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Sample records for milde ryszard przeweda

  1. Ryszard Rodzinski-A Forgotten Polish Inventor and Pioneer of Combined Spinal-Epidural Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Daszkiewicz, Andrzej R; Copik, Maja M; Misiolek, Hanna D; Reiss, Wojciech Z

    2016-10-01

    Dr. Ryszard Rodzinski was a Polish surgeon who, in spite of his short life, had a productive career. His most important discovery was a safer method of performing regional anesthesia for abdominal surgery. The first description of combined spinal epidural anesthesia is generally attributed to Soresi in 1937. In the early 20th century, Rodzinski invented a novel technique, "combined lumbosacral anesthesia," which combined lumbar spinal anesthesia and sacral epidural anesthesia. During the 19th Meeting of Polish Surgeons in July 1922 in Warsaw, Rodzinski presented an article entitled "On Combined Lumbosacral Anaesthesia," in which he described this technique used in surgical clinic in Lwów since October 1921. Given this presentation, Rodzinski could be considered to have made the first known presentation of the combined spinal and epidural anesthesia.

  2. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions Glossary Contact Us Visitor Feedback mild Traumatic Brain Injury mild Traumatic Brain Injury VIDEO STORIES What is TBI Measuring Severity ... most common deployment injuries is a mild Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). A mild TBI is an injury ...

  3. Mild balanoposthitis.

    PubMed Central

    Fornasa, C V; Calabrŏ, A; Miglietta, A; Tarantello, M; Biasinutto, C; Peserico, A

    1994-01-01

    AIM--To identify and study cases of mild balanoposthitis (MBP) with penile pathology among patients observed at a dermatology clinic over an 18-month period. MATERIALS--The study included 321 patients with penile pathology. The term MBP was used to describe balanoposthitis of a localised, inflammatory nature with few, non-specific symptoms and a tendency to become chronic or recur. Two hundred and seventy had diseases clearly identifiable by clinical examination or laboratory tests; 51 cases were diagnosed as MBP and these patients had blood tests (to evaluate immune status) and microbiological examination; when these proved negative, a series of patch tests was also used. RESULTS--Of the 51 patients diagnosed as having MBP, the cause was ascertained in 34 cases (infection, mechanical trauma, contact irritation, contact allergy, etc.), whereas no specific aetiological factor was detected to explain the symptoms in the remaining 17 cases. PMID:8001949

  4. Mild typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Topley, J M

    1986-01-01

    A series of 100 Zimbabwean children aged between 5 months and 13 years with culture positive typhoid fever is presented. The disease was found to be fairly mild with a low prevalence of complications, and no patient in the series died. Possible explanations for the relative mildness of typhoid in this paediatric population are discussed. PMID:3954441

  5. Cognitive Processing in Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.; Poteet, James A.

    Research regarding the cognitive processing of students with learning disabilities, mild mental handicap, and emotional handicap is reviewed. In considering cognitive processing for students with mild mental handicap, research attention has been directed to the issues of memory and learning, acquisition and retrieval deficits, inefficient…

  6. Physical Exercise And Cognitive Engagement Outcomes for Mild Neurocognitive Disorder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Mild Cognitive Impairment; Memory Disorders; Mild Dementia; Impaired Cognition; Mild Cognitive Disorder; Amnestic Disorder; Dementia and Amnestic Conditions; Poor Short-term Memory; Memory Impairment; Mild Neurocognitive Disorder

  7. "White Privilege": A Mild Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    White privilege analysis has been influential in philosophy of education. I offer some mild criticisms of this largely salutary direction--its inadequate exploration of its own normative foundations, and failure to distinguish between "spared injustice", "unjust enrichment" and "non-injustice-related" privileges; its inadequate exploration of the…

  8. Educating Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyen, Edward L., Ed.; And Others

    The book contains 19 papers from the journal, "Focus on Exceptional Children," that discuss new perspectives and practices in educating students with mild disabilities. The first half of the book is titled "New Perspectives" and includes the following articles: "Beyond the Regular Education Initiative/Inclusion and the Resource Room Controversy"…

  9. Teaching Adolescents with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Jennifer M.; Olson, Judy L.

    This textbook provides information on how to teach middle and high school students with mild disabilities both in school settings and in out-of-school settings and how to prepare these adolescents for future postsecondary and work environments. Part 1, "The Student and the Secondary School Environment," addresses the following topics:…

  10. Mildly Handicapped: Reading, Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers 107 materials for teaching reading, with emphasis on reading comprehension skills and high interest low vocabulary formats, to mildly handicapped (learning…

  11. Mild coal gasification: Product separation

    SciTech Connect

    Wallman, P.H.; Singleton, M.F.

    1992-08-04

    Our general objective is to further the development of efficient continuous mild coal gasification processes. The research this year has been focused on product separation problems and particularly the problem of separating entrained ultra-fine particles from the chemically reactive environment of the product gas stream. Specifically, the objective of the present work has been to study candidate barrier filters for application to mild coal gasification processes. Our approach has been to select the most promising existing designs, to develop a design of our own and to test the designs in our bench-scale gasification apparatus. As a first step towards selection of the most promising barrier filter we have determined coking rates on several candidate filter media.

