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Sample records for miembro inferior postruptura

  1. Bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Sahemey, R.; Warfield, A.T.; Ahmed, S.

    2016-01-01

    Osteomas are the most common benign osteoclastic tumours of the paranasal sinuses. However, nasal cavity and turbinate osteomas are extremely rare. Only nine middle turbinate, three inferior turbinate and one inferior turbinate osteoma cases have been reported to date. The present case report describes the management and follow-up of symptomatic bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma. A 60-year-old female presented with symptoms of bilateral nasal obstruction and right-sided epiphora. Radiological investigation found hypertrophic bony changes involving both inferior turbinates. The patient was managed successfully by endoscopic inferior turbinectomies in order to achieve a patent airway, with no further recurrence of tumour after 3 months postoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma. We describe a safe and minimally invasive method of tumour resection, which has a better cosmetic outcome compared with other approaches. PMID:27534890

  2. Bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma.

    PubMed

    Sahemey, R; Warfield, A T; Ahmed, S

    2016-01-01

    Osteomas are the most common benign osteoclastic tumours of the paranasal sinuses. However, nasal cavity and turbinate osteomas are extremely rare. Only nine middle turbinate, three inferior turbinate and one inferior turbinate osteoma cases have been reported to date. The present case report describes the management and follow-up of symptomatic bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma.A 60-year-old female presented with symptoms of bilateral nasal obstruction and right-sided epiphora. Radiological investigation found hypertrophic bony changes involving both inferior turbinates. The patient was managed successfully by endoscopic inferior turbinectomies in order to achieve a patent airway, with no further recurrence of tumour after 3 months postoperatively.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma. We describe a safe and minimally invasive method of tumour resection, which has a better cosmetic outcome compared with other approaches. PMID:27534890

  3. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  4. Incarcerated inferior lumbar (Petit's) hernia.

    PubMed

    Astarcioğlu, H; Sökmen, S; Atila, K; Karademir, S

    2003-09-01

    Petit's hernia is an uncommon abdominal wall defect in the inferior lumbar triangle. Colonic incarceration through the inferior lumbar triangle, which causes mechanical obstructive symptoms, necessitates particular diagnostic and management strategy. We present a rare case of inferior lumbar hernia, leading to mechanical bowel obstruction, successfully treated with prosthetic mesh reinforcement repair.

  5. Isolated inferior mesenteric portal hypertension with giant inferior mesenteric vein and anomalous inferior mesenteric vein insertion

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, G. Raghavendra; Billa, Srikar; Bhandari, Pavaneel; Hussain, Aijaz

    2013-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal hypertension is not an uncommon disease in childhood, but isolated inferior mesenteric portal varices and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleed have not been reported till date. A 4-year-old girl presented with lower GI bleed. Surgical exploration revealed extrahepatic portal vein obstruction with giant inferior mesenteric vein and colonic varices. Inferior mesenteric vein was joining the superior mesenteric vein. The child was treated successfully with inferior mesenteric – inferior vena caval anastomosis. The child was relieved of GI bleed during the follow-up. PMID:23798814

  6. Simulation of the Inferior Mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branca, Mario

    2010-09-01

    A mirage can occur when a continuous variation in the refractive index of the air causes light rays to follow a curved path. As a result, the image we see is displaced from the location of the object. If the image appears higher in the air than the object, it is called a "superior" mirage, while if it appears lower it is called an "inferior" mirage.2 The most common example of an inferior mirage is when, on a hot day, a stretch of dry road off in the distance appears to be wet (see Fig. 1). Many lab activities have been described that simulate the formation of superior mirages. In these demonstrations light beams curve downward as they pass through a nonuni-form fluid.3-6 Much less common are laboratory demonstrations of upward-curving light rays of the kind responsible for inferior mirages. This paper describes a simple version of such a demonstration.

  7. Serotonin in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Thompson, Ann M; Pollak, George D

    2002-06-01

    It has been recognized for some time that serotonin fibers originating in raphe nuclei are present in the inferior colliculi of all mammalian species studied. More recently, serotonin has been found to modulate the responses of single inferior colliculus neurons to many types of auditory stimuli, ranging from simple tone bursts to complex species-specific vocalizations. The effects of serotonin are often quite strong, and for some neurons are also highly specific. A dramatic illustration of this is that serotonin can change the selectivity of some neurons for sounds, including species-specific vocalizations. These results are discussed in light of several theories on the function of serotonin in the IC, and of outstanding issues that remain to be addressed. PMID:12117504

  8. Simulation of the Inferior Mirage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario

    2010-01-01

    A mirage can occur when a continuous variation in the refractive index of the air causes light rays to follow a curved path. As a result, the image we see is displaced from the location of the object. If the image appears higher in the air than the object, it is called a "superior" mirage, while if it appears lower it is called an "inferior"…

  9. Inferior mirages: an improved model.

    PubMed

    Young, Andrew T

    2015-02-01

    A quantitative model of the inferior mirage is presented, based on a realistic temperature profile in the convective boundary layer, using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. The top of the inverted image is determined by the logarithmic part of the profile; the bottom is the apparent horizon, which depends on optical obstruction by roughness elements. These effects of surface roughness are included in the model, which is illustrated with a simulation. The vertical magnification varies throughout the mirage, becoming infinite at Minnaert's ill-named "vanishing line"-which makes green flashes apparent to the naked eye. PMID:25967823

  10. INTERDEPENDENT SUPERIORITY AND INFERIORITY FEELINGS

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Harrington V.

    1949-01-01

    It is postulated that in neurotic persons who have unrealistic feelings of superiority and inferiority the two are interdependent. This is a departure from the concept of previous observers that either one or the other is primary and its opposite is overcompensation. The author postulates considerable parallelism, with equal importance for each. He submits that the neurotic person forms two logic-resistant compartments for the two opposed self-estimates and that treatment which makes inroads of logic upon one compartment, simultaneously does so upon the other. Two examples are briefly reported. The neurotic benefits sought in exaggeration of capability are the same as those sought in insistence upon inferiority: Presumption of superiority at once bids for approbation and delivers the subject from the need to prove himself worthy of it in dreaded competition; exaggeration of incapability baits sympathy and makes competition unnecessary because failure is conceded. Some of the characteristics of abnormal self-estimates that distinguish them from normal are: Preoccupation with self, resistance to logical explanation of personality problems, inconsistency in reasons for beliefs in adequacy on the one hand and inadequacy on the other, unreality, rationalization of faults, and difficulty and vacillation in the selection of adequate goals. PMID:15390573

  11. Inferior vena caval masses identified by echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Asher, C. R.; Xu, Y.; Huang, V.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Novick, A. C.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The most common cause of an inferior vena caval mass is renal cell carcinoma that extends through the lumen, occurring in 47 of 62 patients (85%). Detection of an inferior vena caval mass affects the surgical approach requiring cardiopulmonary bypass for resection when the mass extends to the heart.

  12. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling.

    PubMed

    Zampetti, Benedetta; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Loli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88-100% and 67-100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50-70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  13. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling.

    PubMed

    Zampetti, Benedetta; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Loli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88-100% and 67-100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50-70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres.

  14. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling

    PubMed Central

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing’s syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88–100% and 67–100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50–70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  15. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. Aim and Objective: The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Conclusion: This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages. PMID:25885503

  16. Functional organization of the left inferior precentral sulcus: dissociating the inferior frontal eye field and the inferior frontal junction.

    PubMed

    Derrfuss, J; Vogt, V L; Fiebach, C J; von Cramon, D Y; Tittgemeyer, M

    2012-02-15

    Two eye fields have been described in the human lateral frontal cortex: the frontal eye field (FEF) and the inferior frontal eye field (iFEF). The FEF has been extensively studied and has been found to lie at the ventral part of the superior precentral sulcus. Much less research, however, has focused on the iFEF. Recently, it was suggested that the iFEF is located at the dorsal part of the inferior precentral sulcus. A similar location was proposed for the inferior frontal junction area (IFJ), an area thought to be involved in cognitive control processes. The present study used fMRI to clarify the topographical and functional relationship of the iFEF and the IFJ in the left hemispheres of individual participants. The results show that both the iFEF and the IFJ are indeed located at the dorsal part of the inferior precentral sulcus. Nevertheless, the activations were spatially dissociable in every individual examined. The IFJ was located more towards the depth of the inferior precentral sulcus, close to the junction with the inferior frontal sulcus, whereas the iFEF assumed a more lateral, posterior and superior position. Furthermore, the results provided evidence for a functional double dissociation: the iFEF was activated only in a comparison of saccades vs. button presses, but not in a comparison of incongruent vs. congruent Stroop conditions, while the opposite pattern was found at the IFJ. These results provide evidence for a spatial and functional dissociation of two directly adjacent areas in the left posterior frontal lobe.

  17. [Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning in implant surgery].

    PubMed

    Ardekian, L; Salnea, J; Abu el-Naaj, I; Gutmacher, T; Peled, M

    2001-04-01

    Severe resorption of the posterior mandible possesses one of the most difficult restorative challenges to the implant surgery today. This resorption may prevent the placement of dental implants without the potentially damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. To create the opportunity of insertion dental implants of adequately length in those cases, the technique of nerve repositioning has been advocated. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of nerve repositioning combined with placement of dental implants. Both cases showed appropriate postoperative healing without damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. The inferior alveolar nerve repositioning technique seems to be an acceptable alternative to augmentation procedure prior to dental implants placement in cases exhibiting atrophic posterior mandibular ridges. PMID:11494807

  18. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  19. Anatomy of Inferior Mesenteric Artery in Fetuses.

    PubMed

    Nuzhat, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze Inferior Mesenteric Artery in fetuses through its site of origin, length, diameter, and variation of its branches. Method. 100 fetuses were collected from various hospitals in Warangal at Kakatiya Medical College in Andhra Pradesh, India, and were divided into two groups, group I (second-trimester fetuses) and group II (third-trimester fetuses), followed by dissection. Result. (1) Site of Origin. In group I fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra in 33 out of 34 fetuses (97.2%). In one fetus it was at first lumbar vertebra, 2.8%. In all group II fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra. (2) Length. In group I fetuses it ranged between 18 and 30 mm, average being 24 mm except in one fetus where it was 48 mm. In group II fetuses the length ranged from 30 to 34 mm, average being 32 mm. (3) Diameter. In group I fetuses it ranged from 0.5 to 1 mm, and in group II fetuses it ranged from 1 to 2 mm, average being 1.5 mm. (4) Branches. Out of 34 fetuses of group I, 4 fetuses showed variation. In one fetus left colic artery was arising from abdominal aorta, 2.9%. In 3 fetuses, Inferior Mesenteric Artery was giving a branch to left kidney, 8.8%. Out of 66 fetuses in group II, 64 had normal branching. In one fetus left renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery, 1.5%, and in another fetus one accessory renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery and entering the lower pole of left kidney. Conclusion. Formation, course, and branching pattern of an artery depend on development and origin of organs to attain the actual adult position. PMID:27313956

  20. Outcomes of Unilateral Inferior Oblique Myectomy Surgery in Inferior Oblique Overaction Due to Superior Oblique Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yumuşak, Erhan; Yolcu, Ümit; Küçükevcilioğlu, Murat; Diner, Oktay; Mutlu, Fatih Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To present the outcomes of unilateral inferior oblique myectomy performed in patients with inferior oblique overaction due to superior oblique palsy. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven eyes of 27 patients that underwent inferior oblique myectomy surgery for superior oblique palsy between 2002 and 2008 were included. Inferior oblique overaction scores (between 0-4) at preoperative, early postoperative (within 1 week after surgery) and late postoperative (earliest 6 months) visits were reviewed. Results: There were 12 male and 15 female patients. Eighteen were operated on the right eye, and 9 were operated on the left eye. The mean age was 15.62±13.31 years, and the mean follow-up was 17±11.28 months (range, 6-60 months). Patients who had horizontal component and V-pattern deviation were excluded. Preoperative and early postoperative inferior oblique overaction scores were 2.55±0.75 and 0.14±0.36, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.01). This improvement was maintained up to the late postoperative period. Conclusion: Due to its promising short-term and long-term results, inferior oblique myectomy can be the first choice of surgery for inferior oblique overaction due to superior oblique palsy. PMID:27800253

  1. Multidirectional Instability Accompanying an Inferior Labral Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Kim, Sung-Jae

    2010-01-01

    Paralabral cyst of the shoulder joint can be observed in 2% to 4% of the general population, particularly in men during the third and fourth decade. On average, these cysts measure 10 mm to 20 mm in diameter and are located preferentially on the postero-superior aspect of the glenoid. The MRI has increased the frequency of the diagnosis of paralabral cysts of the shoulder joint. Paralabral cysts of the shoulder joint usually develop in the proximity of the labrum. The relationship between shoulder instability and labral tears is well known, however, the association of shoulder instability with a paralabral cyst is rare. Shoulder instability may cause labral injury or labral injury may cause shoulder instability, and then injured tear develops paralabral cyst. In our patient, the inferior paralabral cyst may be associated with inferior labral tears and instability MRI. PMID:20514270

  2. Maxillary antral lavage using inferior meatal cannula anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mochloulis, G; Hern, J D; Hollis, L J; Tolley, N S

    1996-08-01

    Antral puncture and lavage through the inferior meatus is a minor but common otolaryngological procedure, usually performed under local anaesthesia. We describe a new method of introducing local anaesthetic into the inferior meatus, via the use of a soft intravenous cannula connected to a syringe containing 10 per cent cocaine paste. We have called this new technique inferior meatal cannula anaesthesia (IMCA).

  3. Inferior sinus venosus defects: anatomic features and echocardiographic correlates.

    PubMed

    Plymale, Jennifer; Kolinski, Kellen; Frommelt, Peter; Bartz, Peter; Tweddell, James; Earing, Michael G

    2013-02-01

    Inferior sinus venosus defects (SVDs) are rare imperfections located in the inferior portion of the atrial septum, leading to an overriding inferior vena cava (IVC) and an interatrial connection. These defects have increased risk of anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) and often are confused with secundum atrial septal defects (ASDs) with inferior extension. The authors sought to review their experience with inferior SVDs and to establish at their institution an echocardiographic definition that differentiates inferior SVDs from secundum ASDs with inferior extension. The study identified 161 patients 1.5 to 32 years of age who had undergone repair of a secundum ASD with inferior extension or inferior SVD over the preceding 10 years. All surgical notes, preoperative transthoracic echocardiograms (TTEs), and preoperative transesophageal echocardiograms (TEEs) were reviewed. Based on the surgical notes, 147 patients were classified as having a secundum ASD (147/161, 91 %) and 14 patients (9 %) as having an inferior SVD. The study identified PAPVR in 7 % (1/14) of the patients with inferior SVDs and 3.5 % (5/14) of the patients with secundum ASDs. Surgical diagnosis and preoperative TTE correlated for 143 (89 %) of the 161 patients. Using a strict anatomic and echocardiographic definition with a blinded observer, the majority of the defects (14/18, 78 %) were reclassified correctly after review of their TTE images, and 100 % of the defects were correctly reclassified after TEE image review. Accurate diagnosis of inferior SVDs remains challenging. The data from this study demonstrate that use of a strict anatomic and echocardiographic definition (a defect that originates in the mouth of the IVC and continues into the inferoposterior border of the left atrium, leaving no residual atrial septal tissue at the inferior margin) allows for accurate differentiation between secundum ASDs with inferior extension and inferior SVDs. This differentiation is extremely important

  4. Inferior alveolar and lingual nerve imaging.

    PubMed

    Miloro, Michael; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2011-03-01

    At present, there are no objective testing modalities available for evaluation of iatrogenic injury to the terminal branches of the trigeminal nerve, making such clinical diagnosis and management complicated for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Several imaging modalities can assist in the preoperative risk assessment of the trigeminal nerve as related to commonly performed procedures in the vicinity of the nerve, mostly third molar surgery. This article provides a review of all available imaging modalities and their clinical application relative to preoperative injury risk assessment of the inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve, and postinjury and postsurgical repair recovery status.

  5. Anatomic Variant of Liver, Gall Bladder and Inferior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, Yogesh Ashok; Gladwin, V; Chand, Parkash

    2016-07-01

    The morphology and relations of liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava are cardinal. Their anatomical variations may be a reason for the adverse surgical outcome. During routine anatomy dissection of an abdomen, we noticed a variant liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava in a 63-year-old male cadaver. In the specimen, a retrohepatic segment of inferior vena cava was found to be intrahepatic. On dissection, it was observed that inferior vena cava was covered entirely by a liver tissue on its dorsal aspect. In the same specimen, the gall bladder had undulated inferior surface. On dissection of the gall bladder, numerous mucosal folds were present in the interior. A band of fibrous tissue was found, which was extending from the right side of the gall bladder to the falciform ligament. Hence, preoperative scanning of congenital variations of the liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava may be compassionate in planning safe surgeries and interventional abdominal procedures. PMID:27630832

  6. Anatomic Variant of Liver, Gall Bladder and Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, V.; Chand, Parkash

    2016-01-01

    The morphology and relations of liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava are cardinal. Their anatomical variations may be a reason for the adverse surgical outcome. During routine anatomy dissection of an abdomen, we noticed a variant liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava in a 63-year-old male cadaver. In the specimen, a retrohepatic segment of inferior vena cava was found to be intrahepatic. On dissection, it was observed that inferior vena cava was covered entirely by a liver tissue on its dorsal aspect. In the same specimen, the gall bladder had undulated inferior surface. On dissection of the gall bladder, numerous mucosal folds were present in the interior. A band of fibrous tissue was found, which was extending from the right side of the gall bladder to the falciform ligament. Hence, preoperative scanning of congenital variations of the liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava may be compassionate in planning safe surgeries and interventional abdominal procedures. PMID:27630832

  7. Total laparoscopic retrieval of inferior vena cava filter

    PubMed Central

    Benrashid, Ehsan; Adkar, Shaunak Sanjay; Bennett, Kyla Megan; Zani, Sabino

    2015-01-01

    While there is some local variability in the use of inferior vena cava filters and there has been some evolution in the indications for filter placement over time, inferior vena cava filters remain a standard option for pulmonary embolism prophylaxis. Indications are clear in certain subpopulations of patients, particularly those with deep venous thrombosis and absolute contraindications to anticoagulation. There are, however, a variety of reported inferior vena cava filter complications in the short and long term, making retrieval of the filter desirable in most cases. Here, we present the case of a morbidly obese patient complaining of chronic abdominal pain after inferior vena cava filter placement and malposition of the filter with extensive protrusion outside the inferior vena cava. She underwent successful laparoscopic retrieval of her malpositioned inferior vena cava filters after failure of a conventional endovascular approach. PMID:27489697

  8. Progressive limb ataxia following inferior olive lesions

    PubMed Central

    Horn, K M; Deep, A; Gibson, A R

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar climbing fibres originate in the inferior olive (IO). Temporary IO inactivation produces movement deficits. Does permanent inactivation produce similar deficits and, if so, do they recover? The excitotoxin, kainic acid, was injected into the rostral IO of three cats. Behaviour was measured during reaching and locomotion. Two cats were injected during the reaching task. Within minutes, grasping became difficult and the trajectories of the reaches showed higher arcing than normally seen. During locomotion, both cats showed head and trunk deviation to the injected side, walking paths curved to the injected side, and the paws were lifted higher than normal. Limbs contralateral to the injections became rigid. Within 1 day, posture had normalized, locomotion was unsteady and high lifting of the paws had reversed to a tendency to drag the dorsum of the paws. Passive body movement produced vestibular signs. Over a few days, locomotion normalized and vestibular signs disappeared. Reach trajectories were normal but grasping deficits persisted. Over the first week, the amplitude of limb lift during reaching and locomotion began to increase. The increase continued over time and, after several months, limb movements became severely ataxic. The effects followed the somatotopy of the rostral IO: a loss of cells in medial rostral IO only affected the forelimb, whereas a loss of cells in medial and lateral IO affected both forelimb and hindlimb. Deficits produced by IO lesions involve multiple mechanisms; some recover rapidly, some appear stable, and some worsen over time. The nature of the progressive deficit suggests a gradual loss of Purkinje cell inhibition on cerebellar nuclear cells. PMID:23027819

  9. Spatial selectivity in the temporoparietal junction, inferior frontal sulcus, and inferior parietal lobule.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kathleen A; Chu, Carlton; Dickinson, Annelise; Pye, Brandon; Weller, J Patrick; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2015-01-01

    Spatial selectivity, as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity patterns that vary consistently with the location of visual stimuli, has been documented in many human brain regions, notably the occipital visual cortex and the frontal and parietal regions that are active during endogenous, goal-directed attention. We hypothesized that spatial selectivity also exists in regions that are active during exogenous, stimulus-driven attention. To test this hypothesis, we acquired fMRI data while subjects maintained passive fixation. At jittered time intervals, a briefly presented wedge-shaped array of rapidly expanding circles appeared at one of three contralateral or one of three ipsilateral locations. Positive fMRI activations were identified in multiple brain regions commonly associated with exogenous attention, including the temporoparietal junction, the inferior parietal lobule, and the inferior frontal sulcus. These activations were not organized as a map across the cortical surface. However, multivoxel pattern analysis of the fMRI activity correctly classified every pair of stimulus locations, demonstrating that patterns of fMRI activity were correlated with spatial location. These observations held for both contralateral and ipsilateral stimulus pairs as well as for stimuli of different textures (radial checkerboard) and shapes (squares and rings). Permutation testing verified that the obtained accuracies were not due to systematic biases and demonstrated that the findings were statistically significant. PMID:26382006

  10. Spatial selectivity in the temporoparietal junction, inferior frontal sulcus, and inferior parietal lobule

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kathleen A.; Chu, Carlton; Dickinson, Annelise; Pye, Brandon; Weller, J. Patrick; Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial selectivity, as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity patterns that vary consistently with the location of visual stimuli, has been documented in many human brain regions, notably the occipital visual cortex and the frontal and parietal regions that are active during endogenous, goal-directed attention. We hypothesized that spatial selectivity also exists in regions that are active during exogenous, stimulus-driven attention. To test this hypothesis, we acquired fMRI data while subjects maintained passive fixation. At jittered time intervals, a briefly presented wedge-shaped array of rapidly expanding circles appeared at one of three contralateral or one of three ipsilateral locations. Positive fMRI activations were identified in multiple brain regions commonly associated with exogenous attention, including the temporoparietal junction, the inferior parietal lobule, and the inferior frontal sulcus. These activations were not organized as a map across the cortical surface. However, multivoxel pattern analysis of the fMRI activity correctly classified every pair of stimulus locations, demonstrating that patterns of fMRI activity were correlated with spatial location. These observations held for both contralateral and ipsilateral stimulus pairs as well as for stimuli of different textures (radial checkerboard) and shapes (squares and rings). Permutation testing verified that the obtained accuracies were not due to systematic biases and demonstrated that the findings were statistically significant. PMID:26382006

  11. Variant Inferior Alveolar Nerves and Implications for Local Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kevin T; Brokaw, Everett J; Bell, Andrea; Joy, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A sound knowledge of anatomical variations that could be encountered during surgical procedures is helpful in avoiding surgical complications. The current article details anomalous morphology of inferior alveolar nerves encountered during routine dissection of the craniofacial region in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. We also report variations of the lingual nerves, associated with the inferior alveolar nerves. The variations were documented and a thorough review of literature was carried out. We focus on the variations themselves, and the clinical implications that these variations present. Thorough understanding of variant anatomy of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves may determine the success of procedural anesthesia, the etiology of pathologic processes, and the avoidance of surgical misadventure.

  12. Troubleshooting OptEase inferior vena cava filter retrieval.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    For treatment of deep vein thrombosis and prevention of pulmonary thromboembolism, a retrievable inferior vena cava filter is commonly utilized as an effective bridge to anticoagulation. However, we have experienced difficulties in retrieving inferior vena cava filters. Endovascular retrieval assisted by disposable biopsy forceps is an appropriate approach because it provides a less-invasive low-cost way to remove a migrated filter. We suggest this troubleshooting technique to deal with filter hook migration into the caval wall.

  13. A basic review on the inferior alveolar nerve block techniques

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Hesham

    2014-01-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve block is the most common injection technique used in dentistry and many modifications of the conventional nerve block have been recently described in the literature. Selecting the best technique by the dentist or surgeon depends on many factors including the success rate and complications related to the selected technique. Dentists should be aware of the available current modifications of the inferior alveolar nerve block techniques in order to effectively choose between these modifications. Some operators may encounter difficulty in identifying the anatomical landmarks which are useful in applying the inferior alveolar nerve block and rely instead on assumptions as to where the needle should be positioned. Such assumptions can lead to failure and the failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block has been reported to be 20-25% which is considered very high. In this basic review, the anatomical details of the inferior alveolar nerve will be given together with a description of its both conventional and modified blocking techniques; in addition, an overview of the complications which may result from the application of this important technique will be mentioned. PMID:25886095

  14. Inferior oblique muscle paresis as a sign of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Almog, Yehoshua; Ben-David, Merav; Nemet, Arie Y

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis may affect any of the six extra-ocular muscles, masquerading as any type of ocular motor pathology. The frequency of involvement of each muscle is not well established in the medical literature. This study was designed to determine whether a specific muscle or combination of muscles tends to be predominantly affected. This retrospective review included 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis who had extra-ocular muscle involvement with diplopia at presentation. The diagnosis was confirmed by at least one of the following tests: Tensilon test, acetylcholine receptor antibodies, thymoma on chest CT scan, or suggestive electromyography. Frequency of involvement of each muscle in this cohort was inferior oblique 19 (63.3%), lateral rectus nine (30%), superior rectus four (13.3%), inferior rectus six (20%), medial rectus four (13.3%), and superior oblique three (10%). The inferior oblique was involved more often than any other muscle (p<0.01). Eighteen (60%) patients had ptosis, six (20%) of whom had bilateral ptosis. Diagnosing myasthenia gravis can be difficult, because the disease may mimic every pupil-sparing pattern of ocular misalignment. In addition diplopia caused by paresis of the inferior oblique muscle is rarely encountered (other than as a part of oculomotor nerve palsy). Hence, when a patient presents with vertical diplopia resulting from an isolated inferior oblique palsy, myasthenic etiology should be highly suspected.

  15. The effects of inferior olive lesion on strychnine seizure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.C.; Chung, E.Y.; Van Woert, M.H. )

    1990-10-01

    Bilateral inferior olive lesions, produced by systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3AP) produce a proconvulsant state specific for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus. We have proposed that these phenomena are mediated through increased excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, through activation of glutamate receptors, in response to climbing fiber deafferentation. An increase in quisqualic acid (QA)-displaceable ({sup 3}H)AMPA ((RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid) binding in cerebella from inferior olive-lesioned rats was observed, but no difference in ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding displaced by glutamate, kainic acid (KA) or glutamate diethylester (GDEE) was seen. The excitatory amino acid antagonists GDEE and MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclo-hepten-5,10 imine) were tested as anticonvulsants for strychnine-induced seizures in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned and control rats. Neither drug effected seizures in control rats, however, both GDEE and MK-801 produced a leftward shift in the strychnine-seizure dose-response curve in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned rats. GDEE also inhibited strychnine-induced myoclonus in the lesioned group, while MK-801 had no effect on myoclonus. The decreased threshold for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus in the 3AP-inferior olive-lesioned rats may be due to an increase in glutamate receptors as suggested by the ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding data.

  16. Traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Gutiérrez, Ramón; Montalvo-Moreno, Juan José

    2008-03-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare entities which characteristically arise subsequently to surgery and are usually accompanied by pain, typically neuralgic. We present an unusual case of an intraosseous traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve following tooth extraction. A 56-year-old man consulted for paresthesias and hyperesthesia in the left mandibular region following extraction of the left mandibular third molar (#38). The panoramic radiograph revealed a radiolucent lesion in the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and CT demonstrated the existence of a mass within the canal, producing widening of the same. Nerve-sparing excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with traumatic neuroma of the left inferior alveolar nerve. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and there are no signs of recurrence.

  17. Variant Inferior Alveolar Nerves and Implications for Local Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kevin T; Brokaw, Everett J; Bell, Andrea; Joy, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A sound knowledge of anatomical variations that could be encountered during surgical procedures is helpful in avoiding surgical complications. The current article details anomalous morphology of inferior alveolar nerves encountered during routine dissection of the craniofacial region in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. We also report variations of the lingual nerves, associated with the inferior alveolar nerves. The variations were documented and a thorough review of literature was carried out. We focus on the variations themselves, and the clinical implications that these variations present. Thorough understanding of variant anatomy of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves may determine the success of procedural anesthesia, the etiology of pathologic processes, and the avoidance of surgical misadventure. PMID:27269666

  18. Inferior oblique recession in thyroid-related orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Salchow, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid-related orbitopathy is a form of orbital inflammation associated with thyroid dysfunction, developing in many patients with Graves disease. Fibrosis of the inferior rectus muscle can lead to restricted elevation and vertical ocular misalignment, which may be improved by recessing this muscle. In some patients, vertical misalignment persists after surgical weakening of one or more vertical rectus muscles. In this case series, unilateral inferior oblique recession as a secondary procedure after inferior rectus recession reduced hypertropia in primary gaze from 9(Δ) ± 3(Δ) to 1.3(Δ) ± 1.5(Δ) (mean ± standard deviation) and largest hypertropia in side gaze from 18.3 ± 2.1(Δ) to 3.3(Δ) ± 1.5(Δ). Postoperatively, all 3 patients were diplopia free in primary and downgaze. PMID:26059675

  19. Pleomorphic adenoma originates from inferior nasal turbinate causing epiphora.

    PubMed

    Erol, Bekir; Selçuk, Ömer Tarik; Gürses, Cemil; Osma, Üstün; Köroğlu, Mert; Süren, Dinç

    2013-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common benign tumor of the salivary glands. A 62-year-old female patient presented with epiphora and was suffering from breathing difficulties. With the diagnostic nasal endoscopy, a mass, originating from right inferior nasal turbinate and filling the entire nasal cavity, was seen. Originating from the inferior nasal turbinate is a very rare entity. Paranasal sinus computed tomography and magnetic resonance images revealed a mass that fills and expands the right nasal cavity. Mass was hypoechoic in B-mode ultrasonography and hypovascular in color Doppler ultrasonography, and rate of tissue stiffness was high in sonoelastography. These were helpful for the diagnosis.

  20. Suprarenal symplastic leiomyoma of the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Kepenekci, Ilknur; Demirkan, Arda; Sözener, Ulas; Cakmak, Atil; Demirer, Seher; Alaçayir, Iskender; Ekinci, Cemil

    2009-01-01

    We report on a case of a leiomyoma in the inferior vena cava that appeared in the image to be located in the adrenal gland. En bloc excision of the tumor with the right adrenal gland and the involved segment of the vena cava was carried out. Histopathological work-up of the tumor revealed smooth muscle fibers and marked nuclear pleomorphism consistent with symplastic leiomyoma. This case report presents a distinct histological variant of the rarely seen primary smooth muscle tumor of the inferior vena cava.

  1. Traumatic longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Jessica; Demer, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Orbital floor fractures and associated injuries can cause strabismus. We present the case of a 34-year-old man with incomitant strabismus following orbital reconstruction after a high-impact baseball injury. Multipositional, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed extensive longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle by an orbital floor implant that separated its orbital and global layers. PMID:21463958

  2. Corticofugal regulation of auditory sensitivity in the bat inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Jen, P H; Chen, Q C; Sun, X D

    1998-12-01

    Under free-field stimulation conditions, corticofugal regulation of auditory sensitivity of neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, was studied by blocking activities of auditory cortical neurons with Lidocaine or by electrical stimulation in auditory cortical neuron recording sites. The corticocollicular pathway regulated the number of impulses, the auditory spatial response areas and the frequency-tuning curves of inferior colliculus neurons through facilitation or inhibition. Corticofugal regulation was most effective at low sound intensity and was dependent upon the time interval between acoustic and electrical stimuli. At optimal inter-stimulus intervals, inferior colliculus neurons had the smallest number of impulses and the longest response latency during corticofugal inhibition. The opposite effects were observed during corticofugal facilitation. Corticofugal inhibitory latency was longer than corticofugal facilitatory latency. Iontophoretic application of gamma-aminobutyric acid and bicuculline to inferior colliculus recording sites produced effects similar to what were observed during corticofugal inhibition and facilitation. We suggest that corticofugal regulation of central auditory sensitivity can provide an animal with a mechanism to regulate acoustic signal processing in the ascending auditory pathway.

  3. A periodic network of neurochemical modules in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Chernock, Michelle L; Larue, David T; Winer, Jeffery A

    2004-02-01

    A new organization has been found in shell nuclei of rat inferior colliculus. Chemically specific modules with a periodic distribution fill about half of layer 2 of external cortex and dorsal cortex. Modules contain clusters of small glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive neurons and large boutons at higher density than in other inferior colliculus subdivisions. The modules are also present in tissue stained for parvalbumin, cytochrome oxidase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase, and acetylcholinesterase. Six to seven bilaterally symmetrical modules extend from the caudal extremity of the external cortex of the inferior colliculus to its rostral pole. Modules are from approximately 800 to 2200 microm long and have areas between 5000 and 40,000 microm2. Modules alternate with immunonegative regions. Similar modules are found in inbred and outbred strains of rat, and in both males and females. They are absent in mouse, squirrel, cat, bat, macaque monkey, and barn owl. Modules are immunonegative for glycine, calbindin, serotonin, and choline acetyltransferase. The auditory cortex and ipsi- and contralateral inferior colliculi project to the external cortex. Somatic sensory influences from the dorsal column nuclei and spinal trigeminal nucleus are the primary ascending sensory input to the external cortex; ascending auditory input to layer 2 is sparse. If the immunopositive modular neurons receive this input, the external cortex could participate in spatial orientation and somatic motor control through its intrinsic and extrinsic projections. PMID:14759566

  4. Inferior Colliculus Lesions Impair Eyeblink Conditioning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, John H.; Halverson, Hunter E.; Hubbard, Erin M.

    2007-01-01

    The neural plasticity necessary for acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning has been localized to the cerebellum. However, the sources of sensory input to the cerebellum that are necessary for establishing learning-related plasticity have not been identified completely. The inferior colliculus may be a source of sensory input to the…

  5. Traumatic longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Jessica; Demer, Joseph L

    2011-04-01

    Orbital floor fractures and associated injuries can cause strabismus. We present the case of a 34-year-old man with incomitant strabismus after orbital reconstruction following a high-impact baseball injury. Multipositional, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging revealed extensive longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle by an orbital floor implant that separated its orbital and global layers.

  6. Asymptomatic Lumbar Vertebral Erosion from Inferior Vena Cava Filter Perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Wayne Hieb, Robert A.; Olson, Eric; Carrera, Guillermo F.

    2007-06-15

    In 2002, a 24-year-old female trauma patient underwent prophylactic inferior vena cava filter placement. Recurrent bouts of renal stones prompted serial CT imaging in 2004. In this brief report, we describe erosion and ossification of the L3 vertebral body by a Greenfield filter strut.

  7. Traumatic longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Jessica; Demer, Joseph L

    2011-04-01

    Orbital floor fractures and associated injuries can cause strabismus. We present the case of a 34-year-old man with incomitant strabismus after orbital reconstruction following a high-impact baseball injury. Multipositional, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging revealed extensive longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle by an orbital floor implant that separated its orbital and global layers. PMID:21463958

  8. Surgical outcomes of superior versus inferior glaucoma drainage device implantation

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Amy Z.; Iverson, Shawn; Feuer, William J.; Greenfield, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the safety and intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering efficacy of initial glaucoma drainage device (GDD) implantation performed at the superior versus inferior limbus. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify glaucoma patients that had undergone initial Baerveldt GDD surgery at the inferior limbus for uncontrolled IOP. All eyes had a minimum of 6 months of postoperative follow-up. These eyes were frequency matched to eyes with initial Baerveldt GDD implantation performed at the superior limbus to within 5 years of age and 6 months of follow-up. Baseline demographic and clinical information, as well as preoperative and postoperative IOP, visual acuity, and number of anti-glaucoma medications were extracted. Failure was defined as IOP > 21 mmHg or not reduced by 20% below baseline on two consecutive follow-up visits after 3 months, IOP ≤ 5 mmHg on two consecutive follow-up visits after 3 months, reoperation for glaucoma, or loss of light perception vision. Statistical methods consisted of Student's t-tests, chi-squared test, and Kaplan-Meier time to failure analysis. Results Fifty eyes (17 inferior, 33 superior) of 43 patients were enrolled. Mean postoperative follow-up in both groups were similar (mean 26.2 ± 15.2 for inferior and 23.9 ± 10.43 months for superior, p=0.54). Prior trabeculectomy had been performed in 8/17 (47%) and 11/33 (33%) eyes (p=0.34) with inferior and superior implants, respectively. Mean preoperative IOP (mmHg) in the superior group (26 ± 11) was significantly higher (p=0.02) than in the inferior group (21 ± 7). Success rates were similar (p>0.05) between the inferior and superior GDD groups during the study period, with 64.7% and 75.8% classified as successful at 1-year of follow-up and 43.1% and 65.7% at 2-years of follow-up, respectively. There was no difference in cumulative proportions of eyes failing between the groups (p=0.20, log-rank test). Mean postoperative IOP and number of anti

  9. Inferior turbinate osteoma as a cause of unilateral nose obstruction.

    PubMed

    Grabovac, Stjepan; Hadzibegović, Ana Danić; Markesić, Josip

    2012-11-01

    Osteomas are benign, slow growing bone tumors often seen in paranasal sinuses, mostly in the frontal sinus, whereas they are rare in the nasal cavity. Inferior turbinate osteoma is extremely rare and our case is the third reported in the literature to date. Symptoms vary depending on the location, size and spreading and nasal obstruction is the most common symptom. Treatment of osteomas is surgical and is reserved only for rapidly growing osteomas with symptoms of infection or compression. Although endoscopic surgery is preferred modality, external approach with lateral rhinotomy should be considered with larger osteomas especially those that involve the ethmoid labyrinth. In cases like ours, when large osteoma is localized on the inferior nasal turbinate, sublabial incision through the vestibulum is very suitable approach because it provides wide access and good visibility and leaves no visible scar.

  10. Deep Vein Thrombosis Provoked by Inferior Vena Cava Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Raad A; Saadaldin, Mazin; Kumar, Binay; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2015-01-01

    Inferior vena cava agenesis (IVCA) is a rare congenital anomaly that can be asymptomatic or present with vague, nonspecific symptoms, such as abdominal or lower back pain, or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Here, we present a 55-year-old male who came with painless swelling and redness of his left lower limb. On examination, swelling and redness were noted extending from the left foot to the upper thigh; it was also warm compared to his right lower limb. Venous Doppler ultrasound was done which showed DVT extending up to the common femoral vein. Subsequently, computed-tomography (CT) of the chest and abdomen was done to exclude malignancy or venous flow obstruction; it revealed congenital absence (agenesis) of the infrarenal inferior vena cava (IVC). PMID:26788400

  11. Pheochromocytoma with inferior vena cava thrombosis: An unusual association

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil K.; Kota, Siva K.; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit K.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2012-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas have been described in association with vascular abnormalities like renal artery stenosis. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of headache, sweating, anxiety, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and hypertension. For last several days, he was having a dull aching abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed the presence of a left adrenal pheochromocytoma. An inferior vena cava (IVC) venogram via the right jugular vein demonstrated occlusion of the IVC inferior to the right atrium. Surgical removal of pheochromocytoma was done, followed by anticoagulant treatment for IVC thrombosis, initially with subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin, and then with oral warfarin, resulting in restoration of patency. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of pheochromocytoma in IVC thrombosis has not been reported so far from India. Possible mechanisms of such an involvement are discussed. PMID:22629039

  12. Penetrating injuries of the abdominal inferior vena cava.

    PubMed Central

    Degiannis, E.; Velmahos, G. C.; Levy, R. D.; Souter, I.; Benn, C. A.; Saadia, R.

    1996-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 74 patients with penetrating injuries of the abdominal inferior vena cava; the cause of injury was gunshot in 91% and stabbing in 9%. Of the patients, 77% underwent lateral venorrhaphy, 5% underwent infrarenal ligation of the inferior vena cava (IVC), and 18% died perioperatively before any caval repair could be carried out. There was an overall perioperative mortality of 39%. Persistent shock, the site of the venous injury, particularly in the retrohepatic position, and the number of associated vascular injuries were directly related to mortality. Irrespective of the improvements in resuscitation and the various operative methods available, penetrating trauma of the abdominal IVC remains a life-threatening injury. PMID:8943628

  13. Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia ablation and inferior vena cava agenesis.

    PubMed

    Galand, Vincent; Pavin, Dominique; Behar, Nathalie; Mabo, Philippe; Martins, Raphaël P

    2016-10-01

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are rare and very often diagnosed in asymptomatic patients during computed tomography performed for other purposes. These anomalies can have significant clinical implications, for example if electrophysiology procedures are needed. Diagnostic and ablation procedures are difficult since catheter manipulation and positioning are more complex. We present here a case of successful atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia ablation in a patient with unexpected IVC agenesis, using an azygos route. PMID:27633734

  14. Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nascif, Rafael Lemos; Antón, Ana Graziela Santana; Fernandes, Gabriel Lacerda; Dantas, George Caldas; Gomes, Vinícius de Araújo; Natal, Marcelo Ricardo Canuto

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 48 year-old female patient with moderate abdominal pain and bulging in the abdomen. Physical examination demonstrated the presence of a palpable abdominal mass. Computed tomography showed a heterogeneously enhancing retroperitoneal mass in close contact with the inferior vena cava. En bloc resection of the mass and of the attached vena cava segment was performed. Histological analysis revealed leiomyosarcoma.

  15. [Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report].

    PubMed

    Adorno, Juan Oscar Alarcón; de Andrade, Guilherme Cabral

    2002-12-01

    The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA) syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  16. Truncal ataxia from infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun; Ryoo, Sookyung; Moon, So Young; Seo, Sand Won; Na, Duk L

    2012-08-01

    Truncal ataxia in medullary infarction may be caused by involvement of the lateral part of the medulla; however, truncal ataxia in infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has received comparatively little attention. We report a patient with truncal ataxia due to medial medullary infarction located in the ION. A lesion in the ION could produce a contralateral truncal ataxia due to increased inhibitory input to the contralesional vestibular nucleus from the contralesional flocculus.

  17. [One case of pleomorphic adenoma originates from inferior nasal turbinate].

    PubMed

    Hao, Fang; Xu, Xuehai

    2014-10-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma (PA) is the most common benign tumor of the salivary glands. Originating from the nasal cavity is very rare. This paper reports one case of pleomorphic adenoma of the inferior nasal turbinate to analyze the clinic characteristic of this disease. Although these tumors are rarely seen in everyday practice, one should consider this possibility as an uncommon aetiology when confronted with an intranasal mass.

  18. Inferior hip dislocation after falling from height: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Ali Çağrı; Çabuk, Haluk; Büyükkurt, Cem Dinçay; Dedeoğlu, Süleyman Semih; İmren, Yunus; Gürbüz, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic inferior hip dislocation is the least common of all hip dislocations. Adult inferior hip dislocations usually occur after high-energy trauma, very few cases are reported without fracture. Presentation of case A 26-year-old female was brought to the emergency department with severe pain in the left hip, impaired posture and restricted movement following a fall from 15 m height. The hip joint was fixed in 90° flexion, 15° abduction, and 20° external rotation. No neurovascular impairment was determined. On radiologic examination, a left ischial type inferior hip dislocation was detected. Hemorrhagic shock which developed due to acute blood loss to thoracic and abdominal cavity and patient died at third hour after she was brought to the hospital. Discussion Traumatic hip dislocations have high morbidity and mortality rates due to multiple organ damage, primarily of the extremities, chest and abdomen. In the treatment of traumatic hip dislocation, closed reduction is recommended through muscle relaxation under general anesthesia or sedation. This procedure should be applied before any intervention for concomitant extremity injuries. A detailed evaluation on emergency presentation, a multi-disciplinary approach and early diagnosis with the rapid application of imaging methods could be life-saving for such patients. PMID:27058153

  19. Gaining Surgical Access for Repositioning the Inferior Alveolar Neurovascular Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Al-Siweedi, Saif Yousif Abdullah; Nambiar, P.; Shanmuhasuntharam, P.; Ngeow, W. C.

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining anatomical landmarks that can be used to gain access to the inferior alveolar neurovascular (IAN) bundle. Scanned CBCT (i-CAT machine) data of sixty patients and reconstructions performed using the SimPlant dental implant software were reviewed. Outcome variables were the linear distances of the mandibular canal to the inferior border and the buccal cortex of the mandible, measured immediately at the mental foramen (D1) and at 10, 20, 30, and 40 mm (D2–D5) distal to it. Predictor variables were age, ethnicity, and gender of subjects. Apicobasal assessment of the canal reveals that it is curving downward towards the inferior mandibular border until 20 mm (D3) distal to the mental foramen where it then curves upwards, making an elliptic-arc curve. The mandibular canal also forms a buccolingually oriented elliptic arc in relation to the buccal cortex. Variations due to age, ethnicity, and gender were evident and this study provides an accurate anatomic zone for gaining surgical access to the IAN bundle. The findings indicate that the buccal cortex-IAN distance was greatest at D3. Therefore, sites between D2 and D5 can be used as favorable landmarks to access the IAN bundle with the least complications to the patient. PMID:24892077

  20. Combination-sensitive neurons in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mittmann, D H; Wenstrup, J J

    1995-10-01

    We examined whether neurons in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat (Pteronotus parnellii) are combination sensitive, responding to both low- and high-frequency components of the bat's sonar signal. These neurons, previously reported in the thalamus and cortex, analyze sonar target features including distance. Of 82 single units and 36 multiple units from the 58-112 kHz representations of the inferior colliculus, most (86%) displayed sensitivity to low-frequency sounds that was tuned in the range of the fundamental biosonar component (24-31 kHz). All histologically localized units were in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). There were two major types of combination-sensitive influences. Many neurons were facilitated by low-frequency sounds and selective for particular delays between the low- and high-frequency components. In other neurons, the low-frequency signal was inhibitory if presented simultaneously or a few milliseconds prior to the high-frequency signal. The results indicate that mechanisms creating specialized frequency comparisons and delay sensitivity in combination-sensitive neurons operate at the ICC or below. Since combination sensitivity or multipeaked tuning curves occur in the auditory systems of many species, ICC neurons in these animals may also respond to species-specific frequency combinations.

  1. [Inferior vertical nystagmus: is magnetic resonance imaging mandatory?].

    PubMed

    Esteban-Sánchez, Jonathan; Rueda-Marcos, Almudena; Sanz-Fernández, Ricardo; Martín-Sanz, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Introduccion. La aparicion de un nistagmo vertical inferior clasicamente obliga a descartar una patologia vascular o de la union craneocervical mediante resonancia magnetica (RM). Estudios recientes demuestran una baja rentabilidad de esta prueba, ya que sugieren que este signo oculomotor puede tener una causa vestibular periferica, sobre todo cuando el paciente presenta un vertigo posicional paroxistico benigno (VPPB) del canal semicircular superior. Objetivo. Comprobar la rentabilidad de la RM en una poblacion de pacientes con nistagmo de posicion vertical inferior. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio retrospectivo de 42 pacientes consecutivos a los que se les realizo una historia clinica, exploracion fisica, y pruebas vestibulares caloricas y rotatorias. A todos ellos se les practico una RM craneal y cervical. Resultados. El 52% de los pacientes con nistagmo de posicion vertical inferior presentaba una clinica y exploracion fisica compatibles con VPPB del canal semicircular superior. La RM fue normal en un 67%, un 26% mostraba datos de espondilopatia y un 5% de microangiopatia cerebral no relacionados con la clinica del paciente. La prevalencia de malformacion de Arnold-Chiari de tipo I fue de un 9% en la poblacion estudiada, sin que nadie tuviera un antecedente reciente de VPPB. Los resultados obtenidos en las pruebas complementarias vestibulares no aportaron informacion adicional para llegar a un diagnostico etiologico. Conclusion. En los pacientes con un VPPB, la RM craneal y las pruebas vestibulares tienen una baja rentabilidad diagnostica, y se debe evaluar la necesidad real de esta prueba con el contexto clinico.

  2. Mandibular osteotomies after drawing out the inferior alveolar nerve along the canal.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hoon; Kim, Byung-Gun

    2003-01-01

    In some cases, the inferior alveolar nerve runs through a lower course than usual. In such cases, osteotomy of the mandible can injure the inferior alveolar nerves. In other instances, the course of the mandibular osteotomy can meet that of the inferior alveolar nerve. In these cases, a useful method may be excavating the canal and drawing the nerve out through it. With this technique, we can make the osteotomy as initially planned with minimal damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. PMID:14629066

  3. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    PubMed Central

    PALTI, Dafna Geller; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; RODRIGUES, Antonio de Castro; ANDREO, Jesus Carlos; LIMA, José Eduardo Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 1329% of cases. Objective Objective: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. Materials and Methods A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition) from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side), and the second following the oclusal plane (left side), a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. Results The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. Conclusion This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry. PMID:21437463

  4. Determining the non-inferiority margin for patient reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerlinger, Christoph; Schmelter, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    One of the cornerstones of any non-inferiority trial is the choice of the non-inferiority margin delta. This threshold of clinical relevance is very difficult to determine, and in practice, delta is often "negotiated" between the sponsor of the trial and the regulatory agencies. However, for patient reported, or more precisely patient observed outcomes, the patients' minimal clinically important difference (MCID) can be determined empirically by relating the treatment effect, for example, a change on a 100-mm visual analogue scale, to the patient's satisfaction with the change. This MCID can then be used to define delta. We used an anchor-based approach with non-parametric discriminant analysis and ROC analysis and a distribution-based approach with Norman's half standard deviation rule to determine delta in three examples endometriosis-related pelvic pain measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale, facial acne measured by lesion counts, and hot flush counts. For each of these examples, all three methods yielded quite similar results. In two of the cases, the empirically derived MCIDs were smaller or similar of deltas used before in non-inferiority trials, and in the third case, the empirically derived MCID was used to derive a responder definition that was accepted by the FDA. In conclusion, for patient-observed endpoints, the delta can be derived empirically. In our view, this is a better approach than that of asking the clinician for a "nice round number" for delta, such as 10, 50%, π, e, or i. PMID:21932298

  5. Bruxism elicited by inferior alveolar nerve injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Melis, Marcello; Coiana, Carlo; Secci, Simona

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the history of a patient who received an injury to the right inferior alveolar nerve after placement of a dental implant, with bruxism noted afterward. The symptoms were managed by the use of an occlusal appliance worn at night and occasionally during the day, associated with increased awareness of parafunction during the day to reduce muscle pain and fatigue. Paresthesia of the teeth, gingiva, and lower lip persisted but were reduced during appliance use. PMID:22254232

  6. Evidence of mirror neurons in human inferior frontal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kilner, James M; Neal, Alice; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Friston, Karl J; Frith, Chris D

    2009-08-12

    There is much current debate about the existence of mirror neurons in humans. To identify mirror neurons in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) of humans, we used a repetition suppression paradigm while measuring neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects either executed or observed a series of actions. Here we show that in the IFG, responses were suppressed both when an executed action was followed by the same rather than a different observed action and when an observed action was followed by the same rather than a different executed action. This pattern of responses is consistent with that predicted by mirror neurons and is evidence of mirror neurons in the human IFG.

  7. Inferior Vena Cava Duplication: Incidental Case in a Young Woman.

    PubMed

    Coco, Danilo; Cecchini, Sara; Leanza, Silvana; Viola, Massimo; Ricci, Stefano; Campagnacci, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    A case of a double inferior vena cava (IVC) with retroaortic left renal vein, azygos continuation of the IVC, and presence of the hepatic portion of the IVC drained into the right renal vein is reported and the embryologic, clinical, and radiological significance is discussed. The diagnosis is suggested by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), which reveals the aberrant vascular structures. Awareness of different congenital anomalies of IVC is necessary for radiologists to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and they should be remembered because they can influence several surgical interventions and endovascular procedures. PMID:27217964

  8. Leiomyosarcoma of the Inferior Vena Cava With Kidney Invasion.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Katherine; Attalla, Kyrollis; Husain, Fatima; Tsao, Che-Kai; Badani, Ketan K; Sfakianos, John P

    2016-11-01

    Primary leiomyosarcomas of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are rare tumors associated with poor prognosis, and surgical resection with the goal of obtaining negative margins is the gold standard for initial treatment. Tumor characteristics of both extraluminal extension into renal parenchyma and intraluminal extension of the subdiaphragmatic IVC are even less common. The prognosis of vascular leiomyosarcomas is determined by the location and the size of the tumor, as these factors determine the risk of local recurrence and metastasis. We present a case of a 30-year old female incidentally found to have a 14 cm right renal mass and IVC thrombus. PMID:27679758

  9. Laparoscopic management of inferior lumbar hernia (Petit triangle hernia).

    PubMed

    Ipek, T; Eyuboglu, E; Aydingoz, O

    2005-05-01

    Lumbar hernias are rare defects in the posterolateral abdominal wall that may be congenital or acquired. We present a case of laparoscopic approach to repair an acquired inferior triangle (Petit) lumbar hernia in a woman by using polytetrafluoroethylene mesh. The size of the hernia was 8 x 10 cm. The length of her hospital stay was 2 days. The patient resumed normal activities in less than 2 weeks. The main advantage of this approach is excellent operative visualization, thus avoiding injury to structures near the hernia during repair. Patients benefit from a minimally invasive approach with less pain, shortened hospital course, less analgesic requirements, better cosmetic result, and minimal life-style interference.

  10. Pleomorphic adenoma originated from the inferior nasal turbinate.

    PubMed

    Unlu, H Halis; Celik, Onur; Demir, M Akif; Eskiizmir, Gorkem

    2003-12-01

    Although pleomorphic adenoma is the most common benign neoplasm of the salivary glands, it has also been reported to be present in the neck, ear, mediastinum, external nose and nasal cavity. Intranasal localization of this lesion is very rare and mainly originates from the nasal septum. From wherever the lesion originates, the main treatment modality should be surgical. We presented a very rare case of intranasal pleomorphic adenoma originated from the inferior nasal turbinate. Due to the expansile nature of the lesion, a midfacial degloving approach was preferred.

  11. Left Inferior Vena Cava and Right Retroaortic Renal Vein

    PubMed Central

    Nania, Alberto; Capilli, Fabio; Longo, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, incidental anatomical variants are frequent findings, due to the widespread diffusion of cross-sectional imaging. This case report illustrates a fairly uncommon anatomical variant, that is, the copresence of left inferior vena cava and retroaortic right renal vein reported in a 46-year-old lady, undergoing a staging CT for breast cancer. Although the patient was asymptomatic, the authors highlight potential risks related to the above-mentioned condition and the importance of correct identification and diagnosis of the findings. PMID:26955497

  12. Ectopic supernumerary tooth on the inferior nasal concha.

    PubMed

    Ray, Bappaditya; Singh, Lav Kumar; Das, Chandan Jyoti; Roy, T S

    2006-01-01

    Variations regarding the location of an ectopic tooth in the human nasal cavity, although rare, are documented in the literature, but presence of an ectopic tooth on the inferior nasal concha (INC) has not been reported. We observed an anomalous tooth projecting from the posterior margin of the right INC in two adult female skulls. A small quadrangular tooth projected beyond the posterior margin of the hard palate in one of the skulls and a medium sized conical tooth was observed in the other skull. The affected INC in both skulls were located more inferiorly compared to the opposite side and were in close approximation with the hard palate. No similar findings were noted on the contralateral side nor were there any associated congenital or iatrogenic deformity. The phylogenetic, ontogenetic, and clinical importance of this variant is described. Knowledge of such an anomaly is of paramount importance to otorhinolaryngologists, reconstructive and dental surgeons, and radiologists for identification of such rarities encountered during invasive or non-invasive procedures. PMID:16283635

  13. Aneurysm in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery variant: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saad; Azeem, Abdul; Jiwani, Amyna; Javed, Gohar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are variations in the anatomy of the vertebrobasilar system amongst which the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery-Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (AICA-PICA) variant is thought to have a prevalence of 20–24% (based on retrospective studies). Despite this, aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. We present a case of an AICA-PICA aneurysm and discuss its presentation and management, along with a review of literature. Presentation of case We describe the case of a 35 year old female who presented with signs of meningismus. On the basis of radiological imaging it was initially misdiagnosed as a thrombosed arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The patient was eventually discharged with a plan of interval imaging and interventional radiology (if required). The patient presented again with similar signs and symptoms. Re-evaluation of imaging revealed an aneurysm of the AICA-PICA variant which was managed surgically. Discussion Aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. The radiological features and surgical management represent a unique clinical entity and are discussed below. Conclusion The prevalence of the AICA-PICA variant might be high but aneurysms in this vessel are rare. The scant knowledge available on this subject makes it a diagnostic difficulty. PMID:27017276

  14. ['Non-inferiority' trials. Tips for the critical reader. Research methodology 3].

    PubMed

    Soonawala, Darius; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of non-inferiority trials is to show that a new treatment is not less effective than standard treatment, in other words 'non-inferior'. The non-inferiority margin should be determined before a study commences. This margin determines the maximal magnitude of difference in effectiveness permissible if it is to be concluded that a new treatment is not less effective than the standard treatment. There is usually a good reason for a non-inferiority design. For example, because the new treatment is easier to use, provides better cost-effectiveness or has fewer side effects. The reader of a non-inferiority trial should consider a number of aspects critically: (a) the reason for use of this study design, (b) the assumed benefit of the new treatment, (c) the rationale for the choice of non-inferiority margin and (d) the choice of the standard therapy with which the new treatment is compared.

  15. Posttransplant Complex Inferior Venacava Balloon Dilatation After Hepatic Vein Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Kohli, Vikas; Wadhawan, Manav; Gupta, Subhash; Roy, Vipul

    2010-02-15

    Orthotopic and living related liver transplantation is an established mode of treatment of end-stage liver disease. One of the major causes of postoperative complications is vascular anastomotic stenosis. One such set of such complications relates to hepatic vein, inferior vena cava (IVC), or portal vein stenosis, with a reported incidence of 1-3%. The incidence of vascular complications is reported to be higher in living donor versus cadaveric liver transplants. We encountered a patient with hepatic venous outflow tract obstruction, where the hepatic vein had been previously stented, but the patient continued to have symptoms due to additional IVC obstruction. The patient required double-balloon dilatation of the IVC simultaneously from the internal jugular vein and IVC.

  16. Infrahepatic inferior vena cava agenesis with bilateral renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Skeik, Nedaa; Wickstrom, Kelly K; Schumacher, Clark W; Sullivan, Timothy M

    2013-10-01

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are rare and are estimated to be present in 0.07-8.7% of the general population. IVC agenesis (IVCA) is found in approximately 5% of cases of unprovoked lower extremity deep vein thrombosis in patients <30 years of age. Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is an extremely rare and unusual presentation of IVCA. We report a unique case of a 23-year-old previously healthy man presenting with infrahepatic IVCA-induced bilateral RVT with azygos and hemiazygos continuation. To our knowledge, this is the third reported case in the literature of IVCA-induced RVT and the first to affect the bilateral renal veins in the absence of any other thrombogenic risk factors or any lower extremity venous complications. We also present a literature review of IVCA-induced vein thrombosis and highlight the lack of literature to manage this condition.

  17. Inhibition and the right inferior frontal cortex: one decade on.

    PubMed

    Aron, Adam R; Robbins, Trevor W; Poldrack, Russell A

    2014-04-01

    In our TICS Review in 2004, we proposed that a sector of the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) in humans is critical for inhibiting response tendencies. Here we survey new evidence, discuss ongoing controversies, and provide an updated theory. We propose that the rIFC (along with one or more fronto-basal-ganglia networks) is best characterized as a brake. This brake can be turned on in different modes (totally, to outright suppress a response; or partially, to pause), and in different contexts (externally, by stop or salient signals; or internally, by goals). We affirm inhibition as a central component of executive control that relies upon the rIFC and associated networks, and explain why rIFC disruption could generally underpin response control disorders.

  18. Does the left inferior parietal lobule contribute to multiplication facts?

    PubMed

    van Harskamp, Natasja J; Rudge, Peter; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2005-12-01

    We report a single case, who presents with a selective and severe impairment for multiplication and division facts. His ability to retrieve subtraction and addition facts was entirely normal. His brain lesion affected the left superior temporal and to lesser extent in the left middle temporal gyri and the left precentral gyrus extending inferiorly to the pars opercularis of the left frontal lobe. Interestingly, the left supramarginal and angular gyri (SMG/AG) were spared. This finding realised a double dissociation with a previously reported patient, who despite lesions in the SMG/AG did not have a multiplication impairment (van Harskamp et al., 2002). The previously suggested crucial role of the SMG/AG in the retrieval of simple multiplication facts is therefore poorly supported (Cohen et al., 2000; Lee, 2000). PMID:16350657

  19. Anesthetic Efficacy of Bupivacaine Solutions in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Maria Cristina; Ranali, José; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; de Oliveira, Patrícia Cristine; Ambrosano, Glaúcia Maria Bovi; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 2 bupivacaine solutions. Twenty-two volunteers randomly received in a crossover, double-blinded manner 2 inferior alveolar nerve blocks with 1.8 mL of racemic bupivacaine and a mixture of 75% levobupivacaine and 25% dextrobupivacaine, both 0.5% and with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine. Before and after the injection, the first mandibular pre-molar was evaluated every 2 minutes until no response to the maximal output (80 reading) of the pulp tester and then again every 20 minutes. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon paired test and the paired t test. No differences were found between the solutions for onset and duration of pulpal anesthesia and duration of soft tissue anesthesia (P > .05). It was concluded that the solutions have similar anesthetic efficacy. PMID:16596912

  20. Auditory recognition memory is inferior to visual recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael A.; Horowitz, Todd S.; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2009-01-01

    Visual memory for scenes is surprisingly robust. We wished to examine whether an analogous ability exists in the auditory domain. Participants listened to a variety of sound clips and were tested on their ability to distinguish old from new clips. Stimuli ranged from complex auditory scenes (e.g., talking in a pool hall) to isolated auditory objects (e.g., a dog barking) to music. In some conditions, additional information was provided to help participants with encoding. In every situation, however, auditory memory proved to be systematically inferior to visual memory. This suggests that there exists either a fundamental difference between auditory and visual stimuli, or, more plausibly, an asymmetry between auditory and visual processing. PMID:19307569

  1. Scorpion envenomation-induced acute thrombotic inferior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Baykan, Ahmet Oytun; Gür, Mustafa; Acele, Armağan; Şeker, Taner; Çaylı, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a serious cardiac emergency following scorpion envenomation has rarely been reported and, when so, mostly presented as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock, or myocarditis. Possible mechanisms include imbalance in blood pressure and coronary vasospasm caused by the combination of sympathetic excitation, scorpion venom-induced release of catecholamines, and the direct effect of the toxin on the myocardium. We report a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with acute inferior wall myocardial infarction (MI) within 2 h of being stung by a scorpion. Coronary angiogram revealed total thrombotic occlusion of the left circumflex artery, which was treated successfully with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor, thrombus aspiration, antivenom serum, and supportive therapy. Therefore, life-threatening MI can complicate the clinical course during some types of scorpion envenomation and should be managed as an acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26875137

  2. Evidence of Mirror Neurons in Human Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Kilner, James M.; Neal, Alice; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Friston, Karl J.; Frith, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    There is much current debate about the existence of mirror neurons in humans. To identify mirror neurons in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) of humans we employed a repetition suppression paradigm while measuring neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects either executed or observed a series of actions. Here we show that in the IFG, responses were suppressed both when an executed action was followed by the same rather than a different observed action and when an observed action was followed by the same rather than a different executed action. This pattern of responses is consistent with that predicted by mirror neurons and is evidence of mirror neurons in the human IFG. PMID:19675249

  3. Indications, Management, and Complications of Temporary Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Rieger, Johannes; Schenk, Franz; Rock, Clemens; Mangel, Eugen; Pfeifer, Klaus Juergen

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: We describe the results of a preliminary prospective study using different recently developed temporary and retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. Methods: Fifty temporary IVC filters (Guenther, Guenther Tulip, Antheor) were inserted in 47 patients when the required period of protection against pulmonary embolism (PE) was estimated to be less than 2 weeks. The indications were documented deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and temporary contraindications for anticoagulation, a high risk for PE, and PE despite DVT prophylaxis. Results: Filters were removed 1-12 days after placement and nine (18%) had captured thrombi. Complications were one PE during and after removal of a filter, two minor filter migrations, and one IVC thrombosis. Conclusion: Temporary filters are effective in trapping clots and protecting against PE, and the complication rate does not exceed that of permanent filters. They are an alternative when protection from PE is required temporarily, and should be considered in patients with a normal life expectancy.

