the cranial nerves at MRI].

    PubMed

    Conforti, Renata; Marrone, Valeria; Sardaro, Angela; Faella, Pierluigi; Grassi, Roberta; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review the expected course of each of the 12 cranial nerves. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging depicts only the larger cranial nerves but SSFP sequences of magnetic resonance imaging are capable of depicting the cisternal segments of 12 cranial nerves and also provide submillimetric spatial resolution.

  13. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on the...

  14. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on the...

  15. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe, incomplete...

  16. Late cranial MRI after cranial irradiation in survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Pääkkö, E; Talvensaari, K; Pyhtinen, J; Lanning, M

    1994-11-01

    We carried out MRI on 43 survivors of childhood cancer after different treatment protocols with or without cranial radiotherapy. They were free of disease, therapy having been discontinued 2-20 years earlier. Treatment had been for various malignancies, excluding brain tumours; 27 had received cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or lymphoma. Two asymptomatic young women treated for ALL had falx meningiomas. White matter changes, low intensity foci (representing calcification or old haemorrhage) and heterogeneous intensity focic old haemorrhages) were seen only in patients who had undergone radiotherapy. Because of the possibility of benign, potentially curable brain tumours occurring after cranial irradiation, it may be wise to carry out occasional cranial imaging in the follow-up of these patients. No routine imaging follow-up is needed after chemotherapy alone.

  17. Relationship of cranial robusticity to cranial form, geography and climate in Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Baab, Karen L; Freidline, Sarah E; Wang, Steven L; Hanson, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Variation in cranial robusticity among modern human populations is widely acknowledged but not well-understood. While the use of "robust" cranial traits in hominin systematics and phylogeny suggests that these characters are strongly heritable, this hypothesis has not been tested. Alternatively, cranial robusticity may be a response to differences in diet/mastication or it may be an adaptation to cold, harsh environments. This study quantifies the distribution of cranial robusticity in 14 geographically widespread human populations, and correlates this variation with climatic variables, neutral genetic distances, cranial size, and cranial shape. With the exception of the occipital torus region, all traits were positively correlated with each other, suggesting that they should not be treated as individual characters. While males are more robust than females within each of the populations, among the independent variables (cranial shape, size, climate, and neutral genetic distances), only shape is significantly correlated with inter-population differences in robusticity. Two-block partial least-squares analysis was used to explore the relationship between cranial shape (captured by three-dimensional landmark data) and robusticity across individuals. Weak support was found for the hypothesis that robusticity was related to mastication as the shape associated with greater robusticity was similar to that described for groups that ate harder-to-process diets. Specifically, crania with more prognathic faces, expanded glabellar and occipital regions, and (slightly) longer skulls were more robust than those with rounder vaults and more orthognathic faces. However, groups with more mechanically demanding diets (hunter-gatherers) were not always more robust than groups practicing some form of agriculture.

  18. MR imaging evaluation of inferior olivary nuclei: comparison of postoperative subjects with and without posterior fossa syndrome.

    PubMed

    Patay, Z; Enterkin, J; Harreld, J H; Yuan, Y; Löbel, U; Rumboldt, Z; Khan, R; Boop, F

    2014-04-01

    Posterior fossa syndrome is a severe postoperative complication occurring in up to 29% of children undergoing posterior fossa tumor resection; it is most likely caused by bilateral damage to the proximal efferent cerebellar pathways, whose fibers contribute to the Guillain-Mollaret triangle. When the triangle is disrupted, hypertrophic olivary degeneration develops. We hypothesized that MR imaging patterns of inferior olivary nucleus changes reflect patterns of damage to the proximal efferent cerebellar pathways and show association with clinical findings, in particular the presence or absence of posterior fossa syndrome. We performed blinded, randomized longitudinal MR imaging analyses of the inferior olivary nuclei of 12 children with and 12 without posterior fossa syndrome after surgery for midline intraventricular tumor in the posterior fossa. The Fisher exact test was performed to investigate the association between posterior fossa syndrome and hypertrophic olivary degeneration on MR imaging. The sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging findings of bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration for posterior fossa syndrome were measured. Of the 12 patients with posterior fossa syndrome, 9 had bilateral inferior olivary nucleus abnormalities. The 12 patients without posterior fossa syndrome had either unilateral or no inferior olivary nucleus abnormalities. The association of posterior fossa syndrome and hypertrophic olivary degeneration was statistically significant (P < .0001). Hypertrophic olivary degeneration may be a surrogate imaging indicator for damage to the contralateral proximal efferent cerebellar pathway. In the appropriate clinical setting, bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration may be a sensitive and specific indicator of posterior fossa syndrome.

  19. Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis following cranial surgery.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Dmitriy; Uohara, Michael Y; Ichord, Rebecca; Ali, Zarina; Jastrzab, Laura; Lang, Shih-Shan; Billinghurst, Lori

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) is an important, though less common subtype of pediatric stroke. It has been linked to several risk factors, including cranial procedures, with few studies highlighting this relationship. The aim of this study was to characterize the diagnosis and treatment of CSVT after cranial surgery. An institutional pediatric stroke research database was used to identify all CSVT cases diagnosed within 30 days of cranial surgery from November 2004 to December 2014. Thirteen subjects were retrospectively analyzed for clinical presentation, surgical details, radiographic characteristics, laboratory study results, treatment, and outcome. Diagnostic testing and treatment adhered to a consensus-based institutional stroke protocol. Cranial vault reconstruction, subdural empyema evacuation, and tumor resection were each observed in three subjects. Eleven (85%) subjects had sinus exposure during surgery, and eight (73%) developed thrombus in a sinus within or adjacent to the operative field. Two (15%) had documented iatrogenic sinus injury. On post-operative testing, ten (77%) subjects had prothrombotic abnormalities. Seven (54%) were treated with anti-coagulation therapy (ACT) starting on a median of post-operative day (POD) 3 (IQR 1-3) for a median of 2.9 months (IQR 2.4-5.4). Median time to imaging evidence of partial or complete recanalization was 2.4 months (IQR 0.7-5.1). No symptomatic hemorrhagic complications were encountered. Pediatric CSVT may be encountered after cranial surgery, and decisions related to anti-coagulation are challenging. The risk of CSVT should be considered in pre-surgical planning and post-operative evaluation of cases with known risk factors. In our study, judicious use of ACT was safe in the post-operative period.

  20. A Ruptured Dermoid Cyst of the Cavernous Sinus Extending into the Posterior Fossa

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Seung-Chull; Cheong, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Min

    2015-01-01

    Supratentorial dermoid cysts are uncommon to develop in the cavernous sinus. We present a ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa. The patient was a 32-year-old female who complained occipital headache, blurred vision, and tinnitus over 4 years. Brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an enhanced tumor in the right cavernous sinus extending into the right temporal base and the posterior fossa with findings of ruptured cyst. Surgical resection was performed, and pathological findings were confirmed to be a dermoid cyst. We report a second case with ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa. PMID:26113964

  1. A Ruptured Dermoid Cyst of the Cavernous Sinus Extending into the Posterior Fossa.

    PubMed

    Paik, Seung-Chull; Kim, Choong-Hyun; Cheong, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Min

    2015-05-01

    Supratentorial dermoid cysts are uncommon to develop in the cavernous sinus. We present a ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa. The patient was a 32-year-old female who complained occipital headache, blurred vision, and tinnitus over 4 years. Brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an enhanced tumor in the right cavernous sinus extending into the right temporal base and the posterior fossa with findings of ruptured cyst. Surgical resection was performed, and pathological findings were confirmed to be a dermoid cyst. We report a second case with ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa.

  2. Cranial Bosses of Choerosaurus dejageri (Therapsida, Therocephalia): Earliest Evidence of Cranial Display Structures in Eutheriodonts

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Julien; Manger, Paul R.; Fernandez, Vincent; Rubidge, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    Choerosaurus dejageri, a non-mammalian eutheriodont therapsid from the South African late Permian (~259 Ma), has conspicuous hemispheric cranial bosses on the maxilla and the mandible. These bosses, the earliest of this nature in a eutheriodont, potentially make C. dejageri a key species for understanding the evolutionary origins of sexually selective behaviours (intraspecific competition, ritualized sexual and intimidation displays) associated with cranial outgrowths at the root of the clade that eventually led to extant mammals. Comparison with the tapinocephalid dinocephalian Moschops capensis, a therapsid in which head butting is strongly supported, shows that the delicate structure of the cranial bosses and the gracile structure of the skull of Choerosaurus would be more suitable for display and low energy combat than vigorous head butting. Thus, despite the fact that Choerosaurus is represented by only one skull (which makes it impossible to address the question of sexual dimorphism), its cranial bosses are better interpreted as structures involved in intraspecific selection, i.e. low-energy fighting or display. Display structures, such as enlarged canines and cranial bosses, are widespread among basal therapsid clades and are also present in the putative basal therapsid Tetraceratops insignis. This suggests that sexual selection may have played a more important role in the distant origin and evolution of mammals earlier than previously thought. Sexual selection may explain the subsequent independent evolution of cranial outgrowths and pachyostosis in different therapsid lineages (Biarmosuchia, Dinocephalia, Gorgonopsia and Dicynodontia). PMID:27548428

  3. [Computed tomography in the diagnosis of intracranial trigeminal neuroma].

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Wang, D; Deng, K

    1993-12-01

    CT scans of 12 cases of intracranial trigeminal neuroma were presented. Three of the neuromas were located in petrous apex-middle cranial fossa, two in posterior cranial fossa, and 7 in both the middle and posterior cranial fossae. The tumors appeared hypo- and isodense on the plain CT scan. After contrast infusion, all tumors were well circumscribed with marked enhancement, which was homogeneous, inhomogeneous or circular. None of the trigeminal neuroma had surrounding brain edema. Of 12 cases, 10 showed change of cranial bones, which included dilatation of Meckle's cave and destructions of petrous apex, clivus and the bottom of middle cranial fossa. The tumor in one case extended to paranasopharyngeal space from the bottom of middle cranial fossa, Various features of trigeminal neuroma on CT were reviewed. Also presented were the author's experiences in differentiating intracranial trigeminal neuroma from meningiom, from pituitary adenoma spreading to parasella and glioma adjacent to cranial bottom in middle cranial fossa, and from acoustic neuroma, meningioma, cholesteatoma in cerebellopontine angle.

  4. Paedogenesis in european newts (Triturus: salamandridae): cranial morphology during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Djorović, A; Kalezić, M L

    2000-02-01

    A cross-sectional analysis using different ontogenetic stages (larvae, juveniles, paedotypic, and metamorphic adults) of the smooth newt, Triturus vulgaris, and the alpine newt, T.alpestris, revealed a broad spectrum of perennibranchiation influences on cranial ontogeny in European newts, more pronounced than previously thought. These influences included marked variation in ossification levels, pronounced morphometric variability of many cranial elements, and considerable skull shape changes in the transition from larvae to the adult stage. In comparison with metamorphosed individuals, paedotypic newts had a higher level of variability in both individual cranial traits and cranial shape changes. Sexual size difference of the skull traits was mostly negligible, especially in comparison to the influence of paedogenesis. The main changes in cranial shape of the European newts occurred during metamorphosis. Cranial morphological organization in the majority of examined paedotypes corresponds to cranial organization at late larval stages prior to metamorphosis or at the onset of metamorphosis.

  5. Nili Fossae in Natural Color and Across the Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) took this image of the Nili Fossae region at 0643 UTC (2:43 a.m. EDT) on June 21, 2007, near 21.15 degrees north latitude, 74.24 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across. The region covered is just over 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point, and is one of several dozen that CRISM has taken to map the minerals at candidate landing sites for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, which will launch in 2010.

    The Nili Fossae region is critical to understanding the history of water on Mars and whether water ever formed environments suitable for life, because the region is underlain by a layer of phyllosilicate (clay) minerals. This type of mineralogy formed where water was in contact with Mars' crustal rocks for very long periods, altering the silicates in volcanic rocks. In addition, phyllosilicates can encapsulate and preserve organic chemicals associated with life (if life was present). Its rocky record of an ancient wet environment makes Nili Fossae a top contender among the 30-plus landing sites being considered for MSL, whose objectives include measuring the chemistry preserved in an ancient wet environment.

    This series of four different versions of the same 544-color image illustrates the mineral-mapping capability that comes from moving beyond the wavelength range of the human eye, and into infrared wavelengths where minerals leave distinct 'fingerprints' in reflected sunlight. At upper left, more than three dozen of the distinct wavelengths measured by CRISM were combined to mimic how the human eye would see the image. The subtle shading comes from the Sun's position high in Mars' sky when the image was taken, creating few shadows. The bland, butterscotch color comes from the dust coating nearly all of the Martian surface to some degree. At upper right

  6. Nili Fossae in Natural Color and Across the Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) took this image of the Nili Fossae region at 0643 UTC (2:43 a.m. EDT) on June 21, 2007, near 21.15 degrees north latitude, 74.24 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across. The region covered is just over 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point, and is one of several dozen that CRISM has taken to map the minerals at candidate landing sites for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, which will launch in 2010.

    The Nili Fossae region is critical to understanding the history of water on Mars and whether water ever formed environments suitable for life, because the region is underlain by a layer of phyllosilicate (clay) minerals. This type of mineralogy formed where water was in contact with Mars' crustal rocks for very long periods, altering the silicates in volcanic rocks. In addition, phyllosilicates can encapsulate and preserve organic chemicals associated with life (if life was present). Its rocky record of an ancient wet environment makes Nili Fossae a top contender among the 30-plus landing sites being considered for MSL, whose objectives include measuring the chemistry preserved in an ancient wet environment.

    This series of four different versions of the same 544-color image illustrates the mineral-mapping capability that comes from moving beyond the wavelength range of the human eye, and into infrared wavelengths where minerals leave distinct 'fingerprints' in reflected sunlight. At upper left, more than three dozen of the distinct wavelengths measured by CRISM were combined to mimic how the human eye would see the image. The subtle shading comes from the Sun's position high in Mars' sky when the image was taken, creating few shadows. The bland, butterscotch color comes from the dust coating nearly all of the Martian surface to some degree. At upper right

  7. Phyllosilicate and Olivine around a Fracture in Nili Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) took this observation of part of the Nili Fossae region at the western margin of the Isidis impact basin at 3:07 (UTC) on December 12, 2006, near 21.9 degrees north latitude, 78.2 degrees east longitude. The image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. The image is about 11 kilometers (7 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    The Isidis basin resulted from a gigantic impact on the surface of Mars early in the planet's history. The image of the Isidis basin at the top left is the colored elevation data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) overlain on a digital image mosaic from the Viking mission. Reds represent higher elevations, and blue lower elevations. The western rim of the Isidis basin has numerous, concentric troughs (or 'fossae') which may have formed during faulting associated with the impact event. Since then, the Nili Fossae region has since been heavily eroded, and is one of the most mineralogically diverse spots on Mars.

    This CRISM image targets one of region's smaller fractures. The image is shown overlain on the Viking digital image mosaic at lower left. The lower right CRISM image was constructed from three visible wavelengths (0.71, 0.60 and 0.53 microns in the red, green and blue image planes, respectively) and is close to what the human eye would see. The blue on the right of the image is an artifact from light scattering in the atmosphere. The upper right image was constructed from three infrared channels (2.38, 1.80 and 1.15 microns in the red, green and blue image planes, respectively) to highlight the mineralogy of the area. The bright green areas are rich in 'phyllosilicates,' a category of minerals including clays. The purple material along the walls of the fracture likely contains small amounts of the iron- and magnesium-rich mineral pyroxene. The yellow-brown material contains the

  8. Sinuous Ridge Cutting Across Geologic Units of the Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-18

    Shown here is an exceptionally long sinuous ridge, possibly an inverted fluvial feature, that cuts across newly mapped geologic units of the Medusae Fossae Formation, from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  9. Topographic Post-Formation Modifications of Inverted Fluvial Features in the Western Medusa Fossae Formation, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, A.; Burr, D. M.; Beyer, R. A.; Howard, A. D.

    2011-03-01

    Topographic analyses of sinuous ridges in the western Medusa Fossae Formation (MFF) show gradients locally reversing direction of slope along the presumed flow direction, interpreted as indication of differential settling of the western MFF.