  12. Development of mild gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.I.C.; Gillespie, B.L.

    1988-02-01

    Under a previous contract with Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC21-84MC21108, UCC Research Corporation (UCCRC) built and tested a 1500 lb/day Mild Gasification Process Development Unit (MGU). The MGU, as tested under the previous contract, is shown in Figure 1. Testing completed under the previous contract showed that good quality hydrocarbon liquids and good quality char can be produced in the MGU. However, the MGU is not optimized. The primary objectives of the current project are to optimize the MGU and determine the suitability of char for several commercial applications. The program consists of four tasks; Task 1-Test Plan; Task 2-Optimization of Mild Gasification Process; Task 3-Evaluation of Char and Char/Coal Blends as a Boiler/Blast Furnace Fuel; and Task 4-Analysis of Data and Preparation of Final Report. Task 1 has been completed while work continued on Task 2.

  13. Development of mild gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.I.C.; Gillespie, B.L.

    1987-11-01

    Under a previous contract with Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. AC21-84MC21108, UCC Research Corporation (UCCRC) built and tested a 1500 lb/day Mild Gasification Process Development Unit (MGU). The MGU, as tested under the previous contract, is shown in Figure 1. Testing completed under the previous contract showed that good quality hydrocarbon liquids and good quality char can be produced in the MGU. However, the MGU is not optimized. The primary objectives of the current project are to optimize the MGU and determine the suitability of char for several commercial applications. The program consists of four tasks; Task 1 -- Test Plan; Task 2 -- Optimization of Mild Gasification Process; Task 3 -- Evaluation of Char and Char/Coal Blends as a Boiler/Blast Furnace Fuel; and Task 4 -- Analysis of Data and Preparation of Final Report. Task 1 has been completed while work continued on Task 2.

  14. Development of mild gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.I.C.; Derting, T.M.

    1988-07-01

    Under a previous contract with Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. AC21-84MC21108, UCC Research Corporation (UCCRC) built and tested a 1500 lb/day Mild Gasification Process Development Unit (MGU). The MGU, as tested under the previous contract, is shown in Figure 1. Testing completed under the previous contract showed that good quality hydrocarbon liquids and good quality char can be produced in the MGU. However, the MGU is not optimized. The primary objectives of the current project are to optimize the MGU and determine the suitability of char for several commercial applications. The program consists of four tasks; Task 1 -- Test Plan; Task 2 -- Optimization of Mild Gasification Process; Task 3 -- Evaluation of Char and Char/Coal Blends as a Boiler/Blast Furnace Fuel; and Task 4 -- Analysis of Data and Preparation of Final Report. Task 1 has been completed while work continued on Task 2.

  15. Development of mild gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.I.C.; Williams, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    Under a previous contract with Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. AC21-84MC21108, UCC Research Corporation (UCCRC) built and tested a 1500 lb/day Mild Gasification Process Development Unit (MGU). The MGU, as tested under the previous contract, is shown in Figure 1. Testing completed under the previous contract showed that good quality hydrocarbon liquids and good quality char can be produced in the MGU. However, the MGU is not optimized. The primary objectives of the current project are to optimize the MGU and determine the suitability of char for several commercial applications. The program consists of four tasks; Task 1 -- Test Plan; Task 2 -- Optimization of Mild Gasification Process; Task 3 -- Evaluation of Char and Char/Coal Blends as a Boiler/Blast Furnace Fuel; and Task 4 -- Analysis of Data and Preparation of Final Report. Task 1 has been completed while work continued on Task 2.

  16. Consumer preferences for mild cheddar cheese flavors.

    PubMed

    Drake, S L; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2008-11-01

    Flavor is an important factor in consumer selection of cheeses. Mild Cheddar cheese is the classification used to describe Cheddar cheese that is not aged extensively and has a "mild" flavor. However, there is no legal definition or age limit for Cheddar cheese to be labeled mild, medium, or sharp, nor are the flavor profiles or flavor expectations of these cheeses specifically defined. The objectives of this study were to document the distinct flavor profiles among commercially labeled mild Cheddar cheeses, and to characterize if consumer preferences existed for specific mild Cheddar cheese flavors or flavor profiles. Flavor descriptive sensory profiles of a representative array of commercial Cheddar cheeses labeled as mild (n= 22) were determined using a trained sensory panel and an established cheese flavor sensory language. Nine representative Cheddar cheeses were selected for consumer testing. Consumers (n= 215) assessed the cheeses for overall liking and other consumer liking attributes. Internal preference mapping, cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis were conducted. Mild Cheddar cheeses were diverse in flavor with many displaying flavors typically associated with more age. Four distinct consumer clusters were identified. The key drivers of liking for mild Cheddar cheese were: color, cooked/milky, whey and brothy flavors, and sour taste. Consumers have distinct flavor and color preferences for mild Cheddar cheese. These results can help manufacturers understand consumer preferences for mild Cheddar cheese.

  17. Aetiology of mild mental retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, M A; Dennis, N R

    1988-01-01

    A clinical and family study was carried out in 169 children attending schools for the mildly mentally retarded in Southampton to assess the prevalence of recognised medical risk factors; 71 children (42%) had such risk factors. These were prenatal in 22, perinatal in 41, and postnatal in eight. Risk factors of possible, but less certain, significance were found in a further 63 children (37%). In 86 families (51%) there was a history of serious educational problems in both parents. The prevalence of both types of risk factor was higher in the children whose parents had no educational problems. There were, however, 25 children (15%) whose parents had no history of educational problems and in whom medical risk factors were either absent or minimal. PMID:3178264

  18. Neuropsychological evaluation of mild head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Gentilini, M; Nichelli, P; Schoenhuber, R; Bortolotti, P; Tonelli, L; Falasca, A; Merli, G A

