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Sample records for mike demol werner

  1. Mighty Mike!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles Mike Simmel, a member of the Harlem Wizards professional basketball team and a national spokesman for Epilepsy Awareness. Mike has been diagnosed with epilepsy when he was two-years-old. At age seven, his father gave him a basketball to see if working with the ball would help him overcome his motor skills issues. Mike first…

  2. Mighty Mike!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles Mike Simmel, a member of the Harlem Wizards professional basketball team and a national spokesman for Epilepsy Awareness. Mike has been diagnosed with epilepsy when he was two-years-old. At age seven, his father gave him a basketball to see if working with the ball would help him overcome his motor skills issues. Mike first…

  3. Memories of Mike Elrick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandlos, John

    2010-01-01

    The first time the author met Mike was in the winter of 1989 at his job interview for a senior staff position at Camp Kitchikewana. Mike carried his own passion for outdoor education into his work at Kitchi. The camp had always had a focus on outdoor recreation, with strong boating and swimming programs. Mike showed his staff that they could do…

  4. Mike's Guiding Warmth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leckie, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Mike Elrick knew how to stay warm. He loved to wrap himself from head to toe in wool; the author pictures Mike as a wool-clad moccasin-footed snow walker twisting into lampwick harnesses with his trail axe looped through his belt. Mike looked forward to winter and welcomed a drop in the mercury--the lower the better! He loved the physical work of…

  5. Interview with Mike Shaughnessy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Shaughnessy, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Mike Shaughnessy is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Statistics at Portland State University in Oregon. He served as co-chair for the Board for the Special Interest Group for Research in Mathematics Education of the American Educational Research Association from 2005-2007. A member of the Board of Directors of the National Council of Teachers…

  6. Astronaut Mike Fossum With SHERE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Flight Engineer Mike Fossum aboard the International Space Station takes a moment to demonstrate the Shear History Extensional Rheology Experiment. Known as SHERE, the experiment investigates the e...

  7. In Conversation with Mike Crommie

    ScienceCinema

    Mike Crommie

    2016-07-12

    Dec. 9 2009: Host Alice Egan of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division interviews scientists about their lives and work in language everyone can understand. Her guest is Berkeley Lab's Mike Crommie.

  8. In Conversation with Mike Crommie

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Crommie

    2010-02-16

    Dec. 9 2009: Host Alice Egan of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division interviews scientists about their lives and work in language everyone can understand. Her guest is Berkeley Lab's Mike Crommie.

  9. An interview with Mike Levine.

    PubMed

    Levine, Mike; Vicente, Catarina

    2015-10-15

    Mike Levine, director of the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton University, is a developmental biologist who has dedicated his career to understanding how gene expression is regulated during development. Some of his most significant research, such as the co-discovery of the homeobox genes and his work on even skipped stripe 2, was performed in Drosophila, but he has since branched out to Ciona intestinalis, which he is using as a model to understand how vertebrate features have evolved. We had a lively chat with Mike at this year's Society for Developmental Biology (SDB) meeting, where he was awarded the Edwin Grant Conklin Medal.

  10. Werner's Relevance for Contemporary Developmental Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    Considers the contributions of Heinz Werner to developmental psychology and identifies the tensions between Werner's theory and the practices of contemporary developmental psychology. Core issues of Werner's psychology concern: (1) development as heuristic, rather than phenomenon; (2) developmental process analysis; and (3) conceptions of the…

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Werner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cell's nucleus , where it normally interacts with DNA. Evidence also suggests that the altered protein is broken down more quickly in the cell than the normal Werner protein. Researchers do not ... protein may allow DNA damage to accumulate, which could impair normal cell ...

  12. Werner, Johann (1468-1522)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, mathematician, instrument-maker and geographer, born in Nuremberg, Germany, follower of Regiomontanus. Regiomontanus had suggested that the timing of eclipses and the orbits of comets could be used as clocks to determine longitude. Werner developed a practical version of this idea with the method of lunar distances (i.e. measuring the angle of the Moon from the Sun). He published this...

  13. Remembering Mike at MacArthur

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwood, Bert; Raffan, James

    2010-01-01

    For Bert, Mike, like all good teachers, proved early that he had the ability to predict potential problems and also to look back recognizing problems not adequately controlled. He wrestled with these. He worried at them, not in the neurotic sense of worry, but in the sense of thoroughly examining every aspect of the matter. Mike also knew how to…

  14. Students Speak With NASA Astronaut Mike Foreman

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From NASA’s International Space Station Mission Control Center NASA astronaut Mike Foreman participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with fifth grade students at Berry Elementary Sch...

  15. Space Campers Speak With Astronaut Mike Fossum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA astronaut Mike Fossum participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at a space camp at the Kennedy Space ...

  16. Students Speak With Flight Director Mike Sarafin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From NASA’s International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA Flight Director Mike Sarafin participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students in the Galveston Independent...

  17. Mike Gernhardt on Asteroid Mission Simulation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA astronaut Mike Gernhardt talks with Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean about the simulation of a mission to an asteroid taking place at the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space C...

  18. NASA Astronaut Mike Fossum Talks With Students

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA Astronaut Mike Fossum participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students from Clark Creek STEM Academy in Ackw...

  19. Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Werner Heisenberg was one of the greatest physicists of all times. When he started out as a young research worker, the world of physics was in a very confused and frustrating state, which Abraham Pais has described1 as: It was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair using Charles Dickens' words in A Tale of Two Cities. People were playing a guessing game: There were from time to time great triumphs in proposing, through sheer intuition, make-shift schemes that amazingly explained some regularities in spectral physics, leading to joy. But invariably such successes would be followed by further work which reveal the inconsistency or inadequacy of the new scheme, leading to despair...

  20. Linkage disequilibrium, haplotype analysis and Werner`s syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wijsman, E.M.; Goddard, K.A.B.; Martin, G.M.

    1994-09-01

    Werner`s syndrome (WS) is a rare, autosomal, recessive disorder of premature aging. Although the underlying defect is unknown, the gene for the disorder, WRN, has been mapped to the 8p11.1-21.1 region. We have assembled a sample of 30 Japanese and 24 non-Japanese (primary Caucasian) WS patients, as well as a control sample from each population. 25 of the Japanese patients and 10 of the Caucasian patients are from consanguineous marriages. We recently presented evidence from these families which places WRN in the 10.2 cM interval between D8S87 and D8S137. However, because WS is so rare and because many patients are from consanguineous marriages, fine localization of the gene by traditional meiotic mapping methods is unlikely to succeed. The existence of linkage disequilibrium is now recognized as a key piece of evidence in defining a small region (typically under 1-2 cM) containing a gene of interest. Thus an alternative approach for refining the location of WRN may be to identify linked markers which are in linkage disequilibrium with the disease. We recently suggested that WRN may be close to D8S339 and GSR in the above interval because of the presence of statistically significant evidence of linkage disequilibrium in the Japanese sample. In addition, there was evidence in both populations that a limited number of haplotypes was associated with the disease. Here we report an extension of this study to include a number of additional markers. We present additional evidence that there is linkage disequilibrium between many of these markers and WRN in both the Japanese and Caucasian samples. In addition, the additional markers do not markedly subdivide the disease haplotypes defined by D8S339 and GSR, while at the same time they introduce substantial numbers of new haplotypes into the control populations. These results suggest that the haplotypes associated with WS may be used to further define the limits of WRN.

  1. Acoustic scattering by a modified Werner method

    PubMed

    Ravel; Trad

    2000-02-01

    A modified integral Werner method is used to calculate pressure scattered by an axisymmetric body immersed in a perfect and compressible fluid subject to a harmonic acoustic field. This integral representation is built as the sum of a potential of a simple layer and a potential of volume. It is equivalent to the exterior Helmholtz problem with Neumann boundary condition for all real wave numbers of the incident acoustic field. For elastic structure scattering problems, the modified Werner method is coupled with an elastodynamic integral formulation in order to account for the elastic contribution of the displacement field at the fluid/structure interface. The resulting system of integral equations is solved by the collocation method with a quadratic interpolation. The introduction of a weighting factor in the modified Werner method decreases the number of volume elements necessary for a good convergence of results. This approach becomes very competitive when it is compared with other integral methods that are valid for all wave numbers. A numerical comparison with an experiment on a tungsten carbide end-capped cylinder allows a glimpse of the interesting possibilities for using the coupling of the modified Werner method and the integral elastodynamic equation used in this research.

  2. An Interview with Werner F. Leopold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakuta, Kenji

    A 1983 interview with Werner F. Leopold (1896-1984), a key figure in the study of bilingualism and child language, is presented. An introductory section gives some background to the interview. The discussion itself reviews Leopold's personal and professional background, work, and writing, and focuses largely on the linguistic development of…

  3. STS-104 Crew Interview: Mike Gernhardt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-104 Mission Specialist Mike Gernhardt is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, its payload (the Joint Airlock and the external gas tanks), and the usefulness of the newly installed Canadian Robotic Arm (installed by STS-100 crew). Gernhardt describes his role in the rendezvous, docking, undocking, and flyaround of the Atlantis Orbiter and the International Space Station (ISS) and discusses the mission's planned spacewalks.

  4. [Werner syndrome with torpid trophic ulcera cruris].

    PubMed

    Hürlimann, A F; Schnyder, U W

    1991-11-01

    Werner's syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive inherited disorder with a distinctive clinical picture. The characteristic physiognomy, shortness of stature with thin extremities, and large trophic ulcers are the key signs for the diagnosis. Premature greying of the hair and baldness, juvenile cataracts, a tendency to diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism, calcifications of the blood vessels, osteoporosis, metastatic calcifications of the soft tissue and an elevated incidence of neoplasms are further important features. We describe two patients with this disorder.

  5. Analytic expressions of discord and geometric discord in Werner derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Haojie; Liu, Yimin; Chen, Jianlan; Ye, Biaoliang; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2014-06-01

    Werner derivatives are a special kind of mixing states transformed from Werner states by unitary operations (Hiroshima and Ishizaka in Phys Rev A 62:044302, 2000). In this paper, the inherent quantum correlations in Werner derivatives are quantified by two different quantifiers, i.e., quantum discord and geometric discord. Different analytic expressions of the two discords in Werner derivatives are derived out. Some distinct features of the discords and their underlying physics are exposed via discussions and analyses. Moreover, it is found that the amount of quantum correlations quantified by either quantifier in each derivative cannot exceed that in the original Werner state. In other words, no unitary operation can increase quantum correlation in a Werner state as far as the two quantifiers are concerned.

  6. Hydrological extreme events with Mike Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, M. G.; Carvalho, S.; Fernandes, L.; Caramelo, L.; Alencoão, A.

    2012-04-01

    This work is part of a broader project which aims to develop an integrated system to model and simulate of the hydrological cycle processes at river basin scale. All these processes involved in the dynamics of a watershed, which play an important role in the proper management and sustainable use of water resources, are influenced by many factors (e.g. soil use, vegetation cover, weather and climate) being of particular importance, all aspects related to the occurrence, amount and the spatial-temporal distribution of precipitation. We focus our work on the use of the MIKE Basin model and apply it to the Corgo River basin, which is a tributary of the Douro river, located in the Portuguese region of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro. Different datasets were used to characterize and model the river basin catchment hydrological processes, namely temperature, precipitation and runoff registered in several weather/hydrometric stations from the Institute of Information System for Water Resources (http://snirh.pt/) as well as land use/soil occupation and topography maps. The MIKE BASIN model runs on a Geographic Information System (GIS) to perform hydrologic modeling at basin-scale. This software allows a set of multisectoral water demands (domestic and industrial water supply, irrigation, hydropower generation, among others) and provides simulation and visualization in both space and time. We start by using the topography, soil type, soil use and vegetation cover of the region. Then the model is calibrated and tested, comparing model runoff estimates with observed data. Finally, the model is used to simulate the river basin catchment behavior to the typical conditions of the hydrological extreme events namely, heavy precipitation and drought. We present the geologic, hydrologic and climatologic characterization of the Corgo river catchment, list the most important factors that control the water availability in the river basin, describe the MIKE BASIN model calibration process

  7. Radiographic presentation of musculoskeletal involvement in Werner syndrome (adult progeria).

    PubMed

    David, A; Vincent, M; Arrigoni, P P; Barbarot, S; Pistorius, M A; Isidor, B; Frampas, E

    2016-12-05

    Werner syndrome (i.e., adult progeria) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the WRN gene, which is characterized by the premature appearance of features associated with normal aging and cancer predisposition. Patients with Werner syndrome can present with musculoskeletal complaints, associated with suggestive radiographic features with a potential prognostic or therapeutic impact. This review illustrates the main radiographic features of Werner syndrome, focusing on the musculoskeletal system, such as soft-tissue calcification, muscular atrophy, osteoporosis, foot deformities, osteitis and osteomyelitis, and bone or soft-tissues malignancies. The identification of these features by radiologists can therefore be useful in the clinical screening of Werner syndrome.

  8. STS-110 Crew Interview: Mike Bloomfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Commander Mike Bloomfield is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Bloomfield outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Bloomfield discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  9. STS-110 Crew Interview: Mike Bloomfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Commander Mike Bloomfield is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Bloomfield outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Bloomfield discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  10. Mike"s Conker: a collaborative nonlinear knowledge elicitation repository for mobile HCI practitioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamedally, Dean; Edlich, Stefan; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Petrie, Helen

    2005-03-01

    In the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), we use a variety of Knowledge Elicitation (KE) techniques to capture user cognitive issues e.g. via interviews, paper prototyping, card sorting, focus group debates and more. MIKE (Mobile Interactive Knowledge Elicitation) is an ongoing research direction to enhance the KE capabilities of HCI practitioners via mobile and electronic methods. MIKE tools are a suite of Mobile HCI software and hardware configurations for a variety of mobile platforms. With MIKE's CONKER we describe a Collaborative Non-linear Knowledge Elicitation Repository for HCI practitioners. Its intention is to provide a scalable infrastructure for supporting the management and collaborative retrieval of mobile based KE datasets. Some of its functional design requirements include HCI practitioner profiles management, managing experimental progress from dispersed mobile HCI teams, timetabling expenditures for time critical empirical capture and participant management, and enabling concurrent HCI specialists to compare elicited mobile data. Further expansion of the CONKER system will include incorporation of distributed psychometric analysis methods. CONKER is realized as a sourceforge-alike Web-Portal using state-of-the-art web-framework technologies. We describe several approaches to the capturing and management of HCI data and how CONKER makes this available to the HCI community.

  11. Quantum nondemolition measurement of the Werner state

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jiasen; Yu Changshui; Pei Pei; Song Heshan

    2010-10-15

    We propose a theoretical scheme of quantum nondemolition measurement of two-qubit Werner state. We discuss our scheme with the two qubits restricted in a local place and then extend the scheme to the case in which two qubits are separated. We also consider the experimental realization of our scheme based on cavity quantum electrodynamics. It is very interesting that our scheme is robust against the dissipative effects introduced by the probe process. We also give a brief interpretation of our scheme finally.

  12. Immortalization of Werner syndrome and progeria fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.; Moses, R.E. )

    1991-02-01

    Human fibroblast cells from two different progeroid syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS) and progeria, were established as immortalized cell lines by transfection with plasmid DNA containing the SV40 early region. The lineage of each immortalized cell line was confirmed by VNTR analysis. Each of the immortalized cell lines maintained its original phenotype of slow growth. DNA repair ability of these cells was also studied by measuring sensitivity to killing by uv or the DNA-damaging drugs methyl methansulfonate, bleomycin, and cis-dichlorodiamine platinum. The results showed that both WS and progeria cells have normal sensitivity to these agents.

  13. 100 Years Werner Heisenberg: Works and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenfuß, Dietrich; Lüst, Dieter; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    2003-09-01

    Over 40 renowned scientists from all around the world discuss the work and influence of Werner Heisenberg. The papers result from the symposium held by the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Heisenberg's birth, one of the most important physicists of the 20th century and cofounder of modern-day quantum mechanics. Taking atomic and laser physics as their starting point, the scientists illustrate the impact of Heisenberg's theories on astroparticle physics, high-energy physics and string theory right up to processing quantum information.

  14. Modeling Spitsbergen fjords by hydrodynamic MIKE engine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosecki, Szymon; Przyborska, Anna; Jakacki, Jaromir

    2013-04-01

    Two Svalbard's fjords - Hornsund (on the western side of the most southern part of Spitsbergen island) and Kongsfjorden (also on the western side of Spitsbergen island, but in the northern part) are quite different - the first one is "cold" and second one is "warm". It is obvious that both of them are under influence of West Spitsbergen Current (WSC), which curry out warm Atlantic water and cold East Spitsbergen Current detaches Hornsund. But there is also freshwater stored in Spitsbergen glaciers that have strong influence on local hydrology and physical fjord conditions. Both, local and shelf conditions have impact on state of the fjord and there is no answer which one is the most important in each fjord. Modeling could help to solve this problem - MIKE 3D model has been implemented for both fjords. Mesh-grid of the each fjord has been extended for covering shelf area. External forces like tides, velocities at the boundary and atmospheric forces together with sources of cold and dens fresh water in the fjords will give reliable representation of physical conditions in Hornsund and Kongsfjorden. Calculations of balances between cold fresh water and warm and salt will provide additional information that could help to answer the main question of the GAME (Growing of the Arctic Marine Ecosystem) project - what is the reaction of physically controlled Arctic marine ecosystem to temperature rise.

  15. STS-119 Breakfast Meeting with NASA Administrator Mike Griffin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-01-09

    NASA Administrator Mike Griffen having breakfast with the STS-119 crew, then receiving a tour of the Small Pressurized Rover demonstration. Photo Date: January 9, 2009 Location: Bldg. 27 - Astronaut Quarantine. Photographer: R.Markowitz, x37739

  16. TARA MARSHALL AND MIKE NICHOLS AT TEST STAND 4693

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-14

    TARA MARSHALL, LEFT, A MARSHALL ENGINEER, TALKS ABOUT THE INSTALLATION OF A PRESSURIZATION CONTROL PANEL AT TEST STAND 4693 WITH MIKE NICHOLS, LEAD TEST ENGINEER FOR THE SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM LIQUID HYDROGEN TANK STRUCTURAL TEST ARTICLE.

  17. Journeys of Mike and Wayland: Reflections on a Friend and Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Paul

    2010-01-01

    According to the author, Mike was his close friend and also his mentor. Mike helped him find his way into teaching and he drew him into traditional winter camping. His first winter camping experience was with Mike 16 years ago in Killbear Provincial Park, near Parry Sound. Mike was thinking up Community Environmental Leadership Program (CELP) way…

  18. Behavior of Werner states under relativistic boosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palge, Veiko; Dunningham, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    We study the structure of maps that Lorentz boosts induce on the spin degree of freedom of a system consisting of two massive spin- 1 / 2 particles. We consider the case where the spin state is described by the Werner state and the momenta are discrete. Transformations on the spins are systematically investigated in various boost scenarios by calculating the orbit and concurrence of the bipartite spin state with different kinds of product and entangled momenta. We confirm the general conclusion that Lorentz boosts cause non-trivial behavior of bipartite spin entanglement. Visualization of the evolution of the spin state is shown to be valuable in explaining the pattern of concurrence. The idealized model provides a basis of explanation in terms of which phenomena in systems involving continuous momenta can be understood.

  19. Reflections on My Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nathalie Walker, Guest Writer Editor’s note: This article represents one student’s perspective on her experiences as a Werner H. Kirsten student intern. Failure isn’t just a possibility, it is a certainty; yet failure is what leads you to success. Above all else, that is what I will retain from my experience in the Werner H. Kirsten Student Intern Program (WHK SIP).

  20. Reflections on My Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nathalie Walker, Guest Writer Editor’s note: This article represents one student’s perspective on her experiences as a Werner H. Kirsten student intern. Failure isn’t just a possibility, it is a certainty; yet failure is what leads you to success. Above all else, that is what I will retain from my experience in the Werner H. Kirsten Student Intern Program (WHK SIP).

  1. Multiplex cytokine analysis of Werner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Makoto; Hayata, Koichiro; Chiba, Junji; Matsuura, Masaaki; Iwaki-Egawa, Sachiko; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary We reported a minor inflammation-driven ageing (inflammageing) assessed by highly sensitive CRP (hsCRP) in normal individuals and patients with Werner syndrome (WS), followed by an ageing associated Th2-biased cytokine change in normal ageing in the previous papers. To further study the association of hsCRP and 26 cytokines/chemokines in 35 WS patients, a multiple cytokine array system was used in the same serum samples as were examined for hsCRP. The serum levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and GM-CSF), Th1 products (IL-2, TNFα, IL-12, and IFNγ) and monocyte/macrophage products (MCP-1, basic FGF and G-CSF) in WS were significantly elevated compared with normal ageing. Elevated hsCRP level in WS was significantly correlated with IL-6, IL-12 and VEGF levels, if age and sex were taken into account. A pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine circuit-stimulated immunological shift to Th2 in WS was similar to normal ageing. These cytokine/chemokine changes may induce a systemic chronic inflammation monitored by hsCRP, though these immunological changes in WS were more complicated than normal ageing, possibly due to the WS-specific chronic inflammation such as skin ulcer, diabetes mellitus and central obesity with visceral fat deposition. Further study may warrant the pathophysiology of Th2 shift and Th2-biased inflammageing in normal ageing and WS. PMID:26668779

  2. Oxidative stress and antioxidant response in fibroblasts from Werner and atypical Werner syndromes.

    PubMed

    Seco-Cervera, Marta; Spis, Marta; García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibañez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Velázquez-Ledesma, Ana; Esmorís, Isabel; Bañuls, Sergio; Pérez-Machado, Giselle; Pallardó, Federico V

    2014-03-01

    Werner Syndrome (WS, ICD-10 E34.8, ORPHA902) and Atypical Werner Syndrome (AWS, ICD-10 E34.8, ORPHA79474) are very rare inherited syndromes characterized by premature aging. While approximately 90% of WS individuals have any of a range of mutations in theWRN gene, there exists a clinical subgroup in which the mutation occurs in the LMNA/C gene in heterozygosity. Although both syndromes exhibit an age-related pleiotropic phenotype, AWS manifests the onset of the disease during childhood, while major symptoms in WS appear between the ages of 20 and 30. To study the molecular mechanisms of progeroid diseases provides a useful insight into the normal aging process. Main changes found were the decrease in Cu/Zn and Mn SOD activities in the three cell lines. In AWS, both mRNA SOD and protein levels were also decreased. Catalase and glutathione peroxidases decrease, mainly in AWS. Glutaredoxin (Grx) and thioredoxin (Trx) protein expression was lower in the three progeroid cell lines. Grx and Trx were subjected to post-transcriptional regulation, because protein expression was reduced although mRNA levels were not greatly affected in WS. Low antioxidant defense and oxidative stress occur simultaneously in these rare genetic instability disorders at the onset of progeroid disease.

  3. Possibilities for Children: A Conversation with Mike Rose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marge

    1997-01-01

    Mike Rose wrote "Possible Lives: the Promise of Public Education in America" (1995) to enrich the conversation about public education's alleged shortcomings. The nation's "best" classrooms vary considerably, but all are respectful, physically and emotionally safe, and intellectually and socially vibrant places. Parents and…

  4. Femi, Brake Mechanic: Kinesthetic Learning and Mike Rose's "Remedial" Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Mike Rose, author of "The Mind at Work," extols both the wholesome, pragmatic qualities of handcraft and the implicit intellectual skills required of its practitioners. His recent article, "Rethinking Remedial Education and the Academic-Vocational Divide," is titled with a call to action; in these few words alone, Rose problematizes the polar…

  5. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    During his visit of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Vice President Mike Pence signs a Kennedy Space Center guest book as the agency's Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot, left, and Center Director Bob Cabana look on. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President spoke inside the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space.

  6. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence, left, waves as he and Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida arrive aboard Air Force Two at the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President spoke inside the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space.

  7. Astronaut Mike Hopkins Visit to Maryland Science Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-09

    NASA Astronaut Mike Hopkins explains what it was like to live on the International Space Station for 6 months to visitors at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore, MD on Monday, June 9, 2014. Hopkins served on Expeditions 37 and 38 with Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy and returned home in March, 2014. (Photo Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  8. Vice President Mike Pence Arrival at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence greets NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Robert Cabana after arriving aboard Air Force Two at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During his visit to Kennedy, Pence spoke inside the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space.

  9. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    NASA's Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot, left, greets Vide President Mike Pence at the Shuttle Landing Facility at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President spoke inside the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space.

  10. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Air Force Two, carrying Vice President Mike Pence, taxis on the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President spoke inside the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space.

  11. Vice President Mike Pence Arrival at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence, left, and U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) step off Air Force Two on the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During his visit to Kennedy, Pence spoke inside the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space.

  12. ROBERT BOBO AND MIKE NICHOLS AT TEST STAND 4693

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-14

    ROBERT BOBO, LEFT, AND MIKE NICHOLS TALK BENEATH THE 221-FOOT-TALL TEST STAND 4693, THE LARGEST OF TWO NEW SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM TEST STANDS AT MSFC. BOBO MANAGES SLS STRUCTURAL STRENGTH TESTING, AND NICHOLS IS LEAD TEST ENGINEER FOR THE SLS LIQUID HYDROGEN TANK.

  13. Femi, Brake Mechanic: Kinesthetic Learning and Mike Rose's "Remedial" Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Mike Rose, author of "The Mind at Work," extols both the wholesome, pragmatic qualities of handcraft and the implicit intellectual skills required of its practitioners. His recent article, "Rethinking Remedial Education and the Academic-Vocational Divide," is titled with a call to action; in these few words alone, Rose problematizes the polar…

  14. Correlations and Werner states in finite spin linear arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, P. R.; Chaves, C. M.; d'Albuquerque e Castro, J.; Koiller, Belita

    2013-10-01

    Pairwise quantum correlations in the ground state of an N-spins antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain are investigated. By varying the exchange coupling between two neighboring sites, it is possible to reversibly drive spins from entangled to disentangled states. For even N, the two-spin density matrix is written in the form of a Werner state, allowing identification of its single parameter with the usual spin-spin correlation function. The N = 4 chain is identified as a promising system for practical demonstrations of non-classical correlations and the realization of Werner states in familiar condensed matter systems. Fabrication and measurement ingredients are within current capabilities.

  15. Diverse dealings of the Werner helicase/nuclease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2003-08-06

    The human Werner syndrome is a model for the process of aging. The protein that is mutated in Werner syndrome, WRN, exhibits three catalytic activities: a 3'-to-5' helicase, a 3'-to-5' exonuclease, and an adenosine triphosphatase activity. WRN interacts with a variety of proteins and has been implicated in many aspects of DNA metabolism. A recent paper by Chen et al. published in the August 2003 issue of Aging Cell sheds some light on the multifunctional nature of WRN. It suggests that WRN may be considered as a structural protein, providing a plausible conceptual basis for the many WRN protein-protein interactions.

  16. Vice President Mike Pence visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence, second from right; NASA Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot, left; Deputy Director, Kennedy Space Center, Janet Petro, second from left; NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, center; and Director, Kennedy Space Center, Robert Cabana, right, look at the Orion capsule that will fly on the first integrated flight with the Space Launch System rocket in 2019, during a tour of the Kennedy Space Center's Operations and Checkout Building.

  17. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence speaks before an audience of NASA leaders, U.S. and Florida government officials, and employees inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Pence thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President also toured several facilities highlighting the public-private partnerships, as both NASA and commercial companies prepare to launch American astronauts from the multi-user spaceport.

  18. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Upon his arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Vice President Mike Pence, back to the camera, is greeted by Deputy Center Director Janet Petro. Behind the Vice President, Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, shakes hands with Center Director Bob Cabana. To the right of Cabana is Acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President spoke inside the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space.

  19. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Robert Cabana addresses agency leaders, U.S. and Florida government officials, and employees inside the Vehicle Assembly Building during a visit by Vice President Mike Pence. Pence thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President also toured several facilities highlighting the public-private partnerships, as both NASA and commercial companies prepare to launch American astronauts from the multi-user spaceport.

  20. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Kennedy Space Center Bob Cabana, left, and NASA's Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot, right present Vice President Mike Pence with a framed plaque. On the back of the plaque are patches from each of Cabana's four space shuttle mission, STS-88, STS-53, STS-65, STS-41, and an inscription thanking the Vice President for his support of NASA. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President spoke inside the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space.

  1. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence, back to the camera, is greeted by NASA officials at the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. From the left are, Deputy Center Director Janet Petro, Center Director Bob Cabana and Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot. To the right of Lightfoot is Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President spoke inside the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space.

  2. Vice President Mike Pence Speech at Vehicle Assembly Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence got a first-hand look at the public-private partnerships at America’s multi-user spaceport on Thursday, July 6, during a visit to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Speaking in the center’s iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, the Vice President thanked employees for their commitment to America’s continued leadership in the space frontier.

  3. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence arrives at the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During his visit, Pence spoke inside the iconic building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space. The Vice President also toured several facilities highlighting the public-private partnerships at Kennedy, as both NASA and commercial companies prepare to launch American astronauts from the multi-user spaceport.

  4. Astronaut Mike Hopkins Visit to Maryland Science Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-09

    NASA Astronaut Mike Hopkins explains what it was like to live on the International Space Station for 6 months to seventh graders from Clear Spring Middle School at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore, MD on Monday, June 9, 2014. Hopkins served on Expeditions 37 and 38 with Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy and returned home in March, 2014. (Photo Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  5. Vice President Mike Pence Arrival at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Accompanied by a White House staffer, left, NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Robert Cabana, Acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot and Kennedy Space Center Deputy Director Janet Petro watch as Air Force Two, carrying Vice President Mike Pence, approaches on the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During his visit to Kennedy, Pence spoke inside the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space.

  6. [Werner syndrome. A prototypical form of segmental progeria.

    PubMed

    Lessel, D; Oshima, J; Kubisch, C

    2012-12-01

    Werner syndrome is a segmental progeroid disorder with onset in adolescence or early adulthood. Typical symptoms contributing to patients' prematurely aged appearance include postpubertal development of short stature, cataracts, premature greying/thinning of scalp hair, scleroderma-like skin changes and regional atrophy of subcutaneous fat tissue. In addition, an increased rate and early onset of typical age-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, atherosclerosis, and various malignancies is observed. Werner syndrome is autosomal recessively inherited and caused by mutations in the Werner gene (WRN). To date, more than 70 WRN mutations have been identified. These are spread over the entire gene and typically represent loss of function mutations. WRN encodes a RecQ type helicase involved in DNA repair and the maintenance of DNA integrity, which is reflected by an increased genetic instability in patient cells. Despite the relative rarity of Werner syndrome, its analysis provides important general insights into the roles of DNA stability and integrity for the ageing process and the development of age-associated diseases.

  7. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO TAKEN CIRCA 1909 SEEN FROM TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT CHANNING WAY LOOKING NW. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 9, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence speaks before an audience of NASA leaders, U.S. and Florida government officials, and employees inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Pence thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space. Behind the podium are, from the left, a flown SpaceX Dragon capsule, the Orion spacecraft flown on Exploration Flight test-1 in 2014, and a mockup of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President also toured several facilities highlighting the public-private partnerships, as both NASA and commercial companies prepare to launch American astronauts from the multi-user spaceport.

  9. Marshall Center Director Todd May Briefs Vice President Mike Pence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-25

    Vice President Mike Pence talks with Marshall Space Flight Center Director Todd May and Congressman Robert Aderholt (R-AL) (left) about NASA’s Space Launch System, the agency’s new deep space rocket. May explained progress being made on the rocket. The Vice President visited NASA Marshall in Huntsville, Alabama on Sept. 25, 2017, and saw SLS core stage engine section test hardware (on the right). The engine section is the bottom of the core stage where the four RS-25 engines attach and produce two million pounds of thrust. The SLS engine section is undergoing structural testing.

  10. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence speaks before an audience of NASA leaders, U.S. and Florida government officials, and employees inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Pence thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space. Behind the podium is the Orion spacecraft flown on Exploration Flight test-1 in 2014. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President also toured several facilities highlighting the public-private partnerships, as both NASA and commercial companies prepare to launch American astronauts from the multi-user spaceport.

  11. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    NASA Kennedy Space Center Deputy Director Janet Petro addresses agency leaders, U.S. and Florida government officials and employees inside the Vehicle Assembly Building during a visit by Vice President Mike Pence. Pence thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space. Behind the podium are, from the left, a flown SpaceX Dragon capsule, the Orion spacecraft flown on Exploration Flight test-1 in 2014, and a mockup of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President also toured several facilities highlighting the public-private partnerships, as both NASA and commercial companies prepare to launch American astronauts from the multi-user spaceport.

  12. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Kennedy Space Center Bob Cabana, left, and NASA's Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot, right present Vice President Mike Pence with a framed plaque. At the top is an illustration featuring NASA's efforts to explore Mars. Also included is the flag of the Vice President's home state of Indiana that was flown on the SpaceX Commercial Resupply Services-10 flight in February and March this year. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President spoke inside the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space.

  13. Astronaut Mike Fincke Conducts Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  14. Astronaut Mike Fincke Conducts Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  15. A case of Werner's syndrome associated with osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Murata, K; Hatamochi, A; Shinkai, H; Ishikawa, Y; Kawaguchi, N; Goto, M

    1999-10-01

    We described a case of Werner's syndrome associated with osteosarcoma. A 37-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed as having Werner's syndrome by the presence of juvenile cataracts, skin sclerosis and hyperpigmentation of the feet, high-pitched voice, characteristic bird-like appearance of the face with beak-shaped nose, thinning of the entire skin and hyperkeratoses on soles, hyperlipemia, hyperuricemia, diabetes melitus, and the mutated responsible gene (WRN). He had a 3-month history of a tumor on his left forearm. Histologically, the tumor included four histological patterns; a malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like, a desmoid-like, a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans-like, and a chondrosarcoma-like pattern. Tumoral osteoid formation was also found in the tumor. Therefore, the tumor was diagnosed as osteosarcoma.

  16. Pathways and functions of the Werner syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Wan; Harrigan, Jeanine; Opresko, Patricia L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in human WRN (also known as RECQ3) gene give rise to a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder, Werner syndrome (WS). WS is a premature aging disease characterized by predisposition to cancer and early onset of symptoms related to normal aging including osteoporosis, ocular cataracts, graying and loss of hair, diabetes mellitus, arteriosclerosis, and atherosclerosis. This review focuses on the functional role of Werner protein (WRN) in guarding the genetic stability of cells, particularly by playing an integral role in the base excision repair, and at the telomere ends. Furthermore, in-depth biochemical investigations have significantly advanced our understanding of WRN protein regarding its binding partners and the site of protein-protein interaction. The mapping analysis of protein interaction sites in WRN for most of its binding partners have revealed a common site of protein-protein interaction in the RecQ conserved (RQC) region of WRN.

  17. Verification of the Violation of WWZB Inequality Using Werner States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Álvaro J.; Martins, Luís P.; André, Paulo S.; Pinto, Armando N.

    2015-04-01

    The generation and manipulation of entangled particles presents itself as one of the most important results in quantum mechanics. With the work from Bell, it was possible to prove the nonlocal nature of quantum mechanics, which is nowadays widely accepted. Apart from being possible to prove entanglement from Bell's inequality, it is difficult to compute the system as it increases the number of particles. Such a system containing N qubits can be described by Werner-Wolf-Zukowski-Brukner (WWZB) inequality. In this work, we show how to obtain the maximum of violation of WWZB inequality using a Werner state, simplifying the problem considerably. We get two different results; one for a system containing an odd number of particles and other for a system containing an even number.

  18. Werner-Wheeler mass tensor for fusionlike configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Gherghescu, R.A.; Poenaru, D.N.

    2005-08-01

    The Werner-Wheeler approach is used to calculate the components of the mass tensor for a binary configuration of two intersected spheroids. Four free coordinates form the deformation space: the small semiaxis of the projectile, the two semiaxis ratios of the spheroids, and the distance between centers. A correction term is also calculated, due to the center of mass motion. Final results are presented for the fusion channel {sup 54}Cr+{sup 240}Pu, and all possible couplings are analyzed.

  19. Werner Reutter: A Visionary Pioneer in Molecular Glycobiology.

    PubMed

    Hinderlich, Stephan; Tauber, Rudolf; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2017-07-04

    A creative pioneer: Werner Reutter (1937-2016) was a scientist who both made fundamental discoveries in glycobiology and reached out to disciplines beyond his core field. Many of his former colleagues and students will remember his desire to exchange research ideas, which ultimately contributed to the birth of new research fields. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Mutations in the consensus helicase domains of the Werner syndrome gene. Werner's Syndrome Collaborative Group.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, C E; Oshima, J; Wijsman, E M; Nakura, J; Miki, T; Piussan, C; Matthews, S; Fu, Y H; Mulligan, J; Martin, G M; Schellenberg, G D

    1997-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disease with a complex phenotype that is suggestive of accelerated aging. WS is caused by mutations in a gene, WRN, that encodes a predicted 1,432-amino-acid protein with homology to DNA and RNA helicases. Previous work identified four WS mutations in the 3' end of the gene, which resulted in predicted truncated protein products of 1,060-1,247 amino acids but did not disrupt the helicase domain region (amino acids 569-859). Here, additional WS subjects were screened for mutations, and the intron-exon structure of the gene was determined. A total of 35 exons were defined, with the coding sequences beginning in the second exon. Five new WS mutations were identified: two nonsense mutations at codons 369 and 889; a mutation at a splice-junction site, resulting in a predicted truncated protein of 760 amino acids; a 1-bp deletion causing a frameshift; and a predicted truncated protein of 391 amino acids. Another deletion is >15 kb of genomic DNA, including exons 19-23; the predicted protein is 1,186 amino acids long. Four of these new mutations either partially disrupt the helicase domain region or result in predicted protein products completely missing the helicase region. These results confirm that mutations in the WRN gene are responsible for WS. Also, the location of the mutations indicates that the presence or absence of the helicase domain does not influence the WS phenotype and suggests that WS is the result of complete loss of function of the WRN gene product. PMID:9012406

  1. Werner's Measure on Self-Avoiding Loops and Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Angel; Pickrell, Doug

    2014-08-01

    Werner's conformally invariant family of measures on self-avoiding loops on Riemann surfaces is determined by a single measure μ_0 on self-avoiding loops in C setminus{0} which surround 0. Our first major objective is to show that the measure μ_0 is infinitesimally invariant with respect to conformal vector fields (essentially the Virasoro algebra of conformal field theory). This makes essential use of classical variational formulas of Duren and Schiffer, which we recast in representation theoretic terms for efficient computation. We secondly show how these formulas can be used to calculate (in principle, and sometimes explicitly) quantities (such as moments for coefficients of univalent functions) associated to the conformal welding for a self-avoiding loop. This gives an alternate proof of the uniqueness of Werner's measure. We also attempt to use these variational formulas to derive a differential equation for the (Laplace transform of) the ''diagonal distribution'' for the conformal welding associated to a loop; this generalizes in a suggestive way to a deformation of Werner's measure conjectured to exist by Kontsevich and Suhov (a basic inspiration for this paper).

  2. Compatible quantum correlations: Extension problems for Werner and isotropic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Peter D.; Viola, Lorenza

    2013-09-01

    We investigate some basic scenarios in which a given set of bipartite quantum states may consistently arise as the set of reduced states of a global N-partite quantum state. Intuitively, we say that the multipartite state “joins” the underlying correlations. Determining whether, for a given set of states and a given joining structure, a compatible N-partite quantum state exists is known as the quantum marginal problem. We restrict to bipartite reduced states that belong to the paradigmatic classes of Werner and isotropic states in d dimensions and focus on two specific versions of the quantum marginal problem which we find to be tractable. The first is Alice-Bob, Alice-Charlie joining, with both pairs being in a Werner or isotropic state. The second is m-n sharability of a Werner state across N subsystems, which may be seen as a variant of the N-representability problem to the case where subsystems are partitioned into two groupings of m and n parties, respectively. By exploiting the symmetry properties that each class of states enjoys, we determine necessary and sufficient conditions for three-party joinability and 1-n sharability for arbitrary d. Our results explicitly show that although entanglement is required for sharing limitations to emerge, correlations beyond entanglement generally suffice to restrict joinability, and not all unentangled states necessarily obey the same limitations. The relationship between joinability and quantum cloning as well as implications for the joinability of arbitrary bipartite states are discussed.

  3. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot addresses agency leaders, U.S. and Florida government officials, and employees inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida during a visit by Vice President Mike Pence. Pence thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space. Behind the podium are, from the left, a flown SpaceX Dragon capsule, the Orion spacecraft flown on Exploration Flight test-1 in 2014, and a mockup of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner. During his visit to Kennedy, the Vice President also toured several facilities highlighting the public-private partnerships, as both NASA and commercial companies prepare to launch American astronauts from the multi-user spaceport.

  4. Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence got a first-hand look at the public-private partnerships at America's multi-user spaceport on Thursday, July 6, during a visit to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Vice President started his visit at Shuttle Landing Facility, the former space shuttle landing strip now leased and operated by Space Florida. Speaking in the center's iconic Vehicle Assembly Building, Pence thanked employees for their commitment to America's continued leadership in the space frontier. He then embarked on a spaceport tour showcasing both NASA and commercial work that will soon lead to U.S.-based astronaut launches and eventual missions into deep space. The tour included a visit to the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building, where the Orion spacecraft is being prepped for its first integrated flight with the Space Launch System (SLS) in 2019.

  5. Linkage of mike she to wetland-dndc for carbon budgeting and anaerobic biogeochemistry simulation

    Treesearch

    Jianbo Cui; Changsheng Li; Ge Sun; Carl Trettin

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the linkage between MIKE SHE and Wetland-DNDC for carbon dynamics and greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions simulation in forested wetland.Wet1and-DNDC was modified by parameterizing management measures, refining anaerobic biogeochemical processes, and was linked to the hydrological model - MIKE SHE. As a preliminary application, we simulated the effect...

  6. Pyometra and Pregnancy with Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reis, Maria Inês; Vicente, Ana Patrícia; Cominho, Joana; Gomes, Andrea Sousa; Martins, Luísa; Nunes, Filomena

    2016-12-01

    We describe a Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome (HWWS) patient with previous history of infertility who got pregnant without treatment and presented a pyometra in the contralateral uterus throughout the gestational period, despite multiple antibiotic treatments. Due to the uterus' congenital anomaly and the possibility of ascending infection with subsequent abortion, this pregnancy was classified as high-risk. We believe that the partial horizontal septum in the vagina may have contributed to the closure of the gravid uterus cervix, thus ensuring that the pregnancy came to term, with an uneventful vaginal delivery.

  7. [Werner Leibbrand as psychiatric opponent of National Socialism].

    PubMed

    Seidel, R

    2013-09-01

    The psychiatrist and medical historian Werner Leibbrand resigned from the Berlin Medical Association after the seizure of power in protest against the exclusion of Jewish colleagues and lost both the license to practice as well as his professional position in the public health service. After the end of the war the American military authorities appointed him as expert witness for the prosecution in the Nürnberg Doctors Trial. In addition to a biographical review, Leibbrand's resolute although still undisputed attitude as ethical expert in the trials will be roughly outlined.

  8. Bayesian Nash equilibria using extended Werner-like states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alid-Vaccarezza, M.; Soto, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    We study quantum strategies in games of incomplete information using a formalism of game theory based on multi-sector probability matrix. We analyze an extension of the well-known game of Battle of Sexes using an extended Werner-like state focusing in how its mixedness and entanglement affect the Bayesian Nash payoffs of the player. It is shown that entanglement is needed to outperform classical payoffs but not all entangled states are useful due to the presence of mixedness. A threshold for the mixedness parameter and the minimum entanglement value were found.