  10. Supratentorial Neurometabolic Alterations in Pediatric Survivors of Posterior Fossa Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rueckriegel, Stefan M.; Driever, Pablo Hernaiz; Bruhn, Harald

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Therapy and tumor-related effects such as hypoperfusion, internal hydrocephalus, chemotherapy, and irradiation lead to significant motor and cognitive sequelae in pediatric posterior fossa tumor survivors. A distinct proportion of those factors related to the resulting late effects is hitherto poorly understood. This study aimed at separating the effects of neurotoxic factors on central nervous system metabolism by using H-1 MR spectroscopy to quantify cerebral metabolite concentrations in these patients in comparison to those in age-matched healthy peers. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with World Health Organization (WHO) I pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) treated by resection only, 24 patients with WHO IV medulloblastoma (MB), who additionally received chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation, and 43 healthy peers were investigated using single-volume H-1 MR spectroscopy of parietal white matter and gray matter. Results: Concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) were significantly decreased in white matter (p < 0.0001) and gray matter (p < 0.0001) of MB patients and in gray matter (p = 0.005) of PA patients, compared to healthy peers. Decreased creatine concentrations in parietal gray matter correlated significantly with older age at diagnosis in both patient groups (MB patients, p = 0.009, r = 0.52; PA patients, p = 0.006, r = 0.7). Longer time periods since diagnosis were associated with lower NAA levels in white matter of PA patients (p = 0.008, r = 0.66). Conclusions: Differently decreased NAA concentrations were observed in both PA and MB groups of posterior fossa tumor patients. We conclude that this reflects a disturbance of the neurometabolic steady state of normal-appearing brain tissue due to the tumor itself and to the impact of surgery in both patient groups. Further incremental decreases of metabolite concentrations in MB patients may point to additional harm caused by irradiation and chemotherapy. The stronger decrease of NAA in MB

  11. Polygonal Dike Networks in the Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, L.; Dickson, J. L.; Forget, F.; Head, J. W.; Grosfils, E. B.

    2013-09-01

    1. Introduction 1.1 The Medusae Fossae Formation The Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) is a widespread and voluminous formation which covers 2.1 x 106 km2 between 130-230ºE and 12ºS-12ºN [1-3]. As a fine-grained, friable deposit, its surface is dominated by aeolian features such as yardangs [3-5] and a large number of both fresh and indurated transverse aeolian ridges [TARs] [5]. The deposition of the MFF began at the latest in the Hesperian [6], and over time it has been recognized that, by virtue of its fine-grained nature, the MFF may preserve an important record of Martian history, most directly as a result of the burial and exhumation of channels found in the Zephyria region of the formation [7]. In order to better document the occurrence of smallscale features of interest within the MFF, we examined 427 High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images spread across the formation, during which the occurrence of features of interest were mapped [8]. HiRISE images were supplemented by Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Context Imager (CTX), Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) and Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images where needed. Here we describe the occurrence and characteristics of several polygonal networks of rectilinear ridges. 1.2 Rectilinear Ridges on Mars Rectilinear ridges have been recognized in several different areas on Mars. Long, linear to slightly curving or en echelon ridges hypothesized to be exhumed magmatic dikes have been found in a variety of environments on Mars [9-13], particularly in formerly glaciated terrains where magma may have been emplaced into an icy substrate. A network of rectilinear ridges was described in detail in an unnamed crater on the dichotomy boundary [14]. These chaotic, intersecting ridges, forming irregular polygons ~1 km across, are hypothesized to be brecciated dikes emplaced during the process of crater formation [14]. A group of intersecting rectilinear ridges, informally known as

  12. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  13. Fully endoscopic supraorbital keyhole approach to the anterior cranial base: A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Akçakaya, Mehmet Osman; Aras, Yavuz; İzgi, Nail; Gayretli, Özcan; Sabancı, Pulat Akın; Aydoseli, Aydın; Gürses, İlke Ali; Sencer, Altay; Öztürk, Adnan; Hepgül, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    The supraorbital keyhole approach for anterior cranial base lesions has been increasingly used in clinical practice. Anatomical studies focusing on the endoscopic anatomy via this approach are few, although the microscopic anatomy has been well studied. The aim of this study is to describe the anatomical features and surgical exposure provided by the endoscopic supraorbital keyhole approach using quantitative measurements. Nine formalin-fixed human cadavers from the inventory of the Anatomy department were used. A total of 18 supraorbital keyhole cranitomies were conducted. The distances between the target anatomical structures and the dura mater at the craniotomy site, and the distances between deep anatomical structures were measured with purpose-designed hooks. The distance between the dura mater and optic canal was measured as 69.5 ± 6.7 mm (62-83 mm); optic chiasm as 76.2 ± 5.4 mm (67-86 mm); anterior communicating artery as 82.6 ± 6.1 mm (71-93 mm); internal carotid artery (ICA) bifurcation as 74.7 ± 6.0 mm (66-84 mm) and the basilar tip as 94.9 ± 7.0 mm (87-111 mm). The mean diameter of the optic canal was 7.4 ± 1.3 mm (6-11 mm), whereas the mean diameter of diaphragma sellae was measured as 8.4 ± 1.1 mm (7-10 mm). The results of this study showed that the anterior and medial aspects of the anterior cranial fossa can be visualized properly. Dissection of the ipsilateral arteries of Circle of Willis can be performed easily using an endoscopic supraorbital keyhole approach.

  14. Cranial anatomy of the Duchesnean primate Rooneyia viejaensis: new insights from high resolution computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kirk, E Christopher; Daghighi, Parham; Macrini, Thomas E; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Rowe, Timothy B

    2014-09-01

    Rooneyia viejaensis is a North American Eocene primate of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Although the external cranial anatomy of Rooneyia is well studied, various authors have suggested that Rooneyia is a stem haplorhine, stem strepsirrhine, stem tarsiiform, or stem anthropoid. Here we describe the internal cranial anatomy of the Rooneyia holotype based on micro-computed tomography and discuss the phylogenetic implications of this anatomy. Precise measurements of the natural endocast filling the braincase of the Rooneyia holotype reveal that the genus had a relative brain size comparable to some living callitrichines and strepsirrhines. Rooneyia was thus probably more encephalized than any other known omomyiform, adapiform, or plesiadapiform. Relative olfactory bulb size in Rooneyia was most comparable to some living strepsirrhines and the stem anthropoid Parapithecus. The nasal fossa of Rooneyia resembled that of living strepsirrhines in retaining an obliquely oriented nasolacrimal canal, four ethmoturbinals, and an olfactory recess separated from the nasopharyngeal meatus by a transverse lamina. The ear region of Rooneyia is characterized by large and complete canals for both the stapedial and promontory branches of the internal carotid artery. Rooneyia also retains a patent parotic fissure and thus had an extrabullar origin of the stapedius muscle. In most of these respects, Rooneyia exhibits the condition that is presumed to be primitive for crown primates and lacks a number of key crown haplorhine synapomorphies (e.g., a dorso-ventrally oriented nasolacrimal canal, loss of the olfactory recess, loss of ethmoturbinals 3-4, loss or extreme reduction of the stapedial canal due to involution of the stapedial artery). These data are consistent with the hypothesis that Rooneyia is an advanced stem primate or a basal crown primate but are inconsistent with prior suggestions that Rooneyia is a crown haplorhine.

  15. Fully endoscopic supraorbital keyhole approach to the anterior cranial base: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Akçakaya, Mehmet Osman; Aras, Yavuz; İzgi, Nail; Gayretli, Özcan; Sabancı, Pulat Akın; Aydoseli, Aydın; Gürses, İlke Ali; Sencer, Altay; Öztürk, Adnan; Hepgül, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The supraorbital keyhole approach for anterior cranial base lesions has been increasingly used in clinical practice. Anatomical studies focusing on the endoscopic anatomy via this approach are few, although the microscopic anatomy has been well studied. The aim of this study is to describe the anatomical features and surgical exposure provided by the endoscopic supraorbital keyhole approach using quantitative measurements. Materials and Methods: Nine formalin-fixed human cadavers from the inventory of the Anatomy department were used. A total of 18 supraorbital keyhole cranitomies were conducted. The distances between the target anatomical structures and the dura mater at the craniotomy site, and the distances between deep anatomical structures were measured with purpose-designed hooks. Results: The distance between the dura mater and optic canal was measured as 69.5 ± 6.7 mm (62–83 mm); optic chiasm as 76.2 ± 5.4 mm (67–86 mm); anterior communicating artery as 82.6 ± 6.1 mm (71–93 mm); internal carotid artery (ICA) bifurcation as 74.7 ± 6.0 mm (66–84 mm) and the basilar tip as 94.9 ± 7.0 mm (87–111 mm). The mean diameter of the optic canal was 7.4 ± 1.3 mm (6–11 mm), whereas the mean diameter of diaphragma sellae was measured as 8.4 ± 1.1 mm (7–10 mm). Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the anterior and medial aspects of the anterior cranial fossa can be visualized properly. Dissection of the ipsilateral arteries of Circle of Willis can be performed easily using an endoscopic supraorbital keyhole approach. PMID:26167020

  16. Carotid artery pseudoaneurysm after orthognathic surgery causing lower cranial nerve palsies: endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Hacein-Bey, Lotfi; Blazun, Judith M; Jackson, Richard F

    2013-11-01

    Reported complications following Le Fort osteotomies are rare but can include epistaxis from disruptions or pseudo-aneurysms of the maxillary artery or its distal branches the descending palatine and sphenopalatine arteries, aseptic necrosis of the maxilla, ophthalmic injuries including blindness, ophthalmoplegia, and keratitis sicca, and arteriovenous fistulas or false aneurysms of the carotid arteries (external and/or internal). The mechanism of injury to neurovascular structures can be the result of direct or indirect trauma, such as injuries from surgical instruments, traction injuries during manipulation of the osteotomized bone segments or during inadvertent manipulations of the head and neck, or from fractures extending to the base of the skull, orbit, or pterygopalatine fossa associated with the pterygomandibular dysjunction or maxillary downfracture. An 18 year-old male with facial bone dysplasia, apertognathia, maxillary hypoplasia and mandibular hyperplasia was treated with maxillary Le Fort I osteotomy with internal fixation and elastic intermaxillary fixation. Following surgery, the patient developed palsies of the vagus and accessory nerves manifesting as dysphagia, cough, vocal cord paralysis and trapezius muscle atrophy. Cross sectional imaging revealed a small, laterally pointing pseudoaneurysm of the high cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) at the skull base, exerting pulsatile mass effect on adjacent lower cranial nerves. The patient was treated with carotid artery stent reconstruction and pseudoaneurysm coil obliteration, and kept on dual antiplatelet therapy for two months. Partial recovery from cranial nerve palsies was observed within a year. A small, broad-based, laterally-pointing ICA pseudoaneurysm at the exit of the carotid canal without surrounding hematoma was clearly demonstrated on CTA, which visualization was difficult on MRA due to considerable metallic artifact from surgical hardware. Angiography exquisitely demonstrated the

  17. Novel technique for cranial reconstruction following retrosigmoid craniectomy using demineralized bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Pabaney, Aqueel H; Reinard, Kevin A; Asmaro, Karam; Malik, Ghaus M

    2015-09-01

    A versatile neurosurgical approach, the retrosigmoid craniectomy (RS) has traditionally been associated with high rates of post-operative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, headaches, and aesthetic defects. We introduce a simple surgical strategy for bony cranial reconstruction designed to minimize peri-operative complications and improve cosmetic outcomes. In accordance with the Institutional Review Board, the senior author's (G.M.M.) records were queried between 2006 and 2014. We identified 50 consecutive patients who underwent demineralized bone matrix (DBM)-augmented cranioplasty after RS for MVD (DBM group) and 92 consecutive patients in whom standard cranial reconstruction was undertaken using autologous bone chips only after RS for MVD (non-DBM group). Demographic and clinical information regarding the laterality of each operation, intra-dural drilling for petrous hyperostosis, method of dural closure, length of hospitalization, presence of post-operative headaches, and procedure-related complications were collected and analyzed. The DBM and non-DBM cohorts were well matched for age, laterality of procedure, surgical indications, primary versus revision surgery, intra-dural drilling of petrous hyperostosis, and dural closure techniques. Trigeminal neuralgia was the most common surgical indication (98.6%) in each cohort. Post-operatively, 15% of patients in non-DBM group experienced chronic headaches at the last follow-up compared to only 8% of the patients in the DBM group (p=0.21). The non-DBM patients also suffered more incisional pain in comparison to the DBM patients (7.6% vs. 0%, p=0.045). DBM-augmented reconstruction of posterior fossa defects resulted in low rates of post-operative headaches, better cosmetic outcomes, and represents a simple and effective cranioplasty option for skull base surgeons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transient cranial neuropathies as sequelae of Onyx embolization of arteriovenous shunt lesions near the skull base: possible axonotmetic traction injuries.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Eric MacKenzie; Chaudry, M Imran; Turk, Aquilla S; Turner, Raymond D

    2013-07-01

    Transarterial embolization with Onyx is a relatively safe and increasingly common method of treating cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF) and arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Cranial neuropathy resulting from this procedure has been reported. Three case histories are presented in two patients treated for a DAVF and an AVM near the skull base with heavily parasitized supply from external carotid artery branches. Transarterial embolization resulted in transient cranial neuropathies including two cases of lower facial nerve palsy and one case of trigeminal nerve mandibular segment (V3) neuralgia which resolved spontaneously over a few months. Treatment of the DAVF and AVM was otherwise successful. The most common cranial neuropathies following transarterial Onyx embolization procedures are facial nerve palsy and V3 neuralgia. The middle meningeal and internal maxillary arteries are common conduits used in dural-based and facial arteriovenous shunt lesions and are in proximity to the facial nerve and maxillary segment of the trigeminal nerve as they exit the skull base. Based on their relative frequency and anatomic proximity, it is surmised that these facial neuropathies are traction-type injuries related to microcatheter extraction from the Onyx cast. Cranial neuropathies, specifically facial nerve palsy and V3 neuralgia, following transarterial Onyx embolizations are probably axonotmetic traction injuries related to microcatheter extraction. These appear to be self-limiting and resolve over a few months.

  19. A New Saurichthyiform (Actinopterygii) with a Crushing Feeding Mechanism from the Middle Triassic of Guizhou (China)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feixiang; Chang, Mee-mann; Sun, Yuanlin; Xu, Guanghui

    2013-01-01

    Background Equipped with an effective predatory feeding mechanism enhanced by large and sharp teeth, pointed snout and elongate body, saurichthyiform fishes are considered common fish-eaters in the early Mesozoic aquatic ecosystems. Additionally, because of the similar body plan across species, saurichthyiforms are also regarded evolutionally conservative, with few morphological and ecological changes during their long history. However, their phylogenetic affinity remains unclear as to whether they are chondrostean, neopterygian or stem-actinopteran, and likewise the intrarelationships of the group have rarely been explored. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report a new saurichthyiform from the Middle Triassic of Guizhou, China, based on the well-preserved specimens including a 3-D braincase. The new taxon, Yelangichthys macrocephalus gen. et sp. nov., is unique among saurichthyiforms in having a peculiar neurocranium with a broad orbital tectum, paired posterior myodomes, a deep, transverse fossa in the posterodorsal part of the orbit, and a feeding mechanism structured for durophagy. Phylogenetic analysis places Yelangichthys gen. nov. at the most basal position in the Saurichthyiformes as the sister to Saurichthyidae, and a new family Yelangichthyidae is erected to include only Y. macrocephalus gen. et sp. nov. The monophyly of the Chondrostei comprising [Saurichthyiformes + Acipenseriformes] Birgeriiformes is supported, but not the monophyly of Saurichthys, the type genus of Saurichthyidae. With its outstanding osteological details, Yelangichthys gen. nov. greatly increases the neurocranial variations in saurichthyiforms, and its novel feeding structure suggests the consumption of hard-preys instead of fishes. Conclusions/Significance Our findings highlight the detailed osteology of a saurichthyiform braincase and its feeding design. We suggest that saurichthyiforms are closely allied to the Acipenseriformes. Saurichthyiforms were very diverse in the

  20. Acoustic interaction between the right and left piriform fossae in generating spectral dips.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Hironori; Adachi, Seiji; Mokhtari, Parham; Kitamura, Tatsuya

    2013-10-01

    It is known that the right and left piriform fossae generate two deep dips on speech spectra and that acoustic interaction exists in generating the dips: if only one piriform fossa is modified, both the dips change in frequency and amplitude. In the present study, using a simple geometrical model and measured vocal tract shapes, the acoustic interaction was examined by the finite-difference time-domain method. As a result, one of the two dips was lower in frequency than the two independent dips that appeared when either of the piriform fossae was occluded, and the other dip was higher in frequency than the two dips. At the lower dip frequency, the piriform fossae resonated almost in opposite phase, while at the higher dip frequency, they resonated almost in phase. These facts indicate that the piriform fossae and the lower part of the pharynx can be modeled as a coupled two-oscillator system whose two normal vibration modes generate the two spectral dips. When the piriform fossae were identical, only the higher dip appeared. This is because the lower mode is not acoustically coupled to the main vocal tract enough to generate an absorption dip.

  1. Ewing's Sarcoma of the Cranial Vault

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Geetha; Sreelesh, K. P.; Somanathan, Thara; Soman, Lali V.