    1985-01-01

    Neuropsychological deficits following mild head injury have been reported recently in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate this issue with a strict methodological approach. The neuropsychological performance of 50 mildly head injured patients was compared with that of 50 normal controls chosen with the case-control approach. No conclusive evidence was found that mild head injury causes cognitive impairment one month after the trauma. PMID:3981170

  19. Evaluation of mild skin cleansers.

    PubMed

    Wortzman, M S

    1991-01-01

    Each person makes the decision of how best to care for his or her own skin. Among the prime concerns, especially for facial skin, is the type of dirt, debris, or make-up to be removed. In most cases, all products do an adequate job in the removal of dirt; if not, the washing techniques can be modified to accomplish the task at hand. What cannot be controlled are the adverse side effects inherent in the use of that product. These adverse properties include damages to the barrier function of the skin; increased susceptibility to environmental sources of irritation and sensitization; frank irritation responses, such as erythema and edema; and reduction of the cosmetic qualities of the skin, such as degree of moisture and smoothness. Part of the problem is that most of these changes are subtle, occurring slowly over time. Often, the association of these problems with the use of a particular facial cleansing regimen is overlooked. The typical woman uses as many as 10 to 15 facial cosmetic and cleansing products each day, making the identification of a problem even more difficult. It is important to identify the risks associated with individual products and with product categories in general. Although the identification of a safe group of products to use for facial cleansing is desirable, the results of this investigation indicate that there are no simple answers. It has been assumed that because moisturizing cream formulations are routinely safe and mild in general use, a cleansing product in the same general form would share these attributes. We can see from the results in Table 2 and Figures 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9 that cleansing creams are not uniformly superior to cleansing bars in the key attributes that are used to evaluate mildness. In each evaluation there were individual cleansing creams that demonstrated statistically weaker performance than did cleansing bars in general. As a group, cleansing creams did well in the cosmetic categories of dryness and texture but

  20. Early Allergies -- Payback for a Mild Winter?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Allergies -- Payback for a Mild Winter? Early blooms may start you sneezing and sniffling ahead of ... dormant, Caudle said. Also, trees are starting to bloom in many parts of the United States, in ...

  1. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism (PTH) in mild TBI and develop criteria for assessing which patients with a mild TBI are at risk for...project occurs. 20 subjects were found to have hypopituitarism . Further details are in the body of this report 15. SUBJECT TERMS post traumatic... hypopituitarism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT

  2. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    is to identify the incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism (PTH) in mild TBI and develop criteria for assessing which patients with a mild TBI are...Introduction: The purpose of this project will be to study the diagnosis of post traumatic hypopituitarism after MTBI. We will determine the incidence...of hypopituitarism following MTBI and develop criteria for assessing which MTBI patients are at high risk for developing posttraumatic

  3. Comparing Cognitive Profiles of Licensed Drivers with Mild Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) constitute two of the most common forms of dementia in North America. Driving is a primary means of mobility among older adults and the risk of dementia increases with advanced age. The purpose of this paper is to describe the cognitive profile of licensed drivers with mild AD and mild DLB. Method. Licensed drivers with mild AD, mild DLB, and healthy controls completed neuropsychological tests measuring general cognition, attention, visuospatial/perception, language, and cognitive fluctuations. Results. The results showed differences between healthy controls and demented participants on almost all neuropsychological measures. Participants with early DLB were found to perform significantly worse on some measures of attention and visuospatial functioning in comparison with early AD. Discussion. Future research should examine the relationship between neuropsychological measures and driving outcomes among individuals with mild AD and mild DLB. PMID:27774333

  4. A comparison of emotional decoding abilities in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment, very mild and mild Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Aleksandra; Krzywoszanski, Lukasz; Spisak, Karolina; Donohue, Bryan E; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Slowik, Agnieszka

    2014-02-01

    Deficits in emotional decoding abilities were described in patients with Alzheimer's dementia and amnestic type of mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI). However the pattern of decline and its dependency on the type of emotional stimuli has not been investigated so far. In our study, 5 sets of cartoon-like drawings portraying various human emotions of increasing complexity were presented to patients with very mild and mild Alzheimer's dementia, a-MCI and control subjects. Patients with Alzheimer's dementia, a-MCI and control subjects decoded emotions with similar accuracy. The pattern of decoding abilities was similar in Alzheimer's dementia, a-MCI patients and healthy control subjects. Decoding abilities depended on a manner the emotional stimuli were presented.

  5. Mild Primary Hyperparathyroidism: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Applewhite, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical profile of classic primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) consists of both elevated calcium and parathyroid hormone levels. The standard of care is parathyroidectomy unless prohibited by medical comorbidities. Because more patients are undergoing routine bone density evaluation and neck imaging studies for other purposes, there is a subset of people identified with a biochemically mild form of the pHPT that expresses itself as either elevated calcium or parathyroid hormone levels. These patients often do not fall into the criteria for operation based on the National Institutes of Health consensus guidelines, and they can present a challenge of diagnosis and management. The purpose of this paper is to review the available literature on mild pHPT in an effort to better characterize this patient population and to determine whether patients benefit from parathyroidectomy. Evidence suggests that there are patients with mild pHPT who have overt symptoms that are found to improve after parathyroidectomy. There is also a group of patients with biochemically mild pHPT who are found to progress to classic pHPT over time; however, it is not predictable which group of patients this will be. Early intervention for this group with mild pHPT may prevent progression of bone, psychiatric, and renal complications, and parathyroidectomy has proven safe in appropriately selected patients at high volume centers. PMID:25063228