  4. Sensitivity of rat inferior colliculus neurons to frequency distributions.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Björn; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Han, Emily X; Obleser, Jonas; Bartlett, Edward L

    2015-11-01

    Stimulus-specific adaptation refers to a neural response reduction to a repeated stimulus that does not generalize to other stimuli. However, stimulus-specific adaptation appears to be influenced by additional factors. For example, the statistical distribution of tone frequencies has recently been shown to dynamically alter stimulus-specific adaptation in human auditory cortex. The present study investigated whether statistical stimulus distributions also affect stimulus-specific adaptation at an earlier stage of the auditory hierarchy. Neural spiking activity and local field potentials were recorded from inferior colliculus neurons of rats while tones were presented in oddball sequences that formed two different statistical contexts. Each sequence consisted of a repeatedly presented tone (standard) and three rare deviants of different magnitudes (small, moderate, large spectral change). The critical manipulation was the relative probability with which large spectral changes occurred. In one context the probability was high (relative to all deviants), while it was low in the other context. We observed larger responses for deviants compared with standards, confirming previous reports of increased response adaptation for frequently presented tones. Importantly, the statistical context in which tones were presented strongly modulated stimulus-specific adaptation. Physically and probabilistically identical stimuli (moderate deviants) in the two statistical contexts elicited different response magnitudes consistent with neural gain changes and thus neural sensitivity adjustments induced by the spectral range of a stimulus distribution. The data show that already at the level of the inferior colliculus stimulus-specific adaptation is dynamically altered by the statistical context in which stimuli occur. PMID:26354316

  5. 75 FR 9228 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Non-Inferiority Clinical Trials; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... ``Non- Inferiority Clinical Trials.'' This draft guidance provides sponsors and review staff in the... announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Non-Inferiority Clinical Trials... clinical trials. It does not create or confer any rights for or on any person and does not operate to...

  6. Dynamic Analysis of Gene Expression in Rice Superior and Inferior Grains by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongzheng; Peng, Ting; Zhao, Yafan; Du, Yanxiu; Zhang, Jing; Li, Junzhou; Xin, Zeyu; Zhao, Quanzhi

    2015-01-01

    Poor grain filling of inferior grains located on lower secondary panicle branch causes great drop in rice yield and quality. Dynamic gene expression patterns between superior and inferior grains were examined from the view of the whole transcriptome by using RNA-Seq method. In total, 19,442 genes were detected during rice grain development. Genes involved in starch synthesis, grain storage and grain development were interrogated in particular in superior and inferior grains. Of the genes involved in sucrose to starch transformation process, most were expressed at lower level in inferior grains at early filling stage compared to that of superior grains. But at late filling stage, the expression of those genes was higher in inferior grains and lower in superior grains. The same trends were observed in the expression of grain storage protein genes. While, evidence that genes involved in cell cycle showed higher expression in inferior grains during whole period of grain filling indicated that cell proliferation was active till the late filling stage. In conclusion, delayed expression of most starch synthesis genes in inferior grains and low capacity of sink organ might be two important factors causing low filling rate of inferior grain at early filling stage, and shortage of carbohydrate supply was a limiting factor at late filling stage.

  7. Does the Left Inferior Longitudinal Fasciculus Play a Role in Language? A Brain Stimulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Nouet, Aurelien; Gatignol, Peggy; Capelle, Laurent; Duffau, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    Although advances in diffusion tensor imaging have enabled us to better study the anatomy of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), its function remains poorly understood. Recently, it was suggested that the subcortical network subserving the language semantics could be constituted, in parallel with the inferior occipitofrontal fasciculus, by…

  8. Generalizing Screen Inferiority--Does the Medium, Screen versus Paper, Affect Performance Even with Brief Tasks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidi, Yael; Ophir, Yael; Ackerman, Rakefet

    2016-01-01

    Screen inferiority in performance and metacognitive processes has been repeatedly found with text learning. Common explanations for screen inferiority relate to technological and physiological disadvantages associated with extensive reading on screen. However, recent studies point to lesser recruitment of mental effort on screen than on paper.…

  9. Deep venous thrombosis in a young woman with hypoplastic inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Lavens, Matthias; Moors, Boudewijn; Thomis, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    We present a 33-year-old woman with deep venous thrombosis of the left iliac vein and the left lower limb. A computed tomography scan of her abdomen revealed a hypoplastic inferior vena cava and agenesis of the right kidney. Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava are uncommon and are sometimes an unrecognized cause of deep venous thrombosis.

  10. Tinnitus-Related Changes in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Joel I.; Coomber, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus is highly complex, diverse, and difficult to treat, in part due to the fact that the underlying causes and mechanisms remain elusive. Tinnitus is generated within the auditory brain; however, consolidating our understanding of tinnitus pathophysiology is difficult due to the diversity of reported effects and the variety of implicated brain nuclei. Here, we focus on the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain structure that integrates the vast majority of ascending auditory information and projects via the thalamus to the auditory cortex. The IC is also a point of convergence for corticofugal input and input originating outside the auditory pathway. We review the evidence, from both studies with human subjects and from animal models, for the contribution the IC makes to tinnitus. Changes in the IC, caused by either noise exposure or drug administration, involve fundamental, heterogeneous alterations in the balance of excitation and inhibition. However, differences between hearing loss-induced pathology and tinnitus-related pathology are not well understood. Moreover, variability in tinnitus induction methodology has a significant impact on subsequent neural and behavioral changes, which could explain some of the seemingly contradictory data. Nonetheless, the IC is likely involved in the generation and persistence of tinnitus perception. PMID:25870582

  11. Encoding of Stimulus Probability in Macaque Inferior Temporal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bell, Andrew H; Summerfield, Christopher; Morin, Elyse L; Malecek, Nicholas J; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2016-09-12

    Optimal perceptual decisions require sensory signals to be combined with prior information about stimulus probability. Although several theories propose that probabilistic information about stimulus occurrence is encoded in sensory cortex, evidence from neuronal recordings has not yet fully supported this view. We recorded activity from single neurons in inferior temporal cortex (IT) while monkeys performed a task that involved discriminating degraded images of faces and fruit. The relative probability of the cue being a face versus a fruit was manipulated by a latent variable that was not revealed to the monkeys and that changed unpredictably over the course of each recording session. In addition to responding to stimulus identity (face or fruit), population responses in IT encoded the long-term stimulus probability of whether a face or a fruit stimulus was more likely to occur. Face-responsive neurons showed reduced firing rates to expected faces, an effect consistent with "expectation suppression," but expected stimuli were decoded from multivariate population signals with greater accuracy. These findings support "predictive coding" theories, whereby neural signals in the mammalian visual system actively encode and update predictions about the local sensory environment.

  12. Dopaminergic Input to the Inferior Colliculus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nevue, Alexander A; Elde, Cameron J; Perkel, David J; Portfors, Christine V

    2015-01-01

    The response of sensory neurons to stimuli can be modulated by a variety of factors including attention, emotion, behavioral context, and disorders involving neuromodulatory systems. For example, patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have disordered speech processing, suggesting that dopamine alters normal representation of these salient sounds. Understanding the mechanisms by which dopamine modulates auditory processing is thus an important goal. The principal auditory midbrain nucleus, the inferior colliculus (IC), is a likely location for dopaminergic modulation of auditory processing because it contains dopamine receptors and nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, the sources of dopaminergic input to the IC are unknown. In this study, we iontophoretically injected a retrograde tracer into the IC of mice and then stained the tissue for TH. We also immunostained for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), an enzyme critical for the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, to differentiate between dopaminergic and noradrenergic inputs. Retrogradely labeled neurons that were positive for TH were seen bilaterally, with strong ipsilateral dominance, in the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF). All retrogradely labeled neurons that we observed in other brain regions were TH-negative. Projections from the SPF were confirmed using an anterograde tracer, revealing TH-positive and DBH-negative anterogradely labeled fibers and terminals in the IC. While the functional role of this dopaminergic input to the IC is not yet known, it provides a potential mechanism for context dependent modulation of auditory processing. PMID:26834578

  13. Right inferior longitudinal fasciculus lesions disrupt visual-emotional integration.

    PubMed

    Fischer, David B; Perez, David L; Prasad, Sashank; Rigolo, Laura; O'Donnell, Lauren; Acar, Diler; Meadows, Mary-Ellen; Baslet, Gaston; Boes, Aaron D; Golby, Alexandra J; Dworetzky, Barbara A

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism by which the brain integrates visual and emotional information remains incompletely understood, and can be studied through focal lesions that selectively disrupt this process. To date, three reported cases of visual hypoemotionality, a vision-specific form of derealization, have resulted from lesions of the temporo-occipital junction. We present a fourth case of this rare phenomenon, and investigate the role of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) in the underlying pathophysiology. A 50-year-old right-handed male was found to have a right medial temporal lobe tumor following new-onset seizures. Interstitial laser ablation of the lesion was complicated by a right temporo-parieto-occipital intraparenchymal hemorrhage. The patient subsequently experienced emotional estrangement from visual stimuli. A lesion overlap analysis was conducted to assess involvement of the ILF by this patient's lesion and those of the three previously described cases, and diffusion tensor imaging was acquired in our case to further investigate ILF disruption. All four lesions specifically overlapped with the expected trajectory of the right ILF, and diminished structural integrity of the right ILF was observed in our case. These findings implicate the ILF in visual hypoemotionality, suggesting that the ILF is critical for integrating visual information with its emotional content. PMID:26940563

  14. Serotonin shifts first-spike latencies of inferior colliculus neurons.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Pollak, George D

    2005-08-24

    Many studies of neuromodulators have focused on changes in the magnitudes of neural responses, but fewer studies have examined neuromodulator effects on response latency. Across sensory systems, response latency is important for encoding not only the temporal structure but also the identity of stimuli. In the auditory system, latency is a fundamental response property that varies with many features of sound, including intensity, frequency, and duration. To determine the extent of neuromodulatory regulation of latency within the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain auditory nexus, the effects of iontophoretically applied serotonin on first-spike latencies were characterized in the IC of the Mexican free-tailed bat. Serotonin significantly altered the first-spike latencies in response to tones in 24% of IC neurons, usually increasing, but sometimes decreasing, latency. Serotonin-evoked changes in latency and spike count were not always correlated but sometimes occurred independently within individual neurons. Furthermore, in some neurons, the size of serotonin-evoked latency shifts depended on the frequency or intensity of the stimulus, as reported previously for serotonin-evoked changes in spike count. These results support the general conclusion that changes in latency are an important part of the neuromodulatory repertoire of serotonin within the auditory system and show that serotonin can change latency either in conjunction with broad changes in other aspects of neuronal excitability or in highly specific ways. PMID:16120790

  15. Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava in Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cina, Alessandro; Zamparelli, Roberto; Venturino, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. We investigated whether (a) the inferior vena cava (IVC) is compressed in bowel obstruction and (b) some tracts are more compressed than others. Methods. Two groups of abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations were collected retrospectively. Group O (N = 69) scans were positive for bowel obstruction, group C (N = 50) scans were negative for diseases. IVC anteroposterior and lateral diameters (APD, LAD) were assessed at seven levels. Results. In group C, IVC section had an elliptic shape (APD/LAD: .76 ± .14), the area of which increased gradually from 1.9 (confluence of the iliac veins) to 3.1 cm2/m2 of BSA (confluence of the hepatic veins) with a significant narrowing in the hepatic section. In group O, bowel obstruction caused a compression of IVC (APD/LAD: .54 ± .17). Along its course, IVC section area increased from 1.3 to 2.5 cm2/m2. At ROC curve analysis, an APD/LAD ratio lower than 0.63 above the confluence of the iliac veins discriminated between O and C groups with sensitivity of 74% and specificity of 96%. Conclusions. Bowel obstruction caused a compression of IVC, which involved its entire course except for the terminal section. APD/LAD ratio may be useful to monitor the degree of compression. PMID:24151603

  16. Advanced Techniques for Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Bogdan; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2012-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have proven valuable for the prevention of primary or recurrent pulmonary embolism in selected patients with or at high risk for venous thromboembolic disease. Their use has become commonplace, and the numbers implanted increase annually. During the last 3 years, in the United States, the percentage of annually placed optional filters, i.e., filters than can remain as permanent filters or potentially be retrieved, has consistently exceeded that of permanent filters. In parallel, the complications of long- or short-term filtration have become increasingly evident to physicians, regulatory agencies, and the public. Most filter removals are uneventful, with a high degree of success. When routine filter-retrieval techniques prove unsuccessful, progressively more advanced tools and skill sets must be used to enhance filter-retrieval success. These techniques should be used with caution to avoid damage to the filter or cava during IVC retrieval. This review describes the complex techniques for filter retrieval, including use of additional snares, guidewires, angioplasty balloons, and mechanical and thermal approaches as well as illustrates their specific application.

  17. Inferior vena cava filter migration: updated review and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Janjua, Muhammad; Omran, Fatema M; Kastoon, Tony; Alshami, Mahmood; Abbas, Amr E

    2009-11-01

    We report a case of inferior vena cava filter migration to the right ventricle resulting in ventricular tachycardia and elevated troponin. The patient was taken to the cardiac catheterization laboratory and under fluoroscopy the filter was found to be in the right ventricle. Later in the day the filter was removed surgically with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass. This case, as well as the other 27 reported cases of filter migration, were reviewed. It was noticed that newer retrievable filters made of nitinol, phynox and elgioly have a significantly higher percentage of filter migration into the right ventricle as compared to the old stainless steel and titanium-based Greenfield filters. Similarly, there were also higher percentages of complications and mortality associated with the newer retrievable filters migrating to the right ventricle. Filter migration to the right ventricle as opposed to the right atrium increased over the past 10 years, which has resulted in more serious symptoms, ventricular arrhythmias, deaths and higher rates of surgical removal.

  18. Frustrative reward omission increases aggressive behaviour of inferior fighters

    PubMed Central

    Vindas, Marco A.; Johansen, Ida B.; Vela-Avitua, Sergio; Nørstrud, Karoline Sletbak; Aalgaard, Marion; Braastad, Bjarne O.; Höglund, Erik; Øverli, Øyvind

    2014-01-01

    Animals use aggressive behaviour to gain access to resources, and individuals adjust their behaviour relative to resource value and own resource holding potential (RHP). Normally, smaller individuals have inferior fighting abilities compared with larger conspecifics. Affective and cognitive processes can alter contest dynamics, but the interaction between such effects and that of differing RHPs has not been adjudged. We investigated effects of omission of expected reward (OER) on competing individuals with contrasting RHPs. Small and large rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were conditioned to associate a light with reward. Thereafter, the reward was omitted for half of the fish prior to a contest between individuals possessing a 36–40% difference in RHP. Small control individuals displayed submissive behaviour and virtually no aggression. By contrast, small OER individuals were more aggressive, and two out of 11 became socially dominant. Increased aggression in small OER individuals was accompanied by increased serotonin levels in the dorsomedial pallium (proposed amygdala homologue), but no changes in limbic dopamine neurochemistry were observed in OER-exposed individuals. The behavioural and physiological response to OER in fish indicates that frustration is an evolutionarily conserved affective state. Moreover, our results indicate that aggressive motivation to reward unpredictability affects low RHP individuals strongest. PMID:24759861

  19. Processing of emotional vocalizations in bilateral inferior frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Frühholz, Sascha; Grandjean, Didier

    2013-12-01

    A current view proposes that the right inferior frontal cortex (IFC) is particularly responsible for attentive decoding and cognitive evaluation of emotional cues in human vocalizations. Although some studies seem to support this view, an exhaustive review of all recent imaging studies points to an important functional role of both the right and the left IFC in processing vocal emotions. Second, besides a supposed predominant role of the IFC for an attentive processing and evaluation of emotional voices in IFC, these recent studies also point to a possible role of the IFC in preattentive and implicit processing of vocal emotions. The studies specifically provide evidence that both the right and the left IFC show a similar anterior-to-posterior gradient of functional activity in response to emotional vocalizations. This bilateral IFC gradient depends both on the nature or medium of emotional vocalizations (emotional prosody versus nonverbal expressions) and on the level of attentive processing (explicit versus implicit processing), closely resembling the distribution of terminal regions of distinct auditory pathways, which provide either global or dynamic acoustic information. Here we suggest a functional distribution in which several IFC subregions process different acoustic information conveyed by emotional vocalizations. Although the rostro-ventral IFC might categorize emotional vocalizations, the caudo-dorsal IFC might be specifically sensitive to their temporal features.

  20. Left inferior parietal lobe engagement in social cognition and language.

    PubMed

    Bzdok, Danilo; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Reid, Andrew; Laird, Angela R; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-09-01

    Social cognition and language are two core features of the human species. Despite distributed recruitment of brain regions in each mental capacity, the left parietal lobe (LPL) represents a zone of topographical convergence. The present study quantitatively summarizes hundreds of neuroimaging studies on social cognition and language. Using connectivity-based parcellation on a meta-analytically defined volume of interest (VOI), regional coactivation patterns within this VOI allowed identifying distinct subregions. Across parcellation solutions, two clusters emerged consistently in rostro-ventral and caudo-ventral aspects of the parietal VOI. Both clusters were functionally significantly associated with social-cognitive and language processing. In particular, the rostro-ventral cluster was associated with lower-level processing facets, while the caudo-ventral cluster was associated with higher-level processing facets in both mental capacities. Contrarily, in the (less stable) dorsal parietal VOI, all clusters reflected computation of general-purpose processes, such as working memory and matching tasks, that are frequently co-recruited by social or language processes. Our results hence favour a rostro-caudal distinction of lower- versus higher-level processes underlying social cognition and language in the left inferior parietal lobe. PMID:27241201

  1. Visual modulation of auditory responses in the owl inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Bergan, Joseph F; Knudsen, Eric I

    2009-06-01

    The barn owl's central auditory system creates a map of auditory space in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX). Although the crucial role visual experience plays in the formation and maintenance of this auditory space map is well established, the mechanism by which vision influences ICX responses remains unclear. Surprisingly, previous experiments have found that in the absence of extensive pharmacological manipulation, visual stimuli do not drive neural responses in the ICX. Here we investigated the influence of dynamic visual stimuli on auditory responses in the ICX. We show that a salient visual stimulus, when coincident with an auditory stimulus, can modulate auditory responses in the ICX even though the same visual stimulus may elicit no neural responses when presented alone. For each ICX neuron, the most effective auditory and visual stimuli were located in the same region of space. In addition, the magnitude of the visual modulation of auditory responses was dependent on the context of the stimulus presentation with novel visual stimuli eliciting consistently larger response modulations than frequently presented visual stimuli. Thus the visual modulation of ICX responses is dependent on the characteristics of the visual stimulus as well as on the spatial and temporal correspondence of the auditory and visual stimuli. These results demonstrate moment-to-moment visual enhancements of auditory responsiveness that, in the short-term, increase auditory responses to salient bimodal stimuli and in the long-term could serve to instruct the adaptive auditory plasticity necessary to maintain accurate auditory orienting behavior. PMID:19321633

  2. Lagged cells in the inferior colliculus of the awake ferret

    PubMed Central

    Shechter, Barak; Marvit, Peter; Depireux, Didier A

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in primary auditory cortex (AI) encode complex features of the spectral content of sound, such as direction selectivity. Recent findings of temporal symmetry in AI predict a specific organization of the subcortical input into cortex that contributes to the emergence of direction selectivity. We demonstrate two sub-populations of neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus, which differ in their steady-state temporal response profile: lagged and non-lagged. The lagged cells (23%) are shifted in temporal phase with respect to non-lagged cells and are characterized by an “inhibition first” and delayed excitation in their spectro-temporal receptive fields. Non-lagged cells (77%) have a canonical “excitation first” response. However, we find no difference in the response onset latency to pure tone stimuli between the two sub-populations. Given the homogeneity of tonal response latency, we predict that these lagged cells receive inhibitory input mediated by cortical feedback projections. PMID:20092554

  3. Spectral and Temporal Modulation Tradeoff in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Francisco A.; Read, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    The cochlea encodes sounds through frequency-selective channels that exhibit low-pass modulation sensitivity. Unlike the cochlea, neurons in the auditory midbrain are tuned for spectral and temporal modulations found in natural sounds, yet the role of this transformation is not known. We report a distinct tradeoff in modulation sensitivity and tuning that is topographically ordered within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC). Spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) were obtained with 16-channel electrodes inserted orthogonal to the isofrequency lamina. Surprisingly, temporal and spectral characteristics exhibited an opposing relationship along the tonotopic axis. For low best frequencies (BFs), units were selective for fast temporal and broad spectral modulations. A systematic progression was observed toward slower temporal and finer spectral modulation sensitivity at high BF. This tradeoff was strongly reflected in the arrangement of excitation and inhibition and, consequently, in the modulation tuning characteristics. Comparisons with auditory nerve fibers show that these trends oppose the pattern imposed by the peripheral filters. These results suggest that spectrotemporal preferences are reordered within the tonotopic axis of the CNIC. This topographic organization has profound implications for the coding of spectrotemporal features in natural sounds and could underlie a number of perceptual phenomena. PMID:20018831

  4. The inferior cochlear vein: surgical aspects in cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, HongLei; Chen, Wei; Zhu, XiaoQuan; Liu, Wei; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-02-01

    The patency of the inferior cochlear vein (ICV) may be challenged in cochlear implantation (CI) due to its location near the round window (RW). This may be essential to consider during selection of different trajectories for electrode insertion aiming at preserving residual hearing. Venous blood from the human cochlea is drained through the ICV. The vein also drains blood from the modiolus containing the spiral ganglion neurons. Surgical interference with this vein could cause neural damage influencing CI outcome. We analyzed the topographical relationship between the RW and ICV bony channel and cochlear aqueduct (CA) from a surgical standpoint. Archival human temporal bones were further microdissected to visualize the CA and its accessory canals (AC1 and AC2). This was combined with examinations of plastic and silicone molds of the human labyrinth. Metric analyses were made using photo stereomicroscopy documenting the proximal portion of the AC1, the internal aperture of the CA and the RW. The mean distance between the AC1 and the anterior rim of the RW was 0.81 mm in bone specimens and 0.67 mm assessed in corrosion casts. The AC1 runs from the floor of the scala tympani through the otic capsule passing parallel to the CA to the posterior cranial fossa. The mean distance between the CA and AC1 canal was 0.31 and 0.25 mm, respectively. PMID:25700831

  5. Responses of Inferior Colliculus Neurons to Double Harmonic Tones

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhe

    2008-01-01

    The auditory system can segregate sounds that overlap in time and frequency, if the sounds differ in acoustic properties such as fundamental frequency (f0). However, the neural mechanisms that underlie this ability are poorly understood. Responses of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the anesthetized chinchilla were measured. The stimuli were harmonic tones, presented alone (single harmonic tones) and in the presence of a second harmonic tone with a different f0 (double harmonic tones). Responses to single harmonic tones exhibited no stimulus-related temporal pattern, or in some cases, a simple envelope modulated at f0. Responses to double harmonic tones exhibited complex slowly modulated discharge patterns. The discharge pattern varied with the difference in f0 and with characteristic frequency. The discharge pattern also varied with the relative levels of the two tones; complex temporal patterns were observed when levels were equal, but as the level difference increased, the discharge pattern reverted to that associated with single harmonic tones. The results indicated that IC neurons convey information about simultaneous sounds in their temporal discharge patterns and that the patterns are produced by interactions between adjacent components in the spectrum. The representation is “low-resolution,” in that it does not convey information about single resolved components from either individual sound. PMID:17913991

  6. Effect of Preoperative Pain on Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Subbiya, Arunajatesan; Vivekanandhan, Paramasivam; Sharma, Vikram; Sharma, Ritu; Prakash, Venkatachalam; Geethapriya, Nagarajan

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the amount and severity of preoperative pain will affect the anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One-hundred seventy-seven adult volunteer subjects, actively experiencing pain in a mandibular molar, participated in this prospective double-blind study carried out at 2 different centers. The patients were classified into 3 groups on the basis of severity of preoperative pain: mild, 1-54 mm on the Heft-Parker visual analog scale (HP VAS); moderate, 55-114 mm; and severe, greater than 114 mm. After IANB with 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine, endodontic access preparation was initiated. Pain during treatment was recorded using the HP VAS. The primary outcome measure was the ability to undertake pulp access and canal instrumentation with no or mild pain. The success rates were statistically analyzed by multiple logistic regression test. There was a significant difference between the mild and severe preoperative pain group (P = .03). There was a positive correlation between the values of preoperative and intraoperative pain (r = .2 and .4 at 2 centers). The amount of preoperative pain can affect the anesthetic success rates of IANB in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. PMID:26650491

  7. Surgical treatment of painful lesions of the inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, Federico; Allevi, Fabiana; Lozza, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Nerve-related complications are being reported with increasing frequency following oral and dental surgery, and typically involve the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). We assess herein the etiology of neuropathic pain related to IAN injuries, and describe the various surgical treatment techniques available. Between 2007 and 2013, 19 patients were referred to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) with pain in the area supplied by the IAN, which developed following endodontic treatment, oral surgery and maxillofacial surgery. All patients underwent IAN surgery by several different microsurgical procedures. Most of the patients affected by pain before surgery experienced complete or partial amelioration of symptoms. All patients receiving sural nerve grafts were pain-free 12 months after surgery. In five patients the operation was unsuccessful. In 78.94% of cases, a significant increase in nerve function was observed. Pain following IAN surgical damage may be addressed by microsurgery; nerve substitution with a sural nerve interpositional graft appears to represent the most efficacious procedure. Scar releasing, nerve decompression and nerve substitution using vein grafts are less effective. Removal of endodontic material extravasated into the mandibular canal is mandatory and effective in patients experiencing severe pain. Surgery should be performed within 12 months postoperatively, ideally during the first few weeks after symptoms onset. PMID:26315275

  8. Mesoaortic entrapment of a left inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Naik, Nitish; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh

    2010-02-01

    A persistent left inferior vena cava (IVC) is a rare anomaly, with a reported incidence of only 0.2-0.5%. When present, it courses between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta to continue as the right IVC, similar to the course of a left renal vein (LRV). This anomaly is usually asymptomatic, but there may be vague abdominal complaints if the IVC is compressed in the mesoaortic angle. Although symptomatic compression of the LRV (anterior nutcracker syndrome) is well recognized, there has been only one report in the literature of a similar compression of a persistent left IVC. Because of its rarity, this anomaly may be missed or mistaken for other conditions on imaging. An accurate diagnosis is crucial as the presence of this anomaly may have implications for surgical treatment of aortic lesions or placement of an IVC filter. Magnetic resonance angiography and, more recently, multidetector computed tomography scan, can provide an exquisite three-dimensional demonstration of vascular abnormalities.

  9. Dopaminergic Input to the Inferior Colliculus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nevue, Alexander A.; Elde, Cameron J.; Perkel, David J.; Portfors, Christine V.

    2016-01-01

    The response of sensory neurons to stimuli can be modulated by a variety of factors including attention, emotion, behavioral context, and disorders involving neuromodulatory systems. For example, patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have disordered speech processing, suggesting that dopamine alters normal representation of these salient sounds. Understanding the mechanisms by which dopamine modulates auditory processing is thus an important goal. The principal auditory midbrain nucleus, the inferior colliculus (IC), is a likely location for dopaminergic modulation of auditory processing because it contains dopamine receptors and nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, the sources of dopaminergic input to the IC are unknown. In this study, we iontophoretically injected a retrograde tracer into the IC of mice and then stained the tissue for TH. We also immunostained for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), an enzyme critical for the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, to differentiate between dopaminergic and noradrenergic inputs. Retrogradely labeled neurons that were positive for TH were seen bilaterally, with strong ipsilateral dominance, in the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF). All retrogradely labeled neurons that we observed in other brain regions were TH-negative. Projections from the SPF were confirmed using an anterograde tracer, revealing TH-positive and DBH-negative anterogradely labeled fibers and terminals in the IC. While the functional role of this dopaminergic input to the IC is not yet known, it provides a potential mechanism for context dependent modulation of auditory processing. PMID:26834578

  10. Panmedullary edema with inferior olivary hypertrophy in bilateral medial medullary infarction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuteru; Miyashita, Fumio; Koga, Masatoshi; Yamada, Naoaki; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    Bilateral medial medullary infarction (MMI) is a rare type of stroke with poor outcomes. Inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy results from a pathologic lesion in the Guillain-Mollaret triangle. The relationship between inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy and the medullary lesion is obscure. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 autopsy case with unilateral medial medullary infarction that was associated with ipsilateral inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy has been reported. We describe a rare case with acute infarction in the bilateral medial medulla oblongata accompanied by subacute bilateral inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy and panmedullary edema. The hypertrophy appeared to have been caused by local ischemic damage to the termination of the central tegmental tract at the bilateral inferior olivary nucleus.

  11. Bifurcation of orbits and synchrony in inferior olive neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keum W; Singh, Sahjendra N

    2012-09-01

    Inferior olive neurons (IONs) have rich dynamics and can exhibit stable, unstable, periodic, and even chaotic trajectories. This paper presents an analysis of bifurcation of periodic orbits of an ION when its two key parameters (a, μ) are varied in a two-dimensional plane. The parameter a describes the shape of the parabolic nonlinearity in the model and μ is the extracellular stimulus. The four-dimensional ION model considered here is a cascade connection of two subsystems (S(a) and S(b)). The parameter plane (a - μ) is delineated into several subregions. The ION has distinct orbit structure and stability property in each subregion. It is shown that the subsystem S(a) or S(b) undergoes supercritical Poincare-Andronov-Hopf (PAH) bifurcation at a critical value μ(c)(a) of the extracellular stimulus and periodic orbits of the neuron are born. Based on the center manifold theory, the existence of periodic orbits in the asymptotically stable S(a), when the subsystem S(b) undergoes PAH bifurcation, is established. In such a case, both subsystems exhibit periodic orbits. Interestingly when S(b) is under PAH bifurcation and S(a) is unstable, the trajectory of S(a) exhibits periodic bursting, interrupted by periods of quiescence. The bifurcation analysis is followed by the design of (i) a linear first-order filter and (ii) a nonlinear control system for the synchronization of IONs. The first controller uses a single output of each ION, but the nonlinear control system uses two state variables for feedback. The open-loop and closed-loop responses are presented which show bifurcation of orbits and synchronization of oscillating neurons.

  12. Adjunctive Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement for Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, V. M.; Lee-Llacer, J.; Williams, J.; Ubaissi, H.; Gutierrez, G.

    2010-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are sometimes placed as an adjunct to full anticoagulation in patients with significant pulmonary embolism (PE). We aimed to determine the prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement in individuals diagnosed with PE, as well as the effect of adjunctive filter placement on mortality in patients with right heart strain associated with PE. This was a retrospective study of patients with acute PE treated with full anticoagulation admitted to a single academic medical center. Information abstracted from patient charts included presence or absence of right heart strain and of deep-vein thrombosis, and whether or not an IVC filter was placed. The endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Over 2.75 years, we found that 248 patients were diagnosed with acute PE, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 4.4%. The prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement was 13.3% (33 of 248), and the prevalence of documented right heart strain was 27.0% (67 of 248). In-hospital mortality was 10.2% in the non-filter-treated group (5 of 49), whereas there were no deaths in the filter-treated group (0 of 18); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.37). Both the presence of deep-vein thrombosis and of right heart strain increased the likelihood that an adjunctive IVC filter was placed (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively). At our institution, patients were treated with IVC filters in addition to anticoagulation in 13.3% of cases of acute PE. Prospective studies or large clinical registries should be conducted to clarify whether this practice improves outcomes.

  13. Venous Thromboembolism After Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Tanaka, Osamu; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Miura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of new or recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) after retrieval of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters and risk factors associated with such recurrence. Between March 2001 and September 2008, at our institution, implanted retrievable vena cava filters were retrieved in 76 patients. The incidence of new or recurrent VTE after retrieval was reviewed and numerous variables were analyzed to assess risk factors for redevelopment of VTE after filter retrieval. In 5 (6.6%) of the 76 patients, redevelopment or worsening of VTE was seen after retrieval of the filter. Three patients (4.0%) had recurrent deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the lower extremities and 2 (2.6%) had development of pulmonary embolism, resulting in death. Although there was no significant difference in the incidence of new or recurrent VTE related to any risk factor investigated, a tendency for development of VTE after filter retrieval was higher in patients in whom DVT in the lower extremities had been so severe during filter implantation that interventional radiological therapies in addition to traditional anticoagulation therapies were required (40% in patients with recurrent VTE vs. 23% in those without VTE; p = 0.5866 according to Fisher's exact probability test) and in patients in whom DVT remained at the time of filter retrieval (60% in patients with recurrent VTE vs. 37% in those without VTE; p = 0.3637). In conclusion, new or recurrent VTE was rare after retrieval of IVC filters but was most likely to occur in patients who had severe DVT during filter implantation and/or in patients with a DVT that remained at the time of filter retrieval. We must point out that the fatality rate from PE after filter removal was high (2.6%).

  14. Radiofrequency volumetric inferior turbinate reduction: long-term clinical results.

    PubMed

    De Corso, E; Bastanza, G; Di Donfrancesco, V; Guidi, M L; Morelli Sbarra, G; Passali, G C; Poscia, A; de Waure, C; Paludetti, G; Galli, J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study was to assess long-term results of radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction of inferior turbinates (RVTR). We performed a prospective long-term longitudinal evaluation of 305 patients affected by rhinitis (114 allergic and 191 non-allergic) who were unresponsive to medical treatment and underwent RVTR (January 2004 - December 2010). Subjects were followed for a mean period of 39.70 ± 19.41 months (range 24-60). Patients completed the NOSE-scale questionnaire pre- and post-operatively after 1 month and yearly for 5-years. Recurrence was assumed if the post-operative total NOSE score increased by at least 75% during follow-up and the patient restarted medical treatments. Estimation of relapse over time was performed by Kaplan-Meyer analyses. We documented overall good satisfaction of patients regarding the procedure, with a good rate of pain control and a low rate of complications. Post-operatively there was a significant improvement in nasal stuffiness, nasal obstruction and mouth breathing (p < 0.05). We observed a worsening trend for symptoms after 36 months with progressive increasing rate of recurrences that were significantly higher in allergic than non-allergic patients (p < 0.05). We also observed a slight worsening trend of global satisfaction of patients. Our study confirms the minor discomfort and low risk of side effects of RVTR. Our data showed good efficacy of the procedure in the majority of patients for at least 36 months after surgery, and in fact in this time period the cumulative probability to remain relapse-free was up to 0.8. In the following 2 years, we observed a worse temporal trend in term of recurrence rate, and in particular in allergic patients with a significant difference vs non-allergic individuals (p < 0.05). PMID:27214831

  15. Spectral integration in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat.

    PubMed

    Leroy, S A; Wenstrup, J J

    2000-11-15

    Acoustic behaviors including orientation and social communication depend on neural integration of information across the sound spectrum. In many species, spectral integration is performed by combination-sensitive neurons, responding best when distinct spectral elements in sounds are combined. These are generally considered a feature of information processing in the auditory forebrain. In the mustached bat's inferior colliculus (IC), they are common in frequency representations associated with sonar signals but have not been reported elsewhere in this bat's IC or the IC of other species. We examined the presence of combination-sensitive neurons in frequency representations of the mustached bat's IC not associated with biosonar. Seventy-five single-unit responses were recorded with the best frequencies in 10-23 or 32-47 kHz bands. Twenty-six displayed single excitatory tuning curves in one band with no additional responsiveness to a second signal in another band. The remaining 49 responded to sounds in both 10-23 and 32-47 kHz bands, but response types varied. Sounds in the higher band were usually excitatory, whereas sounds in the lower band either facilitated or inhibited responses to the higher frequency signal. Interactions were usually strongest when the higher and lower frequency stimuli were presented simultaneously, but the strength of interactions varied. Over one-third of the neurons formed a distinct subset; they responded most sensitively to bandpass noise, and all were combination sensitive. We suggest that these combination-sensitive interactions are activated by elements of mustached bat social vocalizations. If so, neuronal integration characterizing analysis of social vocalizations in many species occurs in the IC.

  16. Radiofrequency volumetric inferior turbinate reduction: long-term clinical results.

    PubMed

    De Corso, E; Bastanza, G; Di Donfrancesco, V; Guidi, M L; Morelli Sbarra, G; Passali, G C; Poscia, A; de Waure, C; Paludetti, G; Galli, J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study was to assess long-term results of radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction of inferior turbinates (RVTR). We performed a prospective long-term longitudinal evaluation of 305 patients affected by rhinitis (114 allergic and 191 non-allergic) who were unresponsive to medical treatment and underwent RVTR (January 2004 - December 2010). Subjects were followed for a mean period of 39.70 ± 19.41 months (range 24-60). Patients completed the NOSE-scale questionnaire pre- and post-operatively after 1 month and yearly for 5-years. Recurrence was assumed if the post-operative total NOSE score increased by at least 75% during follow-up and the patient restarted medical treatments. Estimation of relapse over time was performed by Kaplan-Meyer analyses. We documented overall good satisfaction of patients regarding the procedure, with a good rate of pain control and a low rate of complications. Post-operatively there was a significant improvement in nasal stuffiness, nasal obstruction and mouth breathing (p < 0.05). We observed a worsening trend for symptoms after 36 months with progressive increasing rate of recurrences that were significantly higher in allergic than non-allergic patients (p < 0.05). We also observed a slight worsening trend of global satisfaction of patients. Our study confirms the minor discomfort and low risk of side effects of RVTR. Our data showed good efficacy of the procedure in the majority of patients for at least 36 months after surgery, and in fact in this time period the cumulative probability to remain relapse-free was up to 0.8. In the following 2 years, we observed a worse temporal trend in term of recurrence rate, and in particular in allergic patients with a significant difference vs non-allergic individuals (p < 0.05).

  17. Study of the inferior colliculus in patients with schizophrenia by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Granados, B; Martinez-Bisbal, M C; Sanjuan, J; Aguilar, E J; Marti-Bonmati, L; Molla, E; Celda, B

    2014-07-01

    INTRODUCTION. Previous studies have suggested morphometric and functional abnormalities in the inferior colliculus in patients with schizophrenia. Auditory hallucinations are one of the central symptoms in schizophrenia. In this complex and multidimensional event both attention and emotion are thought to play a key role. AIM. To study metabolic changes in the inferior colliculus, a nucleus integrated in the auditory pathway, in patients with schizophrenia and the possible relationship with auditory hallucinations. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging studies were performed in 30 right-handed patients with chronic schizophrenia (19 of them with auditory hallucinations) and 28 controls. A magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging 2D slice was acquired and the voxels representative of both inferior colliculi were selected. N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr) and choline (Cho) peak areas were measured. RESULTS. The patients with schizophrenia showed a NAA/Cr significant reduction in the right inferior colliculus compared to the control subjects. The metabolic data in the right inferior colliculus were correlated with emotional auditory hallucinations items. CONCLUSIONS. The contribution of the inferior colliculus on neural underpinnings of auditory hallucinations is particularly relevant for the right inferior colliculus and is centered on attention-emotional component of this symptom.

  18. Retinoic acid influences the development of the inferior olivary nucleus in the rodent.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Miyuki; Fujinuma, Masahiro; Hirano, Shinji; Hayakawa, Yoshika; Clagett-Dame, Margaret; Zhang, Jinghua; McCaffery, Peter

    2005-04-15

    All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is an endogenous morphogen that regulates gene transcription. Maternal exposure to atRA results in severe developmental abnormalities by disrupting normal patterns of atRA distribution. Previously, we have shown that the pontine nucleus, which originates from the rhombic lip, is severely atrophied in the mouse on exposure to atRA at gestational days 9 and 10. In this study, we show that this same period of atRA exposure has the contrary effect on the inferior olive and this rhombic lip derivative is expanded in volume and probably contains an increased number of cells. The posterior region of the inferior olive maintains a relatively normal shape but is significantly expanded in size. In contrast, the organization of the anterior inferior olive is severely disrupted. Because endogenous atRA levels are known to be higher in the region of the posterior inferior olive at the time of birth of inferior olivary neurons, these results suggest that endogenous atRA may promote the generation, or select the fate, of posterior neurons of the inferior olive. In support of this concept, a reduction in atRA resulting from vitamin A deficiency results in loss of cells of the posterior inferior olive.

  19. Inferior vena cava leiomyosarcoma confirmed by catheter suction biopsy during digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning; Xu, Xiang-Dong; Xu, Hao; Zu, Mao-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma of vascular origin is a rare disease and most cases arise in the inferior vena cava. Inferior vena cava leiomyosarcoma (IVCLMS) usually presents in females in their sixth decade of life. The clinical symptoms are often non-specific and the diagnosis is often delayed. Current imaging techniques can accurately differentiate inferior vena cava neoplasms from other non-neoplastic lesions. However, definitive diagnosis of IVCLMS needs histologic evidence. We report a case of IVCLMS in a 61-year old Chinese woman. This is the first IVCLMS case confirmed by catheter suction biopsy during digital subtraction angiography. PMID:25232438

  20. Inputs to combination-sensitive neurons of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, J J; Mittmann, D H; Grose, C D

    1999-07-12

    In the mustached bat, combination-sensitive neurons display integrative responses to combinations of acoustic elements in biosonar or social vocalizations. One type of combination-sensitive neuron responds to multiple harmonics of the frequency-modulated (FM) components in the sonar pulse and echo of the bat. These neurons, termed FM-FM neurons, are sensitive to the pulse-echo delay and may encode the distance of sonar targets. FM-FM neurons are common in high-frequency regions of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) and may be created there. If so, they must receive low-frequency inputs in addition to the expected high-frequency inputs. We placed single deposits of a tracer at FM-FM recording sites in the ICC and then analyzed retrograde labeling in the brainstem and midbrain. We were particularly interested in labeling patterns suggestive of low-frequency input to these FM-FM neurons. In most nuclei containing labeled cells, there was a single focus of labeling in regions thought to be responsive to high-frequency sounds. More complex labeling patterns were observed in three nuclei. In the anteroventral cochlear nucleus, labeling in the anterior and marginal cell divisions occurred in regions thought to respond to low-frequency sounds. This labeling comprised 6% of total brainstem labeled cells. Labeling in the intermediate nucleus of the lateral lemniscus and the magnocellular part of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus together comprised nearly 40% of all labeled cells. In both nuclei, multiple foci of labeling occurred. These different foci may represent groups of cells tuned to different frequency bands. Thus, one or more of these three nuclei may provide low-frequency input to high-frequency-sensitive cells in the ICC, creating FM-FM responses. We also examined whether ICC neurons responsive to lower frequencies project to high-frequency-sensitive ICC regions; only 0.15% of labeling originated from these lower frequency

  1. Pathological study of pseudohypertrophy of the inferior olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Katsuhiko; Mizutani, Tomohiko; Uehara, Kenji; Minami, Masayuki; Suzuki, Yoshio; Uchihara, Toshiki

    2010-02-01

    There have been only a few reports about the immunohistochemical study of pseudohypertrophy of the inferior olivary nucleus (PH-IO). We therefore performed the detailed immunohistochemical study of 10 PH-IOs in 8 patients to clarify the mechanism of neuronal degeneration and its related phenomenon of PH-IO. We used various antibodies to alphaB-crystallin (alphaBC), synaptophysin (SYP), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu (KDEL) receptors, heat shock protein (HSP) 27 as well as SMI-31. We found alphaBC-positive neurons on the ipsilateral side of 10 PH-IOs. SMI-31-positive neurons were also observed in 6 PH-IOs. Confocal laser microscopy showed co-localization of alphaBC and SMI-31 in some neurons. However, there were no HSP27-positive neurons or astrocytes in any of the 10 PH-IOs. MAP2 immunostaining showed MAP2-positive hypertrophic thick neurites around hypertrophic neurons on the ipsilateral side of 7 PH-IOs and demonstrated "glomeruloid structures" in 3 PH-IOs. In addition, fine granular SYP-immunoreactivity was decreased in the neuropils on the ipsilateral side of all 10 PH-IOs. SYP-immunoreactive dots were scattered in the neuropils and on the neuronal cell bodies on the side of 7 PH-IOs, and the aggregation of SYP-immunoreactive dots scattered in the neuropils was shown in 3 PH-IOs. Double-immunostainings using anti-MAP2 and anti-SYP antibodies demonstrated frequent SYP-immunoreactive dots along the MAP2-positive hypertrophic thick neurites and their cell bodies. Periphery-stained KDEL-positive neurons were also found on the side of 7 PH-IOs. We showed that the change of the distribution of presynaptic terminals correlated well to the hypertrophic thick neurites in PH-IO. Our immuohistochemical stainings demonstrated various changes which occurred to the neurons in PH-IO, and their neurites and presynaptic terminals. We considered that alphaBC was expressed in the neurons in PH-IO, induced by cellular stress. Such a detailed

  2. Clinical Sequelae of Thrombus in an Inferior Vena Cava Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Yeddula, Kalpana; Wicky, Stephan; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term clinical sequelae of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter thrombus and the effect of anticoagulation on filter thrombus. Of 1,718 patients who had IVC filters placed during 2001-2008, 598 (34.8%) had follow-up abdominal CT. Filter thrombus was seen in 111 of the 598 (18.6%). There were 44 men (39.6%). The mean age at filter placement was 64 years. The medical diseases included cancer in 64, trauma in 15, stroke in 12, and others in 20. The frequency of filter thrombus on CT and asymptomatic filter thrombus on CT was calculated. The frequency of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with filter thrombus was calculated. The frequency of thrombus progression or regression (on CT, available in 56) was calculated. The effect of anticoagulation on filter thrombus regression/progression was evaluated using the Fisher exact test by comparing the group of patients who received anticoagulants versus those who did not. A P-value of <0.05 was considered significant. The overall frequency of filter thrombus was 18.6%. Total occlusion of the IVC filter was seen in 12 of 598 (2%). The filter thrombus was asymptomatic in 110 (18.3%). Filter thrombus was detected after a median of 35 days (range, 0-2082) following filter placement. Thrombus extended above the filter in 4 (3.6%); IVC thrombus below the filter was seen in 35(31.5%). Thrombus in the filter occluded <25% of the filter volume in 58 (52.3%), 25-50% in 21 (18.9%), and 50-75% in 20 (18%). Total IVC occlusion was seen in 12 (10.8%). Eighty-three patients received anticoagulation. Sixteen patients developed symptoms of PE. PE was confirmed on CT in 3 of 15 (2.7%). On follow-up, filter thrombus regressed completely in 19 (33.9%) after a median of 6 months. Filter thrombus decreased in size in 13 (23.2%) and it progressed without IVC occlusion in 7 (12.6%). In one (1.7%), filter thrombus progressed to IVC occlusion. Filter thrombus remained stable in 16 (28.6%). There was no

  3. [Calcified bullet thrombus of the inferior vena cava and left renal vein in an adult].

    PubMed

    Leclerc, A; Lapébie, F-X; Thuillier, F; Lacroix, P

    2016-07-01

    Calcifications are rarely located within the inferior vena cava and the renal veins. The etiology is poorly understood and the prognosis is uncertain. We report a case in a 55-year-old man. PMID:27344300

  4. The role of precuneus and left inferior frontal cortex during source memory episodic retrieval.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Brian Nils; Ingvar, Martin; Petersson, Karl Magnus

    2005-10-01

    The posterior medial parietal cortex and left prefrontal cortex (PFC) have both been implicated in the recollection of past episodes. In a previous study, we found the posterior precuneus and left lateral inferior frontal cortex to be activated during episodic source memory retrieval. This study further examines the role of posterior precuneal and left prefrontal activation during episodic source memory retrieval using a similar source memory paradigm but with longer latency between encoding and retrieval. Our results suggest that both the precuneus and the left inferior PFC are important for regeneration of rich episodic contextual associations and that the precuneus activates in tandem with the left inferior PFC during correct source retrieval. Further, results suggest that the left ventro-lateral frontal region/frontal operculum is involved in searching for task-relevant information (BA 47) and subsequent monitoring or scrutiny (BA 44/45) while regions in the dorsal inferior frontal cortex are important for information selection (BA 45/46).

  5. Management of inferior retinal breaks during pars plana vitrectomy for retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, V; Minihan, M; Williamson, T

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine whether it is necessary to support inferior retinal breaks with a scleral explant during pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RD).
METHODS—A prospective study was carried out on nine eyes of nine consecutive patients undergoing PPV for primary RD with associated inferior retinal breaks and no significant proliferative vitreoretinopathy.
RESULTS—Eight eyes were successfully reattached with a single operation. No cases presented with redetachment because of failed closure of the original inferior breaks.
CONCLUSIONS—It is not necessary to support inferior retinal breaks with a scleral explant during PPV for primary RD repair in selected cases.

 PMID:11264142

  6. Anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction with sudden deafness and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takenobu; Nakayasu, Hiroyuki; Doi, Mitsuru; Fukada, Yasuyo; Hayashi, Miwa; Suzuki, Takeo; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2006-12-01

    We report a patient with anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction, which manifested as profound deafness, transient vertigo, and minimal cerebellar signs. We suspect that ischaemia of the left internal auditory artery, which originates from the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, caused the deafness and transient vertigo. A small lesion in the middle cerebellar peduncle in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory and no lesion in the dentate nucleus in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory are thought to explain the minimal cerebellar signs despite the relatively large size of the infarction. Thus a relatively large infarction of the vertebral-basilar territory can manifest as sudden deafness with vertigo. Neuroimaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, is strongly recommended for patients with sudden deafness and vertigo to exclude infarction of the vertebral-basilar artery territory.

  7. Iatrogenic inferior oblique palsy: intentional disinsertion during transcaruncular approach to orbital fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann, Laura M; Lefebvre, Daniel R; Wan, Michael J; Dagi, Linda R

    2014-10-01

    Hypotropia following orbital fracture repair is traditionally attributed to residual tissue entrapment, scarring, direct muscle injury, or damage to the branches of the oculomotor nerve serving the inferior oblique or inferior rectus muscles. We present a case of acquired hypotropia and incyclotropia that occurred following repair of an orbital fracture involving the floor and medial wall. In order to enable adequate visualization and treatment of the combined fractures, access via a transcaruncular approach and disinsertion of the inferior oblique muscle at its origin was necessary. Whereas the possibility of inferior oblique paresis due to repair of an orbital fracture via the transcaruncular approach has received some acknowledgment, there are no prior reports in the ophthalmic literature. Strabismus surgeons should be aware of this possibility when planning surgical correction of hypotropia and incyclotropia in similar cases.

  8. Activation of c-fos expression in the rat inferior olivary nucleus by ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weizhen; Lin, Theodore R; Hu, Yuexian; Fan, Yongyi; Zhao, Lili; Mulholland, Michael W

    2003-12-26

    Ghrelin, a novel 28-amino-acid hormone secreted by gastric oxyntic glands, stimulates food intake and induces adiposity. We examined whether ghrelin activates the inferior olivary nucleus. Systemic administration of ghrelin (37 nmol/kg) induced the expression of c-fos immunoreactivity in inferior olive neurons (n=6 rats). The number of neurons containing c-fos staining was significantly increased in the ghrelin-treated rats (65+/-14 vs.11+/-6 positive neurons, n=5). No significant difference in c-fos-positive neurons was observed between left (32+/-5) and right (33+/-6) inferior olivary nuclei. The number of c-fos-positive neurons in rats with bilateral vagotomy was not significantly different from those with intact vagal nerves. The present study demonstrates that ghrelin induces c-fos expression in inferior olivary nucleus via a central mechanism.

  9. A case of residual inferior sinus venosus defect after ineffective surgical closure

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Sayuri; Hidaka, Takayuki; Takasaki, Taiichi; Kihara, Yasuki

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with cyanosis and heart failure 34 years after patch closure of an atrial septal defect and partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. CT and cardiac catheterisation showed a residual defect that caused right-to-left shunting. The patch almost blocked the inferior vena cava from the right atrium, resulting in uncommon drainage of the inferior vena cava into the left atrium. Other anomalies included the coronary-to-pulmonary artery fistula and duplicate inferior vena cava with dilated azygos venous system. A second surgery was performed, and we confirmed an inferior sinus venosus defect, which is rare and can be misdiagnosed. The ineffective patch closure had caused a haemodynamic status that rarely occurs. We describe the diagnostic process and emphasise the importance of correctly understanding the entity. PMID:25281248

  10. Correction of Excyclotropia by Surgery on the Inferior Rectus Muscle in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease: A Retrospective, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Kitaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Nakakura, Shunsuke; Mito, Hidenori; Kimura, Akiko; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the characteristics of excyclotropia correction through surgery on the inferior rectus muscle in patients with thyroid eye disease. Methods This was a retrospective, observational study at a single institution. We reviewed 36 patients who had undergone unilateral inferior rectus muscle recession, with or without nasal inferior rectus muscle transposition. The following factors were investigated as possibly influencing excyclotropia correction: inferior rectus muscle thickness, degree of adipose change in the inferior rectus muscle, smoking status, history of orbital radiotherapy, and the amount of inferior rectus muscle recession. Using T1-weighted coronal magnetic resonance imaging, we measured the cross-sectional area of the inferior rectus muscle at its largest point, as well as the bright-signal area of the inferior rectus muscle, which reflects intermuscular adipose change. We then calculated the percentage internal bright-signal area at the point of the largest inferior rectus muscle cross-sectional area. The history of orbital radiotherapy was graded using a binary system. We evaluated correlations among excyclotropia correction, the amount of nasal inferior rectus muscle transposition, and the possible influencing factors listed, using stepwise multiple regression analyses. Results The multiple regression model demonstrated a significant relationship among excyclotropia correction, amount of nasal inferior rectus muscle transposition, and the amount of inferior rectus muscle recession (YCORRECTION = 8.546XTENDON WIDTH + 0.405XRECESSION− 0.908; r = 0.844; adjusted r2 = 0.695; P < 0.001). Conclusions Excyclotropia correction was correlated with the amount of nasal inferior rectus muscle transposition and the amount of inferior rectus muscle recession, but not with the other factors. The regression model presented in this study will enable us to determine more precisely the amount of nasal inferior rectus muscle transposition in patients

  11. Inferior alveolar nerve injury in implant dentistry: diagnosis, causes, prevention, and management.

    PubMed

    Alhassani, Ahmed Ali; AlGhamdi, Ali Saad Thafeed

    2010-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve injury is one of the most serious complications in implant dentistry. This nerve injury can occur during local anesthesia, implant osteotomy, or implant placement. Proper understanding of anatomy, surgical procedures, and implant systems and proper treatment planning is the key to reducing such an unpleasant complication. This review discusses the causes of inferior alveolar nerve injury and its diagnosis, prevention, and management. PMID:20545547

  12. Anatomy of the ostia venae hepaticae and the retrohepatic segment of the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, A M; Teixeira, G G; Ortale, J R

    1996-01-01

    In 30 normal adult livers the retrohepatic segment of inferior vena cava had a length of 6.7 cm and was totally encircled by liver substance in 30% of cases. Altogether 442 ostia venae hepaticae were found, averaging 14.7 per liver and classified as large, medium, small and minimum. The localisation of the openings was studied according to the division of the wall of the retrohepatic segment of the inferior vena cava into 16 areas. PMID:8655416

  13. Pseudoaneurysm of the Inferior Epigastric Artery Successfully Treated by Ultrasound-guided Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Takase, Kei Kazama, Takuro; Abe, Kayoko; Chiba, Yoshihiro; Saito, Haruo; Takahashi, Shoki

    2004-09-15

    An 82-year-old woman underwent right hemicolectomy by median laparotomy. Two weeks later, a pulsatile mass was found at the left side of the surgical wound, which was diagnosed as pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery by color Doppler US and CT. The pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated by US-guided compression of the neck of the aneurysm for 30 minutes. US-guided compression should be considered the treatment of choice for postsurgical pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery.

  14. Amebic Liver abscess Complicated by Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Khanra, D; Saha, M; Talukdar, A

    2012-10-01

    Amebic liver abscess is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of infection with Entamoeba histolytica. It is a common disease, especially in endemic areas, but it is a rare cause of inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction, with only a few cases appearing in the literature. The authors describe a case of amebic liver abscess in a patient who developed a rare vascular complication of inferior vena cava thrombosis. The case responded to conservative treatment and radiological intervention.

  15. Arthroscopic autograft reconstruction of the inferior glenohumeral ligament: Exploration of technical feasibility in cadaveric shoulder specimens.

    PubMed

    Bouaicha, Samy; Moor, Beat K

    2013-01-01

    Failure of primary arthroscopic Bankart repair in anterior-inferior glenohumeral instability is low, but in some cases revision surgery is required. Revision procedures show good to excellent results but typically are done open and do not respect the anatomical functionality of the joint capsule. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to explore the feasibility of a completely arthroscopic anatomical reconstruction of the inferior glenohumeral ligament using a hamstring autograft.

  16. [Retroperitoneal hematoma revealing a tumor of the inferior vena cava: about a case].

    PubMed

    Lakhdar, Karim; Malki, Sidi Mohamed; Er-Raji, Ihssane; Derkaoui, Ali; Shimi, Abdelkrim; Khatouf, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of the inferior vena cava are rare, their most common histology is represented by leiomyosarcoma. They have few specific clinical features, however, the literature does not report hemorrhagic manifestations. Preoperative diagnosis is based on tomodensitometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); it is confirmed by histology. We report a case with retroperitoneal hematoma revealing a tumor of the inferior vena cava. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical and radiological findings. PMID:27642432

  17. Traumatic Inferior Gluteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm and Arteriovenous Fistula Managed with Emergency Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, A. N.; Naughton, P. A.; Leahy, A. L.; Lee, M. J.

    2008-07-15

    We present a case of blunt trauma to the buttock resulting in an inferior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula. The characteristic diagnostic features on CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), along with the emergency percutaneous management of this traumatic vascular injury, are described. A review of the literature demonstrates inferior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition, while successful treatment with glue embolization is previously unreported.

  18. Three-Dimensional Rotational Angiography of the Inferior Vena Cava as an Adjunct to Inferior Vena Cava Filter Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Bozlar, Ugur; Edmunds, J. Stewart; Turba, Ulku C.; Hartwell, Gary D.; Housseini, Ahmed M.; Hagspiel, Klaus D.

    2009-01-15

    The objective of this study was to explore the role of three-dimensional (3-D) rotational angiography (RA) of the inferior vena cava (IVC; 3-D CV) before filter retrieval and its impact on treatment planning compared with standard anteroposterior cavography (sCV). Thirty patients underwent sCV and 3-D CV before IVC filter retrieval. Parameters assessed were: projection of filter arms or legs beyond the caval lumen, thrombus burden within the filter and IVC, and orientation of the filter within IVC. Skin and effective radiation doses were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using paired Student t test and nonparametric McNemar's test. Standard anteroposterior cavography detected 49 filter arms or legs projecting beyond the caval lumen in 25 patients. Three-dimensional CV demonstrated 89 filter arms or legs projecting beyond the caval lumen in 28 patients. Twenty-two patients had additional filter arms or legs projecting beyond the caval lumen detected on 3-D CV that were not detected on sCV (p < 0.001). Filter apex tilt detection differed significantly (p < 0.001) between sCV and 3-D CV, with 3-D CV being more accurate. The filter apex abutted the IVC wall in 10 patients (33%) on 3-D CV, but this was diagnosed in only 3 patients (10%) with sCV. Thrombus was detected in 8 patients (27%), 1 thrombus of which was seen only on 3-D CV, and treatment was changed in this patient because of thrombus size. Mean effective radiation doses for 3-D CV were approximately two times higher than for sCV (1.68 vs. 0.86 mSv), whereas skin doses were three times lower (12.87 vs. 35.86 mGy). Compared with sCV, performing 3-D CV before optional IVC filter retrieval has the potential to improve assessment of filter arms or legs projecting beyond the caval lumen, filter orientation, and thrombus burden.

  19. Significance of localization of mandibular foramen in an inferior alveolar nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil; Rethish, E.; Sabitha, S.; SayeeGanesh, N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The mandibular foramen (MF) is an opening on the internal surface of the ramus for divisions of the mandibular vessels and nerve to pass. The aim of this study is to determine the position of the MF from various anatomical landmarks in several dry adult mandibles. Materials and Methods: A total of 102 human dry mandibles were examined, of which 93 were of dentulous and 9 were of edentulous. The measurements were taken from the anterior border of the ramus (coronoid notch) to the midportion of the MF and then from the midportion of the MF to the other landmarks such as internal oblique ridge, inferior border, sigmoid notch, and condyle were measured and recorded. Results: The data were compared using Student's t-test. The MF is positioned at a mean distance of 19 mm (with SD 2.34) from coronoid notch of the anterior border of the ramus. Superio-inferiorly from the condyle to the inferior border MF is situated 5 mm inferior to the midpoint of condyle to the inferior border distance (ramus height). Conclusion: We conclude that failures in the anesthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve are due to the operator error and not due to the anatomical variation. PMID:23225978

  20. Separate limbal-conjunctival autograft transplantation using the inferior conjunctiva for primary pterygium

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Hiroki; Kawano, Koji; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2011-01-01

    Background: Inferior limbal-conjunctival autograft transplantation has been described as a safe and effective treatment for primary pterygium. However, despite its multiple advantages, routine performance of this technique is difficult because the inferior conjunctiva is often too small to provide enough autograft material. To resolve this issue, we modified a technique, inferior separate limbal-conjunctival autograft transplantation, and evaluated its efficacy and safety Materials and Methods: A total of 50 eyes of 47 patients were retrospectively studied. Our surgery consisted of a thorough pterygium excision followed by 0.02% mitomycin C application. Next, we performed inferior conjunctival autografting, in which limbal and bulbar conjunctival autografts were independently harvested and secured to the denuded limbus and the most posterior conjunctival defect at the pterygium excision site to ensure stem-cell restoration and deep fornix reconstruction, respectively; the bare sclera between the two grafts was exposed. The outcome was assessed with a three-point grading scale at the patient's last visit. Results: The success and recurrence rates were 96.0% (48 of 50) and 0%, respectively, assessed at follow-ups occurring at a mean of 19.2 ± 5.6 months after surgery. Only minimal complications were encountered. Conclusion: A combination of inferior separate limbal-conjunctival autograft transplantation with intraoperative 0.02% mitomycin C application is a safe and effective technique enabling the routine use of under-sized autografts harvested from the inferior conjunctiva after thorough pterygium excision. PMID:22279399

  1. Effect of inferior surface angle on the self-oscillation of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Simeon L.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Geometry of the human vocal folds strongly influences their oscillatory motion. While the effect of intraglottal geometry on phonation has been widely investigated, the study of the geometry of the inferior surface of the vocal folds has been limited. In this study the way in which the inferior vocal fold surface angle affects vocal fold vibration was explored using a two-dimensional, self-oscillating finite element vocal fold model. The geometry was parameterized to create models with five different inferior surface angles. Four of the five models exhibited self-sustained oscillations. Comparisons of model motion showed increased vertical displacement and decreased glottal width amplitude with decreasing inferior surface angle. In addition, glottal width and air flow rate waveforms changed as the inferior surface angle was varied. Structural, rather than aerodynamic, effects are shown to be the cause of the changes in model response as the inferior surface angle was varied. Supporting data including glottal pressure distribution, average intraglottal pressure, energy transfer, and flow separation point locations are discussed, and suggestions for future research are given. PMID:22559379

  2. The position of the mandibular canal and histologic feature of the inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    Kilic, C; Kamburoğlu, K; Ozen, T; Balcioglu, H A; Kurt, B; Kutoglu, T; Ozan, H

    2010-01-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve is the one of the large branches of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. It is vulnerable during surgical procedures of the mandible. Despite its importance, no anatomical and histological examination has been conducted to provide a detailed cross-sectional morphology of the mandibular canal according to dental status. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify the position of the mandibular canal through direct measurement and to determine the branches of the inferior alveolar nerve through histologic examination. The area between the anterior margin of the third molar and the anterior margin of the second premolar of dentulous, partially dentulous, and edentulous hemimandible specimens (n = 49) from 26 human cadavers was serially sectioned into seven segments, and specific distances were measured using digital calipers. Following this, 5-microm cross-sections were prepared along the mandibular canal and mental foramen, and examined by fluorescence microscopy. The mandibular canal was located at a mean distance of 10.52 mm above the inferior margin of the mandible. The mean maximum diameters of the mandibular canal, inferior alveolar nerve, inferior alveolar artery, and inferior alveolar vein were 2.52, 1.84, 0.42, and 0.58 mm, respectively. This study found that the inferior alveolar nerve often gives rise to several branches at each level (range 0-3). To minimize the risk of injury, knowledge of the small branches of the nerve and of the detailed findings regarding the position of the mandibular canal reported here should be considered when planning mandibular surgery, especially during implant placement. PMID:19918867

  3. Prognostic significance of resting anterior thallium-201 defects in patients with inferior myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, R.S.; Taylor, G.J.; Watson, D.D.; Berger, B.C.; Crampton, R.S.; Martin, R.P.; Beller, G.A.