    2016-01-01

    Primary Ewing's sarcoma (EWS) arising from cranial bones is rare and accounts for only 1%–4% of all EWS. We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with EWS of the frontoparietal region of the skull. She underwent excision following which she received combination chemotherapy with vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide alternating with ifosfamide, and VP16 and local radiation of 45 Gy. She is alive in complete remission at 40 months. PMID:28163522

  2. The Morphogenesis of Cranial Sutures in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Topczewska, Jolanta M.; Shoela, Ramy A.; Tomaszewski, Joanna P.; Mirmira, Rupa B.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2016-01-01

    Using morphological, histological, and TEM analyses of the cranium, we provide a detailed description of bone and suture growth in zebrafish. Based on expression patterns and localization, we identified osteoblasts at different degrees of maturation. Our data confirm that, unlike in humans, zebrafish cranial sutures maintain lifelong patency to sustain skull growth. The cranial vault develops in a coordinated manner resulting in a structure that protects the brain. The zebrafish cranial roof parallels that of higher vertebrates and contains five major bones: one pair of frontal bones, one pair of parietal bones, and the supraoccipital bone. Parietal and frontal bones are formed by intramembranous ossification within a layer of mesenchyme positioned between the dermal mesenchyme and meninges surrounding the brain. The supraoccipital bone has an endochondral origin. Cranial bones are separated by connective tissue with a distinctive architecture of osteogenic cells and collagen fibrils. Here we show RNA in situ hybridization for col1a1a, col2a1a, col10a1, bglap/osteocalcin, fgfr1a, fgfr1b, fgfr2, fgfr3, foxq1, twist2, twist3, runx2a, runx2b, sp7/osterix, and spp1/ osteopontin, indicating that the expression of genes involved in suture development in mammals is preserved in zebrafish. We also present methods for examining the cranium and its sutures, which permit the study of the mechanisms involved in suture patency as well as their pathological obliteration. The model we develop has implications for the study of human disorders, including craniosynostosis, which affects 1 in 2,500 live births. PMID:27829009

  3. Laryngeal zoster with multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Van Den Bossche, Paul; Van Den Bossche, Karolien; Vanpoucke, Hilde

    2008-03-01

    A young immunocompetent patient is presented with a very rare presentation of a common viral illness: herpes zoster of the left hemilarynx with sensorial and motoric neuropathy of three ipsilateral lower cranial nerves: IX, X and XI. The mucosal lesions were discovered during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. PCR of erosional exsudate confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Antiviral therapy and corticosteroids possibly contributed to the prosperous evolution with complete healing.

  4. Disorders of Cranial Nerves IX and X

    PubMed Central

    Erman, Audrey B.; Kejner, Alexandra E.; Hogikyan, Norman D.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    The glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves mediate the complex interplay between the many functions of the upper aerodigestive tract. Defects may occur anywhere from the brainstem to the peripheral nerve and can result in significant impairment in speech, swallowing, and breathing. Multiple etiologies can produce symptoms. This review will broadly examine the normal functions, clinical examination, and various pathologies of cranial nerves IX and X. PMID:19214937

  5. Disorders of cranial nerves IX and X.

    PubMed

    Erman, Audrey B; Kejner, Alexandra E; Hogikyan, Norman D; Feldman, Eva L

    2009-02-01

    The glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves mediate the complex interplay between the many functions of the upper aerodigestive tract. Defects may occur anywhere from the brainstem to the peripheral nerve and can result in significant impairment in speech, swallowing, and breathing. Multiple etiologies can produce symptoms. In this review, the authors broadly examine the normal functions, clinical examination, and various pathologies of cranial nerves IX and X.

  6. Blepharoptosis Associated With Third Cranial Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Abbas; Borhani, Morteza; Salehirad, Shahram; Yazdani, Shahin; Tavakoli, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the demographics and outcomes of management for blepharoptosis associated with third cranial nerve palsy at a tertiary eye center. This retrospective cross-sectional and interventional study was performed on hospital records of patients with ptosis associated with third cranial nerve palsy who were referred to Labbafinejad Medical Center from January 1999 to January 2009. The authors evaluated age, sex, laterality, severity of involvement, etiology, clinical findings, and treatment modalities and outcomes in patients with blepharoptosis due to third cranial nerve palsy over a 10-year period. Of a total of 45 subjects, 25 cases (55.6%) were males and 20 subjects (44.4%) were females. Mean age of enrolled subjects was 21.1 ± 15.5 years. Etiologies included trauma in 21 (46.7%), congenital in 16 (35.6%), and other causes in 8 (17.7%) cases. Overall, 18 of 45 patients (40%) underwent ptosis surgery: of these, 15 (83.3%) subjects improved with one procedure, whereas 3 (16.7%) subjects required more than one operation. For initial ptosis surgery, 5 (27.7%) patients underwent levator resection and 13 (72.3%) cases underwent frontalis sling; all second and third procedures were frontalis sling. One-step, 2-step, and 3-step ptosis surgery was accomplished in 15 (83.3%), 1 (5.6%), and 2 (11.1%) patients, respectively. Eventually, an open visual axis was attained in all cases following 1-3 operations. Trauma was the most common cause of ptosis associated with third cranial nerve palsy in the current series. Surgical management of ptosis in patients with third nerve palsy may be challenging but most subjects achieve good results following appropriate and stepwise surgical plans.

  7. Comparative myology of the hominoid cranial base. I. The muscular relationships and bony attachments of the digastric muscle.

    PubMed

    Dean, M C

    1984-01-01

    This paper aims to document accurately the soft tissue anatomy and bony attachments of the posterior belly of the digastric muscle and other closely related muscles in the mastoid region of extant hominoids and fossil hominids. Five wet specimens including individuals of Pan, Gorilla and Pongo were dissected and described. Eight casts of fossil hominid cranial bases were also studied along with measurements and notes made from the same original fossil hominid specimens to assess their soft tissue markings in the light of the findings for the three great apes. The results indicate that whereas the attachment of the posterior belly of the digastric muscle in Homo sapiens is associated with a deep groove or fossa, it originates from a widened area and leaves no bony markings on the cranial base of the three great apes. Following a change in the position of the foramen magnum and the occipital condyles in hominids and H. sapiens the insertion of the posterior belly of the digastric has remained posteriorly positioned but has become compressed into a deep groove. It is likely that this has come about by the displacement of the more medial soft tissue structures which have been moved laterally away from the occipital condyles.

  8. Cranial Anatomy and Palaeoneurology of the Archosaur Riojasuchus tenuisceps from the Los Colorados Formation, La Rioja, Argentina.

    PubMed

    von Baczko, Maria Belen; Desojo, Julia Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Riojasuchus tenuisceps Bonaparte 1967 is currently known from four specimens, including two complete skulls, collected in the late 1960s from the upper levels of the Los Colorados Formation (Late Triassic), La Rioja, Argentina. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the skulls of the holotype and a referred specimen of Riojasuchus tenuisceps and the repreparation of the latter allows recognition of new features for a detailed analysis of its cranial anatomy and its comparison with a wide variety of other archosauriform taxa. The diagnosis of Riojasuchus tenuisceps is emended and two autapomorphies are identified on the skull: (1) a deep antorbital fossa with its anterior and ventral edges almost coinciding with the same edges of the maxilla itself and (2) a suborbital fenestra equal in size to the palatine-pterygoid fenestra. Also, the first digital 3D reconstruction of the encephalon of Riojasuchus tenuisceps was carried out to study its neuroanatomy, showing a shape and cranial nerve disposition consistent to that of other pseudosuchians.

  9. Cranial Anatomy and Palaeoneurology of the Archosaur Riojasuchus tenuisceps from the Los Colorados Formation, La Rioja, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    von Baczko, Maria Belen; Desojo, Julia Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Riojasuchus tenuisceps Bonaparte 1967 is currently known from four specimens, including two complete skulls, collected in the late 1960s from the upper levels of the Los Colorados Formation (Late Triassic), La Rioja, Argentina. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the skulls of the holotype and a referred specimen of Riojasuchus tenuisceps and the repreparation of the latter allows recognition of new features for a detailed analysis of its cranial anatomy and its comparison with a wide variety of other archosauriform taxa. The diagnosis of Riojasuchus tenuisceps is emended and two autapomorphies are identified on the skull: (1) a deep antorbital fossa with its anterior and ventral edges almost coinciding with the same edges of the maxilla itself and (2) a suborbital fenestra equal in size to the palatine-pterygoid fenestra. Also, the first digital 3D reconstruction of the encephalon of Riojasuchus tenuisceps was carried out to study its neuroanatomy, showing a shape and cranial nerve disposition consistent to that of other pseudosuchians. PMID:26849433

  10. Studing cranial vault modifications in ancient Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Tiesler, Vera

    2012-01-01

    The artificial modification of infant cranial vaults through massages or by means of constriction and compression devices constitutes a readily visible, permanent body modification that has been employed cross-culturally to express identity, ethnicity, beauty, status and gender. For those ancient societies that staged head shaping, these cultural correlates may be ascertained by examining cranial shapes together with other data sets from the archaeological record. Studies of skulls modified for cultural reasons also provide important clues for understanding principles in neural growth and physiopathological variation in cranial expansion. This paper focuses on head shaping techniques in Mesoamerica, where the practice was deeply rooted and widespread before the European conquest. It provides a comprehensive review of the Mesoamericanistic research on shaping techniques, implements and taxonomies. An up-dated, interdisciplinary examination of the physiological implications and the cultural meanings of artificially produced head shapes in different times and culture areas within Mesoamerica leads to a discussion of the scope, caveats, and future directions involved in this kind of research in the region and beyond.

  11. Pressure-supported ventilation for posterior fossa operation.

    PubMed

    Mori, N; Takahashi, H; Yanase, T; Suzuki, M

    1990-03-01

    To maintain enough gas exchange while using spontaneous respiration as a monitor of the normal brainstem function, we tried pressure-supported ventilation (PSV) with a Servo 900C ventilator (Siemens Elema AB, Sweden) on 12 otherwise healthy patients during posterior fossa operation. Ventilation mode was switched from controlled to PSV after the dura was open uneventfully in all cases but one. With a trigger level of -1 to -2 cm H2O, spontaneous respiration was triggered to start the inspiration. With supporting inspiratory pressure of 4-20 cm H2O, PaCO2 was kept at 31.7-45.9 mm Hg. The ventilatory level could be monitored breath by breath by ventilatory frequency, tidal volume, minute volume, and end-tidal CO2 concentration shown on the ventilator system. Apnea was observed in two cases during surgical manipulation around the brainstem. It was indicated immediately by the ventilator's alarm for decreased expiratory minute volume, and no sign of brainstem dysfunction was observed postoperatively. PSV was useful in maintaining adequate ventilation whereas spontaneous respiration was used as an indicator of normal brainstem function. The alarm system of the ventilator was sensitive enough to detect the surgical invasion of the brainstem at a very early stage.

  12. Neuropsychological improvement after posterior fossa arachnoid cyst drainage.

    PubMed

    Cuny, M L; Pallone, M; Piana, H; Boddaert, N; Sainte-Rose, C; Vaivre-Douret, L; Piolino, P; Puget, S

    2017-01-01

    Posterior fossa arachnoid cysts (PFAC) are mostly considered as benign lesions of the cerebellum. Although many studies have shown the major role of the cerebellum in modulating movement, language, cognition, and social interaction, there are few studies on the cognitive impact and surgical decompression of PFAC. We present the cases of two brothers successively diagnosed with PFAC and neuropsychological delay. After multidisciplinary discussion with the boys' parents, it was decided to drain these lesions. Clinical signs, cerebral images, and neuropsychological status were assessed on admission and then 1 and 3 years after surgery. At presentation, both children had mild cerebellar signs, associated with cognitive and visual-motor impairments and academic regression. CT scans revealed retrovermian cysts, which were shunted. Post-operatively, both brothers demonstrated improved visual-motor skills and behavior. At follow-up, we observed disappearance of dysarthria and academic delay and significant improvement in cognition especially at the intelligence scale and in language. Fine motor skills had improved but remained slower than the average and writing skills appeared limited. Except for PFAC which impair cerebrospinal fluid circulation or which are responsible for a significant mass effect, most PFAC are usually considered as "asymptomatic" and do not require surgical treatment. The two cases reported herein suggest that these lesions might be responsible for some associated but potentially reversible neuropsychological impairment. In the future, clinical assessment should include neuropsychological evaluation to help inform decision for surgical decompression in these children with PFAC.

  13. Pedestal Craters and Wind Streaks, South Medusae Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mars is a desert planet in which wind has a considerable effect on the landscape. Bright and dark wind streaks in this image indicate past movement of fine sediment across the landscape from upper left toward lower right. Two impact craters that look like flowers or starfish are seen in the lower portion of the image. The ejecta deposits of these craters are raised above the surrounding terrain, and indicate that wind has deflated a layer of material (that is, blown it away, thus lowering the surface) that was present at the time that the craters formed. The craters were formed by impacts of meteorites into the earlier, higher surface, and the rocks and gravel thrown out when they formed protected some of this former layer from the wind's effects. This picture--showing part of the Medusae Fossae region near the martian equator--was taken in early April 1999 and covers an area only 1 kilometer (0.62 miles)wide. Illumination is from the lower right.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  14. Pedestal Craters and Wind Streaks, South Medusae Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mars is a desert planet in which wind has a considerable effect on the landscape. Bright and dark wind streaks in this image indicate past movement of fine sediment across the landscape from upper left toward lower right. Two impact craters that look like flowers or starfish are seen in the lower portion of the image. The ejecta deposits of these craters are raised above the surrounding terrain, and indicate that wind has deflated a layer of material (that is, blown it away, thus lowering the surface) that was present at the time that the craters formed. The craters were formed by impacts of meteorites into the earlier, higher surface, and the rocks and gravel thrown out when they formed protected some of this former layer from the wind's effects. This picture--showing part of the Medusae Fossae region near the martian equator--was taken in early April 1999 and covers an area only 1 kilometer (0.62 miles)wide. Illumination is from the lower right.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  15. Preoperative Visualization of Cranial Nerves in Skull Base Tumor Surgery Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Su, Shaobo; Yue, Shuyuan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Yonggang; Chen, Xiaochen; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To visualize cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with special parameters. This study also involved the evaluation of preoperative estimates and intraoperative confirmation of the relationship between nerves and tumor by verifying the accuracy of visualization. 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans including 3D-FSPGR, FIESTA, and DTI were used to collect information from 18 patients with skull base tumor. DTI data were integrated into the 3D slicer for fiber tracking and overlapped anatomic images to determine course of nerves. 3D reconstruction of tumors was achieved to perform neighboring, encasing, and invading relationship between lesion and nerves. Optic pathway including the optic chiasm could be traced in cases of tuberculum sellae meningioma and hypophysoma (pituitary tumor). The oculomotor nerve, from the interpeduncular fossa out of the brain stem to supraorbital fissure, was clearly visible in parasellar meningioma cases. Meanwhile, cisternal parts of trigeminal nerve and abducens nerve, facial nerve were also imaged well in vestibular schwannomas and petroclival meningioma cases. The 3D-spatial relationship between CNs and skull base tumor estimated preoperatively by tumor modeling and tractography corresponded to the results determined during surgery. Supported by DTI and 3D slicer, preoperative 3D reconstruction of most CNs related to skull base tumor is feasible in pathological circumstances. We consider DTI Technology to be a useful tool for predicting the course and location of most CNs, and syntopy between them and skull base tumor.

  16. The naming of the cranial nerves: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew C; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Bosmia, Anand N; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2014-01-01

    The giants of medicine and anatomy have each left their mark on the history of the cranial nerves, and much of the history of anatomic study can be viewed through the lens of how the cranial nerves were identified and named. A comprehensive literature review on the classification of the cranial names was performed. The identification of the cranial nerves began with Galen in the 2nd century AD and evolved up through the mid-20th century. In 1778, Samuel Sömmerring, a German anatomist, classified the 12 cranial nerves as we recognize them today. This review expands on the excellent investigations of Flamm, Shaw, and Simon et al., with discussion of the historical identification as well as the process of naming the human cranial nerves. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Relative placement of the mandibular fossa in great apes and humans.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Richard J; Rowley, Rebecca B; Ward, Steven C

    2002-07-01

    Several researchers have investigated, or commented on, the relative placement of the hominin mandibular fossa with regard to brain expansion and masticatory function. Two confounding factors are identified in this previous work. First, a number of different measurement techniques have been applied, confusing comparisons between studies. Second, the effects of squamous thickening due to temporal bone pneumatization are shown to influence measurements based relative to the ectocranial margin of the skull. To investigate the influence of these factors, a sample of adult human (n=12), chimpanzee (n=12), gorilla (n=15), and orang-utan (n=8) skulls from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, University of Wisconsin Zoology Museum, and University of Wisconsin Anthropology collections, were CT scanned. Coronal scans were horizontally aligned and measured on a personal computer using ImageJ (NIH). To identify fossa placement, fossa breadth was measured as the projected distance in the coronal plane between the tip of the entoglenoid to lateral margin of the articular surface. A second distance, from the tip of the entoglenoid to a sagittal plane, tangent to the lateralmost margin of the endocranial surface was taken to indicate the extent of medial placement of the fossa. By eliminating the influence of pneumatization, these data unambiguously confirmed the medial placement of the human fossa and show all great apes as having a laterally placed fossa. Similar measurements on three fossil hominins, KNM-BC 1 (Homo sp. indet.), OH 5 and KNM-ER 23000 (Paranthropus boisei) demonstrate that, while all specimens demonstrate a broad fossa, only KNM-BC 1 is characterized by a relatively medial placement while the latter two display lateral placement.