  6. Automatic Prosodic Analysis to Identify Mild Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Moreira, Eduardo; Torres-Boza, Diana; Kairuz, Héctor Arturo; Ferrer, Carlos; Garcia-Zamora, Marlene; Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Hernandez-Gómez, Luis Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an exploratory technique to identify mild dementia by assessing the degree of speech deficits. A total of twenty participants were used for this experiment, ten patients with a diagnosis of mild dementia and ten participants like healthy control. The audio session for each subject was recorded following a methodology developed for the present study. Prosodic features in patients with mild dementia and healthy elderly controls were measured using automatic prosodic analysis on a reading task. A novel method was carried out to gather twelve prosodic features over speech samples. The best classification rate achieved was of 85% accuracy using four prosodic features. The results attained show that the proposed computational speech analysis offers a viable alternative for automatic identification of dementia features in elderly adults. PMID:26558287

  7. Mild Wind Series, Minute Steak Event

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-20

    AD-A286 599 _C *POR-6546’ IWT-65461 MILD WIND SERIES MINUTE STEAK EVENT PROJECT OFFICERS REPORT TECHNICAL DIRECTORS SUMMARY REPORT flELECTL...POR-6546 (2) POR-2039 (2) POR-6300 (2) POR-2725 (2) POR-6337 (2) POR-3000 (2) WT-561 (2) WT-601 (2) POR-6546 (WT-6546) MILD WIND SERIES MINUTE STEAK ...PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK. r lit ! ABSTRACT MINUTE STEAK was a Department of Defense Vertical Line of Sight (LOS) undergound It was detonated

  8. Mildly Handicapped: Consumer Education, Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on specil education materials--the bibliography covers 82 materials for teaching consumer education to mildly handicapped (learning disabled, emotionally disturbed, or educable mentally handicapped) students at the…

  9. Learning Strategies for Adolescents with Mild Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Koman, Kara; Schibelka, Mary; Higgin, Karen; Cooper, Cody; Butler, Jordyn

    2013-01-01

    Learning strategy instruction is an evidence-based practice for teaching adolescents with mild disabilities. However, researchers have not developed strategies for every content area or skill. Therefore, teachers need to be able develop strategies based on the needs of their students. This article reviews the process for developing and teaching…

  10. Computer Assessment of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Judith; Morrow, Lisa; Eschman, Amy; Archer, Gretchen; Luther, James; Zuccolotto, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Many older individuals experience cognitive decline with aging. The causes of cognitive dysfunction range from the devastating effects of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) to treatable causes of dysfunction and the normal mild forgetfulness described by many older individuals. Even mild cognitive dysfunction can impact medication adherence, impair decision making, and affect the ability to drive or work. However, primary care physicians do not routinely screen for cognitive difficulties and many older patients do not report cognitive problems. Identifying cognitive impairment at an office visit would permit earlier referral for diagnostic work-up and treatment. The Computer Assessment of Mild Cognitive Impairment (CAMCI) is a self-administered, user-friendly computer test that scores automatically and can be completed independently in a quiet space, such as a doctor’s examination room. The goal of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the CAMCI and the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) to identify mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in 524 nondemented individuals > 60 years old who completed a comprehensive neuropsychological and clinical assessment together with the CAMCI and MMSE. We hypothesized that the CAMCI would exhibit good sensitivity and specificity and would be superior compared with the MMSE in these measures. The results indicated that the MMSE was relatively insensitive to MCI. In contrast, the CAMCI was highly sensitive (86%) and specific (94%) for the identification of MCI in a population of community-dwelling nondemented elderly individuals. PMID:19332976

  11. Halfway Houses for the Mildly Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gia, Gilbert P.

    Investigated were number and location of community residences or halfway houses (of fewer than 61 persons) for the mildly retarded and their programing practices. Form letters and questionnaires uncovered 68 programs meeting internal delimitations of the study. Programs were categorized for analysis purposes into California Programs, New Programs…

  12. [Teaching of Mathematics to Mildly Handicapped Students].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, John

    1987-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter focuses on the teaching of mathematics to mildly handicapped students. The feature article reviews the theory of generalization and its application to specific practices in teaching arithmetic. A set of six-step guidelines is offered for the teacher to follow in ensuring that generalization of arithmetic skills takes…

  13. Mortality associated with mild, untreated xerophthalmia.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, A

    1983-01-01

    The high mortality rate among children with severe corneal xerophthalmia is well recognized. The present study investigates, for the first time, mortality among the very much larger number of otherwise healthy free-living children with mild xerophthalmia (night blindness and Bitot's spots). An average of 3481 children (under 6 years of age) living in six Indonesian villages were reexamined by an ophthalmologist, pediatrician, and nutritionist every 3 months for 18 months. The overall prevalence of mild xerophthalmia was 4.9%. During the 18 months of observation, 132 children died. Of these, 24 had mild xerophthalmia and 108 had normal eyes at the 3-monthly examination preceding their death. Mortality rates were calculated for each 3-month interval by classifying all children by their ocular status at the start of the interval, and then dividing the number of deaths within the interval by the number of children of the same ocular status followed up for that interval. Mortality rates for the six 3-month intervals were then added together, and the results expressed as deaths per 1000 "child-intervals" of follow-up. Overall mortality rates for children with mild xerophthalmia and for children with normal eyes were 23.3 and 5.3, respectively, a ratio of 4 to 1. Excess mortality among the mildly xerophthalmic children increased with the severity of their xerophthalmia. Mortality rates for children with night blindness, with Bitot's spots, and with the two conditions concurrently were 2.7, 6.6, and 8.6 times the mortality rate of non-xerophthalmic children. This direct, almost linear relation between mortality and the severity of mild xerophthalmia was still present after standardizing for age and for the presence or absence of respiratory infection and protein-energy malnutrition. In the population studied, 16% of all deaths in children 1 to 6 years of age were directly related to vitamin A deficiency identified by the presence of mild xerophthalmia. These results