  9. The Spectrum of WRN Mutations in Werner Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shurong; Lee, Lin; Hanson, Nancy B.; Lenaerts, Catherine; Hoehn, Holger; Poot, Martin; Rubin, Craig D.; Chen, Da-Fu; Yang, Chih-Chao; Juch, Heike; Dorn, Thomas; Spiegel, Roland; Oral, Elif Arioglu; Abid, Mohammed; Battisti, Carla; Lucci-Cordisco, Emanuela; Neri, Giovanni; Steed, Erin H.; Kidd, Alexa; Isley, William; Showalter, David; Vittone, Janet L.; Konstantinow, Alexander; Ring, Johannes; Meyer, Peter; Wenger, Sharon L.; von Herbay, Axel; Wollina, Uwe; Schuelke, Markus; Huizenga, Carin R.; Leistritz, Dru F.; Martin, George M.; Mian, I. Saira; Oshima, Junko

    2007-01-01

    The International Registry of Werner syndrome (www.wernersyndrome.org) has been providing molecular diagnosis of the Werner syndrome (WS) for the past decade. The present communication summarizes, from among 99 WS subjects, the spectrum of 50 distinct mutations discovered by our group and by others since the WRN gene (also called RECQL2 or REQ3) was first cloned in 1996; 25 of these have not previously been published. All WRN mutations reported thus far have resulted in the elimination of the nuclear localization signal at the C-terminus of the protein, precluding functional interactions in the nucleus; thus, all could be classified as null mutations. We now report two new mutations in the N-terminus that result in instability of the WRN protein. Clinical data confirm that the most penetrant phenotype is bilateral ocular cataracts. Other cardinal signs were seen in more than 95% of the cases. The median age of death, previously reported to be in the range of 46–48 years, is 54 years. Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) have been cryopreserved from the majority of our index cases, including material from nuclear pedigrees. These, as well as inducible and complemented hTERT (catalytic subunit of human telomerase) immortalized skin fibroblast cell lines are available to qualified investigators. Published 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.† PMID:16673358

  10. Magnetoplasmadynamcis - Portrait of Macon C. 'Mike' Ellis, Jr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Portrait of Macon C. 'Mike' Ellis, Jr. James Hansen described Mike Ellis as 'the first and only person to be in charge of Langley's Magnetoplasmadynamcis (MPD) Branch.' He was 'an NACA veteran who was 42 years old when the branch was organized. Ellis had come to work at Langley in 1939, and over the course of his career at the laboratory, he had been involved in pioneering work on the aerodynamics of jet engines, ramjets, and supersonic inlets and nozzles. Fittingly, Ellis had worked for Eastman Jacobs and with Arthur Kantrowitz in the early 1940s, and he had heard firsthand accounts of his former colleagues' attempts to design a fusion reactor in the spring of 1938. By the late 1950s, Ellis was one of Langley's most outspoken believers in MPD's promise of technological benefits. Ellis encouraged Floyd Thompson's enthusiasm for MPD and persuaded Langley's senior staff of mostly engineers that MPD was a field of research vital to the future of NASA. When the time came to pick someone to head the new branch, Ellis was unquestionably the person for the job. 'Ellis was no extraordinary 'scientific brain.' As an aeronautical engineer, his talents were quite respectable, but he possessed no special competency in the physics of fluids beyond his experience in aerodynamics or gas dynamics. He was always the first to admit that the complexities of plasma physics and MPD were such that 'there was no way' that he personally could conduct basic MPD research. That challenge he would leave to minds more suited for it. But Ellis could bring the MPD researchers together as a unit, serve as their strong external advocate, shield them from front-office pressures, and make sure that they received the support they needed to carry out their work. 'I just tried to keep my head above water,' Ellis explains, 'and keep these *mad scientists' from going off on too many tangents, or going mad myself.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From

  11. Werner syndrome through the lens of tissue and tumour genomics

    PubMed Central

    Tokita, Mari; Kennedy, Scott R.; Risques, Rosa Ana; Chun, Stephen G.; Pritchard, Colin; Oshima, Junko; Liu, Yan; Bryant-Greenwood, Peter K.; Welcsh, Piri; Monnat, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is the canonical adult human progeroid (‘premature aging’) syndrome. Patients with this autosomal recessive Mendelian disorder display constitutional genomic instability and an elevated risk of important age-associated diseases including cancer. Remarkably few analyses of WS patient tissue and tumors have been performed to provide insight into WS disease pathogenesis or the high risk of neoplasia. We used autopsy tissue from four mutation-typed WS patients to characterize pathologic and genomic features of WS, and to determine genomic features of three neoplasms arising in two of these patients. The results of these analyses provide new information on WS pathology and genomics; provide a first genomic characterization of neoplasms arising in WS; and provide new histopathologic and genomic data to test several popular models of WS disease pathogenesis. PMID:27559010

  12. Werner Heisenberg zum 100. Geburtstag: Pionier der Quantenmechanik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, Manfred

    2001-11-01

    Werner Heisenberg war eine der prägendsten Gestalten der Physik des 20. Jahrhunderts. Zu seinen wichtigsten Verdiensten gehören die Grundlegung der Quantenmechanik, die Formulierung der Unschärferelationen sowie die Beteiligung an der Ausarbeitung der Kopenhagener Deutung der Quantenmechanik. Darüber hinaus lieferte er Arbeiten von fundamentalem Charakter zur Theorie des Atomkerns, zur kosmischen Strahlung und zur Quantenfeldtheorie. Während des Krieges war er an den Arbeiten des Uranvereins beteiligt, der die Möglichkeit einer Entwicklung von Kernwaffen untersuchte, jedoch über Vorarbeiten zur Reaktorphysik nicht hinauskam. Wegen dieser Tätigkeit wurde er bei Kriegsende für einige Monate in England interniert. Nach seiner Rückkehr widmete er sich vor allem dem Aufbau der Physik in Deutschland, die während der NS-Zeit nahezu ihrer gesamten Substanz beraubt worden war.

  13. Werner Brandt legacy to PIXE: Past and present perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapicki, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Inner-shell ionization cross sections used in Particle-Induced X-ray Elemental (PIXE) analyses are routinely calculated in the ECPSSR [W. Brandt, G. Lapicki, Phys. Rev. A 23 (1981) 1717-1729] theory and/or semiempirical formulas scaled to that theory. Thirty years after the passing of Werner Brandt, with recognition of his seminal contributions to other research on positron physics and stopping power problems, the work and articles that progressed into the ECPSSR theory for inner-shell ionization by protons and heavier ions are recalled as Brandt's past legacy to the PIXE community. Applications of the ECPSSR and its evolution into the ECUSAR [G. Lapicki, Nucl. Instr. Meth. B 189 (2002) 8-20] theory over the last three decades are reviewed with perspectives on Brandt's present legacy.

  14. Neutron interferometry: The pioneering contributions of Samuel A. Werner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, A. G.

    2006-11-01

    In 1975, Sam Werner, while on the staff of the Scientific Laboratory of the Ford Motor Company, and his collaborators from Purdue University, Roberto Colella and Albert Overhauser, carried out one of the pioneering experiments in neutron interferometry at the 2 MW University of Michigan research reactor. It was the famous COW Experiment [Colella et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 34 (1975) 1472] on gravitationally induced quantum interference. Shortly thereafter he moved to the University of Missouri in Columbia, to set up a program of neutron scattering research, including neutron interferometry. In the 25 years until his retirement a large number of beautiful experiments have been performed by Sam, with his group, his numerous students and many international collaborators. This work and its history are briefly reviewed in this paper.

  15. The history of Werner Spalteholz's Handatlas der Anatomie des Menschen.

    PubMed

    Williams, D J

    1999-12-01

    Werner Spalteholz's Handatlas der Anatomie des Menschen is one of the most elegantly illustrated anatomical atlases of all time. Originally published in Leipzig as three volumes from 1895 to 1903, the atlas is still widely used and remains highly regarded by many. The atlas was remarkably popular during the first half of the 20th century, especially the English version in North America and the UK. Unfortunately, the original illustrations and printing plates for the work disappeared following the Second World War and their fate remains a mystery. And, in spite of the atlas's popularity, little is known to the men who prepared the artwork for Spalteholz. It is commonly believed that Max Brödel contributed illustrations to the atlas, but a close examination of the work does not confirm this. A century after its inception, Spalteholz's atlas remains a classic milestone in the history of anatomical illustration.

  16. Quantum Discord and Entanglement of Quasi-Werner States Based on Bipartite Entangled Coherent States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Manoj K.; Maurya, Ajay K.; Prakash, Hari

    2016-06-01

    Present work is an attempt to compare quantum discord and quantum entanglement of quasi-Werner states formed with the four bipartite entangled coherent states (ECS) used recently for quantum teleportation of a qubit encoded in superposed coherent state. Out of these, the quasi-Werner states based on maximally ECS due to its invariant nature under local operation is independent of measurement basis and mean photon numbers, while for quasi-Werner states based on non-maximally ECS, it depends upon measurement basis as well as on mean photon number. However, for large mean photon numbers since non-maximally ECS becomes almost maximally entangled therefore dependence of quantum discord for non-maximally ECS based quasi-Werner states on the measurement basis disappears.

  17. Werner's syndrome may be lost in the shadow of the scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Gonullu, Emel; Bilge, Nazife Sule Yaşar; Kaşifoğlu, Timuçin; Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2013-05-01

    We describe three patients with Werner's syndrome (WS), two of whom had been mistakenly diagnosed as having scleroderma. We would like to discuss briefly the importance of differentiation of these two disorders from each other.

  18. Entanglement of Formation for Werner States and Isotropic States via Logical Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, Cesarino; Chiara, Maria Luisa Dalla; Leporini, Roberto

    To what extent is a logical characterization of entanglement possible? We investigate some correlations that hold between the concept of entanglement of formation for Werner states and for isotropic states and the probabilistic behavior of some quantum logical gates.

  19. Validating Stormwater system simulations in Edmonton Using MIKE URBAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaafar, M.

    2016-12-01

    Many municipalities use chloramination to disinfect drinking water so as to avert the production of the disinfection by-products (DBPs) that result from conventional chlorination processes and the consequential public health risks. However, the long-lasting monochloramine disinfectant (NH2Cl) can pose a significant risk to the environment. As, it can be introduced into stormwater sewers and thus freshwater sources. This study was intended to investigate decay of NH2Cl in stormwater networks starting by building a stormwater model and validating its hydraulic and hydrologic computations, and then modelling water quality in the storm sewers. The presented work here is only the first stage of this study. The 30th Avenue basin in Edmonton was chosen as a case study, because it has various land-use types including commercial, industrial, residential and parks. The City of Edmonton has already built a MIKE-URBAN stormwater model for modelling floods. However, this model was built to the trunk level where only the main drainage features were presented. Also, this model was not calibrated and known to consistently compute pipe flows higher than the observed values; not to the benefit of studying water quality. So the first goal was to complete modelling and updating the real stormwater network. Then, available GIS Data was used to calculate different catchment properties such as slope, length and imperviousness. To calibrate and validate this model, data of two temporary pipe flow monitoring stations was used along with records of two other permanent stations available for eight consecutive summer seasons. The effect of various hydrological parameters on model results was investigated. It was found that model results were affected by the ratio of impervious areas. The catchment length was tested, however calculated, because it is approximate representation of the catchment shape. Surface roughness coefficients were calibrated using. Consequently, computed flows at the two

  20. An empirical study of the nuclear explosion-induced lightning seen on IVY-MIKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, J. D.; Mitchell, C. K.; Greig, J. R.; Murphy, D. P.; Pechacek, R. E.; Raleigh, M.

    1987-05-01

    We report the results of a unique study of the lightninglike phenomena that were seen to accompany the MIKE shot of operation IVY on October 31 1952. MIKE was a thermonuclear surface burst yielding 10.4 MT, which took place on Enewetak Atoll. During the period of approximately 10 ms after detonation, five discrete luminous channels were seen to start from the ground or sea surface at a distance of approximately 1 km from the burst point and to grow up into the clouds. We have reexamined the original photographic records of IVY-MIKE, obtaining effective brightnesses (optical powers per unit length) for the luminous channels at different altitudes as functions of time. The absolute calibration for the MIKE records was deduced by comparison with the photographic records of other events of that era, laboratory measurements of film sensitivity, and use of atmospheric transmission data taken just prior to the MIKE event. Errors in this analysis lead to an uncertainty of a factor of ˜2 in the brightnesses of the luminous channels. In the laboratory we have used laser-guided electric discharges to create long (100 cm), arclike plasma channels to simulate the observed luminous channels and to allow determination of an empirical relation between the brightness of the channel and the electric current flowing in the channel. These laboratory discharges had peak currents up to 100 kA and periods of ˜2 ms. Spectroscopic analysis showed that the luminous channels consisted primarily of normal air plasma with typical ground-level contaminants. Photographic studies showed that these long-duration discharges are unstable to the m = 1 magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability and become severely distorted in less than 1 ms. By direct comparison of the luminous channels seen at MIKE and the laboratory discharges, we deduce: (1) the peak current in the prominent (brightest) channel at MIKE was between 200 and 600 kA. Here the most likely value of the peak current was 250±50 kA, but

  1. Results on the effective area of the FPG-type digital piston manometer of MIKES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantanen, Markku; Semenoja, Sari

    2005-12-01

    The Centre for Metrology and Accreditation (MIKES) has been using a new type of a digital piston manometer (force-balanced piston gauge (FPG)) since 2001. The instrument was developed by DH Instruments Inc., USA. Determination of the effective area was an essential part in validating the FPG in MIKES. One of the big advantages of the FPG is the fact that a conventional pressure balance can be used to determine the effective area. However, the measurement is not straightforward due to the lubrication gas flow in the FPG. The effective area of the MIKES FPG has now been determined several times in the gauge mode by MIKES, once by NMi-VSL, The Netherlands, once by SP, Sweden, and twice by the manufacturer. Measurements in absolute mode have been made using the mercury column manometer of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany. The measurement methods and the results are described in the paper. The results of measurements in MIKES from 2001 to 2004 illustrate the long-term stability and reproducibility of the instrument.

  2. [A case of Werner syndrome with chromosomal abnormality].

    PubMed

    Ochi, Masayuki; Igase, Michiya; Nagai, Ayako; Nakamura, Syunpei; Nagai, Tokihisa; Kawajiri, Masakazu; Nakura, Jun; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Miki, Tetsurou

    2006-09-01

    A 52-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus (DM) complained of weakness of the arms and legs. She was referred to our hospital in November 2002 because of anemia, thyroid tumor and meningioma including DM. She was short in stature, juvenile bilateral cataract, intractable skin ulcers, clavus on the sole of her foot, a bird-like face and high-pitched voice. Typical physical features led to the final diagnosis of Werner's syndrome. Although the myelogram revealed no abnormal findings except erythroid hypoplasia, cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow cells showed deletion of chromosome 20 in 10% of the analyzed cells, which suggested the possibility of that myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) could occur. She had a thyroidectomy because both lobes of the thyroid gland were enlarged and caused hoarseness, In addition, it is common knowledge that the goiter could become malignant. We need to follow her carefully because she might be vulnerable to malignant disease, including leukemia and malignant meningioma.

  3. Lyman-Werner UV escape fractions from primordial haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Anna T. P.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2015-12-01

    Population III (Pop III) stars can regulate star formation in the primordial Universe in several ways. They can ionize nearby haloes, and even if their ionizing photons are trapped by their own haloes, their Lyman-Werner (LW) photons can still escape and destroy H2 in other haloes, preventing them from cooling and forming stars. LW escape fractions are thus a key parameter in cosmological simulations of early reionization and star formation but have not yet been parametrized for realistic haloes by halo or stellar mass. To do so, we perform radiation hydrodynamical simulations of LW UV escape from 9-120 M⊙ Pop III stars in 105-107 M⊙ haloes with ZEUS-MP. We find that photons in the LW lines (i.e. those responsible for destroying H2 in nearby systems) have escape fractions ranging from 0 to 85 per cent. No LW photons escape the most massive halo in our sample, even from the most massive star. Escape fractions for photons elsewhere in the 11.18-13.6 eV energy range, which can be redshifted into the LW lines at cosmological distances, are generally much higher, being above 60 per cent for all but the least massive stars in the most massive haloes. We find that shielding of H2 by neutral hydrogen, which has been neglected in most studies to date, produces escape fractions that are up to a factor of 3 smaller than those predicted by H2 self-shielding alone.

  4. [The birth of acknowledgement: Michel Foucault and Werner Leibbrand].

    PubMed

    Mildenberger, Florian

    2006-01-01

    In 1964, Werner Leibbrand (1896-1974) was the first German medical historian to present, in Sudhoffs Archiv, a review of the work of Michel Foucault (1926-1984). This paper examines some of the reasons leading to the fact that Leibbrand's own generation refused to acknowledge the importance of Foucault's ideas, while, later on, younger German medical historians, although impressed with Foucault's writings, failed to acknowledge, first, the close relationship between Leibbrand's and Foucault's world views, and, second, Leibbrand's attempts at introducing Foucault to German medical historians. Leibbrand with his Jewish wife had survived the Nazi period partly in hiding. His attempts at clearing post-war German psychiatry and medical historiography of NS-sympathizers isolated him among his colleagues, many of whom had begun their career during the Third Reich. Leibbrand enjoyed the support by the Swiss medical historian and avowed Communist Erwin Ackerknecht (1906-1988), but later turned against him, possibly because Acknerknecht had called Leibbrand's writings "unscientific". Leibbrand was unable to overcome his antagonisms with his contemporaries. At the same time, opposition to Ackerknecht made him appear a respresentative of the past in the eyes of the younger generation. Thus, when Foucault was accepted by the latter, they were not prepared to examine the work of Leibbrand and realize how close some of the ideas developed by Leibbrand and Foucault had been.

  5. Performance evaluation of spectral analysis and Werner deconvolution interpretation techniques in magnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, M.; Gebissa, Fekadu Tamiru

    2017-03-01

    Determining the depth of anomalous geological subsurface structure is an important parameter in any of geophysical methods. Though, numerous magnetic interpretation techniques are available in literature for locating depth to the causative source, no specific information is found on the performance of any of the techniques. Werner deconvolution and Spectral methods are widely used to determine the approximate depth to the causative sources, which are then used in modeling methods. An attempt has been made in this study to evaluate the performance of Werner and spectral methods. Synthetic magnetic anomalies are generated over sheet, dyke and fault models for different combinations of geometric dimensions of the bodies and magnetization angles. These anomalies were interpreted with the two methods: Werner deconvolution and Spectral analysis. The error percentages are calculated as the difference between the theoretical and interpreted values. In addition, the results are discussed for their performance. It is observed that Werner method yields more reasonable values for depth compared to spectral methods particularly when body widths are more and deep seated or faulting is deep. In case of dyke model, the Werner method determines width also reliably.

  6. Lyman-Werner escape fractions from the first galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Anna T. P.; Agarwal, Bhaskar; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Latif, Muhammad A.; Mas-Ribas, Lluís; Rydberg, Claes-Erik; Whalen, Daniel J.; Zackrisson, Erik

    2017-05-01

    Direct collapse black holes forming in pristine, atomically cooling haloes at z ≈ 10-20 may act as the seeds of supermassive black holes (BHs) at high redshifts. In order to create a massive BH seed, the host halo needs to be prevented from forming stars. H2 therefore needs to be irradiated by a large flux of Lyman-Werner (LW) UV photons in order to suppress H2 cooling. A key uncertainty in this scenario is the escape fraction of LW radiation from first galaxies, which is the dominant source of UV photons at this epoch. To better constrain this escape fraction, we have performed radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the growth of H ii regions and their associated photodissociation regions in the first galaxies using the zeus-mp code. We find that the LW escape fraction crucially depends on the propagation of the ionization front (I-front). For an R-type I-front overrunning the halo, the LW escape fraction is always larger than 95 per cent. If the halo recombines later from the outside-in, due to a softened and weakened spectrum, the LW escape fraction in the rest frame of the halo (the near-field) drops to zero. A detailed and careful analysis is required to analyse slowly moving, D-type I-fronts, where the escape fraction depends on the microphysics and can be as small as 3 per cent in the near-field and 61 per cent in the far-field or as large as 100 per cent in both the near-field and the far-field.

  7. Homozygosity mapping of the Werner syndrome locus (WRN)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakura, J.; Miki, T.; Kamino, K.

    1994-10-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the early onset of several age-related diseases. The locus for this disease was recently mapped to 8p12. We studied 27 WS kindreds of mixed ethnic origins, 26 of which were consanguineous. In 24 of these families, the affected subject was given the diagnosis of {open_quotes}definite{close_quotes} WS and affected subjects in the remaining 3 pedigrees were given the diagnosis of {open_quotes}probable{close_quotes} WS. Affected subjects from each kindred were genotyped for 13 short tandem repeat polymorphic sites. Two-point linkage analysis yielded significant evidence for linkage to D8S137, D8S339, D8S87, PLAT, D8S165, and D8S166. The locus yielding a maximum lod score at the smallest recombination fraction was D8S339, suggesting that this marker is the closest to the WS gene (WRN locus) of those tested. D8S339 gave significant lod scores (Z{sub max}{>=}3.0) for both Japanese and non-Japanese (mostly Caucasian) families, demonstrating that a single locus is responsible for WS in both groups. Multipoint analysis of these markers yielded a maximum lod score of 17.05 at a distance of approximately 0.6 cM from D8S339. The combined evidence from 2-point analysis, multipoint analysis, and analysis of regions of homozygosity in subjects from inbred pedigrees indicates that the WRN locus is between D8S131 and D8S87, in an 8.3-cM interval containing D8S339. 32 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  8. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small aortic annulus in a patient having Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, M; Kasuya, S; Yamamoto, K; Koshika, M; Oguma, F; Hayashi, J

    2001-12-01

    Werner's syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by premature aging and scleroderma-like involvement of the skin. We report a case of aortic valve replacement for severely calcified aortic valve stenosis with a small annulus in a patient suffering from Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis

  9. Nonexistence of entangled continuous-variable Werner states with positive partial transpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, Daniel; Tatham, Richard; Mišta, Ladislav

    2014-03-01

    We address an open question about the existence of entangled continuous-variable (CV) Werner states with positive partial transpose (PPT). We prove that no such state exists by showing that all PPT CV Werner states are separable. The separability follows by observing that these CV Werner states can be approximated by truncating the states into a finite-dimensional convex mixture of product states. In addition, the constituents of the product states comprise a generalized non-Gaussian measurement which gives, rather surprisingly, a strictly tighter upper bound on quantum discord than photon counting. These results uncover the presence of only negative partial transpose entanglement and illustrate the complexity of more general nonclassical correlations in this paradigmatic class of genuine non-Gaussian quantum states.

  10. Three Stories about Mike, or How to Advance a Play Ethic in Life over a Work Ethic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Bob

    2010-01-01

    As a physical educator in the mid-1980s, Mike came to the author's office with a proposition. Rather than write a research term paper with "X" number of sources properly referenced, a length of "X" number of words, and the correct formula-style structure, Mike wanted to use the "opportunity" to work out on paper a…

  11. A Micro-Frame Analysis of the On-Camera/On-Mike Paralinguistic Behavior of Three Presidential Candidates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, John Thomas

    This study examined the paralinguistic behavior of three presidential candidates in on-camera and on-mike speeches made during their campaigns. Using tape recordings, a detailed micronotation was made of candidates' paralinguistic patterns, both while speaking on-camera and on-mike and while speaking under circumstances that were not for a mass…

  12. Hypermutable ligation of plasmid DNA ends in cells from patients with Werner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rünger, T M; Bauer, C; Dekant, B; Möller, K; Sobotta, P; Czerny, C; Poot, M; Martin, G M

    1994-01-01

    Werner Syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an increased cancer risk and by symptoms suggestive of premature aging. Cells from these patients demonstrate a typical pattern of chromosomal instability and a spontaneous hypermutability with a high rate of unusually large deletions. We have studied the in vivo DNA ligation in three lymphoblast cell lines from Werner syndrome patients and three from normal donors. In our host cell ligation assay we transfected linearized plasmid pZ189 and measured the amount of plasmid DNA ends rejoined by these host cells as the ability of the recovered plasmid to transform bacteria. A mutagenesis marker gene close to the ligation site allowed screening for mutations. Subsequent mutation analysis provided information about the accuracy of the ligation process. The cells from Werner syndrome patients were as effective as normal cells in ligating DNA ends. However, mutation analysis revealed that the three Werner syndrome cell lines introduced 2.4-4.6 times more mutations (p < 0.001) than the normal cell lines during ligation of the DNA ends: the mutation rates were 69.4, 97.2, and 58.7%, as compared to 23.6, 21.7, and 24.4% in the normal cell lines. These increased mutation frequencies in plasmids ligated during passage through Werner syndrome cells were mainly due to a significant (p < 0.001) increase in deletions. This error-prone DNA ligation might be responsible for the spontaneous hypermutability and the genomic instability in Werner syndrome cells and related to the apparently accelerated aging and high cancer risk in affected patients.

  13. Comments on Mike Rose's Essay "Rethinking Remedial Education and the Academic-Vocational Divide"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldrick-Rab, Sara

    2012-01-01

    The struggle over whether all students have a right to a high-quality, affordable college education, or whether it is a privilege they must "earn" through high test scores and parental savings for tuition, plays out daily in the so-called "remedial" or "developmental" classes. This article presents the author's comments on Mike Rose's essay…

  14. "City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles," by Mike Davis [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Alan

    1992-01-01

    Mike Davis's book presents a history and current sociology of Los Angeles from a socialist perspective, arguing that inequalities in the distribution of power and wealth underlie the area's serious, growing problems: ethnic fear and discrimination, social disinvestment and withdrawal by the "haves," and an epidemic of youth violence. (SV)

  15. STS-131 Flight Control Team in WFCR - Orbit 2 - Flight Director Mike Sarafin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    JSC2010-E-051978 (14 April 2010) --- The members of the STS-131 Orbit 2 flight control team pose for a group portrait in the space shuttle flight control room in the Mission Control Center at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Flight director Mike Sarafin holds the STS-131 mission logo.

  16. "City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles," by Mike Davis [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Alan

    1992-01-01

    Mike Davis's book presents a history and current sociology of Los Angeles from a socialist perspective, arguing that inequalities in the distribution of power and wealth underlie the area's serious, growing problems: ethnic fear and discrimination, social disinvestment and withdrawal by the "haves," and an epidemic of youth violence. (SV)

  17. Allan Bloom, Mike Rose, and Paul Goodman: In Search of a Lost Pedagogical Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    Discusses and compares two recent books on American higher education: "The Closing of the American Mind" by Allan Bloom, and "Lives on the Boundary" by Mike Rose. Develops a view which synthesizes those of Bloom and Rose. Considers this view as comparable to that of Paul Goodman. (HB)

  18. Comments on Mike Rose's Essay "Rethinking Remedial Education and the Academic-Vocational Divide"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldrick-Rab, Sara

    2012-01-01

    The struggle over whether all students have a right to a high-quality, affordable college education, or whether it is a privilege they must "earn" through high test scores and parental savings for tuition, plays out daily in the so-called "remedial" or "developmental" classes. This article presents the author's comments on Mike Rose's essay…

  19. [Utilization of Werner syndrome mouse model in studying premature aging and tumor].

    PubMed

    Jia, Shu-Ting; Yang, Shi-Hua; Luo, Ying

    2009-08-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease in human. It is considered as a good model disease in studying human premature syndrome. Werner protein (WRN) is a nuclear protein mutated in WS. Recent biochemical and genetic studies indicated that WRN plays important roles in DNA replication, DNA repair, and telomere maintenance. Here, we reviewed the molecular genetics of WS and the importance of telomere and WRN in the development of WS. Knocking out both telomerase and Wrn genes in mouse faithfully manifests human WS. The mouse model provides a unique genetic platform to explore the crosstalk of premature aging and tumor.

  20. Alfred Werner's role in the mid-20th century flourishing of American inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Labinger, Jay A

    2014-01-01

    The development of organic and physical chemistry as specialist fields, during the middle and end of the 19th century respectively, left inorganic behind as a decidedly less highly regarded subfield of chemistry. Despite Alfred Werner's groundbreaking studies of coordination chemistry in the early 20th century, that inferior status remained in place - particularly in the US - until the 1950s, when the beginnings of a resurgence that eventually restored its parity with the other subfields can be clearly observed. This paper explores the extent to which Werner's heritage - both direct, in the form of academic descendants, and indirect - contributed to those advances.

  1. Computer Series, 85. Werner and Jorgensen: Presenting History with a Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisnant, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a computer simulation which deals with the Werner-Jorgensen controversy from the standpoint of Kuhn's description of scientific change. Encourages the use of such instructional approaches to introduce general chemistry students to the process of science, including how (1) theories develop, (2) change occurs, and (3) scientists behave.…

  2. Computer Series, 85. Werner and Jorgensen: Presenting History with a Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisnant, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a computer simulation which deals with the Werner-Jorgensen controversy from the standpoint of Kuhn's description of scientific change. Encourages the use of such instructional approaches to introduce general chemistry students to the process of science, including how (1) theories develop, (2) change occurs, and (3) scientists behave.…

  3. Telomere Shortening Exposes Functions for the Mouse Werner and Bloom Syndrome Genes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaobing; Shen, Johnny; Kugan, Nishan; Furth, Emma E.; Lombard, David B.; Cheung, Catherine; Pak, Sally; Luo, Guangbin; Pignolo, Robert J.; DePinho, Ronald A.; Guarente, Leonard; Johnson, F. Brad

    2004-01-01

    The Werner and Bloom syndromes are caused by loss-of-function mutations in WRN and BLM, respectively, which encode the RecQ family DNA helicases WRN and BLM, respectively. Persons with Werner syndrome displays premature aging of the skin, vasculature, reproductive system, and bone, and those with Bloom syndrome display more limited features of aging, including premature menopause; both syndromes involve genome instability and increased cancer. The proteins participate in recombinational repair of stalled replication forks or DNA breaks, but the precise functions of the proteins that prevent rapid aging are unknown. Accumulating evidence points to telomeres as targets of WRN and BLM, but the importance in vivo of the proteins in telomere biology has not been tested. We show that Wrn and Blm mutations each accentuate pathology in later-generation mice lacking the telomerase RNA template Terc, including acceleration of phenotypes characteristic of latest-generation Terc mutants. Furthermore, pathology not observed in Terc mutants but similar to that observed in Werner syndrome and Bloom syndrome, such as bone loss, was observed. The pathology was accompanied by enhanced telomere dysfunction, including end-to-end chromosome fusions and greater loss of telomere repeat DNA compared with Terc mutants. These findings indicate that telomere dysfunction may contribute to the pathogenesis of Werner syndrome and Bloom syndrome. PMID:15367665

  4. Simulation of river stage using artificial neural network and MIKE 11 hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Rabindra K.; Pramanik, Niranjan; Bala, Biplab

    2010-06-01

    Simulation of water levels at different sections of a river using physically based flood routing models is quite cumbersome, because it requires many types of data such as hydrologic time series, river geometry, hydraulics of existing control structures and channel roughness coefficients. Normally in developing countries like India it is not easy to collect these data because of poor monitoring and record keeping. Therefore, an artificial neural network (ANN) technique is used as an effective alternative in hydrologic simulation studies. The present study aims at comparing the performance of the ANN technique with a widely used physically based hydrodynamic model in the MIKE 11 environment. The MIKE 11 hydrodynamic model was calibrated and validated for the monsoon periods (June-September) of the years 2006 and 2001, respectively. Feed forward neural network architecture with Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) back propagation training algorithm was used to train the neural network model using hourly water level data of the period June-September 2006. The trained ANN model was tested using data for the same period of the year 2001. Simulated water levels by the MIKE 11HD were compared with the corresponding water levels predicted by the ANN model. The results obtained from the ANN model were found to be much better than that of the MIKE 11HD results as indicated by the values of the goodness of fit indices used in the study. The Nash-Sutcliffe index ( E) and root mean square error (RMSE) obtained in case of the ANN model were found to be 0.8419 and 0.8939 m, respectively, during model testing, whereas in case of MIKE 11HD, the values of E and RMSE were found to be 0.7836 and 1.00 m, respectively, during model validation. The difference between the observed and simulated peak water levels obtained from the ANN model was found to be much lower than that of MIKE 11HD. The study reveals that the use of Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm with eight hidden neurons in the hidden layer

  5. Assessment of assimilative capacity of Kanhan river stretch using MIKE-11 modeling tool.

    PubMed

    Gedam, V V; Kelkar, P S; Jha, R K; Khadse, G K; Labhasetwar, P K

    2012-10-01

    In the present paper, it is attempted to carry out computer simulation studies for Kanhan river stretch using MIKE-11 modeling tool to evaluate Assimilative Capacity (AC) based on existing and projected waste load scenarios. AC of Kanhan river was estimated in relation to biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and dissolved oxygen (DO). MIKE-11 model simulates the DO and BOD parameters in a one dimensional fashion by calibrating with field data different constant and model parameters. The modeling studies would help in deciding the appropriate waste load allocation based on stream's AC rather than simple effluent standards. The model studies will provide vital information and greater insight into the impact of point and non-point sources of pollution on quality of Kanhan river in a stretch of 120 km.

  6. Application of the Mike21C model to simulate flow in the lower Mekong river basin.

    PubMed

    Dang, Truong An; Tran, Tuan Hoang

    2016-01-01

    Numerical models are useful tools that play an important role in many research projects. Mike21C is one of the most well-established models for simulating a variety of processes, including bank erosion, bed level variations, aggradation, and degradation. Such processes are caused by a variety of activities, such as construction and dredging, as well as seasonal flow fluctuations. Mike21C based on an orthogonal curvilinear grid, which enables a computational speed that is faster than that of other grids. The hydrodynamic part of the model is based on solving the Saint-Venant equations. In this research, the Mike21C model was applied to simulate water depth, flow discharge distribution, and suspended transport rate along reaches of the Bassac River the on Vietnam. The data files of the curvilinear grid and bathymetry were used to generate the model. A time series for the discharge and water level of hydrological stations was established. The model was calibrated using the water level and suspended load data collected during high and low flow discharges. The simulation results show that the model can be applied well to other areas.

  7. The type localities of Anolis aequatorialis Werner, 1894 (Sauria: Iguania: Dactyloidae) and Pristimantis appendiculatus (Werner, 1894) (Amphibia: Anura: Craugastoridae).

    PubMed

    Cisneros-Heredia, Diego F

    2017-01-04

    The eminent Austrian zoologist Franz Werner described several new species of amphibians and reptiles from America, including Anolis aequatorialis Werner, 1894 and Hylodes appendiculatus Werner, 1894. Both species were described based on single specimens, with no more specific type localities than "Ecuador" (Werner 1894a,b). After its description, A. aequatorialis remained unreported until Peters (1967) and Fitch et al. (1976) published information on its distribution and natural history. Anolis aequatorialis is currently known to inhabit low montane and cloud forest on the western slopes of the Andes from extreme southern Colombia to central Ecuador, between 1300 and 2300 m elevation (Ayala-Varela & Velasco 2010; Ayala-Varela et al. 2014; Lynch et al. 2014; D.F. Cisneros-Heredia pers. obs.). Likewise, Hylodes appendiculatus (now Pristimantis appendiculatus) remained only known from its type description until Lynch (1971) and Miyata (1980) provided certain localities and information on its natural history. Pristimantis appendiculatus is currently known to occur in low montane, cloud, and high montane forests on the western slopes of the Andes from extreme southern Colombia to northern Ecuador between 1460 and 2800 m elevation (Lynch 1971; Miyata 1980; Lynch & Burrowes 1990; Lynch & Duellman 1997; Frost 2016). To this date, the type localities of both species remain obscure. The purpose of this paper is to restrict the type localities of Hylodes appendiculatus Werner, 1894 and Anolis aequatorialis Werner, 1894 based on analyses of the travel journals of their original collector.

  8. Several theorems about the interference of particle beams and the theoretical interpretation of Collela-Overhauser-Werner and Marton experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, P.Y.; Shen, Z.J.; Wu, Y.S.

    1985-07-15

    A new theorem about the interference between particle beams is established. The Collela-Overhauser-Werner and Marton experiments are theoretically explained with a theorem established by Chiu and Stodolsky. The Feynman theory is applied to obtaining the propagator for a particle beam in a gravitational field, and the Collela-Overhauser-Werner experiment is further analyzed. Another theorem, established by Chiu and Stodolsky, and our new theorem are proved with the method of Feynman's path integrals.

  9. General relativistic treatment of the Colella-Overhauser-Werner experiment on neutron interference in a gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varjú, Katalin; Ryder, Lewis H.

    2000-05-01

    In the Colella-Overhauser-Werner (COW) experiment a gravity-induced phase shift of spin 1/2 particles was detected. The experimental results were explained by using the Newtonian theory of gravity. The explanation can be easily given using general relativistic arguments and the highest order term reproduces the result of Colella, Overhauser, and Werner together with additional, lower order corrections. The derivation can be considered as an interesting exercise for students with basic knowledge of the field of general relativity.

  10. Heinz Werner: His Life, Ideas, and Contributions to Developmental Psychology in the First Half of the 20th Century.

    PubMed

    Ostler, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The author provides an overview of Heinz Werner's life and contributions to the field of developmental psychology during the first half of the 20th century. She focuses on his early work in Vienna and Munich as well as his tenure at the Psychological Institute in Hamburg, up through the time when he became a named Professor in Psychology at Clark University. Recognized as one of the founders of developmental psychology, Heinz Werner worked in the areas of perceptual development, comparative psychology, and symbol formation. Versatile in rigorous experimental methodologies, and in observational and phenomenological methodologies, Werner's approach to development stood in contrast to other approaches of development, both past and current. For Werner, development was a heuristic, a way of looking at processes in a variety of domains, including ontogeny, phylogeny, microgenesis, biology, developmental psychopathology, neuropsychology, and comparative psychology. Werner viewed development as proceeding from a state of relative globality and lack of differentiation to a state of increasing differentiation, articulation, and hierarchical integration, but he also stressed that individuals can function at different developmental levels under different times and conditions. Werner's holistic, organismic, comparative, and contextual approach to development transcended interdisciplinary boundaries, allowing him to study the interrelatedness between thought, language, feeling, perception, and culture.

  11. Quantum information transmission in the quantum wireless multihop network based on Werner state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Li-Hui; Yu, Xu-Tao; Cai, Xiao-Fei; Gong, Yan-Xiao; Zhang, Zai-Chen

    2015-05-01

    Many previous studies about teleportation are based on pure state. Study of quantum channel as mixed state is more realistic but complicated as pure states degenerate into mixed states by interaction with environment, and the Werner state plays an important role in the study of the mixed state. In this paper, the quantum wireless multihop network is proposed and the information is transmitted hop by hop through teleportation. We deduce a specific expression of the recovered state not only after one-hop teleportation but also across multiple intermediate nodes based on Werner state in a quantum wireless multihop network. We also obtain the fidelity of multihop teleportation. Project supported by the Prospective Future Network Project of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BY2013095-1-18) and the Independent Project of State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves (Grant No. Z201504).

  12. Excitation of the Werner bands of H2 by electron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Absolute cross sections for the excitation of the H2 Werner band system were measured from energy threshold to 300 eV for electron impact on H2. The bands were observed in emission in the wavelength region 1100A to 1250A. The measured cross sections were compared with published transition probabilities, leading to the conclusion that the Werner bands are suitable as the basis for a relative spectral response calibration only when the bands are observed under sufficiently high resolution. The effect of the perturbation between the C 1Pi u and B 1 Sigma-u states of the hydrogen molecule was clearly observed in anomalies in the rotational intensity distribution in bands of the (3 v '') progression.

  13. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M; Eyman, Daniel K; Lessel, Davor; Nürnberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, María J; Kets, Carolien M; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vítor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; López, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P F; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2010-07-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 110 worldwide pedigrees. We now report 18 new mutations, including two genomic rearrangements, a deep intronic mutation resulting in a novel exon, a splice consensus mutation leading to utilization of the nearby splice site, and two rare missense mutations. We also review evidence for founder mutations among various ethnic/geographic groups. Founder WRN mutations had been previously reported in Japan and Northern Sardinia. Our Registry now suggests characteristic mutations originated in Morocco, Turkey, The Netherlands and elsewhere.

  14. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M.; Eyman, Daniel K.; Lessel, Davor; Nürnberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, María J.; Kets, Carolien M.; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vítor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C.; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; López, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P. F.; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 110 worldwide pedigrees. We now report 18 new mutations, including two genomic rearrangements, a deep intronic mutation resulting in a novel exon, a splice consensus mutation leading to utilization of the nearby splice site, and two rare missense mutations. We also review evidence for founder mutations among various ethnic/geographic groups. Founder WRN mutations had been previously reported in Japan and Northern Sardinia. Our Registry now suggests characteristic mutations originated in Morocco, Turkey, The Netherlands and elsewhere. PMID:20443122

  15. Werner Heisenberg and Carl Friedrich Freiherr von Weizsäcker: A Fifty-Year Friendship*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, David C.

    2015-03-01

    This paper follows Werner Heisenberg and Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker during their fifty-year friendship from 1926, when they first met in Copenhagen, to Heisenberg's death in Munich in 1976. The relationship underwent profound changes during that period, as did physics, philosophy, and German society and politics, all of which exerted important influences on their lives, work, and interactions with each other. The nature of these developments and their impact are explored in this paper.

  16. Werner and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes: mechanistic basis of human progeroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Kudlow, Brian A; Kennedy, Brian K; Monnat, Raymond J

    2007-05-01

    Progeroid syndromes have been the focus of intense research in part because they might provide a window into the pathology of normal ageing. Werner syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are two of the best characterized human progeroid diseases. Mutated genes that are associated with these syndromes have been identified, mouse models of disease have been developed, and molecular studies have implicated decreased cell proliferation and altered DNA-damage responses as common causal mechanisms in the pathogenesis of both diseases.

  17. Schrödinger cat and Werner state disentanglement simulated by trapped ion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittencourt, Victor A. S. V.; Bernardini, Alex E.

    2017-04-01

    Disentanglement and loss of quantum correlations due to one global collective noise effect are described for two-qubit Schrödinger cat and Werner states of a four level trapped ion quantum system. Once the Jaynes–Cummings ionic interactions are mapped onto a Dirac spinor structure, the elementary tools for computing quantum correlations of two-qubit ionic states are provided. With two-qubit quantum numbers related to the total angular momentum and to its projection onto the direction of an external magnetic field (which lifts the degeneracy of the ion’s internal levels), a complete analytical profile of entanglement for the Schrödinger cat and Werner states is obtained. Under vacuum noise (during spontaneous emission), the two-qubit entanglement in the Schrödinger cat states is shown to vanish asymptotically. Otherwise, the robustness of Werner states is concomitantly identified, with the entanglement content recovered by their noiseless-like evolution. Most importantly, our results point to a firstly reported sudden transition between classical and quantum decay regimes driven by a classical collective noise on the Schrödinger cat states, which has been quantified by the geometric discord.

  18. Stereochemistry of coordination compounds. From alfred werner to the 21st century.

    PubMed

    von Zelewsky, Alex

    2014-01-01

    As a contribution to the scientific symposium, November 22nd, 2013, commemorating the Nobel Prize awarded to Alfred Werner in 1913, a presentation of the development of stereochemistry of coordination compounds during the past 120 years was given. Stereochemistry was fundamental to Werner's theory of coordination compounds. After Werner's death in 1919, stereochemistry in this field did not progress much further for almost 20 years, but then developed continuously. It was realized that stereochemical features of elements showing coordination numbers larger than four are responsible for an almost unlimited number of stereochemical possibilities, thus opening a molecular world of new structures. In the beginning of the 21st century, interest in the field rose again considerably, mainly due to the potential of stereoselective catalysis, and the self-assembly of supramolecular structures. An end of these developments is not in sight. Here an abbreviated version of the lecture is given. A PowerPoint(®) file, or a video of the presentation, can be downloaded.

  19. Reduction of Waste Water in Erhai Lake Based on MIKE21 Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changjun; Liang, Qinag; Yan, Feng; Hao, Wenlong

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the ecological water environment in Erhai Lake, different monitoring sections were set to research the change of hydrodynamics and water quality. According to the measured data, MIKE21 Ecolab, the water quality simulation software developed by DHI, is applied to simulate the water quality in Erhai Lake. The hydrodynamics model coupled with water quality is established by MIKE21FM software to simulate the current situation of Erhai Lake. Then through the comparison with the monitoring data, the model parameters are calibrated and the simulation results are verified. Based on this, water quality is simulated by the two-dimensional hydrodynamics and water quality coupled model. The results indicate that the level of water quality in the north and south of lake is level III, while in the center of lake, the water quality is level II. Finally, the water environment capacity and total emmision reduction of pollutants are filtered to give some guidance for the water resources management and effective utilization in the Erhai Lake. PMID:23997684

  20. Reduction of waste water in Erhai Lake based on MIKE21 hydrodynamic and water quality model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changjun; Liang, Qinag; Yan, Feng; Hao, Wenlong

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the ecological water environment in Erhai Lake, different monitoring sections were set to research the change of hydrodynamics and water quality. According to the measured data, MIKE21 Ecolab, the water quality simulation software developed by DHI, is applied to simulate the water quality in Erhai Lake. The hydrodynamics model coupled with water quality is established by MIKE21FM software to simulate the current situation of Erhai Lake. Then through the comparison with the monitoring data, the model parameters are calibrated and the simulation results are verified. Based on this, water quality is simulated by the two-dimensional hydrodynamics and water quality coupled model. The results indicate that the level of water quality in the north and south of lake is level III, while in the center of lake, the water quality is level II. Finally, the water environment capacity and total emmision reduction of pollutants are filtered to give some guidance for the water resources management and effective utilization in the Erhai Lake.

  1. MIKE's PET: A participant-based experiment tracking tool for HCI practitioners using mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamedally, Dean; Edlich, Stefan; Klaus, Enrico; Zaphiris, Panayiotis

    2006-02-01

    Knowledge Elicitation (KE) methods are an integral part of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) practices. They are a key aspect to the synthesis of psychology empirical methods with requirements engineering, User Centred Design (UCD) and user evaluations. Examples of these methods include prototyping, focus groups, interviews, surveys and direct video observation. The MIKE project (Mobile Interactive Knowledge Elicitation) at the Centre for HCI Design, City University London, UK provides mobile cyberscience capabilities for HCI practitioners conducting such research while at stakeholder locations. This paper reports on the design and development of a new MIKE based tool, named PET, a Participant-based Experiment Tracking tool for HCI practitioners using Java-based (J2ME) mobile devices. PET integrates its user tracking techniques with the development of the second generation implementation of the CONKER (COllaborative Non-linear Knowledge Elicitation Repository) Web Service. We thus report further on CONKER v2.0's new capabilities developed to enable tighter collaboration and empirical data management between HCI practitioners, considering their UCD needs. The visualisation, tracking and recording of HCI participant-based datasets via PET is explored with close connectivity with the CONKER v2.0 Web Service, in order to provide mobile-web cyberscience for remote and local HCI practitioners.