  18. Morphological study of fossa ovalis and its clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, S.D.; Chawre, H.K.; Joshi, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Patent foramen ovale (PFO) has been implicated in the etiology of a number of different pathologies, including cryptogenic stroke, decompression sickness in divers, etc. It can act as a channel for paradoxical embolism. PFO is not an uncommon condition, with a probe-patency in 15–35% population. The fossa ovalis (FOv) varies in size and shape from heart to heart; the prominence of annulus FOv also varies. The entire FOv may be redundant and aneurysmal. The anatomico-functional characterization of interatrial septum seems to be of paramount importance for both atrial septal defect (ASD) and PFO, not only for the device selection, but also for the evaluation of the outcome of this procedure. Method This study was conducted in 50 apparently normal hearts available in Department of Anatomy. After opening the right atrium, the shape of FOv was observed. The size was measured with the digital vernier caliper; the prominence and extent of limbus, and the redundancy or otherwise of FOv were noted; probe patency was confirmed. Results In the majority, FOv was oval (82%); average transverse diameter was 14.53 mm and vertical 12.60 mm. In 90%, the rim of the annulus was raised; in 20%, a recess was found deep to the margin of the annulus; and 18% showed probe patency. Conclusion As no study of this nature has been carried out in the Indian population, this provides pertinent information on the morphology of FOv, which may be useful for device selection in treating ASD and PFO. PMID:27133322

  19. Hearing Loss following Posterior Fossa Microvascular Decompression: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bartindale, Matthew; Kircher, Matthew; Adams, William; Balasubramanian, Neelam; Liles, Jeffrey; Bell, Jason; Leonetti, John

    2017-09-01

    Objectives (1) Determine the prevalence of hearing loss following microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS). (2) Demonstrate factors that affect postoperative hearing outcomes after MVD. Data Sources PubMed-NCBI, Scopus, CINAHL, and PsycINFO databases from 1981 to 2016. Review Methods Systematic review of prospective cohort studies and retrospective reviews in which any type of hearing loss was recorded after MVD for TN or HFS. Three researchers extracted data regarding operative indications, procedures performed, and diagnostic tests employed. Discrepancies were resolved by mutual consensus. Results Sixty-nine references with 18,233 operations met inclusion criteria. There were 7093 patients treated for TN and 11,140 for HFS. The overall reported prevalence of hearing loss after MVD for TN and HFS was 5.58% and 8.25%, respectively. However, many of these studies relied on subjective measures of reporting hearing loss. In 23 studies with consistent perioperative audiograms, prevalence of hearing loss was 13.47% for TN and 13.39% for HFS, with no significant difference between indications ( P = .95). Studies using intraoperative brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring were more likely to report hearing loss for TN (relative risk [RR], 2.28; P < .001) but not with HFS (RR, 0.88; P = .056). Conclusion Conductive and sensorineural hearing loss are important complications following posterior fossa MVD. Many studies have reported on hearing loss using either subjective measures and/or inconsistent audiometric testing. Routine perioperative audiogram protocols improve the detection of hearing loss and may more accurately represent the true risk of hearing loss after MVD for TN and HFS.

  20. Medusae Fossae Formation: New perspectives from Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Bethany A.; Sakimoto, Susan E. H.; Frey, Herbert; Zimbelman, James R.

    2002-08-01

    The nature and origin of the Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) on Mars has been debated since the return of the first Viking images. The MFF's young age, distinctive surface texture, and lack of obvious source have prompted multiple hypotheses for its origin. This study uses data from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission to examine the MFF at all available scales. We discuss and quantify observations from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topography and Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images to better constrain the origin of the MFF. Topographic grid estimates yield a present extent of 2.1 × 106 km2 and a volume of 1.4 × 106 km3; however, remnant yardang deposits observed far from the thicker lobes of MFF material suggest that it may have once covered up to 5 × 106 km2. We do not find compelling evidence for extensive fluvial reworking of the MFF; however, in several regions, buried channels are apparent in the MFF because the formation is draped over underlying topography. Layering is apparent at all scales, from submeter to hundreds of meters, with variable resistance to weathering. Continuity of layers appears to be local to regional, but not likely formation-wide. Yardangs form both parallel and bidirectional patterns, with resistant layers and jointing probably influencing their orientations. A comparative study of MFF regional topography and surface expression indicates that the MFF is quantitatively dissimilar to Martian polar layered deposits. The material is most likely a friable and irregularly consolidated air fall deposit of probable volcanic origin.

  1. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Jayalakshmi, Sita; Ruikar, Devashish; Surath, Mohandas

    2013-07-01

    Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS) is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth). Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is discussed.

  2. [Cranial nerves - spectrum of inflammatory and tumorous changes].

    PubMed

    Nemec, S F; Kasprian, G; Nemec, U; Czerny, C

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory processes as well as primary and secondary tumorous changes may involve cranial nerves causing neurological deficits. In addition to neurologists, ENT physicians, ophthalmologists and maxillofacial surgeons, radiologists play an important role in the investigation of patients with cranial nerve symptoms. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and particularly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow the depiction of the cranial nerve anatomy and pathological neural changes. This article briefly describes the imaging techniques in MDCT and MRI and is dedicated to the radiological presentation of inflammatory and tumorous cranial nerve pathologies.

  3. Arterial supply of the lower cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Loukas, Marios; Fisher, Winfield S; Rizk, Elias; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    The lower cranial nerves receive their arterial supply from an intricate network of tributaries derived from the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories. A contemporary, comprehensive literature review of the vascular supply of the lower cranial nerves was performed. The vascular supply to the trigeminal, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, spinal accessory, and hypoglossal nerves are illustrated with a special emphasis on clinical issues. Frequently the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories all contribute to the vascular supply of an individual cranial nerve along its course. Understanding of the vasculature of the lower cranial nerves is of great relevance for skull base surgery. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-11-01

    The arterial supply to the upper cranial nerves is derived from a complex network of branches derived from the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations. We performed a comprehensive literature review of the arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves with an emphasis on clinical considerations. Arteries coursing in close proximity to the cranial nerves regularly give rise to small vessels that supply the nerve. Knowledge of the arteries supplying the cranial nerves is of particular importance during surgical approaches to the skull base. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cranial radiation exposure during cerebral catheter angiography.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Muhammad Omar; Sandoval, Daniel; Buchan, Andrew; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Taylor, Christopher L

    2014-10-01

    Radiation exposure to patients and personnel remains a major concern in the practice of interventional radiology, with minimal literature available on exposure to the forehead and cranium. In this study, we measured cranial radiation exposure to the patient, operating interventional neuroradiologist, and circulating nurse during neuroangiographic procedures. We also report the effectiveness of wearing a 0.5 mm lead equivalent cap as protection against radiation scatter. 24 consecutive adult interventional neuroradiology procedures (six interventional, 18 diagnostic) were prospectively studied for cranial radiation exposures in the patient and personnel. Data were collected using electronic detectors and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Mean fluoroscopy time for diagnostic and interventional procedures was 8.48 (SD 2.79) min and 26.80 (SD 6.57) min, respectively. Mean radiation exposure to the operator's head was 0.08 mSv, as measured on the outside of the 0.5 mm lead equivalent protective headgear. This amounts to around 150 mSv/year, far exceeding the current deterministic threshold for the lens of the eye (ie, 20 mSv/year) in high volume centers performing up to five procedures a day. When compared with doses measured on the inside of the protective skullcap, there was a statistically significant reduction in the amount of radiation received by the operator's skull. Our study suggests that a modern neurointerventional suite is safe when equipped with proper protective shields and personal gear. However, cranial exposure is not completely eliminated with existing protective devices and the addition of a protective skullcap eliminates this exposure to both the operator and support staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Cranial computed tomographic abnormalities in leptomeningeal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Glass, J.P.; Geoffray, A.; Wallace, S.

    1984-11-01

    Sixty-four (57.6%) of 111 cancer patients with cerebrospinal fluid cytology positive for malignant cells had cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans within 2 weeks before or after a lumbar puncture. Twenty-two (34.3%) of the 64 had abnormal CT findings indicative of leptomeningeal metastasis. Thirteen (59.6%) of these 22 patients had associated parenchymal metastases. Recognition of leptomeningeal disease may alter the management of patients with parenchymal metastases. Communicating hydrocephalus in cancer patients should be considered to be related to leptomeningeal metastasis until proven otherwise.

  7. The role of cranial kinesis in birds.

    PubMed

    Bout, R G; Zweers, G A

    2001-12-01

    In birds, the ability to move the upper beak relative to the braincase has been the subject of many functional morphological investigations, but in many instances the adaptive significance of cranial kinesis remains unclear. Alternatively, cranial kinesis may be considered a consequence of the general design of the skull, rather than an adaptive trait as such. The present study reviews some results related to the mechanism and functional significance of cranial kinesis in birds. Quantitative three-dimensional X-ray has shown that in skulls morphologically as divers as paleognaths and neognaths the mechanism for elevation of the upper beak is very similar. One of the mechanisms proposed for avian jaw movement is a mechanical coupling of the upper and the lower jaw movement by the postorbital ligament. Such a mechanical coupling would necessitate upper beak elevation. However, independent control of upper and lower jaw has been shown to occur during beak movements in birds. Moreover, kinematic modeling and force measurements suggests that the maximum extensibility of collagen, in combination with the short distance of the insertion of the postorbital ligament to the quadrato-mandibular articulation do not constitute a block to lower jaw depression. The lower jaw ligaments serve to limit the maximal extension of the mandibula. It is suggested here that cranial kinesis in avian feeding may have evolved as a consequence of an increase in eye size. This increase in size led to a reduction of bony bars in the lateral aspect of the skull enabling the transfer of quadrate movement to the upper jaw. The selective forces favoring the development of a kinetic upper beak in birds may be subtle and act in different ecological contexts. Simultaneous movement of the upper and lower jaw not only increases the velocity of beak movements, but with elevated upper beak also less force is required to open the lower jaw. However, the penalty of increased mobility of elements in a

  8. An innovative transparent cranial window based on skull optical clearing An innovative transparent cranial window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, T. H.; Luo, Q. M.; Zhu, D.

    2012-06-01

    Noninvasive optical methods for viewing the structural and functional organization of cortex have been playing important roles in brain research, which usually suffer from turbid skull. Various cranial window models based on surgical operation have been proposed, but have respective limitations. Here, an innovative transparent cranial window of mouse was established by topically treatment with a skull optical clearing solution (SOCS), rather than by craniotomy. Based on the experiment of optical clearing efficacy of skull in vitro, we found that the turbid skull became transparent within 25 min after application of SOCS. The USAF target is visible through the treated skull, and the calculated resolution can achieve 8.4 μm. After the in vivo skull was topically treated with SOCS, the cortical micro-vessels can be visible clearly. The quantitative analysis indicated that the minimum resolution diameter of micro-vessels in 14.4±0.8 μm through the transparent cranial window closed to that in 12.8±0.9 μm of the exposed cortical micro-vessels. Further, preliminary results from Laser Speckle Imaging demonstrated that there was no influence on cortical blood flow distribution of mouse after topically treatment with SOCS on skull. This transparent cranial window will provide a convenient model for cortex imaging in vivo, which is very significant for neuroscience research.

  9. Is Mandibular Fossa Morphology and Articular Eminence Inclination Associated with Temporomandibular Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Akhlaghian, Marzieh; Abolvardi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Finding a significant relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) morphology and the incidence of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) may help early prediction and prevention of these problems. Purpose The purpose of the present study was to determine the morphology of mandibular fossa and the articular eminence inclination in patients with TMD and in control group using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method The CBCT data of bilateral TMJs of 40 patients with TMD and 23 symptom-free cases were evaluated. The articular eminence inclination, as well as the glenoid fossa depth and width of the mandibular fossa were measured. The paired t-test was used to compare these values between two groups. Results The articular eminence inclination and glenoid fossa width and depth were significantly higher in patients with TMD than in the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion The articular eminence inclination was steeper in patients with TMD than in the control group. Glenoid fossa width and depth were higher in patients with TMD than that in the control group. This information may shed light on the relationship between TMJ morphology and the incidence of TMD. PMID:27284559

  10. 3D printing the pterygopalatine fossa: a negative space model of a complex structure.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Ross; Parihar, Shivani; Skarparis, Yiannis; Varsou, Ourania; Cezayirli, Enis

    2017-08-30

    The pterygopalatine fossa is one of the most complex anatomical regions to understand. It is poorly visualized in cadaveric dissection and most textbooks rely on schematic depictions. We describe our approach to creating a low-cost, 3D model of the pterygopalatine fossa, including its associated canals and foramina, using an affordable "desktop" 3D printer. We used open source software to create a volume render of the pterygopalatine fossa from axial slices of a head computerised tomography scan. These data were then exported to a 3D printer to produce an anatomically accurate model. The resulting 'negative space' model of the pterygopalatine fossa provides a useful and innovative aid for understanding the complex anatomical relationships of the pterygopalatine fossa. This model was designed primarily for medical students; however, it will also be of interest to postgraduates in ENT, ophthalmology, neurosurgery, and radiology. The technical process described may be replicated by other departments wishing to develop their own anatomical models whilst incurring minimal costs.

  11. Sandwich Wound Closure Reduces the Risk of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Heymanns, Verena; Oseni, Abidemi W.; Alyeldien, Ameer; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Parvin, Richard; Scholz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8%) in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark), Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA) and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy). The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature. PMID:27478578

  12. Acute posterior fossa epidural hematoma in a newborn infant with Menkes disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Horikawa, Masahiro; Wakamatsu, Hajime; Hashimoto, Jyunya; Nawashiro, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) in newborn infants is rare compared with other types of intracranial hemorrhages. Furthermore, posterior fossa EDH is extremely rare. We present a case of posterior fossa EDH in an infant with Menkes disease with accessory bones in the occiput. A male infant with a condition diagnosed with Menkes disease by prenatal testing was born at 39 weeks via vacuum extraction. The patient presented with a mild tremor at 2 days after delivery. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan showed an acute EDH in the posterior fossa, extending into the occipitoparietal area. Three-dimensional CT and bone window CT scan revealed several accessory bones, diastasis of 1 accessory suture, a communicated fracture, and a linear fracture in the occipital bone. Furthermore, a bone fragment from a communicated fracture displaced toward the inside. The patient was treated conservatively for EDH because of his good general condition. The hematoma gradually resolved, and his tremor did not recur. We suggest the following mechanism of posterior fossa EDH development in our patient: (1) external force was applied to the occiput inside the birth canal during delivery, resulting in diastasis; (2) a communicated fracture occurred, and a bone fragment displaced toward the inside (linear fracture was caused indirectly by the force); (3) a transverse sinus was injured by the fragment; and (4) EDH developed in both the posterior fossa and supratentorial region. Copper deficiency can also cause fragility of connective tissues, vessels, and bones.

  13. Cranial index of children with normal and abnormal brain development in Sokoto, Nigeria: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Muhammad Awwal; Zagga, Abdullahi Daudu; Danfulani, Mohammed; Tadros, Aziz Abdo; Ahmed, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abnormal brain development due to neurodevelopmental disorders in children has always been an important concern, but yet has to be considered as a significant public health problem, especially in the low- and middle-income countries including Nigeria. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine whether abnormal brain development in the form of neurodevelopmental disorders causes any deviation in the cranial index of affected children. Materials and Methods: This is a comparative study on the head length, head width, and cranial index of 112 children (72 males and 40 females) diagnosed with at least one abnormal problem in brain development, in the form of a neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD), in comparison with that of 218 normal growing children without any form of NDD (121 males and 97 females), aged 0-18 years old seen at the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, over a period of six months, June to December, 2012. The head length and head width of the children was measured using standard anatomical landmarks and cranial index calculated. The data obtained was entered into the Microsoft excel worksheet and analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: The mean Cephalic Index for normal growing children with normal brain development was 79.82 ± 3.35 and that of the children with abnormal brain development was 77.78 ± 2.95 and the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: It can be deduced from this present study that the cranial index does not change in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24966551

  14. Cranial mechanics and feeding in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed

    Rayfield, Emily J

    2004-07-22

    It has been suggested that the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex was capable of producing extremely powerful bite forces and resisting multi-directional loading generated during feeding. Contrary to this suggestion is the observation that the cranium is composed of often loosely articulated facial bones, although these bones may have performed a shock-absorption role. The structural analysis technique finite element analysis (FEA) is employed here to investigate the functional morphology and cranial mechanics of the T. rex skull. In particular, I test whether the skull is optimized for the resistance of large bi-directional feeding loads, whether mobile joints are adapted for the localized resistance of feeding-induced stress and strain, and whether mobile joints act to weaken or strengthen the skull overall. The results demonstrate that the cranium is equally adapted to resist biting or tearing forces and therefore the 'puncture-pull' feeding hypothesis is well supported. Finite-element-generated stress-strain patterns are consistent with T. rex cranial morphology: the maxilla-jugal suture provides a tensile shock-absorbing function that reduces localized tension yet 'weakens' the skull overall. Furthermore, peak compressive and shear stresses localize in the nasals rather than the fronto-parietal region as seen in Allosaurus, offering a reason why robusticity is commonplace in tyrannosaurid nasals.