  14. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    modalities. We recruited to the project Margaret A. Parsley to carry out the Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries (MTBIs) under the supervision of Doug DeWitt...abstracts: Hulsebosch CE, Johnson KM, Dewitt DS, Dash PK, Grill R, Parsley MA, Unabia G, Rea H, Perez-Polo JR. Role of IL-1 and TNF receptor activation in...neurological deficits after TBI National Neurotrauma Society, 2010 Johnson KM, Dewitt DS, Dash PK, Grill R, Parsley MA, Unabia G, Rea H, Perez-Polo

  15. Blast-induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    of the mild TBI cases being seen in the current OIF/OEF veterans is the high prevalence of PTSD. PTSD or depression is present in more than one...suggestive of a postconcussion syndrome, PTSD, or depression . The most frequent TBI exposure was blast and, among the sample, 5% reported a TBI with loss of...In addition, major depression was present in 23% and 8% respectively. This high coincidence of PTSD and depression led the investigators to perform

  16. Perinatal Risk Factors for Mild Motor Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands, Beth; Kendall, Garth; Larkin, Dawne; Parker, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of mild motor disability (MMD) is a complex issue and as yet is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of perinatal risk factors in a cohort of 10-year-old boys and girls with (n = 362) and without (n = 1193) MMD. Among the males with MMD there was a higher prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage,…

  17. [Mild type of the Ebstein anomaly].

    PubMed

    Jedliński, Ireneusz; Jamrozek-Jedlińska, Maria; Bugajski, Paweł; Waśniewski, Michał; Poprawski, Kajetan; Słomczyński, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a congenital malformation of the heart that is characterised by apical displacement of the septal and posterior tricuspid valve leaflets, leading to atrialisation of the right ventricle with a variable degree of malformation and displacement of the anterior leaflet. We present a case of a mild type Ebstein anomaly leading to moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation and some degree of right ventricular dysfunction.

  18. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to identify the incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism (PTH) in mild...31 subjects (55%) that met the criteria for hypopituitarism , with this finding, similar to that found in moderate-severe TBI population. 15...SUBJECT TERMS- Post traumatic hypopituitarism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  19. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to identify the incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism (PTH) in mild TBI and...begun. 15. SUBJECT TERMS post traumatic hypopituitarism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...this project will be to study the diagnosis of post traumatic hypopituitarism after MTBI. We will determine the incidence of hypopituitarism

  20. Mild Neurocognitive Disorder: An Old Wine in a New Bottle

    PubMed Central

    Stokin, Gorazd B.; Krell-Roesch, Janina; Petersen, Ronald C.; Geda, Yonas E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The American Psychiatric Association has recently published the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The DSM-IV category “Dementia, Delirium, Amnestic, and Other Cognitive Disorders” has undergone extensive revision. DSM-5 has renamed this category as “Neurocognitive Disorders” (NCD), which now covers three entities: delirium, major NCD, and mild NCD. The DSM-IV version of mild NCD resembles the DSM-5 version in name only. DSM-IV defined mild NCD based on a single criterion, whereas DSM-5 defines mild NCD by using several cognitive and related criteria. The main difference between mild NCD and the Key International Symposium criteria of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is that the research work that led to the construct of MCI primarily involved elderly study participants (even though age was not part of the definition of MCI), whereas mild NCD includes acquired cognitive disorders of all age groups. DSM-5 essentially discusses the epidemiology and diagnostic markers of mild NCD by drawing congruence between MCI and mild NCD. The DSM-5 definition of mild NCD is anchored on four criteria and two specifiers. The four criteria refer to cognitive changes, functional activities, and exclusion of delirium and competing mental disorders. The two specifiers are the presumed etiologies of mild NCD and the presence or absence of behavioral problems. While the category “mild NCD” may improve reliability of diagnoses, it has yet to withstand scientific scrutiny to be considered a valid construct. This article reviews the DSM-5 criteria for mild NCD, compares them with the Key International Symposium MCI criteria, and discusses the pros and cons of the mild NCD construct. PMID:26332219

  1. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter includes the investigation of the mild pyrolysis of unoxidized coals plus a selection of selectively oxidized coals. In addition the effect of particle size and extent of oxidation on pyrolysis was investigated. Some preliminary data concerning pyrolysis under vacuum and ambient pressure was also obtained. Work completed this quarter supports the following conclusions: (1) Desulfurization of unoxidized coals increases with increasing pyrolysis temperature and correlates with the loss of volatile matter. (2) Particle size did not influence the extent of desulfurization significantly. (3) Removing pyrite prior to pyrolysis helps to achieve a lower sulfur product beyond that expected from the removal of pyrite alone. (4) The extent of selective oxidation in teh pretreatment step did not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (5) Up to 84% of the sulfur has been removed from the IBC 101 coal by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (6) Evidence for regressive reactions between volatilized sulfur compounds and partially desulfurized products was obtained by studying how changes in pyrolysis pressure effected the product sulfur content.