  2. Werner Forssmann - A Nobel Prize Winner and His Political Attitude before and after 1945.

    PubMed

    Packy, Lisa-Maria; Krischel, Matthis; Gross, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    In 1956, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded jointly to Werner Forssmann, André Frédéric Cournand and Dickinson W. Richards for their development of cardiac catheterization. Forssmann performed a self-experiment in 1929 by inserting a urethral catheter into his right ventricular cavity via his antecubital vein. Despite his popularity as one of the first German Nobel Laureates after 1945, little is known about Forssmann personally. This contribution aims to close this gap regarding the Nazi period and early post-war Germany. Primary historical sources from Forssmann's private archive were examined, evaluated and interpreted for the first time. Additionally, a comparative analysis based on further archival and secondary sources was performed. Werner Forssmann joined the Nazi Party, the Sturmabteilung (Stormtroopers, SA) and the Nationalsozialistischer Deutscher Ärztebund (Nazi Doctors' Association) in 1932, a year before Hitler's assumption of power. In his autobiography, Forssmann referred to the political situation in passing. However, he expressed his personal thoughts in private letters which he wrote as a medical officer during the war. After World War II, Forssmann underwent denazification and was banned from practicing medicine for 3 years. He did not seem to be averse to Hitler's politics and in some ways expressed his approval. However, correspondence from the 1960s with 2 Jewish colleagues reveals that Forssmann may have changed his attitude toward National Socialism later. Werner Forssmann's political attitudes during the Third Reich and in the post-war era can be characterized as early agreement that gradually changed to a more critical distance to Nazi ideology. In this respect, Forssmann appears to be quite a typical example of a larger proportion of German medical doctors during these eras. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. A new tool for modeling dune field evolution based on an accessible, GUI version of the Werner dune model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.

    2012-02-01

    Research into aeolian dune form and dynamics has benefited from simple and abstract cellular automata computer models. Many of these models are based upon a seminal framework proposed by Werner (1995). Unfortunately, most versions of this model are not publicly available or are not provided in a format that promotes widespread use. In our view, this hinders progress in linking model simulations to empirical data (and vice versa). To this end, we introduce an accessible, graphical user interface (GUI) version of the Werner model. The novelty of this contribution is that it provides a simple interface and detailed instructions that encourage widespread use and extension of the Werner dune model for research and training purposes. By lowering barriers for researchers to develop and test hypotheses about aeolian dune and dune field patterns, this release addresses recent calls to improve access to earth surface models.

  4. Vice President Mike Pence Tours O&C at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence, center left, listens to Lockheed Martin Chairman, President and CEO Marillyn Hewson during a tour of the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where the Orion spacecraft is being readied for a trip beyond the moon on its first integrated flight with the Space Launch System rocket. Walking with them from left to right are U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL), NASA Astronauts Reid Wiseman and Pat Forrester, and NASA Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot. During his visit to Kennedy, Pence spoke inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space. The Vice President also toured several facilities highlighting the public-private partnerships at Kennedy, as both NASA and commercial companies prepare to launch American astronauts from the multi-user spaceport.

  5. Vice President Mike Pence Tours O&C at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence, center, and U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL), left, examine flight hardware during a tour of the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where the Orion spacecraft is being readied for a trip beyond the moon on its first integrated flight with the Space Launch System rocket. During his visit to Kennedy, Pence spoke inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space. The Vice President also toured several facilities highlighting the public-private partnerships at Kennedy, as both NASA and commercial companies prepare to launch American astronauts from the multi-user spaceport.

  6. Vice President Mike Pence Tours O&C at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence, center, is flanked by NASA Astronaut Reid Wiseman and NASA Astronaut Office Chief Pat Forrester as they walk out through the same door used by Apollo and space shuttle flight crews departing for the launch pad. Pence toured the Astronaut Crew Quarters during a stop at the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where the Orion spacecraft is being readied for a trip beyond the moon on its first integrated flight with the Space Launch System rocket. During his visit to Kennedy, Pence spoke inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space. The Vice President also toured several facilities highlighting the public-private partnerships at Kennedy, as both NASA and commercial companies prepare to launch American astronauts from the multi-user spaceport.

  7. Vice President Mike Pence Tours O&C at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-06

    Vice President Mike Pence tours the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where the Orion spacecraft is being readied for a trip beyond the moon on its first integrated flight with the Space Launch System rocket. Pictured from left to right are NASA Kennedy Space Center Deputy Director Janet Petro; Acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot; NASA Astronaut Reid Wiseman; Pence; NASA Astronaut Pat Forrester; retired astronaut Buzz Aldrin; U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL); Lockheed Martin Chairman, President and CEO Marillyn Hewson; and NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Robert Cabana. During his visit to Kennedy, Pence spoke inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, where he thanked employees for advancing American leadership in space. The Vice President also toured several facilities highlighting the public-private partnerships at Kennedy, as both NASA and commercial companies prepare to launch American astronauts from the multi-user spaceport.

  8. Marshall Center Director Todd May Presents Vice President Mike Pence With Space Launch System Model

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-25

    Marshall Space Flight Center Director Todd May (left) presents Vice President Mike Pence (center) with a Space Launch System model. May, Vice President Pence, and Congressman Robert Aderholt (R-AL) (right) are standing in front of an SLS test stand where the engine section, the bottom section of the 212-foot-tall core stage, is being tested. Earlier, engineers working on the test gave the Vice President a close up look at test hardware. The test hardware is for the SLS core stage engine section, which is the bottom of the core stage where the four RS-25 engines are housed. The engine section structure must withstand the incredible stresses produced by more than 8 million pounds of thrust during launch and ascent.

  9. Microwave-assisted synthesis of a pyrazolyl ketone library for evaluation as p38 MAPK inhibitors in Werner syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Mark C; Davis, Terence; Dix, Matthew C; Murziani, Paola Gs; Rokicki, Michal J; Kipling, David

    2010-02-01

    The pyrazolyl ketone motif of RO3201195, which exhibits good oral bioavailability and high selectivity for p38 MAPK over other kinases, is a key pharmacophore that could find application in the treatment of Werner syndrome. Microwave irradiation promotes Knoevenagel condensation of a β-ketonitrile and formamidine, to give β-aminovinyl ketones, and their subsequent cyclocondensation with a subset of hydrazines to provide rapid access to a 24-membered library of pyrazolyl ketones. The library was evaluated in human hTERT-immortalized HCA2 dermal cells and Werner syndrome cells. Four compounds display comparable, if not slightly improved, potency over RO3201195.

  10. Storm Surge Modelling of Super Typhoon Haiyan Event in Tacloban City, Leyte using MIKE 21 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelligera, Flor Angel; Caro, Carl Vincent; Ladiero, Christine; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Lapidez, John Phillip; Malano, Vicente; Agaton, Rojelee; Santiago, Joy; Suarez, John Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    Super Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines on 08 November 2013 causing massive destruction to the central part of the country. Arguably the strongest tropical cyclone to make landfall in recorded history, Haiyan caused 6,201 deaths and damages amounting to PhP 36,690,882,497.27 (USD 824,390,091.77). The typhoon also brought about destructive storm surges reaching up to 7 meters in height. A better understanding of storm surge is essential to the development of mechanisms to mitigate the effects of similar events. Thus, a computer simulation of Haiyan with the resulting wave heights and storm surge levels was made using MIKE 21 model -- a software used for many different coastal and marine engineering projects worldwide. Simulations were made using the Hydrodynamic Flexible Mesh (HD FM) model coupled with the Spectral Wave (SW) model of the software. This coupled approach allows accurate calculations of both surge water levels and wave crest heights for overtopping of coastal structures. The maximum mesh flexibility of MIKE 21 allows mesh refinement for the coastal areas of Tacloban City within coarser mesh elements resulting to higher grid accuracy. Input parameters for the simulations of the coastline of Tacloban City, a densely populated coastal community heaviest hit by the storm surges of Haiyan, were obtained from the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Atmospheric conditions such as wind and pressure values were input to a set of regional and local hydrodynamic and spectral wave models. Simulation results were compared with available tidal gauge records and the comparison showed good correlation. Coastal regional inundation maps were then created from the results of the storm surge simulations. These maps or its equivalent should be used to develop and further improve disaster risk management plans for future surge events. These plans include, but are not limited to

  11. On the probability distribution of stock returns in the Mike-Farmer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, G.-F.; Zhou, W.-X.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, Mike and Farmer have constructed a very powerful and realistic behavioral model to mimick the dynamic process of stock price formation based on the empirical regularities of order placement and cancelation in a purely order-driven market, which can successfully reproduce the whole distribution of returns, not only the well-known power-law tails, together with several other important stylized facts. There are three key ingredients in the Mike-Farmer (MF) model: the long memory of order signs characterized by the Hurst index Hs, the distribution of relative order prices x in reference to the same best price described by a Student distribution (or Tsallis’ q-Gaussian), and the dynamics of order cancelation. They showed that different values of the Hurst index Hs and the freedom degree αx of the Student distribution can always produce power-law tails in the return distribution fr(r) with different tail exponent αr. In this paper, we study the origin of the power-law tails of the return distribution fr(r) in the MF model, based on extensive simulations with different combinations of the left part L(x) for x < 0 and the right part R(x) for x > 0 of fx(x). We find that power-law tails appear only when L(x) has a power-law tail, no matter R(x) has a power-law tail or not. In addition, we find that the distributions of returns in the MF model at different timescales can be well modeled by the Student distributions, whose tail exponents are close to the well-known cubic law and increase with the timescale.

  12. Using the hydrologic model mike she to assess disturbance impacts on watershed process and responses across the Southeastern U.S.

    Treesearch

    Ge Sun; Jianbiao Lu; Steven G. McNulty; James M. Vose; Devendra M. Amayta

    2006-01-01

    A clear understanding of the basic hydrologic processes is needed to restore and manage watersheds across the diverse physiologic gradients in the Southeastern U.S. We evaluated a physically based, spatially distributed watershed hydrologic model called MIKE SHE/MIKE 11 to evaluate disturbance impacts on water use and yield across the region. Long-term forest...

  13. Multi-site calibration, validation, and sensitivity analysis of the MIKE SHE Model for a large watershed in northern China

    Treesearch

    S. Wang; Z. Zhang; G. Sun; P. Strauss; J. Guo; Y. Tang; A. Yao

    2012-01-01

    Model calibration is essential for hydrologic modeling of large watersheds in a heterogeneous mountain environment. Little guidance is available for model calibration protocols for distributed models that aim at capturing the spatial variability of hydrologic processes. This study used the physically-based distributed hydrologic model, MIKE SHE, to contrast a lumped...

  14. A comparison of MIKE SHE and DRAINMOD for modeling forested wetland hydrology in coastal South Carolina, USA

    Treesearch

    Zhaohua Dai; Devendra M. Amatya; Ge Sun; Carl C. Trettin; Changsheng Li; Harbin Li

    2010-01-01

    Models are widely used to assess hydrologic impacts of land-management, land-use change and climate change. Two hydrologic models with different spatial scales, MIKE SHE (spatially distributed, watershed-scale) and DRAINMOD (lumped, fieldscale), were compared in terms of their performance in predicting stream flow and water table depth in a first-order forested...

  15. Hydrological simulation of Sperchios River basin in Central Greece using the MIKE SHE model and geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparrizos, Spyridon; Maris, Fotios

    2017-05-01

    The MIKE SHE model is able to simulate the entire stream flow which includes direct and basic flow. Many models either do not simulate or use simplistic methods to determine the basic flow. The MIKE SHE model takes into account many hydrological data. Since this study was directed towards the simulation of surface runoff and infiltration into saturated and unsaturated zone, the MIKE SHE is an appropriate model for reliable conclusions. In the current research, the MIKE SHE model was used to simulate runoff in the area of Sperchios River basin. Meteorological data from eight rainfall stations within the Sperchios River basin were used as inputs. Vegetation as well as geological data was used to perform the calibration and validation of the physical processes of the model. Additionally, ArcGIS program was used. The results indicated that the model was able to simulate the surface runoff satisfactorily, representing all the hydrological data adequately. Some minor differentiations appeared which can be eliminated with the appropriate adjustments that can be decided by the researcher's experience.

  16. A Different Curriculum of Preparation for Work: Commentary on Mike Rose, Sara Goldrick-Rab, Kris Gutierrez and Norton Grubb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthen, Helena Harlow

    2012-01-01

    The January 2012 issue of "Mind, Culture, and Activity" published the Invited Presidential Address "Rethinking Remedial Education and the Academic-Vocational Divide," given by Mike Rose at the 2011 meeting of the American Educational Research Association in New Orleans, along with responses and commentary by Sara Goldrick-Rab, Kris Gutierrez, and…

  17. Onomastic Mirroring: "The Closing of the American Mind" by Allan Bloom and "Lives on the Boundary" by Mike Rose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heit, Karl

    Although Allan Bloom in "The Closing of the American Mind" and Mike Rose in "Lives on the Boundary" reveal an almost endless list of obvious differences of perspective on literacy and higher education in America, both take divergent yet similar routes to create a permanent place for liberal education. Both Bloom and Rose use…

  18. Bi-criteria evaluation of the MIKE SHE model for a forested watershed on the South Carolina coastal plain

    Treesearch

    Z. Dai; C. Li; C. Trettin; G. Sun; D. Amatya; H. Li

    2010-01-01

    Hydrological models are important tools for effective management, conservation and restoration of forested wetlands. The objective of this study was to test a distributed hydrological model, MIKE SHE, by using bi-criteria (i.e., two measurable variables, streamflow and water table depth) to describe the hydrological processes in a forested watershed that is...

  19. Hydrological simulation of Sperchios River basin in Central Greece using the MIKE SHE model and geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparrizos, Spyridon; Maris, Fotios

    2015-03-01

    The MIKE SHE model is able to simulate the entire stream flow which includes direct and basic flow. Many models either do not simulate or use simplistic methods to determine the basic flow. The MIKE SHE model takes into account many hydrological data. Since this study was directed towards the simulation of surface runoff and infiltration into saturated and unsaturated zone, the MIKE SHE is an appropriate model for reliable conclusions. In the current research, the MIKE SHE model was used to simulate runoff in the area of Sperchios River basin. Meteorological data from eight rainfall stations within the Sperchios River basin were used as inputs. Vegetation as well as geological data was used to perform the calibration and validation of the physical processes of the model. Additionally, ArcGIS program was used. The results indicated that the model was able to simulate the surface runoff satisfactorily, representing all the hydrological data adequately. Some minor differentiations appeared which can be eliminated with the appropriate adjustments that can be decided by the researcher's experience.

  20. A Different Curriculum of Preparation for Work: Commentary on Mike Rose, Sara Goldrick-Rab, Kris Gutierrez and Norton Grubb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthen, Helena Harlow

    2012-01-01

    The January 2012 issue of "Mind, Culture, and Activity" published the Invited Presidential Address "Rethinking Remedial Education and the Academic-Vocational Divide," given by Mike Rose at the 2011 meeting of the American Educational Research Association in New Orleans, along with responses and commentary by Sara Goldrick-Rab, Kris Gutierrez, and…

  1. Future Directions for Modern Languages in the Higher Education Landscape: An Interview with Alison Phipps and Mike Gonzalez

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Alison Phipps, Director of the "Graduate School for Arts and Humanities" at the University of Glasgow, and Mike Gonzales, Professor of Latin American Studies and head of Hispanic Studies at Glasgow University. In the interview, Phipps and Gonzales discuss their book "Modern Languages: Learning…

  2. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities.

    PubMed

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K

    2014-08-01

    Loss of Werner syndrome protein function causes Werner syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN's DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor HU. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency.

  3. POLD1 Germline Mutations in Patients Initially Diagnosed with Werner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lessel, Davor; Hisama, Fuki M.; Szakszon, Katalin; Saha, Bidisha; Sanjuanelo, Alexander Barrios; Salbert, Bonnie A.; Steele, Pamela D.; Baldwin, Jennifer; Brown, W. Ted; Piussan, Charles; Plauchu, Henri; Szilvássy, Judit; Horkay, Edit; Hoögel, Josef; Martin, George M.; Herr, Alan J.; Oshima, Junko; Kubisch, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are rare, heterogeneous disorders characterized by signs of premature aging affecting more than one tissue or organ. A prototypic example is the Werner syndrome (WS), caused by biallelic germline mutations in the Werner helicase gene (WRN). While heterozygous lamin A/C (LMNA) mutations are found in a few nonclassical cases of WS, another 10%–15% of patients initially diagnosed with WS do not have mutations in WRN or LMNA. Germline POLD1 mutations were recently reported in five patients with another segmental progeroid disorder: mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features syndrome. Here, we describe eight additional patients with heterozygous POLD1 mutations, thereby substantially expanding the characterization of this new example of segmental progeroid disorders. First, we identified POLD1 mutations in patients initially diagnosed with WS. Second, we describe POLD1 mutation carriers without clinically relevant hearing impairment or mandibular underdevelopment, both previously thought to represent obligate diagnostic features. These patients also exhibit a lower incidence of metabolic abnormalities and joint contractures. Third, we document postnatal short stature and premature greying/loss of hair in POLD1 mutation carriers. We conclude that POLD1 germline mutations can result in a variably expressed and probably underdiagnosed segmental progeroid syndrome. PMID:26172944

  4. Catalytic activities of Werner protein are affected by adduction with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal.

    PubMed

    Czerwińska, Jolanta; Poznański, Jarosław; Dębski, Janusz; Bukowy, Zuzanna; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Tudek, Barbara; Speina, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde generated during oxidative stress and subsequent peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, Werner protein (WRN) was identified as a novel target for modification by HNE. Werner syndrome arises through mutations in the WRN gene that encodes the RecQ DNA helicase which is critical for maintaining genomic stability. This hereditary disease is associated with chromosomal instability, premature aging and cancer predisposition. WRN appears to participate in the cellular response to oxidative stress and cells devoid of WRN display elevated levels of oxidative DNA damage. We demonstrated that helicase/ATPase and exonuclease activities of HNE-modified WRN protein were inhibited both in vitro and in immunocomplexes purified from the cell extracts. Sites of HNE adduction in human WRN were identified at Lys577, Cys727, His1290, Cys1367, Lys1371 and Lys1389. We applied in silico modeling of the helicase and RQC domains of WRN protein with HNE adducted to Lys577 and Cys727 and provided a potential mechanism of the observed deregulation of the protein catalytic activities. In light of the obtained results, we postulate that HNE adduction to WRN is a post-translational modification, which may affect WRN conformational stability and function, contributing to features and diseases associated with premature senescence.

  5. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-06-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the -wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN.

  6. Catalytic activities of Werner protein are affected by adduction with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    PubMed Central

    Czerwińska, Jolanta; Poznański, Jarosław; Dębski, Janusz; Bukowy, Zuzanna; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Tudek, Barbara; Speina, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde generated during oxidative stress and subsequent peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, Werner protein (WRN) was identified as a novel target for modification by HNE. Werner syndrome arises through mutations in the WRN gene that encodes the RecQ DNA helicase which is critical for maintaining genomic stability. This hereditary disease is associated with chromosomal instability, premature aging and cancer predisposition. WRN appears to participate in the cellular response to oxidative stress and cells devoid of WRN display elevated levels of oxidative DNA damage. We demonstrated that helicase/ATPase and exonuclease activities of HNE-modified WRN protein were inhibited both in vitro and in immunocomplexes purified from the cell extracts. Sites of HNE adduction in human WRN were identified at Lys577, Cys727, His1290, Cys1367, Lys1371 and Lys1389. We applied in silico modeling of the helicase and RQC domains of WRN protein with HNE adducted to Lys577 and Cys727 and provided a potential mechanism of the observed deregulation of the protein catalytic activities. In light of the obtained results, we postulate that HNE adduction to WRN is a post-translational modification, which may affect WRN conformational stability and function, contributing to features and diseases associated with premature senescence. PMID:25170083

  7. POLD1 Germline Mutations in Patients Initially Diagnosed with Werner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lessel, Davor; Hisama, Fuki M; Szakszon, Katalin; Saha, Bidisha; Sanjuanelo, Alexander Barrios; Salbert, Bonnie A; Steele, Pamela D; Baldwin, Jennifer; Brown, W Ted; Piussan, Charles; Plauchu, Henri; Szilvássy, Judit; Horkay, Edit; Högel, Josef; Martin, George M; Herr, Alan J; Oshima, Junko; Kubisch, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are rare, heterogeneous disorders characterized by signs of premature aging affecting more than one tissue or organ. A prototypic example is the Werner syndrome (WS), caused by biallelic germline mutations in the Werner helicase gene (WRN). While heterozygous lamin A/C (LMNA) mutations are found in a few nonclassical cases of WS, another 10%-15% of patients initially diagnosed with WS do not have mutations in WRN or LMNA. Germline POLD1 mutations were recently reported in five patients with another segmental progeroid disorder: mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features syndrome. Here, we describe eight additional patients with heterozygous POLD1 mutations, thereby substantially expanding the characterization of this new example of segmental progeroid disorders. First, we identified POLD1 mutations in patients initially diagnosed with WS. Second, we describe POLD1 mutation carriers without clinically relevant hearing impairment or mandibular underdevelopment, both previously thought to represent obligate diagnostic features. These patients also exhibit a lower incidence of metabolic abnormalities and joint contractures. Third, we document postnatal short stature and premature greying/loss of hair in POLD1 mutation carriers. We conclude that POLD1 germline mutations can result in a variably expressed and probably underdiagnosed segmental progeroid syndrome.

  8. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2012-01-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the μ-wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN. PMID:22713343

  9. Modelling of a Tracer experiment (Bromide) at the lysimeter Wagna/Austria with MIKE-SHE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reszler, Christian; Fank, Johann

    2015-04-01

    Data of a tracer experiment with Bromide at one of the three lysimeters in Wagna/Austria are used to test the unsaturated zone solute transport model in MIKE-SHE. On April 4th, 2005 50 mg/l of Bromide were applied on the lysimeter operated with conventional farming. At this time the lysimeter was covered with bare soil until the start of the cultivation of pumpkin one month later. Concentrations at the lysimeter bottom (180 cm depth) were measured and, after break-through, plant uptake was measured to quantify mass recovery. The model using the Richards-Van Genuchten-Mualem approach is setup by comprehensive data of vegetation and soil hydraulic properties available at the lysimeter. Water movement simulation in the unsaturated zone is tested against measured seepage rates at the lysimeter bottom and soil water contents in different soil depths in a period of five years. A sensitivity study shows that, particularly in the quaternary gravel zone two different parameter sets are necessary to represent the different dynamics of water content and seepage. With both two sets the general dynamics of the tracer experiment are simulated well. However, the early rapid rise of the measured concentrations could not be represented by either parameter set, which indicates a complex pore system consisting of different flow paths in the gravel zone, e.g., a system of matrix flow and macro-pore flow.

  10. Active Control of Repetitive Structural Transitions between Replication Forks and Holliday Junctions by Werner Syndrome Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soochul; Lee, Jinwoo; Yoo, Sangwoon; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Ahn, Byungchan; Hohng, Sungchul

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The reactivation of stalled DNA replication via fork regression invokes Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and the recovery of the replication fork after DNA repair or error-free DNA synthesis. The coordination mechanism for these DNA structural transitions by molecular motors, however, remains unclear. Here we perform single-molecule fluorescence experiments with Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and model replication forks. The Holliday junction is readily formed once the lagging arm is unwound, and migrated unidirectionally with 3.2 ± 0.03 bases/s velocity. The recovery of the replication fork was controlled by branch migration reversal of WRN, resulting in repetitive fork regression. The Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and migration direction reversal are all ATP dependent, revealing that WRN uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to actively coordinate the structural transitions of DNA. PMID:27427477

  11. [From Nobody to Nobel laureate? The case of Werner Forßmann].

    PubMed

    Hansson, N; Packy, L-M; Halling, T; Groß, D; Fangerau, H

    2015-03-01

    The surgeon and urologist Werner Forßmann (1904-1979) was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1956. At the time of the prize ceremony, several newspapers portrayed Forssmann as an unknown rural physician who suddenly had become an international star. Drawing on nominations and reports in the Nobel Prize Archive for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm as well as correspondence from the private archive of the Forßmann family, this paper reconstructs why the Nobel Committee chose to award Forßmann. We show that Forssmann's work was appreciated in medical textbooks and that he enjoyed a relatively sound reputation in the international scientific community even before he became a Nobel Prize laureate. At a more general level, we use his example to explore some mechanisms of scientific recognition.

  12. Aberrant DNA methylation profiles in the premature aging disorders Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria and Werner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Esteller, Manel

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation gradiently changes with age and is likely to be involved in aging-related processes with subsequent phenotype changes and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. The Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGP) and Werner Syndrome (WS) are two premature aging diseases showing features of common natural aging early in life. Mutations in the LMNA and WRN genes were associated to disease onset; however, for a subset of patients the underlying causative mechanisms remain elusive. We aimed to evaluate the role of epigenetic alteration on premature aging diseases by performing comprehensive DNA methylation profiling of HGP and WS patients. We observed profound changes in the DNA methylation landscapes of WRN and LMNA mutant patients, which were narrowed down to a set of aging related genes and processes. Although of low overall variance, non-mutant patients revealed differential DNA methylation at distinct loci. Hence, we propose DNA methylation to have an impact on premature aging diseases.

  13. Redescription Cyrtodactylus lateralis (Werner) (Squamata: Gekkonidae) and Phylogeny of the Prehensile-tailed Cyrtodactylus.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Michael B; O'connell, Kyle A; Wostl, Elijah; Riyanto, Awal; Kurniawan, Nia; Smith, Eric N; Grismer, L Lee

    2016-05-04

    We redescribe Cyrtodactylus lateralis (Werner) on the basis of new specimens. Cyrtodactylus lateralis is a prehensile-tailed species, known from scattered lowland to mid-elevation localities in northern Sumatra. The prehensile-tailed Cyrtodactylus are more speciose and have a wider distribution than previously thought. This group includes a mainland SE Asian clade consisting of C. elok, C. interdigitalis, and C. brevipalmatus and an insular clade containing C. durio, C. lateralis, C. nuaulu, C. serratus, C. spinosus, and C. stresemanni. However, a distinctive color pattern in the Wallacean and Papuan species and uncertainty surrounding the type locality of C. stresemanni raise unresolved questions about the inclusiveness of the insular clade. DNA sequence data supports a close relationship between C. elok and C. interdigitalis, but also reveals that C. lateralis and C. durio are not closely related to these species.

  14. Werner states and the two-spinors Heisenberg anti-ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Casas, M.; Plastino, A.; Plastino, A. R.

    2005-08-01

    We ascertain, following ideas of Arnesen, Bose, and Vedral concerning thermal entanglement [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 017901] and using the statistical tool called entropic non-triviality [P.W. Lamberti, M.T. Martin, A. Plastino, O.A. Rosso, Physica A 334 (2004) 119], that there is a one-to-one correspondence between (i) the mixing coefficient x of a Werner state, on the one hand, and (ii) the temperature T of the one-dimensional Heisenberg two-spin chain with a magnetic field B along the z-axis, on the other one. This is true for each value of B below a certain critical value B. The pertinent mapping depends on the particular B-value one selects within such a range.

  15. Observability, Anschaulichkeit and Abstraction: A Journey into Werner Heisenberg's Science and Philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Jan

    2003-09-01

    Werner Heisenberg was one of the greatest physicists of the 20th century. He participated as a front rank actor in the shaping of a good part of XXth century physics and directly witnessed most of the intellectual struggles which led to what he called “Wandlungen in den Grundlagen der exakten Naturwissenschaft”. This expression is borrowed from one of the many talks and writings he devoted to the analysis of the scientific and philosophical implications of his, and his fellows physicists, findings. Indeed, Heisenberg's scientific activity increasingly reflected his more general intellectual views. This makes him another magnificent representative of a glorious linage going from the remote times of modern science to Einstein, Bohr and the like. This “philosophical” vein started early in his scientific life, and got stronger with time, prompted by the highly demanding scientific, but also social and political context of his mature years.

  16. [Werner Schäfer. A life as researcher and teacher].

    PubMed

    Rott, R; Thiel, H J; Moennig, V

    2000-07-01

    The following short biography recalls Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. Werner Schäfer, emeritus professor and director of the Medical Biology Department of the Max-Planck-Institut für Virusforschung in Tübingen and scientific member of the Max-Planck Society who died on 25th April 2000. He was one of the most distinguished pioneers of animal virology and one of the great personalities who since the Second World War have helped German science to regain its international reputation. In a brief synopsis the important results of his work on the viruses he used as models to conduct his research have been portrayed. As a result of Schäfer's scientific conception to gain insights into the functional characteristics of viruses by looking at their structure, the field of virology has taken new directions and founded a school whose pupils try to continue his successful and much honoured life's work.

  17. Active Control of Repetitive Structural Transitions between Replication Forks and Holliday Junctions by Werner Syndrome Helicase.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soochul; Lee, Jinwoo; Yoo, Sangwoon; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Ahn, Byungchan; Hohng, Sungchul

    2016-08-02

    The reactivation of stalled DNA replication via fork regression invokes Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and the recovery of the replication fork after DNA repair or error-free DNA synthesis. The coordination mechanism for these DNA structural transitions by molecular motors, however, remains unclear. Here we perform single-molecule fluorescence experiments with Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and model replication forks. The Holliday junction is readily formed once the lagging arm is unwound, and migrated unidirectionally with 3.2 ± 0.03 bases/s velocity. The recovery of the replication fork was controlled by branch migration reversal of WRN, resulting in repetitive fork regression. The Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and migration direction reversal are all ATP dependent, revealing that WRN uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to actively coordinate the structural transitions of DNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetics and aging; the Werner syndrome as a segmental progeroid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martin, G M

    1985-01-01

    The maximum lifespan potential is a constitutional feature of speciation and must be subject to polygenic controls acting both in the domain of development and in the domain of the maintenance of macromolecular integrity. The enormous genetic heterogeneity that characterizes our own species, the complexities of numerous nature-nurture interactions, and the quantitative and qualitative variations of the senescent phenotype that are observed suggest that precise patterns of aging in each of us may be unique. Patterns of aging may also differ sharply among species (for example, semelparous vs. multiparous mammals). Some potential common denominators, however, allow one to identify progeroid syndromes in man that could lead to the elucidation of important pathways of gene action. (The suffix "-oid" means "like"; it does not mean identity.) Unimodal progeroid syndromes (eg., familial dementia of the Alzheimer type, an autosomal dominant) can help us understand the pathogenesis of a particular aspect of the senescent phenotype of man. Segmental progeroid syndromes (eg. the Werner syndrome, an autosomal recessive) may be relevant to multiple aspects of the senescent phenotype. Some results of research on the Werner syndrome may be interpreted as support for "peripheral" as opposed to "central" theories of aging; they are consistent with the view that gene action in the domain of development (adolescence, in this instance) can set the stage for patterns of aging in the adult; they point to the importance of mesenchymal cell populations in the pathogenesis of age-related disorders; finally, they underscore the role of chromosomal instability, especially in the pathogenesis of neoplasia.

  19. Prematurely aged children: molecular alterations leading to Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and Werner syndromes.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Gerpe, Lourdes; Araújo-Vilar, David

    2008-12-01

    Ageing is thought to be a polygenic and stochastic process in which multiple mechanisms operate at the same time. At the level of the individual organism ageing is associated with a progressive deterioration of health and quality of life, sharing common features such as: alopecia and grey hair, loss of audition, macular degeneration, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, cataract formation, type-2 diabetes, lipodystrophies; a generally increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmune disorders and diseases such as cancer; and an impaired ability to cope with stress. Recent studies of mechanisms involved in the ageing process are contributing to the identification of genes involved in longevity. Monogenic heritable disorders causing premature ageing, and animal models have contributed to the understanding of some of the characteristic organism-level features associated with human ageing. Werner syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are the best characterized human disorders. Werner syndrome patients have a median life expectancy of 47 years with clinical conditions from the second decade of life. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patients die at a median age of 11-13 years with clinical conditions appearing soon after birth. In both syndromes, alterations in specific genes have been identified, with mutations in the WRN and LMNA genes respectively being the most closely associated with each syndrome. Results from molecular studies strongly suggest an increase in DNA damage and cell senescence as the underlying mechanism of pathological premature ageing in these two human syndromes. The same general mechanism has also been observed in human cells undergoing the normal ageing process. In the present article the molecular mechanisms currently proposed for explaining these two syndromes, which may also partly explain the normal ageing process, are reviewed.

  20. Video Q&A: State-of-the-art therapy for the elite and non-elite athlete: an interview with Mike Carmont

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this video Q&A, Mr Mike Carmont answers questions about state-of-the-art treatments for elite athletes, and the progress and challenges behind translating these into successful therapies for the non-elite athlete. PMID:24438069

  1. Video Q&A: state-of-the-art therapy for the elite and non-elite athlete: an interview with Mike Carmont.

    PubMed

    Carmont, Michael R

    2014-01-17

    In this video Q&A, Mr Mike Carmont answers questions about state-of-the-art treatments for elite athletes, and the progress and challenges behind translating these into successful therapies for the non-elite athlete.

  2. Storm Surge Risk Assessment of Tacloban, Leyte Using MIKE 21 Model Simulation of Typhoon Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelligera, F. A.; Ladiero, C.; Caro, C. V.; Lagmay, A. M. F. A.; Lapidez, J. P. B.; Suarez, J. K. B.; Santiago, J. T.; Agaton, R.

    2014-12-01

    Rehabilitation efforts for the destruction of Typhoon Haiyan which ravaged the central part of the Philippines may take up to 10 years and will cost PhP 250 billion (USD 5.7 billion). To prevent extensive damages and extreme cost for rehabilitation, thorough risk assessment along with systematic infrastructure plans, evacuation plans, and land use planning of the areas must be done. The study conducted a qualitative risk assessment for the city of Tacloban, one of the severely affected areas by the storm surges brought about by the typhoon. Its coastal areas are at high risk to storm surge due to: its location relative to the typhoon track; low elevation topography; dense population; and progressive economic activities. The risk assessment model proposed by the United Nations (1991) was used, where the risk index is defined by the hazard index multiplied by its vulnerability index. The risk index was evaluated into a five-point scale: very high, high, medium, low, very low. The storm surge hazard index of the study area was derived from the simulation results of Typhoon Haiyan event using MIKE 21 - a versatile software used for coastal modelling. Simulations were made using the coupled approach of Hydrodynamic Flexible Mesh (HD FM) and Spectral Wave (SW) models. This approach takes into account both surge water levels and wave crest heights for overtopping of coastal structures. The vulnerability index was determined from population, built environment, and critical service centers. The resulting risk index map will be beneficial to the on-going rehabilitation efforts in the study area.

  3. DSS of Seversky Donets River Water Management developed in MikeBasin Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiliger, A.; Buber, A.; Ermolaeva, O.; Troshina, M.

    2009-04-01

    Nowadays a conventional decision making is based on the use of decision support system (DSS) on the base of hydroinformatics tool packages. This contribution is for the intention to describe a model of decision support system to be used for testing in real decision making for the water management of Seversky Donets transboundary River between Russia and Ukraine. This river is a tributary of the Don River is 650 miles (1,050 km) long and drains a basin of 100,000 square km). Rising in the Central Russian Upland, it flows south past Belgorod, Russia; enters Ukraine and passes to the east of Kharkiv; swings southeastward and eventually reenters Russia; and then turns south to join the Don below Konstantinovsk. The DSS is developed in the frame of the Tempus 23260 DNEPR academic project collaboration between Moscow State University of Environmental Engineering (Russia), The All Russian Research Institute Hydraulics and Land Reclamation named after A. N. Kostiakov and Seversky Donets Water Management Office (Ukraine). This DSS in intended to be used as an educational tool for water professional training in water using management. It is based on advanced software technology integrated in MikeBasin (DHI) package. This DSS allows for simulating integrated water management problems like water demand approval for water scarce years, flooding protection, water quality by dilution of used water removed into river by water stored in water reservoir etc. To meet some requirement of the target application the real monitored for several years data was used for model verification. Keywords: DSS, integrated water management, education

  4. Sowing Black Hole Seeds: Forming Direct Collapse Black Holes With Realistic Lyman-Werner Radiation Fields in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Dunn, Glenna; Bellovary, Jillian M.; Christensen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Luminous quasars detected at redshifts z > 6 require that the first black holes form early and grow to ~109 solar masses within one Gyr. Our work uses cosmological simulations to study the formation and early growth of direct collapse black holes. In the pre-reionization epoch, molecular hydrogen (H2) causes gas to fragment and form Population III stars, but Lyman-Werner radiation can suppress H2 formation and allow gas to collapse directly into a massive black hole. The critical flux required to inhibit H2 formation, Jcrit, is hotly debated, largely due to the uncertainties in the source radiation spectrum, H2 self-shielding, and collisional dissociation rates. Here, we test the power of the direct collapse model in a non-uniform Lyman-Werner radiation field, using an updated version of the SPH+N-body tree code Gasoline with H2 non-equilibrium abundance tracking, H2 cooling, and a modern SPH implementation. We vary Jcrit from 30 to 104 J21 to study the effect on seed black holes, focusing on black hole formation as a function of environment, halo mass, metallicity, and proximity of the Lyman-Werner source. We discuss the constraints on massive black hole occupation fraction in the quasar epoch, and implications for reionization, high-redshift X-ray background radiation, and gravitational waves.

  5. Partial lipodystrophy with severe insulin resistance and adult progeria Werner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donadille, Bruno; D'Anella, Pascal; Auclair, Martine; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Sorel, Marc; Grigorescu, Romulus; Ouzounian, Sophie; Cambonie, Gilles; Boulot, Pierre; Laforêt, Pascal; Carbonne, Bruno; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Vigouroux, Corinne

    2013-07-12

    Laminopathies, due to mutations in LMNA, encoding A type-lamins, can lead to premature ageing and/or lipodystrophic syndromes, showing that these diseases could have close physiopathological relationships. We show here that lipodystrophy and extreme insulin resistance can also reveal the adult progeria Werner syndrome linked to mutations in WRN, encoding a RecQ DNA helicase. We analysed the clinical and biological features of two women, aged 32 and 36, referred for partial lipodystrophic syndrome which led to the molecular diagnosis of Werner syndrome. Cultured skin fibroblasts from one patient were studied. Two normal-weighted women presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome with hypertriglyceridemia and liver steatosis. One of them had also diabetes. Both patients showed a peculiar, striking lipodystrophic phenotype with subcutaneous lipoatrophy of the four limbs contrasting with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation. Their oral glucose tolerance tests showed extremely high levels of insulinemia, revealing major insulin resistance. Low serum levels of sex-hormone binding globulin and adiponectin suggested a post-receptor insulin signalling defect. Other clinical features included bilateral cataracts, greying hair and distal skin atrophy. We observed biallelic WRN null mutations in both women (p.Q748X homozygous, and compound heterozygous p.Q1257X/p.M1329fs). Their fertility was decreased, with preserved menstrual cycles and normal follicle-stimulating hormone levels ruling out premature ovarian failure. However undetectable anti-müllerian hormone and inhibin B indicated diminished follicular ovarian reserve. Insulin-resistance linked ovarian hyperandrogenism could also contribute to decreased fertility, and the two patients became pregnant after initiation of insulin-sensitizers (metformin). Both pregnancies were complicated by severe cervical incompetence, leading to the preterm birth of a healthy newborn in one case, but to a second trimester

  6. Evaluation of artificial groundwater recharge effects with MIKE-SHE: a case study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, M.; Martínez-García, I.; Carreño, F.; de Bustamante, I.; Lillo, J.

    2012-04-01

    In many areas where the technical and financial resources are limited, the treatment and disposal of wastewater comprise a problem. With increasing frequency, the wastewater reuse is considered as another alternative for water management alternative. In this way, the wastewater is converted into an added value resource. Treated wastewater infiltration into the soil could be a viable tertiary treatment, especially for small communities where the availability of land is not a problem and the wastewater has not industrial waste contribution and is highly biodegradable. The Experimental Plant of Carrión de los Céspedes (Seville, Spain) develops non-conventional wastewater treatments for small villages. Currently, a project regarding wastewater reutilization for aquifer recharge through a horizontal permeable reactive barrier and a subsequent soil infiltration is being carried out. One of the aspects to be evaluated within this context is the impact on aquifer. Consequently, the main goal of the present study is to assess the effects on the water flow derived from the future recharge activities by using the MIKE-SHE hydrological code. The unsaturated and saturated zones have been integrated in the model, which requires geological, land use, topography, piezometric head, soil and climate data to build up the model. The obtained results from the model show that with the annual recharge volume contributed by the experimental plant (3 m3 or 0.19 L/s) there is no effect in the groundwater flow. A volume of 400 m3/year (25 L/s) would be required to yield a variation in the piezometric head and therefore, in the groundwater flow i.e. a volume about 100 times larger than the estimated is necessary. To calibrate the model, simulated piezometric head values have been compared to the measured field data at a number of locations. In the calibration, the percent error had to be lower than 15 % at each location. Future works concerning groundwater quality and reactive transport

  7. Structure and function of the human Werner syndrome gene promoter: evidence for transcriptional modulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Hunt, K E; Martin, G M; Oshima, J

    1998-01-01

    The Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by mutations in a novel member ( WRN ) of the RecQ family of helicases. Somatic WS cells are hypermutable and have elongated S phases, suggesting possible defects in DNA replication and/or repair. As an initial approach to the investigation of how this locus might be responsive to DNA damage, we determined the structure of the human WRN promoter. The WRN promoter region has two transcription initiation sites and exhibits several features characteristic of so-called constitutive promoters, including the absence of TATA and CAAT boxes. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that the upstream promoter was used 2-10-fold less frequently than the downstream promoter, the variation being a function of cell type. The activity of the WRN promoter was dramatically reduced in cells from WS patients. The reduction of activity was not seen in three other promoters tested, including one TATA-less promoter and one TATA-containing promoter. This is consistent with the presence of a positive regulatory mechanism of WRN expression. PMID:9671808

  8. Werner syndrome and mutations of the WRN and LMNA genes in France.

    PubMed

    Uhrhammer, Nancy A; Lafarge, Laurence; Dos Santos, Laetitia; Domaszewska, Anna; Lange, Magdalena; Yang, Yong; Aractingi, Selim; Bessis, Didier; Bignon, Yves-Jean

    2006-07-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a pleiotropic disease of premature aging involving short stature, tight, atrophied, and/or ulcerated skin; a characteristic 'birdlike' facies and high, squeaky or hoarse voice; premature greying and thinning of the hair; and early onset cataracts. Additional common symptoms include diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism, osteoporosis, osteosclerosis of the digits, soft tissue calcification, premature atherosclerosis, rare or multiple neoplasms, malformed teeth, and flat feet. Diagnosis can be difficult due to the variable presentation and rarity of the disorder. Transmission is usually autosomal recessive. The WS gene, WRN, is member of the RecQ DNA helicase family. Biallelic mutations of WRN are responsible for most patients. Although heterozygous missense mutations in the LMNA gene have been observed in severely affected WS patients, this only accounts for a small fraction of non-WRN patients. Eighteen WS cases were referred to us for molecular analysis. Eleven had definite and three had probable WS according to the University of Washington Registry clinical criteria. All exons of the WRN gene and their splice junctions were sequenced. Of the fourteen definite or probable cases, 11 had one or more WRN mutation. Thirteen different mutations were found, and ten of these were previously undescribed. There were few phenotypic differences between patients with WRN mutation(s) and those who met clinical criteria though lacking WRN mutations. However, patients with mutations tended to have more symptoms overall, and mutations were not observed in the two cases with cardiomyopathy. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Camptothecin sensitivity in Werner syndrome fibroblasts as assessed by the COMET technique.

    PubMed

    Lowe, J; Sheerin, A; Jennert-Burston, K; Burton, D; Ostler, E L; Bird, J; Green, M H L; Faragher, R G A

    2004-06-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an inherited genetic disease in which individuals display the premature aging of a selected subset of tissues. The disorder results from the loss of function mutations in the wrn gene. Wrn codes for a member of the RecQ helicase family with a unique nuclease domain. There is significant evidence that the role of wrn is to assist in the repair and reinitiation of DNA replication forks that have stalled. Loss of the wrn helicase imposes a distinct set of phenotypes at the cellular level. These include premature replicative senescence (in a subset of cell types), chromosomal instability, a distinct mutator phenotype, and hypersensitivity to a limited number of DNA damaging agents. Unfortunately, most of these phenotypes are not suitable for the rapid assessment of loss of function of the wrn gene product. However, WS cells have been reported to show abnormal sensitivity to the drug camptothecin (an inhibitor of topoisomerase type I). A rapid assay for this sensitivity would be a useful marker of loss of wrn function. The COMET (single-cell gel electrophoresis) assay is a rapid, sensitive, versatile, and robust technique for the quantitative assessment of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells. Using this assay, we have found that a significantly increased level of strand breaks can be demonstrated in WS cells treated with camptothecin compared with normal controls.