  15. Roentgen stereophotogrammetry for analysis of cranial growth.

    PubMed

    Selvik, G; Alberius, P; Fahlman, M

    1986-04-01

    A system of roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) has been developed and its value in studies of cranial growth in both man and the experimental animal (rabbit) has been delineated. This method is based on measurements from metal bone marker images on roentgenograms. Two roentgen tubes simultaneously expose the object, which is placed in one of two types of calibration cages. The object position does not need to be identical from one examination to the next. The cage, holding indicators of predetermined internal positions (in two or four planes), defines a laboratory coordinate system. Two-dimensional image coordinates are obtained by means of a highly accurate cartographic instrument. By computer reconstruction of the x-ray beams through the markers, 3-D object coordinates are calculated. For subsequent analysis of growth processes, extensive software is necessary. To control intrasegmental stability (routinely performed at each examination), a minimum of two markers is required, whereas three markers are needed in each skeletal segment for kinematic analysis using the rigid-body concept. Careful planning of marker placement before implantation minimizes implant loss and instability that otherwise might be a problem. Complications other than bone marker loosening have been nonexistent. The technical accuracy is high. Consequently, roentgen stereophotogrammetry, with the aid of metallic implants, is a superior means to obtain biometric information on cranial growth with relative ease.

  16. Cranial mechanics and feeding in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed Central

    Rayfield, Emily J.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex was capable of producing extremely powerful bite forces and resisting multi-directional loading generated during feeding. Contrary to this suggestion is the observation that the cranium is composed of often loosely articulated facial bones, although these bones may have performed a shock-absorption role. The structural analysis technique finite element analysis (FEA) is employed here to investigate the functional morphology and cranial mechanics of the T. rex skull. In particular, I test whether the skull is optimized for the resistance of large bi-directional feeding loads, whether mobile joints are adapted for the localized resistance of feeding-induced stress and strain, and whether mobile joints act to weaken or strengthen the skull overall. The results demonstrate that the cranium is equally adapted to resist biting or tearing forces and therefore the 'puncture-pull' feeding hypothesis is well supported. Finite-element-generated stress-strain patterns are consistent with T. rex cranial morphology: the maxilla-jugal suture provides a tensile shock-absorbing function that reduces localized tension yet 'weakens' the skull overall. Furthermore, peak compressive and shear stresses localize in the nasals rather than the fronto-parietal region as seen in Allosaurus, offering a reason why robusticity is commonplace in tyrannosaurid nasals. PMID:15306316

  17. Obelionic cranial deformation in the Puebloan Southwest.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Greg C; Madimenos, Felicia C

    2010-11-01

    As a form of cranial deformation, obelionic flattening is rare. Originally named and described by Stewart (J Wash Acad Sci 29 (1939) 460-465), based on a small sample from Florida, it has been little noted since. Previously [Nelson and Madimenos, Paper presented at the Paleopathology Association annual meeting (2007)], we reported the discovery of two individuals from the Pueblo III Gallina site of Cañada Simon I who exhibit flattening of this type. Although technically undescribed in the Southwest before now, there are tantalizing clues in the literature that it occurred in low frequencies throughout the Ancestral Pueblo world. To determine whether the obelionic flattening found at Cañada Simon I was isolated or an indication of a more widespread phenomenon, we undertook a survey of crania from other Gallina sites, Chaco Canyon, and the literature (type of deformation can be determined on lateral photographs of crania properly positioned along the Frankfort Horizontal). We examined 146 crania (78 firsthand) of which seven exhibit obelionic flattening. Our results indicate that obelionic flattening should be added to the suite of cranial deformations that occur in the Southwest. Here, we propose parameters by which obelionic flattening can be described and differentiated from the more common lambdoidal and occipital forms and suggest that the three types of flattening form a continuum of cradleboard induced deformation, although the exact mechanism for obelionic flattening remains elusive. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Benign cranial mediastinal lesions in three cats.

    PubMed

    Malik, R; Gabor, L; Hunt, G B; Church, D B; Barrs, V R; Churcher, R; Dixon, R T; Huxley, C; Canfield, P J

    1997-03-01

    Cranial mediastinal lesions were detected in three cats, associated with respiratory impairment (case one), spontaneous pneumothorax (case two) and myasthenia gravis (case three), respectively. On gross and histological examination, the first case was considered either a lymphangioma or a branchial cystic mass of the thymic region of the mediastinum; a cystic lesion was suggested by sonographic detection of multiple anechoic cavitations within a circumscribed mass, while fine needle aspiration cytology excluded lymphosarcoma. The second case was diagnosed histologically as a cystic thymoma, but the third case was not examined microscopically. The masses were amenable to surgical excision in the first two cats, while this proved unnecessary in the third case because of resolution following treatment with dexamethasone. Corticosteroid responsiveness was unhelpful in distinguishing between these benign lesions and lymphosarcoma, as in two cases there was a partial or complete response to dosing with prednisolone or dexamethasone. These cases are presented to emphasise that conditions other than lymphosarcoma can produce cranial mediastinal lesions in cats, and that the prognosis for surgical treatment of lymphangiomas, multilocular thymic cysts and cystic thymomas can be excellent.

  19. Vasopressin function in familial cranial diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, P. H.; Robertson, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    A family suffering from cranial diabetes insipidus, that extends over 4 generations, is described. Inheritance of polyuria was autosomal dominant. Vasopressin function was studied in members of the last 2 generations, 4 of whom had polyuria. Osmoregulation of vasopressin secretion was assessed by infusion of hypertonic saline. Plasma vasopressin remained undetectable in one patient, while 2 others had very blunted vasopressin responses to osmotic stimulation. Three non-osmotic stimuli were applied. Controlled hypotension produced by trimetaphan infusion and insulin-induced hypoglycaemia did not increase plasma vasopressin but apomorphine-induced nausea caused a minimal rise in plasma vasopressin to 0.7 pg/ml. Polyuria and thirst resolved with antidiuretic therapy in all patients studied. Congenital absence of vasopressin as in Brattleboro rats is unlikely to account for diabetes insipidus in this disorder since small increases in vasopressin have been demonstrated in these patients. In view of previous post-mortem findings, familial cranial diabetes insipidus is most likely to be due to degeneration of vasopressin-synthesizing neurones. PMID:7279821

  20. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required.

  1. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required. PMID:26167022

  2. Posterior fossa imaging in 158 children with ataxia.

    PubMed

    Boddaert, N; Desguerre, I; Bahi-Buisson, N; Romano, S; Valayannopoulos, V; Saillour, Y; Seidenwurm, D; Grevent, D; Berteloot, L; Lebre, A-S; Zilbovicius, M; Puget, S; Salomon, R; Attie-Bitach, T; Munnich, A; Brunelle, F; de Lonlay, P

    2010-10-01

    To propose a MRI cerebellar algorithm that may be applied to guide genetic/malformative or biochemical investigations for patients with cerebellar ataxia. Cerebral MRI of 158 patients with cerebellar ataxia and no supratentorial abnormality were examined according to a new categorization system based on posterior fossa imaging. The clinical and radiological findings were confronted to biochemical and/or genetic results using the MR cerebellar algorithm. Seven groups of cerebellar MRI pattern were described: vermian dysgenesis (n=27), cerebellar hypoplasia (n=15), hemispheric cerebellar dysgenesis (n=6), unilateral hemispheric atrophy (n=5), global cerebellar atrophy (n=84), signal abnormalities (n=11) and normal MRI (n=10). Cerebellar hypoplasia, vermian dysgenesis and hemispheric cerebellar dysgenesis groups were classified as malformative disorders. Global atrophy and signal abnormality groups were classified as metabolic disorders. In the vermian dysgenesis group, a specific genetic diagnosis was obtained in eight children (8/27) and all of the mutated genes (AHI1 (JBS3), CEP290 (JBS5), TMEM67 (JBS6), and RPGRIP1L (JBS7)) are involved in primary cilia function. In the group of pontocerebellar hypoplasia specific genetic diagnosis was obtained in one patient (PCH2) (1/15). Thus, nine of 42 children classified as malformative disorder had a molecular diagnosis. Global atrophy and signal abnormality groups were classified as metabolic disorders, specific biochemical was obtained in 46/95 children. In global atrophy group, respiratory chain deficiency was diagnosed in 18 children (18/84). In 21 children a congenital disorders of glycosylation type 1a (CDG Ia) was diagnosed (21/84) and infantile neuroaxonale dystrophy (INAD) was diagnosed in one child. In signal abnormalities group, specific biochemical diagnosis was obtained in six out of 11 children, five children with respiratory chain deficiency and one child with sulphite oxidase deficiency. In hemispheric

  3. Delayed removal of a maxillary third molar from the infratemporal fossa.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliveira, Guillermo; Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alvarez-Flores, Modesto; Gregoire-Ferriol, Johanna; Martínez-Gimeno, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Removal of an impacted superior third molar is usually a simple and uncomplicated procedure for an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Nevertheless, complications are possible and include infection, facial swallowing, trismus, wound dehiscence, root fracture or even orosinusal fistula. Iatrogenic displacement into the infratemporal fossa is frequently mentioned but rarely reported. This anatomical fossa includes several important structures such as the internal maxillary artery, the venous pterygoid plexus, the sphenopalatine nerve, the coronoid process of the mandible and the pterygoid muscles. Recommended treatment includes immediate surgical removal if possible or initial observation and secondary removal, as necessary, because of infection, limited mandibular movement, inability to extract the tooth, or the patient's psychological unease. Sometimes, the displaced tooth may spontaneously migrate inferiorly and becomes accessible intraorally. This report describes the location and secondary surgical removal of a left maxillary third molar displaced into the infratemporal fossa, two weeks after first attempt at extraction.

  4. Hypertensive posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome causing posterior fossa edema and hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Grossbach, Andrew J; Abel, Taylor J; Hodis, Brendan; Wassef, Shafik N; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2014-02-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a well characterized entity resulting from the inability of cerebral autoregulation to adequately protect the brain from uncontrolled hypertension. It primarily affects the occipital lobes, but can also involve the structures in the posterior fossa including the brainstem and cerebellum. Treatment usually consists of strict blood pressure control, but more aggressive management may be indicated with acutely worsening neurological status. We present a patient with hypertensive encephalopathy that resulted in hydrocephalus and brainstem compression necessitating surgical decompression requiring ventriculostomy and suboccipital craniectomy. In rare cases, PRES can present with severe brainstem compression requiring emergent posterior fossa decompression. When brainstem signs are present on exam, emergent posterior fossa decompression may be safer than ventriculostomy alone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Posterior fossa infected dermoid with congenital heart disease: A novel hypothesis of an unusual association

    PubMed Central

    Teegala, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial dermoid cysts commonly present as a discharging sinus, local swelling, mass lesion, or abscess formation. These can sometimes be found in association with congenital anomalies. The author presents two original cases of infected posterior fossa dermoid associated with congenital heart diseases (CHDs) that is very rare. The embryologic basis for this unique occurrence is reviewed, and a new hypothesis proposed. Two infants with CHD presented with infected midline posterior fossa dermoid. Excision of the dermoid cyst with the sinus tract was performed. Postoperative period was uneventful. Both the infants had undergone surgery for congenial heart disease a few months prior to the present clinical presentation with uneventful recovery. Infected posterior fossa dermoid cyst without a discharging sinus should prompt a thorough examination to detect CHD. Early diagnosis and timely management results in better outcome. PMID:26557168

  6. Displacement of a maxillary third molar into the infratemporal fossa: case report.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulos, Ioannis; Papadaki, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The case of a maxillary third molar displaced into the infratemporal fossa, with difficulty in localization due to the synchronous creation of oroantral communication, is described in this article. The patient was referred to the oral and maxillofacial department and underwent successful surgical treatment through an intraoral access. The causes of tooth displacement into the infratemporal fossa, the aid of a computerized tomography (CT) scan in tooth localization, and the difficulty in treating this complication, particularly when the tooth migrates toward the base of the skull, are emphasized. Prevention of maxillary third molar displacement into the infratemporal fossa predominates over removal and is achieved by adequate flap design, correct extraction technique, and a distal retractor during surgical extraction. In the case of displacement, no effort to retrieve the tooth is recommended because of the risk of hemorrhage, neurologic injury, and further displacement of the tooth. The patient should be treated with antibiotics and referred to an oral and maxillofacial department.

  7. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  8. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  9. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies...

  12. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies...

  13. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies...

  14. [Rapidly progressive compromise of cranial pairs as neurosyphilis manifestation].

    PubMed

    Baccaro, Fernando; Moldes, Sofía; Novelli Poisson, Paola; Arduin, Julieta; Valerga, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis remains a common disease throughout the world, being neurosyphilis a relatively common manifestation. A case of a 34 years old male with HIV and neurosyphilis is presented, characterized by a clinical course evidenced by progressive palsy of cranial nerves. This case is unusual and a rare presentation of progressive cranial involvement with swallowing deficit, have found no similar data in the literature.

  15. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b...

  16. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b...

  17. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b...

  18. Asymmetric type F botulism with cranial nerve demyelination.

    PubMed

    Filozov, Alina; Kattan, Jessica A; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N; Fagan, Ryan P

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients.

  19. Cranial nerve assessment: a concise guide to clinical examination.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Omprakash; Rizk, Elias; Rodriguez, Julian; Lee, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Examination of the cranial nerves is an integral and important part of a complete neurological examination. Historically, these skills were crucial for diagnosing specific lesions. With the development of modern imaging modalities, the significance of clinical examination techniques has perhaps been undermined. The authors present an overview of each cranial nerve with a concise summary of examination techniques.

  20. Asymmetric Type F Botulism with Cranial Nerve Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kattan, Jessica A.; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C. Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N.; Fagan, Ryan P.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients. PMID:22257488

  1. The contribution of subsistence to global human cranial variation.

    PubMed

    Noback, Marlijn L; Harvati, Katerina

    2015-03-01

    Diet-related cranial variation in modern humans is well documented on a regional scale, with ample examples of cranial changes related to the agricultural transition. However, the influence of subsistence strategy on global cranial variation is less clear, having been confirmed only for the mandible, and dietary effects beyond agriculture are often neglected. Here we identify global patterns of subsistence-related human cranial shape variation. We analysed a worldwide sample of 15 populations (n = 255) with known subsistence strategies using 3-D landmark datasets designed to capture the shape of different units of the cranium. Results show significant correlations between global cranial shape and diet, especially for temporalis muscle shape and general cranial shape. Importantly, the differences between populations with either a plant- or an animal-based diet are more pronounced than those between agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers, suggesting that the influence of diet as driver of cranial variation is not limited to Holocene transitions to agricultural subsistence. Dental arch shape did not correlate with subsistence pattern, possibly indicating the high plasticity of this region of the face in relation to age, disease and individual use of the dentition. Our results highlight the importance of subsistence strategy as one of the factors underlying the evolution of human geographic cranial variation.

  2. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  3. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull....

  4. Cranial joint histology in the mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos): new insights on avian cranial kinesis.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Alida M; Witmer, Lawrence M; Holliday, Casey M

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of avian cranial kinesis is a phenomenon in part responsible for the remarkable diversity of avian feeding adaptations observable today. Although osteological, developmental and behavioral features of the feeding system are frequently studied, comparatively little is known about cranial joint skeletal tissue composition and morphology from a microscopic perspective. These data are key to understanding the developmental, biomechanical and evolutionary underpinnings of kinesis. Therefore, here we investigated joint microstructure in juvenile and adult mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos; Anseriformes). Ducks belong to a diverse clade of galloanseriform birds, have derived adaptations for herbivory and kinesis, and are model organisms in developmental biology. Thus, new insights into their cranial functional morphology will refine our understanding of avian cranial evolution. A total of five specimens (two ducklings and three adults) were histologically sampled, and two additional specimens (a duckling and an adult) were subjected to micro-computed tomographic scanning. Five intracranial joints were sampled: the jaw joint (quadrate-articular); otic joint (quadrate-squamosal); palatobasal joint (parasphenoid-pterygoid); the mandibular symphysis (dentary-dentary); and the craniofacial hinge (a complex flexion zone involving four different pairs of skeletal elements). In both the ducklings and adults, the jaw, otic and palatobasal joints are all synovial, with a synovial cavity and articular cartilage on each surface (i.e. bichondral joints) ensheathed in a fibrous capsule. The craniofacial hinge begins as an ensemble of patent sutures in the duckling, but in the adult it becomes more complex: laterally it is synovial; whereas medially, it is synostosed by a bridge of chondroid bone. We hypothesize that it is chondroid bone that provides some of the flexible properties of this joint. The heavily innervated mandibular symphysis is already fused in the

  5. Unusual anatomical detection of a third molar in the infratemporal fossa.

    PubMed

    Corega, C; Vaida, L; Festila, D; Bertossi, D

    2013-01-01

    Third molar presence in the infratemporal fossa is a rare event and it has been reported previously only two times in the literature, except for the cases which arise from complications occurring during the extraction of the impacted upper third molar. Due to the presence of important vessel bundles and nerves in this area, third molar removal requires a correct surgical management in order to avoid many possible serious side effects. We report an unusual case of upper third molar detected in the infratemporal fossa, which has been thoroughly investigated radiologically and removed through a safe surgical approach.