    1980-11-01

    To determine whether Tl-201 scintigraphy performed at rest during the late hospital phase of inferior myocardial infarction can predict subsequent coronary events, 25 patients with historical, enzymatic, and electrocardiographic criteria of transmural inferior infarction underwent serial imaging with computer quantification 7 to 35 days after admission. All 25 patients had inferior defects, and 13 (52%) also had anterior defects implying stenosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The patients were divided into those with inferior and anterior perfusion defects (Group 1) and those with inferior defects alone (Group 2). In Group 1, three patients had persistent defects in the anterior wall and ten had initial defects with redistribution. New or recurrent coronary events - which included new onset or progression of angina pectoris, sudden death, reinfarction, and congestive heart failure - were recorded over an average 7.2 months of followup (range 3 to 9 mo) for all patients. Ten of 13 (77%) patients in Group 1 had 17 coronary events and four of 12 (33%) patients in Group 2 had six coronary events (p < 0.02). Nine patients in Group 1 and three in Group 2 developed angina (p < 0.03). The apparently increased prevalence in Group 1 of sudden death (8% against 0%), reinfarction (8% against 0%), and congestive heart failure (46% against 25%) was not statistically significant. Thus resting T1-201 scintigraphy with computer quantification is a highly sensitive method to detect inferior myocardial infarction even in the late hospital phase. Moreover, it appears to identify those patients with inferior infarction at high risk for subsequent coronary events, presumably due to stenosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery.

  4. Inferior capsular shift operation for multidirectional instability of the shoulder in players of contact sports

    PubMed Central

    Choi, C; Ogilvie-Harris, D

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the results of inferior capsular shift for multidirectional instability of the shoulder in athletes. Methods: Multidirectional instability was surgically corrected in 53 shoulders in 47 athletes who engaged in contact sports. A history of major trauma was found in eight patients, the others having had minor episodes. Before surgery, all patients had complex combinations of instabilities. The surgical approach was selected according to the predominant direction of instability. Results: Anterior inferior capsular shift was carried out in 37 shoulders, and anterior dislocation recurred in three. In one of these, it was anterior alone, one was anterior and inferior, and one was unstable in all three directions. After posterior inferior capsular shift in 16 shoulders, one dislocation occurred anteriorly and one posteriorly. With the anterior approach, four athletes could not return to sport. Two patients treated with the posterior approach could not return to sport. Of these six failures, five patients had had bilateral repairs. Successful repair based on the criteria of the American Shoulder and Elbow Association was achieved in 92% of anterior repairs and 81% of posterior repairs. Successful return to sport was noted in 82% of patients with anterior repairs, 75% with posterior repairs, and 17% with bilateral repairs. Overall, there were five subsequent dislocations, three in the anterior repair group (8%), and two in the posterior repair group (12%). Conclusions: Inferior capsular shift can successfully correct multidirectional instability in most players of contact sports, but the results in bilateral cases are poor. PMID:12145120

  5. Anesthetic efficacy of a combination of hyaluronidase and lidocaine with epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    PubMed Central

    Ridenour, S.; Reader, A.; Beck, M.; Weaver, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of a buffered lidocaine with epinephrine solution compared to a combination buffered lidocaine with epinephrine plus hyaluronidase solution in inferior alveolar nerve blocks. Thirty subjects randomly received an inferior alveolar nerve block using 1 of the 2 solutions at 2 separate appointments using a repeated-measures design. Mandibular anterior and posterior teeth were blindly pulp tested at 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes postinjection. No response from the subject to the maximum output (80 reading) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive readings of 80 were obtained. A postoperative survey was used to measure pain and trismus. The results demonstrated 100% of the subjects had profound lip numbness with both solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. The anesthetic success rates for individual teeth ranged from 20 to 80%. There were no significant differences (P > .05) between the 2 solutions. However, the combination lidocaine/hyaluronidase solution resulted in a significant increase in postoperative pain and trismus. It was concluded that adding hyaluronidase to a buffered lidocaine solution with epinephrine did not statistically increase the incidence of pulpal anesthesia in inferior alveolar nerve blocks and, because of its potential tissue damaging effect, it should not be added to local anesthetic solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. PMID:11495405

  6. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injuries Following Implant Placement - Importance of Early Diagnosis and Treatment: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this article is to systematically review diagnostic procedures and risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve injury following implant placement, to identify the time interval between inferior alveolar nerve injury and its diagnosis after surgical dental implant placement and compare between outcomes of early and delayed diagnosis and treatment given based on case series recorded throughout a period of 10 years. Material and Methods We performed literature investigation through MEDLINE (PubMed) electronic database and manual search through dental journals to find articles concerning inferior alveolar nerve injury following implant placement. The search was restricted to English language articles published during the last 10 years, from December 2004 to March 2014. Results In total, we found 33 articles related to the topic, of which 27 were excluded due to incompatibility with established inclusion criteria. Six articles were eventually chosen to be suitable. The studies presented diagnostic methods of inferior alveolar nerve sensory deficit, and we carried out an assessment of the proportion of patients diagnosed within different time intervals from the time the injury occurred. Conclusions Various diagnostic methods have been developed throughout the years for dealing with 1 quite frequent complication in the implantology field - inferior alveolar nerve injury. Concurrently, the importance of early diagnosis and treatment was proved repeatedly. According to the results of the data analysis, a relatively high percentage of the practitioners successfully accomplished this target and achieved good treatment outcomes. PMID:25635209

  7. Growth in the area of the inferior dental foramen of rats.

    PubMed

    Engel, G; West, V C

    1983-01-01

    The object of the present investigation was to see if the bone around the inferior dental nerve remodelled during mandibular growth and development. The investigation was carried out by injecting 27 albino Lewis rats with three fluorescent bone seeking dyes--oxytetracycline HCl (OTC), alizarin red S (ARS), and 2,4 bis-[N,N'-di' (carbomethyl-aminomethyl)] fluorescein (DCAF)--and then studying the bone around the inferior dental foramen. The mandibles of the animals were studied both macroscopically and microscopically under ultraviolet light to investigate the growth processes occurring and to see if the inferior dental foramen was relocated during growth. A quantitative analysis utilizing two specimens was also carried out for the same purpose. The results of both the qualitative and the quantitative analyses showed that the bone around the inferior dental nerve remodeled during mandibular growth. The mandible grew in an upward and backward direction, and the inferior dental foramen was correspondingly relocated in an upward and backward direction to maintain exactly the same position relative to the condyle and the posterior border of the ramus. This study, then, supports Moss's concept of the "unloaded" nerve, and is in keeping with his view of mandibular growth based on the functional matrix theory.

  8. Neuropharmacologic characterization of strychnine seizure potentiation in the inferior olive lesioned rat

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Cerebellar stimulation is associated with anticonvulsant activity in several animal models. There are two afferent inputs to cerebellar Purkinje cells: (1) parallel fibers, which relay mossy fiber input, from brainstem, spinal cord, cerebral cortex and cerebellum, and (2) climbing fibers, arising from the inferior olive. Both climbing and parallel fibers release excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, which stimulate Purkinje cells and cause GABA release in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Climbing fibers also exert tonic inhibition over Purkinje cell activity by producing an absolute refractory period following stimulation, rendering Purkinje cells unresponsive to parallel fibers. Climbing fiber deafferentation by bilateral inferior olive lesions produced a specific decrease in threshold for strychnine-seizures in the rat. Inferior olive lesions produced no change in threshold to seizures induced by picrotoxin, bicuculline or pentylenetetrazole. Inferior olive lesions also produced abnormal motor behavior including, myoclonus, backward locomotion and hyperextension, which was significantly aggravated by strychnine, brucine, picrotoxin, bicuculline and pentylenetetrazole. Inferior olive lesions produced a significant increase in quisqualate sensitive ({sup 3}H)AMPA ((Rs)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid) binding to cerebellar membranes. AMPA is a glutamate analog with high affinity for quisqualate sensitive receptors.

  9. [Symptomatology and treatment of malformations of the inferior vena cava (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sachweh, D; Horsch, S; Janssen, W

    1979-05-01

    A review of the embryology, pathophysiology semiotics and surgical treatment of malformations of the inferior vena cava is given based on 3 clinical histories. The cases consisted of a typical membrane occlusion, an atresia of the infrarenal segment and of a hitherto not described combination of several malformations of the inferior vena cava: membrane occlusion, aplasia of the infrarenal segment of the vena cava inferior and multiple aneurysms of the iliac vein. The symptomatology of malformations of the vena cava inferior depends on the compensation by the collateral or the persisting embryonic veins, respectively, and on the localization and the degree of the obliteration. The varying hemodynamic reactions are described. The following surgical methods for the treatment of inferior vena cava occlusions in the hepatic segment are available: The so called conservative interventions for the creation of collaterals, the direct or indirect recanalization and the bypass operation. Congenital infrarenal atresias of the vena cava are corrected by homologous or prosthetic interposition. The venous replacement with a bovine heterograft presented here, has not yet been described in the literature.

  10. Importance of human right inferior frontoparietal network connected by inferior branch of superior longitudinal fasciculus tract in corporeal awareness of kinesthetic illusory movement.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Kaoru; Naito, Eiichi

    2016-05-01

    It is generally believed that the human right cerebral hemisphere plays a dominant role in corporeal awareness, which is highly associated with conscious experience of the physical self. Prompted by our previous findings, we examined whether the right frontoparietal activations often observed when people experience kinesthetic illusory limb movement are supported by a large-scale brain network connected by a specific branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus fiber tracts (SLF I, II, and III). We scanned brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) while nineteen blindfolded healthy volunteers experienced illusory movement of the right stationary hand elicited by tendon vibration, which was replicated after the scanning. We also scanned brain activity when they executed and imagined right hand movement, and identified the active brain regions during illusion, execution, and imagery in relation to the SLF fiber tracts. We found that illusion predominantly activated the right inferior frontoparietal regions connected by SLF III, which were not substantially recruited during execution and imagery. Among these regions, activities in the right inferior parietal cortices and inferior frontal cortices showed right-side dominance and correlated well with the amount of illusion (kinesthetic illusory awareness) experienced by the participants. The results illustrated the predominant involvement of the right inferior frontoparietal network connected by SLF III when people recognize postural changes of their limb. We assume that the network bears a series of functions, specifically, monitoring the current status of the musculoskeletal system, and building-up and updating our postural model (body schema), which could be a basis for the conscious experience of the physical self. PMID:26986838

  11. Importance of human right inferior frontoparietal network connected by inferior branch of superior longitudinal fasciculus tract in corporeal awareness of kinesthetic illusory movement.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Kaoru; Naito, Eiichi

    2016-05-01

    It is generally believed that the human right cerebral hemisphere plays a dominant role in corporeal awareness, which is highly associated with conscious experience of the physical self. Prompted by our previous findings, we examined whether the right frontoparietal activations often observed when people experience kinesthetic illusory limb movement are supported by a large-scale brain network connected by a specific branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus fiber tracts (SLF I, II, and III). We scanned brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) while nineteen blindfolded healthy volunteers experienced illusory movement of the right stationary hand elicited by tendon vibration, which was replicated after the scanning. We also scanned brain activity when they executed and imagined right hand movement, and identified the active brain regions during illusion, execution, and imagery in relation to the SLF fiber tracts. We found that illusion predominantly activated the right inferior frontoparietal regions connected by SLF III, which were not substantially recruited during execution and imagery. Among these regions, activities in the right inferior parietal cortices and inferior frontal cortices showed right-side dominance and correlated well with the amount of illusion (kinesthetic illusory awareness) experienced by the participants. The results illustrated the predominant involvement of the right inferior frontoparietal network connected by SLF III when people recognize postural changes of their limb. We assume that the network bears a series of functions, specifically, monitoring the current status of the musculoskeletal system, and building-up and updating our postural model (body schema), which could be a basis for the conscious experience of the physical self.

  12. Simultaneous superior oblique tenotomy and inferior oblique recession in Brown's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parks, M M; Eustis, H S

    1987-08-01

    The technique and results of simultaneous superior oblique tenotomy and 14-mm inferior oblique recession for true Brown's syndrome are presented for 16 eyes of 13 patients. A good or excellent result was achieved in 15 of 16 eyes (94%). Reoperation for overcorrection was not necessary; however, repeat tenotomy was required in two cases. Inferior oblique underaction was present in 12 of 16 eyes (75%) in the early postoperative period; however, elevation in adduction improved over time. At most recent examination, 92% of eyes demonstrated greater than 25 degrees elevation in adduction. Underaction of the superior oblique occurred in 3 of 16 eyes (19%). A simultaneous superior oblique tenotomy and inferior oblique recession is recommended in all patients selected to undergo surgery for true Brown's syndrome to prevent reoperation for iatrogenic superior oblique palsy.

  13. Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement during Pregnancy: An Adjuvant Option When Medical Therapy Fails

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Fátima; Torres, Rita; Borges, Augusta

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a case of a 27-year-old multiparous woman, with multiple thrombophilia, whose pregnancy was complicated with deep venous thrombosis requiring placement of a vena cava filter. At 15th week of gestation, following an acute deep venous thrombosis of the right inferior limb, anticoagulant therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) was instituted without improvement in her clinical status. Subsequently, at 18 weeks of pregnancy, LMWH was switched to warfarin. At 30th week of gestation, the maintenance of high thrombotic risk was the premise for placement of an inferior vena cava filter for prophylaxis of pulmonary embolism during childbirth and postpartum. There were no complications and a vaginal delivery was accomplished at 37 weeks of gestation. Venal placement of inferior vena cava filters is an attractive option as prophylaxis for pulmonary embolism during pregnancy. PMID:23781361

  14. Avoiding injury to the inferior alveolar nerve by routine use of intraoperative radiographs during implant placement.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Jeffrey; Mastin, Chris; Le, Bach

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the inferior alveolar nerve during implant placement in the posterior atrophic mandible is a rare but serious complication. Although a preoperative computerized tomography scan can help determine the distance from the alveolar ridge to the nerve canal, variables such as magnification errors, ridge anatomy, and operator technique can increase the chance for complications. The routine use of intraoperative periapical radiographs during the drilling sequence is an inexpensive and reliable tool, allowing the operator to confidently adjust the direction and depth of the implant during placement. Most important, it helps avoid the risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve in cases in which there is limited vertical alveolar bone. Using this technique for 21 implants placed in the posterior atrophic mandible, with less than 10 mm of vertical bone to the inferior alveolar nerve canal, the authors observed no incidents of postoperative paresthesia. PMID:18390241

  15. Prevention of iatrogenic inferior alveolar nerve injuries in relation to dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Renton, T

    2010-09-01

    This article aims to review current hypotheses on the aetiology and prevention of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injuries in relation to dental procedures. The inferior alveolar nerve can be damaged during many dental procedures, including administration of local anaesthetic, implant bed preparation and placement, endodontics, third molar surgery and other surgical interventions. Damage to sensory nerves can result in anaesthesia, paraesthesia, pain, or a combination of the three. Pain is common in inferior alveolar nerve injuries, resulting in significant functional problems. The significant disability associated with these nerve injuries may also result in increasing numbers of medico-legal claims. Many of these iatrogenic nerve injuries can be avoided with careful patient assessment and planning. Furthermore, if the injury occurs there are emerging strategies that may facilitate recovery. The emphasis of this review is on how we may prevent these injuries and facilitate resolution in the early post surgical phase. PMID:21133047

  16. Uterus-innervating neurones in porcine inferior mesenteric ganglion: an immunohistochemical characteristic.

    PubMed

    Wasowicz, K

    2003-06-01

    The presence of tyrosine hydroxylase, neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, galanin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Gly-Leu, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide was studied with immunohistochemistry in uterus-innervating neurones found in the inferior mesenteric ganglia after fluorescent tracer (Fast Blue) injection into different regions of the porcine uterus (uterine cervix, paracervical, middle and paraoviductal part of the uterine horn). Virtually all Fast Blue-positive neurones found in the inferior mesenteric ganglia after tracer injection into all studied parts of the uterus contained tyrosine hydroxylase and ca. 45% of them contained neuropeptide Y. Single galanin-positive/Fast Blue-positive cells were found in the ganglia only after tracer injections into uterine cervix. No other studied substances were found in the Fast-Blue positive neurones of the inferior mesenteric ganglia. PMID:12823101

  17. Naming difficulties in alexia with agraphia for kanji after a left posterior inferior temporal lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Y; Sakai, K; Sakuta, M; Iwata, M

    1994-01-01

    The case is described of a patient with alexia and agraphia for kanji, and severe anomia after a subcortical haemorrhage in the left posterior inferior temporal area. Magnetic resonance imaging at four months after onset showed a lesion in the inferior temporal and fusiform gyri, extending from the temporo-occipital junction toward the anterior third of the temporal lobe. Comparison with other reported cases of alexia with agraphia and anomia made it clear that when accompanied by severe anomia, the lesions extended either forward to the anterior part of the middle temporal gyrus or medially to the parahippocampal gyrus. It is suggested that the disconnection of association fibres between the parahippocampal, fusiform, middle, and inferior temporal gyri, especially between the parahippocampal gyrus and the other temporal gyri, or the cortical damage to the posterior part of these gyri is essential for the production of anomia. Images PMID:8201334

  18. Deep venous thrombosis caused by congenital absence of inferior vena cava, combined with hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sang Seob; Kim, Ji Il; Kim, Kee Hwan; Sung, Gi Young; Lee, Do Sang; Kim, Jeong Soo; Moon, In Sung; Lim, Keun Woo; Koh, Young Bok

    2004-01-01

    We present a case of suprarenal and infrarenal absence of the inferior vena cava, combined with hyperhomocysteinemia in a 39-year-old woman who presented with symptoms of deep venous thrombosis. The patient also had a homozygous mutation of C677T methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. Deep vein thrombosis has a multifactorial etiology involving both genetic and acquired factors. Absence of the inferior vena cava is a rare congenital anomaly, but recently it was confirmed as an important risk factor for the development of deep vein thrombosis, especially in young persons. Hypercoagulability due to hyperhomocysteinemia with a tendency toward venous stasis, mediated by congenital absence of the inferior vena cava is thought to have caused deep vein thrombosis in our patient. To our knowledge, this association has not yet been reported. The clinical features and prognosis of the entity are discussed. PMID:15043024

  19. Inferior retinal light exposure is more effective than superior retinal exposure in suppressing melatonin in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Hanifin, John P.; Rollag, Mark D.; Wang, Jenny; Cooper, Howard; Brainard, George C.

    2003-01-01

    Illumination of different areas of the human retina elicits differences in acute light-induced suppression of melatonin. The aim of this study was to compare changes in plasma melatonin levels when light exposures of equal illuminance and equal photon dose were administered to superior, inferior, and full retinal fields. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Plexiglass eye shields were modified to permit selective exposure of the superior and inferior halves of the retinas of each subject. The Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer was used both to confirm intact full visual fields and to quantify exposure of upper and lower visual fields. On study nights, eyes were dilated, and subjects were exposed to patternless white light for 90 min between 0200 and 0330 under five conditions: (1) full retinal exposure at 200 lux, (2) full retinal exposure at 100 lux, (3) inferior retinal exposure at 200 lux, (4) superior retinal exposure at 200 lux, and (5) a dark-exposed control. Plasma melatonin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of exposure condition (F = 5.91, p < 0.005). Post hoc Fisher PLSD tests showed significant (p < 0.05) melatonin suppression of both full retinal exposures as well as the inferior retinal exposure; however, superior retinal exposure was significantly less effective in suppressing melatonin. Furthermore, suppression with superior retinal exposure was not significantly different from that of the dark control condition. The results indicate that the inferior retina contributes more to the light-induced suppression of melatonin than the superior retina at the photon dosages tested in this study. Findings suggest a greater sensitivity or denser distribution of photoreceptors in the inferior retina are involved in light detection for the retinohypothalamic tract of humans.

  20. Non-inferiority and networks: inferring efficacy from a web of data.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junjing; Gamalo-Siebers, Margaret; Tiwari, Ram

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of placebo-controlled trials, the efficacy of a test treatment can be alternatively examined by showing its non-inferiority to an active control; that is, the test treatment is not worse than the active control by a pre-specified margin. The margin is based on the effect of the active control over placebo in historical studies. In other words, the non-inferiority setup involves a network of direct and indirect comparisons between test treatment, active controls, and placebo. Given this framework, we consider a Bayesian network meta-analysis that models the uncertainty and heterogeneity of the historical trials into the non-inferiority trial in a data-driven manner through the use of the Dirichlet process and power priors. Depending on whether placebo was present in the historical trials, two cases of non-inferiority testing are discussed that are analogs of the synthesis and fixed-margin approach. In each of these cases, the model provides a more reliable estimate of the control given its effect in other trials in the network, and, in the case where placebo was only present in the historical trials, the model can predict the effect of the test treatment over placebo as if placebo had been present in the non-inferiority trial. It can further answer other questions of interest, such as comparative effectiveness of the test treatment among its comparators. More importantly, the model provides an opportunity for disproportionate randomization or the use of small sample sizes by allowing borrowing of information from a network of trials to draw explicit conclusions on non-inferiority.

  1. Non-inferiority and networks: inferring efficacy from a web of data.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junjing; Gamalo-Siebers, Margaret; Tiwari, Ram

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of placebo-controlled trials, the efficacy of a test treatment can be alternatively examined by showing its non-inferiority to an active control; that is, the test treatment is not worse than the active control by a pre-specified margin. The margin is based on the effect of the active control over placebo in historical studies. In other words, the non-inferiority setup involves a network of direct and indirect comparisons between test treatment, active controls, and placebo. Given this framework, we consider a Bayesian network meta-analysis that models the uncertainty and heterogeneity of the historical trials into the non-inferiority trial in a data-driven manner through the use of the Dirichlet process and power priors. Depending on whether placebo was present in the historical trials, two cases of non-inferiority testing are discussed that are analogs of the synthesis and fixed-margin approach. In each of these cases, the model provides a more reliable estimate of the control given its effect in other trials in the network, and, in the case where placebo was only present in the historical trials, the model can predict the effect of the test treatment over placebo as if placebo had been present in the non-inferiority trial. It can further answer other questions of interest, such as comparative effectiveness of the test treatment among its comparators. More importantly, the model provides an opportunity for disproportionate randomization or the use of small sample sizes by allowing borrowing of information from a network of trials to draw explicit conclusions on non-inferiority. PMID:26639225

  2. Connexin 43 contributes to ectopic orofacial pain following inferior alveolar nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Honda, Kuniya; Unno, Syumpei; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinically, it is well known that injury of mandibular nerve fiber induces persistent ectopic pain which can spread to a wide area of the orofacial region innervated by the uninjured trigeminal nerve branches. However, the exact mechanism of such persistent ectopic orofacial pain is not still known. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of connexin 43 in the trigeminal ganglion on mechanical hypersensitivity in rat whisker pad skin induced by inferior alveolar nerve injury. Here, we examined changes in orofacial mechanical sensitivity following inferior alveolar nerve injury. Furthermore, changes in connexin 43 expression in the trigeminal ganglion and its localization in the trigeminal ganglion were also examined. In addition, we investigated the functional significance of connexin 43 in relation to mechanical allodynia by using a selective gap junction blocker (Gap27). Results Long-lasting mechanical allodynia in the whisker pad skin and the upper eyelid skin, and activation of satellite glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion, were induced after inferior alveolar nerve injury. Connexin 43 was expressed in the activated satellite glial cells encircling trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the whisker pad skin, and the connexin 43 protein expression was significantly increased after inferior alveolar nerve injury. Administration of Gap27 in the trigeminal ganglion significantly reduced satellite glial cell activation and mechanical hypersensitivity in the whisker pad skin. Moreover, the marked activation of satellite glial cells encircling trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the whisker pad skin following inferior alveolar nerve injury implies that the satellite glial cell activation exerts a major influence on the excitability of nociceptive trigeminal ganglion neurons. Conclusions These findings indicate that the propagation of satellite glial cell activation throughout the trigeminal ganglion via gap junctions, which are

  3. Mandibular fracture as a complication of inferior alveolar nerve transposition and placement of endosseous implants: a case report.

    PubMed

    Karlis, Vasiliki; Bae, Richard D; Glickman, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    Placement of endosseous implants and inferior alveolar nerve transposition is a treatment option for patients with an edentulous posterior mandible with inadequate bone height superior to the inferior alveolar canal. Complications associated with these procedures include infection, prolonged neurosensory disturbances, and/or pathologic fracture. This report presents the surgical management of a patient with a mandible fracture after inferior alveolar nerve transposition with concurrent placement of two endosseous implants. PMID:14560480

  4. Endosseous implant placement in conjunction with inferior alveolar nerve transposition: a report of an unusual complication and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Luna, Anibal H B; Passeri, Luis A; de Moraes, Márcio; Moreira, Roger W F

    2008-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve transposition and placement of endosseous implants is one of the treatment options for patients with an edentulous posterior mandible with inadequate bone height superior to the inferior alveolar canal. The possible complications associated with this technique include prolonged neurosensory disturbances, infection, and pathologic fracture. This report presents the surgical management of a patient who sustained a mandibular fracture after inferior alveolar nerve transposition for the placement of 3 endosseous implants. PMID:18416424

  5. The curious case of the disappearing IVC: A case report and review of the aetiology of Inferior Vena Cava Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Michael; Robson, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a previously well 18-year-old male who presented to the Emergency Department with lower limb pain. An ultrasound demonstrated extensive left sided deep vein thrombosis and computed tomography demonstrated inferior vena cava agenesis, leading to the diagnosis of inferior vena cava agenesis associated deep vein thrombosis. The aetiology of inferior vena cava agenesis is explored in depth. PMID:24967034

  6. Hepatic Veins and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis in a Child Treated by Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Tannuri, Uenis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-06-15

    We report the case of a 9-year-old boy with portal hypertension, due to Budd-Chiari syndrome, and retrohepatic inferior vena cava thrombosis, submitted to a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) by connecting the suprahepatic segment of the inferior vena cava directly to the portal vein. After 3 months, the withdrawal of anticoagulants promoted the thrombosis of the TIPS. At TIPS revision, thrombosis of the TIPS and the main portal vein and clots at the splenic and the superior mesenteric veins were found. Successful angiography treatment was performed by thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty of a severe stenosis at the distal edge of the stent.

  7. Spontaneous Recanalization of Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion Following Angioplasty and Stenting of Inferior Mesenteric Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Erhan Cil, Barbaros E.; Arat, Anil; Baykal, Atac; Karaman, Kerem; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2006-02-15

    An 84-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and coronary artery disease was admitted with a progressively worsening diffuse abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and angiography revealed occlusion of the origin and proximal portion of superior mesenteric artery. Aortography also showed severe origin stenosis of inferior mesenteric artery and that the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery was supplied by a prominent marginal artery of Drummond. Patient was effectively treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of the inferior mesenteric artery. Follow-up imaging studies demonstrated patency of the stent and spontaneous recanalization of superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  8. [A case of adenosquamous carcinoma of the sigmoid colon with inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ryota; Maruyama, Takashi; Tanaka, Hajime; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Natsume, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Akinari; Sato, Yayoi; Sazuka, Tetsutaro; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yoshioka, Takafumi; Kanada, Yoko; Yanagihara, Akitoshi; Yokoyama, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Shinichiro

    2014-11-01

    A 63-year-old man who had been admitted to another institute with sepsis and renal failure was referred to our hospital after computed tomography (CT) findings showed thickening of the walls in the sigmoid colon and a defect in contrast enhancement in the portal and inferior mesenteric veins. Emergency sigmoid colon resection with D2 lymphadenectomy was performed after detection of perforation due to sigmoid colon cancer. The histopathological diagnosis was adenosquamous carcinoma, pSS, int, INF b, ly1, v0, pN2, pStage IIIband inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis. He was discharged on day 12, and we administered anticoagulant warfarin therapy.

  9. Anterolateral thigh flap salvage following failed deep inferior epigastric artery perforator breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Krochmal, Daniel J; Rebecca, Alanna M; Casey, William J; Smith, Anthony A

    2011-01-01

    The deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap is an option for women desiring autologous tissue breast reconstruction. If this reconstruction fails, other autologous tissue flaps, including the gluteal artery perforator and latissimus dorsi flaps, may be used for salvage. The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap offers adequate tissue volume for breast reconstruction, acceptable fat quality and a long vascular pedicle. Other advantages include obviating the need for intraoperative position changes and harvesting tissue outside of the radiation field. Two cases involving ALT flaps used in the setting of deep inferior epigastric artery perforator failure are presented with favourable results. A review of the anatomy of the ALT flap is included. PMID:22379371

  10. Involvement of the right inferior longitudinal fascicle in visual hemiagnosia: a brain stimulation mapping study.

    PubMed

    Fernández Coello, Alejandro; Duvaux, Sophie; De Benedictis, Alessandro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Duffau, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Neural foundations underlying visual agnosia are poorly understood. The authors present the case of a patient who underwent awake surgery for a right basal temporooccipital low-grade glioma in which direct electrostimulation was used both at the cortical and subcortical level. Brain mapping over the inferior longitudinal fascicle generated contralateral visual hemiagnosia. These original findings are in agreement with recent tractography data that have confirmed the existence of an occipitotemporal pathway connecting occipital visual input to higher-level processing in temporal lobe structures. This is the first report of a true transient visual hemiagnosia elicited through electrostimulation, supporting the crucial role of inferior longitudinal fascicle in visual recognition.

  11. Bilateral Pedicled Superficial Inferior Epigastric Artery Flap in the Treatment of Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Don; Saber, Sepideh; Patel, Ketan; Carey, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The authors present a new technique in surgically treating hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), a debilitating skin condition. In HS, surgical treatment is often the best option because of the high recurrence rates despite extensive medical treatment. A commonly successful surgical method is using skin flaps after excision of the affected area. A superficial inferior epigastric artery flap is demonstrated here as a new alternative approach to treating a case of extensive HS of the groin. By using the pedicled superficial inferior epigastric artery flap for groin reconstruction, inguinal HS can be widely excised and reconstructed with minimal donor-site morbidity and a good aesthetic outcome. PMID:27622101

  12. Acute inferior myocardial infarction due to cannabis smoking in a young man.

    PubMed

    Kocabay, Gonenc; Yildiz, Mustafa; Duran, Nilufer Eksi; Ozkan, Mehmet

    2009-09-01

    Cannabis smoking, which has euphoric effects, is consistently increasing in Europe. Smoking cannabis is a rare trigger of acute myocardial infarction (MI) by inducing coronary artery spasm. Some cases who have thrombus formation in acute coronary artery and no serious atherosclerotic lesions have been reported in the literature. These cases had involved the left coronary artery. Although some cases were reported with MI after cannabis smoking, only two case reports with inferior MI after cannabis smoking were reported in the literature. The present report is of a young male patient who was affected by acute inferior MI half an hour after cannabis smoking. PMID:19436220

  13. Bilateral Pedicled Superficial Inferior Epigastric Artery Flap in the Treatment of Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Don; Saber, Sepideh; Patel, Ketan; Carey, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The authors present a new technique in surgically treating hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), a debilitating skin condition. In HS, surgical treatment is often the best option because of the high recurrence rates despite extensive medical treatment. A commonly successful surgical method is using skin flaps after excision of the affected area. A superficial inferior epigastric artery flap is demonstrated here as a new alternative approach to treating a case of extensive HS of the groin. By using the pedicled superficial inferior epigastric artery flap for groin reconstruction, inguinal HS can be widely excised and reconstructed with minimal donor-site morbidity and a good aesthetic outcome.

  14. Traumatic Inferior Gluteal Artery Aneurysm Managed with Emergency Transcatheter Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert; Zielinski, Maciej; Wykretowicz, Mateusz; Piekarek, Alina; Majewski, Waclaw

    2010-06-15

    Pseudoaneurysms of the inferior gluteal artery (IGA) are rare and are often caused by trauma. Treatment options vary and include surgery, ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection, and endovascular procedures such as stent-graft placement, coil embolization, and glue injection. We report a 70-year-old male who presented to the hospital after a road accident with a posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm that was treated by endovascular thrombin embolization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of inferior gluteal artery false aneurysm treated by this method.

  15. "A Hidden Part of Me": Latino/a Students, Silencing, and the Epidermalization of Inferiority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irizarry, Jason G.; Raible, John

    2014-01-01

    Using Critical Race Theory (CRT) and Latino/a Critical Race Theory (LatCrit) as analytical tools, this article examines the experiences of a seven Latino/a high school students at various points of engagement with the school-to-prison pipeline. Building on and extending Franz Fanon's (1952) concept of the epidermalization of inferiority, the…

  16. Effects of sexual reproduction of the inferior competitor Brachionus calyciflorus on its fitness against Brachionus angularis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Niu, Cuijuan

    2015-03-01

    Sexual reproduction adversely affects the population growth of cyclic parthenogenetic animals. The density-dependent sexual reproduction of a superior competitor could mediate the coexistence. However, the cost of sex may make the inferior competitor more vulnerable. To investigate the effect of sexual reproduction on the inferior competitor, we experimentally paired the competition of one Brachionus angularis clone against three Brachionus calyciflorus clones. One of the B. calyciflorus clones showed a low propensity for sexual reproduction, while the other two showed high propensities. The results show that all B. calyciflorus clones were excluded in the competition for resources at low food level. The increased food level promoted the competition persistence, but the clones did not show a clear pattern. Both the cumulative population density and resting egg production increased with the food level. The cumulative population density decreased with the mixis investment, while the resting egg production increased with the mixis investment. A trade-off between the population growth and sexual reproduction was observed in this research. The results indicate that although higher mixis investment resulted in a lower population density, it would not determinately accelerate the exclusion process of the inferior competitor. On the contrary, higher mixis investment promoted resting egg production before being excluded and thus promised a long-term benefit. In conclusion, our results suggest that mixis investment, to some extent, favored the excluded inferior competitor under fierce competition or some other adverse conditions.

  17. Attention, Emotion, and Deactivation of Default Activity in Inferior Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geday, Jacob; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Attention deactivates the inferior medial prefrontal cortex (IMPC), but it is uncertain if emotions can attenuate this deactivation. To test the extent to which common emotions interfere with attention, we measured changes of a blood flow index of brain activity in key areas of the IMPC with positron emission tomography (PET) of labeled water…

  18. The Loss and Search for the Puer, A Consideration of Inferiority Feelings in Certain Male Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daher, Douglas

    1981-01-01

    A sense of inferiority in adolescent males can result from a split senex-puer archetype, a Jungian construct focused on the individual's identification with and/or repression of psychic age and youth. Adolescents experience healing of the split senex-puer archetype to the degrees to which they involve themselves in the eros and power of their life…

  19. Case report: Conservative management of an arteriovenous fistula of the inferior epigastric artery.

    PubMed

    Piñero, A; Reus, M; Agea, B; Capel, A; Riquelme, J; Parrilla, P

    2003-02-01

    We present a case of pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula of the inferior epigastric artery secondary to the placement of a drain during a surgical intervention. We stress the utility of colour Doppler ultrasound and arteriography embolisation in diagnosis and treatment, respectively. PMID:12642284

  20. Effects of Category Learning on the Stimulus Selectivity of Macaque Inferior Temporal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Baene, Wouter; Ons, Bart; Wagemans, Johan; Vogels, Rufin

    2008-01-01

    Primates can learn to categorize complex shapes, but as yet it is unclear how this categorization learning affects the representation of shape in visual cortex. Previous studies that have examined the effect of categorization learning on shape representation in the macaque inferior temporal (IT) cortex have produced diverse and conflicting results…

  1. Prominence vs. Aboutness in Sequencing: A Functional Distinction within the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Grewe, Tanja; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Prior research on the neural bases of syntactic comprehension suggests that activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus (lIFG) correlates with the processing of word order variations. However, there are inconsistencies with respect to the specific subregion within the IFG that is implicated by these findings: the pars opercularis or the pars…

  2. Transient myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending coronary artery in acute inferior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Harun; Akdemir, Ramazan; Bicer, Asuman; Dogan, Mehmet

    2009-01-24

    We observed transient myocardial bridging of left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) in 18.75% (12 of the total 64) of the patients during acute inferior myocardial infarction (MI). Myocardial bridging occurred only in the acute phase of inferior MI and not in the chronic phase. In the acute phase of inferior MI, compensatory hypercontraction of the anterior wall is assumed to occur in response to the decrease in the movement of the infarct-related walls. In the chronic phase, disappearance of the myocardial bridging observed due to the resolution of compensatory anterior wall hypercontraction, as a result of the reperfusion of infarct-related coronary artery. Most of the myocardial bridges seen in autopsy series are not seen angiographically. Variation at angiography may in part be attributable to small and thin bridges causing little compression. Adrenergic stimulation or afterload reduction by nitroglycerin facilitates diagnosis of myocardial bridging by increasing coronary compression. Both of these conditions are almost always present in acute MI. We concluded that transient myocardial bridging of LAD can be observed in some patients with acute inferior MI during acute stage. PMID:17920712

  3. Lexical Retrieval Constrained by Sound Structure: The Role of the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, David J.; Scott, Sophie K.; Cutler, Anne; Wise, Richard J. S.

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography was used to investigate two competing hypotheses about the role of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in word generation. One proposes a domain-specific organization, with neural activation dependent on the type of information being processed, i.e., surface sound structure or semantic. The other proposes a…

  4. Laser-activated solder weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Nigel J.; Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Owen, Earl R.; Walker, D. M.

    1997-05-01

    A new laser activated solder weld technique is described for the microsurgical repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats. The laser weld technique used an albumin based solder, containing indocyanine cardiogreen, plus an infrared diode laser. Seven animals had inferior alveolar nerve repairs performed using the laser weld technique and these were compared against corresponding unoperated controls plus three cases of nerve section without repair. Histochemical analysis was performed utilizing neuron counts and horseradish peroxidase tracer (HRP) uptake in the trigeminal ganglion following sacrifice and staining of frozen sections with cresyl violet and diaminobenzidene. The results of this analysis showed comparable mean neuron counts and mean HRP uptake by neurons for the unoperated control and laser weld groups with considerable reduction of mean values in cases of nerve section with no repair. Sections of the repaired inferior alveolar nerves, stained with Masson's trichrome, showed no adverse reactions by axons or epineurium to the coagulative repair with the solder and demonstrated regeneration of myelinated axons at the time of sacrifice. In summary a new technique of laser weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve is described which, on initial analysis, appears to be a reliable alternative to traditional techniques.

  5. Randomized Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial of a Telehealth Treatment for Chronic Stuttering: The Camperdown Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Block, Susan; Jones, Mark; Packman, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although there are treatments that can alleviate stuttering in adults for clinically significant periods, in Australia there are barriers to the accessibility and availability of best-practice treatment. Aims: This parallel group, non-inferiority randomized controlled trial with multiple blinded outcome assessments investigated whether…

  6. Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis in Young Adults – a review of two cases

    PubMed Central

    McAree, Barry J; O'Donnell, Mark E; Boyd, Chris; Spence, Roy AJ; Lee, Bernard; Soong, Chee V

    2009-01-01

    We present two cases of clinically extensive bilateral DVTs associated with inferior vena caval thrombosis. Young patients presenting with symptoms of DVT should be investigated not only to establish any thrombophilic pre-disposition, but to ascertain the proximal extent of thrombus which may itself influence treatment. PMID:19568450

  7. The Contribution of the Inferior Parietal Cortex to Spoken Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geranmayeh, Fatemeh; Brownsett, Sonia L. E.; Leech, Robert; Beckmann, Christian F.; Woodhead, Zoe; Wise, Richard J. S.

    2012-01-01

    This functional MRI study investigated the involvement of the left inferior parietal cortex (IPC) in spoken language production (Speech). Its role has been apparent in some studies but not others, and is not convincingly supported by clinical studies as they rarely include cases with lesions confined to the parietal lobe. We compared Speech with…

  8. Inferior fronto-temporo-occipital connectivity: a missing link between maltreated girls and neglectful mothers

    PubMed Central

    León, Inmaculada; Góngora, Daylin; Hernández-Cabrera, Juan A.; Byrne, Sonia; Bobes, María A.

    2016-01-01

    The neurobiological alterations resulting from adverse childhood experiences that subsequently may lead to neglectful mothering are poorly understood. Maternal neglect of an infant’s basic needs is the most prevalent type of child maltreatment. We tested white matter alterations in neglectful mothers, the majority of whom had also suffered maltreatment in their childhood, and compared them to a matched control group. The two groups were discriminated by a structural brain connectivity pattern comprising inferior fronto-temporo-occipital connectivity, which constitutes a major portion of the face-processing network and was indexed by fewer streamlines in neglectful mothers. Mediation and regression analyses showed that fewer streamlines in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus tract (ILF-R) predicted a poorer quality of mother–child emotional availability observed during cooperative play and that effect depended on the respective interactions with left and right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO-R/L), with no significant impact of psychopathological and cognitive conditions. Volume alteration in ILF-R but not in IFO-L modulated the impact of having been maltreated on emotional availability. The findings suggest the altered inferior fronto-temporal-occipital connectivity, affecting emotional visual processing, as a possible common neurological substrate linking a history of childhood maltreatment with maternal neglect. PMID:27342834

  9. Recession Vs Myotomy–Comparative Analysis of Two Surgical Procedures of Weakening Inferior Oblique Muscle Overaction

    PubMed Central

    Alajbegovic-Halimic, Jasmina; Zvizdic, Denisa; Sahbegovic-Holcner, Amra; Kulanic-Kuduzovic, Amira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Inferior oblique overaction (IOOA) can be primary or secondary, isolated or combined to other types of horizontal deviation, mostly with esotropias. Surgical weakening of IOOA means several techniques like; recession, myotomy, myectomy, anteroposition etc. Goals: we analyzed the effect of inferior oblique muscle surgical weakening comparing two groups of patients with primary hypertropia. Material and methods: In 5-years retrospective study, we observed 33 patients on which we did the surgical procedure of weakening inferior muscle overaction by two methods; recession and myotomy. Results: In total number of 33 patients, there were 57,6% male and 42,4% female patients with average age of 10,6±7,5 (in range of 4–36). There was 33,3% of isolated primary hypertropias, and 66,7% combined with esotropias. At 23 (69,9%) patients the recession surgical procedure was done, and with 10 (30,1%) myotomy. Better effect and binocularity was in 65,2% of patients in recession group which was statistically significant with significance level of p<0,0, χ2=5,705; p=0,021. Conclusion: Comparing of two surgical procedures of weakening inferior oblique muscles overaction, recession is better procedure than myotomy. PMID:26261384

  10. Cytoarchitectural and Functional Abnormalities of the Inferior Colliculus in Sudden Unexplained Perinatal Death

    PubMed Central

    Lavezzi, Anna M.; Pusiol, Teresa; Matturri, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The inferior colliculus is a mesencephalic structure endowed with serotonergic fibers that plays an important role in the processing of acoustic information. The implication of the neuromodulator serotonin also in the aetiology of sudden unexplained fetal and infant death syndromes and the demonstration in these pathologies of developmental alterations of the superior olivary complex (SOC), a group of pontine nuclei likewise involved in hearing, prompted us to investigate whether the inferior colliculus may somehow contribute to the pathogenetic mechanism of unexplained perinatal death. Therefore, we performed in a wide set of fetuses and infants, aged from 33 gestational weeks to 7 postnatal months and died of both known and unknown cause, an in-depth anatomopathological analysis of the brainstem, particularly of the midbrain. Peculiar neuroanatomical and functional abnormalities of the inferior colliculus, such as hypoplasia/structural disarrangement and immunonegativity or poor positivity of serotonin, were exclusively found in sudden death victims, and not in controls. In addition, these alterations were frequently related to dysgenesis of connected structures, precisely the raphé nuclei and the superior olivary complex, and to nicotine absorption in pregnancy. We propose, on the basis of these results, the involvement of the inferior colliculus in more important functions than those related to hearing, as breathing and, more extensively, all the vital activities, and then in pathological conditions underlying a sudden death in vulnerable periods of the autonomic nervous system development, particularly associated to harmful risk factors as cigarette smoking. PMID:25674737

  11. Inferior fronto-temporo-occipital connectivity: a missing link between maltreated girls and neglectful mothers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, María José; León, Inmaculada; Góngora, Daylin; Hernández-Cabrera, Juan A; Byrne, Sonia; Bobes, María A

    2016-10-01

    The neurobiological alterations resulting from adverse childhood experiences that subsequently may lead to neglectful mothering are poorly understood. Maternal neglect of an infant's basic needs is the most prevalent type of child maltreatment. We tested white matter alterations in neglectful mothers, the majority of whom had also suffered maltreatment in their childhood, and compared them to a matched control group. The two groups were discriminated by a structural brain connectivity pattern comprising inferior fronto-temporo-occipital connectivity, which constitutes a major portion of the face-processing network and was indexed by fewer streamlines in neglectful mothers. Mediation and regression analyses showed that fewer streamlines in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus tract (ILF-R) predicted a poorer quality of mother-child emotional availability observed during cooperative play and that effect depended on the respective interactions with left and right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO-R/L), with no significant impact of psychopathological and cognitive conditions. Volume alteration in ILF-R but not in IFO-L modulated the impact of having been maltreated on emotional availability. The findings suggest the altered inferior fronto-temporal-occipital connectivity, affecting emotional visual processing, as a possible common neurological substrate linking a history of childhood maltreatment with maternal neglect. PMID:27342834

  12. Typology of abdominal arteries, with special reference to inferior phrenic arteries and their esophageal branches.

    PubMed

    Piao, D X; Ohtsuka, A; Murakami, T

    1998-08-01

    Origins and distribution of the human inferior phrenic arteries were studied by dissecting 68 Japanese adult cadavers. The inferior phrenic arteries were usually observed as paired (left and right) vessels. Their origins were summarized as follows: a) the aorta itself (85/138 cases, 61.6%), b) the ventro-visceral arteries (celiaco-mesenteric system of the aorta) including the celiac trunk (39/138 cases, 28.2%) and the left gastric artery (4/138 cases, 2.9%), and c) the latero-visceral arteries (adreno-renal system of the aorta) including the middle adrenal artery (4/138 cases, 2.9%) and the renal artery (6/138 cases, 4.3%). The left and right arteries occasionally originated in common trunk from the aorta, celiaco-mesenteric system or adreno-renal system (22/138 cases, 15.9%). A typological diagram explaining these variations is given. The inferior phrenic arteries, especially the left ones, sometimes issued visceral or esophageal branches. This fact indicates that the inferior phrenic arteries are homologous with the celiac trunk and mesenteric arteries. It is further discussed that the celiac trunk and mesenteric arteries are originally paired vessels, through introduction of our previous typological diagram of the abdominal arteries. PMID:9781269

  13. Inferior fronto-temporo-occipital connectivity: a missing link between maltreated girls and neglectful mothers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, María José; León, Inmaculada; Góngora, Daylin; Hernández-Cabrera, Juan A; Byrne, Sonia; Bobes, María A

    2016-10-01

    The neurobiological alterations resulting from adverse childhood experiences that subsequently may lead to neglectful mothering are poorly understood. Maternal neglect of an infant's basic needs is the most prevalent type of child maltreatment. We tested white matter alterations in neglectful mothers, the majority of whom had also suffered maltreatment in their childhood, and compared them to a matched control group. The two groups were discriminated by a structural brain connectivity pattern comprising inferior fronto-temporo-occipital connectivity, which constitutes a major portion of the face-processing network and was indexed by fewer streamlines in neglectful mothers. Mediation and regression analyses showed that fewer streamlines in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus tract (ILF-R) predicted a poorer quality of mother-child emotional availability observed during cooperative play and that effect depended on the respective interactions with left and right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO-R/L), with no significant impact of psychopathological and cognitive conditions. Volume alteration in ILF-R but not in IFO-L modulated the impact of having been maltreated on emotional availability. The findings suggest the altered inferior fronto-temporal-occipital connectivity, affecting emotional visual processing, as a possible common neurological substrate linking a history of childhood maltreatment with maternal neglect.

  14. Retrieval of Cement Embolus from Inferior Vena Cava After Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Athreya, S.; Mathias, N.; Rogers, P.; Edwards, R.

    2009-07-15

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty is an accepted treatment for painful vertebral compression fractures caused by osteoporosis and malignant disease. Venous leakage of cement and pulmonary cement embolism have been reported complications. We describe a paravertebral venous cement leak resulting in the deposition of a cement cast in the inferior vena cava and successful retrieval of the cement embolus.

  15. Procedural and Indwelling Complications with Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Frequency, Etiology, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Lazar; Kennedy, Sean A.; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are commonly used in select high-risk patients for the prevention of pulmonary embolism. Potentially serious complications can arise from the use of IVC filters, including thrombosis of the filter itself and filter fragment embolization. This article discusses the utility of IVC filters and reviews the management of two cases of filter-related complications. PMID:25762846

  16. Left Inferior Frontal Cortex and Syntax: Function, Structure and Behaviour in Patients with Left Hemisphere Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Lorraine K.; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Randall, Billi; Wright, Paul; Devereux, Barry J.; Zhuang, Jie; Papoutsi, Marina; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A.

    2011-01-01

    For the past 150 years, neurobiological models of language have debated the role of key brain regions in language function. One consistently debated set of issues concern the role of the left inferior frontal gyrus in syntactic processing. Here we combine measures of functional activity, grey matter integrity and performance in patients with left…

  17. Inferior Frontal Sensitivity to Common Speech Sounds Is Amplified by Increasing Word Intelligibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaden, Kenneth I., Jr.; Kuchinsky, Stefanie E.; Keren, Noam I.; Harris, Kelly C.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Dubno, Judy R.; Eckert, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) exhibits increased responsiveness when people listen to words composed of speech sounds that frequently co-occur in the English language (Vaden, Piquado, & Hickok, 2011), termed high phonotactic frequency (Vitevitch & Luce, 1998). The current experiment aimed to further characterize the relation of…

  18. Inferior Vena Cava Filter from Left-Sided Superior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Sujit Ettles, Duncan; Robinson, Graham; Scott, Paul

    2008-07-15

    We describe the unusual case of a 71-year-old male with a history of deep vein thrombosis and recurrent multiple pulmonary embolism (PE) despite adequate anticoagulation. Computed tomography (CT) and brachiocephalic venography revealed a left-sided superior vena cava. We describe successful placement of an inferior vena cava filter via a left-sided superior vena cava.

  19. Dissociating Linguistic and Task-Related Activity in the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Paul; Randall, Billi; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Tyler, Lorraine K.

    2011-01-01

    The left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) has long been claimed to play a key role in language function. However, there is considerable controversy as to whether regions within LIFG have specific linguistic or domain-general functions. Using fMRI, we contrasted linguistic and task-related effects by presenting simple and morphologically complex words…

  20. Acute Traumatic Renal Artery to Inferior Vena Cava Fistula Treated with a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, J.; Kossman, T.; Lyon, S.

    2006-12-15

    A 34-year-old man presented within hours of suffering a penetrating stab wound and was diagnosed with a right renal artery to inferior vena cava fistula. Initial attempts at excluding the fistula with a balloon were unsuccessful. He was subsequently treated with a covered stent inserted into the right renal artery which successfully excluded the fistula.

  1. Patella fracture in a boy with bilateral inferior pole bipartite patellae.

    PubMed

    Peek, A C; Barry, M

    2012-10-01

    We present the case of a 12 year old boy who had bilateral inferior pole fragment (Saupe type 1) bipartite patellae, and who sustained a traumatic separation through the right patella while playing basket ball, the left remaining asymptomatic. We have reviewed and discussed the previously published literature and case reports.

  2. Inferiorly based thigh flap for reconstruction of defects around the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Md. Sohaib; Khan, Arshad Hafeez; Khurram, Mohammed Fahud; Ahmad, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Soft-tissue defects around the knees are common in injured limbs and in the same injury the leg is often involved and the thigh is spared. Furthermore due to pliable and relatively lax skin, we have used inferiorly based thigh flap to reconstruct defects around knee joint. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of inferiorly based thigh flap to cover soft-tissue defects over the proximal one-third of the leg, patellar region, knee, and lower thigh. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted during the period between October 2011 and February 2013. Inferiorly based anteromedial thigh fasciocutaneous flap was performed on 12 patients and inferiorly based anterolateral thigh fasciocutaneous flap on four patients. The sites of the soft-tissue defects included patellar regions, infrapatellar region, upper one-third of leg, lower thigh, and over the knee joint. Results: Patients were evaluated post-operatively in terms of viability of flap, the matching of the flap with the recipient site, and donor site morbidity. All the flaps survived well except one which developed distal marginal flap loss, one in which wound dehiscence was noticed, and two in which mild venous congestion was observed. Venous congestion in two patients subsided on its own within 3 days. One patient with wound dehiscence achieved complete healing by secondary intention. Patient who developed distal flap loss required debridement and skin grafting. No appreciable donor site morbidity was encountered. Skin colour and texture of the flap matched well with the recipient site. Conclusions: The inferiorly based thigh flap is a reliable flap to cover the defect over proximal one-third of the leg, patellar region, knee, and lower thigh. PMID:25190918

  3. Unusual Case of Parkes Weber Syndrome with Aneurysm of the Left Common Iliac Vein and Thrombus in Inferior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Banzic, Igor; Brankovic, Milos; Koncar, Igor; Ilic, Nikola; Davidovic, Lazar

    2015-10-01

    We report an unusual case of aneurysm of the left common iliac vein and thrombus formation in inferior vena cava associated with Parkes Weber syndrome (PWS). In addition to many already known clinical signs which determine PWS, common iliac vein aneurysm formation together with inferior vena cava thrombus present a new clinical feature and new challenges in treatment strategy of these patients. PMID:26122423

  4. Factors involved in the antinatriuretic effects of acute constriction of the thoracic and abdominal inferior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction in the absence of alterations in renal perfusion pressure. A comparison is made of the effects of equivalent degrees of TIVC and abdominal inferior vena cava constriction on arterial pressure, renal hemodynamics, and electrolyte excretion.

  5. [Effect of destruction of the inferior colliculi on the performance of the echolocating system of horseshoe-nosed bats].

    PubMed

    Movchan, E V

    1980-01-01

    The effect of unilateral and bilateral destruction of the inferior colliculi on the auditory system sensitivity, sonar signals' parameters and the Doppler shift compensation in echoes was studied in horseshoe bats Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. Complete bilateral destruction of the inferior colliculi did not produce the auditory system disfunction, but it sharply decreased auditory sensitivity of this system which was manifested in a reduction of the maximum detection range and inability to detect a weakly sounding insect. The data obtained suggest that the inferior colliculi are immediately responsible for the maintenance of emitting frequency and that the role which various regions of inferior colliculus play in that process is different. To preserve the effect of the Doppler shift compensation it is necessary to keep intact not less than a half of the central nucleus at least of one inferior colliculus.

  6. A Case of the Inferior Mesenteric Artery Arising from the Superior Mesenteric Artery in a Korean Woman

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Jin; Ku, Min Jung; Cho, Sa Sun

    2011-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the inferior mesenteric artery are extremely uncommon, since the inferior mesenteric artery is regularly diverged at the level of the third lumbar vertebra. We found a rare case in which the inferior mesenteric artery arose from the superior mesenteric artery. The findings were made during a routine dissection of the cadaver of an 82-yr-old Korean woman. This is the tenth report on this anomaly, the second female and the first Korean. The superior mesenteric artery normally arising from abdominal aorta sent the inferior mesenteric artery as the second branch. The longitudinal anastomosis vessels between the superior mesenteric artery and inferior mesenteric artery survived to form the common mesenteric artery. This anatomical variation concerning the common mesenteric artery is of clinical importance, performing procedures containing the superior mesenteric artery. PMID:22022194

  7. The Anterior Branch of the Left Inferior Phrenic Artery Arising from the Right Inferior Phrenic Artery: An Angiographic and CT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hieda, Masashi Toyota, Naoyuki; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Masaki; Horiguchi, Jun; Ito, Katsuhide

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the frequency and anatomical pattern of the anterior branch of the left inferior phrenic artery (LIPA) arising from the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA). Angiography of the RIPA for patients (n = 140) with hepatic malignancy was retrospectively reviewed. The frequency at which the anterior branch of the LIPA arose from the RIPA was 14.3% (20 of 140 patients [pts]). Among the three branches that may arise from the RIPA in these cases (the anterior branch of the LIPA and the anterior and posterior branches of the RIPA), the anterior branch of the LIPA was the first branch of the RIPA in 9 of 20 pts (45%), and the posterior branch of the RIPA in 11 of 20 pts (55%). The anterior branch of the LIPA ran along the ventral side of the esophagus or stomach and supplied the esophagogastric region and dome of the left diaphragm in all cases. In conclusion, the anterior branch of the LIPA arises from the RIPA at a comparatively high frequency. In embolization of the RIPA, to effectively treat and avoid possible complications, interventionalists should be aware of this potential variant anatomy.

  8. Inferior vena cava stenosis-induced sinusoidal obstructive syndrome after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Orgoi, Sergelen; Sandag, Erdene; Namkhai, Ulzii-Orshikh; Badarch, Bat-Ireedui; Batsuuri, Batsaikhan

    2016-01-01

    The sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) is a complication that usually follows hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is also known as veno-occlusive disease, which is a rare complication of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Herein, we reported a 34 year-old female patient presenting SOS after LDLT. Its underlying cause was presumed to be associated with liver abscess and subsequent inferior vena cava stenosis. SOS led to graft failure, thus requiring retransplantation with a deceased donor liver graft. The underlying causes of SOS are complex pathologic entity with multifactorial etiology. It is likely that its multifactorial etiology includes a decrease of hepatic venous outflow that is caused by graft liver infection and inferior vena cava stenosis.

  9. Extranasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Originating in the Inferior Turbinate: A Distinct Clinical Entity at an Unusual Site

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Marco Antonio Ferraz de Barros; Pinna, Fábio de Rezende; Voegels, Richard Louis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma is histologically similar to juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, differing from the latter in clinical and epidemiologic characteristics. Objectives We present a case of extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma originating in the inferior turbinate. Resumed Report The patient was a girl, 8 years and 6 months of age, who had constant bilateral nasal obstruction and recurrent epistaxis for 6 months, worse on the right side, with hyposmia and snoring. Nasal endoscopy showed a reddish lesion, smooth, friable, and nonulcerated. Computed tomography showed a lesion with soft tissue density in the right nasal cavity. We used an endoscopic approach and found the lesion inserted in the right inferior turbinate. We did a subperiosteal dissection and excision with a partial turbinectomy with a resection margin of 0.5 cm. Histopathology reported it to be an extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Conclusion Although rare, extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma should be considered in the diagnosis of vascular tumors of the head and neck. PMID:25992131

  10. Prepro-neuropeptide Y mRNA and NPY binding sites in human inferior vagal ganglia.

    PubMed

    McLean, K J; Jarrott, B; Lawrence, A J

    1997-07-01

    The inferior vagal ganglia contain the cell bodies of centrally projecting vagal afferent neurones. Using in situ hybridization-histochemistry with a combination of two antisense neuropeptide Y (NPY) oligonucleotides, we have demonstrated that a population of human inferior vagal perikarya express mRNA encoding prepro-NPY, the precursor of NPY. In vitro receptor autoradiography, using both [125I]Bolton Hunter-NPY ([125I]BH-NPY, 15 pM) and [125I]peptide YY ([125I]PYY, 25 pM), enabled visualization of NPY binding sites. Competition binding with NPY (1 microM), PYY (1 microM) and [Leu31,Pro34]NPY (100 nM), suggest that both Y1 and Y2 receptor subtypes are present on human vagal afferent neurones. These observations suggest a potential role for NPY in neuromodulation of vagal transmission in humans.

  11. Local colloid trapping in the liver in the inferior vena cava syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.S.; Fletcher, J.W.; Donati, R.M.

    1981-04-01

    Local radioactive areas in the liver were observed as a result of superficial cavoportal shunting of radiocolloids in two patients with the inferior vena cava syndrome. In one patient a paraumbilical and/or a recanalized umbilical vein was apparently involved in the hepatopetal shunting. In the other patient a superficial anastomosis other than the paraumbilical vein shunted colloid to the liver. Relatively discrete areas of increased radioactivity, single or multiple, were seen in the left lobe. Virtually all reported instances of hepatopetal shunting of radioparticles in a superior or an inferior vena cava syndrome have demonstrated similar findings. Various hepatopetal collateral pathways in infrarenal caval obstruction are considered, and factors that could affect liver scan findings in the infrarenal obstruction are discussed.

  12. Massive thrombosis of bilateral superior and inferior ophthalmic veins secondary to ethmoidal rhinosunisitis: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Gedikli, Yusuf; Karaca, Leyla; Okur, Aylin; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-05-01

    Ophthalmic vein thrombosis (OVT) is a rare condition occurring secondary to varied etiologies that commonly presents with proptosis, globe dystopia, ophthalmoplegia, periorbital edema, and occasionally diminished visual acuity. It may be related to inflammation of the orbit or paranasal sinuses. We herein report imaging findings of thrombosed superior and inferior ophthalmic veins in bilateral involvement in a 20-year-old male patient without cavernous sinus thrombosis. He presented with pain, swelling, and blurred vision in both eyes. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, cerebral MR angiography, and susceptibility weighted imaging were performed. Bilateral superior and inferior OVT due to a complication of ethmoidal sinusitis was diagnosed in the patient. Anticoagulant and systemic broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was started. His symptoms were recorded at the end of 14 days of the treatment. PMID:24785747

  13. [Inferior hemiarthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint with articulated condylar prosthesis type Stryker].

    PubMed

    Bucur, A; Dincă, O; Totan, C; Ghită, V

    2007-01-01

    The optimal reconstruction of the mandible and of the temporo-mandibular joint after mandibular hemi-resection with disarticulation is still controversial in literature. This paperwork presents our experience on four cases in the reconstruction of the mandible together with the inferior arthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint, after the resection of extended benign tumors of the mandible, based on fibular free vascularized grafts having attached a Stryker titanium condylar prosthesis reconstructing the inferior segment of the temporo-mandibular joint. Our results for the this technique were excellent, with a functional rehabilitation very close to normal. After reviewing the various techniques and their arguments in literature, with accent on the TMJ reconstruction, we consider this method to be optimal for the reconstruction of mandibular defects in patients with neoplastic conditions.

  14. Inferior vena cava stenosis-induced sinusoidal obstructive syndrome after living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bat-Erdene, Batsaikhan; Orgoi, Sergelen; Sandag, Erdene; Namkhai, Ulzii-Orshikh; Badarch, Bat-Ireedui; Batsuuri, Batsaikhan

    2016-08-01

    The sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) is a complication that usually follows hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is also known as veno-occlusive disease, which is a rare complication of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Herein, we reported a 34 year-old female patient presenting SOS after LDLT. Its underlying cause was presumed to be associated with liver abscess and subsequent inferior vena cava stenosis. SOS led to graft failure, thus requiring retransplantation with a deceased donor liver graft. The underlying causes of SOS are complex pathologic entity with multifactorial etiology. It is likely that its multifactorial etiology includes a decrease of hepatic venous outflow that is caused by graft liver infection and inferior vena cava stenosis. PMID:27621751

  15. Memory of music: roles of right hippocampus and left inferior frontal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Yagishita, Sho; Kikyo, Hideyuki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated neural correlates of retrieval success for music memory using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. To minimize the interference from MRI scan noise, we used sparse temporal sampling technique. Newly composed music materials were employed as stimuli, which enabled us to detect regions in absence of effects of experience with the music stimuli in this study. Whole brain analyses demonstrated significant retrieval success activities in the right hippocampus, bilateral lateral temporal regions, left inferior frontal gyrus and left precuneus. Anatomically defined region-of-interests analyses showed that the activity of the right hippocampus was stronger than that of the left, while the activities of the inferior frontal gyri showed the reverse pattern. Furthermore, performance-based analyses demonstrated that the retrieval success activity of the right hippocampus was positively correlated with the corrected recognition rate, suggesting that the right hippocampus contributes to the accuracy of music retrieval outcome.

  16. Multiorgan resection with inferior vena cava reconstruction for hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Wu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a life-threatening parasitic disease characterized by its tumor-like growth. Radical operation is deemed the curable method for AE treatment if R0-resection is achievable. We present a 26-year-old AE patient with AE lesions invading the right lobe of the liver, the inferior vena cava, inferior lobe of right lung, the right hemidiaphragm, and the right kidney. On the basis of precise preoperative and intraoperative evaluations, a radical surgery that removed the huge lesion en bloc was performed successfully with skillful surgical techniques. This patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and a good prognosis. Multiorgan resection is justified and unavoidable in selected patients when AE lesions invade different organs and the main vascular structures. PMID:27281076

  17. Duplication of Inferior Vena Cava with Associated Anomalies: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shaha, Pramod; Garg, Ashish; Sahoo, Kulamani; Kothari, Nupoor; Garg, Pooja

    2016-03-01

    Duplication of inferior vena cava is an uncommon abnormality and is important in daily today practice for vascular surgeons, radiologist and urologist especially during retroperitoneal surgeries and treatment of thromboembolic disease. Radiologically, Duplicated IVC can be mistaken for lymphadenopathy or left pyeloureteric dilatation. Crossed fused kidney with a single ureter defy the embryological theory of ureteric bud crossing the opposite side and induce nephron formation associated anomaly of Duplication of inferior vena cava and malrotation of gut are not reported in a same patient. On meticulous search of literature no such combination of abnormalities has been reported. In this case report we bring forward this rare type of combination of three congenital malformations that is Duplication of IVC, crossed fused kidney and malrotation of gut.