  10. The Werner's Syndrome protein collaborates with REV1 to promote replication fork progression on damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Lara G.; Sale, Julian E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance pathways facilitate the bypass of DNA lesions encountered during replication. These pathways can be mechanistically divided into recombinational damage avoidance and translesion synthesis, in which the lesion is directly bypassed by specialised DNA polymerases. We have recently shown distinct genetic dependencies for lesion bypass at and behind the replication fork in the avian cell line DT40, bypass at the fork requiring REV1 and bypass at post-replicative gaps requiring PCNA ubiquitination by RAD18. The WRN helicase/exonuclease, which is mutated in the progeroid and cancer predisposition disorder Werner's Syndrome, has previously been implicated in a RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathway. However, WRN has also been shown to be required to maintain normal replication fork progression on a damaged DNA template, a defect reminiscent of REV1-deficient cells. Here we use the avian cell line DT40 to demonstrate that WRN assists REV1-dependent translesion synthesis at the replication fork and that PCNA ubiquitination-dependent post-replicative lesion bypass provides an important backup mechanism for damage tolerance in the absence of WRN protein. PMID:20691646

  11. Scoliosis in Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Yu, Xin; Shen, Jianxiong; Liang, Jinqian

    2014-12-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome (HWWS) is a congenital Müllerian duct anomaly characterized by uterine didelphys, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Little is reported about spinal deformity associated with this syndrome. This study presents a case of scoliosis occurring in the setting of HWWS and explores the possible association between the 2 diseases. A previously unreported scoliosis in HWWS is described. The patient is a 12-year-old Chinese female with scoliosis that underwent a posterior correction at thoracic 5-thoracic 12 (T5-T12) levels, using the Moss-SI (Johnson & Johnson, American) spinal system. At 24-month follow-up, the patient was clinically pain free and well balanced. Plain radiographs showed solid spine fusion with no loss of deformity correction. Six months after scoliosis correction surgery, the patient went to our clinics for the treatment of HWWS. She was performed a vaginal septum resection and detected with pyocolpos. Her follow-up was symptom free at the fourth postoperative month. The prevalence of scoliosis among patients with HWWS was 8.57% that is much higher than the incidence of congential scoliosis among general population (1/1000). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of HWWS with thoracic scoliosis. During surgery, surgeons and anesthesiologists must pay particular attention to the Müllerian duct anomaly and renal agenesis associated with HWWS. There is a potential association between congenital scoliosis and HWWS.

  12. Ethnic differences in thermoregulatory responses during resting, passive and active heating: application of Werner's adaptation model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Young; Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Saat, Mohamed; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2011-12-01

    For the coherent understanding of heat acclimatization in tropical natives, we compared ethnic differences between tropical and temperate natives during resting, passive and active heating conditions. Experimental protocols included: (1) a resting condition (an air temperature of 28°C with 50% RH), (2) a passive heating condition (28°C with 50% RH; leg immersion in a hot tub at a water temperature of 42°C), and (3) an active heating condition (32°C with 70% RH; a bicycle exercise). Morphologically and physically matched tropical natives (ten Malaysian males, MY) and temperate natives (ten Japanese males, JP) participated in all three trials. The results saw that: tropical natives had a higher resting rectal temperature and lower hand and foot temperatures at rest, smaller rise of rectal temperature and greater temperature rise in bodily extremities, and a lower sensation of thirst during passive and active heating than the matched temperate natives. It is suggested that tropical natives' homeostasis during heating is effectively controlled with the improved stability in internal body temperature and the increased capability of vascular circulation in extremities, with a lower thirst sensation. The enhanced stability of internal body temperature and the extended thermoregulatory capability of vascular circulation in the extremities of tropical natives can be interpreted as an interactive change to accomplish a thermal dynamic equilibrium in hot environments. These heat adaptive traits were explained by Wilder's law of initial value and Werner's process and controller adaptation model.

  13. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  14. How personalized medicine became genetic, and racial: Werner Kalow and the formations of pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Jones, David S

    2013-01-01

    Physicians have long puzzled over a well-known phenomenon: different patients respond differently to the same treatment. Although many explanations exist, pharmacogenetics has now captured the medical imagination. While this might seem part of the broader interest in all things genetic, the early history of pharmacogenetics reveals the specific factors that contributed to the emergence of genetics within pharmacology. This paper examines the work of one pioneering pharmacologist, Werner Kalow, to trace the evolving intellectual formations of pharmacogenetics and, in particular, the focus on race. Working in the 1950s and 1960s, Kalow made three arguments to demonstrate the relevance of genetics to pharmacology, based on laboratory techniques, analogies to differences between other animal species, and appeals to the logic of natural selection. After contributing to the emergence of the field, Kalow maintained his advocacy for pharmacogenetics for four decades, collecting more evidence for its relevance, navigating controversies about race and science, and balancing genetics against other possible explanations of patient variability. Kalow's work demonstrates the deep roots of the genetic and racial preoccupations in pharmacology. Understanding this history can restore attention to other explanations of individuality in medical practice, something of increasing importance given the current interest in personalized medicine.

  15. Clinical outcome and mechanism of soft tissue calcification in Werner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Honjo, Satoshi; Yokote, Koutaro; Fujimoto, Masaki; Takemoto, Minoru; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Shimoyama, Tatsushi; Satoh, Seiya; Koshizaka, Masaya; Takada, Aki; Irisuna, Hiroki; Saito, Yasushi

    2008-08-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive progeroid disorder caused by mutations in RecQ DNA helicase. Ectopic soft tissue calcification is one of the well known symptoms in WS. However, the prevalence, clinical outcome, and mechanism of such calcification remain to be elucidated. The clinical features and mechanism of ectopic calcification were examined in seven patients with WS whose diagnosis were confirmed by a genomic DNA analysis. X-ray examinations revealed subcutaneous calcification in 35 of 41 major joints (85.3%). The patients complained of dermal pain at 23 joints among 35 joints (65.7%) with calcification. Refractory skin ulcers were found at the area of the skin overlaying the calcification in 16 joints (45.7%). In contrast, no pain or ulcers were observed in the joints without calcification. The presence of ectopic calcification could not be explained by a systemic hormonal abnormality. Cultured fibroblasts from WS patients underwent spontaneous mineralization in vitro in the normal phosphate condition, and overexpressed Pit-1, a transmembrane type III Na-Pi cotransporter both at the mRNA and protein levels. Phosphonophormic acid, a specific inhibitor for Pit-1, inhibited mineralization in the WS fibroblasts. Both calcification and Pit-1 overexpression were detected in the skin of WS in situ. WS showed a high prevalence of ectopic calcification, which was associated with dermal pain and refractory skin ulcers. An overexpression of Pit-1 therefore seems to play a key role in the formation of soft tissue calcification in this syndrome.

  16. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  17. Gene expression profiling in Werner syndrome closely resembles that of normal aging.

    PubMed

    Kyng, Kasper J; May, Alfred; Kølvraa, Steen; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2003-10-14

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder, displaying defects in DNA replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. It has been hypothesized that several WS phenotypes are secondary consequences of aberrant gene expression and that a transcription defect may be crucial to the development of the syndrome. We used cDNA microarrays to characterize the expression of 6,912 genes and ESTs across a panel of 15 primary human fibroblast cell lines derived from young donors, old donors, and WS patients. Of the analyzed genes, 6.3% displayed significant differences in expression when either WS or old donor cells were compared with young donor cells. This result demonstrates that the WS transcription defect is specific to certain genes. Transcription alterations in WS were strikingly similar to those in normal aging: 91% of annotated genes displayed similar expression changes in WS and in normal aging, 3% were unique to WS, and 6% were unique to normal aging. We propose that a defect in the transcription of the genes as identified in this study could produce many of the complex clinical features of WS. The remarkable similarity between WS and normal aging suggests that WS causes the acceleration of a normal aging mechanism. This finding supports the use of WS as an aging model and implies that the transcription alterations common to WS and normal aging represent general events in the aging process.

  18. The Werner syndrome. A model for the study of human aging.

    PubMed

    Nehlin, J O; Skovgaard, G L; Bohr, V A

    2000-06-01

    Human aging is a complex process that leads to the gradual deterioration of body functions with time. Various models to approach the study of aging have been launched over the years such as the genetic analysis of life span in the yeast S. cerevisiae, the worm C. elegans, the fruitfly, and mouse, among others. In human models, there have been extensive efforts using replicative senescence, the study of centenerians, comparisons of young versus old at the organismal, cellular, and molecular levels, and the study of premature aging syndromes to understand the mechanisms leading to aging. One good model for studying human aging is a rare autosomal recessive disorder known as the Werner syndrome (WS), which is characterized by accelerated aging in vivo and in vitro. A genetic defect implicated in WS was mapped to the WRN locus. Mutations in this gene are believed to be associated, early in adulthood, with clinical symptoms normally found in old individuals. WRN functions as a DNA helicase, and recent evidence, summarized in this review, suggests specific biochemical roles for this multifaceted protein. The interaction of WRN protein with RPA (replication protein A) and p53 will undoubtedly direct efforts to further dissect the genetic pathway(s) in which WRN protein functions in DNA metabolism and will help to unravel its contribution to the human aging process.

  19. The color of complexes and UV-vis spectroscopy as an analytical tool of Alfred Werner's group at the University of Zurich.

    PubMed

    Fox, Thomas; Berke, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Two PhD theses (Alexander Gordienko, 1912; Johannes Angerstein, 1914) and a dissertation in partial fulfillment of a PhD thesis (H. S. French, Zurich, 1914) are reviewed that deal with hitherto unpublished UV-vis spectroscopy work of coordination compounds in the group of Alfred Werner. The method of measurement of UV-vis spectra at Alfred Werner's time is described in detail. Examples of spectra of complexes are given, which were partly interpreted in terms of structure (cis ↔ trans configuration, counting number of bands for structural relationships, and shift of general spectral features by consecutive replacement of ligands). A more complete interpretation of spectra was hampered at Alfred Werner's time by the lack of a light absorption theory and a correct theory of electron excitation, and the lack of a ligand field theory for coordination compounds. The experimentally difficult data acquisitions and the difficult spectral interpretations might have been reasons why this method did not experience a breakthrough in Alfred Werner's group to play a more prominent role as an important analytical method. Nevertheless the application of UV-vis spectroscopy on coordination compounds was unique and novel, and witnesses Alfred Werner's great aptitude and keenness to always try and go beyond conventional practice.

  20. Simulation of the water balance of boreal watersheds of northeastern British Columbia, Canada using MIKE SHE, an integrated hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadzadesahraei, S.; Déry, S.; Rex, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Northeastern British Columbia (BC) is undergoing rapid development for oil and gas extraction, largely depending on subsurface hydraulic fracturing (fracking), which relies on available freshwater. Even though this industrial activity has made substantial contributions to regional and provincial economies, it is important to ensure that sufficient and sustainable water supplies are available for all those dependent on the resource, including ecological systems. Further, BC statistics predict that the northeastern region's population will increase by 30% over the next 25 years, thereby amplifying the demands of domestic and industrial water usage. Hence, given the increasing demands for surface water in the complex wetlands of northeastern BC, obtaining accurate long-term water balance information is of vital importance. Thus, this study aims to simulate the 1979-2014 water balance at two boreal watersheds using the MIKE SHE model. More specifically, this research intends to quantify the historical, and regional, water budgets and their associated hydrological processes at two boreal watersheds—the Coles Lake and Tsea Lake watersheds—in northeastern BC. The development of coupled groundwater and surface water model of these watersheds are discussed. The model setup, calibration process, and results are presented, focusing on the water balance of boreal watersheds. Hydrological components within these watersheds are quantified through a combination of intensive fieldwork, observational data, analysis and numerical modeling. The output from the model provides important information for decision makers to manage water resources in northeastern BC. Keywords: Northeastern BC; boreal watershed; water balance; MIKE SHE hydrological model.

  1. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Werner Arber, Physiology or Medicine 1978

    PubMed Central

    Arber, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Swiss microbial geneticist, Werner Arber shared the 1978 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Hamilton Smith and Daniel Nathans for their discovery of restriction endonucleases. Werner Arber was born in Granichen, Switzerland in 1929. Following a public school education, he entered the Swiss Polytechnical School in Zurich in 1949, working toward a diploma in natural sciences. There, his first research experience involved isolating and characterizing an isomer of chlorine. Following graduation in 1953, Arber joined a graduate program at the University of Geneva, taking on an assistanceship in electron microscopy (EM), in which he studied gene transfer in the bacterial virus (bacteriophage) lambda. Eventually encountering limitations with EM as a tool, he began using microbial genetics as a methodology for his studies. The study of microbial genetics had been possible for a relatively short time: DNA had been discovered to carry genetic information only a decade before he d entered the field. After earning his Ph.D. in 1958, Arber continued to develop skills in microbial genetics, working with colleagues in the United States for a short time before returning to Geneva at beginning of 1960. There, he continued working on lambda transduction in E. coli, but found that the virus would not efficiently propagate. Recalling research done seven years earlier by Joe Bertani and Jean Weigle on "host-controlled restriction-modification", he realized there must be a host-controlled modification of the invading DNA, and sought to identify the mechanism. Based on Grete Kallengerger s work that demonstrated degradation of both irradiated and non-irradiated phage lambda following injection in a host, Arber and his graduate student, Daisy Dussoix further investigated the fate of DNA, and found that restriction and modification (later determined to be postreplicative nuclotide methylation) directly affected DNA, but did not cause mutations. They also found that theses were

  2. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Werner Arber, physiology or medicine 1978.

    PubMed

    Arber, Werner

    2010-03-10

    Swiss microbial geneticist, Werner Arber shared the 1978 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Hamilton Smith and Daniel Nathans for their discovery of restriction endonucleases. Werner Arber was born in Granichen, Switzerland in 1929. Following a public school education, he entered the Swiss Polytechnical School in Zurich in 1949, working toward a diploma in natural sciences. There, his first research experience involved isolating and characterizing an isomer of chlorine. Following graduation in 1953, Arber joined a graduate program at the University of Geneva, taking on an assistanceship in electron microscopy (EM), in which he studied gene transfer in the bacterial virus (bacteriophage) lambda. Eventually encountering limitations with EM as a tool, he began using microbial genetics as a methodology for his studies. The study of microbial genetics had been possible for a relatively short time: DNA had been discovered to carry genetic information only a decade before he d entered the field. After earning his Ph.D. in 1958, Arber continued to develop skills in microbial genetics, working with colleagues in the United States for a short time before returning to Geneva at beginning of 1960. There, he continued working on lambda transduction in E. coli, but found that the virus would not efficiently propagate. Recalling research done seven years earlier by Joe Bertani and Jean Weigle on "host-controlled restriction-modification", he realized there must be a host-controlled modification of the invading DNA, and sought to identify the mechanism. Based on Grete Kallengerger s work that demonstrated degradation of both irradiated and non-irradiated phage lambda following injection in a host, Arber and his graduate student, Daisy Dussoix further investigated the fate of DNA, and found that restriction and modification (later determined to be postreplicative nuclotide methylation) directly affected DNA, but did not cause mutations. They also found that theses were

  3. Mutations in the consensus helicase domains of the Werner syndrome gene

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-En; Oshima, Junko; Wijsman, E.M.

    1997-02-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disease with a complex phenotype that is suggestive of accelerated aging. WS is caused by mutations in a gene, WRN, that encodes a predicted 1,432-amino-acid protein with homology to DNA and RNA helicases. Previous work identified four WS mutations in the 3{prime} end of the gene, which resulted in predicted truncated protein products of 1,060-1,247 amino acids but did not disrupt the helicase domain region (amino acids 569-859). Here, additional WS subjects were screened for mutations, and the intron-exon structure of the gene was determined. A total of 35 exons were defined, with the coding sequences beginning in the second exon. Five new WS mutations were identified: two nonsense mutations at codons 369 and 889; a mutation at a splice-junction site, resulting in a predicted truncated protein of 760 amino acids; a 1-bp deletion causing a frameshift; and a predicted truncated protein of 391 amino acids. Another deletion is >15 kb of genomic DNA, including exons 19-23; the predicted protein is 1,186 amino acids long. Four of these new mutations either partially disrupt the helicase domain region or result in predicted protein products completely missing the helicase region. These results confirm that mutations in the WRN gene are responsible for WS. Also, the location of the mutations indicates that the presence or absence of the helicase domain does not influence the WS phenotype and suggests that WS is the result of complete loss of function of the WRN gene product. 63 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  4. Werner Syndrome-specific induced pluripotent stem cells: recovery of telomere function by reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Shimamoto, Akira; Yokote, Koutaro; Tahara, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare human autosomal recessive premature aging disorder characterized by early onset of aging-associated diseases, chromosomal instability, and cancer predisposition. The function of the DNA helicase encoded by WRN, the gene responsible for WS, has been studied extensively. WRN helicase is involved in the maintenance of chromosome integrity through DNA replication, repair, and recombination by interacting with a variety of proteins associated with DNA repair and telomere maintenance. The accelerated aging associated with WS is reportedly caused by telomere dysfunction, and the underlying mechanism of the disease is yet to be elucidated. Although it was reported that the life expectancy for patients with WS has improved over the last two decades, definitive therapy for these patients has not seen much development. Severe symptoms of the disease, such as leg ulcers, cause a significant decline in the quality of life in patients with WS. Therefore, the establishment of new therapeutic strategies for the disease is of utmost importance. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be established by the introduction of several pluripotency genes, including Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-myc into differentiated cells. iPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a variety of cell types that constitute the human body, and possess infinite proliferative capacity. Recent studies have reported the generation of iPSCs from the cells of patients with WS, and they have concluded that reprogramming represses premature senescence phenotypes in these cells. In this review, we summarize the findings of WS patient-specific iPSCs (WS iPSCs) and focus on the roles of telomere and telomerase in the maintenance of these cells. Finally, we discuss the potential use of WS iPSCs for clinical applications. PMID:25688260

  5. Narrowing the position of the Werner syndrome locus by homozygosity analysis - extension of homozygosity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nakura, Jun; Miki, Tetsuro; Ye, Lin

    1996-08-15

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the premature occurrence of many age-related features. Previously, the WS gene (WRN) was mapped between D8S131 and D8S87, in an 8.3-cM interval. In this study, regions of homozygosity in 36 WS patients from inbred families were searched for by genotyping for 35 dinucleotide repeat polymorphic markers to narrow down the W-RN critical region. The region most consistently homozygous in these patients was between the D8S1219/D8S1220 cluster and D8S278, within a 4.4-cM interval. For 16 markers mapped in this interval, 24 WS patients (22 Japanese patients and 2 Caucasian patients) in whom consanguinity failed to be proved were also genotyped, under the assumption that some of these patients might still be from consanguineous marriages. The data were analyzed by Fisher`s exact test with a 2 x 2 contingency table for the 22 Japanese patients, excluding the 2 Caucasian patients. The frequencies of homozygosity in the 22 patients at 10 of 16 markers tested were significantly higher than those detected in the general population. Analysis of homozygosity patterns indicated that the region most consistently homozygous was between D8S1445 and D8S278. Thus the WRN locus is most likely between the two markers D8S1445 and D8S278, in a 1.6-cM interval. 49 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Early Diagnosis of Werner's Syndrome Using Exome-Wide Sequencing in a Single, Atypical Patient

    PubMed Central

    Raffan, Eleanor; Hurst, Liam A.; Turki, Saeed Al; Carpenter, Gillian; Scott, Carol; Daly, Allan; Coffey, Alison; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Howard, Eleanor; Khan, Naz; Kingston, Helen; Palotie, Aarno; Savage, David B.; O'Driscoll, Mark; Smith, Claire; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Barroso, Inês; Semple, Robert K.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diagnosis of inherited metabolic disease is conventionally achieved through syndrome recognition and targeted gene sequencing, but many patients receive no specific diagnosis. Next-generation sequencing allied to capture of expressed sequences from genomic DNA now offers a powerful new diagnostic approach. Barriers to routine diagnostic use include cost, and the complexity of interpreting results arising from simultaneous identification of large numbers of variants. We applied exome-wide sequencing to an individual, 16-year-old daughter of consanguineous parents with a novel syndrome of short stature, severe insulin resistance, ptosis, and microcephaly. Pulldown of expressed sequences from genomic DNA followed by massively parallel sequencing was undertaken. Single nucleotide variants were called using SAMtools prior to filtering based on sequence quality and existence in control genomes and exomes. Of 485 genetic variants predicted to alter protein sequence and absent from control data, 24 were homozygous in the patient. One mutation – the p.Arg732X mutation in the WRN gene – has previously been reported in Werner's syndrome (WS). On re-evaluation of the patient several early features of WS were detected including loss of fat from the extremities and frontal hair thinning. Lymphoblastoid cells from the proband exhibited a defective decatenation checkpoint, consistent with loss of WRN activity. We have thus diagnosed WS some 15 years earlier than average, permitting aggressive prophylactic therapy and screening for WS complications, illustrating the potential of exome-wide sequencing to achieve early diagnosis and change management of rare autosomal recessive disease, even in individual patients of consanguineous parentage with apparently novel syndromes. PMID:22654791

  7. High-redshift star formation in a time-dependent Lyman-Werner background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visbal, Eli; Haiman, Zoltán; Terrazas, Bryan; Bryan, Greg L.; Barkana, Rennan

    2014-11-01

    The first generation of stars produces a background of Lyman-Werner (LW) radiation which can photodissociate molecular hydrogen, increasing the mass of dark matter haloes required to host star formation. Previous studies have determined the critical mass required for efficient molecular cooling with a constant LW background. However, the true background is expected to increase rapidly at early times. Neglecting this evolution could underestimate star formation in small haloes that may have started to cool in the past when the LW intensity was much lower. Background evolution is a large source of uncertainty in pre-reionization predictions of the cosmological 21cm signal, which can be observed with future radio telescopes. To address this, we perform zero-dimensional one-zone calculations that follow the density, chemical abundances, and temperature of gas in the central regions of dark matter haloes, including hierarchical growth and an evolving LW background. We begin by studying the physics of haloes subjected to a background that increases exponentially with redshift. We find that when the intensity increases more slowly than JLW(z)∝10-z/5, cooling in the past is a relatively small effect. We then self-consistently compute the cosmological LW background over z = 15-50 and find that cooling in the past due to an evolving background has a modest impact. Finally, we compare these results to three-dimensional hydrodynamical cosmological simulations with varying LW histories. While only a small number of haloes were simulated, the results are consistent with our one-zone calculations.

  8. Inflammageing assessed by MMP9 in normal Japanese individuals and the patients with Werner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Makoto; Chiba, Junji; Matsuura, Masaaki; Iwaki-Egawa, Sachiko; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Age-associated minor inflammation: inflammageing may explain human ageing mechanism(s). Our previous study reported a significant increase in the serum level of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with normal ageing and the patients with Werner syndrome (WS). To further study the minor inflammatory condition associated with ageing, another possible ageing biomarker: matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) was examined in the sera from 217 normal Japanese individuals aged between 1 and 100 years and 41 mutation-proven Japanese WS aged between 32 and 70 years. MMP9 was assayed by ELISA. The serum level of MMP9 was elevated significantly (p < 0.001) with normal ageing from both sexes as hsCRP. In contrast to normal ageing, the serum MMP9 level in WS decreased significantly with calendar age (p < 0.05). The MMP9 level (ng/mL) in WS (147.2 ± 28.5) was not significantly different in comparison with those from age-matched normal adult population aged between 25 and 70 years (109.1 ± 9.4), nor normal elderly population aged between 71 and 100 years (179.9 ± 16.1). Although both normal ageing and WS were associated with minor inflammation, the inflammatory parameters such as serum MMP9 and hsCRP changed differently between normal ageing and WS. The WS-specific chronic inflammation including skin ulcer and diabetes mellitus may contribute the different behavior of both ageing biomarkers from normal ageing. PMID:27195193

  9. The Drosophila Werner Exonuclease Participates in an Exonuclease-Independent Response to Replication Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bolterstein, Elyse; Rivero, Rachel; Marquez, Melissa; McVey, Mitch

    2014-01-01

    Members of the RecQ family of helicases are known for their roles in DNA repair, replication, and recombination. Mutations in the human RecQ helicases, WRN and BLM, cause Werner and Bloom syndromes, which are diseases characterized by genome instability and an increased risk of cancer. While WRN contains both a helicase and an exonuclease domain, the Drosophila melanogaster homolog, WRNexo, contains only the exonuclease domain. Therefore the Drosophila model system provides a unique opportunity to study the exonuclease functions of WRN separate from the helicase. We created a null allele of WRNexo via imprecise P-element excision. The null WRNexo mutants are not sensitive to double-strand break-inducing reagents, suggesting that the exonuclease does not play a key role in homologous recombination-mediated repair of DSBs. However, WRNexo mutant embryos have a reduced hatching frequency and larvae are sensitive to the replication fork-stalling reagent, hydroxyurea (HU), suggesting that WRNexo is important in responding to replication stress. The role of WRNexo in the HU-induced stress response is independent of Rad51. Interestingly, the hatching defect and HU sensitivity of WRNexo mutants do not occur in flies containing an exonuclease-dead copy of WRNexo, suggesting that the role of WRNexo in replication is independent of exonuclease activity. Additionally, WRNexo and Blm mutants exhibit similar sensitivity to HU and synthetic lethality in combination with mutations in structure-selective endonucleases. We propose that WRNexo and BLM interact to promote fork reversal following replication fork stalling and in their absence regressed forks are restarted through a Rad51-mediated process. PMID:24709634

  10. The Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome – A Case Report with Radiological Review

    PubMed Central

    Khaladkar, Sanjay Mhalasakant; Kamal, Vigyat; Kamal, Anubhav; Kondapavuluri, Sushen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background HWW syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly of urogenital tract involving Mullerian ducts and mesonephric ducts. It is characterised by a triad of symptoms - uterus didelphys, obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis. It can be classified based on a completely or incompletely obstructed hemivagina. It presents soon after menarche or shows delayed presentation depending on the type. It can exhibit acute pelvic pain shortly after menarche and may show non-specific and variable symptoms with resultant delay in diagnosis. The most common presentation is pain and dysmenorrhea, and pain and abdominal mass in the lower abdomen secondary to haematocolpos and/or haematometra. Case Report Presentation of a clinical case of a 13-year-old patient with HWW syndrome presenting with regular menses, dysmenorrhea and painful lump in hypogastric region on the left side of midline. We described the role of imaging modalities in diagnosis of the Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome with a review of literature. USG and MRI showed left renal agenesis with compensatory hypertrophy of the right kidney, uterus didelphys with haematometra and haematocervix in the left uterus with evidence of blood in a dilated retort-shaped left fallopian tube and a normal right uterus. The unique feature of our case is haematometra and haematocervix with cervical and vaginal atresia found on the left side (classification 1.2) with associated left renal agenesis. Conclusions HWW syndrome can present early or late, depending on the type. In patients with uterine and vaginal abnormalities, a work-up for associated renal anomalies should be performed. Early intervention is needed to reduce the risk of endometriosis and infertility. PMID:28058067

  11. The Werner Syndrome Protein Is Involved in RNA Polymerase II Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Machwe, Amrita; May, Alfred; Gray, Matthew D.; Oshima, Junko; Martin, George M.; Nehlin, Jan O.; Brosh, Robert; Orren, David K.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    1999-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a human progeroid syndrome characterized by the early onset of a large number of clinical features associated with the normal aging process. The complex molecular and cellular phenotypes of WS involve characteristic features of genomic instability and accelerated replicative senescence. The gene involved (WRN) was recently cloned, and its gene product (WRNp) was biochemically characterized as a helicase. Helicases play important roles in a variety of DNA transactions, including DNA replication, transcription, repair, and recombination. We have assessed the role of the WRN gene in transcription by analyzing the efficiency of basal transcription in WS lymphoblastoid cell lines that carry homozygous WRN mutations. Transcription was measured in permeabilized cells by [3H]UTP incorporation and in vitro by using a plasmid template containing the RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II)–dependent adenovirus major late promoter. With both of these approaches, we find that the transcription efficiency in different WS cell lines is reduced to 40–60% of the transcription in cells from normal individuals. This defect can be complemented by the addition of normal cell extracts to the chromatin of WS cells. Addition of purified wild-type WRNp but not mutated WRNp to the in vitro transcription assay markedly stimulates RNA pol II–dependent transcription carried out by nuclear extracts. A nonhelicase domain (a direct repeat of 27 amino acids) also appears to have a role in transcription enhancement, as revealed by a yeast hybrid–protein reporter assay. This is further supported by the lack of stimulation of transcription when mutant WRNp lacking this domain was added to the in vitro assay. We have thus used several approaches to show a role for WRNp in RNA pol II transcription, possibly as a transcriptional activator. A deficit in either global or regional transcription in WS cells may be a primary molecular defect responsible for the WS clinical phenotype

  12. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A.; Martin, George M.; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening. PMID:23847654

  13. Werner complex deficiency in cells disrupts the Nuclear Pore Complex and the distribution of lamin B1.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhu, Yizhou; Zhai, Yujia; R Castroagudin, Michelle; Bao, Yifei; White, Tommy E; Glavy, Joseph S

    2013-12-01

    From the surrounding shell to the inner machinery, nuclear proteins provide the functional plasticity of the nucleus. This study highlights the nuclear association of Pore membrane (POM) protein NDC1 and Werner protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase responsible for the DNA instability progeria disorder, Werner Syndrome. In our previous publication, we connected the DNA damage sensor Werner's Helicase Interacting Protein (WHIP), a binding partner of WRN, to the NPC. Here, we confirm the association of the WRN/WHIP complex and NDC1. In established WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines, we further demonstrate the interdependence of WRN/WHIP and Nucleoporins (Nups). These changes do not completely abrogate the barrier of the Nuclear Envelope (NE) but do affect the distribution of FG Nups and the RAN gradient, which are necessary for nuclear transport. Evidence from WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines demonstrates changes in the processing and nucleolar localization of lamin B1. The appearance of "RAN holes" void of RAN corresponds to regions within the nucleolus filled with condensed pools of lamin B1. From WRN/WHIP knockout cell line extracts, we found three forms of lamin B1 that correspond to mature holoprotein and two potential post-translationally modified forms of the protein. Upon treatment with topoisomerase inhibitors lamin B1 cleavage occurs only in WRN/WHIP knockout cells. Our data suggest the link of the NDC1 and WRN as one facet of the network between the nuclear periphery and genome stability. Loss of WRN complex leads to multiple alterations at the NPC and the nucleolus. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Scheme for directly measuring the concurrences of Collins-Gisin and Werner classes polarization entangled mixed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ting; Chu, Wen-Jing; Yang, Qing; Yang, Ming; Song, Wei; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2017-10-01

    We present a two-copy-based protocol for directly measuring the concurrence of two-photon polarization entangled mixed states (Collins-Gisin class state and the more complicated bipartite mixed entangled state—Werner class state) without quantum state tomography. The quantum circuit designed for directly measuring concurrence can be realized in an optical system. Our protocol works without the sophisticated controlled-NOT gate, which makes it much simpler than the previous ones. Because all the operations used here are local, the scheme can be used for directly measuring remote mixed entanglement too.

  15. Predicting streamflow response to fire-induced landcover change: implications of parameter uncertainty in the MIKE SHE model.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Christine E; Hope, Allen S

    2007-08-01

    Fire is a primary agent of landcover transformation in California semi-arid shrubland watersheds, however few studies have examined the impacts of fire and post-fire succession on streamflow dynamics in these basins. While it may seem intuitive that larger fires will have a greater impact on streamflow response than smaller fires in these watersheds, the nature of these relationships has not been determined. The effects of fire size on seasonal and annual streamflow responses were investigated for a medium-sized basin in central California using a modified version of the MIKE SHE model which had been previously calibrated and tested for this watershed using the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation methodology. Model simulations were made for two contrasting periods, wet and dry, in order to assess whether fire size effects varied with weather regime. Results indicated that seasonal and annual streamflow response increased nearly linearly with fire size in a given year under both regimes. Annual flow response was generally higher in wetter years for both weather regimes, however a clear trend was confounded by the effect of stand age. These results expand our understanding of the effects of fire size on hydrologic response in chaparral watersheds, but it is important to note that the majority of model predictions were largely indistinguishable from the predictive uncertainty associated with the calibrated model - a key finding that highlights the importance of analyzing hydrologic predictions for altered landcover conditions in the context of model uncertainty. Future work is needed to examine how alternative decisions (e.g., different likelihood measures) may influence GLUE-based MIKE SHE streamflow predictions following different size fires, and how the effect of fire size on streamflow varies with other factors such as fire location.

  16. Bi-criteria evaluation of the MIKE SHE model for a forested watershed on the South Carolina coastal plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Z.; Li, C.; Trettin, C.; Sun, G.; Amatya, D.; Li, H.

    2010-06-01

    Hydrological models are important tools for effective management, conservation and restoration of forested wetlands. The objective of this study was to test a distributed hydrological model, MIKE SHE, by using bi-criteria (i.e., two measurable variables, streamflow and water table depth) to describe the hydrological processes in a forested watershed that is characteristic of the lower Atlantic Coastal Plain. Simulations were compared against observations of both streamflow and water table depth measured on a first-order watershed (WS80) on the Santee Experimental Forest in South Carolina, USA. Model performance was evaluated using coefficient of determination (R2) and Nash-Sutcliffe's model efficiency (E). The E and root mean squared error (RMSE) were chosen as objective functions for sensitivity analysis of parameters. The model calibration and validation results demonstrated that the streamflow and water table depth were sensitive to most of the model input parameters, especially to surface detention storage, drainage depth, soil hydraulic properties, plant rooting depth, and surface roughness. Furthermore, the bi-criteria approach used for distributed model calibration and validation was shown to be better than the single-criterion in obtaining optimum model input parameters, especially for those parameters that were only sensitive to some specific conditions. Model calibration using the bi-criteria approach should be advantageous for constructing the uncertainty bounds of model inputs to simulate the hydrology for this type of forested watersheds. R2 varied from 0.60-0.99 for daily and monthly streamflow, and from 0.52-0.91 for daily water table depth. E changed from 0.53-0.96 for calibration and 0.51-0.98 for validation of daily and monthly streamflow, while E varied from 0.50-0.90 for calibration and 0.66-0.80 for validation of daily water table depth. This study showed that MIKE SHE could be a good candidate for simulating streamflow and water table depth in

  17. Bi-criteria evaluation of MIKE SHE model for a forested watershed on South Carolina coastal plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Z.; Li, C.; Trettin, C.; Sun, G.; Amatya, D.; Li, H.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrological models are important tools for effective management, conservation and restoration of forested wetlands. The objective of this study was to test a distributed hydrological model, MIKE SHE by using bi-criteria (two measurable variables, streamflow and water table depth) to describe the hydrological processes in a forested watershed that is characteristic of the lower Atlantic Coastal Plain. Simulations were compared against observations of both streamflow and water table depth measured on a first-order watershed (WS80) on the Santee Experimental Forest in South Carolina, USA. Model performance was evaluated using coefficient of determination (R2) and Nash-Sutcliffe's model efficiency (E). The E and root mean squared error (RMSE) were chosen as objective functions for sensitivity analysis of parameters. The model calibration and validation results demonstrated that the streamflow and water table depth were sensitive to most of the model input parameters, especially to surface detention storage, drainage depth, soil hydraulic properties, plant rooting depth, and surface roughness. Furthermore, the bi-criteria used for distributed model calibration and validation was shown to be better than the single-criterion in obtaining optimum model input parameters, especially for those parameters that were only sensitive to some specific conditions. Model calibration using the bi-criteria approach should be advantageous for constructing the uncertainty bounds of model inputs to simulate the hydrology for this type of forested watersheds. R2 varied from 0.60-0.99 for daily and monthly streamflow, and from 0.52-0.91 for daily water table depth. E changed from 0.53-0.96 for calibration and 0.51-0.98 for validation of daily and monthly streamflow, while E varied from 0.50-0.90 for calibration and 0.66-0.80 for validation of daily water table depth. This study showed that MIKE SHE was applicable for predicting the streamflow and water table depth in this coastal plain

  18. Homozygosity for the WRN Helicase-Inactivating Variant, R834C, does not confer a Werner syndrome clinical phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kamath-Loeb, Ashwini S.; Zavala-van Rankin, Diego G.; Flores-Morales, Jeny; Emond, Mary J.; Sidorova, Julia M.; Carnevale, Alessandra; Cárdenas-Cortés, Maria del Carmen; Norwood, Thomas H.; Monnat, Raymond J.; Loeb, Lawrence A.; Mercado-Celis, Gabriela E.

    2017-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the WRN helicase gene cause Werner syndrome- a progeroid syndrome with an elevated risk of cancer and other age-associated diseases. Large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified in WRN. We report here the organismal, cellular, and molecular phenotypes of variant rs3087425 (c. 2500C > T) that results in an arginine to cysteine substitution at residue 834 (R834C) and up to 90% reduction of WRN helicase activity. This variant is present at a high (5%) frequency in Mexico, where we identified 153 heterozygous and three homozygous individuals among 3,130 genotyped subjects. Family studies of probands identified ten additional TT homozygotes. Biochemical analysis of WRN protein purified from TT lymphoblast cell lines confirmed that the R834C substitution strongly and selectively reduces WRN helicase, but not exonuclease activity. Replication track analyses showed reduced replication fork progression in some homozygous cells following DNA replication stress. Among the thirteen TT homozygotes, we identified a previously unreported and statistically significant gender bias in favor of males (p = 0.0016), but none of the clinical findings associated with Werner syndrome. Our results indicate that WRN helicase activity alone is not rate-limiting for the development of clinical WS. PMID:28276523

  19. Sudden birth versus sudden death of entanglement for the extended Werner-like state in a dissipative environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Chuan-Jia; Chen, Tao; Liu, Ji-Bing; Cheng, Wei-Wen; Liu, Tang-Kun; Huang, Yan-Xia; Li, Hong

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamical behaviour of entanglement in terms of concurrence in a bipartite system subjected to an external magnetic field under the action of dissipative environments in the extended Werner-like initial state. The interesting phenomenon of entanglement sudden death as well as sudden birth appears during the evolution process. We analyse in detail the effect of the purity of the initial entangled state of two qubits via Heisenberg XY interaction on the apparition time of entanglement sudden death and entanglement sudden birth. Furthermore, the conditions on the conversion of entanglement sudden death and entanglement sudden birth can be generalized when the initial entangled state is not pure. In particular, a critical purity of the initial mixed entangled state exists, above which entanglement sudden birth vanishes while entanglement sudden death appears. It is also noticed that stable entanglement, which is independent of different initial states of the qubits (pure or mixed state), occurs even in the presence of decoherence. These results arising from the combination of the extended Werner-like initial state and dissipative environments suggest an approach to control and enhance the entanglement even after purity induced sudden birth, death and revival.

  20. Modulation of Werner syndrome protein function by a single mutation in the conserved RecQ domain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Wan; Kusumoto, Rika; Doherty, Kevin M; Lin, Guang-Xin; Zeng, Wangyong; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; von Kobbe, Cayetano; Brosh, Robert M; Hu, Jin-Shan; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2005-11-25

    Naturally occurring mutations in the human RECQ3 gene result in truncated Werner protein (WRN) and manifest as a rare premature aging disorder, Werner syndrome. Cellular and biochemical studies suggest a multifaceted role of WRN in DNA replication, DNA repair, recombination, and telomere maintenance. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN was determined previously to be the major site of interaction for DNA and proteins. By using site-directed mutagenesis in the WRN RQC domain, we determined which amino acids might be playing a critical role in WRN function. A site-directed mutation at Lys-1016 significantly decreased WRN binding to fork or bubble DNA substrates. Moreover, the Lys-1016 mutation markedly reduced WRN helicase activity on fork, D-loop, and Holliday junction substrates in addition to reducing significantly the ability of WRN to stimulate FEN-1 incision activities. Thus, DNA binding mediated by the RQC domain is crucial for WRN helicase and its coordinated functions. Our nuclear magnetic resonance data on the three-dimensional structure of the wild-type RQC and Lys-1016 mutant proteins display a remarkable similarity in their structures.

  1. Integrated mapping analysis of the Werner syndrome region of chromosome 8.

    PubMed

    Oshima, J; Yu, C E; Boehnke, M; Weber, J L; Edelhoff, S; Wagner, M J; Wells, D E; Wood, S; Disteche, C M; Martin, G M

    1994-09-01

    The Werner syndrome locus (WRN) is located at 8p11-p12. To facilitate eventual cloning of the WRN gene, a 10,000-rad radiation-reduced hybrid (RH) cell panel was generated to map genetic markers, sequence-tagged sites (STSs), and genes in this region. A hamster cell line carrying an intact human chromosome 8 was fused with another hamster cell line. Two sets of hybrid cell panels from 2 separate fusions were generated; each panel consisted of 50 independent clones; 33 and 34 cell lines from the 2 fusions retained human chromsome material as determined by inter-Alu PCR. The combined panel was genotyped for 52 markers spanning the entire chromosome, including 10 genes, 29 anonymous polymorphic loci, and 13 STSs. Seventeen of these markers have not been previously described. Markers near the centromere were retained at a higher frequency than more distal markers. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was also used to localize and order a subset of the markers. A RH map of the WRN region was constructed using a maximum likelihood method, giving the following most likely order: D8S131-D8S339 (GSR)-D8S124-D8S278-D8S259-(D8S71)-D8S283- D8S87-D8S105-D8S135 (FGFR1)-D8S135PB-D8S255-ANK1. A genetic map of 15 short tandem repeat polymorphic loci in the WRN region was also constructed. The marker orders from the genetic and RH maps were consistent. In addition, an integrated map of 24 loci in the WRN region was generated using information from both genetic and RH mapping methods. A 1000:1 framework map for 6 loci (LPL-D8S136-D8S137-D8S87-FGFR1-ANK1) was determined by genetic mapping, and the resulting locus order was fixed during analysis of the RH genotype data. The resulting integrated map contained more markers than could confidently be ordered by either genetic or RH mapping alone.

  2. Diverse gene sequences are overexpressed in werner syndrome fibroblasts undergoing premature replicative senescence.

    PubMed

    Murano, S; Thweatt, R; Shmookler Reis, R J; Jones, R A; Moerman, E J; Goldstein, S

    1991-08-01

    Genes that play a role in the senescent arrest of cellular replication are likely to be overexpressed in human diploid fibroblasts (HDF) derived from subjects with Werner syndrome (WS) because these cells have a severely curtailed replicative life span. To identify some of these genes, a cDNA library was constructed from WS HDF after they had been serum depleted and repleted (5 days in medium containing 1% serum followed by 24 h in medium containing 20% serum). Differential screening of 7,500 colonies revealed 102 clones that hybridized preferentially with [32P]cDNA derived from RNA of WS cells compared with [32P]cDNA derived from normal HDF. Cross-hybridization and partial DNA sequence determination identified 18 independent gene sequences, 9 of them known and 9 unknown. The known genes included alpha 1(I) procollagen, alpha 2(I) procollagen, fibronectin, ferritin heavy chain, insulinlike growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), osteonectin, human tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor type I, thrombospondin, and alpha B-crystallin. The nine unknown clones included two novel gene sequences and seven additional sequences that contained both novel segments and the Alu class of repetitive short interspersed nuclear elements; five of these seven Alu+ clones also contained the long interpersed nuclear element I (KpnI) family of repetitive elements. Northern (RNA) analysis, using the 18 sequences as probes, showed higher levels of these mRNAs in WS HDF than in normal HDF. Five selected mRNAs studied in greater detail [alpha 1(I) procollagen, fibronectin, insulinlike growth factor-binding protein-3, WS3-10, and WS9-14] showed higher mRNA levels in both WS and late-passage normal HDF than in early-passage normal HDF at various intervals following serum depletion/repletion and after subculture and growth from sparse to high-density confluent arrest. These results indicate that senescence of both WS and normal HDF is accompanied by overexpression of similar sets of

  3. Mike's Educational Program: Long Island, New York. Case Study. Social Relationships of Children and Adolescents with Deaf-Blindness Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mar, Harvey H.; Sall, Nancy

    This case study describes the educational history and current program of Mike, a mainstreamed sixth-grader with deaf-blindness. It addresses the boy's successes and the ongoing challenges faced by his family, his educational team, and his peers. Background information notes his diagnosis of total blindness and moderate to severe hearing loss, his…

  4. 78 FR 76814 - In the Matter of: Mohammed Soroush Mahalaty, a/k/a Mohammad Soroush,a/k/a Mike Soroush, 18...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

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  5. The Historical Foundation of Learning Disabilities: A Quantitative Synthesis Assessing the Validity of Strauss and Werner's Exogenous versus Endogenous Distinction of Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavale, Kenneth A.; Forness, Steven R.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews research of A. Strauss and H. Werner on behavioral differences between exogeneous (brain injured) and endogeneous (familial-cultural) mental retardation using quantitative methods of research synthesis. Findings offer little empirical support for the presumed behavioral differences and reveal considerable overlap among the…

  6. Ethnic-Specific WRN Mutations in South Asian Werner Syndrome Patients: Potential Founder Effect in Patients with Indian or Pakistani Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Bidisha; Lessel, Davor; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Rao, Anuradha S; Hisama, Fuki M; Peter, Dincy; Bennett, Chris; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2013-05-01

    Werner syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple features consistent with accelerated aging. It is caused by mutations in the WRN gene, which encodes a RecQ type helicase. To date, more than 70 disease-causing mutations have been reported. While founder mutations and a corresponding relatively high incidence of WS have been reported in Japan and Sardinia, such mutations have not been previously described among patients of South Asian descent. Here we report two novel WRN mutations in three pedigrees. A homozygous c.561A>G mutation in exon 6 was identified both in a pedigree from Kerala, India and in a British patient of Pakistani ancestry. Although c.561A>G does not alter the corresponding amino acid (p.K187K), it creates a cryptic splice site resulting in a 98bp deletion at the mRNA level (r.557-654del98) followed by a frameshift (p.K187fs). These two cases shared the same haplotype across the WRN gene, and were distinct from another Indian Werner patient with a homozygous stop codon mutation, c.2855 C>A (p.S952*) in exon 24. As the Indian population increases and the awareness of Werner syndrome grows, we anticipate that more cases will be identified with these founder mutations among South Asian Werner syndrome patients.