  6. Neonatal cranial sonography: A concise review for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Singhi, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Cranial sonography continues to hold an important place in neonatal care. Attributes favorable to sonography that make it almost indispensable for routine care of the newborn includes easy access, low cost, portability, lack of ionizing radiations and exemption from sedation or anaesthesia. Cranial sonography has highest impact in neonates suspected to have meningitis and its complications; perinatal ischemia particularly periventricular leukomalacia (PVL); hydrocephalus resulting from multitude of causes and hemorrhage. Not withstanding this, cranial sonography has yielded results for a repertoire of indications. Approach to cranial sonography involves knowledge of the normal developmental anatomy of brain parenchyma for correct interpretation. Correct technique, taking advantage of multiple sonographic windows and variable frequencies of the ultrasound probes allows a detailed and comprehensive examination of brain parenchyma. In this review, we discuss the technique, normal and variant anatomy as well as disease entities of neonatal cranial sonography. PMID:27195026

  7. Dangerous extracranial-intracranial anastomoses and supply to the cranial nerves: vessels the neurointerventionalist needs to know.

    PubMed

    Geibprasert, S; Pongpech, S; Armstrong, D; Krings, T

    2009-09-01

    Transarterial embolization in the external carotid artery (ECA) territory has a major role in the endovascular management of epistaxis, skull base tumors, and dural arteriovenous fistulas. Knowledge of the potential anastomotic routes, identification of the cranial nerve supply from the ECA, and the proper choice of embolic material are crucial to help the interventionalist avoid neurologic complications during the procedure. Three regions along the skull base constitute potential anastomotic routes between the extracranial and intracranial arteries: the orbital, the petrocavernous, and the upper cervical regions. Branches of the internal maxillary artery have anastomoses with the ophthalmic artery and petrocavernous internal carotid artery (ICA), whereas the branches of the ascending pharyngeal artery are connected to the petrocavernous ICA. Branches of both the ascending pharyngeal artery and the occipital artery have anastomoses with the vertebral artery. To avoid cranial nerve palsy, one must have knowledge of the supply to the lower cranial nerves: The petrous branch of the middle meningeal artery and the stylomastoid branch of the posterior auricular artery form the facial arcade as the major supply to the facial nerve, and the neuromeningeal trunk of the ascending pharyngeal artery supplies the lower cranial nerves (CN IX-XII).

  8. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories (a) Identification. Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without...

  9. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories (a) Identification. Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without...

  10. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories (a) Identification. Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without...

  11. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories (a) Identification. Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without...

  12. Quantitative computed tomography and cranial burr holes: a model to evaluate the quality of cranial reconstruction in humans.

    PubMed

    Worm, Paulo Valdeci; Ferreira, Nelson Pires; Ferreira, Marcelo Paglioli; Kraemer, Jorge Luiz; Lenhardt, Rene; Alves, Ronnie Peterson Marcondes; Wunderlich, Ricardo Castilho; Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2012-05-01

    Current methods to evaluate the biologic development of bone grafts in human beings do not quantify results accurately. Cranial burr holes are standardized critical bone defects, and the differences between bone powder and bone grafts have been determined in numerous experimental studies. This study evaluated quantitative computed tomography (QCT) as a method to objectively measure cranial bone density after cranial reconstruction with autografts. In each of 8 patients, 2 of 4 surgical burr holes were reconstructed with autogenous wet bone powder collected during skull trephination, and the other 2 holes, with a circular cortical bone fragment removed from the inner table of the cranial bone flap. After 12 months, the reconstructed areas and a sample of normal bone were studied using three-dimensional QCT; bone density was measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Mean (SD) bone density was 1535.89 (141) HU for normal bone (P < 0.0001), 964 (176) HU for bone fragments, and 453 (241) HU for bone powder (P < 0.001). As expected, the density of the bone fragment graft was consistently greater than that of bone powder. Results confirm the accuracy and reproducibility of QCT, already demonstrated for bone in other locations, and suggest that it is an adequate tool to evaluate cranial reconstructions. The combination of QCT and cranial burr holes is an excellent model to accurately measure the quality of new bone in cranial reconstructions and also seems to be an appropriate choice of experimental model to clinically test any cranial bone or bone substitute reconstruction.

  13. Growth of functional cranial components in rats submitted to intergenerational undernutrition

    PubMed Central

    Cesani, María F; Orden, Alicia B; Oyhenart, Evelia E; Zucchi, Mariel; Muñe, María C; Pucciarelli, Héctor M

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to discover how intergenerational undernutrition affects the growth of major and minor functional cranial components in two generations of rats. Control animals constituted the parental generation (P). The undernourished generations (F1 and F2) were fed 75% of the control diet. Animals were X-rayed every 10 days from 20 to 100 days of age. The length, width and height of the major (neurocranium and splanchnocranium) and minor (anterior-neural, middle-neural, posterior-neural, otic, respiratory, masticatory and alveolar) cranial components were measured on each radiograph. Volumetric indices were calculated to estimate size variations of these components. Data were processed using the Kruskal–Wallis and Kolmogorov–Smirnov tests for two samples. Impairment in splanchnocranial and neurocranial growth was found, the latter being more affected than the former in F1. Comparison between F2 and F1 animals showed cumulative effects of undernutrition in both major and minor components (anterior-neural, respiratory, masticatory and alveolar in males, and middle-neural and respiratory in females). Such differential effects on minor components may reflect a residual mechanical strain resulting from the linkage between components. This phenomenon was clearly observed in the neurocranium and could be understood as an adaptive response to the demands of the associated functional matrices. PMID:16879595

  14. On the terminology of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Simon, František; Marečková-Štolcová, Elena; Páč, Libor

    2011-10-20

    The present contribution adopts various points of view to discuss the terminology of the twelve nervi craniales. These are paired nerves and have dual names, terms with Roman ordinal numerals, i.e., the nerves are numbered in the top-to-bottom direction, and descriptive historical names. The time of origin and motivation behind the investigated terms are determined. The majority of terms come from the 17th and 18th centuries. The motivation behind most of them is (a) nerve localization, as this is in conformity with anatomical nomenclature in general, (b) nerve function, and rarely (c) nerve appearance. The occurrence of synonymous names and variants is also a focus of attention. In several cases, reference is made to the process called terminologization, meaning when a certain expression acquires technical meaning and the characteristic/feature of the term. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Retained garden fork following cranial stab injury.

    PubMed

    Gonya, Sonwabile; Mbatha, Andile; Moyeni, Nondabula; Enicker, Basil

    2016-01-07

    Retained garden fork is a rare complication of penetrating cranial trauma. Retained knife blade is the most commonly reported presentation. We report an unusual case of a 30-year-old male patient treated at our institution, who presented with a retained garden fork following a stab to the head, with no associated neurological deficits. Computerized tomographic scan of the brain was performed preoperatively to assess the trajectory of the weapon and parenchymal injury. A craniectomy was performed to facilitate removal of the weapon in the operating theatre under general anaesthesia. Intravenous prophylactic antibiotics were administered pre- and postoperatively to prevent septic complications. The patient recovered well and was discharged home. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of cranial sensory placode development

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Cranial sensory placodes derive from discrete patches of the head ectoderm, and give rise to numerous sensory structures. During gastrulation, a specialized “neural border zone” forms around the neural plate in response to interactions between the neural and non-neural ectoderm and signals from adjacent mesodermal and/or endodermal tissues. This zone subsequently gives rise to two distinct precursor populations of the peripheral nervous system: the neural crest and the pre-placodal ectoderm (PPE). The PPE is a common field from which all cranial sensory placodes arise (adenohypophyseal, olfactory, lens, trigeminal, epibranchial, otic). Members of the Six family of transcription factors are major regulators of PPE specification, in partnership with co-factor proteins such as Eya. Six gene activity also maintains tissue boundaries between the PPE, neural crest and epidermis by repressing genes that specify the fates of those adjacent ectodermally-derived domains. As the embryo acquires anterior-posterior identity, the PPE becomes transcriptionally regionalized, and it subsequently subdivides into specific placodes with distinct developmental fates in response to signaling from adjacent tissues. Each placode is characterized by a unique transcriptional program that leads to the differentiation of highly specialized cells, such as neurosecretory cells, somatic sensory receptor cells, chemosensory neurons, peripheral glia and supporting cells. In this review, we summarize the transcriptional and signaling factors that regulate key steps of placode development, influence subsequent sensory neuron specification, and discuss what is known about mutations in some of the essential PPE genes that underlie human congenital syndromes. PMID:25662264

  17. Cranial computed tomography in purulent meningitis of childhood.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Oguz; Caksen, Hüseyin; Arslan, Sükrü; Atas, Bülent; Uner, Abdurrahman; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Odabas, Dursun

    2004-02-01

    The cranial computed tomography (CT) findings of 48 children with purulent meningitis were examined, prospectively, to determine the importance of cranial CT findings on the prognosis of childhood meningitis, in a developing country. The age of children ranged from 2 months to 13 years. Of 48 patients, 29 (60.5%) survived without sequelae, 13 (27%) survived with sequelae, and six (12.5%) died. Cranial CT was normal in 21 (43%) patients of 48 children with meningitis at admission. Abnormal CT findings were detected in 10, 11, and 6 children in the groups of survived without sequelae, survived with sequelae, and deaths, respectively, at admission (p <.05) We found that CT scan results were correlated with neurological signs (p <.05). At least one or more cranial CTs were was re-taken in children in whom the first CT revealed abnormal findings; we did not find a statistically significant difference for the follow-up CT findings between the groups (p >.05). Hydrocephalus and subdural effusion were the commonest abnormal CT findings. In conclusion, our findings showed that cranial CT may safely be used to detect intracranial complications of meningitis in childhood and the ratio of sequelae and death were more common in children with abnormal cranial CT than those of normal cranial CT findings. Additionally, there was a positive correlation between CT scan results and neurological signs.

  18. A pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet for correcting positional plagiocephaly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Walter T; Richards, Kirsten; Redhed, James; Papay, Frank A

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was o determine the efficacy of a newly developed pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet for correcting positional plagiocephaly. The design was retrospective and the setting was a tertiary care center. Subjects were all patients in whom positional plagiocephaly has been diagnosed and who have been fitted by the Orthotics and Prosthetics Department for the helmet. Diagonal cranial lengths and widths were measured at each visit. Analysis included the calculation of the ratio change in oblique diameters compared with time, patient's age, and head circumference. Seventy-five patients met inclusion criteria (50 boys, 25 girls). Patients with pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet therapy had significantly improved outcomes as compared with pretreatment measurements (P < or = 0.0001). The helmet did not limit cranial growth as evidenced by significant normalization of the oblique measurement ratio when compared with increasing cranial circumference and age (P = 0.0003, P < or = 0.0001, respectively). The pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet successfully corrects positional plagiocephaly and does not hinder cranial growth.

  19. Concomitant cranial and ocular combat injuries during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    PubMed

    Cho, Raymond I; Bakken, Hans E; Reynolds, Mark E; Schlifka, Brett A; Powers, David B

    2009-09-01

    Concomitant cranial and ocular injuries were frequently seen in combat casualties during Operation Iraqi Freedom. The incidence of these injuries is reported along with an interventional case series. A retrospective review was conducted of all surgical patients treated by U.S. Army neurosurgeons and ophthalmologists in Iraq from December 2005 to April 2006. Out of 104 patients with cranial trauma and 158 patients with ocular trauma, 34 had both cranial and ocular injuries (32.7 and 21.5% of patients with cranial and ocular injuries, respectively). Neurosurgical procedures included exploratory craniotomy, decompressive craniectomy, and frontal sinus surgery. Ophthalmologic surgical procedures included globe exploration, open globe repair, primary enucleation, orbital fracture repair, lateral canthotomy and cantholysis, and repair of lid and periocular lacerations. Patients with cranial trauma had a higher incidence of orbital fracture, orbital compartment syndrome, and multiple ocular injuries compared with patients without cranial trauma (odds ratio 6.4, 3.9, and 3.3, respectively). A strong association exists between cranial and ocular trauma in combat casualties treated during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Combat health support personnel should maintain a high level of suspicion for one of these injuries when the other is present. Co-locating neurosurgeons and ophthalmologists in support of combat operations facilitates the optimal treatment of patients with these combined injuries.

  20. Posterior fossa syndrome: Review of the behavioral and emotional aspects in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Jane C; Abrams, Annah N

    2017-02-15

    Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, occurs in the posterior fossa, the part of the intracranial cavity that contains the brainstem and the cerebellum. The cerebellum is involved in many complex aspects of human behavior and function, and when it is disrupted or insulted, this can lead to significant sequelae in children with posterior fossa tumors. A constellation of impairing and distressing symptoms, including mutism, ataxia/hypotonia, and emotional lability, develops in approximately 25% of children after the surgical resection of posterior fossa tumors. These symptoms may impede treatment and frequently require intervention in order for children to be able to participate in their care. The eventual recovery of speech occurs for most, but with slowly improving dysarthria over many months. Behavioral changes and emotional lability also occur. This phenomenon has been classified differently by different investigators over the past 35 years. For the purposes of this article, the term posterior fossa syndrome is used to refer to the neuropsychiatric and behavioral features that compose this condition. The current review summarizes the development of the clinical understanding of this phenomenon with a focus on near- and long-term psychosocial and psychiatric implications. Also, clinical examples of the presentation, management, and lasting implications of this syndrome are provided. This review is intended to be a resource for clinicians who treat affected children. Cancer 2017;123:551-559. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  1. A Cognitive and Affective Pattern in Posterior Fossa Strokes in Children: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossorotoff, Manoelle; Gonin-Flambois, Coralie; Gitiaux, Cyril; Quijano, Susana; Boddaert, Nathalie; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Barnerias, Christine; Dulac, Olivier; Brunelle, Francis; Desguerre, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Posterior fossa strokes account for about 10% of ischaemic strokes in children. Although motor and dysautonomic symptoms are common, to our knowledge cognitive and affective deficits have not been described in the paediatric literature. Our aim, therefore, was to describe these symptoms and deficits. Method: In a retrospective study, we…

  2. Snapshot quiz - recurrent right iliac fossa pain in the patient with a previous history of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Aris Chandran, Johan; Cobb, Will A; Keeler, Barrie D; Soin, Bob

    2015-06-01

    A low threshold for computed tomography (CT) scanning in patients with previous appendicectomy and right iliac fossa pain helps facilitate timely diagnosis and exclusion of other differential diagnoses. Here, we present a rare cause which has significant medicolegal ramifications and is accurately diagnosed with CT.

  3. Small-Scale Features of the Medusae Fossae Formation: Do They Support a Volcanic Origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Medusae Fossae Formation is a widespread and voluminous fine-grained deposit that lies just north of the Martian equator along the dichotomy boundary. It is thought to consist of pyroclastic deposits, either in the form of pyroclastic flows or ashfall, though numerous other possibilities have been suggested, including wind-blown loess and icy dust. For this work a survey was conducted of 427 High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images spread across the Medusae Fossae Formation. From these images maps were created of small-scale features which can aid in distinguishing between formation hypotheses for the deposit, including rootless cones, jointing, layering, and exposed dikes. Relationships between the Medusae Fossae Formation and adjacent lava plains and volcanoes were also carefully examined using HiRISE, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Context Imager (CTX), Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), and Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbital Camera (MOC) images. The interactions between the Medusae Fossae Formation and nearby lava flows can inform us about the chronology of the deposit as well as how it has eroded over time. Certain diagnostic volcanic features were found, but mostly close to deposit boundaries where there are lava flows. The morphologies of the formation are compared with those of terrestrial pyroclastic deposits, terrestrial loess deposits, and other icy dust deposits on Mars. It is found that while the deposit is morphologically unlike icy layered deposits in most places, distinguishing between pyroclastic flow morphologies and reworked aeolian morphologies is more ambiguous.