  2. ENCOAL mild coal gasification project. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This document is the combination of the fourth quarter report (July--September 1993) and the 1993 annual report for the ENCOAL project. The following pages include the background and process description for the project, brief summaries of the accomplishments for the first three quarters, and a detailed fourth quarter report. Its purpose is to convey the accomplishments and current progress of the project. ENCOAL Corporation, has completed the construction of a mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company`s Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC) technology developed by SMC and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin coal to produce two new fuels, Process Derived Fuel (PDF) and Coal Derived Liquids (CDL). ENCOAL submitted an application to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the Clean Coal Technology Program. The project was selected by DOE in December, 1989 and the Cooperative Agreement approved in September, 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL mild coal gasification facility was completed in June of 1992, and the project is currently in the operations phase. Some plant modifications have been required and are discussed in this report.

  3. Recognition memory deficits in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Algarabel, Salvador; Fuentes, Manuel; Escudero, Joaquín; Pitarque, Alfonso; Peset, Vicente; Mazón, José-Francisco; Meléndez, Juan-Carlos

    2012-09-01

    There is no agreement on the pattern of recognition memory deficits characteristic of patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Whereas lower performance in recollection is the hallmark of MCI, there is a strong controversy about possible deficits in familiarity estimates when using recognition memory tasks. The aim of this research is to shed light on the pattern of responding in recollection and familiarity in MCI. Five groups of participants were tested. The main participant samples were those formed by two MCI groups differing in age and an Alzheimer's disease group (AD), which were compared with two control groups. Whereas one of the control groups served to assess the performance of the MCI and AD people, the other one, composed of young healthy participants, served the purpose of evaluating the adequacy of the experimental tasks used in the evaluation of the different components of recognition memory. We used an associative recognition task as a direct index of recollection and a choice task on a pair of stimuli, one of which was perceptually similar to those studied in the associative recognition phase, as an index of familiarity. Our results indicate that recollection decreases with age and neurological status, and familiarity remains stable in the elderly control sample but it is deficient in MCI. This research shows that a unique encoding situation generated deficits in recollective and familiarity mechanisms in mild cognitive impaired individuals, providing evidence for the existence of deficits in both retrieval processes in recognition memory in a MCI stage.

  4. Enhanced tumorigenicity by mitochondrial DNA mild mutations.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vallejo, Carmen G; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J; Gallardo, María Esther; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Quintanilla, Miguel; Garesse, Rafael

    2015-05-30

    To understand how mitochondria are involved in malignant transformation we have generated a collection of transmitochondrial cybrid cell lines on the same nuclear background (143B) but with mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants with different degrees of pathogenicity. These include the severe mutation in the tRNALys gene, m.8363G>A, and the three milder yet prevalent Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutations in the MT-ND1 (m.3460G>A), MT-ND4 (m.11778G>A) and MT-ND6 (m.14484T>C) mitochondrial genes. We found that 143B ρ0 cells devoid of mtDNA and cybrids harboring wild type mtDNA or that causing severe mitochondrial dysfunction do not produce tumors when injected in nude mice. By contrast cybrids containing mild mutant mtDNAs exhibit different tumorigenic capacities, depending on OXPHOS dysfunction.The differences in tumorigenicity correlate with an enhanced resistance to apoptosis and high levels of NOX expression. However, the final capacity of the different cybrid cell lines to generate tumors is most likely a consequence of a complex array of pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic factors associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.Our results demonstrate the essential role of mtDNA in tumorigenesis and explain the numerous and varied mtDNA mutations found in human tumors, most of which give rise to mild mitochondrial dysfunction.

  5. Clinically mild infantile encephalopathy associated with excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Nozomi; Yoshimaru, Daisuke; Moriyama, Yoko; Honda, Takafumi; Yasukawa, Kumi; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi

    2017-02-15

    Acute infectious encephalopathy is very frequently observed in children in East Asia including Japan. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is the most common subtype in Japan; however, more than 40% of the patients remain unclassified into specific syndromes. To investigate the underlying pathomechanism in those with unclassified acute encephalopathy, we evaluated brain metabolism by MR spectroscopy. Among 20 patients with acute encephalopathy admitted to our hospital during January 2015 to May 2016, 12 could not be classified into specific syndromes. MR spectroscopy was performed in 8 of these 12 patients with unclassified encephalopathy. MR spectroscopy showed an increase of glutamine with a normal N-acetyl aspartate level on days 3 to 8 in three of the 8 patients, which had normalized by follow-up studies. The three patients clinically recovered completely. This study suggests that excitotoxicity may be the underlying pathomechanism in some patients with unclassified mild encephalopathy.

  6. Mildly Recycled Pulsars at High-Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzoni, A.

    2011-08-01

    Mildly recyled pulsars (MRP), conventionally defined as neutron star having spin period in the 20-100 ms range and surface magnetic field <1011 Gauss, probably rise from binary systems (disrupted or not) with an intermediate or an high mass companion. Despite their relatively low spin-down energies compared to the ``fully'' recycled millisecond pulsars (arising from common low mass X-ray binaries), nearby MRPs can be detected by deep X-ray observations and by timing analysis of the very long data span provided by gamma-ray space detectors. The discovery of peculiar timing and spectral properties, possibly transitional, of the MRPs can be of the utmost importance to link different classes of neutron stars and study their evolution.

  7. Functional Hubs in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, Adrián; Papo, David; Boccaletti, Stefano; Del-Pozo, F.; Bajo, Ricardo; Maestú, Fernando; Martínez, J. H.; Gil, Pablo; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Buldú, Javier M.