  7. Quantum discord with weak measurement operators of quasi-Werner states based on bipartite entangled coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, E.; Gómez, R.; Ladera, C. L.; Zambrano, A.

    2013-11-01

    Among many applications quantum weak measurements have been shown to be important in exploring fundamental physics issues, such as the experimental violation of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation and the Hardy paradox, and have also technological implications in quantum optics, quantum metrology and quantum communications, where the precision of the measurement is as important as the precision of quantum state preparation. The theory of weak measurement can be formulated using the pre-and post-selected quantum systems, as well as using the weak measurement operator formalism. In this work, we study the quantum discord (QD) of quasi-Werner mixed states based on bipartite entangled coherent states using the weak measurements operator, instead of the projective measurement operators. We then compare the quantum discord for both kinds of measurement operators, in terms of the entanglement quality, the latter being measured using the concept of concurrence. It's found greater quantum correlations using the weak measurement operators.

  8. GENERAL: Thermal entanglement and teleportation of a thermally mixed entangled state of a Heisenberg chain through a Werner state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li-Yuan; Fang, Mao-Fa

    2008-07-01

    The thermal entanglement and teleportation of a thermally mixed entangled state of a two-qubit Heisenberg XXX chain under the Dzyaloshinski-Moriya (DM) anisotropic antisymmetric interaction through a noisy quantum channel given by a Werner state is investigated. The dependences of the thermal entanglement of the teleported state on the DM coupling constant, the temperature and the entanglement of the noisy quantum channel are studied in detail for both the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic cases. The result shows that a minimum entanglement of the noisy quantum channel must be provided in order to realize the entanglement teleportation. The values of fidelity of the teleported state are also studied for these two cases. It is found that under certain conditions, we can transfer an initial state with a better fidelity than that for any classical communication protocol.

  9. A novel Werner Syndrome mutation: pharmacological treatment by read-through of nonsense mutations and epigenetic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Agrelo, Ruben; Sutz, Miguel Arocena; Setien, Fernando; Aldunate, Fabian; Esteller, Manel; Da Costa, Valeria; Achenbach, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Werner Syndrome (WS) is a rare inherited disease characterized by premature aging and increased propensity for cancer. Mutations in the WRN gene can be of several types, including nonsense mutations, leading to a truncated protein form. WRN is a RecQ family member with both helicase and exonuclease activities, and it participates in several cell metabolic pathways, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and telomere maintenance. Here, we reported a novel homozygous WS mutation (c.3767 C > G) in 2 Argentinian brothers, which resulted in a stop codon and a truncated protein (p.S1256X). We also observed increased WRN promoter methylation in the cells of patients and decreased messenger WRN RNA (WRN mRNA) expression. Finally, we showed that the read-through of nonsense mutation pharmacologic treatment with both aminoglycosides (AGs) and ataluren (PTC-124) in these cells restores full-length protein expression and WRN functionality. PMID:25830902

  10. Interstitial Lung Disease in Werner Syndrome: A Case Report of a 55-Year-Old Male Patient

    PubMed Central

    Goletto, Tiphaine; Crockett, Flora; Aractingi, Selim; Toper, Cecile; Senet, Patricia; Cadranel, Jacques; Naccache, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a progeroid or premature aging syndrome characterized by early onset of age-related pathologies and cancer. The average life expectancy of affected people is 52.8 years and tends to increase. The major causes of death are malignancy and myocardial infarction. Increased telomere attrition and decay are thought to play a causative role in the clinical and pathological manifestations of the disease. Although telomere length, with or without germline mutation, is known to be associated with interstitial lung disease, the latter is not associated with WS. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case describing a WS patient with fatal ILD. This case suggests that older patients with WS could develop ILD. Clinical outcome of WS patients may thus be improved by counselling them regarding smoking cessation or other exposure and by proposing antifibrotic therapy. PMID:26788395

  11. Genetic association between chromosome 8 microsatellite (MS8-134) and Werner syndrome (WRN): Chromosome microdissection and homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lin; Nakura, Jun; Mitsuda, Noriaki; Miki, Tetsuro

    1995-08-10

    Werner syndrome (WRN) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature aging that has been mapped to the short arm of chromosome 8, 8p11.2-p12. To refine the genetic map around the WRN region, we have isolated eight microsatellites for this region from a microdissection library. We typed members of Japanese families with WRN on the basis of homozygosity mapping analysis. There was no obligate recombination between the WRN locus and microsatellite clone, MS8-134 (D8S1055). The maximum lod score was 20.28 at {theta} = 0.00. Alleles for MS8-134 showed association with WRN in a case-control study (OR = 3.55, 95% CI 1.56-8.07, P < 0.01). Such microsatellites from a microdissection library of the definite chromosome region may be useful for positional cloning of the WRN gene. 23 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Aging stem cells. A Werner syndrome stem cell model unveils heterochromatin alterations as a driver of human aging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiqi; Li, Jingyi; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Qu, Jing; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Junzhi; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Xu, Xiuling; Ocampo, Alejandro; Yuan, Tingting; Yang, Jiping; Li, Ying; Shi, Liang; Guan, Dee; Pan, Huize; Duan, Shunlei; Ding, Zhichao; Li, Mo; Yi, Fei; Bai, Ruijun; Wang, Yayu; Chen, Chang; Yang, Fuquan; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zimei; Aizawa, Emi; Goebl, April; Soligalla, Rupa Devi; Reddy, Pradeep; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2015-06-05

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by WRN protein deficiency. Here, we report on the generation of a human WS model in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Differentiation of WRN-null ESCs to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) recapitulates features of premature cellular aging, a global loss of H3K9me3, and changes in heterochromatin architecture. We show that WRN associates with heterochromatin proteins SUV39H1 and HP1α and nuclear lamina-heterochromatin anchoring protein LAP2β. Targeted knock-in of catalytically inactive SUV39H1 in wild-type MSCs recapitulates accelerated cellular senescence, resembling WRN-deficient MSCs. Moreover, decrease in WRN and heterochromatin marks are detected in MSCs from older individuals. Our observations uncover a role for WRN in maintaining heterochromatin stability and highlight heterochromatin disorganization as a potential determinant of human aging. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Werner syndrome protein: functions in the response to DNA damage and replication stress in S-phase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Muftuoglu, Meltem; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2007-09-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an excellent model system for the study of human aging. WRN, a nuclear protein mutated in WS, plays multiple roles in DNA metabolism. Our understanding about the metabolic regulation and function of this RecQ helicase has advanced greatly during the past decade, largely due to the availability of purified WRN protein, WRN knockdown cells, and WRN knockout mice. Recent biochemical and genetic studies indicate that WRN plays significant roles in DNA replication, DNA repair, and telomere maintenance. Interestingly, many WRN functions require handling of DNA ends during S-phase, and evidence suggests that WRN plays both upstream and downstream roles in the response to DNA damage. Future research should focus on the mechanism(s) of WRN in the regulation of the various DNA metabolism pathways and development of therapeutic approaches to treat premature aging syndromes such as WS.

  14. Plasmodium falciparum Werner homologue is a nuclear protein and its biochemical activities reside in the N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Farhana; Tarique, Mohammed; Ahmad, Moaz; Tuteja, Renu

    2016-01-01

    RecQ helicases, also addressed as a gatekeeper of genome, are an inevitable family of genome scrutiny proteins conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes and play a vital role in DNA metabolism. The deficiencies of three RecQ proteins out of five are involved in genetic abnormalities like Bloom syndrome (BS), Werner syndrome (WS), and Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS). It is noteworthy that Plasmodium falciparum contains only two members of the RecQ family as opposed to five members present in the host Homo sapiens. In the present study, we report the biochemical characterization of the homologue of Werner (Wrn) helicase from P. falciparum 3D7 strain. Although there are significant sequence conservations between Wrn helicases of both H. sapiens and P. falciparum as well as among all the other Plasmodium species, they contain some peculiar differences also. In silico studies reveal that PfWrn is evolutionarily close to the bacterial RecQ protein. The N-terminal fragment (PfWrnN) contains all the helicase motifs along with all the functional domains and the predicted structure resembles with the human RecQ1 protein, whereas the C-terminal fragment (PfWrnC) contains no significant domain. Biochemical characterization further revealed that purified recombinant PfWrnN shows ATPase and DNA helicase activity in 3' to 5' direction, but PfWrnC lacks the ATPase and helicase activities. Immunofluorescence study shows that PfWrn is expressed in all the stages of intraerythrocytic development of the P. falciparum 3D7 strain and localizes distinctly in the nucleus. This study can be used for further characterization of RecQ helicases that will aid in understanding the physiological significance of these helicases in the malaria parasite.

  15. A Magellan MIKE and Spitzer MIPS Study of 1.5-1.0 M sun Stars in Scorpius-Centaurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Christine H.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Bitner, Martin A.; Pecaut, Mark; Su, Kate Y. L.; Weinberger, Alycia J.

    2011-09-01

    We obtained Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24 μm and 70 μm observations of 182 nearby, Hipparcos F- and G-type common proper motion single and binary systems in the nearest OB association, Scorpius-Centaurus. We also obtained Magellan/MIKE R ~ 50,000 visual spectra at 3500-10500 Å for 181 candidate ScoCen stars in single and binary systems. Combining our MIPS observations with those of other ScoCen stars in the literature, we estimate 24 μm F+G-type disk fractions of 9/27 (33% ± 11%), 21/67 (31% ± 7%), and 25/71 (35% ± 7%) for Upper Scorpius (~10 Myr), Upper Centaurus Lupus (~15 Myr), and Lower Centaurus Crux (~17 Myr), respectively. We confirm previous IRAS and MIPS excess detections and present new discoveries of 41 protoplanetary and debris disk systems, with fractional infrared luminosities ranging from L IR/L * = 10-5 to 10-2 and grain temperatures ranging from T gr = 40-300 K. We searched for an increase in 24 μm excess at an age of 15-20 Myr, consistent with the onset of debris production predicted by coagulation N-body simulations of outer planetary systems. We found such an increase around 1.5 M sun stars but discovered a decrease in the 24 μm excess around 1.0 M sun stars. We additionally discovered that the 24 μm excess around 1.0 M sun stars is larger than predicted by self-stirred models. Finally, we found a weak anti-correlation between fractional infrared luminosity (L IR/L *) and chromospheric activity (R'HK), that may be the result of differences in stellar properties, such as mass, luminosity, and/or winds.

  16. The effect of RO3201195 and a pyrazolyl ketone P38 MAPK inhibitor library on the proliferation of Werner syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Mark C; Dwyer, Jessica E; Baashen, Mohammed; Dix, Matthew C; Murziani, Paola G S; Rokicki, Michal J; Kipling, David; Davis, Terence

    2016-01-21

    Microwave-assisted synthesis of the pyrazolyl ketone p38 MAPK inhibitor RO3201195 in 7 steps and 15% overall yield, and the comparison of its effect upon the proliferation of Werner Syndrome cells with a library of pyrazolyl ketones, strengthens the evidence that p38 MAPK inhibition plays a critical role in modulating premature cellular senescence in this progeroid syndrome and the reversal of accelerated ageing observed in vitro on treatment with SB203580.

  17. Sgs1, a Homologue of the Bloom's and Werner's Syndrome Genes, Is Required for Maintenance of Genome Stability in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Watt, P. M.; Hickson, I. D.; Borts, R. H.; Louis, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SGS1 gene is homologous to Escherichia coli RecQ and the human BLM and WRN proteins that are defective in the cancer-prone disorder Bloom's syndrome and the premature aging disorder Werner's syndrome, respectively. While recQ mutants are deficient in conjugational recombination and DNA repair, Bloom's syndrome cell lines show hyperrecombination. Bloom's and Werner's syndrome cell lines both exhibit chromosomal instability. sgs1Δ strains show mitotic hyperrecombination, as do Bloom's cells. This was manifested as an increase in the frequency of interchromosomal homologous recombination, intrachromosomal excision recombination, and ectopic recombination. Hyperrecombination was partially independent of both RAD52 and RAD1. Meiotic recombination was not increased in sgs1Δ mutants, although meiosis I chromosome missegregation has been shown to be elevated. sgs1Δ suppresses the slow growth of a top3Δ strain lacking topoisomerase III. Although there was an increase in subtelomeric Y' instability in sgs1Δ strains due to hyperrecombination, no evidence was found for an increase in the instability of terminal telomeric sequences in a top3Δ or a sgs1Δ strain. This contrasts with the telomere maintenance defects of Werner's patients. We conclude that the SGS1 gene product is involved in the maintenance of genome stability in S. cerevisiae. PMID:8913739

  18. Mike Mumma, Astrobiologist

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Astrobiology is the study of the origin, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe. The Goddard Center for Astrobiology and the NASA Astrobiology Institute focus on this amazing f...

  19. Strand exchange of telomeric DNA catalyzed by the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is specifically stimulated by TRF2

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Deanna N.; Orren, David K.; Machwe, Amrita

    2014-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS), caused by loss of function of the RecQ helicase WRN, is a hereditary disease characterized by premature aging and elevated cancer incidence. WRN has DNA binding, exonuclease, ATPase, helicase and strand annealing activities, suggesting possible roles in recombination-related processes. Evidence indicates that WRN deficiency causes telomeric abnormalities that likely underlie early onset of aging phenotypes in WS. Furthermore, TRF2, a protein essential for telomere protection, interacts with WRN and influences its basic helicase and exonuclease activities. However, these studies provided little insight into WRN's specific function at telomeres. Here, we explored the possibility that WRN and TRF2 cooperate during telomeric recombination processes. Our results indicate that TRF2, through its interactions with both WRN and telomeric DNA, stimulates WRN-mediated strand exchange specifically between telomeric substrates; TRF2's basic domain is particularly important for this stimulation. Although TRF1 binds telomeric DNA with similar affinity, it has minimal effects on WRN-mediated strand exchange of telomeric DNA. Moreover, TRF2 is displaced from telomeric DNA by WRN, independent of its ATPase and helicase activities. Together, these results suggest that TRF2 and WRN act coordinately during telomeric recombination processes, consistent with certain telomeric abnormalities associated with alteration of WRN function. PMID:24880691

  20. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype studies of chromosome 8p 11. 1-21. 1 markers and Werner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-En; Schellenberg, G.D.; Oshima, Junko; Martin, G.M.; Goddard, K.A.B.; Wijsman, E.M. ); Miki, Tetsuro; Nakura, Jun; Ogihara, Toshio ); Poot, M.; Hoehn, H. )

    1994-08-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized as a progeroid syndrome, previously mapped to the 8p 11.2-21.1 region. Because WS is so rare, and because many patients are from consanguineous marriages, fine localization of the gene by traditional meiotic mapping methods is unlikely to succeed. Here the authors present the results of a search for a region that exhibits linkage disequilibrium with the disorder, under the assumption that identification of such a region may provide an alternative method of narrowing down the location of WRN, the gene responsible for WS. They present allele frequencies in Japanese and Caucasian cases and controls for D8S137, D8S131, D8S87, D8S278, D8S259, D8S283, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, ankyrin 1, D8S339, and two polymorphisms in glutathione reductase (GSR), covering [approximately] 16.5 cM in total. They show that three of the markers examined - D8S339 and both polymorphisms in the GSR locus - show strong statistically significant evidence of disequilibrium with WRN in the Japanese population but not in the Caucasian population. In addition, they show that a limited number of haplotypes are associated with the disease in both populations and that these haplotypes define clusters of apparently related haplotypes that may identify as many as eight or nine independent WRN mutations in these two populations. 36 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. The Direct Collapse of a Massive Black Hole Seed under the Influence of an Anisotropic Lyman-Werner Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, John A.; Johansson, Peter H.; Wise, John H.

    2014-11-01

    The direct collapse model of supermassive black hole seed formation requires that the gas cools predominantly via atomic hydrogen. To this end we simulate the effect of an anisotropic radiation source on the collapse of a halo at high redshift. The radiation source is placed at a distance of 3 kpc (physical) from the collapsing object and is set to emit monochromatically in the center of the Lyman-Werner (LW) band. The LW radiation emitted from the high redshift source is followed self-consistently using ray tracing techniques. Due to self-shielding, a small amount of H2 is able to form at the very center of the collapsing halo even under very strong LW radiation. Furthermore, we find that a radiation source, emitting >1054 (~ 103 J21) photons s-1, is required to cause the collapse of a clump of M ~ 105 M ⊙. The resulting accretion rate onto the collapsing object is ~0.25 M ⊙ yr-1. Our results display significant differences, compared to the isotropic radiation field case, in terms of the H2 fraction at an equivalent radius. These differences will significantly affect the dynamics of the collapse. With the inclusion of a strong anisotropic radiation source, the final mass of the collapsing object is found to be M ~ 105 M ⊙. This is consistent with predictions for the formation of a supermassive star or quasi-star leading to a supermassive black hole.

  2. Niels Bohr's discussions with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schroedinger: the origins of the principles of uncertainty and complementarity

    SciTech Connect

    Mehra, J.

    1987-05-01

    In this paper, the main outlines of the discussions between Niels Bohr with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schroedinger during 1920-1927 are treated. From the formulation of quantum mechanics in 1925-1926 and wave mechanics in 1926, there emerged Born's statistical interpretation of the wave function in summer 1926, and on the basis of the quantum mechanical transformation theory - formulated in fall 1926 by Dirac, London, and Jordan - Heisenberg formulated the uncertainty principle in early 1927. At the Volta Conference in Como in September 1927 and at the fifth Solvay Conference in Brussels the following month, Bohr publicly enunciated his complementarity principle, which had been developing in his mind for several years. The Bohr-Einstein discussions about the consistency and completeness of quantum mechanics and of physical theory as such - formally begun in October 1927 at the fifth Solvay Conference and carried on at the sixth Solvay Conference in October 1930 - were continued during the next decades. All these aspects are briefly summarized.

  3. Enhancement of human DNA polymerase η activity and fidelity is dependent upon a bipartite interaction with the Werner syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    Maddukuri, Leena; Ketkar, Amit; Eddy, Sarah; Zafar, Maroof K; Griffin, Wezley C; Eoff, Robert L

    2012-12-07

    We have investigated the interaction between human DNA polymerase η (hpol η) and the Werner syndrome protein (WRN). Functional assays revealed that the WRN exonuclease and RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domains are necessary for full stimulation of hpol η-catalyzed formation of correct base pairs. We find that WRN does not stimulate hpol η-catalyzed formation of mispairs. Moreover, the exonuclease activity of WRN prevents stable mispair formation by hpol η. These results are consistent with a proofreading activity for WRN during single-nucleotide additions. ATP hydrolysis by WRN appears to attenuate stimulation of hpol η. Pre-steady-state kinetic results show that k(pol) is increased 4-fold by WRN. Finally, pulldown assays reveal a bipartite physical interaction between hpol η and WRN that is mediated by the exonuclease and RQC domains. Taken together, these results are consistent with alteration of the rate-limiting step in polymerase catalysis by direct protein-protein interactions between WRN and hpol η. In summary, WRN improves the efficiency and fidelity of hpol η to promote more effective replication of DNA.

  4. Werner syndrome protein directly binds to the AAA ATPase p97/VCP in an ATP-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Indig, Fred Eliezer; Partridge, Juneth Joaquin; von Kobbe, Cayetano; Aladjem, Mirit I; Latterich, Martin; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2004-01-01

    We have previously shown that the Werner syndrome helicase, WRNp, a member of the RecQ helicase family, forms a tight molecular complex with the p97/Valosin containing protein (VCP), a member of the AAA (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) family of proteins. This interaction is disrupted by chemical agents that confer DNA damage, suggesting that VCP plays an important role in the signal-dependent release of WRNp from its nucleolar sequestration site. Here, we characterized the structural requirements for interactions between WRNp and VCP and for the nuclear localization of VCP. We discovered that VCP directly binds to the RQC (RecQ conserved) domain of WRNp, which is a highly conserved motif common to the RecQ helicase family. This interaction is ATP-dependent, suggesting that VCP plays a mechanistic role in releasing WRNp from the nucleolus. Immunohistochemical analysis of various VCP domains and mutated proteins expressed in vitro demonstrated that VCP may contain several hierarchical cellular localization motifs within its domain structure.

  5. The human Werner syndrome protein stimulates repair of oxidative DNA base damage by the DNA glycosylase NEIL1.

    PubMed

    Das, Aditi; Boldogh, Istvan; Lee, Jae Wan; Harrigan, Jeanine A; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Piotrowski, Jason; de Souza Pinto, Nadja; Ramos, William; Greenberg, Marc M; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2007-09-07

    The mammalian DNA glycosylase, NEIL1, specific for repair of oxidatively damaged bases in the genome via the base excision repair pathway, is activated by reactive oxygen species and prevents toxicity due to radiation. We show here that the Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, associates with NEIL1 in the early damage-sensing step of base excision repair. WRN stimulates NEIL1 in excision of oxidative lesions from bubble DNA substrates. The binary interaction between NEIL1 and WRN (K(D) = 60 nM) involves C-terminal residues 288-349 of NEIL1 and the RecQ C-terminal (RQC) region of WRN, and is independent of the helicase activity WRN. Exposure to oxidative stress enhances the NEIL-WRN association concomitant with their strong nuclear co-localization. WRN-depleted cells accumulate some prototypical oxidized bases (e.g. 8-oxoguanine, FapyG, and FapyA) indicating a physiological function of WRN in oxidative damage repair in mammalian genomes. Interestingly, WRN deficiency does not have an additive effect on in vivo damage accumulation in NEIL1 knockdown cells suggesting that WRN participates in the same repair pathway as NEIL1.

  6. Telomeric protein TRF2 protects Holliday junctions with telomeric arms from displacement by the Werner syndrome helicase.

    PubMed

    Nora, Gerald J; Buncher, Noah A; Opresko, Patricia L

    2010-07-01

    WRN protein loss causes Werner syndrome (WS), which is characterized by premature aging as well as genomic and telomeric instability. WRN prevents telomere loss, but the telomeric protein complex must regulate WRN activities to prevent aberrant telomere processing. Telomere-binding TRF2 protein inhibits telomere t-loop deletion by blocking Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase cleavage activity, but whether TRF2 also modulates HJ displacement at t-loops is unknown. In this study, we used multiplex fluorophore imaging to track the fate of individual strands of HJ substrates. We report the novel finding that TRF2 inhibits WRN helicase strand displacement of HJs with telomeric repeats in duplex arms, but unwinding of HJs with a telomeric center or lacking telomeric sequence is unaffected. These data, together with results using TRF2 fragments and TRF2 HJ binding assays, indicate that both the TRF2 B- and Myb domains are required to inhibit WRN HJ activity. We propose a novel model whereby simultaneous binding of the TRF2 B-domain to the HJ core and the Myb domain to telomeric arms promote and stabilize HJs in a stacked arm conformation that is unfavorable for unwinding. Our biochemical study provides a mechanistic basis for the cellular findings that TRF2 regulates WRN activity at telomeres.

  7. An analytic resolution to the competition between Lyman-Werner radiation and metal winds in direct collapse black hole hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Bhaskar; Regan, John; Klessen, Ralf S.; Downes, Turlough P.; Zackrisson, Erik

    2017-10-01

    A near pristine atomic cooling halo close to a star forming galaxy offers a natural pathway for forming massive direct collapse black hole (DCBH) seeds, which could be the progenitors of the z > 6 redshift quasars. The close proximity of the haloes enables a sufficient Lyman-Werner flux to effectively dissociate H2 in the core of the atomic cooling halo. A mild background may also be required to delay star formation in the atomic cooling halo, often attributed to distant background galaxies. In this paper, we investigate the impact of metal pollution from both the background galaxies and the close star forming galaxy under extremely unfavourable conditions such as instantaneous metal mixing. We find that within the time window of DCBH formation, the level of pollution never exceeds the critical threshold (Zcr ˜ 1 × 10-5 Z⊙) and attains a maximum metallicity of Z ˜ 2 × 10- 6 Z⊙. As the system evolves, the metallicity eventually exceeds the critical threshold, long after the DCBH has formed.

  8. Increased frequency of DNA deletions in pink-eyed unstable mice carrying a mutation in the Werner syndrome gene homologue.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by genomic instability and the premature onset of a number of age-related diseases, including cancers. Accumulating evidence indicates that the WS gene product is involved in resolving aberrant DNA structures that may arise during the process of DNA replication and/or transcription. To estimate the frequency of DNA deletions directly in the skin of mouse embryos, mice with a deletion of part of the murine WRN helicase domain were created. These mutant mice were then crossed to the pink-eyed unstable animals, which have a 70 kb internal duplication at the pink-eyed dilution (p) gene. This report indicates that the frequency of deletion of the duplicated sequence at the p locus is elevated in mice with a mutation in the WRN allele when compared with wild-type mice. In addition, the inhibitor of topoisomerase I camptothecin also increases the frequency of deletion at the p locus. This frequency is even more elevated in WRN mutant mice treated with camptothecin. In contrast, while the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity by 3-aminobenzamide increases the frequency of DNA deletion, mutant WRN mice are not significantly more sensitive to the inhibition of PARP activity than wild-type animals.

  9. Strand exchange of telomeric DNA catalyzed by the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is specifically stimulated by TRF2.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Deanna N; Orren, David K; Machwe, Amrita

    2014-07-01

    Werner syndrome (WS), caused by loss of function of the RecQ helicase WRN, is a hereditary disease characterized by premature aging and elevated cancer incidence. WRN has DNA binding, exonuclease, ATPase, helicase and strand annealing activities, suggesting possible roles in recombination-related processes. Evidence indicates that WRN deficiency causes telomeric abnormalities that likely underlie early onset of aging phenotypes in WS. Furthermore, TRF2, a protein essential for telomere protection, interacts with WRN and influences its basic helicase and exonuclease activities. However, these studies provided little insight into WRN's specific function at telomeres. Here, we explored the possibility that WRN and TRF2 cooperate during telomeric recombination processes. Our results indicate that TRF2, through its interactions with both WRN and telomeric DNA, stimulates WRN-mediated strand exchange specifically between telomeric substrates; TRF2's basic domain is particularly important for this stimulation. Although TRF1 binds telomeric DNA with similar affinity, it has minimal effects on WRN-mediated strand exchange of telomeric DNA. Moreover, TRF2 is displaced from telomeric DNA by WRN, independent of its ATPase and helicase activities. Together, these results suggest that TRF2 and WRN act coordinately during telomeric recombination processes, consistent with certain telomeric abnormalities associated with alteration of WRN function.

  10. Linkage Disequilibrium and Haplotype Studies of Chromosome 8p 11.1-21.1 Markers and Werner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang-En; Oshima, Junko; Goddard, Katrina A. B.; Miki, Tetsuro; Nakura, Jun; Ogihara, Toshio; Poot, Martin; Hoehn, Holger; Fraccaro, Marco; Piussan, Charles; Martin, George M.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Wijsman, Ellen M.

    1994-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized as a progeroid syndrome, previously mapped to the 8p 11.1-21.1 region. Because WS is so rare, and because many patients are from consanguineous marriages, fine localization of the gene by traditional meiotic mapping methods is unlikely to succeed. Here we present the results of a search for a region that exhibits linkage disequilibrium with the disorder, under the assumption that identification of such a region may provide an alternative method of narrowing down the location of WRN, the gene responsible for WS. We present allele frequencies in Japanese and Caucasian cases and controls for D8S137, D8S131, D8S87, D8S278, D8S259, D8S283, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, ankyrin 1, D8S339, and two polymorphisms in glutathione reductase (GSR), covering ∼16.5 cM in total. We show that three of the markers examined—D8S339 and both polymorphisms in the GSR locus—show strong statistically significant evidence of disequilibrium with WRN in the Japanese population but not in the Caucasian population. In addition, we show that a limited number of haplotypes are associated with the disease in both populations and that these haplotypes define clusters of apparently related haplotypes that may identify as many as eight or nine independent WRN mutations in these two populations. PMID:8037212

  11. Impact of Model Uncertainty Description on Assimilating Hydraulic Head into the MIKE-SHE Distributed Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Madsen, H.; Ridler, M. E.; Rasmussen, J.; Refsgaard, J.; Jensen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Catchment-scale hydrological models are used as prediction tools to solve major challenges in water resources management. The reliability of hydrological model predictions is inevitably affected by the amount of information available to set up and calibrate the model. Data assimilation (DA) which combines complementary information from measurements and models has proven to be a powerful and promising tool in numerous research studies to improve model predictions. Especially, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) which is a popular sequential data assimilation technique, has been extensively studied in the earth sciences for assimilating in-situ measurements and remote sensing data. However, one of the major challenges in data assimilation to optimally combine model and measurements is the description of model uncertainty. Only few studies have been reported for defining appropriate model uncertainty in hydrological DA. Modeling uncertainties can be conceptually different in different applications. Traditionally, model uncertainty is represented by parameter uncertainty with corresponding parameter statistics determined by inverse modeling. In most hydrological DA applications, however, model uncertainty is defined by experience using simple statistical descriptions of different uncertainty sources. In this work, both the uncertainty derived from inverse modeling and from empirical knowledge are used and analyzed. A combination of parameter-based, forcing-based and state-based model error is implemented in the EnKF framework for assimilating groundwater hydraulic heads into a catchment-scale model of the Karup Catchment in Denmark using the distributed and integrated hydrological model MIKE SHE. A series of synthetic identical twin experiments are carried out to analyze the impact of different model error assumptions on the feasibility and efficiency of the assimilation. The optimality of the EnKF underlying twin test provides possibilities to diagnose model error

  12. EVA training for Exp. 27 crew member Ron Garan, Exp. 28 Mike Fossum and STS-135 Doug Hurley, Rex Walheim and Sandra Magnus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-18

    JSC2011-E-003210 (18 Jan. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer and Expedition 29 commander, uses virtual reality hardware in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center to rehearse some of his duties on the upcoming mission to the International Space Station. This type of virtual reality training allows the astronauts to wear a helmet and special gloves while looking at computer displays simulating actual movements around the various locations on the station hardware with which they will be working. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  13. EVA training for Exp. 27 crew member Ron Garan, Exp. 28 Mike Fossum and STS-135 Doug Hurley, Rex Walheim and Sandra Magnus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-18

    JSC2011-E-003213 (18 Jan. 2011) --- NASA astronauts Mike Fossum (left), Expedition 28 flight engineer and Expedition 29 commander; and Ron Garan, Expedition 27/28 flight engineer, use virtual reality hardware in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center to rehearse some of his duties on the upcoming mission to the International Space Station. This type of virtual reality training allows the astronauts to wear a helmet and special gloves while looking at computer displays simulating actual movements around the various locations on the station hardware with which they will be working. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  14. EVA training for Exp. 27 crew member Ron Garan, Exp. 28 Mike Fossum and STS-135 Doug Hurley, Rex Walheim and Sandra Magnus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-18

    JSC2011-E-003204 (18 Jan. 2011) --- NASA astronauts Rex Walheim, STS-135 mission specialist; and Mike Fossum (foreground), Expedition 28 flight engineer and Expedition 29 commander; use the virtual reality lab in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center to train for some of their duties aboard the space shuttle and space station. This type of computer interface, paired with virtual reality training hardware and software, helps to prepare crew members for dealing with space station elements. STS-135 is planned to be the final mission of the space shuttle program. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  15. The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Trego, Kelly S.; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Davalos, Albert R.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Finger, L. David; Ng, Cliff; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Yannone, Steven M.; Tainer, John A.; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2011-04-20

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG incision defects result in the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, whereas truncating mutations of XPG cause the severe postnatal progeroid developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. We show that XPG interacts directly with WRN protein, which is defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, and that the two proteins undergo similar sub-nuclear redistribution in S-phase and co-localize in nuclear foci. The co-localization was observed in mid- to late-S-phase, when WRN moves from nucleoli to nuclear foci that have been shown to contain protein markers of both stalled replication forks and telomeric proteins. We mapped the interaction between XPG and WRN to the C-terminal domains of each and show that interaction with the C-terminal domain of XPG strongly stimulates WRN helicase activity. WRN also possesses a competing DNA single-strand annealing activity that, combined with unwinding, has been shown to coordinate regression of model replication forks to form Holliday junction/chicken foot intermediate structures. We tested whether XPG stimulated WRN annealing activity and found that XPG itself has intrinsic strand annealing activity that requires the unstructured R- and C-terminal domains, but not the conserved catalytic core or endonuclease activity. Annealing by XPG is cooperative, rather than additive, with WRN annealing. Taken together, our results suggest a novel function for XPG in S-phase that is at least in part carried out coordinately with WRN, and which may contribute to the severity of the phenotypes that occur upon loss of XPG.

  16. THE WERNER AND BLOOM SYNDROME PROTEINS HELP RESOLVE REPLICATION BLOCKAGE BY CONVERTING (REGRESSED) HOLLIDAY JUNCTIONS TO FUNCTIONAL REPLICATION FORKS

    PubMed Central

    Machwe, Amrita; Karale, Rajashree; Xu, Xioahua; Liu, Yilun; Orren, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Cells cope with blockage of replication fork progression in a manner so that DNA synthesis can be completed and genomic instability minimized. Models for resolution of blocked replication involve fork regression to form Holliday junction structures. The human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM (deficient in Werner and Bloom syndromes, respectively) are critical for maintaining genomic stability and postulated to function in accurate resolution of replication blockage. Consistent with this notion, WRN and BLM localize to sites of blocked replication after certain DNA damaging treatments and exhibit enhanced activity on replication and recombination intermediates. Here we examined the actions of WRN and BLM on a special Holliday junction substrate reflective of a regressed replication fork. Our results demonstrate that, in reactions requiring ATP hydrolysis, both WRN and BLM convert this Holliday junction substrate primarily to a four-stranded replication fork structure, suggesting they target the Holliday junction to initiate branch migration. In agreement, the Holliday junction binding protein RuvA inhibits the WRN- and BLM-mediated conversion reactions. Importantly, this conversion product is suitable for replication with its leading daughter strand readily extended by DNA polymerases. Furthermore, binding to and conversion of this Holliday junction is optimal in low MgCl2, suggesting that WRN and BLM preferentially act on the square planar (open) conformation of Holliday junctions. Our findings suggest that, subsequent to fork regression events, WRN and/or BLM could re-establish functional replication forks to help overcome fork blockage. Such a function is highly consistent with phenotypes associated with WRN- and BLM-deficient cells. PMID:21736299

  17. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F. Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles. PMID:26447695

  18. The direct collapse of a massive black hole seed under the influence of an anisotropic Lyman-Werner source

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, John A.; Johansson, Peter H.; Wise, John H.

    2014-11-10

    The direct collapse model of supermassive black hole seed formation requires that the gas cools predominantly via atomic hydrogen. To this end we simulate the effect of an anisotropic radiation source on the collapse of a halo at high redshift. The radiation source is placed at a distance of 3 kpc (physical) from the collapsing object and is set to emit monochromatically in the center of the Lyman-Werner (LW) band. The LW radiation emitted from the high redshift source is followed self-consistently using ray tracing techniques. Due to self-shielding, a small amount of H{sub 2} is able to form at the very center of the collapsing halo even under very strong LW radiation. Furthermore, we find that a radiation source, emitting >10{sup 54} (∼ 10{sup 3} J{sub 21}) photons s{sup –1}, is required to cause the collapse of a clump of M ∼ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. The resulting accretion rate onto the collapsing object is ∼0.25 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. Our results display significant differences, compared to the isotropic radiation field case, in terms of the H{sub 2} fraction at an equivalent radius. These differences will significantly affect the dynamics of the collapse. With the inclusion of a strong anisotropic radiation source, the final mass of the collapsing object is found to be M ∼ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. This is consistent with predictions for the formation of a supermassive star or quasi-star leading to a supermassive black hole.

  19. Fluctuations in the high-redshift Lyman-Werner background: close halo pairs as the origin of supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Mark; Haiman, Zoltán; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2008-12-01

    The earliest generation of stars and black holes must have established an early `Lyman-Werner' background (LWB) at high redshift, prior to the epoch of reionization. Because of the long mean free path of photons with energies hν < 13.6eV, the LWB was nearly uniform. However, some variation in the LWB is expected due to the discrete nature of the sources, and their highly clustered spatial distribution. In this paper, we compute the probability distribution function (PDF) of the LW flux that irradiates dark matter (DM) haloes collapsing at high redshift (z ~ 10). Our model accounts for (i) the clustering of DM haloes, (ii) Poisson fluctuations in the number of corresponding star-forming galaxies and (iii) scatter in the LW luminosity produced by haloes of a given mass (calibrated using local observations). We find that >99 per cent of the DM haloes are illuminated by an LW flux within a factor of 2 of the global mean value. However, a small fraction, ~10-8 to 10-6, of DM haloes with virial temperatures Tvir >~ 104 K have a close luminous neighbour within <~10 kpc, and are exposed to an LW flux exceeding the global mean by a factor of >20, or to J21,LW > 103 (in units of 10-21 erg s-1 Hz-1 sr-1 cm-2). This large LW flux can photodissociate H2 molecules in the gas collapsing due to atomic cooling in these haloes, and prevent its further cooling and fragmentation. Such close halo pairs therefore provide possible sites in which primordial gas clouds collapse directly into massive black holes (MBH ~ 104-6Msolar), and subsequently grow into supermassive (MBH >~ 109Msolar) black holes by z ~ 6.

  20. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 regulates both the exonuclease and helicase activities of the Werner syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    von Kobbe, Cayetano; Harrigan, Jeanine A; Schreiber, Valérie; Stiegler, Patrick; Piotrowski, Jason; Dawut, Lale; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2004-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a genetic premature aging disorder in which patients appear much older than their chronological age. The gene mutated in WS encodes a nuclear protein (WRN) which possesses 3'-5' exonuclease and ATPase-dependent 3'-5' helicase activities. The genomic instability associated with WS cells and the biochemical characteristics of WRN suggest that WRN plays a role in DNA metabolic pathways such as transcription, replication, recombination and repair. Recently we have identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) as a new WRN interacting protein. In this paper, we further mapped the interacting domains. We found that PARP-1 bound to the N-terminus of WRN and to the C-terminus containing the RecQ-conserved (RQC) domain. WRN bound to the N-terminus of PARP-1 containing DNA binding and BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domains. We show that unmodified PARP-1 inhibited both WRN exonuclease and helicase activities, and to our knowledge is the only known WRN protein partner that inactivates both of the WRN's catalytic activities suggesting a biologically significant regulation. Moreover, this dual inhibition seems to be specific for PARP-1, as PARP-2 did not affect WRN helicase activity and only slightly inhibited WRN exonuclease activity. The differential effect of PARP-1 and PARP-2 on WRN catalytic activity was not due to differences in affinity for WRN or the DNA substrate. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of WRN by PARP-1 was influenced by the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation state of PARP-1. The biological relevance of the specific modulation of WRN catalytic activities by PARP-1 are discussed in the context of pathways in which these proteins may function together, namely in the repair of DNA strand breaks.

  1. Werner Ernst Reichardt Ph.D: founder of modern computational visual neurophysiology and anti-Nazi resistance fighter.

    PubMed

    Flynn, J T

    1999-01-01

    Werner Ernst Reichardt was born on January 30, 1924 in Berlin and at age 19 was drafted into the Luftwaffe and assigned to an electronic signals section laboratory. He became an active member of a resistance group and supplied radios for the movement in Germany. He emerged from the ashes of the Second World War and dedicated his scientific life to the development of the newborn specialty of biological physics. Following graduation from the Technische Hochschule Charlottenburg, he did a fellowship at CalTech under Max Delbrück. On returning to Germany he joined the Max Planck Institut and later became Director of the Max Planck Institut für Biologische Kybernetik in Tübingen, West Germany. Reichardt was one of the founders of the quantitative study of visually controlled orientation in animals. His work is very nearly unique in its close dialectic between elegant non-linear mathematical theory and quantitative experimental test of their predictions. During the 1950s Reichardt and his collaborators jointly developed an autocorrelation model (i.e. the firing rate of the involved visual neurones is closely correlated with the features of the pattern stimulating them) of how moving patterns are perceived by motion detectors in the visual system of the fly. This was the first mathematical description of a biological abstraction process. His findings apply to vertebrate vision, including motion detection and figure-ground description in human vision. His Max Planck Institute became a world renowned center for the computational approach to information processing by the nervous system. At his retirement party from the Institute he founded, Reichardt died on the evening of September 11th, 1992.

  2. From the Peenemuende 'Aggregates' to the American moon rocket - The development of the Saturn V Apollo rocket by Werner von Braun's team based on the Peenemuende concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisig, G. H. R.

    The origin of active space flight and the important role played in it by the innovations made in the Peenemuende rocket program are discussed. The rocket development carried out by the Werner von Braun team is chronologically recalled. The A4 rocket and its aerodynamic configuration are discussed, including the ballistic demands on its configuration, the development of the Peenemuende supersonic wind tunnel, and the pretesting of the A4 configuration using the A5 rocket. Rocket development in the U.S. from the Redstone to the Saturn is reviewed.

  3. Bernard Lerer: recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine (Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics).

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Vural; Endrenyi, Laszlo; Aynacıoğlu, Sükrü; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Dandara, Collet; Dove, Edward S; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hafen, Ernst; Kesim, Belgin Eroğlu; Kolker, Eugene; Lee, Edmund J D; Llerena, Adrian; Nacak, Muradiye; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Someya, Toshiyuki; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tomlinson, Brian; Vayena, Effy; Warnich, Louise; Yaşar, Umit

    2014-04-01

    This article announces the recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine by the Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics (PRACP): Bernard Lerer, professor of psychiatry and director of the Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. The Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize is given to an exceptional interdisciplinary scholar who has made highly innovative and enduring contributions to global omics science and personalized medicine, with both vertical and horizontal (transdisciplinary) impacts. The prize is established in memory of a beloved colleague, mentor, and friend, the late Professor Werner Kalow, who cultivated the idea and practice of pharmacogenetics in modern therapeutics commencing in the 1950s. PRACP, the prize's sponsor, is one of the longest standing learned societies in the Asia-Pacific region, and was founded by Kalow and colleagues more than two decades ago in the then-emerging field of pharmacogenetics. In announcing this inaugural prize and its winner, we seek to highlight the works of prize winner, Professor Lerer. Additionally, we contextualize the significance of the prize by recalling the life and works of Professor Kalow and providing a brief socio-technical history of the rise of pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine as a veritable form of 21(st) century scientific practice. The article also fills a void in previous social science analyses of pharmacogenetics, by bringing to the fore the works of Kalow from 1995 to 2008, when he presciently noted the rise of yet another field of postgenomics inquiry--pharmacoepigenetics--that railed against genetic determinism and underscored the temporal and spatial plasticity of genetic components of drug response, with invention of the repeated drug administration (RDA) method that estimates the dynamic heritabilities of drug response. The prize goes a long way

  4. Ethnic-specific WRN mutations in South Asian Werner syndrome patients: potential founder effect in patients with Indian or Pakistani ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Bidisha; Lessel, Davor; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Rao, Anuradha S; Hisama, Fuki M; Peter, Dincy; Bennett, Chris; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple features consistent with accelerated aging. It is caused by mutations in the WRN gene, which encodes a RecQ type helicase. To date, more than 70 disease-causing mutations have been reported. While founder mutations and a corresponding relatively high incidence of WS have been reported in Japan and Sardinia, such mutations have not been previously described among patients of South Asian descent. Here, we report two novel WRN mutations in three pedigrees. A homozygous c.561A>G mutation in exon 6 was identified both in a pedigree from Kerala, India and in a British patient of Pakistani ancestry. Although c.561A>G does not alter the corresponding amino acid (p.Lys187), it creates a cryptic splice site resulting in a 98 bp deletion at the mRNA level (r.557_654del98) followed by a frameshift (p.Lys187Trpfs*13). These two cases shared the same haplotype across the WRN gene, and were distinct from another Indian Werner patient with a homozygous stop codon mutation, c.2855 C > A (p.Ser952*), in exon 24. As the Indian population increases and the awareness of WS grows, we anticipate that more cases will be identified with these founder mutations among South Asian WS patients. PMID:23936869

  5. EVA training for Exp. 27 crew member Ron Garan, Exp. 28 Mike Fossum and STS-135 Doug Hurley, Rex Walheim and Sandra Magnus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-18

    JSC2011-E-003206 (18 Jan. 2011) --- NASA astronauts Ron Garan (left foreground), Expedition 27/28 flight engineer; Mike Fossum (second left), Expedition 28 flight engineer and Expedition 29 commander; Rex Walheim and Sandy Magnus, both STS-135 mission specialists, use the virtual reality lab in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center to train for some of their duties aboard the space shuttle and space station. This type of computer interface, paired with virtual reality training hardware and software, helps to prepare crew members for dealing with space station elements. STS-135 is planned to be the final mission of the space shuttle program. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  6. Somebody's Gotta Do It: Through His Foundation, Television Producer and Host Mike Rowe Is Working to Change the Perception of Middle-Skills Jobs and Fill Them at the Same Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Mike Rowe wants high school students to rethink that $140,000 art history degree. The creator, executive producer, and host of CNN's Somebody's Gotta Do It and former host of TV's Dirty Jobs has long been passionate about promoting vocational, aka middle-skills, professions. Over the past decade, Rowe has given countless public and private…

  7. Somebody's Gotta Do It: Through His Foundation, Television Producer and Host Mike Rowe Is Working to Change the Perception of Middle-Skills Jobs and Fill Them at the Same Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Mike Rowe wants high school students to rethink that $140,000 art history degree. The creator, executive producer, and host of CNN's Somebody's Gotta Do It and former host of TV's Dirty Jobs has long been passionate about promoting vocational, aka middle-skills, professions. Over the past decade, Rowe has given countless public and private…

  8. Promyelocytic leukemia protein interacts with werner syndrome helicase and regulates double-strand break repair in γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jilai; Song, Yi; Qian, Junjie; Liu, Bin; Dong, Yan; Tian, Baolei; Sun, Zhixian

    2011-05-01

    We show here that γ-irradiation leads to the translocation of endogenous Werner syndrome helicase (WRN) from nucleoli to nucleoplasmic DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), and WRN plays a role in damage repair. The relocation of WRN after irradiation was perturbed by promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) knockdown and enhanced by PML IV overexpression. PML IV physically interacted with WRN after irradiation. Amino acids (a.a.) 394 to 433 of PML were necessary for this interaction and the nucleoplasmic translocation of WRN and were involved in DSB repair and cellular sensitivity to γ-irradiation. Taken together, our results provide molecular support for a model in which PML IV physically interacts with and regulates the translocation of WRN for DNA damage repair through its 394-433 a.a. domain.