  18. Inferior vena cava stenosis-induced sinusoidal obstructive syndrome after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Orgoi, Sergelen; Sandag, Erdene; Namkhai, Ulzii-Orshikh; Badarch, Bat-Ireedui; Batsuuri, Batsaikhan

    2016-01-01

    The sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) is a complication that usually follows hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is also known as veno-occlusive disease, which is a rare complication of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Herein, we reported a 34 year-old female patient presenting SOS after LDLT. Its underlying cause was presumed to be associated with liver abscess and subsequent inferior vena cava stenosis. SOS led to graft failure, thus requiring retransplantation with a deceased donor liver graft. The underlying causes of SOS are complex pathologic entity with multifactorial etiology. It is likely that its multifactorial etiology includes a decrease of hepatic venous outflow that is caused by graft liver infection and inferior vena cava stenosis. PMID:27621751

  19. Extra-Adrenal Retroperitoneal Paraganglioma with Extensive Duodenal Invasion and Inferior Vena Cava Tumor Thrombus.

    PubMed

    Sadamori, Hiroshi; Monden, Kazuteru; Hioki, Masayoshi; Yoshimoto, Masashi; Ueki, Toru; Hyodo, Tsuyoshi; Omonishi, Kunihiro; Kioka, Yukio; Kuriyama, Mitsuhito; Ohno, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Kohsaku; Matsuda, Tadakazu; Takakura, Norihisa

    2016-08-01

    We report a case of extra-adrenal retroperitoneal paraganglioma (RP) with extensive duodenal invasion and tumor thromboses both in the right testicular vein and in the inferior vena cava (IVC). Because there was rigid adherence between the RP and the abdominal aorta, pancreatoduodenectomy with replacement of the IVC and aorta was performed for complete surgical resection. In the present case, both the mode of progression of the RP and the surgical approach were extremely rare. PMID:26921027

  20. Inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in Crohn`s disease: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Coralnick, J.R.; Budin, J.A.; Sedarat, A.

    1996-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis has been described in association with such risk factors as coagulation disorders, postoperative dehydration, sepsis, and trauma. CT and ultrasound have greatly facilitated early diagnosis, and the features of superior mesenteric and portal vein thrombosis are well recognized. We present a case of inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient with Crohn`s disease. To our knowledge, this entity has not been reported in the radiologic literature. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Percutaneous Stent Placement as Treatment of Renal Vein Obstruction Due to Inferior Vena Caval Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stecker, Michael S. Casciani, Thomas; Kwo, Paul Y.

    2006-02-15

    A patient who had undergone his third orthotopic liver transplantation nearly 9 years prior to presentation developed worsening hepatic and renal function, as well as severe bilateral lower extremity edema. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated vena caval thrombosis from the suprahepatic venous anastomosis to the infrarenal inferior vena cava, obstructing the renal veins. This was treated by percutaneous placement of metallic stents from the renal veins to the right atrium. At 16 months clinical follow-up, the patient continues to do well.

  2. Inferior vena cava aneurysm in an infant presenting with a renal mass.

    PubMed

    Unzueta-Roch, José L; García-Abós, Miriam; Sirvent-Cerdá, Sara; de Prada, Inmaculada; Martínez de Azagra, Amelia; Ollero, Jose M; Madero-López, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Aneurysm of the inferior vena cava is a rare finding in the pediatric population. We report the case of a 5-month-old infant presenting with anemia, hypertension, and dehydration in the emergency room. A renal mass was found with ultrasound and MRI and a renal tumor was first considered. Histopathologic review of the surgical specimen led to the diagnosis of aneurysmal dilatation of the vena cava.

  3. Potassium titanyl phosphate laser turbinate reduction in the management of allergic inferior turbinate hypertrophy: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Sabarinath; Divakaran, Shilpa; Gopalakrishnan, Suriyanarayanan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Allergic inferior turbinate hypertrophy is one of the most common causes of nasal obstruction. Several surgical methods can be used for the reduction of allergic inferior turbinate hypertrophy refractory to medical management. Herein, we share our experience with a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser, which is a relatively novel technique for turbinate reduction. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of KTP laser turbinate reduction in terms of symptomatic improvement and its effect on nasal mucociliary clearance. Methods: This study was conducted in the Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India, from November 2012 to July 2013. Thirty patients with inferior turbinate hypertrophy refractory to medical management were selected. A KTP laser was used at 6 W in continuous mode, with a spot size of 0.6–1 mm, and energy delivered through a 400-μm optical fiber. A follow-up was done at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months. All the values (both by the Sino Nasal Outcome Test scoring system and saccharine transit time) were assessed before surgery and at each follow-up visit. Results: The patients showed significant differences in the symptoms (p < 0.0001) at each follow-up. The mean saccharin transit time showed significant prolongation during the first week and first month after surgery, which indicated adverse effects on the mucociliary system (p < 0.0001). This, however, was a temporary effect, and the mean saccharin time returned to normal limits (17.96 minutes) at the third postoperative month. The mean operative time was 11.62 minutes. The procedure was not associated with any serious intra- or postoperative complications. Conclusion: KTP laser turbinate reduction is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive procedure in the treatment of allergic inferior turbinate hypertrophy, with a minimal effect on the nasal mucosa. It can be done as an office procedure, with minimal complications. PMID:27103557

  4. Laparoscopic mobilization of the inferior epigastric artery for penile revascularization in vasculogenic impotence.

    PubMed

    Moon, Y T; Kim, S C

    1997-06-01

    A laparoscopic approach was used for penile revascularization in a patient with vasculogenic impotence to avoid the long abdominal incision which was traditionally required to harvest the inferior epigastric artery as a neoarterial source. Despite the time-consuming nature of laparoscopy, this procedure was as efficacious but less morbid and required less convalescence than open revascularization. Whether more patients may benefit from this procedure must be evaluated in further studies. PMID:9250921

  5. A Rare Case of Angiofibroma Arising from Inferior Turbinate in a Female

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shilpi; Arora, Rubeena; Doloi, Pankaj; Kumar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    A rare case of extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma arising from the inferior turbinate in a young female of 28 years is presented. The case is discussed in light of scant contemporary literature on the cited subject. This clinical record highlights the distinct clinical nature of Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma (ENA) and importance of Immunohistochemistry in diagnosis of such lesions. With this case we report a rare clinical entity which presented in an extremely rare manner. PMID:27190846

  6. Cholelithiasis demonstrated on hepatobiliary scintigraphy as a photopenic defect within the inferior portion of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Yedinak, M.A.; Turnbull, G.L.; Spicer, M.J.; Brown, T.J.

    1984-11-01

    A 47-year-old man presented with the clinical findings of acute cholecystitis. During hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m DISIDA, a persistent photopenic defect was noted within the inferior portion of the liver in the region of the gallbladder. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed large gallstones with acoustic shadowing within a normal-sized gallbladder. Eleven large gallstones were found within a normal-sized intrahepatic gallbladder at surgery.

  7. The inferior olivary nucleus: a postmortem study of essential tremor cases versus controls.

    PubMed

    Louis, Elan D; Babij, Rachel; Cortés, Etty; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G; Faust, Phyllis L

    2013-06-01

    The pathogenesis of essential tremor is poorly understood. Historically, it has been hypothesized that the inferior olivary nucleus plays an important role in the generation of tremor in essential tremor, yet a detailed, controlled, anatomic-pathological study of that brain region has yet to be conducted. A detailed postmortem study was undertaken of the microscopic changes in the inferior olivary nucleus of 14 essential tremor cases versus 15 age-matched controls at the Essential Tremor Centralized Brain Repository. A series of metrics was used to quantify microscopic neuronal and glial changes in the inferior olivary nucleus and its input and output tracts. Olivary linear neuronal density also was assessed. Cases and controls did not differ from one another with respect to any of the assessed metrics (P values ranged from 0.23 to 1.0). Olivary linear neuronal density also was similar in cases and controls (P = 0.62). Paddle-shaped neurons, a morphologic shape change in olivary neurons, which, to our knowledge, have not been previously recognized, occurred to an equal degree in essential tremor cases and controls (P = 0.89) and were correlated with several markers of neuronal loss and gliosis. A systematic postmortem study of the microscopic changes in the inferior olivary nucleus did not detect any differences between cases and controls. These data, along with positron emission tomography data, which have failed to identify any metabolic abnormality of the olive, indicate that, if the olive is involved in essential tremor, then there is no clearly identifiable structural or metabolic correlate.

  8. Guenther Tulip Filter Retrieval from a Left-sided Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N.; Kaufman, John A. Lakin, Paul L.

    2004-01-15

    Optional (retrievable) inferior cava filters (IVC) may have advantages over permanent filters in a certain subset of patients, especially in view of recent concerns about the long-term thrombotic complications of the latter. Retrieval of the Guenther Tulip Filter (GTF), an optional filter, has been reported in a total of 76 patients. We present the first description of GTF retrieval from a left-sided IVC using the right internal jugular approach.

  9. Haematogenous tumour growth in the inferior vena cava in a patient with a nonseminomatous testicular tumour.

    PubMed

    Ham, S J; Schraffordt Koops, H; Sleijfer, D T; Freling, N M; Molenaar, W M

    1991-08-01

    The case history is reported of a patient with an invasion of the inferior vena cava by metastases of a non-seminomatous testicular tumour. He was treated with combination chemotherapy, followed by laparotomy and resection of residual tumour tissue. Fourteen months after this operation he is in good health. For every retroperitoneal lymph node dissection it is necessary to be on the look-out for invasion of the vena cava, because of the risk of a sudden pulmonary embolism.

  10. Calcific thrombi of the inferior vena cava in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Schullinger, J N; Santulli, T V; Berdon, W E; Wigger, H J; MacMillan, R W; Demartini, P D; Baker, D H

    1978-08-01

    Calcified caval thrombus should be considered in any infant or child where calcifications are noted in the high right retroperitoneal area on plain x-rays of the abdomen. Although typically bullet-shaped in configuration, the calcium distribution in the neonate may be atypical or incompletely developed, suggesting neuroblastoma. Definitive diagnosis can be made by inferior vena cavagram. As no deaths or complications have been attributed to the lesion in the cases thus far reported, no specific treatment is recommended.

  11. Language areas involving the inferior temporal cortex on intraoperative mapping in a bilingual patient with glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kin, Hidehiro; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Takano, Shingo; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Matsushita, Akira; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Aiyama, Hitoshi; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira

    2013-01-01

    A 40-year-old bilingual man underwent removal of glioblastoma multiforme with intraoperative language mapping, mainly using the picture-naming and auditory responsive-naming tasks under cortical stimulation. Multiple language areas were identified, including one located in the middle of the inferior temporal cortex (ITC). Individual mapping for glioma patients must be performed because language areas might be located in various and unexpected regions, including the ITC.

  12. Inferior Vena Cava Filter-Related Thrombus/Deep Vein Thrombosis: Data and Management.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Jessica M; Thornburg, Bartley G; Hickey, Ryan M

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent deep venous thrombosis and inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis are well-described complications following IVC filter placement. IVC thrombosis ranges in severity of clinical presentation, but can lead to significant morbidity and mortality with incidence rates depending on patient population and type of filter used. Endovascular therapies such as catheter-directed thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, balloon venoplasty, and stenting are safe and effective in restoration of venous patency. PMID:27247478

  13. Nutcracker syndrome in a patient with a history of inferior vena cava ligation.

    PubMed

    Peker, Ahmet; Yagmurlu, Aydin; Ekim, Mesiha; Gokcora, Haluk; Fitoz, Suat

    2011-09-01

    We report the case of a child with clinical and radiological signs of nutcracker syndrome who had a history of inferior vena cava ligation during a previous surgery. He was referred for evaluation of abdominal pain and hematuria. Entrapment of the left renal vein between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta with aneurysmal dilatation was detected on Doppler ultrasonography. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed paravertebral and epidural collateral vessels.

  14. Colorectal and uterine movement and tension of the inferior hypogastric plexus in cadavers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypotheses on somatovisceral dysfunction often assume interference by stretch or compression of the nerve supply to visceral structures. The purpose of this study is to examine the potential of pelvic visceral movement to create tension of the loose connective tissue that contains the fine branches of the inferior hypogastric nerve plexus. Methods Twenty eight embalmed human cadavers were examined. Pelvic visceral structures were displaced by very gentle 5 N unidirectional tension and the associated movement of the endopelvic fascia containing the inferior hypogastric plexus that this caused was measured. Results Most movement of the fascia containing the inferior hypogastric plexus was obtained by pulling the rectosigmoid junction or broad ligament of the uterus. The plexus did not cross any vertebral joints and the fascia containing it did not move on pulling the hypogastric nerve. Conclusions Uterine and rectosigmoid displacement produce most movement of the fascia containing the hypogastric nerve plexus, potentially resulting in nerve tension. In the living this might occur as a consequence of menstruation, pregnancy or constipation. This may be relevant to somatovisceral reflex theories of the effects of manual therapy on visceral conditions. PMID:22520735

  15. An anomalous muscle linking superior and inferior rectus muscles in the orbit.

    PubMed

    Kakizaki, Hirohiko; Zako, Masahiro; Nakano, Takashi; Asamoto, Ken; Miyaishi, Osamu; Iwaki, Masayoshi

    2006-09-01

    Dissections of the bilateral orbits in a 45-year-old female cadaver, who had no ocular movement disorders in her lifetime, revealed anomalous muscles linking the superior and inferior rectus muscles. The muscles, situated between the optic nerve and the lateral rectus muscle, originated from the annulus of Zinn and branched off two heads; one inserted into the medial inferior side of the superior rectus muscle and the other inserted into the central superior side of the inferior rectus muscle. Each insertion was located on a distal site of the myoneural junction of each rectus muscle. Histological investigations showed that the muscles had a striated muscle structure. No definite nerve insertion was observed in the muscles. Although this type of anomalous muscle has been reported in a few Caucasian cases, the present study is the first report in an Asian person. Anomalous orbital structures, which are a rare cause of strabismus, are important in the differential diagnosis of intra-orbital space-occupying lesions, rather than the differential diagnosis of strabismus.

  16. Compartment syndrome in patients with massive venous thrombosis after inferior vena cava filter placement.

    PubMed

    Mesfin, Addisu; Lum, Ying Wei; Nayfeh, Tariq; Mears, Simon C

    2011-03-11

    Massive venous thrombosis, which can occur acutely after inferior vena cava filter placement, has 2 forms: phlegmasia cerulea dolens and phlegmasia alba dolens. In phlegmasia cerulea dolens, complete occlusion of venous outflow occurs. In the milder phlegmasia alba dolens version, collateral venous flow out of the limb remains despite the venous thrombosis. This article presents, to our knowledge, the first 2 cases of massive venous thrombosis (1 phlegmasia cerulea dolens, 1 phlegmasia alba dolens) below inferior vena cava filters occurring after the acute period. Phlegmasia cerulea dolens and phlegmasia alba dolens can present as compartment syndrome. Prompt fasciotomies were performed, but the underlying massive venous thrombosis was not addressed surgically. Phlegmasia cerulea dolens and phlegmasia alba dolens have high morbidity and mortality. The patient with phlegmasia alba dolens required leg and thigh fasciotomies and eventually required an above-knee amputation. The patient with phlegmasia cerulea dolens developed compartment syndrome in the left leg, right leg, and right thigh. Although he underwent decompression of all of these compartments, he died from multiple organ failure. A multidisciplinary approach with the vascular service and the intensivists is required in the treatment of patients with massive venous thrombosis. Treatment goals include preventing additional propagation of the thrombus via anticoagulation, with strong consideration for catheter-directed thrombolysis or thrombectomy and fasciotomies for compartment syndrome. The orthopedic surgeon should keep phlegmasia cerulea dolens and phlegmasia alba dolens in the differential for compartment syndrome, especially in patients who have had a history of acute or chronic inferior vena cava filter placement.

  17. Learning Curve of Septoplasty with Radiofrequency Volume Reduction of the Inferior Turbinate

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Sung Jae; Park, Chang Mook

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Since few studies on surgical training and learning curves have been performed, majority of inexperienced surgeons are anxious about performing operations. We aimed to access the results and learning curve of septoplasty with radiofrequency volume reduction (RFVR) of the inferior turbinate. Methods We included 270 patients who underwent septoplasty with RFVR of the inferior turbinate by 6 inexperienced surgeons between January 2009 and July 2011. We analyzed success score, cases of revision, cases of complication, operation time, and acoustic rhinometry. Results Success score was relatively high and every surgeon had few cases of revision and complication. No significant difference was found in success score, revision, complication case, or acoustic rhinometry values between early cases and later cases. Operation time decreased according to increase in experience. However, there was no significant difference in the operation time after more than 30 cases. Conclusion We can conclude that 30 cases are needed to develop mature surgical skills for septoplasty with RFVR of the inferior turbinate and that training surgeons do not need to be anxious about performing this operation in the unskilled state. PMID:24353863

  18. Percutaneous closure of patent ductus arteriosus in interrupted inferior caval vein through femoral vein approach.

    PubMed

    Tefera, Endale; Bermudez-Cañete, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous closure of the patent arterial duct in patients with interrupted inferior caval vein poses a technical challenge. A 12-year-old girl with a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and interrupted inferior caval vein is described in this report. The diagnosis of interrupted inferior caval vein and azygos continuation was made in the catheterization laboratory. A catheter was advanced and snared in the descending aorta. An exchange wire was advanced through the catheter and snared in the descending aorta. Then, an Amplatzer TorqVue 2 delivery sheath was advanced over the wire from the venous side and again snared in the descending aorta. An Amplatzer duct occluder (ADO) size 8/6 was advanced through the sheath while still holding the sheath with a snare. The device was opened. The sheath was then unsnared once the aortic disc was completely out. The sheath and the device were pulled back into the duct and the device was successfully implanted. The device was then released and it attained a stable position. An aortic angiogram was performed which showed complete occlusion. PMID:24701089

  19. Arthroscopic posterior-inferior capsular release in the treatment of overhead athletes.

    PubMed

    Codding, Jason; Dahm, Diane L; McCarty, L Pearce; May, Jedediah H; Tucker, Lanning H; Buss, Daniel D

    2015-05-01

    In this article, we present our technique for arthroscopic posterior-inferior capsular release and report the results of applying this technique in a population of athletes with symptomatic glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) that was unresponsive to nonoperative treatment and was preventing them from returning to sport. Fifteen overhead athletes met the inclusion criteria. Two were lost to follow-up. Of the 13 remaining, 6 underwent isolated posterior-inferior capsular releases, and 7 had concomitant procedures. Before and after surgery, patients completed an activity questionnaire, which included the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form. Passive internal rotation in the scapular plane was measured with a bubble goniometer. Mean age was 21 years (range, 16-33 years). Mean follow-up was 31.1 months (range, 24-59 months). Mean ASES score improved significantly (P<.01) from before surgery (71.5) to after surgery (86.9). Mean GIRD improved from 43.1° to 9.7° (P<.05). Three athletes (23%) did not return to their preoperative level of play; the other 10 (77%) returned to their same level of play or a higher level. Selective arthroscopic posterior-inferior capsular release may be a reasonable solution for overhead athletes with symptomatic GIRD unresponsive to conservative management.

  20. Acute inferior myocardial infarction with right ventricular infarction is more prone to develop cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Bari, M A; Roy, A K; Islam, M Z; Aditya, G; Bhuiyan, A S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock is rare in isolated acute inferior myocardial infarction but there is relationship of cardiogenic shock with inferior myocardial infarction if associated with right ventricular infarction. A prospective study was carried out to see the association of cardiogenic shock with inferior myocardial infarction if associated with right ventricular infarction. This study was conducted from January 2011 to November 2011. A total of 100 cases were selected as study population which was taken from the Department of Cardiology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh, Bangladesh. Among them 50 were in Group A and 50 were in Group B. Group A was the patients of acute myocardial infarction with right ventricular infarction. Group B was the patients of acute myocardial infarction without right ventricular infarction. It revealed that 9(18%) in Group A and 3(6%) in Group B developed cardiogenic shock which is statistically significant (p<0.05). The study concluded that AMI (Inf) with RVI is significantly associated with cardiogenic shock.

  1. The Involvement of Occipital and Inferior Frontal Cortex in the Phonological Learning of Chinese Characters

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yuan; Chou, Tai-li; Ding, Guo-sheng; Peng, Dan-ling; Booth, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Neural changes related to the learning of the pronunciation of Chinese characters in English speakers were examined using fMRI. We examined the item-specific learning effects for trained characters and the generalization of phonetic knowledge to novel transfer characters that shared a phonetic radical (part of a character that gives a clue to the whole character’s pronunciation) with trained characters. Behavioral results showed that shared phonetic information improved performance for transfer characters. Neuroimaging results for trained characters over learning found increased activation in the right lingual gyrus, and greater activation enhancement in the left inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann’s area 44) was correlated with higher accuracy improvement. Moreover, greater activation for transfer characters in these two regions at the late stage of training was correlated with better knowledge of the phonetic radical in a delayed recall test. The current study suggests that the right lingual gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus are crucial for the learning of Chinese characters and the generalization of that knowledge to novel characters. Left inferior frontal gyrus is likely involved in phonological segmentation, whereas right lingual gyrus may subserve processing visual–orthographic information. PMID:20807053

  2. Inferior Prefrontal Cortex Mediates the Relationship between Phosphatidylcholine and Executive Functions in Healthy, Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zamroziewicz, Marta K.; Zwilling, Chris E.; Barbey, Aron K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the neural mechanisms that mediate the relationship between phosphatidylcholine and executive functions in cognitively intact older adults. We hypothesized that higher plasma levels of phosphatidylcholine are associated with better performance on a particular component of the executive functions, namely cognitive flexibility, and that this relationship is mediated by gray matter structure of regions within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) that have been implicated in cognitive flexibility. Methods: We examined 72 cognitively intact adults between the ages of 65 and 75 in an observational, cross-sectional study to investigate the relationship between blood biomarkers of phosphatidylcholine, tests of cognitive flexibility (measured by the Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System Trail Making Test), and gray matter structure of regions within the PFC. A three-step mediation analysis was implemented using multivariate linear regressions and we controlled for age, sex, education, income, depression status, and body mass index. Results: The mediation analysis revealed that gray matter thickness of one region within the PFC, the left inferior PFC (Brodmann’s Area 45), mediates the relationship between phosphatidylcholine blood biomarkers and cognitive flexibility. Conclusion: These results suggest that particular nutrients may slow or prevent age-related cognitive decline by influencing specific structures within the brain. This report demonstrates a novel structural mediation between plasma phosphatidylcholine levels and cognitive flexibility. Future work should examine the potential mechanisms underlying this mediation, including phosphatidylcholine-dependent cell membrane integrity of the inferior PFC and phosphatidylcholine-dependent cholinergic projections to the inferior PFC. PMID:27733825

  3. The Effect of 2 Injection Speeds on Local Anesthetic Discomfort During Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Melo, Marcelo Rodrigo; Sabey, Mark Jon Santana; Lima, Carla Juliane; de Almeida Souza, Liane Maciel; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This randomized double-blind crossover trial investigated the discomfort associated with 2 injection speeds, low (60 seconds) and slow (100 seconds), during inferior alveolar nerve block by using 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine. Three phases were considered: (a) mucosa perforation, (b) needle insertion, and (c) solution injection. Thirty-two healthy adult volunteers needing bilateral inferior alveolar nerve blocks at least 1 week apart were enrolled in the present study. The anesthetic procedure discomfort was recorded by volunteers on a 10-cm visual analog scale in each phase for both injection speeds. Comparison between the 2 anesthesia speeds in each phase was performed by paired t test. Results showed no statistically significant difference between injection speeds regarding perforation (P = .1016), needle placement (P = .0584), or speed injection (P = .1806). The discomfort in all phases was considered low. We concluded that the 2 injection speeds tested did not affect the volunteers' pain perception during inferior alveolar nerve blocks. PMID:26398126

  4. [Agenesis of the infrarenal inferior vena cava with thrombosis of the renal vein in a fetus: a case report].

    PubMed

    Raposo Rodríguez, L; Recio Rodríguez, M; Alvarez Moreno, E; López Azorín, M

    2012-01-01

    Agenesis of the inferior vena cava, especially of the infrarenal segment, is exceptional. This condition is thought to result from thrombosis during gestation rather than from a true congenital malformation. Agenesis of the inferior vena cava can be associated with renal vein thrombosis, which in turn is related to suprarenal hemorrhage in the fetus. We present a case of agenesis of the inferior vena cava with preservation of the hepatic segment, thrombosis of the left renal vein, and secondary bilateral suprarenal hemorrhage diagnosed prenatally using sonography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. The inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery.

    PubMed

    Won, Hyung-Sun; Won, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Chang-Seok; Han, Seung-Ho; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Hoan

    2012-12-01

    We report a rare case of a left inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery in an 84-year-old female cadaver. A common trunk for the inferior epigastric and obturator arteries firstly originated from the left internal iliac artery, at 3.0 mm below the bifurcation of the left common iliac artery. This trunk ran straight between the left external iliac artery and left external iliac vein, and was finally divided into the left inferior epigastric and left obturator arteries just superior to the inguinal ligament. PMID:23301197

  6. Avulsion of the Inferior Canaliculus in a Collegiate Wrestler: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kenneth L.; Kersey, Robert D.; Ransone, Jack

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this case study is to aid sports health care personnel in understanding the accurate identification and treatment of traumatic sports injuries involving structures of the lacrimal system. Background: A 21-year-old, 118-pound wrestler sustained an avulsion of the inferior canaliculus of the right eye during a match. The injury resulted when the athlete was struck on the right cheek by the opponent's head, producing an inferior and lateral force. Following the initial control of hemorrhage, the athlete was permitted to complete the match. Upon initial evaluation, it was determined that the medial aspect of the lower right lid had been avulsed. The injury was approximately 1 cm in length. The athlete completed the match before being referred to the hospital for further evaluation. Differential Diagnosis: Avulsion of the medial one-sixth of the lower right eyelid, involving damage to the inferior canaliculus lus and complete avulsion of the inferior medial canthal tendon. Treatment: Surgical intervention was indicated in order to restore the lacrimal drainage system and to ensure patency of the inferior canaliculus. A bicanalicular silicon intubation procedure edure was utilized by the physician. Initial postoperative treatment included the application of topical antibiotics for seven days. The athlete was permitted to return to full participation within 1 week with the use of a wrestling face mask. The superficial sutures were removed 14 days following surgery and at that time the athlete was cleared for unrestricted activity. The silicon-reinforced medial canthal tendon suture was removed 6 weeks following surgical repair. The bicanalicular silicon stent was removed 6 months following initial injury and surgical intervention. No complications were noted throughout the 6-month postoperative stage or at the time of a follow-up interview 2 years postinjury. Uniqueness: This is a relatively uncommon injury to encounter in athletics and one that

  7. Use of noncontrast computed tomography of the inferior vena cava for real-time imaging guidance for the placement of inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Michael A; Majmudar, Palak M; Landwehr, Kevin P; Hobbs, Stephen B; Saha, Sibu P

    2015-03-01

    Appropriate placement of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter necessitates imaging of the renal veins because when an IVC filter is deployed its tip should be at or below the inferior aspect of the inferiormost renal vein. Traditionally, imaging during placement of IVC filters has been with conventional cavography and fluoroscopy. Recently, intravascular ultrasound has been used for the same purpose but with additional expense. Morbidly obese patients often exceed the weight limit of fluoroscopy tables. In addition, short obese patients are at risk of falling from narrow fluoroscopy tables. For such patients, computed tomography (CT) guidance is a viable alternative to conventional fluoroscopic guidance. IVC placement was performed in the CT suite for two obese patients who exceeded the weight limits of the available fluoroscopy tables. In one case, a Vena-Tech filter (Braun Medical, Melsungen, Germany) was placed using CT fluoroscopy. In the second case, a Recovery (Bard, Murray Hill, NJ) filter was placed using intermittent limited z-axis scanning. In the first case, the filter was placed below the level of the renal veins and above the confluence of the iliac veins, which is acceptable placement. In the second case, with refinement of technique, the filter tip was placed less than 1 cm below the inferiormost renal vein, which is considered optimal placement. CT of the IVC precisely images the renal veins and can characterize their number and their confluence with the IVC. CT guidance is a viable alternative to fluoroscopic guidance for the placement of IVC filters in morbidly obese patients. PMID:25780332

  8. F6H8 as an Intraoperative Tool and F6H8/Silicone Oil as a Postoperative Tamponade in Inferior Retinal Detachment with Inferior PVR

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Gian Marco; Bacci, Tommaso; Romeo, Napoleone; Balestrazzi, Angelo; Martone, Gianluca; Caporossi, Tomaso

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8) for intraoperative flattening of the retina and of F6H8/silicone oil (SO) 1000 cSt as a postoperative tamponade for inferior retinal detachment with inferior proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Methods. This is a retrospective review of 22 patients who underwent pars plana vitrectomy using F6H8 as an intraoperative tool to flatten the retina. At the end of the surgery a direct partial exchange between F6H8 and SO 1000 cSt was performed, tamponing the eye with different ratios of F6H8/SO (70/30, 60/40, 50/50, 40/30, and 30/70). Anatomical and functional results and complications were evaluated over the follow-up period (mean 22.63 months). Results. F6H8 was efficacious for intraoperative flattening of the retina. Twenty-one of the 22 patients achieved a complete retinal reattachment. Postoperative visual acuity (VA) ranged from light perception to 20/70, with 72% of patients obtaining VA better than 20/400. No emulsification/inflammation was observed whatever the ratio of F6H8/SO used. With higher ratios of F6H8/SO (70/30 and 60/40) cloudiness of the tamponade was observed. A transparent mixture was present with all the other ratios. Conclusions. The surgical technique adopted is very simple and safe. The optimal F6H8/SO ratio seems to be between 50/50 and 30/70. PMID:24672710

  9. Successful Percutaneous Retrieval of an Inferior Vena Cava Filter Migrating to the Right Ventricle in a Bariatric Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Veerapong, Jula; Wahlgren, Carl Magnus; Jolly, Neeraj; Bassiouny, Hisham

    2008-07-15

    The use of an inferior vena cava filter has an important role in the management of patients who are at high risk for development of pulmonary embolism. Migration is a rare but known complication of inferior vena cava filter placement. We herein describe a case of a prophylactic retrievable vena cava filter migrating to the right ventricle in a bariatric patient. The filter was retrieved percutaneously by transjugular approach and the patient did well postoperatively. A review of the current literature is given.

  10. Flow-Diverter Stent for the Treatment of a Non-Origin Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Alokaili, Riyadh Nasser; Ahmed, Muhammad Ejaz

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the case of a 44-year old man with a ruptured wide-necked non-origin aneurysm of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery successfully treated with placement of a low porosity stent. To our knowledge, there are no cases in the literature of a non-origin posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm treated with a flow-diverter stent. PMID:25196620

  11. Primary stability of inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Chae, Soo-Won; Lee, Haea; Kim, Soo Min; Lee, Juneyoung; Han, Seung-Ho; Kim, Soung-Yon

    2016-06-01

    Glenoid component fixation with inferior tilt has been suggested as one of the surgical methods to decrease scapular notching and improve stability, but its clinically beneficial effect remains a concern. We evaluated the influence of inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component on primary stability in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty by finite element analysis. Finite element models were constructed from cadaveric scapulae of females over the age of 60 years and glenoid components from reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The relative micromotion at the bone-glenoid component interface, distribution of bone stress under the glenoid component and around the screws, contact area between the bone and screws, and cut surface area of the cancellous bone exposed after glenoid reaming were analyzed and compared between a neutral and 10° inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component. The 10° inferior tilt fixation demonstrated greater relative micromotion and higher bone stress than the neutral tilt fixation. Eccentric reaming, which is done to produce the inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component, increased glenoid cancellous bone exposure and decreased bone-screws contact area. Inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component may adversely affect primary stability and longevity after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1061-1068, 2016.

  12. Responses from two firing patterns in inferior colliculus neurons to stimulation of the lateral lemniscus dorsal nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-ting; Wang, Ning-yu; Wang, Yan-jun; Xu, Zhi-qing; Liu, Jin-feng; Bai, Yun-fei; Dai, Jin-sheng; Zhao, Jing-yi

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid neurons (GABAergic neurons) in the inferior colliculus are classified into various patterns based on their intrinsic electrical properties to a constant current injection. Although this classification is associated with physiological function, the exact role for neurons with various firing patterns in acoustic processing remains poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed characteristics of inferior colliculus neurons in vitro, and recorded responses to stimulation of the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Seven inferior colliculus neurons were tested and were classified into two firing patterns: sustained-regular (n = 4) and sustained-adapting firing patterns (n = 3). The majority of inferior colliculus neurons exhibited slight changes in response to stimulation and bicuculline. The responses of one neuron with a sustained-adapting firing pattern were suppressed after stimulation, but recovered to normal levels following application of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor antagonist. One neuron with a sustained-regular pattern showed suppressed stimulation responses, which were not affected by bicuculline. Results suggest that GABAergic neurons in the inferior colliculus exhibit sustained-regular or sustained-adapting firing patterns. Additionally, GABAergic projections from the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus to the inferior colliculus are associated with sound localization. The different neuronal responses of various firing patterns suggest a role in sound localization. A better understanding of these mechanisms and functions will provide better clinical treatment paradigms for hearing deficiencies. PMID:27335563

  13. Dynamic characteristics of optokinetically controlled eye movements following inferior olive lesions in the brown rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hess, B J; Savio, T; Strata, P

    1988-01-01

    1. The inferior olive was destroyed by the drug 3-acetylpyridine in brown rats. Spontaneous and optokinetic eye movements in response to constant-velocity rotation (5-80 deg/s) or sinusoidal oscillations (0.05 and 0.1 Hz with 15 deg/s peak velocity and 0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 2 Hz with 5 deg/s peak velocity) of the visual surround were recorded 4-6 days, 40-50 days and 3-4 months after the lesion using the magnetic search coil technique. 2. Persistent oculomotor deficits were observed in rats with a lesion of more than 97% of inferior olive neurones. In cases with a less complete lesion, no or only transient deficits were observed. In these latter cases the bulk of surviving neurones was located in the caudal half of the inferior olive, which includes the dorsal cap of Kooy. 3. Eye position holding after saccadic gaze shifts in the light was strongly deficient, showing pronounced postsaccadic centripetal drift for several hundred milliseconds. Similar deficits were observed in slow-phase components following quick phases of optokinetic nystagmus. In the dark, eye position holding was also deficient. 4. Closed-loop gains of optokinetic step responses obtained from rats with inferior olive lesions could be as good as those obtained from control animals. There was, however, a trend towards smaller gain values over the range of stimulus velocities tested. The duration of optokinetic after-nystagmus was not changed. 5. The initial fast rise of slow-phase velocity of optokinetic step responses was reduced by about 30-50%, showing no recovery in the follow-up experiments up to 3-4 months after the lesion. 6. Optokinetic responses to sinusoidal oscillations of the visual surround exhibited an increasing drop in gain for frequencies between 0.1 to 0.5 Hz. In the range of 0.5-2.0 Hz gain was only about 0.2 compared to 0.7-0.8 in control animals. Phase lag of sinusoidal responses was shifted to larger values by about 25-35 deg for frequencies increasing from 0.1 to 0.5 Hz. At 1

  14. Mild Perceptual Categorization Deficits Follow Bilateral Removal of Anterior Inferior Temporal Cortex in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Narihisa; Eldridge, Mark A.G.; Saunders, Richard C.; Reoli, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    In primates, visual recognition of complex objects depends on the inferior temporal lobe. By extension, categorizing visual stimuli based on similarity ought to depend on the integrity of the same area. We tested three monkeys before and after bilateral anterior inferior temporal cortex (area TE) removal. Although mildly impaired after the removals, they retained the ability to assign stimuli to previously learned categories, e.g., cats versus dogs, and human versus monkey faces, even with trial-unique exemplars. After the TE removals, they learned in one session to classify members from a new pair of categories, cars versus trucks, as quickly as they had learned the cats versus dogs before the removals. As with the dogs and cats, they generalized across trial-unique exemplars of cars and trucks. However, as seen in earlier studies, these monkeys with TE removals had difficulty learning to discriminate between two simple black and white stimuli. These results raise the possibility that TE is needed for memory of simple conjunctions of basic features, but that it plays only a small role in generalizing overall configural similarity across a large set of stimuli, such as would be needed for perceptual categorical assignment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The process of seeing and recognizing objects is attributed to a set of sequentially connected brain regions stretching forward from the primary visual cortex through the temporal lobe to the anterior inferior temporal cortex, a region designated area TE. Area TE is considered the final stage for recognizing complex visual objects, e.g., faces. It has been assumed, but not tested directly, that this area would be critical for visual generalization, i.e., the ability to place objects such as cats and dogs into their correct categories. Here, we demonstrate that monkeys rapidly and seemingly effortlessly categorize large sets of complex images (cats vs dogs, cars vs trucks), surprisingly, even after removal of area TE

  15. The isolated inferior glenohumeral labrum injury, anterior to posterior (the ILAP): A case series

    PubMed Central

    Irion, Val; Cheah, Michael; Jones, Grant L.; Bishop, Julie Y.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We describe the presentation, exam findings, surgical repair techniques, and short-term outcomes in a series of patients with isolated inferior labral tears. Materials and Methods : A retrospective chart review was performed at a large academic medical center. Isolated inferior labral tears were defined as between the 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock position of the glenoid as determined by direct arthroscopic visualization. Tears that were smaller were also included but were required to cross the 6 o'clock point, having anterior and posterior components. Patients were excluded if they had any other pathology or treatment of the shoulder. 1-year follow-up was required. Results: Of the 17 patients who met inclusion criteria for review, 12 were available for a minimum 1-year follow-up. Average total follow-up for patients to complete the phone interview/Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS) was an average of 37.7 months (range: 16-79 months). Postoperatively, all reported symptom improvement or resolution since surgery. The mean preoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 6.3 (range: 0-10). Mean postoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 2.25 (range: 0-5). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had returned to the level of activity desired. The mean OSIS was 41.4 (median: 43; range: 27-47). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had good or excellent scores. Ten of 12 patients (83.3%) had a feeling of stability in the shoulder. All 12 patients reached were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again in a similar situation. Conclusions: We have presented our series of patients with isolated inferior labral injury, and have shown that when surgically treated, outcomes of this uncommon injury are good to excellent and a full return to sports can be expected. PMID:25709240

  16. Adaptive adjustment of connectivity in the inferior colliculus revealed by focal pharmacological inactivation.

    PubMed

    Gold, J I; Knudsen, E I

    2001-04-01

    In the midbrain sound localization pathway of the barn owl, a map of auditory space is synthesized in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) and transmitted to the optic tectum. Early auditory experience shapes these maps of auditory space in part by modifying the tuning of the constituent neurons for interaural time difference (ITD), a primary cue for sound-source azimuth. Here we show that these adaptive modifications in ITD tuning correspond to changes in the pattern of connectivity within the inferior colliculus. We raised owls with an acoustic filtering device in one ear that caused frequency-dependent changes in sound timing and level. As reported previously, device rearing shifted the representation of ITD in the ICX and tectum but not in the primary source of input to the ICX, the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). We applied the local anesthetic lidocaine (QX-314) iontophoretically in the ICC to inactivate small populations of neurons that represented particular values of frequency and ITD. We measured the effect of this inactivation in the optic tecta of a normal owl and owls raised with the device. In the normal owl, inactivation at a critical site in the ICC eliminated responses in the tectum to the frequency-specific ITD value represented at the site of inactivation in the ICC. The location of this site was consistent with the known pattern of ICC-ICX-tectum connectivity. In the device-reared owls, adaptive changes in the representation of ITD in the tectum corresponded to dramatic and predictable changes in the locations of the critical sites of inactivation in the ICC. Given that the abnormal representation of ITD in the tectum depended on frequency and was likely conveyed directly from the ICX, these results suggest that experience causes large-scale, frequency-specific adjustments in the pattern of connectivity between the ICC and the ICX. PMID:11287481

  17. Ejection Fraction and Mortality Rate of Patients with Isolated Acute Inferior Myocardial Infarction Reperfused by Streptokinase

    PubMed Central

    Beiraghdar, Mozhdeh; Reza Torknezhad, Mohammad; Torkan, Ali

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate the effects of streptokinase on left ventricular ejection fraction and mortality rate of patients with inferior acute myocardial infarction (AMI) without right ventricular myocardial infarction (RVMI). METHODS Fifty five consecutive patients with the diagnosis of inferior AMI without RVMI in the coronary care unit (CCU) of Shariati Hospital in Isfahan were selected for this study. Patients who had a history and/or electrocardiogram (ECG) evidence of previous myocardial infarction, evidence of bundle branch block, historical or clinical findings of valvular or other non-coronary heart diseases or heart failure were excluded. Participants were divided into two groups. Group one (n=28) had no contraindication for taking thrombolytic therapy and group two (n=27) had at least one contraindication for this treatment. Patients in group one took 1,000,000 units streptokinase for one hour. Three days later, LVEF of all participants was measured by an experienced cardiologist using 2-dimentiona1 echocardiography. Patients were followed up until four weeks to assess the mortality rate. RESULTS One death in the first 24 hours was reported in group one. However, no death was reported in any group until four weeks after discharge. There was no significant difference in mortality rate during the first 24 hours and four weeks after discharge between the two groups. Mean LVEF in the two groups did not show any significant difference (P=0.21). CONCLUSION Probably streptokinase has no effects on one-month mortality rate and LVEF in patients with inferior AMI without RVMI. Therefore, streptokinase side effects must be taken into consideration when being administered for this group of patients. PMID:22577446

  18. Outpatient versus inpatient uterine polyp treatment for abnormal uterine bleeding: randomised controlled non-inferiority study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Natalie A M; Middleton, Lee; Diwakar, Lavanya; Smith, Paul; Denny, Elaine; Roberts, Tracy; Stobert, Lynda; Jowett, Susan; Daniels, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness and acceptability of outpatient polypectomy with inpatient polypectomy. Design Pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled non-inferiority study. Setting Outpatient hysteroscopy clinics in 31 UK National Health Service hospitals. Participants 507 women who attended as outpatients for diagnostic hysteroscopy because of abnormal uterine bleeding and were found to have uterine polyps. Interventions Participants were randomly assigned to either outpatient uterine polypectomy under local anaesthetic or inpatient uterine polypectomy under general anaesthesia. Data were collected on women’s self reported bleeding symptoms at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Data were also collected on pain and acceptability of the procedure at the time of polypectomy. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was successful treatment, determined by the women’s assessment of bleeding at six months, with a prespecified non-inferiority margin of 25%. Secondary outcomes included generic (EQ-5D) and disease specific (menorrhagia multi-attribute scale) quality of life, and feasibility and acceptability of the procedure. Results 73% (166/228) of women in the outpatient group and 80% (168/211) in the inpatient group reported successful treatment at six months (intention to treat relative risk 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1.02; per protocol relative risk 0.92, 0.82 to 1.02). Failure to remove polyps was higher (19% v 7%; relative risk 2.5, 1.5 to 4.1) and acceptability of the procedure was lower (83% v 92%; 0.90, 0.84 to 0.97) in the outpatient group Quality of life did not differ significantly between the groups. Four uterine perforations, one of which necessitated bowel resection, all occurred in the inpatient group. Conclusions Outpatient polypectomy was non-inferior to inpatient polypectomy. Failure to remove a uterine polyp was, however, more likely with outpatient polypectomy and acceptability of the procedure was slightly lower. Trial

  19. Interhemispheric insular and inferior frontal connectivity are associated with substance abuse in a psychiatric population.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Humsini; Velasquez, Kenia M; Savjani, Ricky; Molfese, David L; Curtis, Kaylah; Molfese, Peter J; Eagleman, David M; Baldwin, Philip R; Frueh, B Christopher; Fowler, J Christopher; Salas, Ramiro

    2015-05-01

    Substance abuse is highly comorbid with major psychiatric disorders. While the neural underpinnings of drug abuse have been studied extensively, most existing studies compare drug users without comorbidities and healthy, non-user controls. Such studies do not generalize well to typical patients with substance abuse disorders. Therefore, we studied a population of psychiatric inpatients (n = 151) with a range of mental illnesses. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed via structured interviews. Sixty-five percent of patients met criteria for at least one substance use disorder. Patients were recruited for resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) experiments to examine the interhemispheric connectivity between brain regions hypothesized to be involved in drug addiction, namely: the inferior, medial, and superior frontal gyri; insula; striatum; and anterior cingulate cortex. The World Health Organization Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (WHOA) questionnaire was used to further assess drug use. An association between use of tobacco, alcohol, cocaine, sedatives, and hallucinogens with increased insular interhemispheric connectivity was observed. In addition, increased inferior frontal gyrus interhemispheric connectivity was associated with amphetamine and inhalant use. Our results suggest that increased inter-hemispheric insula connectivity is associated with the use of several drugs of abuse. Importantly, psychiatric inpatients without a history of drug dependence were used as an ecologically valid control group rather than the more typical comparison between "mentally ill vs. healthy control" populations. We suggest that dysfunction of interhemispheric connectivity of the insula and to a lesser extent of the inferior frontal gyrus, are related to drug abuse in psychiatric populations.

  20. Computational Modeling of Blood Flow in the TrapEase Inferior Vena Cava Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M A; Henshaw, W D; Wang, S L

    2008-02-04

    To evaluate the flow hemodynamics of the TrapEase vena cava filter using three dimensional computational fluid dynamics, including simulated thrombi of multiple shapes, sizes, and trapping positions. The study was performed to identify potential areas of recirculation and stagnation and areas in which trapped thrombi may influence intrafilter thrombosis. Computer models of the TrapEase filter, thrombi (volumes ranging from 0.25mL to 2mL, 3 different shapes), and a 23mm diameter cava were constructed. The hemodynamics of steady-state flow at Reynolds number 600 was examined for the unoccluded and partially occluded filter. Axial velocity contours and wall shear stresses were computed. Flow in the unoccluded TrapEase filter experienced minimal disruption, except near the superior and inferior tips where low velocity flow was observed. For spherical thrombi in the superior trapping position, stagnant and recirculating flow was observed downstream of the thrombus; the volume of stagnant flow and the peak wall shear stress increased monotonically with thrombus volume. For inferiorly trapped spherical thrombi, marked disruption to the flow was observed along the cava wall ipsilateral to the thrombus and in the interior of the filter. Spherically shaped thrombus produced a lower peak wall shear stress than conically shaped thrombus and a larger peak stress than ellipsoidal thrombus. We have designed and constructed a computer model of the flow hemodynamics of the TrapEase IVC filter with varying shapes, sizes, and positions of thrombi. The computer model offers several advantages over in vitro techniques including: improved resolution, ease of evaluating different thrombus sizes and shapes, and easy adaptation for new filter designs and flow parameters. Results from the model also support a previously reported finding from photochromic experiments that suggest the inferior trapping position of the TrapEase IVC filter leads to an intra-filter region of recirculating

  1. Technique for selecting capsular tightness in repair of anterior-inferior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Warner, J J; Johnson, D; Miller, M; Caborn, D N

    1995-01-01

    Part I of our study consisted of sending a survey questionnaire to all members of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons in which specific questions were asked about their technique of surgical repair in patients with anterior instability who had capsular laxity or injury in conjunction with marked inferior laxity. Part II is a description of the technique and preliminary results in 18 patients of a modified anterior-inferior capsular shift technique that tightens the inferior capsule with the shoulder positioned in abduction and external rotation and the superior capsule with the shoulder in adduction and external rotation. Of the members of the Society of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons who responded to the survey, 80% agreed that preservation of external rotation was important and that shoulder position at the time of capsular repair might influence the ultimate range of motion obtained. However, no more than 50% of the respondents agreed on any one position for the arm when repairing the capsule. The most common responses for each position were flexion 0 degrees (49%) (range, 0 degrees to 40 degrees), abduction 30 degrees (24%) (range, 0 degrees to 80 degrees), and external rotation 30 degrees (37%) (range, 0 degrees to 70 degrees). The average postoperative follow-up period for the 18 patients was 27 months (range, 24 to 39 months). Of the 18 patients, 11 (61%) maintained symmetric motion; the others had minimal loss of external rotation compared with that of the contralateral shoulder. Six of eight patients with repair on the dominant side were able to return to full premorbid recreational throwing or racquet sports, and seven with repair on the nondominant side returned to full participation in overhead sports such as basketball and swimming. We conclude that this method of "selective" capsular repair may be a useful guideline to gauge the degree of capsular tightening in patients who have capsular injury or laxity.

  2. Hypotension in the Right Lateral Position Secondary to Inferior Vena Cava Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Meredith J H; Swamy, Ganesh; Shinkaruk, Kelly; Duttchen, Kaylene

    2015-09-15

    Surgical positioning is accompanied by numerous anesthetic considerations, particularly its potential effects on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems. Clinical studies have shown that lateral positioning does not affect hemodynamics; however, with the addition of trunk flexion, there is a decrease in cardiac output, which may be secondary to caval compression. In this report, we describe a unique case of hypotension that arose in a patient positioned only in the right lateral decubitus position with flexion and that was exacerbated by an abnormally narrow inferior vena cava. PMID:26361387

  3. Creating a Fontan fenestration in a child with dextrocardia and interrupted inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Charlagorla, Pradeepkumar; Breinholt, John P

    2016-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis is a rare life-threatening complication of the Fontan operation. Transcatheter Fontan fenestration can ameliorate symptoms by decompressing elevated venous pressures. Transcatheter creation of a fenestration can be technically challenging in cases with complex venous anatomy. We report a case of a 5-year-old boy with heterotaxy, dextrocardia with unbalanced atrioventricular canal (AVC), atrial and visceral situs inversus, left-sided superior vena cava (SVC), and left-sided interrupted inferior vena cava (IVC) with azygos continuation. With few modifications to the equipment, a successful Fontan fenestration with stent implantation was performed via transjugular approach. At 2-year follow-up, his symptoms of plastic bronchitis improved significantly.

  4. Percutaneous dilatation of right inferior pulmonary vein stenosis following single-lung transplant

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed Mydin, Muhammad I.; Calvert, Patrick A.; Jenkins, David P.; Parmar, Jasvir

    2012-01-01

    We present a 62-year old male who underwent right single-lung transplantation. An autologous pericardial rim was constructed at implantation, as there was insufficient donor atrial cuff. The patient was discharged home but deteriorated over 12 months resulting in oxygen dependency. Computed tomography scan showed stenosis of the right inferior pulmonary vein. The patient underwent pulmonary vein angioplasty under general anaesthesia in September 2007, which was successful and resulted in significant improvement in clinical status. However, his symptoms recurred 2 months later and a second attempt at angioplasty failed. He died 6 weeks later. PMID:22611185

  5. Inferior vena cava stent grafting closure of a high-flow portacaval shunt.

    PubMed

    Alhaizaey, Abdullah; Ghanekar, Anand; Oreopoulos, George

    2016-01-01

    Portacaval (PC) shunts can be of congenital or acquired types. Acquired PC shunts are usually created in patients with end-stage liver disease to manage complications associated with portal hypertension or may be part of selected adult-adult living donor liver transplantation procedures to decrease the chance of the small-for-size syndrome. The main potential complication of these acquired high-flow PC shunts is early hepatic encephalopathy. We present a case of a high-flow acquired PC shunt after liver transplantation that was complicated by uncontrolled encephalopathy. This was treated by endovascular inferior vena cava stent grafting for shunt closure. PMID:26946901

  6. The Typical Presentation Spectrum of Deep Vein Thrombosis Associated with Inferior Vena Cava Malformations

    PubMed Central

    El Lakis, Mustapha A.; Chamieh, Jad

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malformations of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are rare and underreported. They can be a risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) as a result of inadequate venous drainage of the lower extremities through collateral circulation. The significant number of cases reported in the literature highlights their importance, warranting investigating their existence in younger individuals with idiopathic DVT of the lower extremities and pelvic veins. In this systematic review, we depict the typical presentation of IVC malformations, their management, and the management of their associated DVT. PMID:27478635

  7. Unprovoked deep venous thrombosis in a young adult associated with membranous obstruction of inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Epperla, Narendranath; Usoltseva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Unprovoked deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in young adults is an unusual phenomenon, but it is associated with significant morbidity. Developmental anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) should be considered as a possible aetiological factor, and appropriate investigations should be performed to determine the conclusive diagnosis and necessary treatment plan. We report a case of spontaneous thrombosis of the IVC and bilateral iliac venous system in a young man, associated with membranous obstruction of the IVC. He was diagnosed using several different investigational techniques, and successfully treated with mechanical thrombectomy, thrombolysis therapy and anticoagulation.

  8. Dyslexic children lack word selectivity gradients in occipito-temporal and inferior frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Olulade, O.A.; Flowers, D.L.; Napoliello, E.M.; Eden, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    fMRI studies using a region-of-interest approach have revealed that the ventral portion of the left occipito-temporal cortex, which is specialized for orthographic processing of visually presented words (and includes the so-called “visual word form area”, VWFA), is characterized by a posterior-to-anterior gradient of increasing selectivity for words in typically reading adults, adolescents, and children (e.g. Brem et al., 2006, 2009). Similarly, the left inferior frontal cortex (IFC) has been shown to exhibit a medial-to-lateral gradient of print selectivity in typically reading adults (Vinckier et al., 2007). Functional brain imaging studies of dyslexia have reported relative underactivity in left hemisphere occipito-temporal and inferior frontal regions using whole-brain analyses during word processing tasks. Hence, the question arises whether gradient sensitivities in these regions are altered in dyslexia. Indeed, a region-of-interest analysis revealed the gradient-specific functional specialization in the occipito-temporal cortex to be disrupted in dyslexic children (van der Mark et al., 2009). Building on these studies, we here (1) investigate if a word-selective gradient exists in the inferior frontal cortex in addition to the occipito-temporal cortex in normally reading children, (2) compare typically reading with dyslexic children, and (3) examine functional connections between these regions in both groups. We replicated the previously reported anterior-to-posterior gradient of increasing selectivity for words in the left occipito-temporal cortex in typically reading children, and its absence in the dyslexic children. Our novel finding is the detection of a pattern of increasing selectivity for words along the medial-to-lateral axis of the left inferior frontal cortex in typically reading children and evidence of functional connectivity between the most lateral aspect of this area and the anterior aspects of the occipito-temporal cortex. We report

  9. Severe low back pain as the initial symptom of venous thrombosis of the inferior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Mohsen Abdul Wahab; Butros, Victor Mikhaeel; Mahdi, Shihab Ahmed; Ahmad, Mohammad Javad

    2014-01-01

    A 45-year-old previously well male truck driver presented to the emergency department with severe low back pain; lumbosacral X-ray was normal and he was given analgaesics and discharged. The following day, he presented to the emergency department again, his pain had not responded to the analgaesics; this time he also presented with massive bilateral swelling of lower limbs and left testicle that started 3 h earlier. The pain was severe, dull and interfered with the patient's ability to walk. An urgent workup revealed extensive thrombosis of the inferior vena cava. PMID:25155491

  10. Osteochondroma Arising from Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine as a Cause of Snapping Hip

    PubMed Central

    Rhyu, Kee Hyung; Cho, Kye-Youl; Cho, Young Joo; Lee, Chung Seok; Han, Chung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Snapping hip syndrome is a relatively common problem that can be easily managed with conservative treatment. This syndrome can be divided into external, internal and intra-articular types. Internal snapping hip syndrome is the rarest amongst these and its etiology is not well understood. We report a unique case of osteochondroma arising from the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS), which caused the internal snapping hip syndrome with hip pain and restriction of activity. This rare case of snapping hip syndrome from the AIIS was treated surgically and the symptoms completely disappeared after excision of the tumor. PMID:26929811

  11. [Recession of the inferior rectus muscle in superficial anesthesia in the treatment of thyroid orbitopathy].

    PubMed

    Koniszewski, G; Zagórski, Z

    1989-06-01

    Recession of the inferior rectus in surface anaesthesia by 5% cocaine drops was performed in 8 patients with signs of hypotropia in the course of thyroid orbitopathia and with diplopia persisting after conservatory treatment and not corrected by prisms. This method enables us an accurate intraoperative settlement of the distance of recession and it may be recommended in cases metabolically normalized, with not too much advanced exophthalmos, with a stability of the motor disturbances for at least 6 months and without any signs of inflammation.

  12. Lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve with simultaneous implant placement: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Garg, A K; Morales, M J

    1998-01-01

    In the event of moderate to severe mandibular bone resorption posterior to the mental foramen, repositioning of the inferior alveolar nerve provides a greater amount of available bone for implant placement and reduces the risk of nerve injury. While neural paresthesia may initially occur, this altered sensation generally resolves spontaneously. Alveolar nerve repositioning may be possible in cases in which other procedures cannot be performed due to the extent of atrophy of the posterior mandibular alveolar crest. This article presents the surgical technique to achieve this objective. PMID:10093565

  13. Double Origin of the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Diagnosed by MR Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Naoko; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2015-01-01

    The posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) frequently arises from the fenestrated segment of the intracranial vertebral artery (VA), and this common variation can be misinterpreted as or confused with a PICA of double origin. Rarely, a PICA of true double origin occurs when two branches of the PICA arise separately from the intracranial VA and fuse to form an arterial ring. We discovered this rare variation incidentally while interpreting images of magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. This is the first report of MR angiographic findings of this rare variation. PMID:25923681

  14. Kounis syndrome: inferior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction following a bumblebee sting.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Gregoriana; Fontanella, Benedetta; Racheli, Marco; Bortolotti, Monica; Pasini, Gian Franco

    2013-08-01

    The Kounis syndrome was first described in 1991 as'the allergic angina syndrome'which could progress to acute myocardial infarction which was named'allergic myocardial infarction. There are several causes underlying this syndrome including drugs, various conditions and a variety of environmental exposure factors such as animal stings. Hymenoptera stings can induce Kounis syndrome because hymenoptera venom contains allergenic proteins and peptides. The following case report describes a patient who experienced an anaphylactic shock associated with coronary artery ischaemia (inferior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) after a bumblebee sting.

  15. Free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap used for management of post-pneumonectomy space empyema.

    PubMed

    Manley, Kate; Gelvez, Sandra; Meldon, Charlotte J; Levai, Irisz; Malata, Charles M; Coonar, Aman S

    2013-04-01

    Various solutions exist for management of post-pneumonectomy space empyema. We describe the use of a free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap to fill the space and close a pleural window. Previously, flaps involving abdominal muscle or omentum have been used for this purpose. Abdominal surgery to harvest such flaps can impair ventilatory mechanics. The DIEP flap--harvested from the abdomen, and composed primarily of skin and muscle avoids this problem, thus is a desirable technique in patients with impaired lung function. We believe this is the first report of the DIEP flap to close a postpneumonectomy empyema space.

  16. Residual Inferior Vena Cava Thrombus Detected by Transesophageal Echocardiography After Resection of a Malignant Adrenal Mass.

    PubMed

    Burbano, Nelson H; Vlah, Claudene; Argalious, Maged

    2015-10-15

    A 43-year-old woman with a history of the Cushing syndrome secondary to adrenocortical carcinoma presented to the operating room for right adrenalectomy, hepatectomy, nephrectomy, and inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombectomy. Initial intraoperative transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) confirmed the presence of an IVC tumor below the hepatic veins. Total vascular exclusion of the liver was necessary to perform the operation. A repeat TEE showed a residual thrombus within the IVC prompting an additional cavotomy to successfully remove the entire mass. The remainder of the procedure finalized uneventfully. The case highlights the importance of TEE monitoring for noncardiac surgery with thrombotic involvement of the IVC. PMID:26466307

  17. Unerupted Primary Molar Teeth Positioned Inferior to the Permanent Premolar: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Memarpour, M.; Rahimi, M.; Bagheri, A.; Mina, K.

    2012-01-01

    Primary tooth impaction is a rare finding during the development of primary dentition. Several factors contribute to the impaction of a deciduous tooth. This report describes the diagnosis and treatment of a 10-year-old boy who presented an impacted second primary mandibular molar. This tooth, located inferior to the second premolar together with an odontoma, was positioned superior to the premolar teeth. Treatment consisted of surgical removal of the impacted deciduous tooth and odontoma and placement of a passive lower lingual holding arch. Periodic examination was indicated for follow-up. Early intervention was recommended to manage orofacial disfigurement and to avoid consequent problems. PMID:22924106

  18. Intravenous leiomyomatosis with inferior vena cava or intracardiac extension and concurrent bilateral multiple pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guorui; Yu, Xin; Lang, Jinghe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intravenous leiomyomatosis is a special type of uterine leiomyoma and features formation and growth of benign leiomyoma tissue within vascular wall. Benign metastatic leiomyoma refers to benign leiomyoma metastasizing to extra-uterine sites, dominantly lung. Solitary or multiple small nodules in the lung can be seen in image scans. Methods: We report 2 cases of intravenous leiomyomatosis with inferior vena cava or intracardiac extension and concurrent multiple nodules in bilateral lungs. Results: Case 1 was a 40-year-old woman with a large mass in pelvic cavity, masses in heart chambers, and disseminates pulmonary nodules detected at preoperative image scans. Masses in pelvic cavity and heart were resected in a 2-stage surgery. Histology examination confirmed the diagnosis of intravenous leiomyomatosis. Pulmonary nodules stayed stable during follow-up. Case 2 was a 37-year-old woman with 3 times of uterine-related surgeries. A pelvic mass appeared again and filling defect was observed in left ovarian vein, right renal vein, right common iliac vein, and inferior vena cava. Tumors in pelvic cavity and within vessels were removed in a 1-stage surgery. Histology examination confirmed the diagnosis of intravenous leiomyomatosis. Pulmonary nodules remained stable during follow-up. Conclusion: The incidence of benign metastatic leiomyoma in patients with intravenous leiomyomatosis might be relatively high. Metastasis of intravenous leiomyomatosis lesions was a possible source of benign metastatic leiomyoma in these cases. PMID:27583911

  19. Effect of Removing Superior Spikelets on Grain Filling of Inferior Spikelets in Rice

    PubMed Central

    You, Cuicui; Zhu, Honglei; Xu, Beibei; Huang, Wenxiao; Wang, Shaohua; Ding, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhenghui; Li, Ganghua; Chen, Lin; Ding, Chengqiang; Tang, She

    2016-01-01

    Large-panicle rice cultivars often fail to reach their yield potential due to the poor grain filling of inferior spikelets (IS). Thus, it is important to determine the causes of poor IS grain filling. In this study, we attempted to identify whether inferior grain filling of large panicles is restricted by superior spikelets (SS) and their physiological mechanism. SS were removed from two homozygous japonica rice strains (W1844 and WJ165) during flowering in an attempt to force photosynthate transport to the IS. We measured the effects of SS removal on seed setting rate, grain weight, grain filling rate, sucrose content, as well as hormone levels, activities of key enzymes, and expression of genes involved in sucrose to starch metabolism in rice IS during grain filling. The results showed that SS removal improved IS grain filling by increasing the seed setting rate, grain weight, sucrose content, and hormone levels. SS removal also enhanced the activities of key enzymes and the expression levels of genes involved in sucrose to starch metabolism. These results suggest that sucrose and several hormones act as signal substances and play a vital role in grain filling by regulating enzyme activities and gene expression. Therefore, IS grain filling is restricted by SS, which limit assimilate supply and plant hormones, leading to poor grain filling of IS. PMID:27547210

  20. Serotonin modulates responses to species-specific vocalizations in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Pollak, George D

    2005-06-01

    Neuromodulators such as serotonin are capable of altering the neural processing of stimuli across many sensory modalities. In the inferior colliculus, a major midbrain auditory gateway, serotonin alters the way that individual neurons respond to simple tone bursts and linear frequency modulated sweeps. The effects of serotonin are complex, and vary among neurons. How serotonin transforms the responses to spectrotemporally complex sounds of the type normally heard in natural settings has been poorly examined. To explore this issue further, the effects of iontophoretically applied serotonin on the responses of individual inferior colliculus neurons to a variety of recorded species-specific vocalizations were examined. These experiments were performed in the Mexican free-tailed bat, a species that uses a rich repertoire of vocalizations for the purposes of communication as well as echolocation. Serotonin frequently changed the number of recorded calls that were capable of evoking a response from individual neurons, sometimes increasing (15% of serotonin-responsive neurons), but usually decreasing (62% of serotonin-responsive neurons), this number. A functional consequence of these serotonin-evoked changes would be to change the population response to species-specific vocalizations. PMID:15830241

  1. An Overrepresentation of High Frequencies in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus Supports the Processing of Ultrasonic Vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lazaro, Jose A.; Shepard, Kathryn N.; Miranda, Jason A.; Liu, Robert C.; Lesica, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Mice are of paramount importance in biomedical research and their vocalizations are a subject of interest for researchers across a wide range of health-related disciplines due to their increasingly important value as a phenotyping tool in models of neural, speech and language disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying the auditory processing of vocalizations in mice are not well understood. The mouse audiogram shows a peak in sensitivity at frequencies between 15-25 kHz, but weaker sensitivity for the higher ultrasonic frequencies at which they typically vocalize. To investigate the auditory processing of vocalizations in mice, we measured evoked potential, single-unit, and multi-unit responses to tones and vocalizations at three different stages along the auditory pathway: the auditory nerve and the cochlear nucleus in the periphery, and the inferior colliculus in the midbrain. Auditory brainstem response measurements suggested stronger responses in the midbrain relative to the periphery for frequencies higher than 32 kHz. This result was confirmed by single- and multi-unit recordings showing that high ultrasonic frequency tones and vocalizations elicited responses from only a small fraction of cells in the periphery, while a much larger fraction of cells responded in the inferior colliculus. These results suggest that the processing of communication calls in mice is supported by a specialization of the auditory system for high frequencies that emerges at central stations of the auditory pathway. PMID:26244986

  2. Configuration of the inferior alveolar canal as detected by cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Umadevi P; Yazdi, Mehran H; Nayar, Gautam M; Parry, Heath; Katkar, Rujuta A; Nair, Madhu K

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the course of the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) including its frequently seen variations in relation to root apices and the cortices of the mandible at fixed pre-determined anatomic reference points using cone beam volumetric computed tomography (CBVCT). Material and Methods: This retrospective study utilized CBVCT images from 44 patients to obtain quantifiable data to localize the IAC. Measurements to the IAC were made from the buccal and lingual cortical plates (BCP/LCP), inferior border of the mandible and the root apices of the mandibular posterior teeth and canine. Descriptive analysis was used to map out the course of the IAC. Results: IACs were noted to course superiorly toward the root apices from the second molar to the first premolar and closer to the buccal cortical plate anteriorly. The canal was closest to the LCP at the level of the second molar. In 32.95% of the cases, the canal was seen at the level of the canine. Conclusions: This study indicates that caution needs to be exercised during endodontic surgical procedures in the mandible even at the level of the canine. CBVCT seems to provide an optimal, low-dose, 3D imaging modality to help address the complexities in canal configuration. PMID:24347885

  3. Inferior Vena Cava Resection and Reconstruction for Tumoral Recurrence after Right Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Botianu, Pv-H; Chirtes, R; Marcu, C; Kosza, H; Stoian, M; Brusnic, O; Botianu, Amv; Dobre, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 60 years old patient who was admitted for a local recurrence after a right nephrectomy performed 2 years ago (papillary renal carcinoma with areas of sarcomatoid differentiation - pT3a). CT scan showed a retroperitoneal mass with invasion of the inferior vena cava. We performed a complete en-bloque excision of the tumor with the infrarenal portion of the inferior vena cava and lympha-denectomy. The vascular reconstruction was performed by the interposition of a 20 mm diameter Dacron prosthesis. The postoperative course was complicated due to an episode of digestive bleeding (duodenal ulcer) which stopped after conservative treatment (antisecretory and hemostatics, including rFVIIa), but eventually favourable. At 6 months follow-up the patient presents no sign of tumoral relapse and a functional vascular prosthesis. The case is interesting due to the rarity of the surgical procedure and the indication. The surgical approach of the retroperitoneal tumors with vascular involvement is possible in centers with adequate technical endownment and human expertise. PMID:27604673

  4. CT of inferior vena cava filters: normal presentations and potential complications.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Nicholas A; Katz, Douglas S; Ganson, George; Eng, Kaitlin; Hon, Man

    2015-12-01

    With massive pulmonary embolism (PE) being the first or second leading cause of unexpected death in adults, protection against PE is critical in appropriately selected patients. The use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters has increased over the years, paralleling the increased detection of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and PE by improved and more available imaging techniques. The use of IVC filters has become very common as an alternative and/or as a supplement to anticoagulation, and these filters are often seen on routine abdominal CT, including in the emergency setting; therefore, knowledge of the normal spectrum of findings of IVC filters by the radiologist on CT is critical. Additionally, CT can be used specifically to identify complications related to IVC filters, and CT may alternatively demonstrate IVC filter-related problems which are not specifically anticipated clinically. With multiple available IVC filters on the US market, and even more available outside of the USA, it is important for the emergency and the general radiologist to recognize the different models and various appearances and positioning on CT, as well as their potential complications. These complications may be related to venous access, but also include thrombosis related to the filter, filter migration and penetration, and problems associated with filter deployment. With the increasing number of inferior vena cava filters placed and their duration within patients increasing over time, it is critical for emergency and other radiologists to be aware of these findings on CT.