    We investigate how hubs of functional brain networks are modified as a result of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a condition causing a slight but noticeable decline in cognitive abilities, which sometimes precedes the onset of Alzheimer's disease. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the functional brain networks of a group of patients suffering from MCI and a control group of healthy subjects, during the execution of a short-term memory task. Couplings between brain sites were evaluated using synchronization likelihood, from which a network of functional interdependencies was constructed and the centrality, i.e. importance, of their nodes was quantified. The results showed that, with respect to healthy controls, MCI patients were associated with decreases and increases in hub centrality respectively in occipital and central scalp regions, supporting the hypothesis that MCI modifies functional brain network topology, leading to more random structures.

  8. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes work completed during the fourth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. This work is part of a larger effort to develop a new coal liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing scheme consisting of three main process steps: (1) mile pretreatment of the feed coal to enhance dissolution reactivity and dry the coal, (2) low severity thermal dissolution of the pretreated coal to obtain a very reactive coal-derived residual material amenable to upgrading, and (3) catalytic upgrading of the residual products to distillate liquids.

  9. Pressure passivation of mild pyrolysis char

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, T.; Summers, C.; Schroeder, K.; Sands, W.

    1999-07-01

    Low-rank coals that have been thermally dried in the mild pyrolysis process have a tendency to spontaneously combust. The spontaneous combustion of coals and chars has been linked to their affinity for oxygen. The USDOE has developed a method for the passivation of mild pyrolysis char derived from a low-rank coal using pressure differentials to control the oxidation of the active sites in the char rapidly and safely. Initial experiments performed by the USDOE show that the affinity of the coal for oxygen uptake (residual oxygen demand, ROD) is reduced by exposure of the coal-char to high-pressure gas mixtures including air or oxygen-enriched air. Laboratory-scale tests have shown that the ROD can be rapidly reduced by cycling the active coals between low-pressure (atmospheric pressure or less) and high-pressure (500 psi to 1,500 psi) regimes. Cycling the pressure of the treatment gas provides rapid passivation resulting from two effects: The high-pressure cycle forces fresh oxygen into the pores which have been purged of adsorbed gases and reaction products. The pores of coal are small enough to prohibit free convection and force oxygen exchange to take place by way of diffusion under ambient conditions. The forced introduction of fresh process gas under high pressure overcomes the restrictions due to diffusion limits while the removal of adsorbed products clears the way to active surface sites. The high pressure increases the number of oxygen molecules with sufficient energy to overcome the activation barrier of the passivation reaction, due to the increased number of molecules per unit volume of the high-pressure gas. Combined, the two effects rapidly produce a coal with a significantly reduced ROD.

  10. MILD combustion for hydrogen and syngas at elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mingming; Zhang, Zhedian; Shao, Weiwei; Xiong, Yan; Lei, Fulin; Xiao, Yunhan

    2014-02-01

    As gas recirculation constitutes a fundamental condition for the realization of MILD combustion, it is necessary to determine gas recirculation ratio before designing MILD combustor. MILD combustion model with gas recirculation was used in this simulation work to evaluate the effect of fuel type and pressure on threshold gas recirculation ratio of MILD mode. Ignition delay time is also an important design parameter for gas turbine combustor, this parameter is kinetically studied to analyze the effect of pressure on MILD mixture ignition. Threshold gas recirculation ratio of hydrogen MILD combustion changes slightly and is nearly equal to that of 10 MJ/Nm3 syngas in the pressure range of 1-19 atm, under the conditions of 298 K fresh reactant temperature and 1373 K exhaust gas temperature, indicating that MILD regime is fuel flexible. Ignition delay calculation results show that pressure has a negative effect on ignition delay time of 10 MJ/Nm3 syngas MILD mixture, because OH mole fraction in MILD mixture drops down as pressure increases, resulting in the delay of the oxidation process.

  11. Mild Hyperthermia Worsens the Neuropathological Damage Associated with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Atsushi; Atkins, Coleen M.; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Bramlett, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The effects of slight variations in brain temperature on the pathophysiological consequences of acute brain injury have been extensively described in models of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In contrast, limited information is available regarding the potential consequences of temperature elevations on outcome following mild TBI (mTBI) or concussions. One potential confounding variable with mTBI is the presence of elevated body temperature that occurs in the civilian or military populations due to hot environments combined with exercise or other forms of physical exertion. We therefore determined the histopathological effects of pre- and post-traumatic hyperthermia (39°C) on mTBI. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: pre/post-traumatic hyperthermia, post-traumatic hyperthermia alone for 2 h, and normothermia (37°C). The pre/post-hyperthermia group was treated with hyperthermia starting 15 min before mild parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury (1.4–1.6 atm), with the temperature elevation extending for 2 h after trauma. At 72 h after mTBI, the rats were perfusion-fixed for quantitative histopathological evaluation. Contusion areas and volumes were significantly larger in the pre/post-hyperthermia treatment group compared to the post-hyperthermia and normothermic groups. In addition, pre/post-traumatic hyperthermia caused the most severe loss of NeuN-positive cells in the dentate hilus compared to normothermia. These neuropathological results demonstrate that relatively mild elevations in temperature associated with peri-traumatic events may affect the long-term functional consequences of mTBI. Because individuals exhibiting mildly elevated core temperatures may be predisposed to aggravated brain damage after mTBI or concussion, precautions should be introduced to target this important physiological variable. PMID:22026555

  12. Memory complaints in subjective cognitive impairment, amnestic mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Sang Bong; Kim, Tae Woo; Lee, Taek Jun