  9. Colella-Overhauser-Werner test of the weak equivalence principle: A low-energy window to look into the noncommutative structure of space-time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    We construct the quantum mechanical model of the Colella-Overhauser-Werner (COW) experiment assuming that the underlying space time has a granular structure, described by a canonical noncommutative algebra of coordinates xμ. The time-space sector of the algebra is shown to add a mass-dependent contribution to the gravitational acceleration felt by neutron de Brogli waves measured in a COW experiment. This makes time-space noncommutativity a potential candidate for an apparent violation of the weak equivalence principle even if the ratio of the inertial mass mi and gravitational mass mg is a universal constant. The latest experimental result based on the COW principle is shown to place an upper bound several orders of magnitude stronger than the existing one on the time-space noncommutative parameter. We argue that the evidence of noncommutative structure of space-time may be found if the COW-type experiment can be repeated with several particle species.

  10. rqh1+, a fission yeast gene related to the Bloom's and Werner's syndrome genes, is required for reversible S phase arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, E; Chapman, C R; Al-Khodairy, F; Carr, A M; Enoch, T

    1997-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, S phase can be reversibly arrested by drugs that inhibit DNA synthesis or DNA damage. Here we show that recovery from such treatments is under genetic control and is defective in fission yeast rqh1 mutants. rqh1+, previously known as hus2+, encodes a putative DNA helicase related to the Escherichia coli RecQ helicase, with particular homology to the gene products of the human BLM and WRN genes and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SGS1 gene. BLM and WRN are mutated in patients with Bloom's syndrome and Werner's syndrome respectively. Both syndromes are associated with genomic instability and cancer susceptibility. We show that, like BLM and SGS1, rqh1+ is required to prevent recombination and that in fission yeast suppression of inappropriate recombination is essential for reversible S phase arrest. PMID:9184215

  11. Bernard Lerer: Recipient of the 2014 Inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine (Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics)

    PubMed Central

    Aynacıoğlu, Şükrü; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Dandara, Collet; Dove, Edward S.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hafen, Ernst; Kesim, Belgin Eroğlu; Kolker, Eugene; Lee, Edmund J.D.; LLerena, Adrian; Nacak, Muradiye; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Someya, Toshiyuki; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tomlinson, Brian; Vayena, Effy; Warnich, Louise; Yaşar, Ümit

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article announces the recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine by the Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics (PRACP): Bernard Lerer, professor of psychiatry and director of the Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. The Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize is given to an exceptional interdisciplinary scholar who has made highly innovative and enduring contributions to global omics science and personalized medicine, with both vertical and horizontal (transdisciplinary) impacts. The prize is established in memory of a beloved colleague, mentor, and friend, the late Professor Werner Kalow, who cultivated the idea and practice of pharmacogenetics in modern therapeutics commencing in the 1950s. PRACP, the prize's sponsor, is one of the longest standing learned societies in the Asia-Pacific region, and was founded by Kalow and colleagues more than two decades ago in the then-emerging field of pharmacogenetics. In announcing this inaugural prize and its winner, we seek to highlight the works of prize winner, Professor Lerer. Additionally, we contextualize the significance of the prize by recalling the life and works of Professor Kalow and providing a brief socio-technical history of the rise of pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine as a veritable form of 21st century scientific practice. The article also fills a void in previous social science analyses of pharmacogenetics, by bringing to the fore the works of Kalow from 1995 to 2008, when he presciently noted the rise of yet another field of postgenomics inquiry—pharmacoepigenetics—that railed against genetic determinism and underscored the temporal and spatial plasticity of genetic components of drug response, with invention of the repeated drug administration (RDA) method that estimates the dynamic heritabilities of drug response. The prize goes a

  12. The Werner syndrome protein limits the error-prone 8-oxo-dG lesion bypass activity of human DNA polymerase kappa.

    PubMed

    Maddukuri, Leena; Ketkar, Amit; Eddy, Sarah; Zafar, Maroof K; Eoff, Robert L

    2014-10-29

    Human DNA polymerase kappa (hpol κ) is the only Y-family member to preferentially insert dAMP opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) during translesion DNA synthesis. We have studied the mechanism of action by which hpol κ activity is modulated by the Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase known to influence repair of 8-oxo-dG. Here we show that WRN stimulates the 8-oxo-dG bypass activity of hpol κ in vitro by enhancing the correct base insertion opposite the lesion, as well as extension from dC:8-oxo-dG base pairs. Steady-state kinetic analysis reveals that WRN improves hpol κ-catalyzed dCMP insertion opposite 8-oxo-dG ∼10-fold and extension from dC:8-oxo-dG by 2.4-fold. Stimulation is primarily due to an increase in the rate constant for polymerization (kpol), as assessed by pre-steady-state kinetics, and it requires the RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain. In support of the functional data, recombinant WRN and hpol κ were found to physically interact through the exo and RQC domains of WRN, and co-localization of WRN and hpol κ was observed in human cells treated with hydrogen peroxide. Thus, WRN limits the error-prone bypass of 8-oxo-dG by hpol κ, which could influence the sensitivity to oxidative damage that has previously been observed for Werner's syndrome cells.

  13. The Werner Protein Acts as a Coactivator of Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) on HIV-1 and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) Promoters.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Taketoshi; Ishizaka, Aya; Furuichi, Yasuhiro

    2015-07-24

    The Werner syndrome helicase (WRN) plays a role in maintaining genomic stability. The lack of WRN results in Werner syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder, which causes premature aging accompanied by many complications such as rare forms of cancer and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms of these complications, arising due to the loss of WRN, are poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated the function of WRN in transcriptional regulation of NF-κB targets. WRN physically interacts via its RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain with the Rel homology domain of both the RelA (p65) and the p50 subunits of NF-κB. In the steady state, WRN is recruited to HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR), a typical NF-κB-responsive promoter, as well as the p50/p50 homodimer, in an NF-κB site-dependent manner. The amount of WRN on LTR increased along with the transactivating RelA/p50 heterodimer in response to TNF-α stimulation. Further, a knockdown of WRN reduced the transactivation of LTR in exogenous RelA/p50-introduced or TNF-α-stimulated cells. Additionally, knockdown of WRN reduced TNF-α stimulation-induced activation of the endogenous promoter of IL-8, an NF-κB-responsive gene, and WRN increased its association with the IL-8 promoter region together with RelA/p50 after TNF-α stimulation. In conjunction with studies that have shown NF-κB to be a key regulator of aging and inflammation, our results indicate a novel role of WRN in transcriptional regulation. Along with NF-κB, the loss of WRN is expected to result in incorrect regulation of downstream targets and leads to immune abnormalities and homeostatic disruption.

  14. The Werner Protein Acts as a Coactivator of Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) on HIV-1 and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) Promoters*

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Taketoshi; Ishizaka, Aya; Furuichi, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Werner syndrome helicase (WRN) plays a role in maintaining genomic stability. The lack of WRN results in Werner syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder, which causes premature aging accompanied by many complications such as rare forms of cancer and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms of these complications, arising due to the loss of WRN, are poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated the function of WRN in transcriptional regulation of NF-κB targets. WRN physically interacts via its RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain with the Rel homology domain of both the RelA (p65) and the p50 subunits of NF-κB. In the steady state, WRN is recruited to HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR), a typical NF-κB-responsive promoter, as well as the p50/p50 homodimer, in an NF-κB site-dependent manner. The amount of WRN on LTR increased along with the transactivating RelA/p50 heterodimer in response to TNF-α stimulation. Further, a knockdown of WRN reduced the transactivation of LTR in exogenous RelA/p50-introduced or TNF-α-stimulated cells. Additionally, knockdown of WRN reduced TNF-α stimulation-induced activation of the endogenous promoter of IL-8, an NF-κB-responsive gene, and WRN increased its association with the IL-8 promoter region together with RelA/p50 after TNF-α stimulation. In conjunction with studies that have shown NF-κB to be a key regulator of aging and inflammation, our results indicate a novel role of WRN in transcriptional regulation. Along with NF-κB, the loss of WRN is expected to result in incorrect regulation of downstream targets and leads to immune abnormalities and homeostatic disruption. PMID:26037922

  15. The Werner syndrome protein limits the error-prone 8-oxo-dG lesion bypass activity of human DNA polymerase kappa

    PubMed Central

    Maddukuri, Leena; Ketkar, Amit; Eddy, Sarah; Zafar, Maroof K.; Eoff, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase kappa (hpol κ) is the only Y-family member to preferentially insert dAMP opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) during translesion DNA synthesis. We have studied the mechanism of action by which hpol κ activity is modulated by the Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase known to influence repair of 8-oxo-dG. Here we show that WRN stimulates the 8-oxo-dG bypass activity of hpol κ in vitro by enhancing the correct base insertion opposite the lesion, as well as extension from dC:8-oxo-dG base pairs. Steady-state kinetic analysis reveals that WRN improves hpol κ-catalyzed dCMP insertion opposite 8-oxo-dG ∼10-fold and extension from dC:8-oxo-dG by 2.4-fold. Stimulation is primarily due to an increase in the rate constant for polymerization (kpol), as assessed by pre-steady-state kinetics, and it requires the RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain. In support of the functional data, recombinant WRN and hpol κ were found to physically interact through the exo and RQC domains of WRN, and co-localization of WRN and hpol κ was observed in human cells treated with hydrogen peroxide. Thus, WRN limits the error-prone bypass of 8-oxo-dG by hpol κ, which could influence the sensitivity to oxidative damage that has previously been observed for Werner's syndrome cells. PMID:25294835

  16. NASA DC-8 Ground Support Technicians Mark Corlew and Mike Lakowski perform routine maintenance on the aircraft in Punta Arenas, Chile

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-17

    NASA DC-8 Ground Support Technicians Mark Corlew and Mike Lakowski perform routine maintenance on the aircraft at Carlos Ibanez del Campo International Airport in Punta Arenas, Chile. AirSAR 2004 is a three-week expedition by an international team of scientists that is using an all-weather imaging tool, called the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AirSAR) which is located onboard NASA's DC-8 airborne laboratory. Scientists from many parts of the world including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are combining ground research done in several areas in Central and South America with NASA's AirSAR technology to improve and expand on the quality of research they are able to conduct. In South America and Antarctica, AirSAR will collect imagery and data to help determine the contribution of Southern Hemisphere glaciers to sea level rise due to climate change. In Patagonia, researchers found this contribution had more than doubled from 1995 to 2000, compared to the previous 25 years. AirSAR data will make it possible to determine whether that trend is decreasing, continuing or accelerating. AirSAR will also provide reliable information on ice shelf thickness to measure the contribution of the glaciers to sea level.

  17. DC-8 Quality Inspector Scott Silver signs documents while Acting Crew Chief Mike Bereda looks on prior to a DC-8 AirSAR flight in Costa Rica

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-06

    DC-8 Quality Inspector Scott Silver signs documents while Acting Crew Chief Mike Bereda looks on prior to a DC-8 AirSAR flight in Costa Rica. AirSAR 2004 Mesoamerica is a three-week expedition by an international team of scientists that uses an all-weather imaging tool, called the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AirSAR) which is located onboard NASA's DC-8 airborne laboratory. Scientists from many parts of the world including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are combining ground research done in several areas in Central America with NASA's AirSAR technology to improve and expand on the quality of research they are able to conduct. The radar, developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, can penetrate clouds and also collect data at night. Its high-resolution sensors operate at multiple wavelengths and modes, allowing AirSAR to see beneath treetops, through thin sand, and dry snow pack. AirSAR's 2004 campaign is a collaboration of many U.S. and Central American institutions and scientists, including NASA; the National Science Foundation; the Smithsonian Institution; National Geographic; Conservation International; the Organization of Tropical Studies; the Central American Commission for Environment and Development; and the Inter-American Development Bank.

  18. A MAGELLAN MIKE AND SPITZER MIPS STUDY OF 1.5-1.0 M{sub sun} STARS IN SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Christine H.; Bitner, Martin A.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Pecaut, Mark; Su, Kate Y. L.; Weinberger, Alycia J.

    2011-09-10

    We obtained Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m observations of 182 nearby, Hipparcos F- and G-type common proper motion single and binary systems in the nearest OB association, Scorpius-Centaurus. We also obtained Magellan/MIKE R {approx} 50,000 visual spectra at 3500-10500 A for 181 candidate ScoCen stars in single and binary systems. Combining our MIPS observations with those of other ScoCen stars in the literature, we estimate 24 {mu}m F+G-type disk fractions of 9/27 (33% {+-} 11%), 21/67 (31% {+-} 7%), and 25/71 (35% {+-} 7%) for Upper Scorpius ({approx}10 Myr), Upper Centaurus Lupus ({approx}15 Myr), and Lower Centaurus Crux ({approx}17 Myr), respectively. We confirm previous IRAS and MIPS excess detections and present new discoveries of 41 protoplanetary and debris disk systems, with fractional infrared luminosities ranging from L{sub IR}/L{sub *} = 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -2} and grain temperatures ranging from T{sub gr} = 40-300 K. We searched for an increase in 24 {mu}m excess at an age of 15-20 Myr, consistent with the onset of debris production predicted by coagulation N-body simulations of outer planetary systems. We found such an increase around 1.5 M{sub sun} stars but discovered a decrease in the 24 {mu}m excess around 1.0 M{sub sun} stars. We additionally discovered that the 24 {mu}m excess around 1.0 M{sub sun} stars is larger than predicted by self-stirred models. Finally, we found a weak anti-correlation between fractional infrared luminosity (L{sub IR}/L{sub *}) and chromospheric activity (R'{sub HK}), that may be the result of differences in stellar properties, such as mass, luminosity, and/or winds.

  19. Simulation of flow processes in a large scale karst system with an integrated catchment model (Mike She) - Identification of relevant parameters influencing spring discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doummar, Joanna; Sauter, Martin; Geyer, Tobias

    2012-03-01

    SummaryIn a complex environment such as karst systems, it is difficult to assess the relative contribution of the different components of the system to the hydrological system response, i.e. spring discharge. Not only is the saturated zone highly heterogeneous due to the presence of highly permeable conduits, but also the recharge processes. The latter are composed of rapid recharge components through shafts and solution channels and diffuse matrix infiltration, generating a highly complex, spatially and temporally variable input signal. The presented study reveals the importance of the compartments vegetation, soils, saturated zone and unsaturated zone. Therefore, the entire water cycle in the catchment area Gallusquelle spring (Southwest Germany) is modelled over a period of 10 years using the integrated hydrological modelling system Mike She by DHI (2007). Sensitivity analyses show that a few individual parameters, varied within physically plausible ranges, play an important role in reshaping the recessions and peaks of the recharge functions and consequently the spring discharge. Vegetation parameters especially the Leaf Area Index (LAI) and the root depth as well as empirical parameters in the relationship of Kristensen and Jensen highly influence evapotranspiration, transpiration to evaporation ratios and recharge respectively. In the unsaturated zone, the type of the soil (mainly the hydraulic conductivity at saturation in the water retention and hydraulic retention curves) has an effect on the infiltration/evapotranspiration and recharge functions. Additionally in the unsaturated karst, the saturated moisture content is considered as a highly indicative parameter as it significantly affects the peaks and recessions of the recharge curve. At the level of the saturated zone the hydraulic conductivity of the matrix and highly conductive zone representing the conduit are dominant parameters influencing the spring response. Other intermediate significant

  20. Niels Bohr's discussions with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schrödinger: The origins of the principles of uncertainty and complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehra, Jagdish

    1987-05-01

    In this paper, the main outlines of the discussions between Niels Bohr with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schrödinger during 1920 1927 are treated. From the formulation of quantum mechanics in 1925 1926 and wave mechanics in 1926, there emerged Born's statistical interpretation of the wave function in summer 1926, and on the basis of the quantum mechanical transformation theory—formulated in fall 1926 by Dirac, London, and Jordan—Heisenberg formulated the uncertainty principle in early 1927. At the Volta Conference in Como in September 1927 and at the fifth Solvay Conference in Brussels the following month, Bohr publicly enunciated his complementarity principle, which had been developing in his mind for several years. The Bohr-Einstein discussions about the consistency and completeness of qnautum mechanics and of physical theory as such—formally begun in October 1927 at the fifth Solvay Conference and carried on at the sixth Solvay Conference in October 1930—were continued during the next decades. All these aspects are briefly summarized.

  1. Detection by Epitope-defined Monoclonal Antibodies of Werner DNA Helicases in the Nucleoplasm and Their Upregulation by Cell Transformation and Immortalization

    PubMed Central

    Shiratori, Miwa; Sakamoto, Sakae; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Tokutake, Yoshiki; Kawabe, Yoichi; Enomoto, Takemi; Sugimoto, Masanobu; Goto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Furuichi, Yasuhiro

    1999-01-01

    We prepared several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for the NH2- and COOH-terminal regions of the DNA helicase (WRN helicase) responsible for Werner's syndrome known as a premature aging disease. With these antibodies, we detected by immunoblot analysis the endogenous WRN helicase of a relative mass of 180 kD in several lines of cultured cells, but not in patient cells with a defined mutation. Immunocytochemical staining of proliferating fibroblasts and tumor cells showed that the major part of WRN helicase is in the nucleoplasm and not in the nucleolus. Similar experiments with a rat mAb specific to the mouse homologue of human WRN helicase yielded an identical conclusion. Although this nucleoplasmic staining was evident in cells in interphase, the condensed chromatin structure in metaphase was not stained by the same mAbs, suggesting that WRN helicases exist perhaps in a soluble form or bound to the unfolded chromatin structure. From quantitative immunoblot analysis, higher levels of WRN helicase were observed in all transformed cells and tumor cells examined than those of normal cells. The expression of WRN helicase was enhanced consistently in fibroblasts and B-lymphoblastoid cells by transformation with SV-40 and Epstein-Barr virus, respectively, suggesting that rapidly proliferating cells require a high copy numbers of WRN helicase. PMID:9885239

  2. Coronary artery disease in a Werner syndrome-like form of progeria characterized by low levels of progerin, a splice variant of lamin A.

    PubMed

    Hisama, Fuki M; Lessel, Davor; Leistritz, Dru; Friedrich, Katrin; McBride, Kim L; Pastore, Matthew T; Gottesman, Gary S; Saha, Bidisha; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2011-12-01

    Classical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by LMNA mutations that generate an alternatively spliced form of lamin A, termed progerin. HGPS patients present in early childhood with atherosclerosis and striking features of accelerated aging. We report on two pedigrees of adult-onset coronary artery disease with progeroid features, who were referred to our International Registry of Werner Syndrome (WS) because of clinical features consistent with the diagnosis. No mutations were identified in the WRN gene that is responsible for WS, among these patients. Instead, we found two novel heterozygous mutations at the junction of exon 10 and intron 11 of the LMNA gene. These mutations resulted in the production of progerin at a level substantially lower than that of HGPS. Our findings indicate that LMNA mutations may result in coronary artery disease presenting in the fourth to sixth decades along with short stature and a progeroid appearance resembling WS. The absence of early-onset cataracts in this setting should suggest the diagnosis of progeroid laminopathy. This study illustrates the evolving genotype-phenotype relationship between the amount of progerin produced and the age of onset among the spectrum of restrictive dermopathy, HGPS, and atypical forms of WS.

  3. Association of the rs1346044 Polymorphism of the Werner Syndrome Gene RECQL2 with Increased Risk and Premature Onset of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zins, Karin; Frech, Barbara; Taubenschuss, Eva; Schneeberger, Christian; Abraham, Dietmar; Schreiber, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Like other RECQ helicases, WRN/RECQL2 plays a crucial role in DNA replication and the maintenance of genome stability. Inactivating mutations in RECQL2 lead to Werner syndrome, a rare autosomal disease associated with premature aging and an increased susceptibility to multiple cancer types. We analyzed the association of two coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms in WRN, Cys1367Arg (rs1346044), and Arg834Cys (rs3087425), with the risk, age at onset, and clinical subclasses of breast cancer in a hospital-based case-control study of an Austrian population of 272 breast cancer patients and 254 controls. Here we report that the rare homozygous CC genotype of rs1346044 was associated with an approximately two-fold elevated breast cancer risk. Moreover, patients with the CC genotype exhibited a significantly increased risk of developing breast cancer under the age of 55 in both recessive and log-additive genetic models. CC patients developed breast cancer at a mean age of 55.2 ± 13.3 years and TT patients at 60.2 ± 14.7 years. Consistently, the risk of breast cancer was increased in pre-menopausal patients in the recessive model. These findings suggest that the CC genotype of WRN rs1346044 may contribute to an increased risk and a premature onset of breast cancer. PMID:26690424

  4. Improved Laboratory Values of the H{sub 2} Lyman and Werner Lines for Constraining Time Variation of the Proton-to-Electron Mass Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Salumbides, E. J.; Khramov, A.; Wolf, A. L.; Eikema, K. S. E.; Ubachs, W.; Bailly, D.; Vervloet, M.

    2008-11-28

    Two distinct high-accuracy laboratory spectroscopic investigations of the H{sub 2} molecule are reported. Anchor lines in the EF{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}-X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} system are calibrated by two-photon deep-UV Doppler-free spectroscopy, while independent Fourier-transform spectroscopic measurements are performed that yield accurate spacings in the B{sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}-EF{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} and I{sup 1}{pi}{sub g}-C{sup 1}{pi}{sub u} systems. From combination differences accurate transition wavelengths for the B-X Lyman and the C-X Werner lines can be determined with accuracies better than {approx}5x10{sup -9}, representing a major improvement over existing values. This metrology provides a practically exact database to extract a possible variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio based on H{sub 2} lines in high-redshift objects. Moreover, it forms a rationale for equipping a future class of telescopes, carrying 30-40 m dishes, with novel spectrometers of higher resolving powers.

  5. A missense single nucleotide polymorphism, V114I of the Werner syndrome gene, is associated with risk of osteoporosis and femoral fracture in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heying; Mori, Seijiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sawabe, Motoji; Arai, Tomio; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Mieno, Makiko Naka; Shinkai, Shoji; Yamada, Yoshiji; Miyachi, Motohiko; Murakami, Haruka; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Ito, Hideki

    2015-11-01

    Werner syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the human WRN gene and characterized by the early onset of normal aging symptoms. Given that patients with this disease exhibit osteoporosis, the present study aimed to determine whether the WRN gene contributes to the etiology of osteoporosis. A genetic association study of eight non-synonymous polymorphisms in the WRN gene and the incidence of femoral fracture was undertaken in 1,632 consecutive Japanese autopsies in which 140 patients had experienced the fracture during their lifetime. The results were validated in 251 unrelated postmenopausal Japanese women with osteoporosis and 269 non-institutionalized, community-dwelling Japanese adults. A statistically significant association was observed between rs2230009 (c.340G > A)--which results in a Val to Ile substitution--and fracture risk; the incidence of femoral fracture increased dose-dependently with the number of A alleles (p = 0.0120). Femoral neck bone and whole bone densities were lower among postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and community-dwelling adults, respectively, if they were of the AG instead of the GG genotype. The results suggest that Japanese subjects bearing at least one A allele of rs2230009 of the WRN gene are at a significantly higher risk of femoral fracture, possibly due to decreased bone density.

  6. A novel ZRS mutation leads to preaxial polydactyly type 2 in a heterozygous form and Werner mesomelic syndrome in a homozygous form.

    PubMed

    VanderMeer, Julia E; Lozano, Reymundo; Sun, Miao; Xue, Yuan; Daentl, Donna; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Wilcox, William R; Ahituv, Nadav

    2014-08-01

    Point mutations in the zone of polarizing activity regulatory sequence (ZRS) are known to cause human limb malformations. Although most mutations cause preaxial polydactyly (PPD), triphalangeal thumb (TPT) or both, a mutation in position 404 of the ZRS causes more severe Werner mesomelic syndrome (WMS) for which malformations include the distal arm or leg bones in addition to the hands and/or feet. Of more than 15 reported families with ZRS mutations, only one homozygous individual has been reported, with no change in phenotype compared with heterozygotes. Here, we describe a novel point mutation in the ZRS, 402C>T (AC007097.4:g.105548C>T), that is transmitted through two Mexican families with one homozygous individual. The homozygous phenotype for this mutation, WMS, is more severe than the numerous heterozygous individuals genotyped from both families who have TPT and PPD. A mouse transgenic enhancer assay shows that this mutation causes an expansion of the enhancer's expression domain in the developing mouse limb, confirming its pathogenicity. Combined, our results identify a novel ZRS mutation in the Mexican population, 402C>T, and suggest that a dosage effect exists for this ZRS mutation.

  7. Werner's syndrome protein is phosphorylated in an ATR/ATM-dependent manner following replication arrest and DNA damage induced during the S phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Pichierri, Pietro; Rosselli, Filippo; Franchitto, Annapaola

    2003-03-13

    Werner's syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized at the cellular level by genomic instability in the form of variegated translocation mosaicism and extensive deletions. Individuals with WS prematurely develop multiple age-related pathologies and exhibit increased incidence of cancer. WRN, the gene defective in WS, encodes a 160-kDa protein (WRN), which has 3'-5'exonuclease, DNA helicase and DNA-dependent ATPase activities. WRN-defective cells are hypersensitive to certain genotoxic agents that cause replication arrest and/or double-strand breaks at the replication fork, suggesting a pivotal role for WRN in the protection of the integrity of the genoma during the DNA replication process. Here, we show that WRN is phosphorylated through an ATR/ATM dependent pathway in response to replication blockage. However, we provide evidence that WRN phosphorylation is not essential for its subnuclear relocalization after replication arrest. Finally, we show that WRN and ATR colocalize after replication fork arrest, suggesting that WRN and the ATR kinase collaborate to prevent genome instability during the S phase.

  8. Toward localization of the Werner syndrome gene by linkage disequilibrium and ancestral haplotyping: Lessons learned from analysis of 35 chromosome 8p11.1-21.1 markers

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, K.A.B.; Wijsman, E.M.; Martin, G.M.

    1996-06-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature onset of a number of age-related diseases. The gene for WS, WRN, has been mapped to the 8p11.1-21.1 region with further localization through linkage disequilibrium mapping. Here we present the results of linkage disequilibrium and ancestral haplotype analyses of 35 markers to further refine the location of WRN. We identified an interval in this region in which 14 of 18 markers tested show significant evidence of linkage disequilibrium in at least one of the two populations tested. Analysis of extended and partial haplotypes covering 21 of the markers studied supports the existence of both obligate and probable ancestral recombinant events which localize WRN almost certainly to the interval between DSS2196 and D8S2186, and most likely to the narrower interval between D8S2168 and D8S2186. These haplotype analyses also suggest that there are multiple WRN mutations in each of the two populations under study. We also present a comparison of approaches to performing disequilibrium tests with multiallelic markers, and show that some commonly used approximations for such tests perform poorly in comparison to exact probability tests. Finally, we discuss some of the difficulties introduced by the high mutation rate at microsatellite markers which influence our ability to use ancestral haplotype analysis to localize disease genes. 51 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Serines 440 and 467 in the Werner syndrome protein are phosphorylated by DNA-PK and affects its dynamics in response to DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto-Matsuo, Rika; Ghosh, Deblina; Karmakar, Parimal; May, Alfred; Ramsden, Dale; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2014-01-01

    WRN protein, defective in Werner syndrome (WS), a human segmental progeria, is a target of serine/threonine kinases involved in sensing DNA damage. DNA-PK phosphorylates WRN in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the main phosphorylation sites and functional importance of the phosphorylation of WRN has remained unclear. Here, we identify Ser-440 and −467 in WRN as major phosphorylation sites mediated by DNA-PK. In vitro, DNA-PK fails to phosphorylate a GST-WRN fragment with S440A and/or S467A substitution. In addition, full length WRN with the mutation expressed in 293T cells was not phosphorylated in response to DSBs produced by bleomycin. Accumulation of the mutant WRN at the site of laser-induced DSBs occurred with the same kinetics as wild type WRN in live HeLa cells. While the wild type WRN relocalized to the nucleoli after 24 hours recovery from etoposide-induced DSBs, the mutant WRN remained mostly in the nucleoplasm. Consistent with this, WS cells expressing the mutants exhibited less DNA repair efficiency and more sensitivity to etoposide, compared to those expressing wild type. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation of Ser-440 and −467 in WRN are important for relocalization of WRN to nucleoli, and that it is required for efficient DSB repair. PMID:24429382

  10. Coronary Artery Disease in a Werner Syndrome-Like Form of Progeria Characterized by Low Levels of Progerin, a Splice Variant of Lamin A

    PubMed Central

    Hisama, Fuki M.; Lessel, Davor; Leistritz, Dru; Friedrich, Katrin; McBride, Kim L.; Pastore, Matthew T.; Gottesman, Gary S.; Saha, Bidisha; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Classical Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by LMNA mutations that generate an alternatively spliced form of lamin A, termed progerin. HGPS patients present in early childhood with atherosclerosis and striking features of accelerated aging. We report on two pedigrees of adult-onset coronary artery disease with progeroid features, who were referred to our International Registry of Werner Syndrome (WS) because of clinical features consistent with the diagnosis. No mutations were identified in the WRN gene that is responsible for WS, among these patients. Instead, we found two novel heterozygous mutations at the junction of exon 10 and intron 11 of the LMNA gene. These mutations resulted in the production of progerin at a level substantially lower than that of HGPS. Our findings indicate that LMNA mutations may result in coronary artery disease presenting in the fourth to sixth decades along with short stature and a progeroid appearance resembling WS. The absence of early-onset cataracts in this setting should suggest the diagnosis of progeroid laminopathy. This study illustrates the evolving genotype–phenotype relationship between the amount of progerin produced and the age of onset among the spectrum of restrictive dermopathy, HGPS, and atypical forms of WS. PMID:22065502

  11. [Werner Leibbrand, Annemarie Wettley and controversies on "euthanasia" the background of medico-historical and ethical debates in the Post World War II era].

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, Christine; Frewer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatrists and medical historians Werner Leibbrand (1896 - 1974) and Annemarie Wettley (1913 - 1996) are amongst the most striking figures in the field of history of medicine. Leibbrand was appointed director of the "Heil- und Pflegeanstalt" in Erlangen shortly after the war. Fuelled by his own experiences of suppression and persecution during the Nazi era he promised to unearth the crimes and atrocities which had happened under watch of the Nazi regime. He was joined by Annemarie Wettley, who worked as a physician at the hospital and had developed an increasing interest in the history of medicine. In 1946 they published "Um die Menschenrechte der Geisteskranken" ("Human Rights of the Mentally Ill") about the "euthanasia" campaign of the Nazi regime. Although a number of substantial works followed, Leibbrand and Wettley failed to inform in more depth on crimes and atrocities, for instance killings of patients and forced malnutrition. Doubts and charges against Wettley regarding her role in dietary programmes at the Erlangen hospital and against Leibbrand regarding special expert's reports--both had a short-term arrest warrant--might have contributed to stagnation in their efforts. In 1953 Leibbrand accepted the offer of a chair at the University in Munich, Wettley followed and habilitated in history of medicine; in the year 1962 they married. Contacts and exchange amongst medico-historical experts shed light on developments during the post-war era; still, a critical and fundamental review of the crimes within the medical system of the Nazi regime did not take place during this time.

  12. Cobalt(III) Werner Complexes with 1,2-Diphenylethylenediamine Ligands: Readily Available, Inexpensive, and Modular Chiral Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts for Enantioselective Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kyle G; Ghosh, Subrata K; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai; Gladysz, John A

    2015-03-25

    In the quest for new catalysts that can deliver single enantiomer pharmaceuticals and agricultural chemicals, chemists have extensively mined the "chiral pool", with little in the way of inexpensive, readily available building blocks now remaining. It is found that Werner complexes based upon the D3 symmetric chiral trication [Co(en)3](3+) (en = 1,2-ethylenediamine), which features an earth abundant metal and cheap ligand type, and was among the first inorganic compounds resolved into enantiomers 103 years ago, catalyze a valuable carbon-carbon bond forming reaction, the Michael addition of malonate esters to nitroalkenes, in high enantioselectivities and without requiring inert atmosphere conditions. The title catalysts, [Co((S,S)-dpen)3](3+) ((S,S)-3 (3+)) 3X(-), employ a commercially available chiral ligand, (S,S)-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine. The rates and ee values are functions of the configuration of the cobalt center (Λ/Δ) and the counteranions, which must be lipophilic to solubilize the trication in nonaqueous media. The highest enantioselectivities are obtained with Λ and 2Cl(-)BArf (-), 2BF4 (-)BArf (-), or 3BF4 (-) salts (BArf (-) = B(3,5-C6H3(CF3)2)4 (-)). The substrates are not activated by metal coordination, but rather by second coordination sphere hydrogen bonding involving the ligating NH2 groups. Crystal structures and NMR data indicate enthalpically stronger interactions with the NH moieties related by the C3 symmetry axis, as opposed to those related by the C2 symmetry axes; rate trends and other observations suggest this to be the catalytically active site. Both Λ- and Δ-(S,S)-3 (3+) 2Cl(-)BArf (-) are effective catalysts for additions of β-ketoesters to RO2CN=NCO2R species (99-86% yields, 81-76% ee), which provide carbon-nitrogen bonds and valuable precursors to α-amino acids.

  13. Cobalt(III) Werner Complexes with 1,2-Diphenylethylenediamine Ligands: Readily Available, Inexpensive, and Modular Chiral Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts for Enantioselective Organic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the quest for new catalysts that can deliver single enantiomer pharmaceuticals and agricultural chemicals, chemists have extensively mined the “chiral pool”, with little in the way of inexpensive, readily available building blocks now remaining. It is found that Werner complexes based upon the D3 symmetric chiral trication [Co(en)3]3+ (en = 1,2-ethylenediamine), which features an earth abundant metal and cheap ligand type, and was among the first inorganic compounds resolved into enantiomers 103 years ago, catalyze a valuable carbon–carbon bond forming reaction, the Michael addition of malonate esters to nitroalkenes, in high enantioselectivities and without requiring inert atmosphere conditions. The title catalysts, [Co((S,S)-dpen)3]3+ ((S,S)-33+) 3X–, employ a commercially available chiral ligand, (S,S)-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine. The rates and ee values are functions of the configuration of the cobalt center (Λ/Δ) and the counteranions, which must be lipophilic to solubilize the trication in nonaqueous media. The highest enantioselectivities are obtained with Λ and 2Cl–BArf–, 2BF4–BArf–, or 3BF4– salts (BArf– = B(3,5-C6H3(CF3)2)4–). The substrates are not activated by metal coordination, but rather by second coordination sphere hydrogen bonding involving the ligating NH2 groups. Crystal structures and NMR data indicate enthalpically stronger interactions with the NH moieties related by the C3 symmetry axis, as opposed to those related by the C2 symmetry axes; rate trends and other observations suggest this to be the catalytically active site. Both Λ- and Δ-(S,S)-33+ 2Cl–BArf– are effective catalysts for additions of β-ketoesters to RO2CN=NCO2R species (99–86% yields, 81–76% ee), which provide carbon–nitrogen bonds and valuable precursors to α-amino acids. PMID:27162946

  14. Residues in the RecQ C-terminal Domain of the Human Werner Syndrome Helicase Are Involved in Unwinding G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Ketkar, Amit; Voehler, Markus; Mukiza, Tresor; Eoff, Robert L

    2017-02-24

    The structural and biophysical properties typically associated with G-quadruplex (G4) structures render them a significant block for DNA replication, which must be overcome for cell division to occur. The Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is a RecQ family helicase that has been implicated in the efficient processing of G4 DNA structures. The aim of this study was to identify the residues of WRN involved in the binding and ATPase-driven unwinding of G4 DNA. Using a c-Myc G4 DNA model sequence and recombinant WRN, we have determined that the RecQ-C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN imparts a 2-fold preference for binding to G4 DNA relative to non-G4 DNA substrates. NMR studies identified residues involved specifically in interactions with G4 DNA. Three of the amino acids in the WRN RQC domain that exhibited the largest G4-specific changes in NMR signal were then mutated alone or in combination. Mutating individual residues implicated in G4 binding had a modest effect on WRN binding to DNA, decreasing the preference for G4 substrates by ∼25%. Mutating two G4-interacting residues (T1024G and T1086G) abrogated preferential binding of WRN to G4 DNA. Very modest decreases in G4 DNA-stimulated ATPase activity were observed for the mutant enzymes. Most strikingly, G4 unwinding by WRN was inhibited ∼50% for all three point mutants and >90% for the WRN double mutant (T1024G/T1086G) relative to normal B-form dsDNA substrates. Our work has helped to identify residues in the WRN RQC domain that are involved specifically in the interaction with G4 DNA.

  15. Expression profiling of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with a deletion in the helicase domain of the Werner Syndrome gene homologue treated with hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Werner Syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder characterized by the premature onset of a number of age-related diseases. The gene responsible for WS encodes a DNA helicase/exonuclease protein believed to affect different aspects of transcription, replication, and/or DNA repair. In addition to genomic instability, human WS cells exhibit oxidative stress. In this report, we have examined the impact of exogenous hydrogen peroxide on the expression profile of mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN homologue (here referred to as WrnΔhel/Δhel). Results WrnΔhel/Δhel mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit increased oxidative stress. This was reflected by increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased oxidative damage in genomic DNA, changes in ATP/ADP ratios, and a disruption of the inner mitochondrial transmembrane potential when compared to wild type mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Expression profile analyses of hydrogen peroxide-treated wild type cells have indicated significant decreases in the expression of genes involved in mitosis, glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, and cell cycle control, as well as protein modification and stability. Such decreases in these biological processes were not observed in hydrogen peroxide-treated WrnΔhel/Δhel cells. Importantly, untreated WrnΔhel/Δhel cells already exhibited down regulation of several biological processes decreased in wild type cells that had been treated with hydrogen peroxide. Conclusion Expression profiling of WrnΔhel/Δhel mutant cells revealed a very different response to exogenous addition of hydrogen peroxide in culture compared to wild type cells. This is due in part to the fact that WrnΔhel/Δhel mutant cells already exhibited a modest chronic intracellular oxidative stress. PMID:20175907

  16. ROVIBRATIONALLY RESOLVED DIRECT PHOTODISSOCIATION THROUGH THE LYMAN AND WERNER TRANSITIONS OF H{sub 2} FOR FUV/X-RAY-IRRADIATED ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, C. D.; Porter, R. L.; Stancil, P. C.; Abel, N. P.; Ferland, G. J.; Shaw, G.; Van Hoof, P. A. M.; Williams, R. J. R. E-mail: ryanlporter@gmail.com E-mail: npabel2@gmail.com E-mail: gargishaw@gmail.com E-mail: robin.williams@awe.co.uk

    2012-02-10

    Using ab initio potential curves and dipole transition moments, cross-section calculations were performed for the direct continuum photodissociation of H{sub 2} through the B{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u} <- X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g} (Lyman) and C{sup 1}{Pi}{sub u} <- X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g} (Werner) transitions. Partial cross-sections were obtained for wavelengths from 100 A to the dissociation threshold between the upper electronic state and each of the 301 bound rovibrational levels v''J'' within the ground electronic state. The resulting cross-sections are incorporated into three representative classes of interstellar gas models: diffuse clouds, photon-dominated regions, and X-ray-dominated regions (XDRs). The models, which used the CLOUDY plasma/molecular spectra simulation code, demonstrate that direct photodissociation is comparable to fluorescent dissociation (or spontaneous radiative dissociation, the Solomon process) as an H{sub 2} destruction mechanism in intense far-ultraviolet or X-ray-irradiated gas. In particular, changes in H{sub 2} rotational column densities are found to be as large as 20% in the XDR model with the inclusion of direct photodissociation. The photodestruction rate from some high-lying rovibrational levels can be enhanced by pumping from H Ly{beta} due to a wavelength coincidence with cross-section resonances resulting from quasi-bound levels of the upper electronic states. Given the relatively large size of the photodissociation data set, a strategy is described to create truncated, but reliable, cross-section data consistent with the wavelength resolving power of typical observations.

  17. Entanglement teleportation via werner states

    PubMed

    Lee; Kim

    2000-05-01

    Transfer of entanglement and information is studied for quantum teleportation of an unknown entangled state through noisy quantum channels. We find that the quantum entanglement of the unknown state can be lost during the teleportation even when the channel is quantum correlated. We introduce a fundamental parameter of correlation information which dissipates linearly during the teleportation through the noisy channel. Analyzing the transfer of correlation information, we show that the purity of the initial state is important in determining the entanglement of the replica state.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach throws out the first pitch at a local baseball game at Manatees Stadium. KSC employees were hosted by the Brevard Manatees, a minor league baseball team in Central Florida. Before the game, attendees offered a moment of silence to honor the STS-107 crew and two recovery workers who died in a helicopter crash.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach throws out the first pitch at a local baseball game at Manatees Stadium. KSC employees were hosted by the Brevard Manatees, a minor league baseball team in Central Florida. Before the game, attendees offered a moment of silence to honor the STS-107 crew and two recovery workers who died in a helicopter crash.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (second from left) accompanies Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (fourth from left) and others visiting the Columbia Debris Hangar. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (second from left) accompanies Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (fourth from left) and others visiting the Columbia Debris Hangar. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (left) accompanies Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (third from left) and others visiting the Columbia Debris Hangar. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (left) accompanies Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (third from left) and others visiting the Columbia Debris Hangar. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (right) explains recovery and reconstruction efforts of Columbia to the Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (second from left) and others visiting the Columbia Debris Hangar. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (right) explains recovery and reconstruction efforts of Columbia to the Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (second from left) and others visiting the Columbia Debris Hangar. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At right, Mike Young and Les Hanks, with United Space Alliance, prepare a window on Atlantis for removal. The windows are being removed to inspect them for contaminants in the thermal seal. Atlantis has been undergoing routine maintenance in the Orbiter Processing Facility for Return to Flight, on mission STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-23

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At right, Mike Young and Les Hanks, with United Space Alliance, prepare a window on Atlantis for removal. The windows are being removed to inspect them for contaminants in the thermal seal. Atlantis has been undergoing routine maintenance in the Orbiter Processing Facility for Return to Flight, on mission STS-114.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto, with Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., works on an experiment found during the search for Columbia debris. Mike Casasanto, also with ITA, looks on. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-06

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto, with Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., works on an experiment found during the search for Columbia debris. Mike Casasanto, also with ITA, looks on. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

  4. [Two traditions in the scientific learning of the world. A case study of creation and reception of quantum mechanics over the period 1925-1927, on the bases of discussion between Werner Heisenberg and Albert Einstein].