  5. ERP adaptation provides direct evidence for early mirror neuron activation in the inferior parietal lobule.

    PubMed

    Möhring, Nicole; Brandt, Emily S L; Mohr, Bettina; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Neuhaus, Andres H

    2014-10-01

    Mirror neuron systems are frequently investigated by assessing overlapping brain activity during observation and execution of actions; however, distinct neuronal subpopulations may be activated that fall below the spatial resolution of magnetic resonance techniques. This shortfall can be resolved using repetition suppression paradigms that identify physiological adaptation processes caused by repeated activation of identical neuronal circuits. Here, event-related potentials were used to investigate the time course of mirror neuron circuit activation using repetition suppression within and across action observation and action execution modalities. In a lip-reading and speech production paradigm, the N170 component indexed stimulus repetition by adapting to both cross-modal and intra-modal repetitions in the left hemisphere. Neuronal source localization revealed activation of the left inferior parietal lobule during cross-modal relative to intra-modal trials. These results provide support for the position that the same neuronal circuits are activated in perceiving and performing articulatory actions. Moreover, our data strongly suggest that inferior parietal lobule mirror neurons are activated relatively early in time, which indicates partly automatic processes of linguistic perception and mirroring. Repetition suppression paradigms therefore help to elucidate neuronal correlates of different cognitive processes and may serve as a starting point for advanced electrophysiological research on mirror neurons.

  6. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates nerve regeneration following inferior alveolar nerve transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mai; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Masamichi; Iwata, Koichi; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury, which is frequently caused by orofacial surgery or trauma, induces sensory loss in orofacial regions innervated by the IAN. However, no effective treatment for orofacial sensory loss currently exists. We determined whether sensory loss in facial skin above the mental foramen following IAN transection was recovered by exposure of the transected IAN to low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS). Inferior alveolar nerve transection (IANX) was performed in 7-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. On day 7 after IANX, the effect of daily LIPUS (from day 0) on the transected IAN, in terms of sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, was examined. Moreover, the number of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the facial skin above the mental foramen of rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS was counted using the retrograde neurotracing technique. Daily exposure of the transected IAN to LIPUS significantly promoted recovery of the head-withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, and the number of TG neurons innervating the facial skin above mental foramen was significantly increased in rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS compared with sham or LIPUS-unexposed rats. Daily treatment of stumps of the transected IAN with LIPUS facilitated morphological and functional regeneration, suggesting that LIPUS is an effective and novel therapy for IAN injury. PMID:27058986

  7. Coronectomy of the mandibular third molar: Respect for the inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    Kouwenberg, A J; Stroy, L P P; Rijt, E D Vree-V D; Mensink, G; Gooris, P J J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of coronectomy as an alternative surgical procedure to complete removal of the impacted mandibular third molar in patients with a suspected close relationship between the tooth root(s) and the mandibular canal. A total of 151 patients underwent coronectomy and were followed up with clinical examinations and panoramic radiographs for a minimum of 6 months after surgery. None of the patients exhibited inferior alveolar nerve injury. Eruption of the retained root(s) was more frequent in younger patients (18-35 years). Thirty-six patients (23.8%) exhibited insufficient growth of new bone in the alveolar defect, and 11.3% required a second surgical procedure to remove the root remnant(s). Our results indicate that coronectomy can be a reliable alternative to complete removal of the impacted mandibular third molar in patients exhibiting an increased risk of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve on panoramic radiographs. PMID:26976696

  8. ERP adaptation provides direct evidence for early mirror neuron activation in the inferior parietal lobule.

    PubMed

    Möhring, Nicole; Brandt, Emily S L; Mohr, Bettina; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Neuhaus, Andres H

    2014-10-01

    Mirror neuron systems are frequently investigated by assessing overlapping brain activity during observation and execution of actions; however, distinct neuronal subpopulations may be activated that fall below the spatial resolution of magnetic resonance techniques. This shortfall can be resolved using repetition suppression paradigms that identify physiological adaptation processes caused by repeated activation of identical neuronal circuits. Here, event-related potentials were used to investigate the time course of mirror neuron circuit activation using repetition suppression within and across action observation and action execution modalities. In a lip-reading and speech production paradigm, the N170 component indexed stimulus repetition by adapting to both cross-modal and intra-modal repetitions in the left hemisphere. Neuronal source localization revealed activation of the left inferior parietal lobule during cross-modal relative to intra-modal trials. These results provide support for the position that the same neuronal circuits are activated in perceiving and performing articulatory actions. Moreover, our data strongly suggest that inferior parietal lobule mirror neurons are activated relatively early in time, which indicates partly automatic processes of linguistic perception and mirroring. Repetition suppression paradigms therefore help to elucidate neuronal correlates of different cognitive processes and may serve as a starting point for advanced electrophysiological research on mirror neurons. PMID:25017963

  9. Development of a fluid resuscitation protocol using inferior vena cava and lung ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher W C; Kory, Pierre D; Arntfield, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    Appropriate fluid resuscitation has been a major focus of critical care medicine since its inception. Currently, the most accurate method to guide fluid administration decisions uses "dynamic" measures that estimate the change in cardiac output that would occur in response to a fluid bolus. Unfortunately, their use remains limited due to required technical expertise, costly equipment, or applicability in only a subset of patients. Alternatively, point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become widely used as a tool to help clinicians prescribe fluid therapy. Common POCUS applications that serve as guides to fluid administration rely on assessments of the inferior vena cava to estimate preload and lung ultrasound to identify the early presence of extravascular lung water and avoid fluid overresuscitation. Although application of these POCUS measures has multiple limitations that are commonly misunderstood, current evidence suggests that they can be used in combination to sort patients among 3 fluid management categories: (1) fluid resuscitate, (2) fluid test, and (3) fluid restrict. This article reviews the pertinent literature describing the use of inferior vena cava and lung ultrasound for fluid responsiveness and presents an evidence-informed algorithm using these measures to guide fluid resuscitation decisions in the critically ill. PMID:26475100

  10. A functional architecture of optic flow in the inferior parietal lobule of the behaving monkey.

    PubMed

    Raffi, Milena; Siegel, Ralph M

    2007-02-07

    The representation of navigational optic flow across the inferior parietal lobule was assessed using optical imaging of intrinsic signals in behaving monkeys. The exposed cortex, corresponding to the dorsal-most portion of areas 7a and dorsal prelunate (DP), was imaged in two hemispheres of two rhesus monkeys. The monkeys actively attended to changes in motion stimuli while fixating. Radial expansion and contraction, and rotation clockwise and counter-clockwise optic flow stimuli were presented concentric to the fixation point at two angles of gaze to assess the interrelationship between the eye position and optic flow signal. The cortical response depended upon the type of flow and was modulated by eye position. The optic flow selectivity was embedded in a patchy architecture within the gain field architecture. All four optic flow stimuli tested were represented in areas 7a and DP. The location of the patches varied across days. However the spatial periodicity of the patches remained constant across days at approximately 950 and 1100 microm for the two animals examined. These optical recordings agree with previous electrophysiological studies of area 7a, and provide new evidence for flow selectivity in DP and a fine scale description of its cortical topography. That the functional architectures for optic flow can change over time was unexpected. These and earlier results also from inferior parietal lobule support the inclusion of both static and dynamic functional architectures that define association cortical areas and ultimately support complex cognitive function.

  11. Selective functional connectivity abnormality of the transition zone of the inferior parietal lobule in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingyun; Zhuo, Chuanjun; Qin, Wen; Zhu, Jiajia; Xu, Lixue; Xu, Yongjie; Yu, Chunshui

    2016-01-01

    Structural and functional alterations in the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) in schizophrenia have been frequently reported; however, the IPL connectivity changes in schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Based on heterogeneity of the IPL in structure, connection and function, we hypothesize that the resting-state functional connectivities (rsFCs) of the IPL subregions are differentially affected in schizophrenia. This study included 95 schizophrenia patients and 104 healthy controls. The IPL subregions were defined according to a previous in vivo connection-based parcellation study. We calculated the rsFC of each IPL subregion and compared them between the two groups while controlling for the effects of age, gender, and grey matter volume. Among the six subregions of the left IPL and the five subregions of the right IPL, only the bilateral PFm (a transition zone of the IPL) subregions exhibited abnormal rsFC in schizophrenia. Specifically, the left PFm showed increased rsFC with the bilateral lingual gyri in schizophrenia patients than in healthy controls. The right PFm exhibited increased rsFC with the right lingual gyrus and inferior occipital gyrus, and bilateral mid-cingulate and sensorimotor cortices in schizophrenia patients. These findings suggest a selective rsFC abnormality in the IPL subregions in schizophrenia, characterized by the increased rsFC between the PFm subregion of the IPL and the visual and sensorimotor areas. PMID:27354957

  12. [Postero'inferior aneurysm of the left ventricle following myocardial infarction. Diagnosis and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Flores Covarrubias, S E; Acoltzin Vidal, C; Nava Lopez, G; Palacios Macedo, X

    1979-01-01

    This is a report of the first four cases of left ventricle aneurysm of the posterior and inferior segments successfully treated surgically in the Hospital de Cardiología y Neumología del Centro Médico Nacional, México D. F., and represent the twelve per cent of all realized aneurysmectomies. The patients were all men with 57 years mean age, and a previous history of posteroinferior myocardial infarction, complicated in three of them with angor and severe ventricle arrythmias; chest X ray in lateral view showed a bump of the posteroinferior border of the cardiac silhouette; the echocardiography increase in the ventricular diameter below the mitral valve; the ventriculography made evident a diastolic bulging with systolic expansion of posterior and inferior segments of the left ventricle and no mitral regurgitation; selective coronary arteriography showed a dominant right pattern with 100 per cent proximal occlusion. Aneurysmectomy was done in all four cases and aortocoronary by-pass in two. The posteromedial papilar muscle was found respected in all cases and in two cases a mural thrombus was detected.

  13. Microcirculatory Evaluation of the Abdominal Skin in Breast Reconstruction with Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator Flap

    PubMed Central

    Tønseth, Kim Alexander; Pripp, Are Hugo; Tindholdt, Tyge Tind

    2016-01-01

    Background: No studies have assessed the perfusion of the undermined abdominal skin in breast reconstruction with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. A greater understanding of the procedure’s impact on the perfusion of the abdominal skin can be valuable in predicting areas susceptible to necrosis. Methods: Microcirculatory changes were monitored in the abdominal skin of 20 consecutive patients undergoing breast reconstruction with a deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. Quantitative mapping was performed with laser Doppler perfusion imaging at 7 set intervals. Measurements were taken and recorded within 4 standardized zones covering the skin between the xiphoid process and the upper incisional boundary of the flap (zones 1–4; cranial to caudal). Results: Before commencing surgery, a significantly higher perfusion was registered in zones 3 and 4 when compared with zone 1. After undermining the abdominal skin, the perfusion in zones 1–3 increased significantly. After the abdominal closure, the perfusion dropped in all 4 zones and only the perfusion level in zone 1 remained significantly higher than preoperative mean. Postoperatively, the perfusion of each zone stabilized at a significantly higher level compared with preoperative values. No tissue necrosis was observed in any of the zones. Conclusions: Although perforators are divided during undermining of the abdominal skin, there seems to be a reactive hyperemia that exceeds the blood supply delivered by the perforators. Thus, due to microcirculatory mechanisms, the undermining of the abdomen during the procedure does not seem to present any great risk of tissue necrosis. PMID:27014545

  14. An Overrepresentation of High Frequencies in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus Supports the Processing of Ultrasonic Vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lazaro, Jose A; Shepard, Kathryn N; Miranda, Jason A; Liu, Robert C; Lesica, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Mice are of paramount importance in biomedical research and their vocalizations are a subject of interest for researchers across a wide range of health-related disciplines due to their increasingly important value as a phenotyping tool in models of neural, speech and language disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying the auditory processing of vocalizations in mice are not well understood. The mouse audiogram shows a peak in sensitivity at frequencies between 15-25 kHz, but weaker sensitivity for the higher ultrasonic frequencies at which they typically vocalize. To investigate the auditory processing of vocalizations in mice, we measured evoked potential, single-unit, and multi-unit responses to tones and vocalizations at three different stages along the auditory pathway: the auditory nerve and the cochlear nucleus in the periphery, and the inferior colliculus in the midbrain. Auditory brainstem response measurements suggested stronger responses in the midbrain relative to the periphery for frequencies higher than 32 kHz. This result was confirmed by single- and multi-unit recordings showing that high ultrasonic frequency tones and vocalizations elicited responses from only a small fraction of cells in the periphery, while a much larger fraction of cells responded in the inferior colliculus. These results suggest that the processing of communication calls in mice is supported by a specialization of the auditory system for high frequencies that emerges at central stations of the auditory pathway.

  15. [Methodology for superiority versus equivalence and non-inferior clinical studies. A practical review].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martin; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efrén; Magaña-Serrano, José Antonio; Valencia-Sánchez, Jesús Salvador; Garrido-Garduño, Martin; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Physicians should always remember that a negative result in a superiority trial never would prove that the therapies under research are equivalent; more often, there may be a risk of type 2 (false negative) error. Equivalence and not inferiority studies demand high standards to provide reliable results. Physicians should take into account above all that the equivalence margins tend to be too large to be clinically significant and that the claim of equivalence can be misleading if a study has not been conducted at a sufficiently high level. In addition, physicians must be a bit skeptical of judgments that do not include the basic requirements of information, including the definition and justification of the equivalence margin, the calculation of the size of the sample bearing in mind this margin, the presentation of both analysis (intention-to-treat and by protocol), and provide confidence intervals for the results. Equivalence and inferiority studies are not indicated in certain areas. If one follows the required strict adherence to the specific methodology, such studies can provide new and important knowledge.

  16. Effectiveness of Inferior Vena Cava Filters without Anticoagulation Therapy for Prophylaxis of Recurrent Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zektser, Miri; Bartal, Carmi; Zeller, Lior; Nevzorov, Roman; Jotkowitz, Alan; Stavi, Vered; Romanyuk, Vitaly; Chudakov, Gregory; Barski, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Objective The optimal treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is anticoagulation therapy. Inferior vena cava filter (IVC) placement is another option for the prevention of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with deep vein thrombosis. This is used mostly in patients with a contraindication to anticoagulant therapy. The purpose of the present study was to compare the two options. Methods A retrospective cohort study of two groups of patients with DVT: patients who received an IVC filter and did not receive anticoagulation due to contraindications; and patients with DVT and similar burden of comorbidity treated with anticoagulation without IVC insertion. To adjust for a potential misbalance in baseline characteristics between the two groups, we performed matching for age, gender, and Charlson’s index, which is used to compute the burden of comorbid conditions. The primary outcome was an occurrence of a PE. Results We studied 1,742 patients hospitalized with the diagnosis of DVT in our hospital;93 patients from this population received IVC filters. Charlson’s score index was significantly higher in the IVC filter group compared with the anticoagulation group. After matching of the groups of patients according to Charlson’s score index there were no significant differences in primary outcomes. Conclusion Inferior vena cava filter without anticoagulation may be an alternative option for prevention of PE in patients with contraindications to anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27487310

  17. A Functional Architecture of Optic Flow in the Inferior Parietal Lobule of the Behaving Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Raffi, Milena; Siegel, Ralph M.

    2007-01-01

    The representation of navigational optic flow across the inferior parietal lobule was assessed using optical imaging of intrinsic signals in behaving monkeys. The exposed cortex, corresponding to the dorsal-most portion of areas 7a and dorsal prelunate (DP), was imaged in two hemispheres of two rhesus monkeys. The monkeys actively attended to changes in motion stimuli while fixating. Radial expansion and contraction, and rotation clockwise and counter-clockwise optic flow stimuli were presented concentric to the fixation point at two angles of gaze to assess the interrelationship between the eye position and optic flow signal. The cortical response depended upon the type of flow and was modulated by eye position. The optic flow selectivity was embedded in a patchy architecture within the gain field architecture. All four optic flow stimuli tested were represented in areas 7a and DP. The location of the patches varied across days. However the spatial periodicity of the patches remained constant across days at ∼950 and 1100 µm for the two animals examined. These optical recordings agree with previous electrophysiological studies of area 7a, and provide new evidence for flow selectivity in DP and a fine scale description of its cortical topography. That the functional architectures for optic flow can change over time was unexpected. These and earlier results also from inferior parietal lobule support the inclusion of both static and dynamic functional architectures that define association cortical areas and ultimately support complex cognitive function. PMID:17285147

  18. A rare case of synovial chondromatosis of the inferior TMJ compartment. Diagnosis and treatment aspect

    PubMed Central

    Sozzi, Davide; Bocchialini, Gabriele; Novelli, Giorgio; Valente, Maria Gabriella; Moltrasio, Francesca; Bozzetti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a rare, benign non neoplastic arthopathy characterized by the metaplastic development of cartilaginous nodules within the synovial membrane. In only 3% of all cases does it affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and cases that arise from the lower compartment are rarely found in literature. The aim of this paper is to report a new case of SC of the inferior TMJ compartment with the description of the clinical, therapeutic and histopathological findings. Case report This article presents a 68-year-old woman with preauricular swelling on the right side, pain, crepitus and limited joint motion. This patient was evaluated by preoperative clinical manifestation, CT scan and MR images. Both showed multiple, calcified loose bodies in the inferior compartment. Based on these images as well as the patient’s signs and symptoms, a surgical intervention was performed. A good functional recovery with no signs of recurrence at 36 months of follow up was obtained. Conclusion Among cases of synovial chondromatosis in literature, only twelve originating in the lower compartment have been reported, this one included. In all the cases treated for SC in the lower compartment, both in literature and in our case report, surgical treatment led to healing. PMID:26941895

  19. CT of inferior vena cava filters: normal presentations and potential complications.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Nicholas A; Katz, Douglas S; Ganson, George; Eng, Kaitlin; Hon, Man

    2015-12-01

    With massive pulmonary embolism (PE) being the first or second leading cause of unexpected death in adults, protection against PE is critical in appropriately selected patients. The use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters has increased over the years, paralleling the increased detection of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and PE by improved and more available imaging techniques. The use of IVC filters has become very common as an alternative and/or as a supplement to anticoagulation, and these filters are often seen on routine abdominal CT, including in the emergency setting; therefore, knowledge of the normal spectrum of findings of IVC filters by the radiologist on CT is critical. Additionally, CT can be used specifically to identify complications related to IVC filters, and CT may alternatively demonstrate IVC filter-related problems which are not specifically anticipated clinically. With multiple available IVC filters on the US market, and even more available outside of the USA, it is important for the emergency and the general radiologist to recognize the different models and various appearances and positioning on CT, as well as their potential complications. These complications may be related to venous access, but also include thrombosis related to the filter, filter migration and penetration, and problems associated with filter deployment. With the increasing number of inferior vena cava filters placed and their duration within patients increasing over time, it is critical for emergency and other radiologists to be aware of these findings on CT. PMID:26183040

  20. A neural network model of the inferior colliculus with modifiable lateral inhibitory synapses for human echolocation.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Osamu; Kuroiwa, Kazuharu

    2002-03-01

    We propose a neural network model of the inferior colliculus (IC) for human echolocation. Neuronal mechanisms for human echolocation were investigated by simulating the model. The model consists of the neural networks of the central nucleus (ICc) and external nucleus (ICx) of the inferior colliculus. The neurons of the ICc receive interaural sound stimuli via multiple contralateral delay lines and a single ipsilateral delay line. The neurons of the ICc send output signals to the neurons of the ICx in a convergent manner. We stimulated the ICc with pairs of a direct sound (a sonar sound) and an echo sound (the reflection from an object). Information about the distance between the model and the object is expressed by the delay time of the echo sound with respect to the direct sound. The results presented here show that neurons of the ICc responsive to interaural onset time differences contribute to the creation of an auditory distance map in the ICx. We trained the model with various pairs of direct-echo sounds and modified synaptic connection strengths of the networks according to the Hebbian rule. It is shown that self-organized long-term depression of lateral inhibitory synaptic connections plays an important role in enhancing echolocation skills.

  1. Spectral integration in the inferior colliculus: role of glycinergic inhibition in response facilitation.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, J; Leroy, S A

    2001-02-01

    This study examined the contribution of glycinergic inhibition to the time-sensitive spectral integration performed by neurons in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat (Pteronotus parnellii). These neurons are sometimes called combination-sensitive because they display facilitatory (or inhibitory) responses to the combination of distinct spectral elements in sonar or social vocalizations. Present in a wide range of vertebrates, their temporally and spectrally selective integration is thought to endow them with the ability to discriminate among social vocalizations or to analyze particular cues concerning sonar targets. The mechanisms that underlie these responses or the sites in the auditory system where they are created are not known. We examined combination-sensitive neurons that are facilitated by the presentation of two different harmonic elements of the bat's sonar call and echo. Responses of 24 single units were recorded before and during local application of strychnine, an antagonist of glycinergic inhibition. For each of the 24 units, strychnine application eliminated or greatly reduced temporally sensitive facilitation. There was no difference in this effect for neurons tuned to frequencies associated with the frequency-modulated or the constant-frequency sonar components. These results are unusual because glycine is considered to be an inhibitory neurotransmitter, but here it appears to be essential for the expression of combination-sensitive facilitation. The findings provide strong evidence that facilitatory combination-sensitive response properties present throughout the mustached bat's auditory midbrain, thalamus, and cortex originate through neural interactions in the inferior colliculus.

  2. Motivationally significant self-control: enhanced action withholding involves the right inferior frontal junction.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, David A; Upton, Daniel J; Moore, Jennifer; Hester, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In everyday life, people use self-control to withhold actions. This ability is particularly important when the consequences of action withholding have an impact on the individual's well-being. Despite its importance, it is unclear as to how the neural nodes implicated in action withholding contribute to this real-world type of self-control. By modifying an action withholding paradigm, the go/no-go task, we examined how the brain exerts self-control during a scenario in which the implications of withholding an action are meaningful and motivationally significant. A successfully withheld response contributed to long-term monetary rewards, whereas failure to withhold a response incurred an immediate monetary punishment. Compared with neutral action withholding, participants significantly improved their performance when these contingencies were applied. Crucially, although the right IFG and pre-SMA were found to promote overall action withholding, the enhancement in behavioral performance relative to a neutral condition was only reflected by a physiological change in a region encompassing the right inferior frontal junction and precentral gyrus. We speculate that the ability to flexibly modulate attention to goal-relevant stimuli is crucial to enhanced, motivationally driven action withholding and that this ability is subserved by the right inferior frontal junction. These findings suggest that control-modulating factors, rather than action withholding processes per se, can be critical to improving motivationally significant action withholding outcomes. PMID:25115186

  3. Effect of Removing Superior Spikelets on Grain Filling of Inferior Spikelets in Rice.

    PubMed

    You, Cuicui; Zhu, Honglei; Xu, Beibei; Huang, Wenxiao; Wang, Shaohua; Ding, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhenghui; Li, Ganghua; Chen, Lin; Ding, Chengqiang; Tang, She

    2016-01-01

    Large-panicle rice cultivars often fail to reach their yield potential due to the poor grain filling of inferior spikelets (IS). Thus, it is important to determine the causes of poor IS grain filling. In this study, we attempted to identify whether inferior grain filling of large panicles is restricted by superior spikelets (SS) and their physiological mechanism. SS were removed from two homozygous japonica rice strains (W1844 and WJ165) during flowering in an attempt to force photosynthate transport to the IS. We measured the effects of SS removal on seed setting rate, grain weight, grain filling rate, sucrose content, as well as hormone levels, activities of key enzymes, and expression of genes involved in sucrose to starch metabolism in rice IS during grain filling. The results showed that SS removal improved IS grain filling by increasing the seed setting rate, grain weight, sucrose content, and hormone levels. SS removal also enhanced the activities of key enzymes and the expression levels of genes involved in sucrose to starch metabolism. These results suggest that sucrose and several hormones act as signal substances and play a vital role in grain filling by regulating enzyme activities and gene expression. Therefore, IS grain filling is restricted by SS, which limit assimilate supply and plant hormones, leading to poor grain filling of IS. PMID:27547210

  4. Evidence of Left Inferior Frontal–Premotor Structural and Functional Connectivity Deficits in Adults Who Stutter

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Barry; Ostuni, John; Reynolds, Richard; Ludlow, Christy L.

    2011-01-01

    The neurophysiological basis for stuttering may involve deficits that affect dynamic interactions among neural structures supporting fluid speech processing. Here, we examined functional and structural connectivity within corticocortical and thalamocortical loops in adults who stutter. For functional connectivity, we placed seeds in the left and right inferior frontal Brodmann area 44 (BA44) and in the ventral lateral nucleus (VLN) of the thalamus. Subject-specific seeds were based on peak activation voxels captured during speech and nonspeech tasks using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) was used to find brain regions with heightened functional connectivity with these cortical and subcortical seeds during speech and nonspeech tasks. Probabilistic tractography was used to track white matter tracts in each hemisphere using the same seeds. Both PPI and tractrography supported connectivity deficits between the left BA44 and the left premotor regions, while connectivity among homologous right hemisphere structures was significantly increased in the stuttering group. No functional connectivity differences between BA44 and auditory regions were found between groups. The functional connectivity results derived from the VLN seeds were less definitive and were not supported by the tractography results. Our data provide strongest support for deficient left hemisphere inferior frontal to premotor connectivity as a neural correlate of stuttering. PMID:21471556

  5. Subcomponents and Connectivity of the Inferior Fronto-Occipital Fasciculus Revealed by Diffusion Spectrum Imaging Fiber Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yupeng; Sun, Dandan; Wang, Yong; Wang, Yibao

    2016-01-01

    The definitive structure and functional role of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) are still controversial. In this study, we aimed to investigate the connectivity, asymmetry, and segmentation patterns of this bundle. High angular diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) analysis was performed on 10 healthy adults and a 90-subject DSI template (NTU-90 Atlas). In addition, a new tractography approach based on the anatomic subregions and two regions of interest (ROI) was evaluated for the fiber reconstructions. More widespread anterior-posterior connections than previous “standard” definition of the IFOF were found. This distinct pathway demonstrated a greater inter-subjects connective variability with a maximum of 40% overlap in its central part. The statistical results revealed no asymmetry between the left and right hemispheres and no significant differences existed in distributions of the IFOF according to sex. In addition, five subcomponents within the IFOF were identified according to the frontal areas of originations. As the subcomponents passed through the anterior floor of the external capsule, the fibers radiated to the posterior terminations. The most common connection patterns of the subcomponents were as follows: IFOF-I, from frontal polar cortex to occipital pole, inferior occipital lobe, middle occipital lobe, superior occipital lobe, and pericalcarine; IFOF-II, from orbito-frontal cortex to occipital pole, inferior occipital lobe, middle occipital lobe, superior occipital lobe, and pericalcarine; IFOF-III, from inferior frontal gyrus to inferior occipital lobe, middle occipital lobe, superior occipital lobe, occipital pole, and pericalcarine; IFOF-IV, from middle frontal gyrus to occipital pole, and inferior occipital lobe; IFOF-V, from superior frontal gyrus to occipital pole, inferior occipital lobe, and middle occipital lobe. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of high resolution diffusion tensor tractography with sufficient sensitivity

  6. The combination of inferior pedicle method and dermal suspension sling technique: one new efficient method for breast reduction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Wang, Benzhong; Gu, Yufang; Zhao, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore a method of breast reduction which ensures well nipple and areola lactation function, adequate blood supply and good medial fullness and projection. At the same time, this study could evaluate the advantages of the combination of inferior pedicle method and dermal suspension sling technique for breast reduction. Methods: From 2011.11 to 2013.8, 13 women have undergone breast reduction using utilizing inferior pedicle combined with the dermal suspension sling technique. The inferior pedicle was designed with medial and lateral triangular flaps in the areas where normally be excised. These triangular flaps were deepithelialized and defatted. The flaps were attached to the chest wall above the inferior pedicle to create a dermal “cage”. Results: After operation, Sensation of nipple and areola complex, breast projection and shape were sustained during follow-up, of which the median interval was 12 months. No patient had poor projection and bottoming out. Conclusion: Dermal suspension and horizontal dermal placation provides a structural foundation to the inferior pedicle. It is an effective method of treatment for breast reduction, in that the sensation and lactation function of nipple and areola complex get further guaranteed, have nice breast projection and shape, and can be applied to all cases of breast reduction. PMID:26131293

  7. Anatomy of Mandibular Vital Structures. Part I: Mandibular Canal and Inferior Alveolar Neurovascular Bundle in Relation with Dental Implantology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives It is critical to determine the location and configuration of the mandibular canal and related vital structures during the implant treatment. The purpose of the present study was to review the literature concerning the mandibular canal and inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle anatomical variations related to the implant surgery. Material and Methods Literature was selected through the search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandibular canal, inferior alveolar nerve, and inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1973 to November 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, prosthetic and periodontal journals and books were performed. Results In total, 46 literature sources were obtained and morphological aspects and variations of the anatomy related to implant treatment in posterior mandible were presented as two entities: intraosseous mandibular canal and associated inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. Conclusions A review of morphological aspects and variations of the anatomy related to mandibular canal and mandibular vital structures are very important especially in implant therapy since inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle exists in different locations and possesses many variations. Individual, gender, age, race, assessing technique used and degree of edentulous alveolar bone atrophy largely influence these variations. It suggests that osteotomies in implant dentistry should not be developed in the posterior mandible until the position of the mandibular canal is established. PMID:24421958

  8. The vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for reconstruction of the inferior alveolar nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kenji; Hiroto, Saijo; Morooka, Shin; Kuwabara, Kaoru; Fujioka, Masaki

    2015-03-01

    The sural nerve has been described for nerve reconstruction of the maxillofacial region since it provides many advantages. We report a case of a vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for immediate reconstruction after the removal of intraosseous neuroma originating in the inferior alveolar nerve. The patient had a neuroma caused by iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. A 4-cm long neuroma existed in the inferior alveolar nerve and was resected. A peroneal perforator was chosen as the pedicle of the vascularized sural nerve graft for the nerve gap. The graft including the skin paddle for monitoring the perfusion supplied by this perforator was transferred to the lesion. The nerve gap between the two stumps of the inferior alveolar nerve was repaired using the 6-cm long vascularized sural nerve. The perforator of the peroneal artery was anastomosed to the branch of the facial artery in a perforator-to-perforator fashion. There was no need to sacrifice any main arteries. The skin paddle with 1 cm × 3 cm in size was inset into the incised medial neck. Perceptual function tests with a Semmes-Weinstein pressure esthesiometer and two-point discrimination in the lower lip and chin at 10 months after surgery showed recovery almost to the level of the normal side. This free vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator may be a good alternative for reconstruction of inferior alveolar nerve defects. PMID:25346479

  9. Efficacy and complications associated with a modified inferior alveolar nerve block technique. A randomized, triple-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Montserrat-Bosch, Marta; Nogueira-Magalhães, Pedro; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the efficacy and complication rates of two different techniques for inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB). Study Design: A randomized, triple-blind clinical trial comprising 109 patients who required lower third molar removal was performed. In the control group, all patients received an IANB using the conventional Halsted technique, whereas in the experimental group, a modified technique using a more inferior injection point was performed. Results: A total of 100 patients were randomized. The modified technique group showed a significantly higher onset time in the lower lip and chin area, and was frequently associated to a lingual electric discharge sensation. Three failures were recorded, 2 of them in the experimental group. No relevant local or systemic complications were registered. Conclusions: Both IANB techniques used in this trial are suitable for lower third molar removal. However, performing an inferior alveolar nerve block in a more inferior position (modified technique) extends the onset time, does not seem to reduce the risk of intravascular injections and might increase the risk of lingual nerve injuries. Key words:Dental anesthesia, inferior alveolar nerve block, lidocaine, third molar, intravascular injection. PMID:24608204

  10. Lexical retrieval and semantic knowledge in patients with left inferior temporal lobe lesions

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Sharon M.; Beeson, Pélagie M.; Labiner, David M.; Rapcsak, Steven Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that anomia following left inferior temporal lobe lesions may have two different underlying mechanisms with distinct neural substrates. Specifically, naming impairment following damage to more posterior regions (BA 37) has been considered to result from a disconnection between preserved semantic knowledge and phonological word forms (pure anomia), whereas anomia following damage to anterior temporal regions (BAs 38, 20/21) has been attributed to the degradation of semantic representations (semantic anomia). However, the integrity of semantic knowledge in patients with pure anomia has not been demonstrated convincingly, nor were lesions in these cases necessarily confined to BA 37. Furthermore, evidence of semantic anomia often comes from individuals with bilateral temporal lobe damage, so it is unclear whether unilateral temporal lobe lesions are sufficient to produce significant semantic impairment. Aims The main goals of this study were to determine whether anomia following unilateral left inferior temporal lobe damage reflected a loss of semantic knowledge or a post-semantic deficit in lexical retrieval and to identify the neuroanatomical correlates of the naming impairment. Methods & Procedures Eight individuals who underwent left anterior temporal lobectomy (L ATL) and eight individuals who sustained left posterior cerebral artery strokes (L PCA) completed a battery of language measures that assessed lexical retrieval and semantic processing, and 16 age- and education-matched controls also completed this battery. High-resolution structural brain scans were collected to conduct lesion analyses. Outcomes & Results Performance of L ATL and L PCA patients was strikingly similar, with both groups demonstrating naming performance ranging from moderately impaired to unimpaired. Anomia in both groups occurred in the context of mild deficits to semantic knowledge, which manifested primarily as greater difficulty in naming living things

  11. Teaching alternatives to the standard inferior alveolar nerve block in dental education: outcomes in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Thomas M; Badovinac, Rachel; Shaefer, Jeffry

    2007-09-01

    Surveys were sent to Harvard School of Dental Medicine students and graduates from the classes of 2000 through 2006 to determine their current primary means of achieving mandibular anesthesia. Orthodontists and orthodontic residents were excluded. All subjects received clinical training in the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block and two alternative techniques (the Akinosi mandibular block and the Gow-Gates mandibular block) during their predoctoral dental education. This study tests the hypothesis that students and graduates who received training in the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block, the Akinosi mandibular block, and the Gow-Gates mandibular block will report more frequent current utilization of alternatives to the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block than clinicians trained in the conventional technique only. At the 95 percent confidence level, we estimated that between 3.7 percent and 16.1 percent (mean=8.5 percent) of clinicians trained in using the Gow-Gates technique use this injection technique primarily, and between 35.4 percent and 56.3 percent (mean=47.5 percent) of those trained in the Gow-Gates method never use this technique. At the same confidence level, between 0.0 percent and 3.8 percent (mean=0.0 percent) of clinicians trained in using the Akinosi technique use this injection clinical technique primarily, and between 62.2 percent and 81.1 percent (mean=72.3 percent) of those trained in the Akinosi method never use this technique. No control group that was completely untrained in the Gow-Gates or Akinosi techniques was available for comparison. However, we presume that zero percent of clinicians who have not been trained in a given technique will use the technique in clinical practice. The confidence interval for the Gow-Gates method excludes this value, while the confidence interval for the Akinosi technique includes zero percent. We conclude that, in the study population, formal clinical training in the Gow-Gates and

  12. Lexical retrieval and semantic knowledge in patients with left inferior temporal lobe lesions.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Sharon M; Beeson, Pélagie M; Labiner, David M; Rapcsak, Steven Z

    2008-03-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that anomia following left inferior temporal lobe lesions may have two different underlying mechanisms with distinct neural substrates. Specifically, naming impairment following damage to more posterior regions (BA 37) has been considered to result from a disconnection between preserved semantic knowledge and phonological word forms (pure anomia), whereas anomia following damage to anterior temporal regions (BAs 38, 20/21) has been attributed to the degradation of semantic representations (semantic anomia). However, the integrity of semantic knowledge in patients with pure anomia has not been demonstrated convincingly, nor were lesions in these cases necessarily confined to BA 37. Furthermore, evidence of semantic anomia often comes from individuals with bilateral temporal lobe damage, so it is unclear whether unilateral temporal lobe lesions are sufficient to produce significant semantic impairment. AIMS: The main goals of this study were to determine whether anomia following unilateral left inferior temporal lobe damage reflected a loss of semantic knowledge or a post-semantic deficit in lexical retrieval and to identify the neuroanatomical correlates of the naming impairment. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; PROCEDURES: Eight individuals who underwent left anterior temporal lobectomy (L ATL) and eight individuals who sustained left posterior cerebral artery strokes (L PCA) completed a battery of language measures that assessed lexical retrieval and semantic processing, and 16 age- and education-matched controls also completed this battery. High-resolution structural brain scans were collected to conduct lesion analyses. OUTCOMES #ENTITYSTARTX00026; RESULTS: Performance of L ATL and L PCA patients was strikingly similar, with both groups demonstrating naming performance ranging from moderately impaired to unimpaired. Anomia in both groups occurred in the context of mild deficits to semantic knowledge, which manifested primarily as

  13. Socioeconomic status and paranoia: the role of life hassles, self-mastery, and striving to avoid inferiority.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Fraser; Freeman, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Paranoid ideation is more common in the general population than previously thought, and it is associated with low socioeconomic status. Daily life hassles, self-mastery, and striving to avoid inferiority may partly account for this association, but these factors have not been examined in relation to paranoid thoughts. Two hundred fifteen individuals from the general population completed self-report assessments of paranoid thoughts during the last month, daily life hassles, self-mastery, striving to avoid inferiority, and socioeconomic classification. A greater number of daily hassles, low self-mastery, and insecure striving were all associated with greater levels of paranoid thinking. Each variable was associated with markers of socioeconomic status. This study demonstrates for the first time the association of paranoid thoughts with life hassles, self-mastery, and striving to avoid inferiority. Each of the factors examined may be a plausible candidate to account for why lower socioeconomic status is associated with greater perceptions of threat from other people.

  14. Clinical evaluation of inferior alveolar nerve block by injection into the pterygomandibular space anterior to the mandibular foramen.

    PubMed Central

    Takasugi, Y.; Furuya, H.; Moriya, K.; Okamoto, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (conventional technique) has potential risks of neural and vascular injuries. We studied a method of inferior alveolar nerve block by injecting a local anesthetic solution into the pterygomandibular space anterior to the mandibular foramen (anterior technique) with the purpose of avoiding such complications. The insertion angle of the anterior technique and the estimation of anesthesia in the anterior technique were examined. The predicted insertion angle measured on computed tomographic images was 60.1 +/- 7.1 degrees from the median, with the syringe end lying on the contralateral mandibular first molar, and the insertion depth was approximately 10 mm. We applied the anterior technique to 100 patients for mandibular molar extraction and assessed the anesthetic effects. A success rate of 74% was obtained. This is similar to that reported for the conventional technique but without the accompanying risks for inferior alveolar neural and vascular complications. Images Figure 2 PMID:11432177

  15. Activation in the Right Inferior Parietal Lobule Reflects the Representation of Musical Structure beyond Simple Pitch Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Royal, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique T.; Zendel, Benjamin Rich; Robitaille, Nicolas; Schönwiesner, Marc; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Pitch discrimination tasks typically engage the superior temporal gyrus and the right inferior frontal gyrus. It is currently unclear whether these regions are equally involved in the processing of incongruous notes in melodies, which requires the representation of musical structure (tonality) in addition to pitch discrimination. To this aim, 14 participants completed two tasks while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging, one in which they had to identify a pitch change in a series of non-melodic repeating tones and a second in which they had to identify an incongruous note in a tonal melody. In both tasks, the deviants activated the right superior temporal gyrus. A contrast between deviants in the melodic task and deviants in the non-melodic task (melodic > non-melodic) revealed additional activity in the right inferior parietal lobule. Activation in the inferior parietal lobule likely represents processes related to the maintenance of tonal pitch structure in working memory during pitch discrimination. PMID:27195523

  16. Activation in the Right Inferior Parietal Lobule Reflects the Representation of Musical Structure beyond Simple Pitch Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Royal, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique T; Zendel, Benjamin Rich; Robitaille, Nicolas; Schönwiesner, Marc; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Pitch discrimination tasks typically engage the superior temporal gyrus and the right inferior frontal gyrus. It is currently unclear whether these regions are equally involved in the processing of incongruous notes in melodies, which requires the representation of musical structure (tonality) in addition to pitch discrimination. To this aim, 14 participants completed two tasks while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging, one in which they had to identify a pitch change in a series of non-melodic repeating tones and a second in which they had to identify an incongruous note in a tonal melody. In both tasks, the deviants activated the right superior temporal gyrus. A contrast between deviants in the melodic task and deviants in the non-melodic task (melodic > non-melodic) revealed additional activity in the right inferior parietal lobule. Activation in the inferior parietal lobule likely represents processes related to the maintenance of tonal pitch structure in working memory during pitch discrimination. PMID:27195523

  17. Capsular tear in line with the inferior glenohumeral ligament: a cause of anterior glenohumeral instability in 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, David L; Burks, Robert T

    2009-08-01

    Anterior glenohumeral instability typically involves lesions associated with the inferior glenohumeral ligament complex. Multiple lesions have been described in this setting, including Bankart, humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament complex, and mid-substance capsular tears. These lesions are indicative of the high-force traumatic nature of anterior shoulder dislocation. Two cases of recurrent anterior shoulder instability are presented with a capsular tear perpendicular to the usual orientation and not consistent to the amount of force involved in a dislocation. Arthroscopy revealed a capsular defect from the glenoid to the humeral head in the anterior inferior glenohumeral ligamentous complex in both. This lesion is an unusual circumstance, providing another pathology to include in the differential diagnosis of anterior glenohumeral instability.

  18. A massive retroperitoneal neuroblastoma with stenosis of the inferior vena cava in a 5-month-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jui-Ting; Dai, Yang-Hong; Kuo, Shih-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the second most common retroperitoneal tumour in children after Wilms’ tumour. When it originates in the retroperitoneum, neuroblastoma usually presents as an abdominal mass with clinical manifestations of nausea, vomiting and weight loss. Imaging studies of this tumour demonstrate a heterogeneous mass with an irregular capsule and visible calcifications. Encasement and compression of the abdominal vessels, especially the inferior vena cava, are often observed. However, stenosis of the inferior vena cava has never been reported to be associated with this tumour. Here, we present a case of a 5-month-old boy with a right retroperitoneal tumour with extensive encasement of the inferior vena cava and significant narrowing of its distal part between the venous bifurcation and the tumour capsule. To our knowledge, this is the first case of neuroblastoma with this manifestation in a child. PMID:24671327

  19. Secondary hyperfunction of unoperated inferior oblique muscle after surgical treatment of strabismus.

    PubMed

    Alexieva, G

    1994-01-01

    Secondary hyperfunction of the inferior oblique muscle IO of one of the eyes is a frequent complication after unilateral recession of the overacting IO of the fellow's eye. It is often observed in cases with bilateral asymmetric hyperfunction of the IO's when these are surgically decreased. The pathogenesis of this secondary hyperfunction is not sufficiently explained yet. We evaluated the condition of unoperated IO in 42 children with unilateral hyperfunction of the IO. In all cases the operation we performed was recession combined with a fixed anteroposition. During the two years follow up period we found no secondary hyperfunction of the unoperated oblique muscle in 31 of the children, mild level of elevation in 7 of them, middle--in 2, and severe in 2 of the children. This observation confirmed our conviction of refraining from simultaneous surgical intervention on both IO muscles when there is hyperfunction of one of them.

  20. Effects of emotional music on visual processes in inferior temporal area.

    PubMed

    Jomori, Izumi; Hoshiyama, Minoru; Uemura, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Yoshiro; Hoshino, Aiko; Iwamoto, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of emotional music on visual processes, we analyzed visual evoked magnetic fields (VEF) on listening to emotional music in 14 healthy subjects. Positive and negative pieces of music were delivered during VEF recording following stimulation by emotionally neutral pictures of faces and landscapes. VEF components at 100 (M100) and 150 (M170)ms after stimulus onset were analyzed, and the estimated current strength for M170 following face stimulation was enhanced with negative compared to positive music in the right hemisphere. The equivalent current dipole for M100 and M170 was estimated in the primary visual cortex (V1) and inferior temporal area (IT), respectively. The present results indicate that background music showed a top-down control of the visual processes in IT, which is a core site responsible for the interpretation of facial expression. The emotional contents of music could alter visual processes, especially those involving the face. PMID:24073696

  1. Utilization of Inferiorly Based Dermofat Flap in Breast Reconstruction after Simple Mastectomy due to Gigantomastia.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov-Berezovsky, A; Krieger, Y; Shoham, Y; Silberstein, E

    2013-01-01

    Gigantomastia (GM) is a rare disabling condition characterized by excessive breast tissue growth. To date, there is no universal classification and definition of GM. At present, GM is determined as weight over 1.5 kg per breast (Dancey et al., 2008) or 3% or more of the patient's total body weight (Dafydd et al., 2011). The lack of generally acknowledged approach regarding GM is expressed by the different methods of its treatment ranging from hormonal prescription to mastectomy and subsequent complex breast reconstruction (Shoma et al., 2011). We describe a treatment approach, including simple mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction by an inferiorly based dermofat flap with silicone implants and nipple grafting.

  2. Creating a Fontan fenestration in a child with dextrocardia and interrupted inferior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Charlagorla, Pradeepkumar; Breinholt, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis is a rare life-threatening complication of the Fontan operation. Transcatheter Fontan fenestration can ameliorate symptoms by decompressing elevated venous pressures. Transcatheter creation of a fenestration can be technically challenging in cases with complex venous anatomy. We report a case of a 5-year-old boy with heterotaxy, dextrocardia with unbalanced atrioventricular canal (AVC), atrial and visceral situs inversus, left-sided superior vena cava (SVC), and left-sided interrupted inferior vena cava (IVC) with azygos continuation. With few modifications to the equipment, a successful Fontan fenestration with stent implantation was performed via transjugular approach. At 2-year follow-up, his symptoms of plastic bronchitis improved significantly. PMID:27212858

  3. GABAA-Mediated Inhibition Modulates Stimulus-Specific Adaptation in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-González, David; Hernández, Olga; Covey, Ellen; Malmierca, Manuel S.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to detect novel sounds in a complex acoustic context is crucial for survival. Neurons from midbrain through cortical levels adapt to repetitive stimuli, while maintaining responsiveness to rare stimuli, a phenomenon called stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA). The site of origin and mechanism of SSA are currently unknown. We used microiontophoretic application of gabazine to examine the role of GABAA-mediated inhibition in SSA in the inferior colliculus, the midbrain center for auditory processing. We found that gabazine slowed down the process of adaptation to high probability stimuli but did not abolish it, with response magnitude and latency still depending on the probability of the stimulus. Blocking GABAA receptors increased the firing rate to high and low probability stimuli, but did not completely equalize the responses. Together, these findings suggest that GABAA-mediated inhibition acts as a gain control mechanism that enhances SSA by modifying the responsiveness of the neuron. PMID:22479591

  4. Hypoplasia of the inferior vena cava in a young man presenting with extensive deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Bryony Eloise Pfyffer; de Boisanger, James; Bottomley, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 34-year-old man with extensive deep venous thrombosis (DVT) who was found to have multiple abnormalities of venous anatomy, notably hypoplasia of the inferior vena cava with azygous continuation. DVT has an annual incidence of around 1 in 1000 people in the UK. Many cases will have readily identifiable risk factors, such as underlying malignancy, immobility or thrombophilia, but at times, these might not be so straightforward and unexpected contributing factors may be found. Although relatively uncommon in the general population, congenital venous abnormalities have been found at higher incidence in young adults presenting with spontaneous DVT and should therefore remain a consideration when classical risk factors are absent.

  5. Temporal properties of inferior colliculus neurons to photonic stimulation in the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaodong; Young, Hunter; Matic, Agnella Izzo; Zirkle, Whitney; Rajguru, Suhrud; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) may be beneficial in auditory prostheses because of its spatially selective activation of spiral ganglion neurons. However, the response properties of single auditory neurons to INS and the possible contributions of its optoacoustic effects are yet to be examined. In this study, the temporal properties of auditory neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) of guinea pigs in response to INS were characterized. Spatial selectivity of INS was observed along the tonotopically organized ICC. Trains of laser pulses and trains of acoustic clicks were used to evoke single unit responses in ICC of normal hearing animals. In response to INS, ICC neurons showed lower limiting rates, longer latencies, and lower firing efficiencies. In deaf animals, ICC neurons could still be stimulated by INS while unresponsive to acoustic stimulation. The site and spatial selectivity of INS both likely shaped the temporal properties of ICC neurons.

  6. Mandibular Inferior Cortical Bone Thickness on Panoramic Radiographs in Patients using Bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Sandra R.; Chen, Curtis S. K.; Leroux, Brian G.; Lee, Peggy P.; Hollender, Lars G.; Lloid, Michelle; Drew, Shane Patrick; Schubert, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To detect dimensional changes in the mandibular cortical bone associated with bisphosphonate (BP) use and to correlate the measurements of the cortical bone with the cumulative dose of BP therapy. Methods Mandibular inferior cortical bone thickness (MICBT) was measured under the mental foramen from panoramic radiographs of subjects using BP with and without bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) and controls. Results The highest mean MICBT was observed in BRONJ subjects 6.81 (± 1.35 mm), when compared to subjects using BP 5.44 (± 1.09 mm) and controls 4.79 (± 0.85 mm; p<0.01). The mean MICBT of BRONJ subjects was significantly higher than that of subjects using BP without BRONJ. There was a correlation between MICBT and cumulative dose of zolendronate. Conclusion The MICBT on panoramic radiograph is a potentially useful tool for the detection of dimensional changes associated with BP therapy. PMID:25864820

  7. Inferior Vena Cava Filtration in the Management of Venous Thromboembolism: Filtering the Data

    PubMed Central

    Molvar, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for hospitalized patients. Pulmonary embolism (PE) is the leading preventable cause of in-hospital mortality. The preferred method of both treatment and prophylaxis for VTE is anticoagulation. However, in a subset of patients, anticoagulation therapy is contraindicated or ineffective, and these patients often receive an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. The sole purpose of an IVC filter is prevention of clinically significant PE. IVC filter usage has increased every year, most recently due to the availability of retrievable devices and a relaxation of thresholds for placement. Much of this recent growth has occurred in the trauma patient population given the high potential for VTE and frequent contraindication to anticoagulation. Retrievable filters, which strive to offer the benefits of permanent filters without time-sensitive complications, come with a new set of challenges including methods for filter follow-up and retrieval. PMID:23997414

  8. Accessory Inferior Sulci of the Liver in an Afro-Caribbean Population

    PubMed Central

    O. Cawich, Shamir; T. Gardner, Michael; Shetty, Ramnanand; W. Pearce, Neil; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There have been no previous reports on the anatomic variations that exist on inferior surface of the liver in Caribbean populations. This information is important to optimize radiology and hepatobiliary surgical services in the region. Methods: Two investigators independently observed 69 cadaveric dissections over five years and described the variations in surface anatomy. Results: In this population 88% of cadaveric livers had conventional hepatic surface anatomy. However, 12% had accessory sulci present on the visceral surface of the liver, with a 7:1 male preponderance. When present, there was 100% correlation between the presence of Rouvière’s sulcus and the right branch of portal pedicle. Conclusion: Abnormal surface anatomy is present in 12% of unselected specimens in this Caribbean population. Interventional radiologists and hepatobiliary surgeons practicing in the Caribbean must be cognizant of these differences in order to minimize morbidity during invasive procedures. PMID:27493591

  9. [Amaurosis fugax in inferior wall myocardial infarction with ST segment elevation].

    PubMed

    Hrycek, Eugeniusz; Bońkowski, Michał; Nowakowski, Przemysław; Żurakowski, Aleksander; Buszman, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The patient, a fifty nine year old male, was admitted to the ward with symptoms of inferior wall myocardial infarction with ST segment elevation combined with intermittent right side sight loss. Despite typical resting stenocardial chest pain, ST segment elevation in ECG, transient symptoms of acute heart failure and slightly elevated myocardial necrosis biomarkers, coronarography did not reveal obvious source of myocardial ischemia. Moreover, echocardiography did not confirm decreased ejection fraction. However further research confirmed critical stenosis of the left internal carotid artery and chronic occlusion of the right internal carotid artery. Several questions were raised during diagnostic process including: the cause of cardiac ischemia and the cause of cerebral ischemia. Clinical data analysis and available literature allowed authors to exclude cerebral ischemia as a source of ECG ischemic changes and to establish transient myocardial ischemia causing circulatory decompensation amplified by carotid arteries atherosclerosis as the source of neurological symptoms. PMID:27487548

  10. Incidental Finding of Inferior Vena Cava Atresia Presenting with Deep Venous Thrombosis following Physical Exertion

    PubMed Central

    Koppisetty, Shalini; Smith, Alton G.; Dhillon, Ravneet K.

    2015-01-01

    Inferior vena cava atresia (IVCA) is a rare but well described vascular anomaly. It is a rare risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), found in approximately 5% of cases of unprovoked lower extremity (LE) DVT in patients <30 years of age. Affected population is in the early thirties, predominantly male, often with a history of major physical exertion and presents with extensive or bilateral DVTs. Patients with IVC anomalies usually develop compensatory circulation through the collateral veins with enlarged azygous/hemizygous veins. Despite the compensatory circulation, the venous drainage of the lower limbs is often insufficient leading to venous stasis and thrombosis. We describe a case of extensive and bilateral deep venous thrombosis following physical exertion in a thirty-six-year-old male patient with incidental finding of IVCA on imaging. PMID:26640723

  11. Stimulus expectancy modulates inferior frontal gyrus and premotor cortex activity in auditory perception.

    PubMed

    Osnes, Berge; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Hjelmervik, Helene; Specht, Karsten

    2012-04-01

    In studies on auditory speech perception, participants are often asked to perform active tasks, e.g. decide whether the perceived sound is a speech sound or not. However, information about the stimulus, inherent in such tasks, may induce expectations that cause altered activations not only in the auditory cortex, but also in frontal areas such as inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and motor cortices, even in the absence of an explicit task. To investigate this, we applied spectral mixes of a flute sound and either vowels or specific music instrument sounds (e.g. trumpet) in an fMRI study, in combination with three different instructions. The instructions either revealed no information about stimulus features, or explicit information about either the music instrument or the vowel features. The results demonstrated that, besides an involvement of posterior temporal areas, stimulus expectancy modulated in particular a network comprising IFG and premotor cortices during this passive listening task. PMID:22377261

  12. The relationship of the 'inferior constrictor swallow' and 'globus hystericus' or the hypopharyngeal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gray, L P

    1983-07-01

    The term 'Globus Hystericus' is considered to be a very bad term for such a common condition and it is recommended that it be replaced by the 'Hypopharyngeal Syndrome'. The normal modified swallow initiated from the lingual tonsil--epiglottis area, called the Inferior Constrictor Swallow, can cause all the symptoms. The epiglottis does not bend. There are two groups of symptoms: the first due to sensation from local irritation of the lingual tonsil; and the second due to vicious circles causing increased muscle tension and strain swallowing. If there is pain or dysphagia or impairment in swallowing, then it is not the Hypopharyngeal Syndrome. The key-note of treatment is the logical explanation of these symptoms and that the vicious circles must be broken. PMID:6875362

  13. A Critical Review of Available Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jennifer P; Kaufman, John A

    2016-06-01

    Inferior vena cava filters have been placed in patients for decades for protection against pulmonary embolism. The widespread use of filters has dramatically increased owing at least in part to the approval of retrievable vena cava filters. Retrievable filters have the potential to protect against pulmonary embolism and then be retrieved once no longer needed to avoid potential long-term complications. There are several retrievable vena cava filters available for use. This article discusses the different filter designs as well as the published data on these available filters. When selecting a filter for use, it is important to consider the potential short-term complications and the filters' window for retrieval. Understanding potential long-term complications is also critical, as these devices are approved for permanent placement and many filters are not retrieved. Finally, this article will address research into new designs that may be the future of vena cava filtration.

  14. Implant Injury Case Series and Review of the Literature Part 1: Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Du Toit, Jonathan; Gluckman, Howard; Gamil, Rami; Renton, Tara

    2015-08-01

    Injury to adjacent structures is an unfortunate and avoidable outcome of oral implant placement surgery. Paramount among these is perforation into paranasal sinus; into neighboring tooth root; through cortical plate; and into vessels, canals, and, most importantly, nerves. In most cases, injudicious oral implant placement can be attributed to poor treatment planning. We present the cases of several patients referred for postsurgical radiology that illustrate injury to the inferior alveolar canal by implant impingement, penetration, and even complete obliteration of the nerve and canal in the absence of proper treatment planning and imaging modalities. The authors stress the importance of thorough implant case preparation and planning, which may include the use of cone beam computerized tomography in order to minimize nerve injury. PMID:24945089

  15. Iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve: etiology, signs and symptoms, and observations on recovery.

    PubMed

    Hillerup, S

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective, non-randomised, descriptive study is to characterise the neurosensory deficit and associated neurogenic discomfort in 52 patients with iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). All patients were examined and followed up according to a protocol assessing tactile, thermal, and positional perception as well as two-point discrimination and pain. In 48 patients with IAN injuries of differing etiologies who did not undergo surgery, 32 patients with injury associated with third molar surgery exhibited significant spontaneous improvement of sensory function. Recovery improvement of sensory function was insignificant in the patients with other etiologies. In most patients the level of sensory perception was such that microsurgical repair was only occasionally indicated. Four patients had microsurgical repair; the outcome was favourable in three. IAN injuries associated with third molar surgery, other dento-alveolar surgery or implant surgery occur sufficiently often to render prevention a key issue. PMID:18501561

  16. Supra hepatic inferior vena cava and right atrial thrombosis following a traffic car crash

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Karim, Hosein; Haghi, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: We present a case of nephrotic syndrome associated with right atrial and supra hepatic vein part of inferior vena caval thrombosis. This patient presented with dyspena, lower extremity edema and back pain after a vehicle accident and blunt trauma to the abdomen. Trauma should be considered not only as a thrombophilic pre-disposition, but also as a predisposing factor to IVC endothelium injury and thrombosis formation. Echocardiography revealed supra hepatic vein IVC thrombosis floating to the right atrium. A C-T scan with contrast also showed pulmonary artery emboli to the left upper lobe. With open heart surgery, the right atrial and IVC clot were extracted and the main left and right pulmonary arteries were evaluated for possible clot lodging. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and thrombosis has not reoccurred with periodical follow-up examinations. PMID:26836612

  17. Anterior-inferior shoulder instability: treatment based on the Thal method.

    PubMed

    Russo, R; Giudice, G; Ciccarelli, M; Vernaglia Lombardi, L; Cautiero, F

    2005-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to analyze the results of a consecutive series of 139 patients affected with anterior-inferior shoulder instability and treated by arthroscopic capsuloplasty using the Thal method with absorbable and non-absorbable Mitek knotless anchors. Much attention was paid to the preoperative and intraoperative selection of patients, excluding from the arthroscopic procedure those with bony Bankart lesions measuring more than 25%, with an inverted-pear glenoid, with engaged Hill-Sachs lesions and patients with HAGL lesions. Pre- and postoperative clinical evaluation was carried out using the Rowe scale. Scores rose from 45-55 to 96 postoperatively. Intra-articular mobilization of the anchors did not occur and peri-metallic lysis was not manifested. Areas of bone resorption were observed in 7 cases (7/38, 18.4%) with the presence of peri-insertional geodes with biological anchors, but this had no effect on the clinical results.

  18. A Dedicated Inferior Vena Cava Filter Service Line: How to Optimize Your Practice.

    PubMed

    Karp, Jennifer K; Desai, Kush R; Salem, Riad; Ryu, Robert K; Lewandowski, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Despite the increased placement of retrievable inferior vena cava filters (rIVCFs), efforts to remove these devices are not commensurate. The majority of rIVCFs are left in place beyond their indicated usage, and often are retained permanently. With a growing understanding of the clinical issues associated with these devices, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has prompted clinicians to remove rIVCF when they are no longer indicated. However, major obstacles exist to filter retrieval, chief among them being poor clinical follow-up. The establishment of a dedicated IVC filter service line, or clinic, has been shown to improve filter retrieval rates. Usage of particular devices, specifically permanent versus retrievable filters, is enhanced by prospective physician consultation. In this article, the rationale behind a dedicated IVC filter service line is presented as well as described the structure and activities of the authors' IVC filter clinic; supporting data will also be provided when appropriate.

  19. Patient inertia and the status quo bias: when an inferior option is preferred.

    PubMed

    Suri, Gaurav; Sheppes, Gal; Schwartz, Carey; Gross, James J

    2013-09-01

    Medical noncompliance is a major public-health problem. One potential source of this noncompliance is patient inertia. It has been hypothesized that one cause of patient inertia might be the status quo bias-which is the tendency to select the default choice among a set of options. To test this hypothesis, we created a laboratory analogue of the decision context that frequently occurs in situations involving patient inertia, and we examined whether participants would stay with a default option even when it was clearly inferior to other available options. Specifically, in Studies 1 and 2, participants were given the option to reduce their anxiety while waiting for an electric shock. When doing nothing was the status quo option, participants frequently did not select the option that would reduce their anxiety. In Study 3, we demonstrated a simple way to overcome status quo bias in a context relevant to patient inertia.