  4. Geomorphic Mapping and Analysis of the Eastern Medusae Fossae Region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takagi, M.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    A geomorphic map of the MC-8SE quadrangle on Mars is used to examine hypotheses of origin for the Medusae Fossae Formation, as well as to characterize the regional setting of these enigmatic materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. A Cognitive and Affective Pattern in Posterior Fossa Strokes in Children: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossorotoff, Manoelle; Gonin-Flambois, Coralie; Gitiaux, Cyril; Quijano, Susana; Boddaert, Nathalie; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Barnerias, Christine; Dulac, Olivier; Brunelle, Francis; Desguerre, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Posterior fossa strokes account for about 10% of ischaemic strokes in children. Although motor and dysautonomic symptoms are common, to our knowledge cognitive and affective deficits have not been described in the paediatric literature. Our aim, therefore, was to describe these symptoms and deficits. Method: In a retrospective study, we…

  6. Modified folding radial forearm flap in soft palate and tonsillar fossa reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Gu; Park, Myong Chul; Lim, Hyoseob; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Lee, Il Jae

    2013-03-01

    Wide excision of cancer arising from the tonsillar fossa and soft palate has several functional sequelae (e.g., speech, swallowing, chewing, and breathing) that require surgical restoration of the pharyngeo-palatal structure and optimal velopharyngeal function. For this purpose, several kinds of surgical procedures have been introduced. Our method to reconstruct the tonsillar fossa and soft palate entails folding the flaps and reconstructions at the same time as the oral and nasal planes, with some modifications.Patient 1 was a 64-year-old man with left soft palate cancer. After wide excision of the tumor, the defect size of the nasal floor was 3 × 3 cm, and that of soft palate and tonsillar fossa was 8 × 5 cm. Patient 2 was a 49-year-old man with left tonsil cancer. The defect size of the nasal floor was 3 × 3 cm, and that of left lateral wall of the tonsillar fossa was 8 × 3 cm. For reconstruction of oral, nasal, and tonsillar plane, we designed the flap fit to the defect site, especially cutting of the edge of the square plane of the flap to a round shape.Both patients achieved good functional recovery without surgical complications. The average speech intelligibility score in the 2 patients was 10. Swallowing functional score was 4 in both patients. Creative reconstruction with modified radial forearm free flap for tonsillar and soft palate area makes it possible to restore velopharyngeal function to levels close to the preoperative condition.

  7. [Recurrent right iliac fossa pain in children: two cases report related to food allergy].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Urribarri, Ana; Sabrá, Aderbal; Tenorio, Isaac; Sabrá, Selma; Arias-Stella Castillo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    To present two cases of food allergy of uncommon presentation and discuss the diagnostic approach to give in these cases: Case N° 1: 11-year-old girl, afflicting pain in the right iliac fossa 3 months ago. Prematurity, atopy (dermatitis, rhinitis, cramping). Sister and mother are atopic too. The physical exam show exquisite pain on right iliac fossa at palpation. Laboratory: Urine normal, parasitological serial negative. EDN (neurotoxin derived from eosinophils) fecal >3210 ng/ml (V. N. < 360 ng/ml). Colonoscopy: lymphoid hyperplasia of ileum. Case N° 2: Child of 9 years of age. Right fossa iliac painful three months ago, predominantly nocturnal and with irradiation to right thigh. A child psychiatrist may prescribe antidepressants. Personal History: Breastfeeding and formula since newborn. Atopy: asthma, atopic dermatitis, infant colic. Family history: Mother allergic to food, father presents rhinitis. The physical examination: Pain on palpation in the right iliac fossa. Laboratory: Immunoglobulin E 160.5 IU/ml (V. N. < 90) Colonoscopy: lymphoid hyperplasia in the distal ileum. Both cases relieved by hypoallergenic diet. When both, ileal nodular lymphoid hyperplasia and atopy personal or familiar are present, we must be think in food allergy therapeutic.

  8. Hypopharynx and larynx defect repair after resection for pyriform fossa cancer with a platysma skin flap.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qian; Liang, Faya; Huang, Xiaoming; Han, Ping; Pan, Yong; Zheng, Yiqing

    2015-02-01

    We used a platysma skin flap to repair larynx and hypopharynx defects to improve postoperative laryngeal function in patients with pyriform fossa cancer. Larynx-sparing surgery and postoperative radiotherapy were used in 10 patients with pyriform fossa cancer. The surgical approaches of lymph node dissection of the neck, vertical partial laryngectomy, and pyriform fossa resection were adopted, and a platysma skin flap was used to repair the resulting defects. In this group, the overall 3-year survival rate was 75% according to the Kaplan-Meier analysis, and the local control rate was 90%. Additionally, all patients were able to speak fluently with mild-to-moderate hoarseness. The tracheal tube was removed in all cases. Laryngeal fistulas were observed in 1 patient during radiotherapy. In conclusion, a platysma skin flap can be used to rebuild the larynx and hypopharynx in larynx-sparing resection for pyriform fossa cancer. These patients can obtain good postoperative function in swallowing, breathing, and pronunciation. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  9. Age and sex related differences in normal pituitary gland and fossa volumes.

    PubMed

    Pecina, Hrvoje Ivan; Pecina, Tatjana Cicvara; Vyroubal, Vlasta; Kruljac, Ivan; Slaus, Mario

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates the influence of age and sex on the volumes of the pituitary fossa and gland in 91 males and 108 females from Croatia who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the endocranium for complaints not related to the pituitary gland. Isometric 3DT1 MPRAGE and 3DT1 MPR sequences were obtained on 1.5. Tesla and analysed on ISSA software. The volumes were obtained from the sum of all the areas multiplied by the thickness of the section. The mean volume of the pituitary fossa for males was 1111.1.4 mm(3), for females 1354.4.2 mm(3). Correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation (P=0.0.09) between age of the patient, and pituitary volume. Age of the patient and free volume demonstrate a significant positive correlation (P=0.0.01) indicating that the amount of unoccupied space in the pituitary fossa significantly increases with age. Determining general morphological values, as well as variations of pituitary depth and the occupation of the fossa with the pituitary gland is of great help in everyday diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  10. MOLA Topography of Small Volcanoes in Tempe Terra and Ceraunius Fossae, Mars: Implications for Eruptive Styles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, M. P.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Garvin, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    We use Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data to measure small volcanoes in the Tempe Terra and Ceraunius Fossae regions of Mars. We find that previous geometry estimates based on imagery alone are inaccurate, but MOLA data support image-based interpretations of eruptive style. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Geomorphology and structural geology of Saturnalia Fossae and adjacent structures in the northern hemisphere of Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Yin, A.; Russell, C. T.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Williams, D. A.; Blewett, D. T.; Ruesch, O.; Hiesinger, H.; Le Corre, L.; Mercer, C.; Yingst, R. A.; Garry, W. B.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Gaskell, R. W.; Schröder, S. E.; Ammannito, E.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Vesta is a unique, intermediate class of rocky body in the Solar System, between terrestrial planets and small asteroids, because of its size (average radius of ∼263 km) and differentiation, with a crust, mantle and core. Vesta's low surface gravity (0.25 m/s2) has led to the continual absence of a protective atmosphere and consequently impact cratering and impact-related processes are prevalent. Previous work has shown that the formation of the Rheasilvia impact basin induced the equatorial Divalia Fossae, whereas the formation of the Veneneia impact basin induced the northern Saturnalia Fossae. Expanding upon this earlier work, we conducted photogeologic mapping of the Saturnalia Fossae, adjacent structures and geomorphic units in two of Vesta's northern quadrangles: Caparronia and Domitia. Our work indicates that impact processes created and/or modified all mapped structures and geomorphic units. The mapped units, ordered from oldest to youngest age based mainly on cross-cutting relationships, are: (1) Vestalia Terra unit, (2) cratered highlands unit, (3) Saturnalia Fossae trough unit, (4) Saturnalia Fossae cratered unit, (5) undifferentiated ejecta unit, (6) dark lobate unit, (7) dark crater ray unit and (8) lobate crater unit. The Saturnalia Fossae consist of five separate structures: Saturnalia Fossa A is the largest (maximum width of ∼43 km) and is interpreted as a graben, whereas Saturnalia Fossa B-E are smaller (maximum width of ∼15 km) and are interpreted as half grabens formed by synthetic faults. Smaller, second-order structures (maximum width of <1 km) are distinguished from the Saturnalia Fossae, a first-order structure, by the use of the general descriptive term 'adjacent structures', which encompasses minor ridges, grooves and crater chains. For classification purposes, the general descriptive term 'minor ridges' characterizes ridges that are not part of the Saturnalia Fossae and are an order of magnitude smaller (maximum width of <1 km vs

  12. Cranial bone regeneration via BMP-2 encoding mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vural, Altugan Cahit; Odabas, Sedat; Korkusuz, Petek; Yar Sağlam, Atiye Seda; Bilgiç, Elif; Çavuşoğlu, Tarık; Piskin, Erhan; Vargel, İbrahim

    2017-05-01

    Cranial bone repair and regeneration via tissue engineering principles has attracted a great deal of interest from researchers during last decade. Here, within this study, 6 mm critical-sized bone defect regeneration via genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were monitored up to 4 months. Cranial bone repair and new bone formations were evaluated by histological staining and real time PCR analysis in five different groups including autograft and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) transfected MSC groups. Results presented here indicate a proper cranial regeneration in autograft groups and a prospering regeneration for hBMP-2 encoding mesenchymal stem cells.

  13. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects in children

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, A.J.; Schiapachasse, V.; Guerrero, R.

    1982-05-01

    Three children with idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects are reported. The syndrome was recognized after birth and in the two oldest siblings, the cranial defects and subperiosteal bone formation resolved almost completely by age 4 and 6 years. The joint swelling and clubbing persisted and mild bone reabsorption of the distal phalanges became apparent at an older age. Two siblings and both parents had normal bone X-rays and no clubbing. This study confirms the association of cranial sutural defects and familial idopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  14. Intra-cranial Toxoplasmosis in an Immunocompetent Female.

    PubMed

    Hoti, Yaser Ud Din; Aziz, Amir; Ishaque, Khurram; Abbas, Sadia; Ud Din, Tariq Salah

    2016-06-01

    Intra-cranial toxoplasmosis is a rare entity occurring mostly in immunosuppressed individuals. It is extremely rare in an immune competent patient. Toxoplasmosis is the third leading cause of food borne illness. Depending upon the site, degree of inflammation and local damage, toxoplasmosis encephalitis and cranial abscess can cause long lasting neurologic sequel. With modern imaging techniques, toxoplasmosis antibody titers, slit lamp examination and brain biopsy, there is improvement in diagnosis along with reduction in the mortality rate. We present a case illustrating the radiological manifestations, complications, potential pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment of intra-cranial toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patient.

  15. Recent refinements to cranial implants for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jessica M.; Cohen, Yale E.; Shirley, Harry; Tsunada, Joji; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Veeder, Christin L.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of cranial implants revolutionized primate neurophysiological research because they allow researchers to stably record neural activity from monkeys during active behavior. Cranial implants have improved over the years since their introduction, but chronic implants still increase the risk for medical complications including bacterial contamination and resultant infection, chronic inflammation, bone and tissue loss and complications related to the use of dental acrylic. These complications can lead to implant failure and early termination of study protocols. In an effort to reduce complications, we describe several refinements that have helped us improve cranial implants and the wellbeing of implanted primates. PMID:27096188

  16. Botulinum toxin physiology in focal hand and cranial dystonia.

    PubMed

    Karp, Barbara Illowsky

    2012-11-20

    The safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin for the treatment of focal hand and cranial dystonias are well-established. Studies of these adult-onset focal dystonias reveal both shared features, such as the dystonic phenotype of muscle hyperactivity and overflow muscle contraction and divergent features, such as task specificity in focal hand dystonia which is not a common feature of cranial dystonia. The physiologic effects of botulinum toxin in these 2 disorders also show both similarities and differences. This paper compares and contrasts the physiology of focal hand and cranial dystonias and of botulinum toxin in the management of these disorders.

  17. Recent refinements to cranial implants for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jessica M; Cohen, Yale E; Shirley, Harry; Tsunada, Joji; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Veeder, Christin L

    2016-05-01

    The advent of cranial implants revolutionized primate neurophysiological research because they allow researchers to stably record neural activity from monkeys during active behavior. Cranial implants have improved over the years since their introduction, but chronic implants still increase the risk for medical complications including bacterial contamination and resultant infection, chronic inflammation, bone and tissue loss and complications related to the use of dental acrylic. These complications can lead to implant failure and early termination of study protocols. In an effort to reduce complications, we describe several refinements that have helped us improve cranial implants and the wellbeing of implanted primates.

  18. Cranial nerve injury after minor head trauma.

    PubMed

    Coello, Alejandro Fernández; Canals, Andreu Gabarrós; Gonzalez, Juan Martino; Martín, Juan José Acebes

    2010-09-01

    There are no specific studies about cranial nerve (CN) injury following mild head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) in the literature. The aim of this analysis was to document the incidence of CN injury after mild head trauma and to correlate the initial CT findings with the final outcome 1 year after injury. The authors studied 49 consecutive patients affected by minor head trauma and CN lesions between January 2000 and January 2006. Detailed clinical and neurological examinations as well as CT studies using brain and bone windows were performed in all patients. Based on the CT findings the authors distinguished 3 types of traumatic injury: no lesion, skull base fracture, and other CT abnormalities. Patients were followed up for 1 year after head injury. The authors distinguished 3 grades of clinical recovery from CN palsy: no recovery, partial recovery, and complete recovery. Posttraumatic single nerve palsy was observed in 38 patients (77.6%), and multiple nerve injuries were observed in 11 (22.4%). Cranial nerves were affected in 62 cases. The most affected CN was the olfactory nerve (CN I), followed by the facial nerve (CN VII) and the oculomotor nerves (CNs III, IV, and VI). When more than 1 CN was involved, the most frequent association was between CNs VII and VIII. One year after head trauma, a CN deficit was present in 26 (81.2%) of the 32 cases with a skull base fracture, 12 (60%) of 20 cases with other CT abnormalities, and 3 (30%) of 10 cases without CT abnormalities. Trivial head trauma that causes a minor head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) can result in CN palsies with a similar distribution to moderate or severe head injuries. The CNs associated with the highest incidence of palsy in this study were the olfactory, facial, and oculomotor nerves. The trigeminal and lower CNs were rarely damaged. Oculomotor nerve injury can have a good prognosis, with a greater chance of recovery if no lesion is demonstrated on the initial CT scan.

  19. Cranial irradiation in childhood decreases likelihood of marriage.

    PubMed

    2009-11-18

    Adults who have survived childhood cancer are less likely to get married than their peers. Those who had central nervous system tumours, cranial irradiation, impaired processing efficiency and short stature were least likely to marry.

  20. Intellectual, educational, and behavioural sequelae after cranial irradiation and chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, V; Smibert, E; Ekert, H; Godber, T

    1994-01-01

    Cognitive and educational sequelae are inconsistently reported in children treated with cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. This study investigated differences in these skills after cranial irradiation, controlling the effects of chemotherapy and psychosocial factors. Three groups were evaluated: 100 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and treated with cranial irradiation and chemotherapy; 50 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or other cancers and treated with chemotherapy alone; and a healthy control group of 100 children. Children in the clinical groups stopped treatment at least two years before evaluation and had no history of relapse. Children were aged between 7 and 16 at the time of assessment. Evaluation included cognitive, educational, and behavioural measures. Analyses found that children receiving cranial irradiation and chemotherapy performed more poorly than non-irradiated groups on intellectual and educational tests, with verbal and attentional deficits most pronounced. Children receiving chemotherapy alone performed similarly to controls, suggesting such treatment is not associated with adverse neurobehavioural sequelae. PMID:8048815

  1. "Moya-moya' disease caused by cranial trauma.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alvarez, E; Pineda, M; Royo, C; Manzanares, R

    1979-01-01

    A case of "moya-moya" disease of a 12-year-old boy is reported. The clinical history started at 3 years 2 months after cranial trauma. The patient developed mental retardation, hemiparesis and seizures.

  2. 3D Reconstruction For The Detection Of Cranial Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettner, B.; Shalev, S.; Lavelle, C.

    1986-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of three-dimensional (3D) cranial reconstruction from CT scans for surgical planning. A low-cost imaging system has been developed, which provides pseudo-3D images which may be manipulated to reveal the craniofacial skeleton as a whole or any particular component region. The contrast between congenital (hydrocephalic), normocephalic and acquired (carcinoma of the maxillary sinus) anomalous cranial forms demonstrates the potential of this system.

  3. Short course prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feld, R.; Clamon, G.H.; Blum, R.; Moran, E.; Weiner, R.; Kramer, B.; Evans, W.K.; Herman, J.G.; Hoffman, F.; Burmeister, L.

    1985-10-01

    Ninety-one patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were given a shortened, intensive course of prophylactic cranial irradiation consisting of 2,000 rad in five fractions. The CNS relapse rate was 21%, but in only one of 91 patients was the brain the first and only site of relapse. Acute toxicities consisting of headache (16%) and nausea and vomiting (15%) were observed. Results are compared with previous results from other studies of cranial irradiation.

  4. Characterization of a Composite Material to Mimic Human Cranial Bone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ARL-RP-0552 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Characterization of a Composite Material to Mimic Human Cranial Bone by...presented at: 20th International Conference on Composite Materials; 2015 Jul 19–24; Copenhagen, Denmark. Approved for public release...US Army Research Laboratory Characterization of a Composite Material to Mimic Human Cranial Bone by Thomas A Plaisted Weapons and Materials

  5. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  6. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles.