    PubMed

    Krajniak, Wiktor

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is the analyses of discussion between Albert Einstein and Werner Heisenberg in the period 1925-1927. Their disputes, relating to the sources of scientific knowledge, its methods and the value of knowledge acquired in this way, are part of the characteristic for the European science discourse between rationalism and empirism. On the basis of some sources and literature on the subject, the epistemological positions of both scholars in the period were reconstructed. This episode, yet poorly known, is a unique example of scientific disputes, whose range covers a broad spectrum of methodological problems associated with the historical development of science. The conducted analysis sheds some light on the source of popularity of logical empirism in the first half of the 20th century. A particular emphasis is placed on the impact of the neopositivist ideas which reflect Heisenberg's research program, being the starting point for the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. The main assumption of logical empirism, concerning acquisition of scientific knowledge only by means of empirical procedures and logical analysis of the language of science, in view of the voiced by Einstein arguments, bears little relationship with actual testing practices in the historical aspect of the development of science. The criticism of Heisenberg's program, carried out by Einstein, provided arguments for the main critics of the neopositivist ideal and contributed to the bankruptcy of the idea of logical empirism, thereby starting a period of critical rationalism prosperity, arising from criticism of neopositivism and alluding to Einstein's ideas.

  5. Down regulation of miR-124 in both Werner syndrome DNA helicase mutant mice and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans wrn-1 reveals the importance of this microRNA in accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Alexandra; Garand, Chantal; Paquel, Eric R; Mitchell, Sarah J; de Cabo, Rafael; Simard, Martin J; Lebel, Michel

    2012-09-01

    Small non-coding microRNAs are believed to be involved in the mechanism of aging but nothing is known on the impact of microRNAs in the progeroid disorder Werner syndrome (WS). WS is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-like DNA helicase. Mice lacking the helicase domain of the WRN ortholog exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including a pro-oxidant status and a shorter mean life span.Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) with a nonfunctional wrn-1 DNA helicase also exhibit a shorter life span. Thus, both models are relevant to study the expression of microRNAs involved in WS. In this study, we show that miR-124 expression is lost in the liver of Wrn helicase mutant mice. Interestingly, the expression of this conserved miR-124 in whole wrn-1 mutant worms is also significantly reduced. The loss of mir-124 in C. elegans increases reactive oxygen species formation and accumulation of the aging marker lipofuscin, reduces whole body ATP levels and results in a reduction in life span. Finally, supplementation of vitamin C normalizes the median life span of wrn-1 and mir-124 mutant worms. These results suggest that biological pathways involving WRN and miR-124 are conserved in the aging process across different species.

  6. Down regulation of miR-124 in both Werner syndrome DNA helicase mutant mice and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans wrn-1 reveals the importance of this microRNA in accelerated aging

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Alexandra; Garand, Chantal; Paquet, Eric R.; Mitchell, Sarah J.; de Cabo, Rafael; Simard, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Small non-coding microRNAs are believed to be involved in the mechanism of aging but nothing is known on the impact of microRNAs in the progeroid disorder Werner syndrome (WS). WS is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-like DNA helicase. Mice lacking the helicase domain of the WRN ortholog exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including a pro-oxidant status and a shorter mean life span. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) with a nonfunctional wrn-1 DNA helicase also exhibit a shorter life span. Thus, both models are relevant to study the expression of microRNAs involved in WS. In this study, we show that miR-124 expression is lost in the liver of Wrn helicase mutant mice. Interestingly, the expression of this conserved miR-124 in whole wrn-1 mutant worms is also significantly reduced. The loss of mir-124 in C. elegans increases reactive oxygen species formation and accumulation of the aging marker lipofuscin, reduces whole body ATP levels and results in a reduction in life span. Finally, supplementation of vitamin C normalizes the median life span of wrn-1 and mir-124 mutant worms. These results suggest that biological pathways involving WRN and miR-124 are conserved in the aging process across different species. PMID:23075628

  7. Congressman Mike Oxley talks about Superfund reform

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, C.

    1995-10-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is currently undergoing an extensive review in both the US House of Representatives and Senate. Congress is under some time pressure in its work, as the program`s taxing authority expires at the end of this year. During the last Congress, a coalition of environmentalists, industry members, and others supported reform legislation. However, the 103rd Congress and the coalition`s efforts ultimately failed for various reasons, including Congressional opposition at that time to including a broad risk assessment measure with the Superfund bill. With the November 1994 election, a Republic majority took over both the House and the Senate, and with it came changes; among the changes were new congressional Committee chairmen. National Ground Water Association staff recently spoke with Congressman Michael G. Oxley (R-OH), the new chairman of the House Commerce, Trade, and Hazardous Materials Subcommittee. This House Subcommittee is responsible for Superfund reauthorization issues. Congressman Oxley will play a key role in any Superfund legislation that is drafted and may eventually pass in the 104th Congress.

  8. Kongsfjorden-MIKE 3D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przyborska, Anna; Kosecki, Szymon; Jakacki, Jaromir

    2014-05-01

    Kongsfjorden is a West Svalbard fjord with a surface area of about 210 km2. It is obvious that the depths of the outer and central basins are influenced by the open sea, under influence of West Spitsbergen Current (WSC), which curry out warm Atlantic water and cold East Spitsbergen Current, while the shallower, inner basin has a large glacial outflow and its maximum depths do not exceed 100 m. Freshwater stored in Spitsbergen glaciers have strong influence on local hydrology and physical fjord conditions. Both, local and shelf conditions have impact on state of the fjord. External forces like tides, velocities at the boundary and atmospheric forces together with sources of cold and dens fresh water in the fjords will give reliable representation of physical conditions in Kongsfjorden. Modeling could help to solve this problem and we have hope that we find answer which one is the most important for local conditions in fjord. Calculations of balances between cold fresh water and warm and salt will provide additional information that could help to answer the main question of the GAME (Growing of the Arctic Marine Ecosystem) project - what is the reaction of physically controlled Arctic marine ecosystem to temperature rise.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach points to some of the debris as he explains to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach points to some of the debris as he explains to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (right) talks to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (right) talks to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a KSC visit, Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (kneeling, left) reaches out to a piece of Columbia debris in the Columbia Debris Hangar. At right is Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach, who is explaining recovery and reconstruction efforts. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a KSC visit, Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (kneeling, left) reaches out to a piece of Columbia debris in the Columbia Debris Hangar. At right is Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach, who is explaining recovery and reconstruction efforts. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The media get a guided tour of the Columbia Debris Hangar. Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach discussed activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The media get a guided tour of the Columbia Debris Hangar. Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach discussed activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Mike Hyatt, with United Space Alliance, installs a spar on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing with a series of floating joints - spars - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Mike Hyatt, with United Space Alliance, installs a spar on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing with a series of floating joints - spars - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Mike Hyatt (above) and Saul Ngy (below), with United Space Alliance, install a spar on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing with a series of floating joints - spars - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Mike Hyatt (above) and Saul Ngy (below), with United Space Alliance, install a spar on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing with a series of floating joints - spars - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mike Hyatt (left) and Saul Ngy, technicians with United Space Alliance, prepare to install a spar on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing with a series of floating joints - spars - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-22

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mike Hyatt (left) and Saul Ngy, technicians with United Space Alliance, prepare to install a spar on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing with a series of floating joints - spars - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Mike Hyatt (left) and Saul Ngy (right), with United Space Alliance, finish installing a spar on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing with a series of floating joints - spars - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Mike Hyatt (left) and Saul Ngy (right), with United Space Alliance, finish installing a spar on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing with a series of floating joints - spars - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mike Hyatt (left) and Saul Ngy, technicians with United Space Alliance, install a spar on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing with a series of floating joints - spars - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-22

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mike Hyatt (left) and Saul Ngy, technicians with United Space Alliance, install a spar on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing with a series of floating joints - spars - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Les Hanks (foreground) and Mike Young (behind him), with United Space Alliance, prepare a window on Atlantis for removal. Behind Young is Lance Emery, with USA, works on tile under the windows. The windows are being removed to inspect them for contaminants in the thermal seal. Atlantis has been undergoing routine maintenance in the Orbiter Processing Facility for Return to Flight, on mission STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-23

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Les Hanks (foreground) and Mike Young (behind him), with United Space Alliance, prepare a window on Atlantis for removal. Behind Young is Lance Emery, with USA, works on tile under the windows. The windows are being removed to inspect them for contaminants in the thermal seal. Atlantis has been undergoing routine maintenance in the Orbiter Processing Facility for Return to Flight, on mission STS-114.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach answers questions from the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG). Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (fifth from left), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach answers questions from the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG). Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (fifth from left), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Mike Rein (at left), division chief of KSC External Affairs, moderates the press conference featuring (second from left to right) U.S. Rep. Tom Feeney, Center Director Jim Kennedy and U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon. The media were interested in hearing Kennedy’s and the congressmen’s reactions to the new mission for NASA outlined by President George W. Bush Jan. 14.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Mike Rein (at left), division chief of KSC External Affairs, moderates the press conference featuring (second from left to right) U.S. Rep. Tom Feeney, Center Director Jim Kennedy and U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon. The media were interested in hearing Kennedy’s and the congressmen’s reactions to the new mission for NASA outlined by President George W. Bush Jan. 14.

  1. Federal Aviation Administration Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  2. Mike O’Callaghan Federal Medical Center Campus Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    No Action Alternative would not result in any change to the socioeconomic condition. Environmental Justice and Protection of Children. There are no...OSS (TERPS) and Airfield Management required to avoid intrusions into protected airport airspace during construction and coordination with the...changes to existing socioeconomic resources. Environmental Justice and Protection of Children  There are no residences and therefore no adverse

  3. Mike Fuller Receives 2012 John Adam Fleming Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Thank you, Chris and Subir, for nominating me for the Fleming Medal and for your very kind comments on my research. In looking back over the medalists since 1962, it is hard to believe that I could be lucky enough to join such distinguished company. Yet, I have been very lucky through life. First, I was lucky to go to Christ's Hospital and Cambridge University. Second, my Aunt Marjorie married a physicist, Johnnie Clegg, who was an excellent teacher and inspiration for me. Third, to be born in England in the mid-1930s was to be a member of a fortunate generation of scientists. Providing one safely negotiated World War II, one joined the academic world at a time of great excitement, of expansion, and support for science.

  4. Expedition 18 crew member Koichi Wakata & Mike Fincke

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-05-12

    JSC2008-E-039235 (12 May 2008) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 18 flight engineer, gives a "thumbs-up" signal as he awaits the start of a training session in the waters of the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) near NASA's Johnson Space Center. Wakata is attired in a training version of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit.

  5. STS-109 Astronaut Mike Massimino in ETA Chamber

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-12-10

    JSC2001-E-44739 (December 2001) --- Astronaut Michael J. Massimino, STS-109 mission specialist, dons a training version of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit prior to a mission training session in the Environmental Test Article (ETA) Chamber in the Crew Systems Laboratory at Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  6. The Elementary Private School Recognition Program: Mike Mulligan's View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodish, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes the goals, the selection criteria, and the selection process of the Elementary Private School Recognition Program. Includes a listing, by states, of the 60 private elementary schools selected for 1985-86 recognition. (IW)

  7. STS-86 Pilot Mike Bloomfield speaks at TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield speaks to media representatives and other onlookers during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. This will be his first spaceflight. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25.

  8. STS-97 Pilot Mike Bloomfield suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-97 Pilot Michael Bloomfield signals thumbs up for launch after donning his launch and entry suit. This is his second Shuttle flight. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. It is transporting the P6 Integrated Truss Structure that comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. The 11-day mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. The Station'''s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (center) points to some of the tiles recovered from the orbiter as he explains to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (center) points to some of the tiles recovered from the orbiter as he explains to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach points to some of the tiles recovered from the orbiter as he explains to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach points to some of the tiles recovered from the orbiter as he explains to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach talks to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. Behind him is a model of the left wing of the orbiter. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach talks to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. Behind him is a model of the left wing of the orbiter. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (left) talks to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. Behind him is a model of the left wing of the orbiter. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (left) talks to the media about activities that have taken place since the Columbia accident on Feb. 1, 2003. Behind him is a model of the left wing of the orbiter. STS-107 debris recovery and reconstruction operations are winding down. To date, nearly 84,000 pieces of debris have been recovered and sent to KSC. That represents about 38 percent of the dry weight of Columbia, equaling almost 85,000 pounds.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - While talking to the media in the RLV Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach points to the model of the leading edge of an orbiter’s left wing that is being used to reconstruct Columbia’s wing with the recovered debris. The items shipped to KSC number more than 82,000 and weigh 84,800 pounds or 38 percent of the total dry weight of Columbia. Of those items, 78,760 have been identified, with 753 placed on the left wing grid in the Hangar.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-14

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - While talking to the media in the RLV Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach points to the model of the leading edge of an orbiter’s left wing that is being used to reconstruct Columbia’s wing with the recovered debris. The items shipped to KSC number more than 82,000 and weigh 84,800 pounds or 38 percent of the total dry weight of Columbia. Of those items, 78,760 have been identified, with 753 placed on the left wing grid in the Hangar.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach, Center Director Jim Kennedy and NASA Vehicle Manager Scott Thurston unveil a plaque honoring “Columbia, the crew of STS-107, and their loved ones.” The site is the “Columbia room,” a permanent repository of the debris collected in the aftermath of the tragic accident Feb. 1, 2003, that claimed the orbiter and lives of the seven-member crew. The dedication of the plaque was made in front of the 40-member preservation team.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach, Center Director Jim Kennedy and NASA Vehicle Manager Scott Thurston unveil a plaque honoring “Columbia, the crew of STS-107, and their loved ones.” The site is the “Columbia room,” a permanent repository of the debris collected in the aftermath of the tragic accident Feb. 1, 2003, that claimed the orbiter and lives of the seven-member crew. The dedication of the plaque was made in front of the 40-member preservation team.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (left) talks to members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) about reconstruction efforts. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (second from right), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (left) talks to members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) about reconstruction efforts. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (second from right), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Posing with the plaque dedicated to Columbia Jan. 29, 2004, are (left to right) United Space Alliance project leader for Columbia reconstruction Jim Comer, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach, astronauts Douglas Hurley and Pam Melroy, Center Director Jim Kennedy and NASA Vehicle Manager Scott Thurston. The dedication of the plaque was made in front of the 40-member preservation team in the “Columbia room,” a permanent repository in the Vehicle Assembly Building of the debris collected in the aftermath of the tragic accident Feb. 1, 2003, that claimed the orbiter and lives of the seven-member crew.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Posing with the plaque dedicated to Columbia Jan. 29, 2004, are (left to right) United Space Alliance project leader for Columbia reconstruction Jim Comer, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach, astronauts Douglas Hurley and Pam Melroy, Center Director Jim Kennedy and NASA Vehicle Manager Scott Thurston. The dedication of the plaque was made in front of the 40-member preservation team in the “Columbia room,” a permanent repository in the Vehicle Assembly Building of the debris collected in the aftermath of the tragic accident Feb. 1, 2003, that claimed the orbiter and lives of the seven-member crew.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left), Saul Ngy (center) and Jerry Belt (right) prepare to install a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left), Saul Ngy (center) and Jerry Belt (right) prepare to install a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (right) attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (right) attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (above), Saul Ngy (right) and Jerry Belt (below) install a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (above), Saul Ngy (right) and Jerry Belt (below) install a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (above) and Saul Ngy (below right) finish installing a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (above) and Saul Ngy (below right) finish installing a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left) Jerry Belt (center), and Saul Ngy (right), lift a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel they will attach to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left) Jerry Belt (center), and Saul Ngy (right), lift a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel they will attach to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left) Saul Ngy (center) and Jerry Belt (right) lift a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to attach onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left) Saul Ngy (center) and Jerry Belt (right) lift a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to attach onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt looks over a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel that will be attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt looks over a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel that will be attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) completes installation of a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) completes installation of a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers, from center, left to right, Saul Ngy, Jerry Belt and Mike Hyatt, prepare to attach a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel (on the table) to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers, from center, left to right, Saul Ngy, Jerry Belt and Mike Hyatt, prepare to attach a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel (on the table) to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) finishes installing a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) finishes installing a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  9. n/a

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-17

    Members of the original Von Braun german rocket team participate in the Saturn V replica didication ceremony at the U. S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL. Pictured are (L/R): Walter Jacobi, Konrad Dannenberg, Apollo 14's Edgar Mitchell, NASA Administrator Dan Goldin, Apollo 12's Dick Gordon, Gerhard Reisig, Werner Dahm, MSFC Director Art Stephenson, Director of the U. S. Space and Rocket Center Mike Wing, Walter Haeusserman, and Ernst Stuhlinger.

  10. Saturn V Dedication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Members of the original Von Braun german rocket team participate in the Saturn V replica didication ceremony at the U. S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL. Pictured are (L/R): Walter Jacobi, Konrad Dannenberg, Apollo 14's Edgar Mitchell, NASA Administrator Dan Goldin, Apollo 12's Dick Gordon, Gerhard Reisig, Werner Dahm, MSFC Director Art Stephenson, Director of the U. S. Space and Rocket Center Mike Wing, Walter Haeusserman, and Ernst Stuhlinger.

  11. Philip Werner Baumeister (1929-2003): in memoriam.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, J A

    2006-03-01

    Philip Baumeister pioneered the design of optical thin films by computer methods. He has published many important papers on various aspects of optical coatings, and he initiated the Optical Society of America's Topical Meetings on Optical Interference Coatings. Most important, during his time at the University of Rochester and thereafter, he trained and mentored generations of researchers and engineers in the theory and practice of thin-film interference coatings. Originally, a talk was prepared to celebrate his 75th birthday at the ninth Topical Meeting on Optical Interference Coatings. Because of his untimely demise on 22 October 2003, it was presented at the conference to honor his memory. This is a written version of the tribute that contains a comprehensive list of Philip Baumeister's various publications.

  12. Vygotsky, Werner, and English Composition: Paradigms for Thinking and Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jambeck, Karen K.; Winder, Barbara D.

    1990-01-01

    Notes that creating focus which leads to formulating a thesis is a task with which many writers have trouble. Describes a process model of conceptual development that helps students gain confidence in abstracting, conceptualizing, and formulating a thesis. (NH)

  13. The Technical Division (of the Werner Heisenberg Institute of Physics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuecker, H.

    1990-12-01

    The organization of the technical division, whose task is to design and build devices and appliances for physical experiments, is presented. From Oct. 1989 to Sep. 1990, the tasks covered the H detector for HERA, the ALEPH minivertex detector, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), and the High Energy Gamma Ray Astronomy (HEGRA) detectors. The tasks carried out in coooperation with industrial companies are reported.

  14. [Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker and Werner Heisenberg].

    PubMed

    Cassidy, David C

    2014-01-01

    The 50-year relationship between Weizsäcker and Heisenberg spanned the highpoints of discovery and dictatorship during the 1930s, extended into the war-time uranium project, the post-war controversy over that project, debates over West German nuclear policy, and the philosophical implications of modern physics. This paper explores the interaction between these two leading figures during that difficult and significant half-century.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Armando Oliu, Final Inspection Team lead for the Shuttle program, speaks to reporters about the aid the Image Analysis Lab is giving the FBI in a kidnapping case. Behind him at right is Mike Rein, External Affairs division chief. Oliu oversees the image lab that is using an advanced SGI® TP9500 data management system to review the tape of the kidnapping in progress in Sarasota, Fla. KSC installed the new $3.2 million system in preparation for Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle fleet. The lab is studying the Sarasota kidnapping video to provide any new information possible to law enforcement officers. KSC is joining NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama in reviewing the tape.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Armando Oliu, Final Inspection Team lead for the Shuttle program, speaks to reporters about the aid the Image Analysis Lab is giving the FBI in a kidnapping case. Behind him at right is Mike Rein, External Affairs division chief. Oliu oversees the image lab that is using an advanced SGI® TP9500 data management system to review the tape of the kidnapping in progress in Sarasota, Fla. KSC installed the new $3.2 million system in preparation for Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle fleet. The lab is studying the Sarasota kidnapping video to provide any new information possible to law enforcement officers. KSC is joining NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama in reviewing the tape.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

  18. Impact of uncertainty description on assimilating hydraulic head in the MIKE SHE distributed hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Donghua; Madsen, Henrik; Ridler, Marc E.; Refsgaard, Jens C.; Jensen, Karsten H.

    2015-12-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a popular data assimilation (DA) technique that has been extensively used in environmental sciences for combining complementary information from model predictions and observations. One of the major challenges in EnKF applications is the description of model uncertainty. In most hydrological EnKF applications, an ad hoc model uncertainty is defined with the aim of avoiding a collapse of the filter. The present work provides a systematic assessment of model uncertainty in DA applications based on combinations of forcing, model parameters, and state uncertainties. This is tested in a case where groundwater hydraulic heads are assimilated into a distributed and integrated catchment-scale model of the Karup catchment in Denmark. A series of synthetic data assimilation experiments are carried out to analyse the impact of different model uncertainty assumptions on the feasibility and efficiency of the assimilation. The synthetic data used in the assimilation study makes it possible to diagnose model uncertainty assumptions statistically. Besides the model uncertainty, other factors such as observation error, observation locations, and ensemble size are also analysed with respect to performance and sensitivity. Results show that inappropriate definition of model uncertainty can greatly degrade the assimilation performance, and an appropriate combination of different model uncertainty sources is advised.

  19. Introducing Critical Theory to the Management Classroom: An Exercise Building on Jermier's "Life of Mike"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, M. T.; Dyer, S.

    2005-01-01

    This exercise invites critical consideration of domestication, exploitation, and hegemony. We enquired with participants into the ways in which these processes may be embedded in the taken-for-granted logics of organizational and personal decision making. We contrast participation or tolerance of these processes with commitment to often…

  20. The Trailwatcher: A Collection of Colonel Mike Malone’s Writings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-21

    seemed meet our Con:unandant had read asked that out three with a rubber the characters On 2, labeled rine." He the ion Conference attendee • He...of , didn’t and didn’t move around like an ant for a crumb . is that it took about 12 hours before least wey. This could mean that a few hours...beat rubber meets seldom 12 I I I still to understand the the guys who make I remember ’s air. knows very about the road, because these

  1. George Washington's Printed Draft of the Constitution and Mike Wilkins's "Preamble"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann; Eder, Elizabeth K.

    2009-01-01

    On July 23, 1787, delegates at the Constitutional Convention established a Committee of Detail to prepare a report and a printed draft of a Constitution "conformable to the proceedings of the convention." Two weeks later, the committee submitted a printed rough draft to the delegates for their consideration. In this first draft, the Preamble began…

  2. STS-133 crew members Mike Barratt and Nicole Stott in cupola

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-08

    JSC2010-E-090701 (8 June 2010) --- Several computer monitors are featured in this image photographed during an STS-133 exercise in the systems engineering simulator in the Avionics Systems Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The facility includes moving scenes of full-sized International Space Station components over a simulated Earth.

  3. STS-133 crew members Mike Barratt and Nicole Stott in cupola

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-08

    JSC2010-E-090700 (8 June 2010) --- NASA astronauts Michael Barratt and Nicole Stott, both STS-133 mission specialists, participate in an exercise in the systems engineering simulator in the Avionics Systems Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The facility includes moving scenes of full-sized International Space Station components over a simulated Earth.

  4. STS-133 crew members Mike Barratt and Nicole Stott in cupola

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-08

    JSC2010-E-090702 (8 June 2010) --- NASA astronauts Michael Barratt and Nicole Stott, both STS-133 mission specialists, participate in an exercise in the systems engineering simulator in the Avionics Systems Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The facility includes moving scenes of full-sized International Space Station components over a simulated Earth.

  5. STS-133 crew members Mike Barratt and Nicole Stott in cupola

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-08

    JSC2010-E-090698 (8 June 2010) --- NASA astronauts Michael Barratt and Nicole Stott, both STS-133 mission specialists, participate in an exercise in the systems engineering simulator in the Avionics Systems Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The facility includes moving scenes of full-sized International Space Station components over a simulated Earth.

  6. STS-133 crew members Mike Barratt and Nicole Stott in cupola

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-08

    JSC2010-E-090704 (8 June 2010) --- NASA astronauts Michael Barratt and Nicole Stott, both STS-133 mission specialists, participate in an exercise in the systems engineering simulator in the Avionics Systems Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The facility includes moving scenes of full-sized International Space Station components over a simulated Earth.

  7. STS-133 crew members Mike Barratt and Nicole Stott in cupola

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-08

    JSC2010-E-090695 (8 June 2010) --- NASA astronauts Nicole Stott and Michael Barratt, both STS-133 mission specialists, participate in an exercise in the systems engineering simulator in the Avionics Systems Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The facility includes moving scenes of full-sized International Space Station components over a simulated Earth.

  8. Reinventing the Formal Definition of Limit: The Case of Amy and Mike

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinyard, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Relatively little is known about how students come to reason coherently about the formal definition of limit. While some have conjectured how students might think about limits formally, there is insufficient empirical evidence of students making sense of the conventional [superscript epsilon]-[delta] definition. This paper provides a detailed…

  9. George Washington's Printed Draft of the Constitution and Mike Wilkins's "Preamble"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann; Eder, Elizabeth K.

    2009-01-01

    On July 23, 1787, delegates at the Constitutional Convention established a Committee of Detail to prepare a report and a printed draft of a Constitution "conformable to the proceedings of the convention." Two weeks later, the committee submitted a printed rough draft to the delegates for their consideration. In this first draft, the Preamble began…

  10. Evaluation of the MIKE SHE model for application in the Loess Plateau, China

    Treesearch

    Zhiqiang Zhang; Shenping Wang; Ge Sun; Steven G. McNulty; Huayong Zhang; Jianlao Li; Manliang Zhang; Eduard Klaghofer; Peter Strauss

    2008-01-01

    Quantifying the hydrologic responses to land use / land cover change and climate variability is essential for integrated sustainable watershed management in water limited regions such as the Loess Plateau in Northwestern China where an adaptive watershed management approach is being implemented. Traditional empirical modeling approach to quantifying the accumulated...

  11. FSDC, Astronauts Mike Lopez-Alegria and Fred Leslie perform IFM on experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-11-05

    STS073-233-032 (20 October - 5 November 1995) --- Astronaut Michael E. Lopez-Alegria (left), STS-73 mission specialist, assists payload specialist Fred W. Leslie in an in-flight maintenance task involving the Fiber Support Droplet Combustion (FSDC) experiment. This new Glovebox investigation tests a technique for studying combustion in the weightless environment of space. The two joined five other crew members onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia for 16 days of in-space research in support of the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2) mission.

  12. Mike or me? Self-recognition in a split-brain patient.

    PubMed

    Turk, David J; Heatherton, Todd F; Kelley, William M; Funnell, Margaret G; Gazzaniga, Michael S; Macrae, C Neil

    2002-09-01

    A split-brain patient (epileptic individual whose corpus callosum had been severed to minimize the spread of seizure activity) was asked to recognize morphed facial stimuli--presented separately to each hemisphere--as either himself or a familiar other. Both hemispheres were capable of face recognition, but the left hemisphere showed a recognition bias for self and the right hemisphere a bias for familiar others. These findings suggest a possible dissociation between self-recognition and more generalized face processing within the human brain.

  13. Reinventing the Formal Definition of Limit: The Case of Amy and Mike

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinyard, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Relatively little is known about how students come to reason coherently about the formal definition of limit. While some have conjectured how students might think about limits formally, there is insufficient empirical evidence of students making sense of the conventional [superscript epsilon]-[delta] definition. This paper provides a detailed…

  14. Analysis of acrylamide in food: dedicated to Professor Dr. Werner Baltes.

    PubMed

    Matissek, Reinhard; Raters, Marion

    2005-01-01

    Since the first discovery of the presence of acrylamide in a variety of food products in April 2002, numerous methods have been developed to determine the acrylamide monomer in heat-treated carbohydrate-rich food. These detection methods are mainly MS-based, coupled with a chromatographic step using LC or GC. The Food Chemistry Institute (LCI) of the Association of the German Confectionery Industry (BDSI) therefore established a detection method by means of aqueous extraction plus a cleaning step and LC-MS/MS detection, making great efforts to ensure internal and external validation. Citing potato crisps as an example, we will in the following show how the German manufacturing companies have gone to great pains to reduce acrylamide levels in their products.

  15. [Rainer Werner Fassbinder's "Garbage, the city and death"-- a German landscape of the soul].

    PubMed

    Vogt, R

    1995-04-01

    No other recent "art event" has aroused so much public debate in Germany as Fassbinder's play "Garbage, City, Death" (1976). The controversy it sparked on its appearance has still not entirely died down. In a painstaking psychoanalytic interpretation Vogt first shows that the play achieves an artistic representation of the unconscious dilemma besetting the second generation of non-Jewish Germans in their relationship to National Socialism. In Fassbinder's play this dilemma, which is bound up with vicarious guilt feelings, is however only presented and not in any way worked out. The upshot is that all those forms of identification with German traditions that have been repudiated on a conscious level re-enter, as it were by the back door, and attain a new virulence. The author demonstrates that at the heart of the play a mechanism of guilt-refusal is operative that inverts the historical culprit-victim relation and makes the Germans themselves into the real victims. In the second part of his article Vogt is concerned to situate the play and the controversy surrounding it in a broader political context--Bitburg (1985), the "historians' conflict" (1986), Jenninger's speech (1988)--revealing a specific collective psychological inscape in present-day Germany for which, in its profounder well-springs, Fassbinder's play may be legitimately regarded as symptomatic. Fassbinder (born 1945) articulates for his generation aspects of an "ethnic disturbance" (George Devereux) which continues to persist precisely because there is a German past "that refuses to go away" (Ernst Nolte).

  16. The 16th Werner Brandt Workshop on charged particle penetration phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: impact parameter dependence of charge transfer and energy loss; nonlinear dynamical response of the electron gas: comparison of some simple theories; stopping of ultrarelativistic ions in solids (33.2-TeV {sup 108}Pb); collective excitation in reduced dimensionality; collective states in atoms and cluster; plasmon coupling with external probes; atomic collisions with antiprotons; layer-number scaling in ultra-thin film stopping and energetics; atom-surface scattering under classical conditions; nonlinear effect of sweeping-out electrons in stopping power and electron emission in cluster impacts; electron emission from fast grazing collisions of ions with silicon surfaces; electron emission from ultra-thin carbon foils by kiV ions; Auger rates for highly charged ions in metals; Auger and plasmon assisted neutralization at surfaces; low energy (< 5eV) F{sup +} and F{sup -} ions transmission through condensed layers of water: enhancement and attenuation processes; charge transfer for H interacting with Al: atomic levels and linewidths; scattered projectile angular and charge state distributions for grazing collisions of multicharged ions with metal and insulator single crystal targets; the prolate hyperboloidat model in scanning probe microscopy; scanning probe microscopy of large biomolecules; microcantilever sensors; solution of the Fokker-Planck equation for electron transport using analytic spatial moments; and effective charge parametrization for z = 3-17 projectiles in composite targets.

  17. Inelastic near-surface interactions. Proceedings of the Werner Brandt workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    This workshop is one of an annual series covering penetration phenomena of charged particles in matter. This specific workshop includes electron scattering, ion and atom scattering, stopping powers, and cluster ion impacts on solids. Abstracts were prepared for individual items in the proceedings for inclusion in the data base. (GHT)

  18. Activities report of the Werner-Heisenberg Institute for Physics, Munich, Federal Republic of Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical research work was done in the fields of perturbative renormalization, statistical mechanics in the quantum field theory, geometrically formulated description of elementary particles, basic problems of the quantum field theory, the standard model (supersymmetry, strings), elementary particle physics and cosmology, non-relativistic particle physics, and history of physics. The Experimental Division A contributed to experiments on particle physics (CERN), on the tevatron accelerator of the Fermilab (FNAL), on the electron positron storage ring PETRA with the CELLO detector, and on the electron-positron storage ring HERA; a detector for low-energy particles was developed. The Experimental Division B contributed to the LRP project ALEPH, to the CERN SPS experiment NA 32, and to the HEGRA experiment; several detectors were developed.

  19. Extreme genetic diversity in the lizard Atlantolacerta andreanskyi (Werner, 1929): A montane cryptic species complex

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Atlantolacerta andreanskyi is an enigmatic lacertid lizard that, according to the most recent molecular analyses, belongs to the tribe Eremiadini, family Lacertidae. It is a mountain specialist, restricted to areas above 2400 m of the High Atlas Mountains of Morocco with apparently no connection between the different populations. In order to investigate its phylogeography, 92 specimens of A. andreanskyi were analyzed from eight different populations across the distribution range of the species for up to 1108 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA (12S, ND4 and flanking tRNA-His) and 2585 base pairs of nuclear DNA including five loci (PDC, ACM4, C-MOS, RAG1, MC1R). Results The results obtained with both concatenated and coalescent approaches and clustering methods, clearly show that all the populations analyzed present a very high level of genetic differentiation for the mitochondrial markers used and are also generally differentiated at the nuclear level. Conclusions These results indicate that A. andreanskyi is an additional example of a montane species complex. PMID:22946997

  20. The Application of Werner and Kaplan's Concept of "Distancing" to Children Who Are Deaf-Blind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Susan M.

    2005-01-01

    Through the process of distancing, children develop an understanding of the differences between themselves and others, themselves and objects, and objects and representations. Adults can support progressive distancing in children who are congenitally deaf-blind by applying strategies, such as the hand-under-hand exploration of objects, the…

  1. Operation IVY, Pacific Proving Grounds, November 1952. Project 11.5. Radiobiological Studies at Eniwetok before and after Mike Shot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1953-06-01

    Plants of Portulaca oleracea Growing in the Vicinity of the Atom-bomb Test Sites of Eniwetok Atoll, Report UWFL-31, 1952. UNCLASSIFIED • APPENDIX B...shore in an injured condition. Note absence of skin and scales on right side and back above lateral line . Left side of fish apparently normal...that the radioactivity found in the median portion lined small cavities which are present in the skeleton rather than actually being incorporated in

  2. Simulation of Saturated and Unsaturated Flow Processes in a Large Scale Karst System with AN Integrated Catchment Model (mike She)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doummar, J.; Sauter, M.; Geyer, T.

    2011-12-01

    Saline conditions induce not only chemical but physical changes in swelling clays, and have a significant influence on the crack dynamics in desiccating clays. In this study, we used X-ray computerized tomography (CT) to experimentally investigate the effects of sodium chloride on the morphology and dynamics of desiccation cracks in three-dimensional mixtures of sand-bentonite slurry under varying rheological conditions. Rectangular glass containers (40.5x40.5x56 mm^3) were packed with sand-bentonite slurries of different salt concentrations, with the top boundary exposed to air for evaporation. The growth and propagation of the cracking network that subsequently formed was visualized in 3D at multiple intervals. 3D characterization of cracking dynamics shows a high extent of localized superficial crack networks at low salinity, with a transition to less extensive but deeper, more centralized crack networks with increased salinity. The observed behavior was described in the context of rheological and colloidal properties of the clay, which suggest the transition from a voluminous and poorly-sorted stacked clay structure to a more compact and highly cohesive entangled clay structure as salt concentration increases in the evaporating samples. This is further corroborated by vertical profiles of sample water distribution, which shows localized uniform drying at the higher salt concentrations. Our results provide new insights regarding the formation, patterns, dynamics and characteristics of desiccation cracks formed during evaporation from 3D saline clay structures, which will be useful in various hydrological applications including water management, land surface evaporation, and subsurface contaminant transport.

  3. Spring Research Festival Features Visit from FCPS Superintendent | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    One of the highlights of the 19th annual Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 4–7, was a visit from Terry Alban, Ph.D., superintendent of Frederick County Public Schools (FCPS), and Mike Markoe, deputy superintendent, FCPS. They toured the event on May 7, talking to researchers and students about their posters. “Dr. Alban was very interested in hearing what the Werner H. Kirsten students were presenting at their posters,” said Andrea Frydl, public affairs specialist, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick. “Many WHK students are also FCPS students, some of whom Dr. Alban and Dr. Markoe knew personally.” Alban tweeted (@FCPSMDSuper) photos and information about four of the students whose posters she visited during the tour.

  4. Spring Research Festival Features Visit from FCPS Superintendent | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    One of the highlights of the 19th annual Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 4–7, was a visit from Terry Alban, Ph.D., superintendent of Frederick County Public Schools (FCPS), and Mike Markoe, deputy superintendent, FCPS. They toured the event on May 7, talking to researchers and students about their posters. “Dr. Alban was very interested in hearing what the Werner H. Kirsten students were presenting at their posters,” said Andrea Frydl, public affairs specialist, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick. “Many WHK students are also FCPS students, some of whom Dr. Alban and Dr. Markoe knew personally.” Alban tweeted (@FCPSMDSuper) photos and information about four of the students whose posters she visited during the tour.

  5. Integrated map of the chromosome 8p12-p21 region, a region involved in human cancers and Werner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Imbert, A.; Chaffanet, M.; Birnbaum, D.; Pebusque, M.J.

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the genetic mapping of the specific region on human chromosome 8, 8p12-p21, and its implications to human hereditary cancers and diseases. The localization of disease genes such as NEFL and FGFR1 are given, accomplished using contigs which span the region of deletion involved in these hereditary diseases. 59 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Optimal measurements for tests of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering with no detection loophole using two-qubit Werner states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, D. A.; Wiseman, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    It has been shown in earlier works that the vertices of Platonic solids are good measurement choices for tests of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR)-steering using isotropically entangled pairs of qubits. Such measurements are regularly spaced, and measurement diversity is a good feature for making EPR-steering inequalities easier to violate in the presence of experimental imperfections. However, such measurements are provably suboptimal. Here, we develop a method for devising optimal strategies for tests of EPR-steering, in the sense of being most robust to mixture and inefficiency (while still closing the detection loophole, of course), for a given number n of measurement settings. We allow for arbitrary measurement directions, and arbitrary weightings of the outcomes in the EPR-steering inequality. This is a difficult optimization problem for large n , so we also consider more practical ways of constructing near-optimal EPR-steering inequalities in this limit.

  7. Off the Beat. An Appreciation of Werner Heisenberg and Some Talk About How Physics Was in the Good Old Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is an insight into man's idea about physics and being a physicist in the days when Heisenberg, P. A. M. Dirac, Louis de Broglic and other famous physicists were young men. Heisenberg is compared to Newton, inventing new math as he needed it. Emphasis is placed on the fact that he was not a Nazi sympathizer. (EB)

  8. Off the Beat. An Appreciation of Werner Heisenberg and Some Talk About How Physics Was in the Good Old Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is an insight into man's idea about physics and being a physicist in the days when Heisenberg, P. A. M. Dirac, Louis de Broglic and other famous physicists were young men. Heisenberg is compared to Newton, inventing new math as he needed it. Emphasis is placed on the fact that he was not a Nazi sympathizer. (EB)

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Tc IV, Tc V and Tc VI oscillator strengths (Werner+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Kucas, S.; Kruk, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of technetium (Tc) in the atmospheres of red giants by Merrill (1952ApJ...116...21M) constituted convincing proof that s-process nucleosynthesis is indeed occurring in evolved stars. In principle, Tc should still be present in the atmospheres of hot post-AGB stars and (pre-) white dwarfs although, due to radioactive decay, it should be present in decreasing quantities along post-AGB evolution. The recent discovery of a large number of trans-iron group elements in hot white dwarfs with atomic numbers in the range A=30-56 (Zn to Ba) raises the prospect that Tc (A=43) may also be detected. However, this is currently not feasible because no atomic data exist for ionization stages beyond TcII. As an initial step, we calculated atomic energy levels and oscillator strengths of Tc IV-VI and used these data to compute non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres to estimate at which minimum abundance level Tc could be detected. We show that Tc lines can be found in ultraviolet spectra of hot white dwarfs provided Tc is as abundant as other detected trans-Fe elements. We find that radiative levitation can keep Tc in large, easily detectable quantities in the atmosphere. A direct identification of Tc lines is still not feasible because wavelength positions cannot be computed with necessary precision. Laboratory measurements are necessary to overcome this problem. Our results suggest that such efforts are beneficial to the astrophysical community. (6 data files).

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the KSC television studio, KSC management and other employees applaud President George W. Bush, who addressed the public and an assembly of government officials at NASA Headquarters, outlining a new focus and vision for the space agency. Fourth from left is Mike Leinbach, Shuttle launch director; at right, front row, are Bill Pickavance vice president and associate program manager of Florida Operations, United Space Alliance (USA) and Howard DeCastro, USA vice president and Space Shuttle program manager. The President stated his goals for NASA’s new mission: Completing the International Space Station, retiring the Space Shuttle orbiters, developing a new crew exploration vehicle, and returning to the moon and beyond within the next two decades. Pres. Bush was welcomed by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Expedition 8 Commander Michael Foale, who greeted him from the International Space Station. Members of the Washington, D.C., audience included astronauts Eileen Collins, Ed Lu and Michael Lopez-Alegria, and former astronaut Gene Cernan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-14

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the KSC television studio, KSC management and other employees applaud President George W. Bush, who addressed the public and an assembly of government officials at NASA Headquarters, outlining a new focus and vision for the space agency. Fourth from left is Mike Leinbach, Shuttle launch director; at right, front row, are Bill Pickavance vice president and associate program manager of Florida Operations, United Space Alliance (USA) and Howard DeCastro, USA vice president and Space Shuttle program manager. The President stated his goals for NASA’s new mission: Completing the International Space Station, retiring the Space Shuttle orbiters, developing a new crew exploration vehicle, and returning to the moon and beyond within the next two decades. Pres. Bush was welcomed by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and Expedition 8 Commander Michael Foale, who greeted him from the International Space Station. Members of the Washington, D.C., audience included astronauts Eileen Collins, Ed Lu and Michael Lopez-Alegria, and former astronaut Gene Cernan.

  11. Running Head: Feasibility of Blood Management. Feasibility Study of a Blood Management Program in the Mike O’Callaghan Federal Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-02

    58611,59525 19 Abdominal Perineal Resection 45110 2 aorto-bifemoral prosthesis 34832 aorto-bifemoral bypass 35540 1 hysterectomy 58210,58285, 2... hysterectomy , and total hip replacements are the procedures most capable of benefitting from pre- and peri-operative blood management techniques. These... hysterectomy . Medical Services Autologous Donation - Initially projected as a potential cost-saving and allogeneic transfusion-reducing initiative, the PAD

  12. Teacher Working Conditions are Student Learning Conditions. A Report to Mike Easley on the 2004 North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Center for Teaching Quality (The), University of North Carolina, 2004

    2004-01-01

    For virtually any business or organization, the conditions in which employees work drive their satisfaction and productivity. Yet, while business often focuses on employee satisfaction, many schools often struggle to address critical working conditions -- isolating teachers in classrooms with closed doors, denying them basic materials to do their…

  13. Extreme 34S depletions in ZnS at the Mike gold deposit, Carlin Trend, Nevada: Evidence for bacteriogenic supergene sphalerite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bawden, T.M.; Einaudi, M.T.; Bostick, B.C.; Meibom, A.; Wooden, J.; Norby, J.W.; Orobona, M.J.T.; Chamberlain, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    We identified submicrometer-sized framboidal sphalerite (ZnS) below the base of supergene oxidation in a Carlin-type gold deposit of Eocene age in Nevada, United States, where the framboidal sphalerite forms a blanket-like body containing >400,000 metric tons of zinc. Framboidal sphalerite <0.1 ??m in diameter, formed in the early Miocene, ranges from <0.1 to 0.35 mol% FeS; the ??34S values range from -25??? to -70???, the lowest values measured in a marine or terrestrial environment. These S isotope data demonstrate the involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria and provide the first documentation that sphalerite can form significant supergene sulfide-enrichment blankets.

  14. Jim Smolka (left) details a flight experiment to Jerry McKee, Kevin Petersen and NASA Administrator Mike Griffin (right) during Griffin's initial visit to DFRC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-24

    NASA Dryden research pilot Jim Smolka (left) details a recent flight experiment on a modified F-15B research aircraft to test range program manager Jerry McKee, center director Kevin Petersen and NASA Administrator Michael Griffin (right) during Griffin's initial visit to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Tuesday, May 24.

  15. Society News: RAS Awards 2012; Prof. Andy Fabian; Prof. John C Brown; Prof. Andrew Fazakerley; Dr. Mike Irwin; Joss Bland-Hawthorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-02-01

    Each year the RAS recognizes outstanding achievement in astronomy and geophysics by the award of medals and prizes. Candidates are nominated by Fellows and the awards made by a committee of Fellows, ensuring that these scientists have earned the respect and admiration of their peers in the research community.