  20. Spontaneous healing and complete disappearance of a ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Su, Tsung-Ming; Cheng, Ching-Hsiao; Chen, Wu-Fu; Hsu, Shih-Wei

    2014-05-01

    A 7-month-old baby presented with a 4-day history of drowsiness and vomiting after a falling accident. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, and variable stages of subdural hematoma in bilateral occipital and left temporal subdural spaces. A partially thrombosed aneurysm was noted in the right craniocervical junction. Ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral retinal petechial hemorrhages. Conventional cerebral angiography revealed a dissecting aneurysm in the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Endovascular embolization was suggested, but the family refused. After conservative treatment, follow-up MRI revealed that the PICA aneurysm had remodeled and ultimately disappeared completely at the 10th month. This case illustrates the relatively plastic nature of intracranial aneurysms in pediatric patients. More studies are necessary to clarify the natural history of spontaneously thrombosed aneurysms to assist in their overall management.

  1. Vascular Microanatomy of the Pontomedullary Junction, Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Arteries, and the Lateral Spinal Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, PH.; Brassier, G.; Fournier, H-D; Picquet, J.; Papon, X.; Lasjaunias, P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary This study of 25 brains at the pontomedullary junction defined the different possible origins of the perforating arteries and lateral spinal arteries in relation to the posterior inferior cerebellar arteries (PICAs). - If the PICA emerges from the common trunk of the AICA-PICA coming from the basilar artery, it never gives perforating arteries or a lateral spinal artery on the lateral surface of the brain stem but supplies blood to a part of the ipsilateral cerebellar hemisphere. - If the PICA arises extradurally at C1, it never gives perforating arteries for the lateral surface of the brain stem, but it gives pial branches for the posterior surface of the medulla oblongata and is always the origin of the lateral spinal artery. - If the PICA emerges in the intradural vertebral artery, it is the source of the perforating arteries for the lateral surface of the brain stem and of the blood supply of the ipsilateral cerebellum. PMID:20557786

  2. Patterns of Change in Psychological Variables Leading up to Competition in Superior Versus Inferior Performers.

    PubMed

    Boat, Ruth; Taylor, Ian M

    2015-06-01

    The study explored patterns of change in a number of potentially performance-related variables (i.e., fatigue, social support, self-efficacy, autonomous motivation, mental skills) during the lead-up to a competitive triathlon, and whether these patterns of change differed for relatively superior versus inferior performers. Forty-two triathletes completed an inventory measuring the study variables every other day during a 2-week period leading up to competition. Performance was assessed using participants' race time, and using a self-referenced relative score compared with personal best times. Multilevel growth curve analyses revealed significant differences in growth trajectories over the 2-week period in mental skills use, social support, and fatigue. The results provide novel insight into how athletes' fluctuating psychological state in the 2 weeks before competition may be crucial in determining performance. PMID:26265338

  3. Matching categorical object representations in inferior temporal cortex of man and monkey.

    PubMed

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Mur, Marieke; Ruff, Douglas A; Kiani, Roozbeh; Bodurka, Jerzy; Esteky, Hossein; Tanaka, Keiji; Bandettini, Peter A

    2008-12-26

    Inferior temporal (IT) object representations have been intensively studied in monkeys and humans, but representations of the same particular objects have never been compared between the species. Moreover, IT's role in categorization is not well understood. Here, we presented monkeys and humans with the same images of real-world objects and measured the IT response pattern elicited by each image. In order to relate the representations between the species and to computational models, we compare response-pattern dissimilarity matrices. IT response patterns form category clusters, which match between man and monkey. The clusters correspond to animate and inanimate objects; within the animate objects, faces and bodies form subclusters. Within each category, IT distinguishes individual exemplars, and the within-category exemplar similarities also match between the species. Our findings suggest that primate IT across species may host a common code, which combines a categorical and a continuous representation of objects. PMID:19109916

  4. [Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy with complete occlusion of the superior and inferior vena cava].

    PubMed

    Runde, J; Ebbecke, H; Kurlemann, G; Frosch, M; Schuierer, G

    1997-01-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML) is a rare disease of the lymph nodes, still of unknown origin. We are reporting the case of a 16 year old boy with SHML which occurred in 1983. Investigations showed a massive lymphadenopathy of the mediastinal and abdominal nodes, causing displacement and compression of surrounding tissue. The patient further developed a blockage of the vena cava superior and inferior, leading to numerous collateral circulation routes in the upper and lower extremities. The etiology of the venous blockage is still disputed. It is possible that they are the result of compression of the major veins. Alternatively, the cause could lie in the disruption of the coagulation system. Finally and more likely, the problem could be the result of fibrosis developing through the healing process.

  5. Entrapment of Guide Wire in an Inferior Vena Cava Filter: A Technique for Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Aal, Ahmed Kamel Saddekni, Souheil; Hamed, Maysoon Farouk; Fitzpatrick, Farley

    2013-04-15

    Entrapment of a central venous catheter (CVC) guide wire in an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter is a rare, but reported complication during CVC placement. With the increasing use of vena cava filters (VCFs), this number will most likely continue to grow. The consequences of this complication can be serious, as continued traction upon the guide wire may result in filter dislodgement and migration, filter fracture, or injury to the IVC. We describe a case in which a J-tipped guide wire introduced through a left subclavian access without fluoroscopic guidance during CVC placement was entrapped at the apex of an IVC filter. We describe a technique that we used successfully in removing the entrapped wire through the left subclavian access site. We also present simple useful recommendations to prevent this complication.

  6. Renal Failure Secondary to Thrombotic Complications of Suprarenal Inferior Vena Cava Filter in Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Magne, Nicolas; Frenay, Marc; Bruneton, Jean-Noel

    2001-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate renal function before and after suprarenal inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement.Methods: We describe, in a personal series of 13 consecutive cases (all of them stage IV cancer patients, one LGM filter, one Antheor filter, 11 Greenfield filters) in our institution, two cases of fatal renal vein thrombosis after placement of a suprarenal filter. Evaluation of renal function was based on serum urea (in mmol/L; normal 3.30-6.60), serum creatinine (in {mu}mol/L; normal <115.1), and calculation of serum creatinine clearance. Results and conclusion: This study suggests that in advanced-stage cancer patients who have a single functional kidney, renal functional insufficiency, or previous renal vein thrombosis, IVC filter placement above the renal veins may not be appropriate. Suprarenal filter placement should be performed only after analysis of predicted survival, after detailed discussions with the patient, and most importantly after renal function evaluation.

  7. Acute wiiitis representing as thrombosis of the inferior vena cava and left pelvic veins.

    PubMed

    Brodmann, M; Gary, T; Hafner, F; Eller, P; Deutschmann, H; Pilger, E; Seinost, G

    2015-08-01

    Deep venous thrombosis as a result of venous wall injury provoked by trauma is a common finding. It often occurs in patients with sportive overstraining, caused by over fatigue of the body structures. In 2007, the entity of "acute wiiitis" was first described in a letter to the New England Journal of Medicine. Acute wiiitis sums up all affections, mainly skeletal and muscle affections, provoked by playing Nintendo Wii, a very common and loved video-game system. Deep venous thrombosis as a consequence of Nintendo Wii has not been described so far. We present a patient with a massive free floating thrombus of the left pelvic veins originating from the gluteal veins and reaching into the inferior vena cava after playing Nintendo Wii.

  8. Cyclic Cushing's disease with misleading inferior petrosal sinus sampling results during a trough phase.

    PubMed

    Bonert, Vivien; Bose, Namrata; Carmichael, John D

    2015-02-01

    Diagnosing Cushing's syndrome is challenging and is further hampered when investigations are performed in a patient with cyclic Cushing's syndrome. A subset of patients with Cushing's syndrome exhibit periods of abnormal cortisol secretion with interspersed normal secretion. Patients can have periods of clinical improvement during these quiescent phases or remain symptomatic. Initial diagnostic testing can be challenging because of the unpredictable durations of the peak and trough phases, and it is especially challenging when the diagnosis of cyclic Cushing's syndrome has not yet been determined. Here, the authors present the case of a patient with Cushing's disease with a pathology-proven adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma and whose initial inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) results were deemed indeterminate; further studies elucidated the diagnosis of cyclic Cushing's syndrome. Repeat IPSS was diagnostic of a central source for ACTH secretion, and the patient was treated successfully with transsphenoidal resection. Literature concerning the diagnosis and management of cyclic Cushing's syndrome is also reviewed.

  9. Medial Wall Fracture and Orbital Emphysema Mimicking Inferior Rectus Entrapment in a Child.

    PubMed

    Collin, John; Afshar, Farid; Thomas, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Orbital emphysema is commonly associated with fractures of the orbital floor or medial wall. The air often dissipates spontaneously, but rarely can cause increased intraocular pressure and even loss of vision. Entrapment of the extraocular muscles can also occur with orbital fractures and may require prompt treatment in the pediatric patient due to the risk muscle ischemia. Both conditions can cause diplopia due to restriction of eye movement and differentiation of the two etiologies is important to prevent unnecessary surgical exploration. Identification and prompt management of raised intraocular pressure is essential in patients with orbital trauma. We present a case of orbital emphysema mimicking inferior rectus entrapment following trauma in an 11-year-old boy.

  10. Temporal properties of inferior colliculus neurons to photonic stimulation in the cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Young, Hunter; Matic, Agnella Izzo; Zirkle, Whitney; Rajguru, Suhrud; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) may be beneficial in auditory prostheses because of its spatially selective activation of spiral ganglion neurons. However, the response properties of single auditory neurons to INS and the possible contributions of its optoacoustic effects are yet to be examined. In this study, the temporal properties of auditory neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) of guinea pigs in response to INS were characterized. Spatial selectivity of INS was observed along the tonotopically organized ICC. Trains of laser pulses and trains of acoustic clicks were used to evoke single unit responses in ICC of normal hearing animals. In response to INS, ICC neurons showed lower limiting rates, longer latencies, and lower firing efficiencies. In deaf animals, ICC neurons could still be stimulated by INS while unresponsive to acoustic stimulation. The site and spatial selectivity of INS both likely shaped the temporal properties of ICC neurons. PMID:26311831

  11. Endovascular treatment for ruptured distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm -case report-.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Daizo; Takechi, Akihiko; Shinagawa, Katsuhiro; Sogabe, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured left distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysm. Computed tomography showed a thin subarachnoid hemorrhage in the ambient cistern, and digital subtraction angiography revealed an aneurysm arising from the lateral branch of the left AICA, which was separate from the meatal loop. Endovascular treatment was performed to achieve parent artery occlusion using two Guglielmi detachable coils. Postoperatively, the patient had no complications except for left hearing disturbance, and she was independent in daily life. Endovascular parent artery occlusion for distal AICA aneurysm, especially distal from the meatal loop, can avoid sacrificing the internal auditory artery if the lateral branch of the AICA could be occluded more distally from the meatal loop. Sufficient collateral circulation prevents major infarction, and this strategy may be the first-line treatment choice. PMID:20505296

  12. Adult liver transplantation in the congenital absence of inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Angelico, R; Stonelake, S; Perera, D S; Mirza, D F; Russell, S; Muiesan, P; Perera, M T P R

    2015-10-01

    Whereas congenital absence of inferior vena cava observed in paediatric population more often than not, as an isolated or syndromic variety, this is seldom encountered in adult liver transplant recipients. There appear few sporadic reports in the literature on experience of such anomaly in adults. Given the rarity of situation, surprising encounters of such anomalies may pose challenge to the unprepared transplant surgeon and unfavourable outcomes may even have resulted in under-reportage of this condition. In this brief report we document our recent experience with two such cases and this is supplemented with extensive reference to the literature on classification of such anomalies with the endeavour to document implications of such in the adult liver transplant setting. PMID:26278662

  13. Dissecting Aneurysm of Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Initially Presenting with Nonhemorrhagic Symptom.

    PubMed

    Sasame, Jo; Nomura, Motohiro

    2015-08-01

    We report a patient with a probable dissecting aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) initially presenting with a nonhemorrhagic symptom, which resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 61-year-old woman suddenly experienced nausea. Computed tomography (CT) on admission showed a high-density mass with a double lumen in the right cerebellopontine angle without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Five days after the onset, she suddenly lost consciousness. CT demonstrated subarachnoid hemorrhage. Emergency angiography revealed a probable dissecting aneurysm at the lateral pontomedullary segment of the right AICA. Although the initial symptom is not hemorrhage, an unruptured dissecting aneurysm of the AICA may have a high risk of rupture. Immediate radical treatment to prevent subsequent rupture is necessary for even an unruptured dissecting aneurysm of the AICA.

  14. Inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia after overfilling of endodontic sealer into the mandibular canal.

    PubMed

    González-Martín, Maribel; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José Luis; Segura-Egea, Juan José

    2010-08-01

    The present study describes a case of endodontic sealer (AH Plus) penetration within and along the mandibular canal from the periapical zone of a lower second molar after endodontic treatment. The clinical manifestations comprised anesthesia of the left side of the lower lip, paresthesia and anesthesia of the gums in the third quadrant, and paresthesia and anesthesia of the left mental nerve, appearing immediately after endodontic treatment. The paresthesia and anesthesia of the lip and gums were seen to decrease, but the mental nerve paresthesia and anesthesia persisted after 3.5 years. This case illustrates the need to expend great care with all endodontic techniques when performing nonsurgical root canal therapy, especially when the root apices are in close proximity to vital anatomic structures such as the inferior alveolar canal. PMID:20647109

  15. Greater leftward lateralization of the inferior frontal gyrus in second language learners with higher syntactic abilities.

    PubMed

    Nauchi, Arihito; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L

    2009-11-01

    There is a great individual variability for acquiring syntactic knowledge in a second language (L2). Little is, however, known if there is any anatomical basis in the brain for individual differences in syntactic acquisition. Here we examined brain structures in 95 nonnative speakers of English, including 78 high-school students and 17 adult international students. We found a significant correlation between the performance of a syntactic task and leftward lateralization of a single region in the triangular part (F3t) of the inferior frontal gyrus, which has been proposed as the grammar center. Moreover, this correlation was independent of the performance of a spelling task, age, gender, and handedness. This striking result suggests that the neural basis for syntactic abilities in L2 is independent of that for lexical knowledge in L2, further indicating that the individual differences in syntactic acquisition are related to the lateralization of the grammar center.

  16. Supra hepatic inferior vena cava and right atrial thrombosis following a traffic car crash.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Karim, Hosein; Haghi, Marjan

    2016-07-01

    We present a case of nephrotic syndrome associated with right atrial and supra hepatic vein part of inferior vena caval thrombosis. This patient presented with dyspena, lower extremity edema and back pain after a vehicle accident and blunt trauma to the abdomen. Trauma should be considered not only as a thrombophilic pre-disposition, but also as a predisposing factor to IVC endothelium injury and thrombosis formation. Echocardiography revealed supra hepatic vein IVC thrombosis floating to the right atrium. A C-T scan with contrast also showed pulmonary artery emboli to the left upper lobe. With open heart surgery, the right atrial and IVC clot were extracted and the main left and right pulmonary arteries were evaluated for possible clot lodging. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and thrombosis has not reoccurred with periodical follow-up examinations. PMID:26836612

  17. Acute bilateral cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branches of posterior inferior cerebellar arteries.

    PubMed

    Gurer, G; Sahin, G; Cekirge, S; Tan, E; Saribas, O

    2001-10-01

    The most frequent type of cerebellar infarcts involved the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and superior cerebellar artery territories but bilateral involvement of lateral or medial branches of PICA is extremely rare. In this report, we present a 55-year-old male who admitted to hospital with vomiting, nausea and dizziness. On examination left-sided hemiparesia and ataxic gait were detected. Infarct on bilateral medial branch of PICA artery territories was found out with cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and 99% stenosis of the left vertebral artery was found out with digital subtraction arteriography. The patient was put on heparin treatment. After 3 weeks, his complaints and symptoms had disappeared except for mild gait ataxia. PMID:11532563

  18. Pseudoadenomatous Hyperplasia of the Inferior Forniceal Conjunctiva Due To Prosthetic Irritation in an Anophthalmic Socket.

    PubMed

    Jakobiec, Frederick A; Rashid, Alia; Massoud, Vicky; Fay, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Secondary complications in an anophthalmic socket can include late appearing shrinkage due to scarring and squamous cell carcinoma. This article reports a 51-year-old man who 27 years after an enucleation developed an inability to retain his ocular prosthesis due to an acquired multilobular fleshy mass in his inferior fornix. The patient had worn his prosthesis without removal for years at a time. Microscopic evaluation of the excised lesion disclosed a pseudoadenomatous (pseudoglandular) hyperplasia of the conjunctival epithelium with myriad goblet cells and accompanying chronic inflammation. In cross section, these structures microscopically resembled an adenoma but were found to display multifocal origins from the surface epithelium resembling exaggerated pseudoglands of Henle. Simple excision without recurrence 6 months later has permitted a new prosthesis to be comfortably worn with stability.

  19. Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma Metastatic from the Uterus to the Inferior Vena Cava and Right Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Nghiem, William; Aziz, Salim; Rahbar, Rodeen; Banks, Whitney; Venbrux, Anthony; Sarin, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcoma metastases usually occur within the pelvis and rarely involve the great vessels or the heart. We present the case of a 55-year-old woman who was referred for endovascular therapy to treat presumed thrombosis of the inferior vena cava. The suspected thrombus was recalcitrant to endovascular removal with use of an AngioVac venous drainage device. Results of an intraprocedural transvenous biopsy revealed the mass to be the intravascular extension of an endometrial stromal sarcoma. The patient underwent surgical excision of the tumor, and, shortly thereafter, a hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy. This complex case highlights both the rarity of malignancy masquerading as caval thrombus and the importance of multispecialty collaboration. PMID:26664311

  20. Bedside insertion of inferior vena cava filters by a medical intensivist: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Haley, Michael; Christmas, Britton; Sing, Ronald F

    2009-01-01

    The development of percutaneous techniques has allowed vena cava filters to be safely placed at the bedside. Such procedures appear uniquely suited for critically ill patients as they avoid the inherent risks associated with transportation. We report a "medical intensivist's" experience with the placement of 13 percutaneous vena cava filters. Vena cava filters were successfully placed in 12 of 13 patients as confirmed by postplacement venacavograms; 1 placement attempt was aborted because of a completely occluded inferior vena cava. These results suggest that with appropriate training and supervision, medical intensivists can safely insert vena cava filters in the intensive care unit setting. Such a practice appears safe, reduces patient risk associated with intrahospital transport, and may promote cost containment.

  1. Klippel-Trenaunay and Sturge-Weber syndromes with renal hemangioma and double inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Schofield, D; Zaatari, G S; Gay, B B

    1986-08-01

    We describe a 3 1/2-year-old boy with the Klippel-Trenaunay and Sturge-Weber syndromes. The child had congenital superficial capillary hemangiomas, congenital glaucoma and mild hydrocephalus. During the first year of life he experienced intermittent hematuria. When he was 3 years old he presented with seizures and left hemihypertrophy first was noted. Several months later radiological examination of a large abdominal mass demonstrated its origin to be in the right kidney. Radical nephrectomy documented the presence of renal hemangioma with complicating perirenal hematoma. A double inferior vena cava was another unexpected surgical finding that complicated the course of this patient. All of these unusual features in these rare syndromes with their clinical, pathogenetic and therapeutic implications are discussed. The differential diagnosis of renal masses in these syndromes also is presented. PMID:3016342

  2. Immuno-histochemical analysis of rod and cone reaction to RPE65 deficiency in the inferior and superior canine retina.

    PubMed

    Klein, Daniela; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Schlegel, Patrice; Rolling, Fabienne; Lorenz, Birgit; Haverkamp, Silke; Stieger, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the RPE65 gene are associated with autosomal recessive early onset severe retinal dystrophy. Morphological and functional studies indicate early and dramatic loss of rod photoreceptors and early loss of S-cone function, while L and M cones remain initially functional. The Swedish Briard dog is a naturally occurring animal model for this disease. Detailed information about rod and cone reaction to RPE65 deficiency in this model with regard to their location within the retina remains limited. The aim of this study was to analyze morphological parameters of cone and rod viability in young adult RPE65 deficient dogs in different parts of the retina in order to shed light on local disparities in this disease. In retinae of affected dogs, sprouting of rod bipolar cell dendrites and horizontal cell processes was dramatically increased in the inferior peripheral part of affected retinae, while central inferior and both superior parts did not display significantly increased sprouting. This observation was correlated with photoreceptor cell layer thickness. Interestingly, while L/M cone opsin expression was uniformly reduced both in the superior and inferior part of the retina, S-cone opsin expression loss was less severe in the inferior part of the retina. In summary, in retinae of young adult RPE65 deficient dogs, the degree of rod bipolar and horizontal cell sprouting as well as of S-cone opsin expression depends on the location. As the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is pigmented similar to the RPE in the inferior part of the canine retina, and the kinetics of photoreceptor degeneration in humans seems to be similar to what has been observed in the inferior peripheral retina in dogs, this area should be studied in future gene therapy experiments in this model.

  3. Immuno-Histochemical Analysis of Rod and Cone Reaction to RPE65 Deficiency in the Inferior and Superior Canine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Daniela; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Schlegel, Patrice; Rolling, Fabienne; Lorenz, Birgit; Haverkamp, Silke; Stieger, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the RPE65 gene are associated with autosomal recessive early onset severe retinal dystrophy. Morphological and functional studies indicate early and dramatic loss of rod photoreceptors and early loss of S-cone function, while L and M cones remain initially functional. The Swedish Briard dog is a naturally occurring animal model for this disease. Detailed information about rod and cone reaction to RPE65 deficiency in this model with regard to their location within the retina remains limited. The aim of this study was to analyze morphological parameters of cone and rod viability in young adult RPE65 deficient dogs in different parts of the retina in order to shed light on local disparities in this disease. In retinae of affected dogs, sprouting of rod bipolar cell dendrites and horizontal cell processes was dramatically increased in the inferior peripheral part of affected retinae, while central inferior and both superior parts did not display significantly increased sprouting. This observation was correlated with photoreceptor cell layer thickness. Interestingly, while L/M cone opsin expression was uniformly reduced both in the superior and inferior part of the retina, S-cone opsin expression loss was less severe in the inferior part of the retina. In summary, in retinae of young adult RPE65 deficient dogs, the degree of rod bipolar and horizontal cell sprouting as well as of S-cone opsin expression depends on the location. As the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is pigmented similar to the RPE in the inferior part of the canine retina, and the kinetics of photoreceptor degeneration in humans seems to be similar to what has been observed in the inferior peripheral retina in dogs, this area should be studied in future gene therapy experiments in this model. PMID:24466015

  4. Development of Intrinsic Connectivity in the Central Nucleus of the Mouse Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Joshua; Nguyen, Tuan

    2014-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) in the mammalian midbrain is the major subcortical auditory integration center receiving ascending inputs from almost all auditory brainstem nuclei as well as descending inputs from the thalamus and cortex. In addition to these extrinsic inputs, the IC also contains a dense network of local, intracollicular connections, which are thought to provide gain control and contribute to the selectivity for complex acoustic features. However, in contrast to the organization of extrinsic IC afferents, the development and functional organization of intrinsic connections in the IC has remained poorly understood. Here we used laser-scanning photostimulation with caged glutamate to characterize the spatial distribution and strength of local synaptic connections in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of newborn mice until after hearing onset (P2-P22). We demonstrate the presence of an extensive excitatory and inhibitory intracollicular network already at P2. Excitatory and inhibitory synaptic maps to individual IC neurons formed continuous maps that largely overlapped with each other and that were aligned with the presumed isofrequency axis of the central nucleus of the IC. Although this characteristic organization was present throughout the first three postnatal weeks, the size of input maps was developmentally regulated as input maps underwent an expansion during the first week that was followed by a dramatic refinement after hearing onset. These changes occurred in parallel for excitatory and inhibitory input maps. However, the functional elimination of intrinsic connections was greater for excitatory than for inhibitory connections, resulting in a predominance of intrinsic inhibition after hearing onset. PMID:25378168

  5. Aberrant network integrity of the inferior frontal cortex in women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Giel, Katrin E; Teufel, Martin; Thiel, Ansgar; Zipfel, Stephan; Preissl, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies investigating the neural profile of anorexia nervosa (AN) have revealed a predominant imbalance between the reward and inhibition systems of the brain, which are also hallmark characteristics of the disorder. However, little is known whether these changes can also be determined independent of task condition, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, in currently ill AN patients. Therefore the aim of our study was to investigate resting-state connectivity in AN patients (n = 12) compared to healthy athlete (n = 12) and non-athlete (n = 14) controls. For this purpose, we used degree centrality to investigate functional connectivity of the whole-brain network and then Granger causality to analyze effective connectivity (EC), to understand directional aspects of potential alterations. We were able to show that the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) is a region of special functional importance within the whole-brain network, in AN patients, revealing reduced functional connectivity compared to both healthy control groups. Furthermore, we found decreased EC from the right IFG to the midcingulum and increased EC from the bilateral orbitofrontal gyrus to the right IFG. For the left IFG, we only observed increased EC from the bilateral insula to the left IFG. These results suggest that AN patients have reduced connectivity within the cognitive control system of the brain and increased connectivity within regions important for salience processing. Due to its fundamental role in inhibitory behavior, including motor response, altered integrity of the inferior frontal cortex could contribute to hyperactivity in AN. PMID:24936412

  6. Primary Intraventricular Brain Abscess Resulting in Isolated Dilation of the Inferior Horn and Unilateral Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Kawazoe, Yushi; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Primary intraventricular brain abscesses are rare, and there are no established treatment guidelines for this condition. We report a case in which isolated ventricular dilatation and unilateral hydrocephalus developed after seemingly successful conservative management and which required surgical diversion of the cerebrospinal fluid. A 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with high-grade fever and headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed abscesses in the bilateral posterior horn. Although surgical evacuation of the abscesses was considered, conservative management with antibiotics was selected because of the paucity of severe neurological deficits and the concern that an attempt to evacuate the intraventricular abscess might lead to inadvertent rupture of the abscess capsule and acute ventriculitis. Despite reduction in the abscess volume, the patient developed an altered mental status 4 weeks after admission. Follow-up MRI revealed isolated dilation of the left inferior horn, compressing the brainstem. Emergency fenestration of the dilated inferior horn was performed, and endoscopic observation revealed an encapsulated abscess with adhesion to the ventricular wall which was thought responsible for the ventricular dilation and unilateral hydrocephalus. Two weeks after the initial surgery, the unilateral hydrocephalus was treated by placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Eradication of the intraventricular brain abscesses without surgical evacuation may justify the conservative management of this patient. However, the possibility that earlier surgical evacuation might have prevented development of the isolated ventricular dilation cannot be denied. Additional clinical experience is required to determine which treatment (surgical vs. conservative) is more appropriate in patients with primary intraventricular brain abscesses. PMID:26351446

  7. Primary Intraventricular Brain Abscess Resulting in Isolated Dilation of the Inferior Horn and Unilateral Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Kawazoe, Yushi; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Primary intraventricular brain abscesses are rare, and there are no established treatment guidelines for this condition. We report a case in which isolated ventricular dilatation and unilateral hydrocephalus developed after seemingly successful conservative management and which required surgical diversion of the cerebrospinal fluid. A 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with high-grade fever and headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed abscesses in the bilateral posterior horn. Although surgical evacuation of the abscesses was considered, conservative management with antibiotics was selected because of the paucity of severe neurological deficits and the concern that an attempt to evacuate the intraventricular abscess might lead to inadvertent rupture of the abscess capsule and acute ventriculitis. Despite reduction in the abscess volume, the patient developed an altered mental status 4 weeks after admission. Follow-up MRI revealed isolated dilation of the left inferior horn, compressing the brainstem. Emergency fenestration of the dilated inferior horn was performed, and endoscopic observation revealed an encapsulated abscess with adhesion to the ventricular wall which was thought responsible for the ventricular dilation and unilateral hydrocephalus. Two weeks after the initial surgery, the unilateral hydrocephalus was treated by placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Eradication of the intraventricular brain abscesses without surgical evacuation may justify the conservative management of this patient. However, the possibility that earlier surgical evacuation might have prevented development of the isolated ventricular dilation cannot be denied. Additional clinical experience is required to determine which treatment (surgical vs. conservative) is more appropriate in patients with primary intraventricular brain abscesses. PMID:26351446

  8. Infrahepatic inferior caval and azygos vein formation in mammals with different degrees of mesonephric development.

    PubMed

    Hikspoors, Jill P J M; Mekonen, Hayelom K; Mommen, Greet M C; Cornillie, Pieter; Köhler, S Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H

    2016-03-01

    Controversies regarding the development of the mammalian infrahepatic inferior caval and azygos veins arise from using topography rather than developmental origin as criteria to define venous systems and centre on veins that surround the mesonephros. We compared caudal-vein development in man with that in rodents and pigs (rudimentary and extensive mesonephric development, respectively), and used Amira 3D reconstruction and Cinema 4D-remodelling software for visualisation. The caudal cardinal veins (CCVs) were the only contributors to the inferior caval (IVC) and azygos veins. Development was comparable if temporary vessels that drain the large porcine mesonephros were taken into account. The topography of the CCVs changed concomitant with expansion of adjacent organs (lungs, meso- and metanephroi). The iliac veins arose by gradual extension of the CCVs into the caudal body region. Irrespective of the degree of mesonephric development, the infrarenal part of the IVC developed from the right CCV and the renal part from vascular sprouts of the CCVs in the mesonephros that formed 'subcardinal' veins. The azygos venous system developed from the cranial remnants of the CCVs. Temporary venous collaterals in and around the thoracic sympathetic trunk were interpreted as 'footprints' of the dorsolateral-to-ventromedial change in the local course of the intersegmental and caudal cardinal veins relative to the sympathetic trunk. Interspecies differences in timing of the same events in IVC and azygos-vein development appear to allow for proper joining of conduits for caudal venous return, whereas local changes in topography appear to accommodate efficient venous perfusion. These findings demonstrate that new systems, such as the 'supracardinal' veins, are not necessary to account for changes in the course of the main venous conduits of the embryo. PMID:26659476

  9. Deactivation of the inferior colliculus by cooling demonstrates intercollicular modulation of neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Orton, Llwyd D; Poon, Paul W F; Rees, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The auditory pathways coursing through the brainstem are organized bilaterally in mirror image about the midline and at several levels the two sides are interconnected. One of the most prominent points of interconnection is the commissure of the inferior colliculus (CoIC). Anatomical studies have revealed that these fibers make reciprocal connections which follow the tonotopic organization of the inferior colliculus (IC), and that the commissure contains both excitatory and, albeit fewer, inhibitory fibers. The role of these connections in sound processing is largely unknown. Here we describe a method to address this question in the anaesthetized guinea pig. We used a cryoloop placed on one IC to produce reversible deactivation while recording electrophysiological responses to sounds in both ICs. We recorded single units, multi-unit clusters and local field potentials (LFPs) before, during and after cooling. The degree and spread of cooling was measured with a thermocouple placed in the IC and other auditory structures. Cooling sufficient to eliminate firing was restricted to the IC contacted by the cryoloop. The temperature of other auditory brainstem structures, including the contralateral IC and the cochlea were minimally affected. Cooling below 20°C reduced or eliminated the firing of action potentials in frequency laminae at depths corresponding to characteristic frequencies up to ~8 kHz. Modulation of neural activity also occurred in the un-cooled IC with changes in single unit firing and LFPs. Components of LFPs signaling lemniscal afferent input to the IC showed little change in amplitude or latency with cooling, whereas the later components, which likely reflect inter- and intra-collicular processing, showed marked changes in form and amplitude. We conclude that the cryoloop is an effective method of selectively deactivating one IC in guinea pig, and demonstrate that auditory processing in the IC is strongly influenced by the other. PMID:23248587

  10. Optimum level of inferior mesenteric artery ligation for the left-sided colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guraya, Salman Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compares the effectiveness and impact of high inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) versus low IMA ligation on 5-year survival, lymph node yield rates, and peri-operative morbidity and mortality. Methods: The databases of Educational Resources Information Centre (ERIC), the Web of Science, EBSCO and MEDLINE were searched using MeSH terms ‘colorectal cancer’, ‘inferior mesenteric artery’, ‘high ligation’, ‘low ligation’, ‘mesenteric lymph nodes’, ‘prognosis’, and ‘survival’. Only clinical studies were selected and review articles and meta-analysis were excluded. In cases of duplicate cohorts, only the latest article was included. Irrelevant articles and the articles on both right and left sided CRC were excluded. The finally selected studies were analysed for the defined end-point outcomes. Results: The published data has shown that high IMA ligation improves the yield of harvested lymph node that allows accurate tumor staging and a more reliable estimation of prognosis. High ligation was not found to be positively correlated with increased anastomotic leakage or impaired genito-urinary function. However, high ligation demands advanced surgical expertise and longer operating time. There was no significant difference in 5-year survival rates for both techniques. Some studies have reported fatal complications of high ligation such as proximal bowel necrosis. Conclusion: Although there is no consensus, this research signals the routine use of high ligation for left-sided CRC. However, the published fatal complications following high ligation and no significant difference in 5-year survival rates demand more studies to establishing a unified protocol. PMID:27381531

  11. The value of prolactin in inferior petrosal sinus sampling with desmopressin stimulation in Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiaona; Ye, Hongying; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhao, Weiwei; Zhang, Shuo; Lu, Bin; Wang, Xuanchun; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Wu, Xi; He, Min; Zhao, Xiaolong; Li, Shiqi; Zhou, Linuo; Yang, Yehong; Hu, Renming; Li, Yiming

    2015-03-01

    Prolactin may reduce false-negative results in diagnosing Cushing's disease (CD) during inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS). Prolactin normalization could improve the accuracy of IPSS in predicting adenoma lateralization in CD. However, none of the previous studies had involved the use of desmopressin during IPSS. Our objective was to examine the utility of prolactin measurement during IPSS with desmopressin stimulation. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 40 patients (including 31 females) with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome who underwent IPSS between 2010 and 2013. Thirty-eight CD patients were partitioned into true positive (n = 35) and false negative (n = 3). The proportion of improper IPSS venous sampling defined by corresponding IPS:P (inferior petrosal sinus to peripheral) prolactin ratio <1.8 was significantly different between two groups (P = 0.004). Applying a prolactin-normalized ACTH IPS:P ratio >0.8 cutoff could increase the sensitivity of IPSS to 38/38 (100 %). Among the 31 patients with histopathologically proven adenoma localization, correct prediction of adenoma lateralization was obtained in 14/31 (45 %) patients by a peak intersinus ACTH gradient of ≥1.4 in baseline and was not improved by desmopressin stimulation. Left-right intersinus gradients of unilateral prolactin-adjusted ACTH IPS:P ratios could increase the correct prediction of adenoma lateralization to 20/31 (65 %) in baseline and 24/31 (77 %) (P = 0.006) after desmopressin stimulation, respectively. Prolactin is helpful to adjust negative results of IPSS with desmopressin stimulation. It may improve the accuracy in predicting adenoma lateralization in CD as well.

  12. Deactivation of the inferior colliculus by cooling demonstrates intercollicular modulation of neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Llwyd D.; Poon, Paul W. F.; Rees, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The auditory pathways coursing through the brainstem are organized bilaterally in mirror image about the midline and at several levels the two sides are interconnected. One of the most prominent points of interconnection is the commissure of the inferior colliculus (CoIC). Anatomical studies have revealed that these fibers make reciprocal connections which follow the tonotopic organization of the inferior colliculus (IC), and that the commissure contains both excitatory and, albeit fewer, inhibitory fibers. The role of these connections in sound processing is largely unknown. Here we describe a method to address this question in the anaesthetized guinea pig. We used a cryoloop placed on one IC to produce reversible deactivation while recording electrophysiological responses to sounds in both ICs. We recorded single units, multi-unit clusters and local field potentials (LFPs) before, during and after cooling. The degree and spread of cooling was measured with a thermocouple placed in the IC and other auditory structures. Cooling sufficient to eliminate firing was restricted to the IC contacted by the cryoloop. The temperature of other auditory brainstem structures, including the contralateral IC and the cochlea were minimally affected. Cooling below 20°C reduced or eliminated the firing of action potentials in frequency laminae at depths corresponding to characteristic frequencies up to ~8 kHz. Modulation of neural activity also occurred in the un-cooled IC with changes in single unit firing and LFPs. Components of LFPs signaling lemniscal afferent input to the IC showed little change in amplitude or latency with cooling, whereas the later components, which likely reflect inter- and intra-collicular processing, showed marked changes in form and amplitude. We conclude that the cryoloop is an effective method of selectively deactivating one IC in guinea pig, and demonstrate that auditory processing in the IC is strongly influenced by the other. PMID:23248587

  13. Distinct roles of left inferior frontal regions that explain individual differences in second language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kuniyoshi L; Nauchi, Arihito; Tatsuno, Yoshinori; Hirano, Kazuyoshi; Muraishi, Yukimasa; Kimura, Masakazu; Bostwick, Mike; Yusa, Noriaki

    2009-08-01

    Second language (L2) acquisition is more susceptible to environmental and idiosyncratic factors than first language acquisition. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging for L2 learners of different ages of first exposure (mean: 12.6 and 5.6 years) in a formal school environment, and compared the cortical activations involved in processing English sentences containing either syntactic or spelling errors, where the testing ages and task performances of both groups were matched. We found novel activation patterns in two regions of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) that correlated differentially with the performances of the late and early learners. Specifically, activations of the dorsal and ventral triangular part (F3t) of the left IFG correlated positively with the accuracy of the syntactic task for the late learners, whereas activations of the left ventral F3t correlated negatively with the accuracy for the early learners. In contrast, other cortical regions exhibited differential correlation patterns with the reaction times (RTs) of the syntactic task. Namely, activations of the orbital part (F3O) of the left IFG, as well as those of the left angular gyrus, correlated positively with the RTs for the late learners, whereas those activations correlated negatively with the RTs for the early learners. Moreover, the task-selective activation of the left F3O was maintained for both the late and early learners. These results explain individual differences in L2 acquisition, such that the acquisition of linguistic knowledge in L2 is subserved by at least two distinct inferior frontal regions of the left F3t and F3O.

  14. Early allograft dysfunction in liver transplantation with donation after cardiac death donors results in inferior survival.

    PubMed

    Lee, David D; Singh, Amandeep; Burns, Justin M; Perry, Dana K; Nguyen, Justin H; Taner, C Burcin

    2014-12-01

    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver allografts have been associated with increased morbidity from primary nonfunction, biliary complications, early allograft failure, cost, and mortality. Early allograft dysfunction (EAD) after liver transplantation has been found to be associated with inferior patient and graft survival. In a cohort of 205 consecutive liver-only transplant patients with allografts from DCD donors at a single center, the incidence of EAD was found to be 39.5%. The patient survival rates for those with no EAD and those with EAD at 1, 3, and 5 years were 97% and 89%, 79% and 79%, and 61% and 54%, respectively (P = 0.009). Allograft survival rates for recipients with no EAD and those with EAD at 1, 3, and 5 years were 90% and 75%, 72% and 64%, and 53% and 43%, respectively (P = 0.003). A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant association between the development of EAD and the cold ischemia time [odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-1.56, P = 0.037] and hepatocellular cancer as a secondary diagnosis in recipients (OR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.11-4.58, P = 0.025). There was no correlation between EAD and the development of ischemic cholangiopathy. In conclusion, EAD results in inferior patient and graft survival in recipients of DCD liver allografts. Understanding the events that cause EAD and developing preventive or early therapeutic approaches should be the focus of future investigations. PMID:25179581

  15. Clinical study of medial area infarction in the region of posterior inferior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Katsuhiko; Suzuki, Yutaka; Oishi, Minoru; Kamei, Satoshi; Shigihara, Shuntaro; Nomura, Yasuyuki

    2013-05-01

    Our objective is to study the neurological characteristics of medial area infarction in the caudal cerebellum. Medial area of the caudal cerebellum is supplied with 2 branches of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). The medial hemispheric branch of the PICA distributes to the medial area of the caudal cerebellar hemisphere. The medial branch of the PICA (mPICA) distributes to the inferior vermis. We studied the neurological characteristics of 18 patients with medial area infarction of the caudal cerebellum. The infarction was located in the medial area of the cerebellar hemisphere and vermis (medial ch/vermis) in 11 patients and in the medial area of the cerebellar hemisphere (medial ch) in 7 patients. All the 18 patients showed acute vertigo and disturbance of standing and gait at onset. On admission, the lateropulsion and wide-based gait were present in 13 patients, respectively. Mild ataxia of the extremities was shown in 7 patients. Acute vertigo and unsteadiness were prominent at onset in the 18 patients, although their ataxia of the extremities was mild or none. This result was consistent with the characteristics of medial area infarction of the caudal cerebellum. Comparing the neurological symptoms between the medial ch/vermis group and medial ch group, both lateropulsion and wide-based gait were significantly infrequent in medial ch group. This result indicated that the vermis was spared because the mPICA was not involved in the medial ch group. It is necessary to make a careful diagnosis when we encounter patients who present acute vertigo because truncal and gait ataxia are unremarkable on admission in patients with the medial area infarction of the caudal cerebellum without vermis involvement.

  16. Mandibular fracture after endosseous implant placement in conjunction with inferior alveolar nerve transposition: a patient treatment report.

    PubMed

    Kan, J Y; Lozada, J L; Boyne, P J; Goodacre, C J; Rungcharassaeng, K

    1997-01-01

    A patient with a severely atrophic right posterior mandible had three endosseous implants placed in conjunction with transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve. Three weeks following implant placement surgery, the patient experienced a spontaneous fracture of the mandible involving the two anterior implants. The two implants were removed, and the fracture was treated with open reduction and fixation with titanium mesh. The fracture healed, and the posterior implant integrated. This report suggests that the buccolingual and superior-inferior position of the mandibular canal can increase the possibility of mandibular fracture by increasing the size of the buccal cortical plate that is removed to expose the nerve during surgery. PMID:9337027

  17. Alternative to the inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia when placing mandibular dental implants posterior to the mental foramen.

    PubMed

    Heller, A A; Shankland, W E

    2001-01-01

    Local anesthesia block of the inferior alveolar nerve is routinely taught throughout dental education. This commonly used technique eliminates all somatosensory perception of the mandible, mandibular teeth, floor of the mouth, ipsilateral tongue, and all but the lateral (buccal) gingivae. Generally, the dentist or surgeon desires these structures to be anesthetized. However, in the placement of mandibular implants, it may be useful for the patient to be able to sense when the inferior alveolar nerve is in danger of being damaged, possibly producing permanent paresthesia. In this article, the technique of mandibular infiltration prior to mandibular implant placement in the mandible is discussed. PMID:12500871

  18. [Bilateral renal vein thrombosis and acute renal failure due to inferior vena cava filter thrombosis. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Vega, Jorge; Díaz, Rienzi

    2014-11-01

    Bilateral renal vein thrombosis is an unusual etiology of acute renal failure and usually is associated with nephrotic syndrome. We report a 77-year-old man, consulting in the emergency room for anuria that appeared 24 hours after a syncope. The patient was carrier of an inferior vena cava filter prophylactically installed 17 months earlier and was not receiving anticoagulation. Serum creatinine on admission was 5.45 mg/dl and blood urea nitrogen was 54 mg/dl. Computed tomography and Doppler ultrasonography showed an extensive thrombosis of inferior vena cava and both renal veins. Heparin therapy was started with a rapid recovery of renal function and diuresis.

  19. [Intraluminal dilation of inferior vena cava stenosis after repair of the scimitar syndrome in an adult patient].

    PubMed

    Benito Bartolomé, Fernando; González García, Ana; Oliver Ruiz, José M

    2002-02-01

    A 39 year-old woman diagnosed with anomalous drainage of middle and lower right pulmonary veins to the inferior vena cava was corrected surgically by means of baffle with patch up to the left atrium. Early after the operation the patient related intolerance to small efforts and an episode of syncope. The cardiac catheterization demonstrated the presence of a severe stenosis in the inferior vena cava, in its union with the right atrium, that was successfully treated by means of intraluminal percutaneous dilation with a catheter of Inoue. After the procedure the gradient decreased and she improved tolerance to effort, which persisted 10 months later.

  20. Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava by the Right Iliac Artery: A Rare Variant of May-Thurner Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Fretz, V.; Binkert, C. A.

    2010-10-15

    May-Thurner syndrome is known as compression of the left common iliac vein by the right common iliac artery. We describe a case of an atypical compression of the inferior vena cava by the right common iliac artery secondary to a high aortic bifurcation. Despite an extensive collateral network, there was a significant venous gradient between the iliac veins and the inferior vena cava above the compression. After stenting the venous pressure gradient disappeared. Follow-up 4 months later revealed a good clinical response with a patent stent.

  1. [Diagnostics and treatment of acute odontogenic osteomyelitis of the mandible considering functional state of inferior alveolar nerve].

    PubMed

    Malanchuk, V A; Pavlovskiĭ, L L

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of functional impairment of inferior alveolar nerve in acute odontogenic inflammatory processes was carried out in this clinical study by means of stimulation electroneurography. Possibility of early diagnosis of acute odontogenic osteomyelitis by this method and effectiveness of decompression osteoperforation for its treatment was shown.

  2. Discontinuation of antidepressant medication after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for recurrent depression: randomised controlled non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    Huijbers, Marloes J.; Spinhoven, Philip; Spijker, Jan; Ruhé, Henricus G.; van Schaik, Digna J. F.; van Oppen, Patricia; Nolen, Willem A.; Ormel, Johan; Kuyken, Willem; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Blom, Marc B. J.; Schene, Aart H.; Rogier, A.; Donders, T.; Speckens, Anne E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) and maintenance antidepressant medication (mADM) both reduce the risk of relapse in recurrent depression, but their combination has not been studied. Aims To investigate whether MBCT with discontinuation of mADM is non-inferior to MBCT+mADM. Method A multicentre randomised controlled non-inferiority trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00928980). Adults with recurrent depression in remission, using mADM for 6 months or longer (n = 249), were randomly allocated to either discontinue (n = 128) or continue (n = 121) mADM after MBCT. The primary outcome was depressive relapse/recurrence within 15 months. A confidence interval approach with a margin of 25% was used to test non-inferiority. Key secondary outcomes were time to relapse/recurrence and depression severity. Results The difference in relapse/recurrence rates exceeded the non-inferiority margin and time to relapse/recurrence was significantly shorter after discontinuation of mADM. There were only minor differences in depression severity. Conclusions Our findings suggest an increased risk of relapse/recurrence in patients withdrawing from mADM after MBCT. PMID:26892847

  3. Pre-operative assessment of relationship between inferior dental nerve canal and mandibular impacted third molar in Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Shujaat, S.; Abouelkheir, H.M.; Al-Khalifa, K.S.; Al-Jandan, B.; Marei, H.F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the correlation between the position of the inferior dental (ID) nerve canal and the angulation of impacted mandibular third molars using dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods The study considered 100 impactions in 85 patients (60 males, 25 females), for whom an initial panoramic radiographic assessment had revealed that the ID canal and the lower 3rd molar were in close proximity. A CBCT scan of each patient was carried out to assess how the ID nerve canal position influenced the class and position of impaction, angulation of impaction, and bone contact. Results Class I position B impactions were found in the majority of cases, where the position of the ID canal was approximate to the lingual plate and inferior to the 3rd molar (85.7%). The results were statistically significant (p = 0.001). 96% of the ID canals showed bone contact. Of these, 77.1% of ID canals exhibited lingual bone contact, inferior to impaction. The results were statistically significant (p = 0.001). Horizontally angulated impactions were most common in the mandible, and significantly associated with lingual and inferior positioning of the ID canal (76.2%). Conclusions Our sample population most commonly exhibited horizontally angulated class I position B impactions of the mandible. The position of the ID canal significantly influenced the type of impaction and bone contact. PMID:25057230

  4. The Medial Temporal Lobe and the Left Inferior Prefrontal Cortex Jointly Support Interference Resolution in Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztekin, Ilke; Curtis, Clayton E.; McElree, Brian

    2009-01-01

    During working memory retrieval, proactive interference (PI) can be induced by semantic similarity and episodic familiarity. Here, we used fMRI to test hypotheses about the role of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and the medial temporal lobe (MTL) regions in successful resolution of PI. Participants studied six-word lists and responded to a…

  5. Azygos Vein Dialysis Catheter Placement Using the Translumbar Approach in a Patient with Inferior Vena Cava Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jaber, Mohammad R.; Thomson, Matthew J.; Smith, Douglas C.

    2008-07-15

    We describe percutaneous, translumbar placement of a 14-Fr dialysis catheter into an ascending lumbar vein to achieve tip position in an enlarged azygos vein. The patient had thrombosis of all traditional vascular sites, as well as the inferior vena cava. This catheter functioned well for 7 months before fatal catheter-related infection developed.

  6. Acute inferior myocardial infarction in a patient with a prosthetic aortic valve and high international normalized ratio

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Ibrahim; Delil, Kenan; Ileri, Cigdem; Samadov, Fuad

    2014-01-01

    ST elevation acute myocardial infarction in patients with a mechanical prosthetic valve is rare and usually due to inadequate anticoagulation. We present a case of acute inferior myocardial infarction in a patient with a prosthetic aortic valve and high international normalized ratio, which has not been reported previously. PMID:24799934

  7. Precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction: early thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, A.S.; Weiss, A.T.; Shah, P.K.; Maddahi, J.; Peter, T.; Ganz, W.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1985-02-01

    To investigate the myocardial perfusion correlates of precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction, a rest thallium-201 scintigram and a closely timed 12 lead electrocardiogram were obtained within 6 hours of the onset of infarction in 44 patients admitted with their first acute inferior myocardial infarction. Thirty-six patients demonstrated precordial ST segment depression (group 1) and eight did not (group 2). A perfusion defect involving the inferior wall was present in all 44 patients. Additional perfusion defects of the adjacent posterolateral wall (n . 20), the ventricular septum (n . 9) or both (n . 6) were present in 35 of 36 patients from group 1 compared with only 1 of 8 patients from group 2 (p less than 0.001). There was no significant difference in the frequency of multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery between group 1 and group 2 or between patients with and those without a thallium-201 perfusion defect involving the ventricular septum. Thus, precordial ST segment depression during an acute inferior myocardial infarction is associated with thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of more extensive involvement of the adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal myocardial segments, which probably reflects the extent and pattern of distribution of the artery of infarction, rather than the presence of coexistent multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery.

  8. Anterior ST depression with acute transmural inferior infarction due to posterior infarction. A vectorcardiographic and scintigraphic study

    SciTech Connect

    Mukharji, J.; Murray, S.; Lewis, S.E.; Croft, C.H.; Corbett, J.R.; Willerson, J.T.; Rude, R.E.

    1984-07-01

    The hypothesis that anterior ST segment depression represents concomitant posterior infarction was tested in 49 patients admitted with a first transmural inferior myocardial infarction. Anterior ST depression was defined as 0.1 mV or more ST depression in leads V1, V2 or V3 on an electrocardiogram recorded within 18 hours of infarction. Serial vectorcardiograms and technetium pyrophosphate scans were obtained. Eighty percent of the patients (39 of 49) had anterior ST depression. Of these 39 patients, 34% fulfilled vectorcardiographic criteria for posterior infarction, and 60% had pyrophosphate scanning evidence of posterior infarction. Early anterior ST depression was neither highly sensitive (84%) nor specific (20%) for the detection of posterior infarction as defined by pyrophosphate imaging. Of patients with persistent anterior ST depression (greater than 72 hours), 87% had posterior infarction detected by pyrophosphate scan. In patients with inferior myocardial infarction, vectorcardiographic evidence of posterior infarction correlated poorly with pyrophosphate imaging data. Right ventricular infarction was present on pyrophosphate imaging in 40% of patients with pyrophosphate changes of posterior infarction but without vectorcardiographic evidence of posterior infarction. It is concluded that: 1) the majority of patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction have anterior ST segment depression; 2) early anterior ST segment depression in such patients is not a specific marker for posterior infarction; and 3) standard vectorcardiographic criteria for transmural posterior infarction may be inaccurate in patients with concomitant transmural inferior myocardial infarction or right ventricular infarction, or both.

  9. Why I tense up when you watch me: Inferior parietal cortex mediates an audience’s influence on motor performance

    PubMed Central

    Yoshie, Michiko; Nagai, Yoko; Critchley, Hugo D.; Harrison, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an evaluative audience can alter skilled motor performance through changes in force output. To investigate how this is mediated within the brain, we emulated real-time social monitoring of participants’ performance of a fine grip task during functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging. We observed an increase in force output during social evaluation that was accompanied by focal reductions in activity within bilateral inferior parietal cortex. Moreover, deactivation of the left inferior parietal cortex predicted both inter- and intra-individual differences in socially-induced change in grip force. Social evaluation also enhanced activation within the posterior superior temporal sulcus, which conveys visual information about others’ actions to the inferior parietal cortex. Interestingly, functional connectivity between these two regions was attenuated by social evaluation. Our data suggest that social evaluation can vary force output through the altered engagement of inferior parietal cortex; a region implicated in sensorimotor integration necessary for object manipulation, and a component of the action-observation network which integrates and facilitates performance of observed actions. Social-evaluative situations may induce high-level representational incoherence between one’s own intentioned action and the perceived intention of others which, by uncoupling the dynamics of sensorimotor facilitation, could ultimately perturbe motor output. PMID:26787326

  10. Why I tense up when you watch me: Inferior parietal cortex mediates an audience's influence on motor performance.

    PubMed

    Yoshie, Michiko; Nagai, Yoko; Critchley, Hugo D; Harrison, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an evaluative audience can alter skilled motor performance through changes in force output. To investigate how this is mediated within the brain, we emulated real-time social monitoring of participants' performance of a fine grip task during functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging. We observed an increase in force output during social evaluation that was accompanied by focal reductions in activity within bilateral inferior parietal cortex. Moreover, deactivation of the left inferior parietal cortex predicted both inter- and intra-individual differences in socially-induced change in grip force. Social evaluation also enhanced activation within the posterior superior temporal sulcus, which conveys visual information about others' actions to the inferior parietal cortex. Interestingly, functional connectivity between these two regions was attenuated by social evaluation. Our data suggest that social evaluation can vary force output through the altered engagement of inferior parietal cortex; a region implicated in sensorimotor integration necessary for object manipulation, and a component of the action-observation network which integrates and facilitates performance of observed actions. Social-evaluative situations may induce high-level representational incoherence between one's own intentioned action and the perceived intention of others which, by uncoupling the dynamics of sensorimotor facilitation, could ultimately perturbe motor output. PMID:26787326

  11. Catheter-directed thrombolysis for double inferior vena cava with deep venous thrombosis: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Chen, Zhengxin; Cai, Qianrong

    2014-08-01

    Double inferior vena cava (DIVC) with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is rare, and there is only one reported case of DIVC with DVT treated by catheter-directed thrombolysis. We report a case of a 32-year-old man with an extensive venous clot involving the infrarenal segment of a double IVC who received filter implantation and catheter-directed thrombolysis.

  12. Patellar Shape-Memory Fixator for the Treatment of Comminuted Fractures of the Inferior Pole of the Patella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin-Wei; Shang, Hui-Juan; Xu, Shuo-Gui; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Chun-Cai; Fu, Qing-Ge

    2011-07-01

    Comminuted and displaced fractures of the inferior pole of the patella are not easy to reduce and it is difficult to fix the fragments soundly enough to allow early movement of the knee. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the internal fixation technique with Patellar Shape-Memory Fixator (PSMF) in acute comminuted fractures of the inferior pole of the patella. We retrospectively studied 25 patients with comminuted fractures of the inferior pole of the patella who were treated with PSMF and followed up for a mean period of 26 months (14 to 60). All the fractures healed at a mean of 6 weeks (5 to 7). The mean grading at the final follow-up was 29.5 points (27 to 30) using the Bostman score, with no observable restriction of movement. No breakage of the PSMF or infection occurred. No delayed union, nonunion, and infection were seen. This technique preserved the length of the patella, reduced the comminuted fragments of the inferior pole and avoided long-term immobilization of the knee.

  13. The Inferior Whorl For Detecting Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Using Corneal Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Ferdousi, Maryam; Marshall, Andrew; Alam, Uazman; Ponirakis, Georgios; Azmi, Shazli; Fadavi, Hassan; Efron, Nathan; Tavakoli, Mitra; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. In vivo corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) is increasingly used as a surrogate endpoint in studies of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). However, it is not clear whether imaging the central cornea provides optimal diagnostic utility for DPN. Therefore, we compared nerve morphology in the central cornea and the inferior whorl, a more distal and densely innervated area located inferior and nasal to the central cornea. Methods. A total of 53 subjects with type 1/type 2 diabetes and 15 age-matched control subjects underwent detailed assessment of neuropathic symptoms (NPS), deficits (neuropathy disability score [NDS]), quantitative sensory testing (vibration perception threshold [VPT], cold and warm threshold [CT/WT], and cold- and heat-induced pain [CIP/HIP]), and electrophysiology (sural and peroneal nerve conduction velocity [SSNCV/PMNCV], and sural and peroneal nerve amplitude [SSNA/PMNA]) to diagnose patients with (DPN+) and without (DPN−) neuropathy. Corneal nerve fiber density (CNFD) and length (CNFL) in the central cornea, and inferior whorl length (IWL) were quantified. Results. Comparing control subjects to DPN− and DPN+ patients, there was a significant increase in NDS (0 vs. 2.6 ± 2.3 vs. 3.3 ± 2.7, P < 0.01), VPT (V; 5.4 ± 3.0 vs. 10.6 ± 10.3 vs. 17.7 ± 11.8, P < 0.01), WT (°C; 37.7 ± 3.5 vs. 39.1 ± 5.1 vs. 41.7 ± 4.7, P < 0.05), and a significant decrease in SSNCV (m/s; 50.2 ± 5.4 vs. 48.4 ± 5.0 vs. 39.5 ± 10.6, P < 0.05), CNFD (fibers/mm2; 37.8 ± 4.9 vs. 29.7 ± 7.7 vs. 27.1 ± 9.9, P < 0.01), CNFL (mm/mm2; 27.5 ± 3.6 vs. 24.4 ± 7.8 vs. 20.7 ± 7.1, P < 0.01), and IWL (mm/mm2; 35.1 ± 6.5 vs. 26.2 ± 10.5 vs. 23.6 ± 11.4, P < 0.05). For the diagnosis of DPN, CNFD, CNFL, and IWL achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.75, 0.74, and 0.70, respectively, and a combination of IWL-CNFD achieved an AUC of 0.76. Conclusions. The parameters of CNFD, CNFL, and IWL have a comparable ability to diagnose patients with DPN. However, IWL

  14. A study of the inferior mesenteric and pelvic ganglia of guinea-pigs with intracellular electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Crowcroft, P. J.; Szurszewski, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    1. Ganglion cells in the inferior mesenteric ganglion (IMG) and the pelvic plexus of the guinea-pig were studied using intracellular micro-electrodes. 2. Ganglion cells had resting membrane potentials of 55-65 mV. Threshold for initiation of an action potential ranged from 10 to 20 mV depolarization. Action potentials often exceeded 100 mV in amplitude and were followed by an after-hyperpolarization of up to 20 mV. 3. Synaptic responses were recorded from cells in the IMG in response to stimulation of the right and left hypogastric nerves, ascending mesenteric, inferior splanchnic and colonic nerves. It has been established that more than forty preganglionic fibres converge on any one cell. Preganglionic fibres to the IMG were also observed in the pelvic nerves. 4. In contrast to the IMG, ganglion cells in the pelvic plexus received up to ten preganglionic fibres. 5. Ganglion cells responded to supramaximal preganglionic stimulation with up to four action potentials. 6. In the IMG, action potentials in response to synaptic action were followed by a prolonged period of hyperpolarization (after-hyperpolarization) and a later phase of prolonged depolarization (after-depolarization). The time course of these after potentials depended on the pattern of firing of action potentials during the period of stimulation. In the presence of dihydro-β-erythroidine, or if synaptic action was insufficient to evoke action potentials, only the after-depolarization was observed. 7. Other cells were impaled whose properties differed from those described above. In one group of cells the resting membrane potentials were higher (up to 85 mV), input resistances lower and the threshold for initiation of an action potential was higher. The other group were inexcitable, had high resting membrane potentials (up to 85 mV), low input resistances and underwent a slow depolarization in response to repetitive stimulation of preganglionic fibres. 8. This study indicates that marked convergence of

  15. Prolonged Delayed Graft Function Is Associated with Inferior Patient and Kidney Allograft Survivals

    PubMed Central

    de Sandes-Freitas, Tainá Veras; Felipe, Cláudia Rosso; Aguiar, Wilson Ferreira; Cristelli, Marina Pontello; Tedesco-Silva, Hélio; Medina-Pestana, José Osmar

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear if there is an association between the duration of delayed graft function (DGF) and kidney transplant (KT) outcomes. This study investigated the impact of prolonged DGF on patient and graft survivals, and renal function one year after KT. This single center retrospective analysis included all deceased donor KT performed between Jan/1998 and Dec/2008 (n = 1412). Patients were grouped in quartiles according to duration of DGF (1–5, 6–10, 11–15, and >15 days, designated as prolonged DGF). The overall incidence of DGF was 54.2%. Prolonged DGF was associated with retransplantation (OR 2.110, CI95% 1.064–4.184,p = 0.033) and more than 3 HLA mismatches (OR 1.819, CI95% 1.117–2.962,p = 0.016). The incidence of acute rejection was higher in patients with DGF compared with those without DGF (36.2% vs. 12.2%, p<0.001). Compared to patients without DGF, DGF(1–5), DGF(6–10), and DGF(11–15), patients with prolonged DGF showed inferior one year patient survival (95.2% vs. 95.4% vs. 95.5% vs. 93.4% vs. 88.86%, p = 0.003), graft survival (91% vs. 91.4% vs. 92% vs. 88.7% vs. 70.5%, p<0.001), death-censored graft survival (95.7% vs. 95.4% vs. 96.4% vs. 94% vs. 79.3%, p<0.001), and creatinine clearance (58.0±24.6 vs. 55.8±22.2 vs. 53.8±24.1 vs. 53.0±27.2 vs. 36.8±27.0 mL/min, p<0.001), respectively. Multivariable analysis showed that prolonged DGF was an independent risk factor for graft loss (OR 3.876, CI95% 2.270–6.618, p<0.001), death censored graft loss (OR 4.103, CI95% 2.055–8.193, p<0.001), and death (OR 3.065, CI95% 1.536–6.117, p = 0.001). Prolonged DGF, determined by retransplantation and higher HLA mismatches, was associated with inferior renal function, and patient and graft survivals at one year. PMID:26679933

  16. Telephone Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Non-inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Cynthia M.; Mataix-Cols, David; Lovell, Karina; Krebs, Georgina; Lang, Katie; Byford, Sarah; Heyman, Isobel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Many adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) do not have access to evidence-based treatment. A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial was conducted in a specialist OCD clinic to evaluate the effectiveness of telephone cognitive-behavioral therapy (TCBT) for adolescents with OCD compared to standard clinic-based, face-to-face CBT. Method Seventy-two adolescents, aged 11 through 18 years with primary OCD, and their parents were randomized to receive specialist TCBT or CBT. The intervention provided differed only in the method of treatment delivery. All participants received up to 14 sessions of CBT, incorporating exposure with response prevention (E/RP), provided by experienced therapists. The primary outcome measure was the Children’s Yale–Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS). Blind assessor ratings were obtained at midtreatment, posttreatment, 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. Results Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that TCBT was not inferior to face-to-face CBT at posttreatment, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up. At 12-month follow-up, there were no significant between-group differences on the CY-BOCS, but the confidence intervals exceeded the non-inferiority threshold. All secondary measures confirmed non-inferiority at all assessment points. Improvements made during treatment were maintained through to 12-month follow-up. Participants in each condition reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention received. Conclusion TCBT is an effective treatment and is not inferior to standard clinic-based CBT, at least in the midterm. This approach provides a means of making a specialized treatment more accessible to many adolescents with OCD. Clinical trial registration information–Evaluation of telephone-administered cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) for young people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); http://www.controlled-trials.com; ISRCTN27070832. PMID:25457928

  17. [Anatomic study of the right ventricular inferior wall. Search for the optimal site for implanting epicardial pacing electrodes].