  7. Morphometric analysis of posterior fossa in Indian CP angle acoustic schwannoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Patibandla, Mohana Rao; Panigrahi, Manas K.; Gurram, Paniraj L.; Thotakura, Amit Kumar; Kulkarni, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the morphometry of posterior fossa in Indian CP angle schwannoma patients in order to know its influence on the extent of excision of the CP angle acoustic schwannomas. Materials and Methods: One hundred cases of cerebellopontine angle schwannomas treated surgically by the senior author and 20 controls between January 2006 and June 2011 were consecutively investigated with computed tomography (CT) using the high-resolution CT bone windows before surgery. Evaluation of anatomic parameters of the petrous bone and posterior fossa cavity were done in all patients and controls. Data were entered in Excel software and were analyzed using NCSS software. All possible regression analysis was done to select the important variables to be included in the model to predict the excision of tumor with these variables. A prediction model was developed defining the binary outcome as total excision or subtotal excision as dependent variable and the morphometric data and grading of tumor as independent variables. Results: Interpetrous distance (IP) is the distance between the two petrous apices. Sigmoid distance (IS) distance is the distance between the two sigmoid points. Sigmoid point is the point at which the scalloped impression of the sigmoid sinus straightens to join the occipital bone posteriorly. SAG is the distance between the mid IP point and the mid-point on the inner wall of the occipital bone. The PM angle was 47.8±4.14 degrees (38-58), the PA angle was 42.68±4.47 degrees (34-53), the IP distance was 2.07±0.13 cm (1.5-2.8), the sagittal diameter of posterior fossa was 6.22±0.73 cm (5.1-9.8) and the intersigmoid distance was 9.45±0.73 cm (7.4-11). There was no significant gender difference in the posterior fossa morphometry between patients and controls. Inter-sigmoid distance and the petrous-apex angle were more in the Indians when compared to the European population mentioned in the Mathies and Samii study. Conclusions: The posterior fossa

  8. Properties of the Medussae Fossae Formation and its relation to the volcanic history of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Anton B.; Cantini, Federico

    2016-10-01

    Medussae Fossae (MFF) is a well known formation, stretching west of Tharsis volanoes. It is characterized as a relatively young Amazonian units (Amm, Amu), due to widespread signs of erosion. Earth based imaging radar observations at 3.5 cm [1] and 12 cm [2] have discovered a dark radar feature (Stealth), which roughly correlates with the MFF outline.Recent investigations [3], suggested that the unit emplacement is in fact during Hesperian period, but it is composed of material that can be easily eroded. It is not clear when the erosion happened and if it is a continuing process. Hypotheses on MFF formation range from volcanic material emplacement (ash flow tuffs or pyroclastic materials) to an ice-rich dusty mantle, deposited during high obliquity.In this work, we will present the latest observations of the East Medussae Fossae formation by the long wavelength MARSIS radar, continuing the work reported in [4], as well as complementing data surveyed by SHARAD data in [5]. The MARSIS radar has detected strong subsurface interfaces in the areas of Gordi and Eumenides Dorsae at depths up to 1.5km. We will present our analysis of the data, inferring the dielectric properties of the material to constrain properties of the material constituting the Medusae Fossae formation. We will also demonstrate an efficient user interface to work with MARSIS data inside a Geographical Information System (GIS).The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Unions Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under iMars grant agreement 607379.[1] D. Muhleman, et al., "Radar images of mars," Science, vol. 253, no. 5027, 1991.[2] J. K. Harmon, et al., "Arecibo radar imagery of Mars: The major volcanic provinces," Icarus, vol. 220, aug 2012.[3] L. Kerber, et al., "The dispersal of pyroclasts from Apollinaris Patera, Mars: Implications for the origin of the Medusae Fossae Formation," Icarus, vol. 216, nov 2011.[4] T. R. Watters, et al., "Radar Sounding of the

  9. Decrypting the Formation Conditions of the Basement Carbonate-Bearing Rocks at Nili Fossae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Nili Fossae region is the site of a number of proposed Landing Sites for the Mars 2020 Rover. A distinguishing feature of many of these sites is the access to large exposures of carbonate (Ehlmann et al. 2008). Serpentinization has been proposed as a formation mechanism of these carbonates, including carbonated (Brown et al. 2010, Viviano, et al. 2013) and low temperature, near surface serpentinization. The potential for carbonated serpentization at Nili Fossae links the region to Earth analogs in terrestrial greenstone belts such as the Pilbara in Western Australia, where talc-carbonate bearing komatiite cumulate units of the Dresser Formation overlie the siliceous, stromatolite-bearing Strelley Pool Chert unit (Van Kranendonk and Pirajno, 2004). If a similar relationship exists on Mars, investigations of rocks stratigraphically beneath the carbonate-bearing units at Nili Fossae ("the basement rocks") may provide the best chance to examine well preserved organic material from the Noachian. This hypothesis is testable by Mars 2020. In preparation for the the Mars 2020 landing site, we are examining the thermodynamic relationships that favor formation of serpentine and talc-carbonate and different pressures and temperatures in the crust (Barnes 2007). This will allow us to constrain the low grade metamorphism required to replicate the proposed models of serpentinisation and help us understand the regional metamophic gradient that is critical to furthering our knowledge of the ancient rocks of Nili Fossae. Refs:Barnes, S. J. "Komatiites: Petrology, Volcanology, Metamorphism, and Geochemistry." S.E.G. 13 (2007): 13. Brown, A. J., et al.. "Hydrothermal Formation of Clay-Carbonate Alteration Assemblages in the Nili Fossae Region of Mars." EPSL 297 (2010): 174-82. Ehlmann, B. L. et al. "Orbital Identification of Carbonate-Bearing Rocks on Mars." Science 322, no. 5909 1828-32. Van Kranendonk, M.J., and F. Pirajno. "Geochemistry of Metabasalts and Hydrothermal

  10. Morphometric analysis of posterior fossa in Indian CP angle acoustic schwannoma patients.

    PubMed

    Patibandla, Mohana Rao; Panigrahi, Manas K; Gurram, Paniraj L; Thotakura, Amit Kumar; Kulkarni, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    To study the morphometry of posterior fossa in Indian CP angle schwannoma patients in order to know its influence on the extent of excision of the CP angle acoustic schwannomas. One hundred cases of cerebellopontine angle schwannomas treated surgically by the senior author and 20 controls between January 2006 and June 2011 were consecutively investigated with computed tomography (CT) using the high-resolution CT bone windows before surgery. Evaluation of anatomic parameters of the petrous bone and posterior fossa cavity were done in all patients and controls. Data were entered in Excel software and were analyzed using NCSS software. All possible regression analysis was done to select the important variables to be included in the model to predict the excision of tumor with these variables. A prediction model was developed defining the binary outcome as total excision or subtotal excision as dependent variable and the morphometric data and grading of tumor as independent variables. Interpetrous distance (IP) is the distance between the two petrous apices. Sigmoid distance (IS) distance is the distance between the two sigmoid points. Sigmoid point is the point at which the scalloped impression of the sigmoid sinus straightens to join the occipital bone posteriorly. SAG is the distance between the mid IP point and the mid-point on the inner wall of the occipital bone. The PM angle was 47.8±4.14 degrees (38-58), the PA angle was 42.68±4.47 degrees (34-53), the IP distance was 2.07±0.13 cm (1.5-2.8), the sagittal diameter of posterior fossa was 6.22±0.73 cm (5.1-9.8) and the intersigmoid distance was 9.45±0.73 cm (7.4-11). There was no significant gender difference in the posterior fossa morphometry between patients and controls. Inter-sigmoid distance and the petrous-apex angle were more in the Indians when compared to the European population mentioned in the Mathies and Samii study. The posterior fossa morphological parameters of the Indian and European population

  11. Highly Conformal Craniospinal Radiotherapy Techniques Can Underdose the Cranial Clinical Target Volume if Leptomeningeal Extension through Skull Base Exit Foramina is not Contoured.

    PubMed

    Noble, D J; Ajithkumar, T; Lambert, J; Gleeson, I; Williams, M V; Jefferies, S J

    2017-07-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) remains a crucial treatment for patients with medulloblastoma. There is uncertainty about how to manage meningeal surfaces and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that follows cranial nerves exiting skull base foramina. The purpose of this study was to assess plan quality and dose coverage of posterior cranial fossa foramina with both photon and proton therapy. We analysed the radiotherapy plans of seven patients treated with CSI for medulloblastoma and primitive neuro-ectodermal tumours and three with ependymoma (total n = 10). Four had been treated with a field-based technique and six with TomoTherapy™. The internal acoustic meatus (IAM), jugular foramen (JF) and hypoglossal canal (HC) were contoured and added to the original treatment clinical target volume (Plan_CTV) to create a Test_CTV. This was grown to a test planning target volume (Test_PTV) for comparison with a Plan_PTV. Using Plan_CTV and Plan_PTV, proton plans were generated for all 10 cases. The following dosimetry data were recorded: conformity (dice similarity coefficient) and homogeneity index (D2 - D98/D50) as well as median and maximum dose (D2%) to Plan_PTV, V95% and minimum dose (D99.9%) to Plan_CTV and Test_CTV and Plan_PTV and Test_PTV, V95% and minimum dose (D98%) to foramina PTVs. Proton and TomoTherapy™ plans were more conformal (0.87, 0.86) and homogeneous (0.07, 0.04) than field-photon plans (0.79, 0.17). However, field-photon plans covered the IAM, JF and HC PTVs better than proton plans (P = 0.002, 0.004, 0.003, respectively). TomoTherapy™ plans covered the IAM and JF better than proton plans (P = 0.000, 0.002, respectively) but the result for the HC was not significant. Adding foramen CTVs/PTVs made no difference for field plans. The mean Dmin dropped 3.4% from Plan_PTV to Test_PTV for TomoTherapy™ (not significant) and 14.8% for protons (P = 0.001). Highly conformal CSI techniques may underdose meninges and CSF in the dural reflections of

  12. Extreme redundancy of the valve of the fossa ovalis with right heart hypoplasia in a neonate with trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Himeshkumar; Cabalka, Allison K

    2006-10-01

    Infants with trisomy 18 often have important cardiovascular malformations. We describe an infant with trisomy 18 who had extreme redundancy of the flap valve of the fossa ovalis along with right heart hypoplasia.

  13. An Exploration Zone in Cerberus Containing Young and Old Terrains, Including Fossae/Faults and Shergottite Distal Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. P.; Niles, P. B.; Bell, M. S.; Milbury, C.; Rice, J. W.; Burton, A. S.; Archer, P. D.; Rampe, E. B.; Piqueux, S.

    2015-10-01

    Cerberus contains Amazonian lava flows embaying a range of photogeologic units: ridged plains, heavily cratered terrain, highland knobs, and perhaps the Medusa Fossae Fm. Zunil Crater distal ejecta produced secondary crater fields (of shergottites?).

  14. Penetrating Orbital-Cranial Injuries Management in a Limited Resource Hospital in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Estebanez, Glyn; Garavito, Diana; López, Laura; Ortiz, Juan Carlos; Rubiano, Andrés M.

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating orbital-cranial injuries (POCIs) are difficult cases especially in hospitals in low-middle-income countries (LMIC) where resources are limited. We present a case series of POCI managed in a university hospital in such scenario. A retrospective case series was conducted including patients with POCI in 2011. Mechanism of injury, Glasgow Coma Scale score, imaging, medical and surgical management, complications, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were analyzed. A total of 30 patients with penetrating orbital injuries were admitted from March 2011 to December 2011. Of this group, only four patients were diagnosed with cranial penetration. Computed tomography (CT) angiography revealed orbital fractures and injury to frontal, temporal, or occipital lobes. Urgent craniotomy with isolation of ipsilateral carotid artery was performed. GOS score at discharge was 5 in three patients and 4 in one patient. POCIs are not uncommon in hospitals of LMIC. In such scenarios, a standard approach with CT angiography and early neurosurgical intervention results in good outcome. PMID:26576244

  15. History and morphology of faulting in the Noctis Labyrinthus-Claritas Fossae Region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Davis, Philip A.

    1987-01-01

    The topographically high areas cut by Noctis Labyrinthus, Noctis Fossae, and Claritas Fossae were subjected to only minor resurfacing during and following local tectonic activity. Principal resurfacing materials consist of lava flows from Syria Planum and Tharsis Montes. Thus, these areas preserve much of the fault record produced by tectonism in this region. Although recent geologic maps of the area have been produced from Viking images, the only detailed fault histories available until now were described from Mariner 9 images. Much of the faulting in the Tharsis tectonic province was centered in Syria Planum; therefore, understanding the fault history in this region is critical to understanding the stress history and tectonism of Tharsis as a whole.

  16. The small saphenous vein and other 'neglected' veins of the popliteal fossa: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, T F; Iafrati, M D

    2007-01-01

    The small saphenous vein (SSV) and other veins in the popliteal fossa merit little discussion in the literature or in didactic programmes regarding their role in chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and, in this sense, they are neglected. The purpose of this review is to present both duplex ultrasound findings and the associated clinical characteristics of patients with SSV reflux, from several large series. Both the anatomic variations and the epidemiology of the SSV, as well as other veins of the popliteal fossa, the gastrocnemius veins, Gocamini vein, popliteal area veins and popliteal vein, will be discussed. Findings from our review of the current available literature will demonstrate the important role that these veins play in association with CVI. The implications for open and endovenous surgery will be underlined.

  17. Effects of friction massage of the popliteal fossa on blood flow velocity of the popliteal vein

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Koji; Mizukami, Masafumi; Asakawa, Yasutsugu; Endo, Yusuke; Takata, Yuichi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshio, Masaharu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Friction massage (friction) of the popliteal fossa is provided for the purpose of relieving pain related to circulatory disorders by improving venous flow in the lower legs. The purpose of this study is to verify the effects of enhancing the venous flow based on measuring the blood flow velocity of the popliteal vein before and after providing friction to the patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen healthy male university students participated in the study. The Doppler ultrasonography (DU) was used to measure the blood flow velocity of the popliteal vein, in order to verify the effects of enhancing the venous flow by comparing the measured values before and after a friction massage. [Results] The result of comparing the blood flow velocity before and after providing friction showed that there was a significant increase after friction. [Conclusion] This study proved that friction to the popliteal fossa is effectively enhances venous flow by increasing the blood flow velocity in the popliteal vein. PMID:28356643

  18. An Inflammatory Pseudotumor Arising from Pterygopalatine Fossa with Invasion to the Maxillary Sinus and Orbital Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Hidenori; Yazawa, Takuya; Matsumoto, Yuma; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Masachika; Ohkura, Yasuo; Kohno, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient who had an inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) that invaded to the maxillary sinus and orbital cavity, with the left pterygopalatine fossa as the principal site; this is a very rare case. The patient was an 83-year-old woman who suddenly became aware of impairment in the eyesight and visual field of the left eye. CT images showed a neoplastic lesion that invaded to the maxillary sinus and orbital cavity, with the left pterygopalatine fossa as the principal site, and also showed contrast effects. To obtain a definitive diagnosis from histopathological analysis, the lesion was biopsied, and she was diagnosed as the inflammatory pseudotumor with the immunohistochemical study and multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based clonality assays. The patient had a lymphoid-predominant lesion that responded to radiotherapy but corticosteroids were not effective. It is important to scrutinize the pathology to avoid unnecessary and mutilating surgery. PMID:26167321

  19. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  20. A Nomenclature for Vertebral Fossae in Sauropods and Other Saurischian Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jeffrey A.; D'Emic, Michael D.; Ikejiri, Takehito; Moacdieh, Emile M.; Whitlock, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The axial skeleton of extinct saurischian dinosaurs (i.e., theropods, sauropodomorphs), like living birds, was pneumatized by epithelial outpocketings of the respiratory system. Pneumatic signatures in the vertebral column of fossil saurischians include complex branching chambers within the bone (internal pneumaticity) and large chambers visible externally that are bounded by neural arch laminae (external pneumaticity). Although general aspects of internal pneumaticity are synapomorphic for saurischian subgroups, the individual internal pneumatic spaces cannot be homologized across species or even along the vertebral column, due to their variability and absence of topographical landmarks. External pneumatic structures, in contrast, are defined by ready topological landmarks (vertebral laminae), but no consistent nomenclatural system exists. This deficiency has fostered confusion and limited their use as character data in phylogenetic analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a simple system for naming external neural arch fossae that parallels the one developed for the vertebral laminae that bound them. The nomenclatural system identifies fossae by pointing to reference landmarks (e.g., neural spine, centrum, costal articulations, zygapophyses). We standardize the naming process by creating tripartite names from “primary landmarks,” which form the zygodiapophyseal table, “secondary landmarks,” which orient with respect to that table, and “tertiary landmarks,” which further delineate a given fossa. Conclusions/Significance The proposed nomenclatural system for lamina-bounded fossae adds clarity to descriptions of complex vertebrae and allows these structures to be sourced as character data for phylogenetic analyses. These anatomical terms denote potentially homologous pneumatic structures within Saurischia, but they could be applied to any vertebrate with vertebral laminae that enclose spaces, regardless of their developmental origin