  16. EVA training for Exp. 27 crew member Ron Garan, Exp. 28 Mike Fossum and STS-135 Doug Hurley, Rex Walheim and Sandra Magnus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-18

    JSC2011-E-003209 (18 Jan. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Ron Garan, Expedition 27/28 flight engineer, uses virtual reality hardware in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center to rehearse some of his duties on the upcoming mission to the International Space Station. This type of virtual reality training allows the astronauts to wear a helmet and special gloves while looking at computer displays simulating actual movements around the various locations on the station hardware with which they will be working. David Homan assisted Garan. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  17. EVA training for Exp. 27 crew member Ron Garan, Exp. 28 Mike Fossum and STS-135 Doug Hurley, Rex Walheim and Sandra Magnus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-18

    JSC2011-E-003207 (18 Jan. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-135 mission specialist, uses the virtual reality lab in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center to train for some of his duties aboard the space shuttle and space station. This type of computer interface, paired with virtual reality training hardware and software, helps to prepare crew members for dealing with space station elements. STS-135 is planned to be the final mission of the space shuttle program. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  18. EVA training for Exp. 27 crew member Ron Garan, Exp. 28 Mike Fossum and STS-135 Doug Hurley, Rex Walheim and Sandra Magnus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-18

    JSC2011-E-003203 (18 Jan. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-135 mission specialist, uses the virtual reality lab in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center to train for some of his duties aboard the space shuttle and space station. This type of computer interface, paired with virtual reality training hardware and software, helps to prepare crew members for dealing with space station elements. STS-135 is planned to be the final mission of the space shuttle program. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  19. Chief Information Officer: Schools Need Qualified Librarians To Manage the Accelerating Crush of Knowledge and Technology, Says Library Guru Mike Eisenberg. Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Mike; Barton, Rhonda

    2003-01-01

    In this interview, a leading expert in school librarianship discusses the school librarian's role in creating students who are effective users of information. The importance of information technology to information management is described, as are strategies librarians can use to collaborate with teachers and administrators. He describes how…

  20. Starting at the End When Planning for Base Closure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-17

    and over 50 Logistics Civil Augmen- tation Program contracts, required continual refinement and manage- ment to meet the needs of a base in... required to minimize the impact of their de- parture. Nearly all of the Logistics Civil Augmentation Program con- tractors were, by contract, allotted...would have caused an overall delay in the drawdown and transition time line. Engineers were required to demol- ish large camps within the TB and

  1. Revision of the phylogeny and chorology of the tribe Iphisini with the revalidation of Colobosaura kraepelini Werner, 1910 (Reptilia, Squamata, Gymnophthalmidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cacciali, Pier; Martínez, Nicolás; Köhler, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The family Gymnophthalmidae contains nearly 235 species with a distribution range from southern Mexico to central Argentina as well as in the Antilles. Among gymnophthalmids, the genus Colobosaura is a member of the tribe Iphisini, and currently is considered monotypic (C. modesta). The diversity of the tribe was studied recently, with the erection of several new genera. In this work genetic and morphological data of specimens of Colobosaura recently collected in Paraguay were analyzed. Genetic (16S barcode) data indicate that these samples are not conspecific with C. modesta and they are allocated to the nominal species C. kraepelini. Because the original primary type of the latter taxon is considered to be lost, a neotype (SMF 101370) is designated for this species and a redescription provided based on our material. Colobosaura kraepelini is distributed in the Humid Chaco, being the only member of the whole tribe in this ecoregion. PMID:28769654

  2. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure and spectroscopy of a Werner-type host Co(II) complex, trans-bisisothiocyanatotetrakis( trans-4-styrylpyridine)cobalt(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, C.; Thomas, K. R. J.; Shunmugasundaram, A.; Murugesan, R.

    2000-05-01

    Single crystals of the title Co(II) complex, [Co(stpy)4(NCS)2] [stpy=trans-4-styrylpyridine] are prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, and UV-visible spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structure determination. The complex crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pna21 with unit-cell parameters, a=32.058(3), b=15.362(5), c=9.818(5) Å, and Z=4. The structure consists of discrete monomeric units of [Co(stpy)4(NCS)2]. The equatorial positions of the Co(II) polyhedron are occupied by nitrogen atoms of the four stpy ligands and the axial positions are occupied by the nitrogen atoms of the two thiocyanate ions. The unit cell packing reveals interpenetration of styryl groups owing to conformational flexibility of phenyl and pyridyl rings in stpy ligands. Thus, it leads to efficient packing of the crystal lattice leaving no space available for guest inclusion. IR spectra reveal nitrogen coordination from stpy and terminal -NCS coordination of the thiocyanate group. The optical reflectance bands 475, 540 (shoulder) and 1022 nm suggest octahedral geometry in accordance with the X-ray data. However, the optical spectrum of acetonitrile solution shows an intense band at 615 nm and a weak shoulder at 570 nm suggesting participation of the solvent molecules in the coordination sphere. These bands indicate the presence of both tetrahedral and octahedral species in solution.

  3. Back from the dead! Resurrection and revalidation of the Indian endemic snake genus Wallophis Werner, 1929 (Squamata: Colubridae) insights from molecular data.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Zeeshan A; Patel, Harshil

    2017-01-27

    The monotypic colubrid snake genus Wallophis is revalidated and rediagnosed. Partial sequence for nuclear gene Oocyte maturation factor Mos (c-mos), mitochondrial Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) and cytochrome b (cyt b) were used to assess phylogenetic relationship. Wallophis brachyura type species for the genus was found to be a member of the Western Palearctic clade of Colubrinae and is recovered as a sister taxa to Wallaceophis gujaratensis. Wallophis differs from Wallaceophis in an uncorrected pairwise p-distance of 17% for mitochondrial ND4 gene. Wallaceophis gujaratensis was described in three different spellings in the literature hence we here propose Wallaceophis gujaratensis as the correct spelling for the species based on provisions in the article 24.2.3. of the International Code for Zoological Nomenclature.

  4. Microwave-assisted synthesis of 5-aminopyrazol-4-yl ketones and the p38(MAPK) inhibitor RO3201195 for study in Werner syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Mark C; Davis, Terence; Dix, Matthew C; Murziani, Paola G S; Rokicki, Michal J; Kipling, David

    2008-07-01

    5-Aminopyrazol-4-yl ketones are prepared rapidly and efficiently using microwave dielectric heating from beta-ketonitriles by treatment with N,N'-diphenylformamidine followed by heterocyclocondensation by irradiation with a hydrazine. The inhibitory activity of RO3201195 prepared by this methodology was confirmed in hTERT-immortalized HCA2 and WS dermal fibroblasts at 200nM concentration, both by ELISA and immunoblot assay, and displays excellent kinase selectivity for p38alpha MAPK over the related stress-activated kinase JNK.

  5. Revision of the phylogeny and chorology of the tribe Iphisini with the revalidation of Colobosaura kraepelini Werner, 1910 (Reptilia, Squamata, Gymnophthalmidae).

    PubMed

    Cacciali, Pier; Martínez, Nicolás; Köhler, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    The family Gymnophthalmidae contains nearly 235 species with a distribution range from southern Mexico to central Argentina as well as in the Antilles. Among gymnophthalmids, the genus Colobosaura is a member of the tribe Iphisini, and currently is considered monotypic (C. modesta). The diversity of the tribe was studied recently, with the erection of several new genera. In this work genetic and morphological data of specimens of Colobosaura recently collected in Paraguay were analyzed. Genetic (16S barcode) data indicate that these samples are not conspecific with C. modesta and they are allocated to the nominal species C. kraepelini. Because the original primary type of the latter taxon is considered to be lost, a neotype (SMF 101370) is designated for this species and a redescription provided based on our material. Colobosaura kraepelini is distributed in the Humid Chaco, being the only member of the whole tribe in this ecoregion.

  6. Space and Missile Systems Center Compliance Specifications and Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-31

    Mike Jensen United Launch Alliance mike.jensen@ulalaunch.com Hans Koenigsmann SpaceX Hans.Koenigsmann@ spacex . com APPROVED BY_________________________________________________________________ DATE_______________ (AF OFFICE)

  7. Disaster Health Management: A Primer for Students and Practitioners Fitzgerald Gerry Tarrant Mike Aitken Peter et al Disaster Health Management: A Primer for Students and Practitioners 352pp £39.99 Routledge 9781138911185 1138911186 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2017-02-10

    This comprehensive textbook addresses the history of disaster management, terminology, concepts, principles and trends. While the book refers mainly to Australian policies and guidelines, international examples are offered too.

  8. Lesions caused in suckling mice by certain viruses isolated from cases of so called non-paralytic poliomyelitis and of pleurodynia.

    PubMed

    PAPPENHEIMER, A M; DANIELS, J B; CHEEVER, F S; WELLER, T H

    1950-08-01

    A STUDY HAS BEEN MADE OF THE LESIONS PRODUCED IN SUCKLING MICE BY THE FOLLOWING VIRUSES: Powers, Matulaitis, DeMole, Kine, McCarthy, Conn. 5, Ohio R, High Point, WS No. 4, EMC, and Col. SK. Pathologic alterations have been found in myocardium, lungs, liver, pancreas, thymus, brain and spinal cord, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscles. A comparison of the lesions produced by the individual strains has disclosed certain differential features which are discussed in detail. Within the group of so called Coxsackie viruses, myositis has not proved to be a constant finding, and it may occur in suckling mice infected with other types of virus.

  9. Comment by J.P. Figueiredo, & Hoorn, C. on 'Late Miocene sedimentary environments in south-western Amazonia (Solimões Formation; Brazil)' by Martin Gross, Werner E. Piller, Maria Ines Ramos, Jackson Douglas da Silva Paz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Jorge Jesus Picanço

    2012-04-01

    In their paper Gross et al., 2011 present an excellent description of a series of outcrops from the Eirunepe region in western Amazonia (Brazil). The authors interpret these sediments as relics of a Late Miocene anastomosing fluvial system and conclude that the paleogeography of the entire western Amazon region must have been characterized by this environmental setting. They also imply that therefore a long-lived lake system - or megawetland - never existed. We contend this assumption for some reasons, amongst them, the most important are: (1) this is an inconsistent overgeneralized conclusion; (2) The authors make references to previous scientific works we published which we consider incorrect, and therefore can mislead their readers.

  10. [Ecological studies on helminthic taxocenosis of sympatric Chaunus ictericus (Spix, 1824) and Chaunus schneideri (Werner, 1894) (Anura: Bufonidae) captured on São Cristóvão district, Três Barras county, Santa Catarina State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Estevam G Lux; Pedrassani, Daniela; Hoffmann-Inocente, Ana Cecília; Tebaldi, José H; Storti, Luis Fernando; Zanuzzo, Felipe S; Avancini, Neuri; Do Nascimento, Adjair Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Fifty eight Chaunus ictericus and 42 C. schneideri specimens were collected on São Cristóvão district, Três Barras, SC for helminthological studies. Fourteen helminth species were diagnosed, from which only five species were found on both hosts. Chaunus ictericus showed higher values of species richness (2,8448+/-1,1516) and diversity (H = 1,374), with mild dominance (1-D = 0,642, J = 0,5528), in comparison with C. schneideri (0,6428+/-1,007; H = 1,165; 1-D = 0,5822 e J = 0,5985). Also, descriptors of helminthic infection were superior in the former host. Little number of shared species between the analyzed toad species suggests parasitic host-specificity.

  11. Flight Simulations Prep Shuttle Crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    As they simulate one of the three spacewalks scheduled for their upcoming mission to the International Space Station, Commander Ken Ham and Mission Specialist Mike Good discuss with Mike Massimino ...

  12. Teacher's Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noon, Elizabeth F.

    1977-01-01

    Dan DuCote brought in his friend Mike Shane to be the sixth-grade team leader and introduce intraclass instruction. Mike did just that, without consulting the other three teachers. And the war was on! (Editor)

  13. Teacher's Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noon, Elizabeth F.

    1977-01-01

    Dan DuCote brought in his friend Mike Shane to be the sixth-grade team leader and introduce intraclass instruction. Mike did just that, without consulting the other three teachers. And the war was on! (Editor)

  14. Behind the Scenes: Sarafin Goes from Farm to Flight Director

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In this episode of NASA Behind the Scenes, astronaut Mike Massimino chats with flight director Mike Sarafin about when he joined NASA and moved from his family's farm in New York to Houston...with ...

  15. Finite Difference Methods for Time-Dependent, Linear Differential Algebraic Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-27

    Time-Dependent, Linear Differential Algebraic Equations ’ BY PATRICK J. RABIER AND WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT 2 T r e n - sa le; its tot puba"- c. 2 ed...1993 Finite Difference Methods for Time-Dependent, I Linear Differential Algebraic Equations ’ BY PATRICK J. RABIER AND WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT2...LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL ALGEBRAIC EQUATIONS 1 BY PATRICK J. RABIER AND WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT 2 ABSTRACT. Recently the authors developed a global reduction

  16. Technical Evaluation Report on the Flight Mechanics Panel Symposium on the Use of Computers as a Design Tool.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    by Professor Dr- gfrie r Hochschule der Bundeswehr Minchen Werner - Heisenberg -Weg 39 8014 Neubiberg, Germany DTI Tl sJUN . This Advisory Report was...Wagner March 1980 10. Author’s/Editor’s Address II. Pages Hochschule der Bundeswehr MUnchen Werner - Heisenberg -Weg 39 21 8014 Neubiberg, Germany 12...SYMPOSIUM ON THE USE OF COMPUTERS AS A DESIGN TOOL by Professor Dr.-Ing. Siegfried N. Wagner Luftfahrttechnik Hochschule der Bundeswehr Mflnchen Werner

  17. Service-Oriented Architectures and Project Optimization for a Special Cost Management Problem Creating Synergies for Informed Change between Qualitative and Quantitative Strategic Management Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Science, Werner Heisenberg -Weg 39,85577 Neubiberg, Germany,CA,93943 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S...University of the Federal Armed Forces of Germany Institute for Theoretic Computer Science Mathematics and Operations Research Werner Heisenberg -Weg...Research Werner Heisenberg -Weg 39 85577 Neubiberg, Germany Phone +49 89 6004 2400 Marco Schuler—Marco Schuler is an active Officer of the Federal

  18. The Resolution of a Completely Inorganic Coordination Compound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasui, Takaji; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a technique used by Alfred Werner to resolve inorganic coordination compounds. The materials, procedures and analysis necessary for undergraduates to repeat this procedure are described. (CW)

  19. On the Anandan-Stodolsky effect

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, W.G.

    1986-04-01

    By placing a force field in the vertical arms of the Collela-OverhauserWerner interferometer, an additional phase shift, of order the mean potential for this force mc/sup 2/ times the Colella-Overhauser-Werner phase shift, can be obtained, which comes about because of the different velocity dependences of the gravitational and extra forces.

  20. Moisture Effects and Peel Testing of Polymethacrylimide and Honeycomb Core in Sandwich/Skin Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    suitahle. REFERENCES 1. Hollman, Martin, •which Sandwich?", Homebuilt Aircraft , Werner and Werner Publishing Co. Encino, CA. February 1984. 2...sandwich/skin laminates typical of candidate composite aircraft structures, provirtetl a more realistic guide for understanding how the moisture

  1. Relaxation of Fermionic Excitations in a Strongly Attractive Fermi Gas in an Optical Lattice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-27

    energy physics of the repulsive Hubbard model reduces to an antiferro- magnetic Heisenberg model which exhibits a canted anti- ferromagnetic (CAFM...Oka, P. Werner , and H. Aoki, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 236401 (2011); M. Eckstein and P. Werner , Phys. Rev. B 84, 035122 (2011); A. L. Chudnovskiy, D.M

  2. Martha Muchow and Organismic-Developmental Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wapner, Seymour

    1985-01-01

    Examines Martha Muchow's work from the perspective of Heinz Werner's organismic-developmental theory, in terms of its stress on the environment as perceived and experienced by the child and its relevance to Werner's concept of differing "spheres of reality." (Author/SO)

  3. Theories of Intelligence, Learning, and Motivation as a Basis for Praxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nderu-Boddington, Eulalee

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines how Piaget, Werner, and Gardner differ regarding the roles of cognition, intelligence, and learning in the developmental process. Piaget believes in the predominance of genetic factors. Werner stresses the influence of biological factors, while Gardner proposes that the environment plays a greater influence in how intelligence…

  4. High-Power Considerations in Metamaterial Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    2009. [4] Z. H. Jiang, M. Gregory, and D. H. Werner, “Experimental demonstration of a broadband transformation optics lens for highly directive... multibeam emission,” Physical Review B, vol. 84, pp. 165111/1–6, Oct. 2011. [5] J. P. Turpin, Q. Wu, D. H. Werner, B. Martin, M. Bray, and E. Lier, “Low

  5. Human Behaviour Representation in Constructive Modelling (Representation du comportement humain dans des modelisations creatives)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    aspects of Effects Based Operations and non-kinetic warfare. The second keynote presentation, by Mr. Mike Greenley , CAE Inc. provided an industry...faite par Mr. Mike Greenley , de CAE Inc., a donné le point de vue industriel, en indiquant le besoin pour une approche des bons usages de la...Drive Suite 200 Kanata, Ontario K2K 3G7 CANADA Presenter: Mr. Mike Greenley Vice President Modelling and Simulation CAE Inc. 8585 Côte de

  6. Infrared Reflectance Imaging for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Inspection Through Organic Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-15

    MAY 2008 John Benfer John Weir Dennis Leyble Brian Pollock Matthew Campbell Steven Chu Nils Fonneland Mike Miller NAVAIR ISSC/FRC-SE... Dennis Leyble, Brian Pollock, Matthew Campbell, Steven Chu, Nils Fonneland, Mike Miller 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...NAVAIR Jacksonville, principal investigator), Mr. Steven Chu (NGC), Mr. Nils Fonneland (NGC), Mr. Dennis Leyble (NGC), Mr. Mike Miller (CTC), and Mr

  7. Theory of Non-First Norman Form Relational Databases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    Report) B .... k tS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES E I7~L tn’.J A =ER~ 9".Alf - APROEDFOR PUBLIC RELEASE: ’A F 9- enfor Researc an< Professional Development 19...233 Appendix A .. ...... ....... ....... .... 235 x Appendix B ........ ......................... ... 238 Bibliography...typing Jones Joe typing Mike dictation Jones Mike typing I_____ _____ data entry Jones Joe dictation( b Jones Mi~ke dictation( b Jones Joe data entry

  8. Space Station Live: ISS Communications Unit Upgrade

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters interviews International Space Station Flight Director Mike Lammers about the recent Ku communications unit upgrade work taking place aboard th...

  9. Borisenko Hands Over Command to Fossum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Expedition 28 Commander Andrey Borisenko handed over station command duties to Flight Engineer Mike Fossum. Fossum will command Expedition 29. The traditional Change of Command Ceremony took place ...

  10. APPEL Masters with Masters #3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Masters with Masters #3 features Mike Hawes, Assoc. Administrator, Office of Independent Program Cost & Evaluation, and Lynn Cline, Deputy Assoc. Administrator for Special Operations Missions, disc...

  11. ISS Update: Preparing to Leave the Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer interviews NASA astronaut Mike Fossum about his time as commander of the International Space Station's Expedition 29 crew, including his preparations for ...

  12. STS-134 Tribute to Endeavour

    NASA Image and Video Library

    STS-134 Commander Mark Kelly pays tribute to space shuttle Endeavour and the spacecraft's contribution to human spaceflight. Mission specialists Andrew Feustel, Mike Fincke, Roberto Vittori, Greg C...

  13. Station Commander Congratulates New Flight Directors

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 29 Commander Mike Fossum congratulates Judd Frieling, Tomas Gonzalez-Torres and Greg Whitney on being selected as NASA's newest flight directors. ...

  14. 78 FR 16449 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia; Prevention of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... 25304. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mike Gordon, (215) 814-2039, or by email at gordon.mike@epa.gov.... U.S. Court of Appeals' Decision in Natural Resources Defense Council v. EPA On January 4, 2013, the U.S. Court of Appeals, in Natural Resources Defense Council v. EPA, No. 08-1250, 2013 WL 45653...

  15. Comment and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College English, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Critics comment on three earlier "College English" articles: Mike Rose's "The Language of Exclusion: Writing Instruction at the University," Elizabeth A. Nist's "Tattle's Well's Faire: English Women Authors of the Sixteenth Century," and Patrick Hartwell's "Grammar, Grammars, and the Teaching of Grammar." Contains responses from Mike Rose and…

  16. Fine Scale Modeling and Forecasts of Upper Atmospheric Turbulence for Operational Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-30

    ARW and WRF NMM, Unified Model [Andrew Brown, Sean Milton , Mike Cullen, Brian Golding, John Mitchell, and Ann Shelly (2012), http...unified-modei, Unified Model (UM) developed by the UK Met Office. • Andrew Brown, Sean Milton , Mike Cullen, Brian Goiding, John Mitchell, and Ann

  17. Crazy Engineering Starshade and Coronagraph

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-04-26

    Episode 7 of Crazy Engineering series. Host Mike Meacham, Mechanical Engineer at JPL, learns about the two technologies NASA is investing in to image exoplanets: the Starshade and the Coronagraph. Mike interviews Nick Siegler, Program Chief Technologist, NASA Exoplanet Program in the Starshade lab and the High Contrast Imaging Testbed lab.

  18. Sensitivity of stream flow and water table depth to potential climatic variability in a coastal forested watershed

    Treesearch

    Zhaohua Dai; Carl Trettin; Changsheng Li; Devendra M. Amatya; Ge Sun; Harbin Li

    2010-01-01

    A physically based distributed hydrological model, MIKE SHE, was used to evaluate the effects of altered temperature and precipitation regimes on the streamflow and water table in a forested watershed on the southeastern Atlantic coastal plain. The model calibration and validation against both streamflow and water table depth showed that the MIKE SHE was applicable for...

  19. Securely Connecting Instant Messaging Systems for Ad Hoc Networks to Server Based Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    protocol, a key establishment scheme based on key trees and Diffie - Hellman key establishment. It dynamically changes the group key whenever group...protocol The encryption key is provided by the MIKE protocol MIKE: Group key distribution protocol based on Diffie - Hellman key exchange Key is provided

  20. Upstream Transcriptional Regulatory Elements of the S. cerevisiae CSG2 Gene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-07

    dCfCCGTGGGGCCCAATGG, used for the double stranded DNA sequencing was prepared by Mike Flora of the USUHS Oligonucleotide Synthesizing Facility. MEmODS...laboralory’s standard rapid plasmid prep was purified with the Qiagen column prior to sequencing. CSG2 specific primers were synthesized by Mike Flora of the USUHS

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND REVIEW OF MONITORING METHODS AND RISK ASSESSMENT MODELS USED TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF BIOSOLIDS LAND APPLICATION ON HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development and Review of monitoring methods and risk assessment models for biosolids land application impacts on air and land

    Ronald F Herrmann (NRMRL), Mike Broder (NCEA), and Mike Ware (NERL)

    Science Questions .

    MYP Science Question: What additional model...

  2. Peer Review Process and Accreditation of Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-02

    Mike Casas , CPT, and Jim Boatner, CPT, T Understandina and Validatina Complex Simulation Models (Atlanta, Georgia: Georgia Institute of Technology...34 p. 4. 39 BIBLIOGRAPHY Banks, Jerry, Mike Casas and Jim Boatner. Testing, Understanding, and Validating Complex Simulation Models. Atlanta, Georgia...Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory MITRE Corporation RAND Arroyo Center Commandant U. S. Army Air Defense Artillery

  3. A history of logging in the Caspar Creek basin

    Treesearch

    Michael Napolitano; Francis Jackson; Peter Cafferata

    1989-01-01

    Mike Napolitano has written a short paper on this subject as part of his Master's degree work in the Geology Department at Humboldt State University. Mike has produced a "sediment budget" for the North Fork, and took past logging history into account in his work. Francis Jackson is a long-time resident of the Mendocino area and an expert on its history...

  4. Could Wind or Solar Energy Replace Diesel Generators for Aviation Ground Maintenance Operations?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-17

    by Spick, Mike. The Great Book of Modern Warplanes. London: Salamander Books Limited, 2000. Gleim, Irving N. and Gleim, Garret W. Gleim Federal...by Mike Spick, The Great Book of Modern Warplanes (London: Salamander Books Limited 2000) 278-279, Diesel Service and Supply, Electrical Power

  5. Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) from the Magnetic Bubble Source as a Discriminator of Underground Nuclear Explosions, Including Cavity Decoupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    existing VLF lightning arrays  1. Tailor available EMP simulators to extract ELF/VLF pulses to benchmark the receiver system design at existing EMP...ATTN: ADOP Dick Gullickson ATTN: RD-CX Stephen Dowling ATTN: RD-CX Mike Giltrud ATTN: RD-NT COL Jeff Musk ATTN: RD-NT Mike Kuliasha ATTN: OP-OS

  6. Joint Center for Operational Analysis Journal. Volume 9, Issue 3, September 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Transformation of the Joint Lessons Learned Program ,” by Mr. Mike Barker, looks at the development of the program from the earliest Government Accountability...the Joint Lessons Learned Program ................................................... 42 JCOA Journal, September 2007vi JCOA Journal, September 2007...JCOA Journal, September 200742 The Transformation of the Joint Lessons Learned Program Mike Barker, Joint Center for Operational Analysis Executive

  7. The Working Poor and the Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosow, La Vergne

    1994-01-01

    Profiles Mike, a middle-aged Comanche who was preliterate when beginning the author's class in English as a Second Language. Although traditional schooling had failed him, Mike learned enough English to become a prolific writer and translator of North American poetry. By raising tuition and standards, California community college system will…

  8. 77 FR 62537 - Notice of Waste Management Permit Application Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... application by Mike Libecki of Salt Lake City, Utah is submitted to NSF pursuant to regulations issued under... disposal. If camping fuel is spilled, the contaminated snow and ice will be contained in waste barrels and brought to Cape Town for disposal. The permit applicant: Mike Libecki, Salt Lake City, Utah, Permit...

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Equivalent widths of WASP-94A and WASP-94B (Teske+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teske, J. K.; Khanal, S.; Ramirez, I.

    2016-05-01

    Observations of WASP-94AB were acquired on 2015 May 1 (UT) with the MIKE high-resolution spectrograph on the 6.5m Clay Magellan Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. The standard MIKE setup was used with a 0.5" slit, providing ~320-1000nm wavelength coverage and R~45000. (1 data file).

  10. DEVELOPMENT AND REVIEW OF MONITORING METHODS AND RISK ASSESSMENT MODELS USED TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF BIOSOLIDS LAND APPLICATION ON HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development and Review of monitoring methods and risk assessment models for biosolids land application impacts on air and land

    Ronald F Herrmann (NRMRL), Mike Broder (NCEA), and Mike Ware (NERL)

    Science Questions .

    MYP Science Question: What additional model...

  11. 44th Annual Gun and Missile Systems Conference and Exhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-09

    Fin Stabilized High Spinning Projectile, Mr. Rabin Shalil, MalaM , IAI, Israel · 7895 - BTERM II Projectile, Mr. Mike Lukas, Naval Surface...Spinning Projectile, Mr. Rabin Shalil, MalaM , IAI, Israel 3:40 pm - 4:00 pm 7895 - BTERM II Projectile, Mr. Mike Lukas, Naval Surface Warfare Center

  12. STS-125 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-18

    JSC2008-E-096965 (December 2007) --- Astronauts Mike Massimino (right) and Mike Good, STS-125 mission specialists, with home plate from New York City's Shea Stadium during a break from their training in the JSC Neutral Buoyancy Lab. The plate will fly with the STS-125 crew aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. (Photo Credit: NASA)

  13. Comment and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College English, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Critics comment on three earlier "College English" articles: Mike Rose's "The Language of Exclusion: Writing Instruction at the University," Elizabeth A. Nist's "Tattle's Well's Faire: English Women Authors of the Sixteenth Century," and Patrick Hartwell's "Grammar, Grammars, and the Teaching of Grammar." Contains responses from Mike Rose and…

  14. Recollections of Physics and of Physicists During the 1920's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, David M.

    1974-01-01

    Presents the author's recollections of the emergence of the new quantum theory and his associations with such men as Oskar Klein, Niels Bohr, Frederick Hund, Werner Heisenberg, J. J. Thomson, and others. (GS)

  15. Vitamin C and colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... belief is that vitamin C can cure the common cold . However, research about this claim is conflicting. Although ... Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ...

  16. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ... gov/pubmed/22962927 . Melio FR, Berge LR. Upper respiratory tract infections. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  17. Recollections of Physics and of Physicists During the 1920's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, David M.

    1974-01-01

    Presents the author's recollections of the emergence of the new quantum theory and his associations with such men as Oskar Klein, Niels Bohr, Frederick Hund, Werner Heisenberg, J. J. Thomson, and others. (GS)

  18. Student Interns Tour Two NIH Facilities | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Thirty-five Werner H. Kirsten student interns toured the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda in August to learn about the services and opportunities available.

  19. Why Extra Gauge Bosons Should Exist and How to Hunt Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leike, Arnd

    2003-09-01

    Werner Heisenberg's work is the foundation for many topics of present research. This is also true for the search for extra gauge bosons. The prospects of future colliders in this search are shortly mentioned.

  20. Validate Mitotic Checkpoint and Kinetochore Motor Proteins in Breast Cancer Cells as Targets for the Development of Novel Anti-Mitotic Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    which chromosomal instability, aneuploidy, and increased tumorigenesis are prominent hallmarks. These include ataxia-telangiectasia, xeroderma ... pigmentosum , Nijmegen breakage syndromes, Bloom’s syndrome, and Werner’s syndrome, (Modesti and Kanaar, 2001; Thompson and Schild, 2002). Defects in mitotic

  1. Student Interns Tour Two NIH Facilities | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Thirty-five Werner H. Kirsten student interns toured the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda in August to learn about the services and opportunities available.

  2. ARC-1973-A73-9045-139

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-11-21

    Pioneer 10 Mission to Jupiter; Press conference and tour of Mission Control for VIP visitors with Dr. Werner Von Braun on left (in trench coat) Dr Richard Fimmel, Ames, center (with album) and Dr Fletcher, NASA Administrator to his right.

  3. 78 FR 70267 - Multilayered Wood Flooring From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Wood Co., Ltd........ 4.77 Fujian Wuyishan Werner Green Industry 4.77 Co., Ltd. Fusong Jinlong Wooden....; Riverside Plywood Corporation; Samling Elegant Living Trading (Labuan) Limited; Samling Global USA,...

  4. WHK Student Interns Named Top Scholars in Regeneron Science Talent Search | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two Werner H. Kirsten Student Interns were recently named Top Scholars in the 2017 Regeneron Science Talent Search, the nation’s most prestigious science and math competition for high school students.

  5. Travelers' Health: Coccidioidomycosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Galgiani JN, Ampel NM, Blair JE, Catanzaro A, Johnson RH, Stevens DA, et al. Coccidioidomycosis. Clin Infect ... Rosenstein NE, Emery KW, Werner SB, Kao A, Johnson R, Rogers D, et al. Risk factors for ...

  6. Survivable Loosely Coupled Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Verlag Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pages 291–303, Pune, India, September 2000. [6] Saddek Bensalem, Marius Bozga, Jean - Claude Fernandez, Lucian...IEEE Computer Society. [5] John Rushby. An overview of formal verification for the time-triggered architecture. In Werner Damm and Ernst-Rüdiger...Agathe Merceron. Parametric verification of a group membership algo- rithm. In Werner Damm and Ernst-Rüdiger Olderog, editors, Formal Techniques in Real

  7. The Determination of User Information Requirements during the Development of Management Information Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Werner , Greenburg, and Goldberg [Ref. 51 1 for determining the p information needs of an outpatient clinic) tries to make up for this difficulty. Rather...observed to determine what information is being used and how it is being used. Werner et al. point out that, "The behavior of the physician does not...the " Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle," namely: ...any system development activity inevitably changes the environment out of which tte need for the

  8. [Types of neurons in the visual cortex of the rat, identified in Nissl- and deimpregnated Golgi preparations].

    PubMed

    Werner, L; Hedlich, A; Winkelmann, E

    1985-01-01

    Neuronal types of the rat's visual cortex were identified in Nissl stained and deimpregnated Golgi sections (rapid Golgi method modified by Fairén et al. 1977, Golgi-Bubenaite, Golgi-Kopsch and modified by Braitenberg; deimpregnation after FAIREN et al. 1977 and Braak and Braak 1982, respectively). Cytoplasm and nucleus become visible in deimpregnated neurons and can then be counter-stained with methylene blue or toluidin blue. Somal and nuclear features of Nissl stained and deimpregnated neurons were compared. Provided that these features as well as the specific localization, the relative size and the shape of the soma agree the neurons are identical. We could find that the following neuronal types are identical in Golgi and Nissl stained sections: pyramidal cells of layers II-VI, pyramid-like neurons of layers VI and VII (VIa, b, c) (type C, Werner et al. 1982), multiangular neurons of layer I (type A, Werner et al. 1982), spiny stellate cells of layer IV, sparsely spined neurons with ascending axons (Martinotti cells) (type H, Werner et al. 1982), large and medium-sized spine-free, multipolar neurons (basket cells) (type B, Werner et al. 1982). Bipolar neurons and chandelier cells are identical with neurons poor in cytoplasm (types E, F, G, Werner et al. 1982). Until today two neuronal types could not be identified: type D of L I (Werner et al. 1982) and small, sparsely-spined neurons of layer IV with variable axons (Hedlich and Winkelmann 1982; Hedlich et al. 1984). Characteristics of somata, dendrites and axons of neurons identified in this paper are summarized in table 1. In most cases, these findings confirm earlier suppositions concerning the identity of neuronal types of the rat's visual cortex in Golgi and Nissl stained sections (Werner et al. 1979) and verify the values of their frequency and distribution pattern (Werner et al. 1982).

  9. Teachers, Globalization, and Hope: Beyond the Narrative of Redemption. Essay Review of "Teachers and the State: Towards a Directed Profession," by Mike Bottery and Nigel Wright; "The Life and Work of Teachers: International Perspectives in Changing Times," edited by Christopher Day, Alicia Fernandez, Trond E. Hauge, and Jorunnn Moller; and "Teachers' Work in a Globalizing Economy," by John Smyth, Alastair Dow, Robert Hattam, Alan Reid, and Geoffrey Shacklock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischman, Gustavo E.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews three books that argue that the teaching profession is being deprofessionalized by the demands and policies of "neoliberal globalizers." Discusses the nature of hope in these global times and its role in developing alternative proposals to the current process of intensification of teachers' work. (SV)

  10. Evaluation of various modelling approaches in flood routing simulation and flood area mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, George; Loukas, Athanasios; Vasiliades, Lampros; Aronica, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    An essential process of flood hazard analysis and mapping is the floodplain modelling. The selection of the modelling approach, especially, in complex riverine topographies such as urban and suburban areas, and ungauged watersheds may affect the accuracy of the outcomes in terms of flood depths and flood inundation area. In this study, a sensitivity analysis implemented using several hydraulic-hydrodynamic modelling approaches (1D, 2D, 1D/2D) and the effect of modelling approach on flood modelling and flood mapping was investigated. The digital terrain model (DTMs) used in this study was generated from Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) point cloud data. The modelling approaches included 1-dimensional hydraulic-hydrodynamic models (1D), 2-dimensional hydraulic-hydrodynamic models (2D) and the coupled 1D/2D. The 1D hydraulic-hydrodynamic models used were: HECRAS, MIKE11, LISFLOOD, XPSTORM. The 2D hydraulic-hydrodynamic models used were: MIKE21, MIKE21FM, HECRAS (2D), XPSTORM, LISFLOOD and FLO2d. The coupled 1D/2D models employed were: HECRAS(1D/2D), MIKE11/MIKE21(MIKE FLOOD platform), MIKE11/MIKE21 FM(MIKE FLOOD platform), XPSTORM(1D/2D). The validation process of flood extent achieved with the use of 2x2 contingency tables between simulated and observed flooded area for an extreme historical flash flood event. The skill score Critical Success Index was used in the validation process. The modelling approaches have also been evaluated for simulation time and requested computing power. The methodology has been implemented in a suburban ungauged watershed of Xerias river at Volos-Greece. The results of the analysis indicate the necessity of sensitivity analysis application with the use of different hydraulic-hydrodynamic modelling approaches especially for areas with complex terrain.

  11. Phase 2 trial of sunitinib and gemcitabine in patients with sarcomatoid and/or poor-risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Michaelson MD, McKay RR, Werner L, Atkins MB, Van Allen EM, Olivier KM, Song J, Signoretti S, McDermott DF, Choueiri TK.Cancer. 2015 Oct 1;121(19):3435-43. [Epub 2015 Jun 8]. doi: 10.1002/cncr.29503.

    PubMed

    Jay, Raman; McKay, R R; Werner, L; Atkins, M B; Van Allen, E M; Olivier, K M; Song, J; Signoretti, S; McDermott, D F; Choueiri, T K

    2017-03-01

    Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is associated with an aggressive biology and a poor prognosis. Poor-risk RCC is defined by clinical prognostic factors and demonstrates similarly aggressive behavior. No standard treatment exists for patients with sarcomatoid RCC, and treatment options for patients with poor-risk disease are of limited benefit. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy in clinically aggressive RCC. This was a phase 2, single-arm trial of sunitinib and gemcitabine in patients with sarcomatoid or poor-risk RCC. The primary end point was the objective response rate (ORR). Secondary end points included the time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), safety, and biomarker correlatives. Overall, 39 patients had sarcomatoid RCC, and 33 had poor-risk RCC. The ORR was 26% for patients with sarcomatoid RCC and 24% for patients with poor-risk RCC. The median TTP and OS for patients with sarcomatoid RCC were 5 and 10 months, respectively. For patients with poor-risk disease, the median TTP and OS were 5.5 and 15 months, respectively. Patients whose tumors had>10% sarcomatoid histology had a higher clinical benefit rate (ORR plus stable disease) than those with≤10% sarcomatoid histology (P = 0.04). The most common grade 3 or higher treatment-related adverse events included neutropenia (n = 20), anemia (n = 10), and fatigue (n = 7). These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy are an active and well-tolerated combination for patients with aggressive RCC. The combination may be more efficacious than either therapy alone and is currently under further investigation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Flexible sparse regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Dirk A.; Resmerita, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The seminal paper of Daubechies, Defrise, DeMol made clear that {{\\ell }}p spaces with p\\in [1,2) and p-powers of the corresponding norms are appropriate settings for dealing with reconstruction of sparse solutions of ill-posed problems by regularization. It seems that the case p = 1 provides the best results in most of the situations compared to the cases p\\in (1,2). An extensive literature gives great credit also to using {{\\ell }}p spaces with p\\in (0,1) together with the corresponding quasi-norms, although one has to tackle challenging numerical problems raised by the non-convexity of the quasi-norms. In any of these settings, either superlinear, linear or sublinear, the question of how to choose the exponent p has been not only a numerical issue, but also a philosophical one. In this work we introduce a more flexible way of sparse regularization by varying exponents. We introduce the corresponding functional analytic framework, that leaves the setting of normed spaces but works with so-called F-norms. One curious result is that there are F-norms which generate the ℓ 1 space, but they are strictly convex, while the ℓ 1-norm is just convex.

  13. Human Behaviour Representation in Constructive Modelling (Representation du comportement humain dans des modelisations creatives)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Operations and non-kinetic warfare. The second keynote presentation, by Mr. Mike Greenley , CAE Inc. provided an industry perspective, noting the need for...aspects humains des opérations basées sur les effets et des actions de combats non cinétiques. La seconde présentation faite par Mr. Mike Greenley , de...K2K 3G7 CANADA Presenter: Mr. Mike Greenley Vice President Modelling and Simulation CAE Inc. 8585 Côte de Liesse Saint-Laurent, Québec H4T

  14. KSC-2009-1505

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-03

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Mike Curie (left), with NASA Public Affairs, introduces NASA managers following their day-long Flight Readiness Review of space shuttle Discovery for the STS-119 mission. Next to Curie are (from left) William H. Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for Space Operations, John Shannon, Shuttle Program manager, Mike Suffredini, program manager for the International Space Station, and Mike Leinbach, shuttle launch director. NASA managers decided to plan a launch no earlier than Feb. 19, pending additional analysis and particle impact testing associated with a flow control valve in the shuttle's main engine system. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston

  15. STS-114: Discovery Post Landing Press Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A post landing discussion of the STS-114 Space Shuttle Discovery is shown. Dean Acosta, Deputy Assistant Administrator of Public Affairs introduces the panel. The panel consists of: Michael Griffin, NASA Administrator, Bill Parsons, Space Shuttle Program Manager, Mike Leinbach, NASA Launch Director, and Bill Readdy, Associate Administrator for Space Operations. Mike Griffin answers questions from the news media about the amount of damage to the Space Shuttle and the possibility of returning to space, Mike Leinbach addresses the question about the process of bringing Discovery back to Kennedy Space Center and Bill Parsons talks about milestones reached during this mission.

  16. iss028e034116

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-26

    ISS028-E-034116 (26 Aug. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance on the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  17. FE Fossum performs aRED In-Flight Maintenance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-28

    ISS028-E-019392 (28 July 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  18. iss028e034309

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-25

    ISS028-E-034309 (25 Aug. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance on the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  19. iss028e034305

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-25

    ISS028-E-034305 (25 Aug. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance on the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  20. Behind the Scenes: Discovery Crew Practices Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In this episode of NASA Behind the Scenes, Astronaut Mike Massimino introduces you to Commander Steve Lindsey and the crewmembers of STS-133, space shuttle Discovery's last mission. Go inside one o...

  1. Fossum in sleeping bag on middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-06-09

    S124-E-007975 (9 June 2008) --- Astronaut Mike Fossum, STS-124 mission specialist, sleeps in his sleeping bag, which is attached to the lockers on the middeck of the Space Shuttle Discovery, while docked with the International Space Station.

  2. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    Students listen intently while NASA's Director, Earth Science Division, Mike Freilich, speaks at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  3. Peter Frampton Talks to Station Crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Rocker Peter Frampton and his band are introduced by astronaut Ron Garan to Commander Mike Fossum and Flight Engineers Satoshi Furukawa and Sergei Volkov aboard the International Space Station duri...

  4. FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA665, INTERIOR. UPPER LEVEL. CONCRETE WALLS. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA-665, INTERIOR. UPPER LEVEL. CONCRETE WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD42-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 3/2004 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA666, INTERIOR. INSIDE LABORATORY 102, CAMERA FACING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA-666, INTERIOR. INSIDE LABORATORY 102, CAMERA FACING NORTH. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-24-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Behind the Scenes: Mission Control Practices Launching Discovery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Before every shuttle launch, the astronauts train with their ascent team in Mission Control Houston. In this episode of NASA Behind the Scenes, astronaut Mike Massimino introduces you to some of th...

  7. Behind the Scenes: Astronauts Pockets Deep in Mystery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Host Mike Massimino returns to the pre-launch suit up room at the Kennedy Space Center to reexamine the question: what's inside all those pockets of the astronauts' big orange suits? Find out on "N...

  8. Building Learning Health Systems to Accelerate Research and Improve Outcomes of Clinical Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    English, Mike; Irimu, Grace; Agweyu, Ambrose; Gathara, David; Oliwa, Jacquie; Ayieko, Philip; Were, Fred; Paton, Chris; Tunis, Sean; Forrest, Christopher B

    2016-04-01

    Mike English and colleagues argue that as efforts are made towards achieving universal health coverage it is also important to build capacity to develop regionally relevant evidence to improve healthcare.

  9. Space Station Live: Installing the AMS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    PAO Officer Kyle Herring interviews NASA astronaut Mike Fincke about his contribution during STS-134, the shuttle mission that installed the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) in May 2011. As a miss...

  10. Cosmesis: The Art of Making Artificial Limbs Look Lifelike

    MedlinePlus

    ... from others. Mike Holt is president of a company that makes cosmeses. He explains that they not ... detail. William J. Hanson is president of a company that provides custom cosmeses. He says that they ...

  11. ETRCF, TRA654, INTERIOR. TEST VESSEL (NOT REACTOR) INSIDE PIT. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR-CF, TRA-654, INTERIOR. TEST VESSEL (NOT REACTOR) INSIDE PIT. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD24-2-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, ca. 2003 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA635. SOUTH SIDE. CAMERA FACING NORTH. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA-635. SOUTH SIDE. CAMERA FACING NORTH. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-41-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA666, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF TEST LOOP PIPING. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA-666, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF TEST LOOP PIPING. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD30-1-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 6/2001 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. 75 FR 52437 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 95 IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This amendment adopts miscellaneous... Programs Division, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation Administration, Mike ] Monroney Aeronautical...

  15. 78 FR 10060 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 97 Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Division, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation Administration, Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center...

  16. 76 FR 52239 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 97 Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Programs Divisions, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation Administration, Mike Monroney Aeronautical...

  17. Fossum during HAM radio pass

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-31

    ISS029-E-036777 (31 Oct. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 29 commander, conducts a ham radio session in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station with students at the Kantonsschule in Zug, Switzerland.

  18. White House

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trump Sign Up to Receive Updates President Donald J. Trump's Joint Address to Congress Watch the President's ... All Americans The Administration The Administration President Donald J. Trump Vice President Mike Pence First Lady Melania ...

  19. Behind the Scenes: Food Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Astronaut Mike Massimino talks to Vicki Kloeris, NASA Food Scientist and manager of the Space Food Systems Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center, about a special "All-American" meal for the STS...

  20. ARC-2007-ACD07-0145-014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-01

    NASA Officials gather at Ames Research Center to discuss Spaceship development progress. Constellation is developing the Orion spacecraft and Ares rockets to support an American return to the moon by 2020. (with Mike Mewhinney, Ames PAO (news chief) Officer)