    PubMed

    Gavelle, P; Laurens, P; Guérinon, J; Maurice, P

    1983-12-01

    The inferior wall of the right ventricle was studied to determine the optimal site of implantation of epicardial pacing electrodes. The hearts of 10 patients without cardiac disease, aged 57 to 84 years, who died in Broussais hospital, were studied. The hearts were washed, weighed (300 to 550 g) and placed in a formol solution to which was added half its volume of Larsen's solution. They were then examined and cut in sections about 0,8 cm thick, perpendicular to the long axis of the heart. Each section was drawn and the thickness of the inferior right ventricular wall measured. The inferior wall of the right ventricle is shaped like a right angled triangle limited medially by the inferior interventricular groove, posteriorly by the atrioventricular groove (containing the right coronary artery), and laterally by the right free border. The surface area of the triangle varies between 14 and 34 cm2, a fatty border is always observed, and, in 5 out of 10 cases, vessels (arteries and veins) run in a randomised fashion across its surface. The inferior wall is very irregular on section, appearing craggy and cavernous with sudden variations of 1 to 10 mm in thickness due to the many 2nd and 3rd order trabeculations. In the muscular zone near the interventricular septum, the thickness varies from 2 to 10 mm, but only 10 out of 70 measurements were less than 4 mm. In the middle and central zones, only 34 out of 182 measurements were less than 4 mm thick. On the other hand, at the apex and right border of the heart, the values fell to 7 mm and parts of the anterior right ventricular wall was as thin as 0,5 mm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Postulating a Role for Connective Tissue Elements in Inferior Oblique Muscle Overaction (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Stager, David; McLoon, Linda K.; Felius, Joost

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the localization and density of collagens I, IV, VI, and elastin, the major protein components of connective tissue, in the inferior oblique muscle of patients with overelevation in adduction and in controls and to characterize changes that develop following surgery. Biomechanical studies suggest that the connective tissue matrix plays a critical role in extraocular muscle function, determining tensile strength and force transmission during contraction. Methods: Prospective laboratory-based case-control study of inferior oblique muscle specimens from 31 subjects: 16 with primary inferior oblique overaction, 6 with craniofacial dysostosis, and 9 normal controls. Collagen I, IV, VI, and elastin were localized and quantified using immunohistochemical staining. Densities were compared using analysis of variance and post hoc comparisons. Results: In primary inferior oblique overaction, all connective tissue components in unoperated specimens were elevated compared to controls (P<.0001). Previously operated muscles showed normal levels of collagens IV and VI (P>.27) but increased collagen I. In unoperated craniofacial dysostosis specimens, only elastin was elevated (P=.03), whereas density of collagens IV and VI was lower in previously operated vs unoperated specimens (P=.015). Conclusions: Elevated collagen and elastin levels in the cohort with primary inferior oblique overaction are consistent with the clinical finding of muscle stiffness. Contrarily, normal connective tissue densities in craniofacial dysostosis support the hypothesis that overelevation in this group reflects anomalous muscle vectors rather than tissue changes. Surgical intervention was associated with changes in the connective tissue matrix in both cohorts. These results have ramifications for treating patients with overelevation in adduction. PMID:24385670

  19. Studies on Budd-chiari syndrome complicated with hepatocellular carcinoma: most patients without inferior vena cava obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Xiaowei; Li, Luhao; Li, Suxin; Wang, Yafei; Li, Hai; Xu, Shaokai; Xu, Peiqin

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the characteristics of Budd-Chiari syndrome (B-CS) types, rate of HCC complicated by different types of B-CS and values of CTA in diagnosis of B-CS and HCC complicated by B-CS. Material and Methods: 494 patients with B-CS were analyzed retrospectively. All patients underwent CTA, which was used to assess the accuracy of diagnosing B-CS and the rate of HCC complicated by various kinds of B-CS. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pathological examination were used as gold standard. Results: Among 494 patients diagnosed by DSA, there were 21 (4.3%) cases of inferior vena cava type, 80 (16.2%) cases of hepatic vein type and 393 (79.6%) cases of hepatic vein combined with inferior vena cava complex type. The accuracy of diagnosing B-CS by CTA was 86.6% (428/494), in which the accuracy of diagnosing inferior vena cava type was 85.7% (18/21), 83.8% (67/80) for hepatic vein type and 87.3% (343/393) for complex type. The rate of HCC complicated by B-CS was 12.8% (63/494), among which inferior vena cava type was 4.8% (1/21), hepatic vein type was 11.3% (9/80) and complex type was 13.5% (53/393). There were no statistic differences between these three types (P=0.459). The accuracy of diagnosing HCC by CTA was 82.5% (52/63). Conclusion: B-CS in patients from China’s Yellow River basin is mainly hepatic vein combined with inferior vena cava complex type, which is more likely to be complicated by HCC. CTA plays an important role in diagnosing B-CS and HCC complicated by B-CS. PMID:26309561

  20. Biomechanical evaluation of inferior scapula notching of reverse shoulder arthroplasty depending on implant configuration and scapula neck anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tomas; Bäunker, Alexandra; Krämer, Manuel; Hurschler, Christof; Kaufmann, Melena; Pastor, Marc Frederic; Wellmann, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The presence of inferior scapula notching is significantly affected by the anatomy the scapula and can be influenced by the glenosphere design and position and the onlay type. Materials and Methods: A biomechanical study was undertaken with 13 human shoulder specimens in a robot-assisted shoulder simulator. Inferior scapula contact during adduction of the humerus was detected using a contact pressure film. Computed tomography scans with three-dimensional reconstructions of each specimen were performed. Results: The greatest improvement of the scapula notching angle (SNA) was achieved by simultaneous implantation of a shallow humeral onlay and an eccentric glenosphere design: 16.3-19.0° (P < 0.005). The SNA was significantly decreased by 5.8° when shifting from a 38 mm centric glenosphere to a 42 mm centric glenosphere (P < 0.005) and by 8.9° comparing the 38 mm centric glenosphere with 38 mm eccentric glenosphere (P < 0.005). The solitary implantation of a shallow onlay significantly decreased the SNA depending on the glenosphere size between 7.4° and 8.0° (P = 0.001). A more inferior position of the metaglene as well as a long scapula neck (P = 0.029) and a large lateral scapula pillar angle (P = 0.033) were correlated with a lower SNA. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the importance of inferior glenosphere placement and the benefit of eccentric glenosphere and shallow humeral cup design to reduce the adduction deficit of the reverse shoulder. The presence of a short neck of the scapula can have a negative prognostic effect on inferior impingement during adduction of the arm. Level of Evidence: Basic Science Study PMID:26622125

  1. The arcuate nucleus of the C57BL/6J mouse hindbrain is a displaced part of the inferior olive.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu Hong; Watson, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The arcuate nucleus is a prominent cell group in the human hindbrain, characterized by its position on the pial surface of the pyramid. It is considered to be a precerebellar nucleus and has been implicated in the pathology of several disorders of respiration. An arcuate nucleus has not been convincingly demonstrated in other mammals, but we have found a similarly positioned nucleus in the C57BL/6J mouse. The mouse arcuate nucleus consists of a variable group of neurons lying on the pial surface of the pyramid. The nucleus is continuous with the ventrolateral part of the principal nucleus of the inferior olive and both groups are calbindin positive. At first we thought that this mouse nucleus was homologous with the human arcuate nucleus, but we have discovered that the neurons of the human nucleus are calbindin negative, and are therefore not olivary in nature. We have compared the mouse arcuate neurons with those of the inferior olive in terms of molecular markers and cerebellar projection. The neurons of the arcuate nucleus and of the inferior olive share three major characteristics: they both contain neurons utilizing glutamate, serotonin or acetylcholine as neurotransmitters; they both project to the contralateral cerebellum, and they both express a number of genes not present in the major mossy fiber issuing precerebellar nuclei. Most importantly, both cell groups express calbindin in an area of the ventral hindbrain almost completely devoid of calbindin-positive cells. We conclude that the neurons of the hindbrain mouse arcuate nucleus are a displaced part of the inferior olive, possibly separated by the caudal growth of the pyramidal tract during development. The arcuate nucleus reported in the C57BL/6J mouse can therefore be regarded as a subgroup of the rostral inferior olive, closely allied with the ventral tier of the principal nucleus.

  2. Recency Effects in the Inferior Parietal Lobe during Verbal Recognition Memory.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, Bradley R; Ye, Donald; D'Esposito, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The most recently encountered information is often most easily remembered in psychological tests of memory. Recent investigations of the neural basis of such "recency effects" have shown that activation in the lateral inferior parietal cortex (LIPC) tracks the recency of a probe item when subjects make recognition memory judgments. A key question regarding recency effects in the LIPC is whether they fundamentally reflect the storage (and strength) of information in memory, or whether such effects are a consequence of task difficulty or an upswing in resting state network activity. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we show that recency effects in the LIPC are independent of the difficulty of recognition memory decisions, that they are not a by-product of an increase in resting state network activity, and that they appear to dissociate from regions known to be involved in verbal working memory maintenance. We conclude with a discussion of two alternative explanations - the memory strength and "expectancy" hypotheses, respectively - of the parietal lobe recency effect.

  3. Management of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Kidney with Inferior Vena Cava Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sahil; Majumder, Kaustav; Chahal, Anurag; Saini, Ashish K.; Gupta, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) are an aggressive group of small round cell tumors usually arising in the nervous system and affecting children. They have a tendency for local invasion, distant spread and formation of tumor thrombi. The kidney is a rare primary location for these tumors. Outcomes are frequently poor due to late diagnosis (Wilms tumor is a more common tumor in this population) and early spread. Immunohistochemistry is invaluable in making the diagnosis of PNET. We report a case of a primary renal PNET with extensive tumor thrombus into the inferior vena cava, and lung metastasis in a pediatric patient, and its successful management. Our 14-year-old patient with renal PNET was managed with radical nephrectomy, thrombectomy and chemotherapy and remains disease free to date. The diagnosis of renal PNETs should be considered in young adult patients who present with aggressive renal masses at initial presentations. Despite its aggressive nature, good outcomes can be achieved by a multimodality therapeutic strategy. PMID:26989372

  4. Evidence-based outcomes following inferior alveolar and lingual nerve injury and repair: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kushnerev, E; Yates, J M

    2015-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and lingual (LN) are susceptible to iatrogenic surgical damage. Systematically review recent clinical evidence regarding IAN/LN repair methods and to develop updated guidelines for managing injury. Recent publications on IAN/LN microsurgical repair from Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were screened by title/abstract. Main texts were appraised for exclusion criteria: no treatment performed or results provided, poor/lacking procedural description, cohort <3 patients. Of 366 retrieved papers, 27 were suitable for final analysis. Treatment type for injured IANs/LNs depended on injury type, injury timing, neurosensory disturbances and intra-operative findings. Best functional nerve recovery occurred after direct apposition and suturing if nerve ending gaps were <10 mm; larger gaps required nerve grafting (sural/greater auricular nerve). Timing of microneurosurgical repair after injury remains debated. Most authors recommend surgery when neurosensory deficit shows no improvement 90 days post-diagnosis. Nerve transection diagnosed intra-operatively should be repaired in situ; minor nerve injury repair can be delayed. No consensus exists regarding optimal methods and timing for IAN/LN repair. We suggest a schematic guideline for treating IAN/LN injury, based on the most current evidence. We acknowledge that additional RCTs are required to provide definitive confirmation of optimal treatment approaches. PMID:26059454

  5. Structural hierarchies define toughness and defect-tolerance despite simple and mechanically inferior brittle building blocks

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Dipanjan; Buehler, Markus J.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralized biological materials such as bone, sea sponges or diatoms provide load-bearing and armor functions and universally feature structural hierarchies from nano to macro. Here we report a systematic investigation of the effect of hierarchical structures on toughness and defect-tolerance based on a single and mechanically inferior brittle base material, silica, using a bottom-up approach rooted in atomistic modeling. Our analysis reveals drastic changes in the material crack-propagation resistance (R-curve) solely due to the introduction of hierarchical structures that also result in a vastly increased toughness and defect-tolerance, enabling stable crack propagation over an extensive range of crack sizes. Over a range of up to four hierarchy levels, we find an exponential increase in the defect-tolerance approaching hundred micrometers without introducing additional mechanisms or materials. This presents a significant departure from the defect-tolerance of the base material, silica, which is brittle and highly sensitive even to extremely small nanometer-scale defects. PMID:22355554

  6. Different serotonin receptor agonists have distinct effects on sound-evoked responses in inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M

    2006-11-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin has a complex set of effects on the auditory responses of neurons within the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain auditory nucleus that integrates a wide range of inputs from auditory and nonauditory sources. To determine whether activation of different types of serotonin receptors is a source of the variability in serotonergic effects, four selective agonists of serotonin receptors in the serotonin (5-HT) 1 and 5-HT2 families were iontophoretically applied to IC neurons, which were monitored for changes in their responses to auditory stimuli. Different agonists had different effects on neural responses. The 5-HT1A agonist had mixed facilitatory and depressive effects, whereas 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C agonists were both largely facilitatory. Different agonists changed threshold and frequency tuning in ways that reflected their effects on spike count. When pairs of agonists were applied sequentially to the same neurons, selective agonists sometimes affected neurons in ways that were similar to serotonin, but not to other selective agonists tested. Different agonists also differentially affected groups of neurons classified by the shapes of their frequency-tuning curves, with serotonin and the 5-HT1 receptors affecting proportionally more non-V-type neurons relative to the other agonists tested. In all, evidence suggests that the diversity of serotonin receptor subtypes in the IC is likely to account for at least some of the variability of the effects of serotonin and that receptor subtypes fulfill specialized roles in auditory processing. PMID:16870843

  7. The serotonin releaser fenfluramine alters the auditory responses of inferior colliculus neurons.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ian C; Hurley, Laura M

    2007-06-01

    Local direct application of the neuromodulator serotonin strongly influences auditory response properties of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC), but endogenous stores of serotonin may be released in a distinct spatial or temporal pattern. To explore this issue, the serotonin releaser fenfluramine was iontophoretically applied to extracellularly recorded neurons in the IC of the Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis). Fenfluramine mimicked the effects of serotonin on spike count and first spike latency in most neurons, and its effects could be blocked by co-application of serotonin receptor antagonists, consistent with fenfluramine-evoked serotonin release. Responses to fenfluramine did not vary during single applications or across multiple applications, suggesting that fenfluramine did not deplete serotonin stores. A predicted gradient in the effects of fenfluramine with serotonin fiber density was not observed, but neurons with fenfluramine-evoked increases in latency occurred at relatively greater recording depths compared to other neurons with similar characteristic frequencies. These findings support the conclusion that there may be spatial differences in the effects of exogenous and endogenous sources of serotonin, but that other factors such as the identities and locations of serotonin receptors are also likely to play a role in determining the dynamics of serotonergic effects. PMID:17339086

  8. Greater Left Inferior Frontal Activation for SVO than VOS during Sentence Comprehension in Kaqchikel

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Masatoshi; Kim, Jungho

    2016-01-01

    Cortical activations during the processing of Kaqchikel transitive sentences with canonical and non-canonical word orders were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Kaqchikel is an endangered Mayan language spoken in Guatemala. The word order in this language is relatively flexible. We observed higher cortical activations in the left inferior frontal gyrus for sentences with the subject-verb-object (SVO) word order, as compared to sentences with the verb-object-subject (VOS) word order, suggesting that Kaqchikel sentences are easier to process when they have the VOS order than when they have the SVO order. This supports the traditional analysis of Mayan word order: the syntactically simplest word order of transitive sentences in Mayan languages, including Kaqchikel, is VOS. More importantly, the results revealed that the subject-before-object word order preference in sentence comprehension, previously observed in other languages, might not reflect a universal aspect of human languages. Rather, processing preference may be language-specific to some extent, reflecting syntactic differences in individual languages. PMID:27790165

  9. Decreased norepinephrine (NE) uptake in cerebral cortex and inferior colliculus of genetically epilepsy prone (GEP) rats

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.A.; Rigler-Daugherty, S.K.; Long, G.; Jobe, P.C.; Wade, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    GEP rats are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to seizures caused by a variety of stimuli, most notably sound. Pharmacological treatments that reduce the synaptic concentration of NE increase seizure severity in GEP rats while elevations in NE have the opposite effect. GEP rats also display a widespread deficit in brain NE concentration suggesting that their increased seizure susceptibility is related to a deficit in noradrenergic transmission. The authors have compared the kinetics of /sup 3/H-NE uptake in the P/sub 2/ synaptosomal fraction isolated from the cerebral cortex of normal and GEP-rats. Although the apparent Kms were not significantly different (Normal +/- SEM:0.37 +/- 0.13..mu..M; GEP +/- SEM: 0.29 +/- 0.07..mu..M), the Vmax for GEP rats was 48% lower than that of normal rats (Normal +/- SEM: 474 +/- 45 fmole/mg/4min; GEP +/- SEM: 248 +/- 16 fmole/mg/4min). Because of the possible role of the inferior colliculus (IC) in the initiation of sound-induced seizures in GEP rats, the authors measured synaptosomal NE uptake in the IC using a NE concentration of 50 nM. The IC synaptosomal NE uptake was found to be 35% lower in GEP than in normal rats. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a deficit in noradrenergic transmission is related to the increased seizure susceptibility of GEP rats.

  10. TMS stimulation over the inferior parietal cortex disrupts prospective sense of agency.

    PubMed

    Chambon, Valérian; Moore, James W; Haggard, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Sense of agency refers to the feeling of controlling an external event through one's own action. On one influential view, sense of agency is inferred after an action, by "retrospectively" comparing actual effects of actions against their intended effects. However, it has been recently shown that earlier processes, linked to action selection, may also contribute to sense of agency, in advance of the action itself, and independently of action effects. The inferior parietal cortex (IPC) may underpin this "prospective" contribution to agency, by monitoring signals relating to fluency of action selection in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Here, we combined transcranial stimulation (TMS) with subliminal priming of action selection to investigate the causal role of these regions in the prospective coding of agency. In a first experiment, we showed that TMS over left IPC at the time of action selection disrupts perceived control over subsequent effects of action. In a second experiment, we exploited the temporal specificity of single-pulse TMS to pinpoint the exact timing of IPC contribution to sense of agency. We replicated the reduction in perceived control at the point of action selection, while observing no effect of TMS-induced disruption of IPC at the time of action outcomes. PMID:25134684

  11. Proteomic approaches for profiling negative fertility markers in inferior boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Woo-Sung; Oh, Shin-Ae; Kim, Ye-Ji; Rahman, Md Saidur; Park, Yoo-Jin; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict male fertility is of paramount importance for animal breeding industries and for human reproduction. Conventional semen analysis generally provides information on the quantitative parameters of spermatozoa, but yields no information concerning its functional competence. Proteomics have identified candidates for male fertility biomarkers, but no studies have clearly identified the relationship between the proteome and sperm fertility. Therefore, we performed a proteomic analysis to investigate small and large litter size boar spermatozoa and identify proteins related to male fertility. In this study, 20 proteins showed differential expression levels in small and large litter size groups. Nineteen of these proteins exhibited decreased expression in large litter size samples and increased expression in the small litter group. Interestingly, only one protein was highly expressed in the large litter size spermatozoa. We then identified signaling pathways associated with the differentially expressed protein markers. Glutathione S-transferase Mu3 and glutathione peroxidase 4 were related to the glutathione metabolic pathway and arginine vasopressin receptor 2 was linked to vasopressin R2/STAT. In summary, this is the first study to consider negative fertility biomarkers, and the identified proteins could potentially be used as biomarkers for the detection of inferior male fertility.

  12. [Current and future approaches for the treatment of inflammatory diseases of inferior respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Guidos Fogelbach, Guillermo Arturo; Rodríguez Velasco, Jorge Gabriel; Almeida Arvizu, Victor Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Among the allergic disorders we emphasize the inflammatory diseases of the inferior respiratory tract by their incidence, repercussion in daily activities, and by their high cost of medical attention. For their treatment, they require more than one inhaled or systemic drug. Current medicines tend to have adverse or secondary effects, such as: osteoporosis, type 3 diabetes mellitus, tremor or tachycardia. New medicines are being developed with less adverse or secondary effects, and much more selective and specific in the molecules involved in the allergic disease's physiopathology. Among them we find pascolizumab, which inhibits the differentiation made to Th2, as well as the citokines production. Other drugs are: mepolizumab, monoclonal antibody antiCD23, and the selective inhibitor of IgE (AJP13358) Rhu-Mab-E25. Currently, they are being developed some new drugs, such as SB-207499 (SKB) and LAS 31025, which are selective inhibitors of fosfodiesterase. Within the currently studied medicines that offer high specificity to inhibit the synthesis of interleukines we emphasize the presence of humanized monoclonal antibodies antireceptor IL-4. The anti IL-5 (SB-240563) is administered in asthmatic patients to reduce eosinofilia in expectoration. Tosilate of suplatast is a selective IL-4 and IL-5 inhibitor. Ramatroban (BAY or 3405) is an antagonist of the tromboxane A2 receptor, which reduces the inflammatory process of the nasal mucose without hemodynamic effects. Immunotherapy with peptides avoids the response of IgE by the allergen, without mast cell degranulation.

  13. Left middle temporal and inferior frontal regions contribute to speed of lexical decision: a TMS study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zude; Gold, Brian T; Chang, Chi-Fu; Wang, Suiping; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2015-02-01

    Activation of left anterior inferior frontal gyrus (aLIFG) and left middle temporal gyrus (LMTG) has been observed in some functional neuroimaging studies of lexical decision but not others. It is thus unclear whether these two regions are necessary for word recognition. By applying continuous theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) which temporally suppresses local brain function, we examined whether aLIFG and LMTG play causal roles in word recognition in a visual lexical decision task (LDT). Furthermore, we manipulated stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between prime and target to test whether these regions contribute to word recognition differently. In the LDT task, target words were preceded by semantically related primes (Related Condition; RC) or semantically unrelated words (Unrelated Condition; UC), under both short (150 ms) and long (600 ms) SOA conditions. TMS of aLIFG and LMTG significantly affected the word recognition speed compared to TMS of Vertex. Our results provide evidence that both aLIFG and LMTG contribute to word recognition speed. Furthermore, at short SOA, TMS of aLIFG or LMTG prolonged reaction time (RT). In contrast, at long SOA, there was a significant region by SOA by TMS interaction such that TMS of aLIFG prolonged RT, whereas TMS of LMTG speeded RT. These results suggest that aLIFG and LMTG may play different roles in word recognition.

  14. Are meals at full-service and fast-food restaurants "normal" or "inferior"?

    PubMed

    Kim, DaeHwan; Leigh, J Paul

    2011-12-01

    Whereas some studies show statistically significant linear associations between consumption at full-service restaurants and consumer incomes, studies of fast-food restaurants fail to find statistically significant linear associations. In this study, nationally representative data were drawn from the 1994-1996 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals and the accompanying Diet and Health Knowledge Survey. The sample contained 4972 individuals who were 21 years of age or older. Dependent variables measured number of restaurant visits on 2 nonconsecutive days. Income was total annual household income. Control variables reflected sociodemographic, economic, lifestyle, and attitudinal variables. To capture possible curvilinear relationships between income and food consumption, we analyzed frequency distributions, regressions on full samples including income squared, and we divided samples into above- and below-average income groups. Zero-inflated negative binomial regressions accounted for excessive zeros within dependent variables. We found that fast-food restaurants were "normal goods" for below-average income, but "inferior goods" for above-average income, whereas full-service restaurants were "normal" for virtually all income levels. Earlier studies were flawed because they only tested for linear associations. Our results have implications for the poverty and obesity debate.

  15. Right Double Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) with Preaortic Iliac Confluence - Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Babu, C S Ramesh; Lalwani, Rekha; Kumar, Indra

    2014-02-01

    Anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are uncommon and most of them remain asymptomatic. Though rare, anomalies of IVC can lead to severe hemorrhagic complications especially during aortoiliac surgery. Prior knowledge of these variations facilitates proper interpretation of radiological images and safe performance of interventional procedures and surgeries. During routine anatomical dissection of abdomen in a female cadaver we observed the presence of right sided duplication of IVC. Both IVCs were present on the right side of abdominal aorta, one ventral and the other more dorsal in position and named ventral right IVC and dorsal right IVC. The ventrally and medially placed IVC, which appeared to be the main IVC was formed by the union of two common iliac veins in front of the right common iliac artery (Preaortic iliac confluence-"Marsupial Cava"). The right external iliac vein continued as the more dorsally and laterally placed dorsal right IVC. The right internal iliac vein after receiving a transverse anastomotic vein from the external iliac continued as the right common iliac vein. This transverse anastomosis was present behind the right common iliac artery. The narrower dorsal right IVC joined the wider ventral right IVC just below the level of renal veins to form a single IVC. The abdominal aorta presented a convexity to the left.

  16. Successful Treatment of Acute on Chronic Mesenteric Ischaemia by Common Iliac to Inferior Mesenteric Artery Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Coakley, D. N.; Shaikh, F. M.; Kavanagh, E. G.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischaemia is a rare and potentially fatal condition most commonly due to atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of two or more mesenteric arteries. Multivessel revascularisation of both primary mesenteric vessels, the celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), is the current mainstay of treatment; however, in a certain cohort of patients, revascularisation one or both vessels may not be possible. Arteries may be technically unreconstructable or the patient may be surgically unfit for the prolonged aortic cross clamping times required. Here we present a case involving a 72-year-old woman with acute on chronic mesenteric ischaemia. She was a high risk surgical patient with severe unreconstructable stenotic disease of the SMA and celiac arteries. She was successfully treated with single vessel revascularisation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) via a common iliac to IMA reversed vein bypass. At two-year follow-up, the graft remains patent and the patient continues to be symptom-free and is maintaining her weight. PMID:26421207

  17. Network oscillations of inferior olive neurons: entrainment and phase-locking of locally-coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartrand, Thomas; Goldman, Mark S.; Lewis, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Although the inferior olive is known to contribute to the generation of timing and error signals for motor control, the specific role of its distinctive spatiotemporal activity patterns is still controversial. Olivary neurons display regular, sometimes synchronized oscillations of subthreshold membrane potential, driven in part by the highest density of electrical coupling of any brain region. We show that a reduced model of coupled phase oscillators is sufficient to reproduce and study experimental observations previously only demonstrated in more complex models. These include stable phase differences, variability of entrainment frequency, wave propagation, and cluster formation. Using the phase-response curve (PRC) of a conductance-based model of olivary neurons, we derive our phase model according to the theory of weakly-coupled oscillators. We retain the heterogeneity of intrinsic frequencies and heterogeneous, spatially constrained coupling as weak perturbations to the limit-cycle dynamics. Generalizing this model to an ensemble of coupled oscillator lattices with frequency and coupling disorder, we study the onset of entrainment and phase-locking as coupling is strengthened, including the scaling of cluster sizes with coupling strength near each phase transition.

  18. A causal role for inferior parietal lobule in emotion body perception.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Tahnée; de Graaf, Tom A; Sack, Alexander T; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations of emotion body perception have established that perceiving fearful body expressions critically triggers activity in dorsal stream structures related to action preparation. However, the causal contributions of these areas remain unclear. In the current experiment, we addressed this issue using online transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) in the dorsal stream and visual areas (extrastriate body area - EBA in the ventral stream and early visual cortex - EVC). Participants performed a delayed-match-to-sample task requiring detection of a change in posture of body expressions that were either neutral or fearful. Results revealed a significant interaction between the stimulation site and the emotional valence of stimuli, indicating that processing of emotional versus neutral bodies is affected differentially by stimulation of different central areas in body processing. IPL stimulation specifically enhanced fearful body processing. These findings relate emotion processing to separate processing streams, and moreover provide the first evidence that IPL plays a causal role in processing of fearful bodies. PMID:26460868

  19. Converging Neuronal Activity in Inferior Temporal Cortex during the Classification of Morphed Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Akrami, Athena; Liu, Yan; Treves, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    How does the brain dynamically convert incoming sensory data into a representation useful for classification? Neurons in inferior temporal (IT) cortex are selective for complex visual stimuli, but their response dynamics during perceptual classification is not well understood. We studied IT dynamics in monkeys performing a classification task. The monkeys were shown visual stimuli that were morphed (interpolated) between pairs of familiar images. Their ability to classify the morphed images depended systematically on the degree of morph. IT neurons were selected that responded more strongly to one of the 2 familiar images (the effective image). The responses tended to peak ∼120 ms following stimulus onset with an amplitude that depended almost linearly on the degree of morph. The responses then declined, but remained above baseline for several hundred ms. This sustained component remained linearly dependent on morph level for stimuli more similar to the ineffective image but progressively converged to a single response profile, independent of morph level, for stimuli more similar to the effective image. Thus, these neurons represented the dynamic conversion of graded sensory information into a task-relevant classification. Computational models suggest that these dynamics could be produced by attractor states and firing rate adaptation within the population of IT neurons. PMID:18669590

  20. Selecting Among Competing Alternatives: Selection and Retrieval in the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Moss, H.E.; Abdallah, S.; Fletcher, P.; Bright, P.; Pilgrim, L.; Acres, K.; Tyler, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    It has been widely argued that the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) is involved in the control of retrieval of information from long-term memory. Recent claims that the LIFG is involved in selecting among semantic alternatives have been challenged on the grounds that the manipulation of selection demands may have been confounded with controlled retrieval. The current study used an event-related functional magnetic resonance paradigm to re-examine the possibility that LIFG activation is involved in selection processes. In order to minimize potential confounding effects of controlled retrieval, we used an automatic retrieval task (picture naming) and held retrieval demands constant, while varying selection demands by way of competitor priming from earlier semantically related trials. We found significant activation in LIFG as a function of increased selection demands; activation centred on two peaks, one in anterior LIFG and a second more superior and posterior region. These data support the view that LIFG plays a role in selection among semantic information, even in the absence of controlled retrieval processes. PMID:15728742

  1. Responses of Neurons in Primary and Inferior Temporal Visual Cortices to Natural Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddeley, Roland; Abbott, L. F.; Booth, Michael C. A.; Sengpiel, Frank; Freeman, Tobe; Wakeman, Edward A.; Rolls, Edmund T.

    1997-12-01

    The primary visual cortex (V1) is the first cortical area to receive visual input, and inferior temporal (IT) areas are among the last along the ventral visual pathway. We recorded, in area V1 of anaesthetized cats and area IT of awake macaque monkeys, responses of neurons to videos of natural scenes. Responses were analysed to test various hypotheses concerning the nature of neural coding in these two regions. A variety of spike-train statistics were measured including spike-count distributions, interspike interval distributions, coefficients of variation, power spectra, Fano factors and different sparseness measures. All statistics showed non-Poisson characteristics and several revealed self-similarity of the spike trains. Spike-count distributions were approximately exponential in both visual areas for eight different videos and for counting windows ranging from 50 ms to 5 seconds. The results suggest that the neurons maximize their information carrying capacity while maintaining a fixed long-term-average firing rate, or equivalently, minimize their average firing rate for a fixed information carrying capacity.

  2. Neuronal morphology in subdivisions of the inferior colliculus of chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Niederleitner, Bertram; Luksch, Harald

    2012-05-01

    The avian inferior colliculus (IC), also referred to as the nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis (MLd), is an auditory midbrain nucleus that converges auditory cues from tonotopically organized brainstem nuclei. This information is relayed onto the optic tectum on the one hand and to nucleus ovoidalis on the other hand. Morphologically, there has been considerable debate about the number and nomenclature of the subnuclei within the IC. Here, we provide morphological characteristics of single cells in five IC subnuclei in chicken. The cellular structure within the IC was studied by whole-cell patch technique and biocytin iontophoresis. In addition, histological staining was performed, to delineate the borders between subnuclei of the IC. We were able to discriminate between 5 subnuclei: the core of the central nucleus (ICCc), the medial and lateral shell of the central nucleus (ICCms and ICCls), the external nucleus (ICX) and the superficial nucleus (ICS) of the IC. Our findings suggest the existence of at least two different morphologies of neurons with two subtypes each. The IC in chicken is a largely homogenous nucleus in terms of neuronal anatomy on a cellular level. However, its compartmentation into diversified subnuclei with different neurophysiological characteristics suggests a complex system to process auditory information. The auditory system in chicken is not as hypertrophied as in specialists such as the barn owl, but appears to have comparable connectivity and cellular morphology. PMID:22525356

  3. Changing from whole-cell to acellular pertussis vaccines would trade superior tolerability for inferior protection.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Notifications of infant deaths, assumed to be related to the introduction of new pentavalent DTwP-Hib-HBV childhood vaccines, caused, during 2008-2010 in few Asian countries, temporary interruptions of the respective vaccination programs. The sudden appearance of fatal cases was due to increased awareness/publicity and improved safety monitoring/reporting in countries with relatively high background infant mortalities. WHO investigations could not establish any causal relationships and vaccinations were again resumed. Recently, questions were raised in one concerned country as to why not to change to less reactogenic acellular pertussis (aP)-containing vaccines that are available in private practice and are generally perceived as 'better'. For resource-poor countries, the financial impacts render such a switch impossible and would also not be supported by external funding. Furthermore, it would be a disservice to the children, as in recent years evidence of inferior long-term efficacy of aP vaccines has accumulated. This report summarizes current knowledge on comparative whole-cell pertussis (wP) and aP vaccine performance, outlines the new July 2014 WHO guidance on the choice of pertussis vaccines and presents recent data on outbreak protection, antibody waning, long-term protection, wP-priming, pathogen adaptation, transmission and herd immunity.

  4. Excitatory, inhibitory and facilitatory frequency response areas in the inferior colliculus of hearing impaired mice.

    PubMed

    Felix, Richard A; Portfors, Christine V

    2007-06-01

    Individuals with age-related hearing loss often have difficulty understanding complex sounds such as basic speech. The C57BL/6 mouse suffers from progressive sensorineural hearing loss and thus is an effective tool for dissecting the neural mechanisms underlying changes in complex sound processing observed in humans. Neural mechanisms important for processing complex sounds include multiple tuning and combination sensitivity, and these responses are common in the inferior colliculus (IC) of normal hearing mice. We examined neural responses in the IC of C57Bl/6 mice to single and combinations of tones to examine the extent of spectral integration in the IC after age-related high frequency hearing loss. Ten percent of the neurons were tuned to multiple frequency bands and an additional 10% displayed non-linear facilitation to the combination of two different tones (combination sensitivity). No combination-sensitive inhibition was observed. By comparing these findings to spectral integration properties in the IC of normal hearing CBA/CaJ mice, we suggest that high frequency hearing loss affects some of the neural mechanisms in the IC that underlie the processing of complex sounds. The loss of spectral integration properties in the IC during aging likely impairs the central auditory system's ability to process complex sounds such as speech. PMID:17412539

  5. Left inferior-parietal lobe activity in perspective tasks: identity statements.

    PubMed

    Arora, Aditi; Weiss, Benjamin; Schurz, Matthias; Aichhorn, Markus; Wieshofer, Rebecca C; Perner, Josef

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the theory that the left inferior parietal lobe (IPL) is closely associated with tracking potential differences of perspective. Developmental studies find that perspective tasks are mastered at around 4 years of age. Our first study, meta-analyses of brain imaging studies shows that perspective tasks specifically activate a region in the left IPL and precuneus. These tasks include processing of false belief, visual perspective, and episodic memory. We test the location specificity theory in our second study with an unusual and novel kind of perspective task: identity statements. According to Frege's classical logical analysis, identity statements require appreciation of modes of presentation (perspectives). We show that identity statements, e.g., "the tour guide is also the driver" activate the left IPL in contrast to a control statements, "the tour guide has an apprentice." This activation overlaps with the activations found in the meta-analysis. This finding is confirmed in a third study with different types of statements and different comparisons. All studies support the theory that the left IPL has as one of its overarching functions the tracking of perspective differences. We discuss how this function relates to the bottom-up attention function proposed for the bilateral IPL.

  6. Histology of Tissue Adherent to OptEase Inferior Vena Cava Filters Regarding Indwelling Time

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri Volkov, Alexander; Garniek, Alexander; Golan, Gil; Bensaid, Paul; Khaitovich, Boris; Abu-Salah, Kamel; Zissin, Rivka; Simon, Daniel; Konen, Eli

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the histology of tissues found on retrieved filters with regard to indwelling time. Between February 2006 and January 2007, 28 Optease inferior vena cava filters (Cordis Europa, Roden, The Netherlands) were retrieved from 27 patients. Twenty-two filters were inserted prophylactically for trauma patients and six for patients with venous thromboembolism. Cavography was performed both before and after filter removal to evaluate the presence of thrombi or wall damage. Filters were retrieved with the snare and sheath method. All material adherents to the filters were examined histologically.The mean indwelling time of the filters was 24.9 days (range, 6-69 days). Red tissue fragments were seen on all the filters, consistent microscopically with clots and fibrin. On five filters (18%; mean indwelling time, 45.4 days) white tissue consistent with vascular intima was found. All postprocedure cavographies were normal. We conclude that most material adherent to the retrieved filters is thrombi, while vascular intima can be found in the minority of filters with a longer indwelling time.

  7. Inferior frontal cortex activity is modulated by reward sensitivity and performance variability.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Ávila, César; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Costumero, Víctor; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan Carlos; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    High reward sensitivity has been linked with motivational and cognitive disorders related with prefrontal and striatal brain function during inhibitory control. However, few studies have analyzed the interaction among reward sensitivity, task performance and neural activity. Participants (N=57) underwent fMRI while performing a Go/No-go task with Frequent-go (77.5%), Infrequent-go (11.25%) and No-go (11.25%) stimuli. Task-associated activity was found in inhibition-related brain regions, with different activity patterns for right and left inferior frontal gyri (IFG): right IFG responded more strongly to No-go stimuli, while left IFG responded similarly to all infrequent stimuli. Reward sensitivity correlated with omission errors in Go trials and reaction time (RT) variability, and with increased activity in right and left IFG for No-go and Infrequent-go stimuli compared with Frequent-go. Bilateral IFG activity was associated with RT variability, with reward sensitivity mediating this association. These results suggest that reward sensitivity modulates behavior and brain function during executive control.

  8. Mad-honey sexual activity and acute inferior myocardial infarctions in a married couple.

    PubMed

    Yarlioglues, Mikail; Akpek, Mahmut; Ardic, Idris; Elcik, Deniz; Sahin, Omer; Kaya, Mehmet Gungor

    2011-01-01

    Mad-honey poisoning can occur after the eating of honey that contains grayanotoxin. Mad honey is intentionally produced from the nectar of Rhododendron ponticum, which grows in Japan, Nepal, Brazil, parts of North America and Europe, and the eastern Black Sea region of Turkey. Low doses of grayanotoxin can cause dizziness, hypotension, and bradycardia, and high doses can cause impaired consciousness, syncope, atrioventricular block, and asystole due to vagal stimulation. Reports of acute coronary syndrome are very rare. Herein, we present the case of a 50-year-old husband and 42-year-old wife who, to improve sexual performance, intentionally ate honey from the Black Sea area of Turkey for 1 week. Within 3 hours of consuming increased amounts of the honey, they presented at our emergency department with acute inferior myocardial infarctions. Coronary angiography revealed normal coronary arteries in both patients. Supportive treatment with atropine rapidly resolved the clinical symptoms and electrocardiographic irregularities. Grayanotoxin-containing rhododendron pollen was detected in the honey.In patients from geographic regions where mad honey can be obtained, mad-honey poisoning should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chest pain, particularly in the presence of unexplained bradyarrhythmia and hypotension. Sexual performance is a chief reason for the purchase of mad honey and self-treatment with it by persons of our patients' ages.

  9. Pancreatic and multiorgan resection with inferior vena cava reconstruction for retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, John A; Fakhre, G Peter; Dougherty, Marjorie K; Nakhleh, Raouf E; Maples, William J; Nguyen, Justin H

    2009-01-01

    Background Inferior vena cava (IVC) leiomyosarcoma is a rare tumor of smooth muscle origin. It is often large by the time of diagnosis and may involve adjacent organs. A margin-free resection may be curative, but the resection must involve the tumor en bloc with the affected segment of vena cava and locally involved organs. IVC resection often requires vascular reconstruction, which can be done with prosthetic graft. Case presentation We describe a 39-year-old man with an IVC leiomyosarcoma that involved the adrenal gland, distal pancreas, and blood supply to the spleen and left kidney. Tumor excision involved en bloc resection of all involved organs with reimplantation of the right renal vein and reconstruction of the IVC with a polytetrafluoroethylene graft. The patient recovered without renal insufficiency, graft infection, or other complications. Follow-up abdominal imaging at 1 year showed a patent IVC graft and no locally recurrent tumor. Prosthetic graft provides a sufficient diameter and length for replacement conduit in extensive resection of IVC leiomyosarcoma. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first case of resection of an IVC sarcoma with prosthetic graft reconstruction in combination with pancreatic resection. Aggressive surgical resection including vascular reconstruction is warranted for select IVC tumors to achieve a potentially curative outcome. PMID:19126222

  10. Development of hyperactivity after acoustic trauma in the guinea pig inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mulders, W H A M; Robertson, D

    2013-04-01

    The time of onset of hyperactivity (increased spontaneous firing rates) was investigated by single neuron recording in the inferior colliculus (IC) of guinea pigs subjected to unilateral acoustic trauma (exposure to a loud 10 kHz tone). Hyperactivity was present by 12 h post acoustic trauma whereas data obtained within approximately 4 h of the cessation of acoustic trauma found no evidence of hyperactivity. These data suggest that hyperactivity in the IC begins at some time between 4 and 12 h post trauma and is a relatively rapid plastic event beginning within hours rather than days post cochlear trauma. This is consistent with results reported in the cat auditory cortex (Norena and Eggermont, 2003). Hyperactivity did not show any further systematic increase between 12 h and up to 2 weeks post acoustic trauma. At recovery times of 12 and 24 h hyperactivity was widespread across most regions of the IC but at longer recovery times, it became progressively more restricted to ventral regions corresponding to the regions of the cochlea where there was persistent damage. PMID:23276730

  11. First spike latency code for interaural phase difference discrimination in the guinea pig inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Oran; Shackleton, Trevor M; Nelken, Israel; Palmer, Alan R; Shamir, Maoz

    2011-06-22

    First spike latency has been suggested as a source of the information required for fast discrimination tasks. However, the accuracy of such a mechanism has not been analyzed rigorously. Here, we investigate the utility of first spike latency for encoding information about the location of a sound source, based on the responses of inferior colliculus (IC) neurons in the guinea pig to interaural phase differences (IPDs). First spike latencies of many cells in the guinea pig IC show unimodal tuning to stimulus IPD. We investigated the discrimination accuracy of a simple latency code that estimates stimulus IPD from the preferred IPD of the single cell that fired first. Surprisingly, despite being based on only a single spike, the accuracy of the latency code is comparable to that of a conventional rate code computed over the entire response. We show that spontaneous firing limits the capacity of the latency code to accumulate information from large neural populations. This detrimental effect can be overcome by generalizing the latency code to estimate the stimulus IPD from the preferred IPDs of the population of cells that fired the first n spikes. In addition, we show that a good estimate of the neural response time to the stimulus, which can be obtained from the responses of the cells whose response latency is invariant to stimulus identity, limits the detrimental effect of spontaneous firing. Thus, a latency code may provide great improvement in response speed at a small cost to the accuracy of the decision. PMID:21697370

  12. A function for binaural integration in auditory grouping and segregation in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kyle T; Shackleton, Trevor M; Magezi, David A; Palmer, Alan R

    2015-03-15

    Responses of neurons to binaural, harmonic complex stimuli in urethane-anesthetized guinea pig inferior colliculus (IC) are reported. To assess the binaural integration of harmonicity cues for sound segregation and grouping, responses were measured to harmonic complexes with different fundamental frequencies presented to each ear. Simultaneously gated harmonic stimuli with fundamental frequencies of 125 Hz and 145 Hz were presented to the left and right ears, respectively, and recordings made from 96 neurons with characteristic frequencies >2 kHz in the central nucleus of the IC. Of these units, 70 responded continuously throughout the stimulus and were excited by the stimulus at the contralateral ear. The stimulus at the ipsilateral ear excited (EE: 14%; 10/70), inhibited (EI: 33%; 23/70), or had no significant effect (EO: 53%; 37/70), defined by the effect on firing rate. The neurons phase locked to the temporal envelope at each ear to varying degrees depending on signal level. Many of the cells (predominantly EO) were dominated by the response to the contralateral stimulus. Another group (predominantly EI) synchronized to the contralateral stimulus and were suppressed by the ipsilateral stimulus in a phasic manner. A third group synchronized to the stimuli at both ears (predominantly EE). Finally, a group only responded when the waveform peaks from each ear coincided. We conclude that these groups of neurons represent different "streams" of information but exhibit modifications of the response rather than encoding a feature of the stimulus, like pitch. PMID:25540219

  13. Failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block among dental students and interns

    PubMed Central

    AlHindi, Maryam; Rashed, Bayan; AlOtaibi, Noura

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) among dental students and interns, causes of failure, investigate awareness of different IANB techniques, and to report IANB-associated complications. Methods: A 3-page questionnaire containing 13 questions was distributed to a random sample of 350 third to fifth years students and interns at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on January 2011. It included demographic questions (age, gender, and academic level) and questions on IANB failure frequency and reasons, actions taken to overcome the failure, and awareness of different anesthetic techniques, supplementary techniques, and complications. Results: Of the 250 distributed questionnaires, 238 were returned (68% response rate). Most (85.7%) of surveyed sample had experienced IANB failure once or twice. The participants attributed the failures most commonly (66.45%) to anatomical variations. The most common alternative technique used was intraligamentary injection (57.1%), although 42.8% of the sample never attempted any alternatives. Large portion of the samples stated that they either lacked both knowledge of and training for other techniques (44.9%), or that they had knowledge of them but not enough training to perform them (45.8%). Conclusion: To decrease IANB failure rates for dental students and interns, knowledge of landmarks, anatomical variation and their training in alternatives to IANB, such as the Gow-Gates and Akinosi techniques, both theoretically and clinically in the dental curriculum should be enhanced. PMID:26739980

  14. fMRI adaptation reveals mirror neurons in human inferior parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Chong, Trevor T-J; Cunnington, Ross; Williams, Mark A; Kanwisher, Nancy; Mattingley, Jason B

    2008-10-28

    Mirror neurons, as originally described in the macaque, have two defining properties [1, 2]: They respond specifically to a particular action (e.g., bringing an object to the mouth), and they produce their action-specific responses independent of whether the monkey executes the action or passively observes a conspecific performing the same action. In humans, action observation and action execution engage a network of frontal, parietal, and temporal areas. However, it is unclear whether these responses reflect the activity of a single population that represents both observed and executed actions in a common neural code or the activity of distinct but overlapping populations of exclusively perceptual and motor neurons [3]. Here, we used fMRI adaptation to show that the right inferior parietal lobe (IPL) responds independently to specific actions regardless of whether they are observed or executed. Specifically, responses in the right IPL were attenuated when participants observed a recently executed action relative to one that had not previously been performed. This adaptation across action and perception demonstrates that the right IPL responds selectively to the motoric and perceptual representations of actions and is the first evidence for a neural response in humans that shows both defining properties of mirror neurons.

  15. Nerve injury associated with orthognathic surgery. Part 2: inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    McLeod, N M H; Bowe, D C

    2016-05-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is the most commonly injured structure during mandibular osteotomies. The prevalence of temporary injury has been reported as 70/100 patients (95% CI 67 to 73/100) or 56/100 nerves (95% CI 46 to 65/100), and the prevalence of permanent alteration in sensation was 33/100 patients (95% CI 30 to 35/100) or 20/100 nerves (95% CI 18 to 21/100) when assessed subjectively. The prevalence varied significantly between different operations (p<0.0001). It was significantly higher for sagittal split osteotomy (SSO) combined with genioplasty than for SSO alone (p<0.0001) or vertical ramus osteotomy (VRO) (p<0.0001). Injury may result from traction during stripping or manipulation of the distal fragment, incorrect placement of the cuts, or misjudged placement of fixation in ramus ostotomy. During SSO, they can occur during retraction to make cuts in the medial ramus, when the bone is cut or split, and on fixation. The impact of injury is generally said to be low as it does not seem to affect patients' opinions about the operation. PMID:26922403

  16. Inferior alveolar nerve injuries associated with mandibular fractures at risk: a two-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Boffano, Paolo; Roccia, Fabio; Gallesio, Cesare; Karagozoglu, K; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury in mandibular fractures. This study is based on two databases that have continuously recorded patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures in two departments-Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Turin, Italy. Demographic, anatomic, and etiology variables were considered for each patient and statistically assessed in relation to the neurosensory IAN impairment. Statistically significant associations were found between IAN injury and fracture displacement (p = 0.03), isolated mandibular fractures (p = 0.01), and angle fractures (p = 0.004). A statistically significant association was also found between IAN injury and assaults (p = 0.03). Displaced isolated mandibular angle fractures could be considered at risk for increased incidence of IAN injury. Assaults seem to be the most important etiological factor that is responsible for IAN lesions. PMID:25383147

  17. Modeling Flow Past a TrapEase Inferior Vena Cava Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Michael; Henshaw, William; Wang, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    This study uses three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the efficacy of the TrapEase inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. Hemodynamics of the unoccluded and partially occluded filter are examined, and the clinical implications are assessed. The IVC, which is the primary vein that drains the legs, is modeled as a straight pipe, and a geometrically accurate model of the filter is constructed using computer aided design. Blood is modeled as a homogeneous, incompressible, Newtonian fluid, and the method of overset grids is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. Results are corroborated with in-vitro studies. Flow around the unoccluded filter demonstrates minimal disruption, but spherical clots in the downstream trapping position lead to regions of stagnant and recirculating flow that may promote further clotting. The volume of stagnant flow and the peak wall shear stress increase with clot volume. For clots trapped in the upstream trapping position, flow is disrupted along the cava wall downstream of the clot and within the filter. The shape and location of trapped clots also effect the peak wall shear stress and may impact the efficacy of the filter.

  18. Behavioral demand modulates object category representation in the inferior temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Emadi, Nazli; Esteky, Hossein

    2014-11-15

    Visual object categorization is a critical task in our daily life. Many studies have explored category representation in the inferior temporal (IT) cortex at the level of single neurons and population. However, it is not clear how behavioral demands modulate this category representation. Here, we recorded from the IT single neurons in monkeys performing two different tasks with identical visual stimuli: passive fixation and body/object categorization. We found that category selectivity of the IT neurons was improved in the categorization compared with the passive task where reward was not contingent on image category. The category improvement was the result of larger rate enhancement for the preferred category and smaller response variability for both preferred and nonpreferred categories. These specific modulations in the responses of IT category neurons enhanced signal-to-noise ratio of the neural responses to discriminate better between the preferred and nonpreferred categories. Our results provide new insight into the adaptable category representation in the IT cortex, which depends on behavioral demands.

  19. Outcome assessment of 603 cases of concomitant inferior turbinectomy and Le Fort I osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Movahed, Reza; Morales-Ryan, Carlos; Allen, Will R.; Warren, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective study assessed the outcome of 603 patients undergoing partial inferior turbinectomies (PIT) in association with Lefort I osteotomy. The study included 1234 patients from a single private practice; these patients had dentofacial deformities and underwent Lefort I osteotomy procedures. For the full patient group, 888 patients (72%) were women; in the turbinectomy group, 403 (67%) were women. The anteroposterior, transverse, and vertical dimensions of the mandible, maxilla, and occlusal plane of each subject were assessed, in addition to cephalometric analysis and determination of the presence or absence of temporomandibular joint disorders. PIT, when indicated, was performed after downfracture of the maxilla, providing access to the turbinates where approximately two thirds of the total turbinate volume was removed and septoplasty was completed if indicated. Hypertrophied turbinates causing significant nasal airway obstruction were present in 603 (49%) of the 1234 patients undergoing Le Fort I osteotomy. The results of this study showed that PIT performed simultaneously with Le Fort I osteotomy is a safe method of managing nasal airway obstruction related to hypertrophied turbinates with minimal complications. PMID:24082413

  20. Nicotine evokes kinetic tremor by activating the inferior olive via α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, Naofumi; Iha, Higor A; Shimizu, Saki; Tokudome, Kentaro; Mukai, Takahiro; Kinboshi, Masato; Serikawa, Tadao; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2016-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of movement disorders (e.g., tremor) and epilepsy. Here, we performed behavioral and immunohistochemical studies using mice and rats to elucidate the mechanisms underlying nicotine-induced tremor. Treatments of animals with nicotine (0.5-2mg/kg, i.p.) elicited kinetic tremor, which was completely suppressed by the nACh receptor antagonist mecamylamine (MEC). The specific α7 nACh receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) also inhibited nicotine-induced tremor, whereas the α4β2 nACh antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) or the peripheral α3β4 nACh antagonist hexamethonium showed no effects. Mapping analysis of Fos protein expression, a biological marker of neural excitation, revealed that a tremorgenic dose (1mg/kg) of nicotine region-specifically elevated Fos expression in the piriform cortex (PirC), medial habenula, solitary nucleus and inferior olive (IO) among 44 brain regions examined. In addition, similarly to the tremor responses, nicotine-induced Fos expression in the PirC and IO was selectively antagonized by MLA, but not by DHβE. Furthermore, an electrical lesioning of the IO, but not the PirC, significantly suppressed the induction of nicotine tremor. The present results suggest that nicotine elicits kinetic tremor in rodents by activating the IO neurons via α7 nACh receptors.

  1. Gene Transfection of Human Turbinate Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human Inferior Turbinate Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jin Seon; Park, Seung Hun; Baek, Ji Hye; Dung, Truong Minh; Kim, Sung Won; Min, Byoung Hyun; Kim, Jae Ho; Kim, Moon Suk

    2016-01-01

    Human turbinate mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs) are novel stem cells derived from nasal inferior turbinate tissues. They are easy to isolate from the donated tissue after turbinectomy or conchotomy. In this study, we applied hTMSCs to a nonviral gene delivery system using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a gene carrier; furthermore, the cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency of hTMSCs were evaluated to confirm their potential as resources in gene therapy. DNA-PEI nanoparticles (NPs) were generated by adding the PEI solution to DNA and were characterized by a gel electrophoresis and by measuring particle size and surface charge of NPs. The hTMSCs were treated with DNA-PEI NPs for 4 h, and toxicity of NPs to hTMSCs and gene transfection efficiency were monitored using MTT assay, fluorescence images, and flow cytometry after 24 h and 48 h. At a high negative-to-positive charge ratio, DNA-PEI NPs treatment led to cytotoxicity of hTMSCs, but the transfection efficiency of DNA was increased due to the electrostatic effect between the NPs and the membranes of hTMSCs. Importantly, the results of this research verified that PEI could deliver DNA into hTMSCs with high efficiency, suggesting that hTMSCs could be considered as untapped resources for applications in gene therapy. PMID:26783402

  2. Achilles' ear? Inferior human short-term and recognition memory in the auditory modality.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, James; Poremba, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the memory capabilities of nonhuman primates have consistently revealed a relative weakness for auditory compared to visual or tactile stimuli: extensive training is required to learn auditory memory tasks, and subjects are only capable of retaining acoustic information for a brief period of time. Whether a parallel deficit exists in human auditory memory remains an outstanding question. In the current study, a short-term memory paradigm was used to test human subjects' retention of simple auditory, visual, and tactile stimuli that were carefully equated in terms of discriminability, stimulus exposure time, and temporal dynamics. Mean accuracy did not differ significantly among sensory modalities at very short retention intervals (1-4 s). However, at longer retention intervals (8-32 s), accuracy for auditory stimuli fell substantially below that observed for visual and tactile stimuli. In the interest of extending the ecological validity of these findings, a second experiment tested recognition memory for complex, naturalistic stimuli that would likely be encountered in everyday life. Subjects were able to identify all stimuli when retention was not required, however, recognition accuracy following a delay period was again inferior for auditory compared to visual and tactile stimuli. Thus, the outcomes of both experiments provide a human parallel to the pattern of results observed in nonhuman primates. The results are interpreted in light of neuropsychological data from nonhuman primates, which suggest a difference in the degree to which auditory, visual, and tactile memory are mediated by the perirhinal and entorhinal cortices.

  3. The impact of orientation filtering on face-selective neurons in monkey inferior temporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Taubert, Jessica; Goffaux, Valerie; Van Belle, Goedele; Vanduffel, Wim; Vogels, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    Faces convey complex social signals to primates. These signals are tolerant of some image transformations (e.g. changes in size) but not others (e.g. picture-plane rotation). By filtering face stimuli for orientation content, studies of human behavior and brain responses have shown that face processing is tuned to selective orientation ranges. In the present study, for the first time, we recorded the responses of face-selective neurons in monkey inferior temporal (IT) cortex to intact and scrambled faces that were filtered to selectively preserve horizontal or vertical information. Guided by functional maps, we recorded neurons in the lateral middle patch (ML), the lateral anterior patch (AL), and an additional region located outside of the functionally defined face-patches (CONTROL). We found that neurons in ML preferred horizontal-passed faces over their vertical-passed counterparts. Neurons in AL, however, had a preference for vertical-passed faces, while neurons in CONTROL had no systematic preference. Importantly, orientation filtering did not modulate the firing rate of neurons to phase-scrambled face stimuli in any recording region. Together these results suggest that face-selective neurons found in the face-selective patches are differentially tuned to orientation content, with horizontal tuning in area ML and vertical tuning in area AL. PMID:26879148

  4. Sodium salicylate reduces the level of GABAB receptors in the rat's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Butt, S; Ashraf, F; Porter, L A; Zhang, H

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that sodium salicylate (SS) can cause hearing abnormalities through affecting the central auditory system. In order to understand central effects of the drug, we examined how a single intraperitoneal injection of the drug changed the level of subunits of the type-B γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAB receptor) in the rat's inferior colliculus (IC). Immunohistochemical and western blotting experiments were conducted three hours following a drug injection, as previous studies indicated that a tinnitus-like behavior could be reliably induced in rats within this time period. Results revealed that both subunits of the receptor, GABABR1 and GABABR2, reduced their level over the entire area of the IC. Such a reduction was observed in both cell body and neuropil regions. In contrast, no changes were observed in other brain structures such as the cerebellum. Thus, a coincidence existed between a structure-specific reduction in the level of GABAB receptor subunits in the IC and the presence of a tinnitus-like behavior. This coincidence likely suggests that a reduction in the level of GABAB receptor subunits was involved in the generation of a tinnitus-like behavior and/or used by the nervous system to restore normal hearing following application of SS. PMID:26705739

  5. Substance P-mediated membrane currents in voltage-clamped guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Griffith, W H; Hills, J M; Brown, D A

    1988-01-01

    Responses to substance P (SP) and to hypogastric nerve stimulation were recorded from voltage-clamped guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglion (IMG) neurons, and compared with those to muscarine. Muscarine produced a voltage-dependent inward current accompanied by a reduced input conductance and inhibition of IM a time- and voltage-dependent K+-current (Brown and Adams: Nature 283:673-676, 1980). SP also produced an inward current, accompanied by a fall in input conductance (20 out of 31 cells) or a rise in input conductance (7 out of 31 cells). The fall in input conductance was not accompanied by an inhibition of M-current (unlike frog ganglia: Adams et al.: British Journal of Pharmacology 79:330-333, 1983) or an inhibition of the inward rectifier current (unlike globus pallidus neurons: Stanfield et al.: Nature 315:498-501, 1985). Repetitive hypogastric nerve stimulation (10-20 Hz, 2-10 s) produced a slow inward postsynaptic current lasting 1-3 min, with decreases or increases of input conductance matching those produced by SP. The postsynaptic current did not show a consistent or reproducible change in amplitude on varying the holding potential between -90 and -25 mV. It is concluded that SP and hypogastric stimulation produce complex and variable changes in ionic conductance in IMG neurons.

  6. Inferior frontal gyrus white matter abnormalities in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Óscar F; Sousa, Sónia; Maia, Liliana; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Ganho, Ana; Fernandes-Gonçalves, Ana; Frank, Brandon; Pocinho, Fernando; Carracedo, Angel; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-06-17

    The aim of the present study is to explore obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)-related abnormalities in white matter connectivity in OCD for a core region associated with inhibitory control [i.e. inferior frontal gyrus (IFG)]. Fifteen patients with OCD (11 men) and 15 healthy controls (nine men) underwent diffusion tensor imaging scanning to study four diffusivity indexes of white matter integrity [fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity (RD)]. The results showed that persons with OCD manifested significantly lower fractional anisotropy levels in the bilateral IFG as well as its parcellations in the pars opercularis, pars triangularis, and pars orbitalis. Significantly higher levels of MD, RD were evident for the OCD group in the IFG as a whole as well as in the bilateral subregions of the pars triangularis and pars opercularis (for MD and RD), the right side of the pars orbitalis (for RD), and the left side of the pars triangularis and right side pars opercularis (for axial diffusivity). Overall, the results suggest significant alterations in structural connectivity, probably associated with myelination and axonal abnormalities in the IFG of OCD patients. PMID:25945482

  7. Step-up procedures for non-inferiority tests with multiple experimental treatments.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Koon Shing; Cheung, Siu Hung; Hayter, Anthony J

    2016-08-01

    Non-inferiority (NI) trials are becoming more popular. The NI of a new treatment compared with a standard treatment is established when the new treatment maintains a substantial fraction of the treatment effect of the standard treatment. A valid NI trial is also required to show assay sensitivity, the demonstration of the standard treatment having the expected effect with a size comparable to those reported in previous placebo-controlled studies. A three-arm NI trial is a clinical study that includes a new treatment, a standard treatment and a placebo. Most of the statistical methods developed for three-arm NI trials are designed for the existence of only one new treatment. Recently, a single-step procedure was developed to deal with NI trials with multiple new treatments with the overall familywise error rate controlled at a specified level. In this article, we extend the single-step procedure to two new step-up procedures for NI trials with multiple new treatments. A comparative study of test power shows that both proposed step-up procedures provide a significant improvement of power when compared to the single-step procedure. One of the two proposed step-up procedures also allows the flexibility of allocating different error rates between the sensitivity hypothesis and the NI hypotheses so that the assignment of fewer patients to the placebo becomes possible when designing NI trials. We illustrate the new procedures using data from a clinical trial.

  8. Dissociable roles of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus and fornix in face and place perception.

    PubMed

    Hodgetts, Carl J; Postans, Mark; Shine, Jonathan P; Jones, Derek K; Lawrence, Andrew D; Graham, Kim S

    2015-01-01

    We tested a novel hypothesis, generated from representational accounts of medial temporal lobe (MTL) function, that the major white matter tracts converging on perirhinal cortex (PrC) and hippocampus (HC) would be differentially involved in face and scene perception, respectively. Diffusion tensor imaging was applied in healthy participants alongside an odd-one-out paradigm sensitive to PrC and HC lesions in animals and humans. Microstructure of inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF, connecting occipital and ventro-anterior temporal lobe, including PrC) and fornix (the main HC input/output pathway) correlated with accuracy on odd-one-out judgements involving faces and scenes, respectively. Similarly, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response in PrC and HC, elicited during oddity judgements, was correlated with face and scene oddity performance, respectively. We also observed associations between ILF and fornix microstructure and category-selective BOLD response in PrC and HC, respectively. These striking three-way associations highlight functionally dissociable, structurally instantiated MTL neurocognitive networks for complex face and scene perception. PMID:26319355

  9. Preservation of spectrotemporal tuning between the nucleus laminaris and the inferior colliculus of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Christianson, G Björn; Peña, José Luis

    2007-05-01

    Performing sound recognition is a task that requires an encoding of the time-varying spectral structure of the auditory stimulus. Similarly, computation of the interaural time difference (ITD) requires knowledge of the precise timing of the stimulus. Consistent with this, low-level nuclei of birds and mammals implicated in ITD processing encode the ongoing phase of a stimulus. However, the brain areas that follow the binaural convergence for the computation of ITD show a reduced capacity for phase locking. In addition, we have shown that in the barn owl there is a pooling of ITD-responsive neurons to improve the reliability of ITD coding. Here we demonstrate that despite two stages of convergence and an effective loss of phase information, the auditory system of the anesthetized barn owl displays a graceful transition to an envelope coding that preserves the spectrotemporal information throughout the ITD pathway to the neurons of the core of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. PMID:17314241

  10. Noise reduction of coincidence detector output by the inferior colliculus of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Christianson, G Björn; Peña, José Luis

    2006-05-31

    A recurring theme in theoretical work is that integration over populations of similarly tuned neurons can reduce neural noise. However, there are relatively few demonstrations of an explicit noise reduction mechanism in a neural network. Here we demonstrate that the brainstem of the barn owl includes a stage of processing apparently devoted to increasing the signal-to-noise ratio in the encoding of the interaural time difference (ITD), one of two primary binaural cues used to compute the position of a sound source in space. In the barn owl, the ITD is processed in a dedicated neural pathway that terminates at the core of the inferior colliculus (ICcc). The actual locus of the computation of the ITD is before ICcc in the nucleus laminaris (NL), and ICcc receives no inputs carrying information that did not originate in NL. Unlike in NL, the rate-ITD functions of ICcc neurons require as little as a single stimulus presentation per ITD to show coherent ITD tuning. ICcc neurons also displayed a greater dynamic range with a maximal difference in ITD response rates approximately double that seen in NL. These results indicate that ICcc neurons perform a computation functionally analogous to averaging across a population of similarly tuned NL neurons. PMID:16738236

  11. Inhibition sensitive to interaural time difference in the barn owl's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Albeck, Y

    1997-07-01

    In spontaneously active neurons in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the barn owl, a stimulus-driven discharge was followed by a quiescent period lasting tens of milliseconds before the spontaneous activity resumed. The more favorable the interaural time difference, the longer the quiet period. The duration of the quiescent period also depended on stimulus frequency. Frequencies different from the neuron's best frequency induced shorter quiescent periods, although they could elicit similar rates of impulses. Also, the duration of the quiescent period was independent of interaural intensity difference. Thus, the quiet period is not due to an after-hyperpolarization but was an inhibitory effect that depended on the activity of other neurons. In some neurons, discharge continued after the stimulus without a quiescent period and gradually decayed over a period of 50-100 ms past the stimulus offset. The similarity between the quiescent period of the neurons mentioned above and the time course of the poststimulus discharge in these neurons suggests that these neurons serve as inhibitory interneurons. PMID:9259240

  12. Human inferior colliculus activity relates to individual differences in spoken language learning

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    A challenge to learning words of a foreign language is encoding nonnative phonemes, a process typically attributed to cortical circuitry. Using multimodal imaging methods [functional magnetic resonance imaging-adaptation (fMRI-A) and auditory brain stem responses (ABR)], we examined the extent to which pretraining pitch encoding in the inferior colliculus (IC), a primary midbrain structure, related to individual variability in learning to successfully use nonnative pitch patterns to distinguish words in American English-speaking adults. fMRI-A indexed the efficiency of pitch representation localized to the IC, whereas ABR quantified midbrain pitch-related activity with millisecond precision. In line with neural “sharpening” models, we found that efficient IC pitch pattern representation (indexed by fMRI) related to superior neural representation of pitch patterns (indexed by ABR), and consequently more successful word learning following sound-to-meaning training. Our results establish a critical role for the IC in speech-sound representation, consistent with the established role for the IC in the representation of communication signals in other animal models. PMID:22131377

  13. Development of hyperactivity after acoustic trauma in the guinea pig inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mulders, W H A M; Robertson, D

    2013-04-01

    The time of onset of hyperactivity (increased spontaneous firing rates) was investigated by single neuron recording in the inferior colliculus (IC) of guinea pigs subjected to unilateral acoustic trauma (exposure to a loud 10 kHz tone). Hyperactivity was present by 12 h post acoustic trauma whereas data obtained within approximately 4 h of the cessation of acoustic trauma found no evidence of hyperactivity. These data suggest that hyperactivity in the IC begins at some time between 4 and 12 h post trauma and is a relatively rapid plastic event beginning within hours rather than days post cochlear trauma. This is consistent with results reported in the cat auditory cortex (Norena and Eggermont, 2003). Hyperactivity did not show any further systematic increase between 12 h and up to 2 weeks post acoustic trauma. At recovery times of 12 and 24 h hyperactivity was widespread across most regions of the IC but at longer recovery times, it became progressively more restricted to ventral regions corresponding to the regions of the cochlea where there was persistent damage.

  14. Developmental changes in the inferior frontal cortex for selecting semantic representations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shu-Hui; Booth, James R.; Chen, Shiou-Yuan; Chou, Tai-Li

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine the neural correlates of semantic judgments to Chinese words in a group of 10–15 year old Chinese children. Two semantic tasks were used: visual–visual versus visual–auditory presentation. The first word was visually presented (i.e. character) and the second word was either visually or auditorily presented, and the participant had to determine if these two words were related in meaning. Different from English, Chinese has many homophones in which each spoken word corresponds to many characters. The visual–auditory task, therefore, required greater engagement of cognitive control for the participants to select a semantically appropriate answer for the second homophonic word. Weaker association pairs produced greater activation in the mid-ventral region of left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 45) for both tasks. However, this effect was stronger for the visual–auditory task than for the visual–visual task and this difference was stronger for older compared to younger children. The findings suggest greater involvement of semantic selection mechanisms in the cross-modal task requiring the access of the appropriate meaning of homophonic spoken words, especially for older children. PMID:22337757

  15. Inferior joint space arthrography of normal temporomandibular joints: Reassessment of diagnostic criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.A.; Tu, H.K.; Sleder, P.R.; Lydiatt, D.D.; Laney, T.J.

    1986-06-01

    Inferior joint space arthrograms of the temporomandibular joints of 31 healthy volunteers (62 joints) were obtained to determine normal arthrographic findings. The superior margin of the anterior recess was smooth and flat in 68% of the joints and concave in 32% with the subjects' mouths closed. The concavity was the result of the anterior ridge of the meniscus impinging on the contrast material. The concave impression could be distinguished easily from an anteriorly displaced meniscus on videotaped studies, which demonstrated a smooth transition of contrast material from the anterior to the posterior recess during opening of a subject's mouth. With the mouth open, the anterior recess decreased in size, appearing as a small, crescent-shaped collection of contrast material anterior to the head of the condyle in 52 joints (84%); it remained large in ten joints (16%) at maximal mouth opening. The configuration of the posterior recess was identical to that described previously; however, with the subjects' mouths closed, it was larger than the anterior recess, contrary to most previously reported results.

  16. Nicotine evokes kinetic tremor by activating the inferior olive via α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, Naofumi; Iha, Higor A; Shimizu, Saki; Tokudome, Kentaro; Mukai, Takahiro; Kinboshi, Masato; Serikawa, Tadao; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2016-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of movement disorders (e.g., tremor) and epilepsy. Here, we performed behavioral and immunohistochemical studies using mice and rats to elucidate the mechanisms underlying nicotine-induced tremor. Treatments of animals with nicotine (0.5-2mg/kg, i.p.) elicited kinetic tremor, which was completely suppressed by the nACh receptor antagonist mecamylamine (MEC). The specific α7 nACh receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) also inhibited nicotine-induced tremor, whereas the α4β2 nACh antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) or the peripheral α3β4 nACh antagonist hexamethonium showed no effects. Mapping analysis of Fos protein expression, a biological marker of neural excitation, revealed that a tremorgenic dose (1mg/kg) of nicotine region-specifically elevated Fos expression in the piriform cortex (PirC), medial habenula, solitary nucleus and inferior olive (IO) among 44 brain regions examined. In addition, similarly to the tremor responses, nicotine-induced Fos expression in the PirC and IO was selectively antagonized by MLA, but not by DHβE. Furthermore, an electrical lesioning of the IO, but not the PirC, significantly suppressed the induction of nicotine tremor. The present results suggest that nicotine elicits kinetic tremor in rodents by activating the IO neurons via α7 nACh receptors. PMID:27506652

  17. Neural Representations of Personally Familiar and Unfamiliar Faces in the Anterior Inferior Temporal Cortex of Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Eifuku, Satoshi; De Souza, Wania C.; Nakata, Ryuzaburo; Ono, Taketoshi; Tamura, Ryoi

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the neural representations of faces in primates, particularly in relation to their personal familiarity or unfamiliarity, neuronal activities were chronically recorded from the ventral portion of the anterior inferior temporal cortex (AITv) of macaque monkeys during the performance of a facial identification task using either personally familiar or unfamiliar faces as stimuli. By calculating the correlation coefficients between neuronal responses to the faces for all possible pairs of faces given in the task and then using the coefficients as neuronal population-based similarity measures between the faces in pairs, we analyzed the similarity/dissimilarity relationship between the faces, which were potentially represented by the activities of a population of the face-responsive neurons recorded in the area AITv. The results showed that, for personally familiar faces, different identities were represented by different patterns of activities of the population of AITv neurons irrespective of the view (e.g., front, 90° left, etc.), while different views were not represented independently of their facial identities, which was consistent with our previous report. In the case of personally unfamiliar faces, the faces possessing different identities but presented in the same frontal view were represented as similar, which contrasts with the results for personally familiar faces. These results, taken together, outline the neuronal representations of personally familiar and unfamiliar faces in the AITv neuronal population. PMID:21526206

  18. Left inferior-parietal lobe activity in perspective tasks: identity statements

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Aditi; Weiss, Benjamin; Schurz, Matthias; Aichhorn, Markus; Wieshofer, Rebecca C.; Perner, Josef

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the theory that the left inferior parietal lobe (IPL) is closely associated with tracking potential differences of perspective. Developmental studies find that perspective tasks are mastered at around 4 years of age. Our first study, meta-analyses of brain imaging studies shows that perspective tasks specifically activate a region in the left IPL and precuneus. These tasks include processing of false belief, visual perspective, and episodic memory. We test the location specificity theory in our second study with an unusual and novel kind of perspective task: identity statements. According to Frege's classical logical analysis, identity statements require appreciation of modes of presentation (perspectives). We show that identity statements, e.g., “the tour guide is also the driver” activate the left IPL in contrast to a control statements, “the tour guide has an apprentice.” This activation overlaps with the activations found in the meta-analysis. This finding is confirmed in a third study with different types of statements and different comparisons. All studies support the theory that the left IPL has as one of its overarching functions the tracking of perspective differences. We discuss how this function relates to the bottom-up attention function proposed for the bilateral IPL. PMID:26175677

  19. Computational Simulations of Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filter Placement and Hemodynamics in Patient-Specific Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aycock, Kenneth; Sastry, Shankar; Kim, Jibum; Shontz, Suzanne; Campbell, Robert; Manning, Keefe; Lynch, Frank; Craven, Brent

    2013-11-01

    A computational methodology for simulating inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement and IVC hemodynamics was developed and tested on two patient-specific IVC geometries: a left-sided IVC, and an IVC with a retroaortic left renal vein. Virtual IVC filter placement was performed with finite element analysis (FEA) using non-linear material models and contact modeling, yielding maximum vein displacements of approximately 10% of the IVC diameters. Blood flow was then simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with four cases for each patient IVC: 1) an IVC only, 2) an IVC with a placed filter, 3) an IVC with a placed filter and a model embolus, all at resting flow conditions, and 4) an IVC with a placed filter and a model embolus at exercise flow conditions. Significant hemodynamic differences were observed between the two patient IVCs, with the development of a right-sided jet (all cases) and a larger stagnation region (cases 3-4) in the left-sided IVC. These results support further investigation of the effects of IVC filter placement on a patient-specific basis.

  20. Functional heterogeneity of inferior parietal cortex during mathematical cognition assessed with cytoarchitectonic probability maps.

    PubMed

    Wu, S S; Chang, T T; Majid, A; Caspers, S; Eickhoff, S B; Menon, V

    2009-12-01

    Although the inferior parietal cortex (IPC) has been consistently implicated in mathematical cognition, the functional roles of its subdivisions are poorly understood. We address this problem using probabilistic cytoarchitectonic maps of IPC subdivisions intraparietal sulcus (IPS), angular gyrus (AG), and supramarginal gyrus. We quantified IPC responses relative to task difficulty and individual differences in task proficiency during mental arithmetic (MA) tasks performed with Arabic (MA-A) and Roman (MA-R) numerals. The 2 tasks showed similar levels of activation in 3 distinct IPS areas, hIP1, hIP2, and hIP3, suggesting their obligatory role in MA. Both AG areas, PGa and PGp, were strongly deactivated in both tasks, with stronger deactivations in posterior area PGp. Compared with the more difficult MA-R task, the MA-A task showed greater responses in both AG areas, but this effect was driven by less deactivation in the MA-A task. AG deactivations showed prominent overlap with lateral parietal nodes of the default mode network, suggesting a nonspecific role in MA. In both tasks, greater bilateral AG deactivation was associated with poorer performance. Our findings suggest a close link between IPC structure and function and they provide new evidence for behaviorally salient functional heterogeneity within the IPC during mathematical cognition. PMID:19406903

  1. [Effect of trimebutine on cholinergic transmission in neurons of the inferior mesenteric ganglion of the rabbit].

    PubMed

    Julé, Y

    1987-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of trimebutine on the synaptic activity of neurons of the rabbit inferior mesenteric ganglion, using intracellular recording techniques. The synaptic activity was produced by subthreshold stimuli (0.5 Hz) applied individually, on lumbar splanchnic and lumbar colonic nerves. These stimuli triggered cholinergic responses corresponding to fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials. In 8 of 20 neurones tested trimebutine (10(-6) g/ml) produced an inhibition of excitatory postsynaptic potentials, without any change in the resting membrane potential. In 6 of 20 neurons tested, trimebutine produced, successively, an early facilitation followed by a late inhibition of excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Both effects occurred without change in the resting membrane potential. The inhibitory and facilitatory effects of trimebutine were accompanied, by an increase and a decrease in the number of failures of nerve stimulation respectively. These results indicate that inhibitory and facilitatory effects of trimebutine correspond respectively to a decrease and an increase in the amount of acetylcholine released from presynaptic nerve terminals originating from the spinal cord and the distal colon. PMID:3038656

  2. Alignment of sound localization cues in the nucleus of the brachium of the inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Young, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate sound localization is based on three acoustic cues (interaural time and intensity difference and spectral cues from directional filtering by the pinna). In natural listening conditions, every spatial position of a sound source provides a unique combination of these three cues in “natural alignment.” Although neurons in the central nucleus (ICC) of the inferior colliculus (IC) are sensitive to multiple cues, they do not favor their natural spatial alignment. We tested for sensitivity to cue alignment in the nucleus of the brachium of the IC (BIN) in unanesthetized marmoset monkeys. The BIN receives its predominant auditory input from ICC and projects to the topographic auditory space map in the superior colliculus. Sound localization cues measured in each monkey were used to synthesize broadband stimuli with aligned and misaligned cues; spike responses to these stimuli were recorded in the BIN. We computed mutual information (MI) between the set of spike rates and the stimuli containing either aligned or misaligned cues. The results can be summarized as follows: 1) BIN neurons encode more information about auditory space when cues are aligned compared with misaligned. 2) Significantly more units prefer aligned cues in the BIN than in ICC. 3) An additive model based on summing the responses to stimuli with the localization cues varying individually accurately predicts the alignment preference with all cues varying. Overall, the results suggest that the BIN is the first site in the ascending mammalian auditory system that is tuned to natural combinations of sound localization cues. PMID:24671535

  3. Anatomy of the Inferior Orbital Fissure: Implications for Endoscopic Cranial Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    De Battista, Juan Carlos; Zimmer, Lee A.; Theodosopoulos, Philip V.; Froelich, Sebastien C.; Keller, Jeffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    Considering many approaches to the skull base confront the inferior orbital fissure (IOF) or sphenomaxillary fissure, the authors examine this anatomy as an important endoscopic surgical landmark. In morphometric analyses of 50 adult human dry skulls from both sexes, we divided the length of the IOF into three segments (anterolateral, middle, posteromedial). Hemotoxylin- and eosin-stained sections were analyzed. Dissections were performed using transnasal endoscopy in four formalin-fixed cadaveric cranial specimens (eight sides); three endoscopic approaches to the IOF were performed. IOF length ranged from 25 to 35 mm (mean 29 mm). Length/width of the individual anterolateral, middle, and posteromedial segments averaged 6.46/5, 4.95/3.2, and 17.6/ 2.4 mm, respectively. Smooth muscle within the IOF had a consistent relationship with several important anatomical landmarks. The maxillary antrostomy, total ethmoidectomy approach allowed access to the posteromedial segment of the fissure. The endoscopic modified, medial maxillectomy approach allowed access to the middle and posterior-medial segment. The Caldwell-Luc approach allowed complete exposure of the IOF. The IOF serves as an important anatomic landmark during endonasal endoscopic approaches to the skull base and orbit. Each of the three segments provides a characteristic endoscopic corridor, unique to the orbit and different fossas surrounding the fissure. PMID:23542710

  4. Transient Gain Adjustment in the Inferior Colliculus is Serotonin- and Calcium-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Miko, Ilona J.; Sanes, Dan H.

    2009-01-01

    In the inferior colliculus (IC), a brief period of acoustic conditioning can transiently enhance evoked discharge rate. The cellular basis of this phenomenon was assessed with whole cell current-clamp recordings in a gerbil IC brain slice preparation. The current needed to elicit a single action potential was first established for each neuron. A 5s synaptic stimulus train was delivered to the lateral lemniscus (LL), and followed immediately by the initial current pulse to assess a change in postsynaptic gain. The majority of IC neurons (66%) displayed an increase in current-evoked action potentials (positive gain). Despite the blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors, this effect was correlated with membrane depolarization that occurred during the synaptic train. The postsynaptic mechanism for positive gain was examined by selective blockade of specific neurotransmitter receptors. Gain in action potentials was enhanced by antagonists of metabotropic glutamate, acetylcholine, GABAA and glycine receptors. In contrast, the gain was blocked or reduced by an antagonist to ionotropic serotonin receptors (5-HT3R). Blocking voltage-activated calcium channels with verapamil also reduced the effect. These results suggest that 5-HT3R activation, coupled with increased intracellular calcium, can transiently alter postsynaptic excitability in IC neurons. PMID:19232535

  5. Congenital agenesis of inferior vena cava: a rare cause of unprovoked deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Pouria; Lane, John S; Barleben, Andrew R; Owens, Erik L; Bandyk, Dennis

    2015-07-01

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC), although rare, are a risk factor for lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT). A 19-year-old male presented with a left flank and groin pain caused by iliofemoral venous thrombosis. Vascular imaging by computed tomography (CT) scanning and venography demonstrated agenesis of the IVC. Catheter-directed thrombolysis via a popliteal vein was attempted but did not alter the patency of the common femoral vein outflow collaterals into the retroperitoneal azygous venous system. The patient was anticoagulated using systemic heparin infusion and clinical symptoms resolved within 5 days. He was transitioned to oral Coumadin anticoagulation, and follow-up venous duplex testing demonstrated no infrainguinal DVT and phasic venous flow with respiration in the femoral vein indicating patent collateral veins. Anomalies of the IVC are present in 0.3-0.5% of otherwise healthy individuals. Agenesis of the IVC has an incidence of 0.0005-1% in the general population but is found in almost 5% of patients <30 years of age with unprovoked lower limb DVT. In adults, IVC agenesis anomaly can cause diagnostic problems in the paravertebral area because of the tumor-like appearance of the azygous venous collaterals on noncontrast CT imaging. In young adults presenting with unprovoked lower limb DVT, the presence of an IVC anomaly should be considered and evaluated for by venous duplex testing and if necessary CT venography.

  6. Excitatory and facilitatory frequency response areas in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat.

    PubMed

    Portfors, Christine V; Wenstrup, Jeffrey J

    2002-06-01

    In the mustached bat's central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC), many neurons display facilitatory or inhibitory responses when presented with two tones of distinctly different frequencies. Our previous studies have focused on spectral interactions between specific frequency bands contained in the bat's sonar vocalization. In this study, we describe excitatory and facilitatory frequency response areas across all frequencies in the mustached bat's audible range. We show that many neurons in the ICC have more extensive frequency interactions than previously documented. We recorded responses of 96 single units to single tones and combinations of two tones. Best frequencies of the units ranged from 59-15 kHz. Forty-one units had a single, excitatory frequency response area. The rest of the units had more complex frequency tuning that included multiple excitatory frequency response areas and facilitatory frequency response areas. Some of the facilitatory frequency interactions were between one sound with energy in a sonar frequency band and a second sound with energy in a non-sonar frequency band. We also found that neurons could be facilitated by more than one additional frequency band. Our findings of extensive frequency interactions in the ICC of the mustached bat suggest that some neurons may be well suited for the analysis of complex sounds, possibly including social communication sounds.

  7. FM signals produce robust paradoxical latency shifts in the bat's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinming; Galazyuk, Alexander V; Feng, Albert S

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies in echolocating bats, Myotis lucifugus, showed that paradoxical latency shift (PLS) is essential for neural computation of target range and that a number of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) exhibit unit-specific PLS (characterized by longer first-spike latency at higher sound levels) in response to tone pulses at the unit's best frequency. The present study investigated whether or not frequency-modulated (FM) pulses that mimic the bat's echolocation sonar signals were equally effective in eliciting PLS. For two-thirds of PLS neurons in the IC, both FM and tone pulses could elicit PLS, but only FM pulses consistently produced unit-specific PLS. For the remainder of PLS neurons, only FM pulses effectively elicited PLS; these cells showed either no PLS or no response, to tone pulses. PLS neurons generally showed more pronounced PLS in response to narrow-band FM (each sweeping 20 kHz in 2 ms) pulse that contained the unit's best frequency. In addition, almost all PLS neurons showed duration-independent PLS to FM pulses, but the same units exhibited duration-dependent PLS to tone pulses. Taken together, when compared to tone pulses, FM stimuli can provide more reliable estimates of target range.

  8. Oscillatory activity, phase differences, and phase resetting in the inferior olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lefler, Yaara; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; Yarom, Yosef

    2013-01-01

    The generation of temporal patterns is one of the most fascinating functions of the brain. Unlike the response to external stimuli temporal patterns are generated within the system and recalled for a specific use. To generate temporal patterns one needs a timing machine, a "master clock" that determines the temporal framework within which temporal patterns can be generated and implemented. Here we present the concept that in this putative "master clock" phase and frequency interact to generate temporal patterns. We define the requirements for a neuronal "master clock" to be both reliable and versatile. We introduce this concept within the inferior olive nucleus which at least by some scientists is regarded as the source of timing for cerebellar function. We review the basic properties of the subthreshold oscillation recorded from olivary neurons, analyze the phase relationships between neurons and demonstrate that the phase and onset of oscillation is tightly controlled by synaptic input. These properties endowed the olivary nucleus with the ability to act as a "master clock."

  9. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analyses of the inferior parietal lobule from three different pathological stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Judy C; Swomley, Aaron M; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is clinically characterized by progressive neuronal loss resulting in loss of memory and dementia. AD is histopathologically characterized by the extensive distribution of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, and synapse loss. Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is generally accepted to be an early stage of AD. MCI subjects have pathology and symptoms that fall on the scale intermediately between 'normal' cognition with little or no pathology and AD. A rare number of individuals, who exhibit normal cognition on psychometric tests but whose brains show widespread postmortem AD pathology, are classified as 'asymptomatic' or 'preclinical' AD (PCAD). In this study, we evaluated changes in protein phosphorylation states in the inferior parietal lobule of subjects with AD, MCI, PCAD, and control brain using a 2-D PAGE proteomics approach in conjunction with Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein staining. Statistically significant changes in phosphorylation levels were found in 19 proteins involved in energy metabolism, neuronal plasticity, signal transduction, and oxidative stress response. Changes in the disease state phosphoproteome may provide insights into underlying mechanisms for the preservation of memory with expansive AD pathology in PCAD and the progressive memory loss in amnestic MCI that escalates to the dementia and the characteristic pathology of AD brain.

  10. Structural hierarchies define toughness and defect-tolerance despite simple and mechanically inferior brittle building blocks.

    PubMed

    Sen, Dipanjan; Buehler, Markus J

    2011-01-01

    Mineralized biological materials such as bone, sea sponges or diatoms provide load-bearing and armor functions and universally feature structural hierarchies from nano to macro. Here we report a systematic investigation of the effect of hierarchical structures on toughness and defect-tolerance based on a single and mechanically inferior brittle base material, silica, using a bottom-up approach rooted in atomistic modeling. Our analysis reveals drastic changes in the material crack-propagation resistance (R-curve) solely due to the introduction of hierarchical structures that also result in a vastly increased toughness and defect-tolerance, enabling stable crack propagation over an extensive range of crack sizes. Over a range of up to four hierarchy levels, we find an exponential increase in the defect-tolerance approaching hundred micrometers without introducing additional mechanisms or materials. This presents a significant departure from the defect-tolerance of the base material, silica, which is brittle and highly sensitive even to extremely small nanometer-scale defects.

  11. Structural hierarchies define toughness and defect-tolerance despite simple and mechanically inferior brittle building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Dipanjan; Buehler, Markus J.

    2011-07-01

    Mineralized biological materials such as bone, sea sponges or diatoms provide load-bearing and armor functions and universally feature structural hierarchies from nano to macro. Here we report a systematic investigation of the effect of hierarchical structures on toughness and defect-tolerance based on a single and mechanically inferior brittle base material, silica, using a bottom-up approach rooted in atomistic modeling. Our analysis reveals drastic changes in the material crack-propagation resistance (R-curve) solely due to the introduction of hierarchical structures that also result in a vastly increased toughness and defect-tolerance, enabling stable crack propagation over an extensive range of crack sizes. Over a range of up to four hierarchy levels, we find an exponential increase in the defect-tolerance approaching hundred micrometers without introducing additional mechanisms or materials. This presents a significant departure from the defect-tolerance of the base material, silica, which is brittle and highly sensitive even to extremely small nanometer-scale defects.

  12. Assessment of Snared-Loop Technique When Standard Retrieval of Inferior Vena Cava Filters Fails

    SciTech Connect

    Doody, Orla Noe, Geertje; Given, Mark F.; Foley, Peter T.; Lyon, Stuart M.

    2009-01-15

    Purpose To identify the success and complications related to a variant technique used to retrieve inferior vena cava filters when simple snare approach has failed. Methods A retrospective review of all Cook Guenther Tulip filters and Cook Celect filters retrieved between July 2006 and February 2008 was performed. During this period, 130 filter retrievals were attempted. In 33 cases, the standard retrieval technique failed. Retrieval was subsequently attempted with our modified retrieval technique. Results The retrieval was successful in 23 cases (mean dwell time, 171.84 days; range, 5-505 days) and unsuccessful in 10 cases (mean dwell time, 162.2 days; range, 94-360 days). Our filter retrievability rates increased from 74.6% with the standard retrieval method to 92.3% when the snared-loop technique was used. Unsuccessful retrieval was due to significant endothelialization (n = 9) and caval penetration by the filter (n = 1). A single complication occurred in the group, in a patient developing pulmonary emboli after attempted retrieval. Conclusion The technique we describe increased the retrievability of the two filters studied. Hook endothelialization is the main factor resulting in failed retrieval and continues to be a limitation with these filters.

  13. Fatal traumatic aneurysm of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery with delayed rupture.

    PubMed

    Purgina, Bibianna; Milroy, Christopher Mark

    2015-02-01

    Traumatic aneurysms of intracranial arteries are rare, forming less than 1% of all intracranial arteries. They may be associated with penetrating and non-penetrating trauma. Most cases are associated with fracturing of the skull. Rupture of traumatic aneurysms occur in up to 50% of cases and are typically delayed from days to weeks following the initiating trauma. We report a case of a 22-year-old man who was punched to the head. He was rendered unconscious but recovered and had a GCS of 14 on admission. CT scans showed subarachnoid hemorrhage. An initial angiogram was negative but on day 7 following the incident he was noted to have a 1 mm aneurysm of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery on CT angiogram. On day 9 he collapsed and was found to have new subarachnoid hemorrhage and to have a 4.0 mm × 3.7 mm. He did not recover and was declared brain dead on day 12. At autopsy, there was a 4.0 mm aneurysm of the left PICA just after the origin of the artery. Histological examination confirmed the presence of a traumatic false aneurysm in the left PICA. This case study shows sequential radiological imaging with pathologiocal correlation.

  14. Ruptured intrameatal aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery accompanying an arteriovenous malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Joo; Koh, Jun Seok; Ryu, Chang Woo; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2012-09-01

    The distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms located inside the internal auditory canal are rare. The association of the distal AICA aneurysms and an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) on the same arterial trunk is exceptional. Eight reports of a total of ten cases have been published and all of the reported aneurysms were located in the meatal or postmeatal segment of the AICA. Herein, we report a case of ruptured aneurysm in the intrameatal portion of the AICA accompanying an AVM fed by the same artery. A 55-year-old man suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured intrameatal aneurysm with a small AVM underwent surgical trapping of the meatal loop, resulting in uneventful recovery. Follow-up angiography demonstrated neither aneurysm nor residual AVM nidus. We propose that trapping of the meatal loop could be a safe and feasible alternative to unroofing followed by neck clipping in selected patients with an intrameatal aneurysm of the AICA. We also review here the relevant literature.

  15. Negative temporal summation of the responses to pairs of tone bursts in albino mice inferior colliculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikov, Nikolay G.; Cai, Chen Qi; Jie, Tang

    2003-10-01

    The extracellular activities of single units in an inferior colliculus of narcotized albino mice have been studied. As a stimuli pairs of best frequency (BF) tone bursts with different duration have been used and forward masking has been studied. The test tone usually has a 40 ms duration at intensity 5 dB above threshold. The intensity and duration of the masker could be changed. It was shown that the forward masking essentially depends upon the duration of the first burst. In many cases, the negative temporal summation can be seen. The increase in the duration of first burst (or masker) leads to the decrease in the whole response. Moreover, the BF tone burst which did not evoke any spike response could inhibit the response to the second (test) tone in some cases. Therefore in many units the inhibitory threshold was lower than the excitatory threshold even at the best frequency. The local application of bicuculline through a multibarrel-electrode increased the pulse activity considerably. However, the effect of forward masking usually left even after an inhibitory antagonist (bicuculline) application. [Work supported by grants 39970251 from NSFC, T010360056 from the Foreign Expert Bureau of the State Council of China, and 02-04-3900 from RFBR-NSFC.

  16. Disintegration of the 'waterfall phenomenon' in the inferior vena cava due to right heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kira, S; Dambara, T; Mieno, T; Tamaki, S; Natori, H

    1996-03-01

    The concept of the waterfall phenomenon in Zone 2 in the pulmonary vasculature is well known from West's lung model. It is believed that the flow through this zone is determined by the pressure difference between the pulmonary artery and alveoli, and the left atrial pressure is not transmissible to the alveolar capillaries. However, it is impossible to see whether alveolar capillaries are really displaying the waterfall phenomenon or not. In this review, the interrelation between the flow and geometry of the alveolar capillaries in the waterfall phenomenon is analyzed based on physiological studies using a model system and isolated lung lobe experiments. Further, extending the concept to the analysis of ventilatory changes of the inferior vena cava (IVC) configuration, it is ascertained that the waterfall phenomenon normally occurs in the IVC during inspiration just before it enters the thorax and the waterfall phenomenon in the IVC disintegrates with elevation of the central venous pressure. Because these configurations of the IVC in normal and abnormal conditions are visible with ultrasonography, the technique is very useful as a noninvasive approach to diagnose right heart failure.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative studies of the inferior olivary complex in the water buffalo (Buballus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Rashed, Reda; Emara, Saad; Shinozaki, Aya; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Uehara, Masato

    2007-02-01

    The shape and neuronal number of the inferior olivary complex (IOC) were determined in the water buffalo (Buballus bubalis). The configuration and interrelations of the IOC compartments were ascertained by investigating serial sections through the whole rostro-caudal extent of the IOC. Nissl-stained celloidin sections of six water buffalo's brainstems were used. The IOC in the water buffalo consisted of three major nuclei and four small cell groups. The medial accessory olivary nucleus (MAO) had the longest rostro-caudal extent as well as the highest number of neurons (98,000 +/- 3,000). Although the total area of the principal olivary nucleus (PO) was smaller than the area of the dorsal accessory olivary nucleus (DAO), the PO had the second largest neuronal number. The total number of neurons on both sides of the IOC was 210,000 +/- 7,000 cells. The average neuronal density was 3,000 cells/mm3. Although the size of the PO relatively increases while the size of MAO decreases with the development of the cerebellar hemispheres, the IOC in most mammals maintains a similar structure except for the higher primates and marsupials. The water buffalo IOC showed morphological similarities to the almost all mammalian IOC including rats as follow; the main part of the MAO consists of three subgroups (a, b and c), the DAO is Boomerang-shaped while the PO is a simple U-shaped structure.

  18. Spread of cochlear excitation during stimulation with pulsed infrared radiation: inferior colliculus measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, C.-P.; Rajguru, S. M.; Matic, A. I.; Moreno, E. L.; Fishman, A. J.; Robinson, A. M.; Suh, E.; Walsh, J. T., Jr.

    2011-10-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has received considerable attention over the last few years. It provides an alternative method to artificially stimulate neurons without electrical current or the introduction of exogenous chromophores. One of the primary benefits of INS could be the improved spatial selectivity when compared with electrical stimulation. In the present study, we have evaluated the spatial selectivity of INS in the acutely damaged cochlea of guinea pigs and compared it to stimulation with acoustic tone pips in normal-hearing animals. The radiation was delivered via a 200 µm diameter optical fiber, which was inserted through a cochleostomy into the scala tympani of the basal cochlear turn. The stimulated section along the cochlear spiral ganglion was estimated from the neural responses recorded from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). ICC responses were recorded in response to cochlear INS using a multichannel penetrating electrode array. Spatial tuning curves (STCs) were constructed from the responses. For INS, approximately 55% of the activation profiles showed a single maximum, ~22% had two maxima and ~13% had multiple maxima. The remaining 10% of the profiles occurred at the limits of the electrode array and could not be classified. The majority of ICC STCs indicated that the spread of activation evoked by optical stimuli is comparable to that produced by acoustic tone pips.

  19. Indirect post-implant lesions of the inferior alveolar nerve. Radiological and biomechanical findings

    PubMed Central

    DIOTALLEVI, P.; MOGLIONI, E.; PEZZUTI, E.; BOFFA, L.; FERRANTE, G.; PASQUALINI, M.; FLORIS, P.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of the work. The mandibular canal, if it is affected by different illnesses, often shows typical radiological changes, made up of widespread hypodensity, an increase in its diameter and disappearing walls. This study aims to verify the reliability of such radiological signs in the cases of later post-operative lesions of the mandiblular canal. Materials and method. The study includes 16 patients, 9 males and 7 females, with an average age of 54 years, who underwent an operation to rehabilitate the mandible with a prosthetic implant for a total of 37 implants. All the subjects underwent an Orthopantograph due to the appearance of painful radicular symptoms some time after the operation. Results. In 36 cases out of 37 we found, with the Orthopantograph, a slight increase in the calibre of the mandibular canal compared to the controlateral. In 10 subjects we observed hypodensity of the canal itself, while in 6 subjects the canal passages were no longer recognisable. Conclusion. The radiological indications of damage of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) are reliable even in the case of indirect post-implant lesions. PMID:23285339

  20. Attention Drives Synchronization of Alpha and Beta Rhythms between Right Inferior Frontal and Primary Sensory Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Sacchet, Matthew D.; LaPlante, Roan A.; Wan, Qian; Pritchett, Dominique L.; Lee, Adrian K.C.; Hämäläinen, Matti; Moore, Christopher I.; Kerr, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    The right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) is specifically associated with attentional control via the inhibition of behaviorally irrelevant stimuli and motor responses. Similarly, recent evidence has shown that alpha (7–14 Hz) and beta (15–29 Hz) oscillations in primary sensory neocortical areas are enhanced in the representation of non-attended stimuli, leading to the hypothesis that allocation of these rhythms plays an active role in optimal inattention. Here, we tested the hypothesis that selective synchronization between rIFC and primary sensory neocortex occurs in these frequency bands during inattention. We used magnetoencephalography to investigate phase synchrony between primary somatosensory (SI) and rIFC regions during a cued-attention tactile detection task that required suppression of response to uncertain distractor stimuli. Attentional modulation of synchrony between SI and rIFC was found in both the alpha and beta frequency bands. This synchrony manifested as an increase in the alpha-band early after cue between non-attended SI representations and rIFC, and as a subsequent increase in beta-band synchrony closer to stimulus processing. Differences in phase synchrony were not found in several proximal control regions. These results are the first to reveal distinct interactions between primary sensory cortex and rIFC in humans and suggest that synchrony between rIFC and primary sensory representations plays a role in the inhibition of irrelevant sensory stimuli and motor responses. PMID:25653364

  1. Management of inferior vena cava tumor thrombus in locally advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Psutka, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma is accompanied by intravascular tumor thrombus in up to 10% of cases, of which nearly one-third of patients also have concurrent metastatic disease. Surgical resection in the form of radical nephrectomy and caval thrombectomy represents the only option to obtain local control of the disease and is associated with durable oncologic control in approximately half of these patients. The objective of this clinical review is to outline the preoperative evaluation for, and operative management of patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma with venous tumor thrombi involving the inferior vena cava. Cornerstones of the management of these complex patients include obtaining high-quality imaging to characterize the renal mass and tumor thrombus preoperatively, with further intraoperative real-time evaluation using transesophageal echocardiography, careful surgical planning, and a multidisciplinary approach. Operative management of patients with high-level caval thrombi should be undertaken in high-volume centers by surgical teams with capacity for bypass and invasive intraoperative monitoring. In patients with metastatic disease at presentation, cytoreductive nephrectomy and tumor thrombectomy may be safely performed with simultaneous metastasectomy if possible. In the absence of level one evidence, neoadjuvant targeted therapy should continue to be viewed as experimental and should be employed under the auspices of a clinical trial. However, in patients with significant risk factors for postoperative complications and mortality, and especially in those with metastatic disease, consultation with medical oncology and frontline targeted therapy may be considered. PMID:26445601

  2. Adrenal cortical carcinoma with extension into the inferior vena cava – case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare endocrine malignancy with an incidence rate of 1 to 2 per million person-years. ACC most commonly arises sporadically, but may be associated with familial tumour syndromes. Clinical symptoms are mainly related to an excess of steroid hormones. We present an unusual case of adrenocortical carcinoma in a 27-year-old male who complained of non specific mass-effect related symptoms of slowly growing intensity differing from others described in literature because of the patient’s age and the sudden deterioration of the clinical course. The tumour was resected with the left kidney with an extension into the inferior vena cava. Histological examination revealed morphological features characteristic of an adrenal cortical tumour. The immunohistochemical results (positive reactions for vimentin, CD56, inhibin, melan A, synaptophysin, bcl-2, calretinin) confirmed the diagnosis. According to the most widely used modified Weiss criteria and the Van Slooten system, a diagnosis of adrenal cortical carcinoma was strongly confirmed. The postoperative condition was poor. Reoperation was conducted, including abdominal aorta thrombectomy and aortic prosthesis implantation. The patient died two days after the second operation. Autopsy revealed a metastatic tumour in the left lung and morphological symptoms of acute circulatory collapse due to a massive haemorrhage into the abdominal cavity, which was the direct cause of death. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1602226377106882. PMID:24602387

  3. Age-related neurochemical changes in the rhesus macaque inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Engle, James R.; Gray, Daniel T.; Turner, Heather; Udell, Julia B.; Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is marked by audiometric hearing deficits that propagate along the auditory pathway. Neurochemical changes as a function of aging have also been identified in neurons along the auditory pathway in both rodents and carnivores, however, very little is known about how these neurochemicals change in the non-human primate. To examine how these compensatory neurochemical changes relate to normal aging and audiometric sensitivity along the auditory pathway, we collected auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and brain specimens from seven rhesus monkeys spanning in age from 15 to 35 years old, and examined the relationship between click evoked ABR thresholds and the ABR evoked pure tone average (PTA) and changes in the number of parvalbumin and NADPH-diaphorase positive cells in the auditory midbrain. We found that the number of parvalbumin positive cells in the central nucleus and the surrounding cortex regions of the inferior colliculus were strongly correlated with advancing age and ABR PTA. We also found that the numbers of NADPHd positive cells in these same regions were not associated with normal aging or changes in the ABR thresholds. These findings suggest that the auditory midbrain undergoes an up-regulation of parvalbumin expressing neurons with aging that is related to changes in the processing of frequencies across the audiometric range. PMID:24795627

  4. Inhibition shapes selectivity to vocalizations in the inferior colliculus of awake mice

    PubMed Central

    Mayko, Zachary M.; Roberts, Patrick D.; Portfors, Christine V.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) is a major center for integration of auditory information as it receives ascending projections from a variety of brainstem nuclei as well as descending projections from the thalamus and auditory cortex. The ascending projections are both excitatory and inhibitory and their convergence at the IC results in a microcircuitry that is important for shaping responses to simple, binaural, and modulated sounds in the IC. Here, we examined the role inhibition plays in shaping selectivity to vocalizations in the IC of awake, normal-hearing adult mice (CBA/CaJ strain). Neurons in the IC of mice show selectivity in their responses to vocalizations, and we hypothesized that this selectivity is created by inhibitory microcircuitry in the IC. We compared single unit responses in the IC to pure tones and a variety of ultrasonic mouse vocalizations before and after iontophoretic application of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and glycine receptor (GlyR) antagonists. The most pronounced effects of blocking GABAAR and GlyR on IC neurons were to increase spike rates and broaden excitatory frequency tuning curves in response to pure tone stimuli, and to decrease selectivity to vocalizations. Thus, inhibition plays an important role in creating selectivity to vocalizations in the IC. PMID:23087616

  5. Periodotopy in the gerbil inferior colliculus: local clustering rather than a gradient map

    PubMed Central

    Schnupp, Jan W. H.; Garcia-Lazaro, Jose A.; Lesica, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Periodicities in sound waveforms are widespread, and shape important perceptual attributes of sound including rhythm and pitch. Previous studies have indicated that, in the inferior colliculus (IC), a key processing stage in the auditory midbrain, neurons tuned to different periodicities might be arranged along a periodotopic axis which runs approximately orthogonal to the tonotopic axis. Here we map out the topography of frequency and periodicity tuning in the IC of gerbils in unprecedented detail, using pure tones and different periodic sounds, including click trains, sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) noise and iterated rippled noise. We found that while the tonotopic map exhibited a clear and highly reproducible gradient across all animals, periodotopic maps varied greatly across different types of periodic sound and from animal to animal. Furthermore, periodotopic gradients typically explained only about 10% of the variance in modulation tuning between recording sites. However, there was a strong local clustering of periodicity tuning at a spatial scale of ca. 0.5 mm, which also differed from animal to animal. PMID:26379508

  6. Dynamic temporal signal processing in the inferior colliculus of echolocating bats

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Philip H.-S.; Wu, Chung Hsin; Wang, Xin

    2012-01-01

    In nature, communication sounds among animal species including humans are typical complex sounds that occur in sequence and vary with time in several parameters including amplitude, frequency, duration as well as separation, and order of individual sounds. Among these multiple parameters, sound duration is a simple but important one that contributes to the distinct spectral and temporal attributes of individual biological sounds. Likewise, the separation of individual sounds is an important temporal attribute that determines an animal's ability in distinguishing individual sounds. Whereas duration selectivity of auditory neurons underlies an animal's ability in recognition of sound duration, the recovery cycle of auditory neurons determines a neuron's ability in responding to closely spaced sound pulses and therefore, it underlies the animal's ability in analyzing the order of individual sounds. Since the multiple parameters of naturally occurring communication sounds vary with time, the analysis of a specific sound parameter by an animal would be inevitably affected by other co-varying sound parameters. This is particularly obvious in insectivorous bats, which rely on analysis of returning echoes for prey capture when they systematically vary the multiple pulse parameters throughout a target approach sequence. In this review article, we present our studies of dynamic variation of duration selectivity and recovery cycle of neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the frequency-modulated bats to highlight the dynamic temporal signal processing of central auditory neurons. These studies use single pulses and three biologically relevant pulse-echo (P-E) pairs with varied duration, gap, and amplitude difference similar to that occurring during search, approach, and terminal phases of hunting by bats. These studies show that most collicular neurons respond maximally to a best tuned sound duration (BD). The sound duration to which these neurons are

  7. Therapeutic Progress in Treating Vertebral Dissecting Aneurysms Involving the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Xu, Kan; Sun, Xiaofeng; Yu, Jinlu

    2016-01-01

    Among the variations of vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VDAs), VDAs involving the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA), especially ruptured and high-risk unruptured aneurysms, are the most difficult to treat. Because the PICA is an important structure, serious symptoms may occur after its occlusion. Retained PICAs are prone to re-bleeding because VDAs are difficult to completely occlude. There is therefore confusion regarding the appropriate treatment for VDAs involving the PICA. Here, we used the PubMed database to review recent research concerning VDAs that involve the PICA, and we found that treatments for VDAs involving the PICA include (i) endovascular treatment involving the reconstruction of blood vessels and blood flow, (ii) occluding the aneurysm using an internal coil trapping or an assisted bypass, (iii) inducing reversed blood flow by occluding the proximal VDA or forming an assisted bypass, or (iv) the reconstruction of blood flow via a craniotomy. Although the above methods effectively treat VDAs involving the PICA, each method is associated with both a high degree of risk and specific advantages and disadvantages. The core problem when treating VDAs involving the PICA is to retain the PICA while occluding the aneurysm. Therefore, the method is generally selected on a case-by-case basis according to the characteristics of the aneurysm. In this study, we summarize the various current methods that are used to treat VDAs involving the PICA and provide schematic diagrams as our conclusion. Because there is no special field of research concerning VDAs involving the PICA, these cases are hidden within many multiple-cases studies. Therefore, this study does not review all relevant documents and may have some limitations. Thus, we have focused on the mainstream treatments for VDAs that involve the PICA. PMID:27429591

  8. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Inferior Vena Cava and Right Atrial Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, M. C. Chuang, V. P. Cheng, T. Lin, Z. H. Lin, Y. M.

    2008-07-15

    Advanced hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) with invasion of venous systems usually indicates not only a poor prognosis but also a contraindication for transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). This study evaluated the feasibility of TACE for advanced HCC with inferior vena cava (IVC) and right atrium (RA) tumors and, also, to search for the ideal embolization particle size. Twenty-six patients who had HCC invasion into the IVC included five patients with coexistent RA tumors that were treated with TACE. The chemoembolization method was cisplatin, doxorubicin, and mitomycin C mixed with Lipiodol and Ivalon. The selection of Ivalon particles was divided into two groups based on their size: (A) >180 {mu}m, N = 9; and (B) 47-180 {mu}m, N = 17. The overall response rate was 53.8% (14/26). Based on the response to TACE, the median survival period of the entire group was 4.2 months (range, 1.5 to 76.7 months). The median survival period of the 14 responders was 13.5 months (1.5-76.7 months), and that of the 12 nonresponders, 3.3 months (2.1 to 24.3 months) (p < 0.002). Comparing the two Ivalon particle sizes, the response rate was 12.5% (1/9 patients) for group A and 76.5% for group B (13/17 patients) (p < 0.02). No serious complication was observed post-chemoembolization. In conclusion, TACE is a safe and effective treatment for advanced HCC with IVC and RA tumors, and small Ivalon particles (47-180 {mu}m) are superior to large ones (>180 {mu}m).

  9. Excitatory and inhibitory projections in parallel pathways from the inferior colliculus to the auditory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Jeffrey G; Foster, Nichole L; Ohl, Andrew P; Schofield, Brett R

    2014-01-01

    Individual subdivisions of the medial geniculate body (MG) receive a majority of their ascending inputs from 1 or 2 subdivisions of the inferior colliculus (IC). This establishes parallel pathways that provide a model for understanding auditory projections from the IC through the MG and on to auditory cortex. A striking discovery about the tectothalamic circuit was identification of a substantial GABAergic component. Whether GABAergic projections match the parallel pathway organization has not been examined. We asked whether the parallel pathway concept is reflected in guinea pig tectothalamic pathways and to what degree GABAergic cells contribute to each pathway. We deposited retrograde tracers into individual MG subdivisions (ventral, MGv; medial, MGm; dorsal, MGd; suprageniculate, MGsg) to label tectothalamic cells and used immunochemistry to identify GABAergic cells. The MGv receives most of its IC input (~75%) from the IC central nucleus (ICc); MGd and MGsg receive most of their input (~70%) from IC dorsal cortex (ICd); and MGm receives substantial input from both ICc (~40%) and IC lateral cortex (~40%). Each MG subdivision receives additional input (up to 32%) from non-dominant IC subdivisions, suggesting cross-talk between the pathways. The proportion of GABAergic cells in each pathway depended on the MG subdivision. GABAergic cells formed ~20% of IC inputs to MGv or MGm, ~11% of inputs to MGd, and 4% of inputs to MGsg. Thus, non-GABAergic (i.e., glutamatergic) cells are most numerous in each pathway with GABAergic cells contributing to different extents. Despite smaller numbers of GABAergic cells, their distributions across IC subdivisions mimicked the parallel pathways. Projections outside the dominant pathways suggest opportunities for excitatory and inhibitory crosstalk. The results demonstrate parallel tectothalamic pathways in guinea pigs and suggest numerous opportunities for excitatory and inhibitory interactions within and between pathways.

  10. The representation of sound localization cues in the barn owl's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Singheiser, Martin; Gutfreund, Yoram; Wagner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    The barn owl is a well-known model system for studying auditory processing and sound localization. This article reviews the morphological and functional organization, as well as the role of the underlying microcircuits, of the barn owl's inferior colliculus (IC). We focus on the processing of frequency and interaural time (ITD) and level differences (ILD). We first summarize the morphology of the sub-nuclei belonging to the IC and their differentiation by antero- and retrograde labeling and by staining with various antibodies. We then focus on the response properties of neurons in the three major sub-nuclei of IC [core of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCc), lateral shell of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCls), and the external nucleus of the IC (ICX)]. ICCc projects to ICCls, which in turn sends its information to ICX. The responses of neurons in ICCc are sensitive to changes in ITD but not to changes in ILD. The distribution of ITD sensitivity with frequency in ICCc can only partly be explained by optimal coding. We continue with the tuning properties of ICCls neurons, the first station in the midbrain where the ITD and ILD pathways merge after they have split at the level of the cochlear nucleus. The ICCc and ICCls share similar ITD and frequency tuning. By contrast, ICCls shows sigmoidal ILD tuning which is absent in ICCc. Both ICCc and ICCls project to the forebrain, and ICCls also projects to ICX, where space-specific neurons are found. Space-specific neurons exhibit side peak suppression in ITD tuning, bell-shaped ILD tuning, and are broadly tuned to frequency. These neurons respond only to restricted positions of auditory space and form a map of two-dimensional auditory space. Finally, we briefly review major IC features, including multiplication-like computations, correlates of echo suppression, plasticity, and adaptation. PMID:22798945

  11. Relationship of the Gonial Angle and Inferior Alveolar Canal Course Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Anbiaee, Najmeh; Bagherpour, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Accurate localization of the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) is extremely important in some dental treatments. Anatomical variation of the canal means that it can be difficult to locate. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of the gonial angle (GA) size and IAC position using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 61 dry adult human hemi-mandibles were used. The CBCT scans were taken of all samples and GA was measured on all CBCT scans. The samples were divided into two groups of low angle (≤125°) and high angle (>125°). The canal dimensions, length and course were evaluated. On the sagittal view, the IAC path was classified as type A, B or C. On the axial view, canal course was defined as A1 or A2 according to the mental foramen angle. Results: The average GA size was 121.8±7.05° at the right side and 123.8±6.32° at the left side. On the sagittal view, there was a significant correlation between the GA size and the canal course (P=0.04). In the high-angle group, type A was dominant; whereas in the low-angle group, type B was more common. On the axial view of IAC course, type A1 was more common (73.43%). Conclusion: The results showed that GA size was associated with IAC course. In cases with a larger GA, the canal runs in a more straightforward path, and at the same level as the mental foramen. PMID:27252759

  12. Representation of Perceptual Color Space in Macaque Posterior Inferior Temporal Cortex (the V4 Complex).

    PubMed

    Bohon, Kaitlin S; Hermann, Katherine L; Hansen, Thorsten; Conway, Bevil R

    2016-01-01

    The lateral geniculate nucleus is thought to represent color using two populations of cone-opponent neurons [L vs M; S vs (L + M)], which establish the cardinal directions in color space (reddish vs cyan; lavender vs lime). How is this representation transformed to bring about color perception? Prior work implicates populations of glob cells in posterior inferior temporal cortex (PIT; the V4 complex), but the correspondence between the neural representation of color in PIT/V4 complex and the organization of perceptual color space is unclear. We compared color-tuning data for populations of glob cells and interglob cells to predictions obtained using models that varied in the color-tuning narrowness of the cells, and the color preference distribution across the populations. Glob cells were best accounted for by simulated neurons that have nonlinear (narrow) tuning and, as a population, represent a color space designed to be perceptually uniform (CIELUV). Multidimensional scaling and representational similarity analyses showed that the color space representations in both glob and interglob populations were correlated with the organization of CIELUV space, but glob cells showed a stronger correlation. Hue could be classified invariant to luminance with high accuracy given glob responses and above-chance accuracy given interglob responses. Luminance could be read out invariant to changes in hue in both populations, but interglob cells tended to prefer stimuli having luminance contrast, regardless of hue, whereas glob cells typically retained hue tuning as luminance contrast was modulated. The combined luminance/hue sensitivity of glob cells is predicted for neurons that can distinguish two colors of the same hue at different luminance levels (orange/brown). PMID:27595132

  13. Classification of frequency response areas in the inferior colliculus reveals continua not discrete classes.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Alan R; Shackleton, Trevor M; Sumner, Christian J; Zobay, Oliver; Rees, Adrian

    2013-08-15

    A differential response to sound frequency is a fundamental property of auditory neurons. Frequency analysis in the cochlea gives rise to V-shaped tuning functions in auditory nerve fibres, but by the level of the inferior colliculus (IC), the midbrain nucleus of the auditory pathway, neuronal receptive fields display diverse shapes that reflect the interplay of excitation and inhibition. The origin and nature of these frequency receptive field types is still open to question. One proposed hypothesis is that the frequency response class of any given neuron in the IC is predominantly inherited from one of three major afferent pathways projecting to the IC, giving rise to three distinct receptive field classes. Here, we applied subjective classification, principal component analysis, cluster analysis, and other objective statistical measures, to a large population (2826) of frequency response areas from single neurons recorded in the IC of the anaesthetised guinea pig. Subjectively, we recognised seven frequency response classes (V-shaped, non-monotonic Vs, narrow, closed, tilt down, tilt up and double-peaked), that were represented at all frequencies. We could identify similar classes using our objective classification tools. Importantly, however, many neurons exhibited properties intermediate between these classes, and none of the objective methods used here showed evidence of discrete response classes. Thus receptive field shapes in the IC form continua rather than discrete classes, a finding consistent with the integration of afferent inputs in the generation of frequency response areas. The frequency disposition of inhibition in the response areas of some neurons suggests that across-frequency inputs originating at or below the level of the IC are involved in their generation. PMID:23753527

  14. Descending and tonotopic projection patterns from the auditory cortex to the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Straka, M M; Hughes, R; Lee, P; Lim, H H

    2015-08-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) receives many corticofugal projections, which can mediate plastic changes such as shifts in frequency tuning or excitability of IC neurons. While the densest projections are found in the IC's external cortices, fibers originating from the primary auditory cortex (AI) have been observed throughout the IC's central nucleus (ICC), and these projections have shown to be organized tonotopically. Some studies have also found projections from other core and non-core cortical regions, though the organization and function of these projections are less known. In guinea pig, there exists a non-core ventrorostral belt (VRB) region that has primary-like properties and has often been mistaken for AI, with the clearest differentiating characteristic being VRB's longer response latencies. To better understand the auditory corticofugal descending system beyond AI, we investigated if there are projections from VRB to the ICC and if they exhibit a different projection pattern than those from AI. In this study, we performed experiments in ketamine-anesthetized guinea pigs, in which we positioned 32-site electrode arrays within AI, VRB, and ICC. We identified the monosynaptic connections between AI-to-ICC and VRB-to-ICC using an antidromic stimulation method, and we analyzed their locations across the midbrain using three-dimensional histological techniques. Compared to the corticocollicular projections to the ICC from AI, there were fewer projections to the ICC from VRB, and these projections had a weaker tonotopic organization. The majority of VRB projections were observed in the caudal-medial versus the rostral-lateral region along an isofrequency lamina of the ICC, which is in contrast to the AI projections that were scattered throughout an ICC lamina. These findings suggest that the VRB directly modulates sound information within the ascending lemniscal pathway with a different or complementary role compared to the modulatory effects of AI, which may

  15. Indications, applications, and outcomes of inferior vena cava filters for venous thromboembolism in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yugo; Unoki, Takashi; Takagi, Daisuke; Hamatani, Yasuhiro; Ishii, Mitsuru; Iguchi, Moritake; Ogawa, Hisashi; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Abe, Mitsuru; Akao, Masaharu

    2016-07-01

    A recent multicenter registry study of venous thromboembolism (VTE) patients in Japan demonstrated a high prevalence of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement. However, data regarding indications, applications, and outcomes of IVC filters in Japanese patients are quite limited. This study was an observational, single-center, retrospective cohort study of all consecutive patients with acute VTE treated between March 2006 and February 2014. Data extracted included patient demographics, indications, applications, and complications of IVC filters, as well as VTE recurrence and death. A total of 257 consecutive patients were analyzed. Seventy-eight patients (30 %) received IVC filters. The proportions of IVC filter placement were 26 % for deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) alone, 10 % for pulmonary embolism (PE) alone, and 46 % for both DVT and PE. There was no significant difference in patient demographics between the IVC filter group and no-IVC filter group. Stated indications for filter placement were 24 cases (30 %) of DVT in intrapelvic veins, 16 cases (20 %) of DVT in proximal veins, and 11 cases (14 %) of contraindication to anticoagulant therapy. In the IVC filter group, cases of class I indication (guidelines: JCS 75:1258-1281, 2009) numbered only 6 (8 %). Many of the retrievable IVC filters were not removed and placed permanently and the retrieval rate was 42 %. We found complications of IVC filters in 8 cases (10 %). IVC filter placement was significantly associated with a better survival rate and a higher incidence of DVT recurrence during a mean observation period of 541 days. Our research suggests the frequent use of IVC filters for VTE treatment, combined with a low retrieval rate. Most of the stated indications of IVC filter placement for VTE in Japanese patients were cases of DVT in intrapelvic veins or proximal veins, not cases of contraindication to anticoagulant therapy.

  16. Clinical and electrophysiological assessment of inferior alveolar nerve function after lateral nerve transposition.

    PubMed

    Nocini, P F; De Santis, D; Fracasso, E; Zanette, G

    1999-04-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) transposition surgery may cause some degree of sensory impairment. Accurate and reproducible tests are mandatory to assess IAN conduction capacity following nerve transposition. In this study subjective (heat, pain and tactile-discriminative tests) and objective (electrophysiological) assessments were performed in 10 patients receiving IAN transposition (bilaterally in 8 cases) in order to evaluate any impairment of the involved nerves one year post-operatively. All patients reported a tingling, well-tolerated sensation in the areas supplied by the mental nerve with no anaesthesia or burning paresthesia. Tactile discrimination was affected the most (all but 1 patient). No action potential was recorded in 4 patients' sides (23.5%); 12 sides showed a decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV) (70.5%) and 1 side normal NCV values (6%). There was no significant difference in NCV decrease between partial and total transposition sides, if examined separately. Nerve conduction findings were related 2-point discrimination scores, but not to changes in pain and heat sensitivity. These findings show that lateral nerve transposition, though resulting in a high percentage of minor IAN injuries, as determined by electrophysiological testing, provides a viable surgical procedure to allow implant placement in the posterior mandible without causing severe sensory complaints. Considering ethical and forensic implications, patients should be fully informed that a certain degree of nerve injury might be expected to occur from the procedure. Electrophysiological evaluation is a reliable way to assess the degree of IAN dysfunction, especially if combined with a clinical examination. Intraoperative monitoring of IAN conduction might help identify the pathogenetic mechanisms of nerve injury and the surgical steps that are most likely to harm nerve integrity. PMID:10219131

  17. A Computational Model of Inferior Colliculus Responses to Amplitude Modulated Sounds in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rabang, Cal F.; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Venkataraman, Yamini; Fisher, Zachery L.; Gardner, Stephanie M.; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) receives ascending excitatory and inhibitory inputs from multiple sources, but how these auditory inputs converge to generate IC spike patterns is poorly understood. Simulating patterns of in vivo spike train data from cellular and synaptic models creates a powerful framework to identify factors that contribute to changes in IC responses, such as those resulting in age-related loss of temporal processing. A conductance-based single neuron IC model was constructed, and its responses were compared to those observed during in vivo IC recordings in rats. IC spike patterns were evoked using amplitude-modulated tone or noise carriers at 20–40 dB above threshold and were classified as low-pass, band-pass, band-reject, all-pass, or complex based on their rate modulation transfer function tuning shape. Their temporal modulation transfer functions were also measured. These spike patterns provided experimental measures of rate, vector strength, and firing pattern for comparison with model outputs. Patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic convergence to IC neurons were based on anatomical studies and generalized input tuning for modulation frequency. Responses of modeled ascending inputs were derived from experimental data from previous studies. Adapting and sustained IC intrinsic models were created, with adaptation created via calcium-activated potassium currents. Short-term synaptic plasticity was incorporated into the model in the form of synaptic depression, which was shown to have a substantial effect on the magnitude and time course of the IC response. The most commonly observed IC response sub-types were recreated and enabled dissociation of inherited response properties from those that were generated in IC. Furthermore, the model was used to make predictions about the consequences of reduction in inhibition for age-related loss of temporal processing due to a reduction in GABA seen anatomically with age. PMID:23129994

  18. Successful Kidney Transplantation in Children With a Compromised Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Seiichiro; Kawamura, Takeshi; Hamasaki, Yuko; Takahashi, Yusuke; Itabashi, Yoshihiro; Muramatsu, Masaki; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Aikawa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background Children with a compromised inferior vena cava (IVC) were previously considered unsuitable for kidney transplantation because of the technical difficulties and the increased risk of graft thrombosis secondary to inadequate renal venous outflow. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 11 transplants in 9 patients with end-stage renal disease and thrombosed IVCs who received adult kidney allografts between 2000 and 2015. The mean age at transplantation was 7.5 ± 3.5 years. A pretransplant diagnosis of the IVC thrombosis was made in 7 patients by magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography, whereas there were 2 instances of intraoperative discovery of the IVC thrombosis. Results In the early cases, a kidney was placed intraperitoneally at the right iliac fossa with a venous anastomosis to the patent segment of the suprarenal IVC. After 2008, however, 6 adult-sized kidneys were subsequently placed in the left orthotopic position. Venous drainage was attained to the infrahepatic IVC (n = 3), left native renal vein (n = 2), and ascending lumbar vein (n = 1). Moreover, a venous bypass was created between the graft and the splenic vein in 2 children who showed high return pressure after the vessel was declamped. The mean glomerular filtration rate of the functioning 8 grafts 1 year posttransplant was 73.4 ± 20.4 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Of note, 6 of the grafts have been functioning well, with a mean follow-up of 66 months. Both 1- and 5-year graft survival were 81.8%. Conclusions Transplantation into the left orthotopic position and the revascularization methods are an effective set of surgical techniques that could potentially be adopted as safe and reliable transplant approaches in children with IVC thrombosis. PMID:27500272

  19. A rostro-caudal gradient of structured sequence processing in the left inferior frontal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Uddén, Julia; Bahlmann, Jörg

    2012-07-19

    In this paper, we present two novel perspectives on the function of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG). First, a structured sequence processing perspective facilitates the search for functional segregation within the LIFG and provides a way to express common aspects across cognitive domains including language, music and action. Converging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies suggests that the LIFG is engaged in sequential processing in artificial grammar learning, independently of particular stimulus features of the elements (whether letters, syllables or shapes are used to build up sequences). The LIFG has been repeatedly linked to processing of artificial grammars across all different grammars tested, whether they include non-adjacent dependencies or mere adjacent dependencies. Second, we apply the sequence processing perspective to understand how the functional segregation of semantics, syntax and phonology in the LIFG can be integrated in the general organization of the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC). Recently, it was proposed that the functional organization of the lateral PFC follows a rostro-caudal gradient, such that more abstract processing in cognitive control is subserved by more rostral regions of the lateral PFC. We explore the literature from the viewpoint that functional segregation within the LIFG can be embedded in a general rostro-caudal abstraction gradient in the lateral PFC. If the lateral PFC follows a rostro-caudal abstraction gradient, then this predicts that the LIFG follows the same principles, but this prediction has not yet been tested or explored in the LIFG literature. Integration might provide further insights into the functional architecture of the LIFG and the lateral PFC.

  20. Variations in lung lymphatic drainage into the inferior tracheobronchial lymph nodes junction: Applications in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Assane; Dimarino, Vincent; Ndiaye, Aïnina; Gaye, Magaye; Ba, Papa Salmane; Nazarian, Serge

    2016-10-01

    The group of inferior tracheobronchial lymph nodes (ITB) is a lymphatic junction through which the lymph from both lungs is carried. Lymphatic activity in this area can be used to assess the lymphatic spreading of lung cancers. Our aim was to quantify lymph drainage from the lung segments towards the ITB group and to determine the direction of the lymph flow into other mediastinal and abdominal lymph nodes. We injected dye directly into the subpleural lymphatic vessels in 100 lung segments of 25 fresh cadaver subjects; the cadavers were then dissected. Thirty-eight segments (38%) drained into the ITB group in 18 subjects. The drainage into the ITB group involved 15.6% of the upper lobe segments, 87.5% of the middle lobe segments, and 70.6% of the lower lobe segments in the right lung. On the left, 6.9% of the upper lobe segments and 83.3% of the lower lobe segments were drained into the ITB group. For three subjects, the dye did not pass beyond the ITB group. The efferent vessels of the ITB group drained towards the right paratracheal and tracheoesophageal chains in 12 subjects and through the left ascending recurrent chain in five subjects. For six subjects, the efferent channels reached the abdominal lymph nodes. A contralateral drainage involved 14 segments (36%). The size and variety of the segments that drain into the ITB group, coupled with the efferent contralateral mediastinal and abdominal pathways, account for the severity of metastasis to this area. Clin. Anat. 29:955-962, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27480071