    2016-12-01

    Memory complaints are a frequent phenomenon in elderly individuals and can lead to opportunistic help-seeking behavior. The aim of this study was to compare different aspects of memory complaints (i.e., prospective versus retrospective complaints) in individuals with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study included a total of 115 participants (mean age: 68.82 ± 8.83 years) with SCI (n = 34), aMCI (n = 46), and mild AD (n = 35). Memory complaints were assessed using the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ), which consists of 16 items that describe everyday memory failure of both prospective memory (PM) and retrospective memory (RM). For aMCI and AD subjects, informants also completed an informant-rating of the PRMQ. All participants completed detailed neuropsychological tests. Results show that PM complaints were equivalent among the three groups. However, RM complaints differed. Specifically, RM complaints in aMCI were higher than SCI, but similar to AD. Informant-reported memory complaints were higher for AD than aMCI. Our study suggests that RM complaints of memory complaints may be helpful in discriminating between SCI and aMCI, but both PM and RM complaints are of limited value in differentiating aMCI from AD.

  13. Aortic Valve Calcification in Mild Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Shinichi; Walker, Marcella Donovan; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Hyodo, Eiichi; Jin, Zhezhen; Liu, Rui; Sacco, Ralph L.; Homma, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    Context: It is unclear whether cardiovascular disease is present in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Objective: Aortic valve structure and function were compared in PHPT patients and population-based controls. Design: This is a case-control study. Setting: The study was conducted in a university hospital metabolic bone disease unit. Participants: We studied 51 patients with PHPT and 49 controls. Outcome Measures: We measured the aortic valve calcification area and the transaortic pressure gradient. Results: Aortic valve calcification area was significantly higher in PHPT (0.24 ± 0.02 vs. 0.17 ± 0.02 cm2, p<0.01), although there was no difference in the peak transaortic pressure gradient, a functional measure of valvular calcification (5.6 ± 0.3 vs. 6.0 ± 0.3 mm Hg, P = 0.39). Aortic valve calcification area was positively associated with PTH (r = 0.34; P < 0.05) but not with serum calcium, phosphorus, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels or with calcium-phosphate product. Serum PTH level remained an independent predictor of aortic valve calcification area after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, history of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Conclusions: Mild PHPT is associated with subclinical aortic valve calcification. PTH, but not serum calcium concentration, predicted aortic valve calcification. PTH was a more important predictor of aortic valve calcification than well-accepted cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:22031523

  14. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes work completed during the fifth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. Work this quarter focused on analytical characterization of untreated and treated Wyodak subbituminous coal and Illinois {number sign}6 bituminous coal. Mossbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques were used to study the effect of methanol/HCl pretreatment on the composition of each coal's inorganic phase. Results from these studies indicated that calcite is largely removed during pretreatment, but that other mineral species such as pyrite are unaffected. This finding is significant, since calcite removal appears to directly correlate with low severity liquefaction enhancement. Further work will be performed to study this phenomenon in more detail.

  15. Mild Photochemical Biofunctionalization of Glass Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Rui Rijo; Pujari, Sidharam P; Gahtory, Digvijay; Vrouwe, Elwin X; Albada, Bauke; Zuilhof, Han

    2017-01-10

    The ability to locally modify the inside of microfluidic channels with bioactive molecules is of ever-rising relevance. In this article, we show the direct photochemical coupling of a N-hydroxysuccinimide-terminated ω-alkene onto hydrogen-terminated silicon oxide, and its subsequent functionalization with a catalytically active DNAzyme. To achieve this local attachment of a DNAzyme, we prepared hydrogen-phenyl-terminated glass (H-Φ-glass) by the reaction of glass with H-SiPhCl2. The presence of a radical-stabilizing substituent on the Si atom (i.e., phenyl) enabled the covalent modification of bare glass substrates and of the inside of glass microchannels with a functional organic monolayer that allowed direct reaction with an amine-functionalized biomolecule. In this study, we directly attached an NHS-functionalized alkene to the modified glass surface using light with a wavelength of 328 nm, as evidenced by SCA, G-ATR, XPS, SEM, AFM and fluorescence microscopy. Using these NHS-based active esters on the surface, we performed a direct localized attachment of a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking hemin/G-quadruplex (hGQ) DNAzyme complex inside a microfluidic channel. This wall-coated hGQ DNAzyme effectively catalyzed the in-flow oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) [ABTS] in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. This proof-of-concept of mild biofunctionalization will allow the facile preparation of modified microchannels for myriad biorelevant applications.

  16. Get Well Care: Guidelines for Programs Serving Mildly Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montanari, Ellen Orton, Ed.

    Although child care programs for mildly ill children are proliferating around the country, very few states have developed regulations for these types of programs, and no states have developed standards or guidelines. Based upon this concern, a group of medical and early childhood professionals, parents, and directors of programs for mildly ill…

  17. Low Elevated Lead Levels and Mild Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Mike; And Others

    To investigate the relation between low level lead absorption and mild mental retardation, hair lead concentrations were compared in a group of 40 mildly retarded children "etiology unknown" with a control group of 20 children. Children with probable cause for retardation were excluded from the sample as were children with a history of lead…

  18. Impaired Verb Fluency: A Sign of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostberg, Per; Fernaeus, Sven-Erik; Hellstrom, Ake; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Wahlund, Lars Olof

    2005-01-01

    We assessed verb fluency vs. noun and letter-based fluency in 199 subjects referred for cognitive complaints including Subjective Cognitive Impairment, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. ANCOVAs and factor analyses identified verb, noun, and letter-based fluency as distinct tasks. Verb fluency performance in Mild Cognitive…

  19. Mild Aphasia: Is This the Place for an Argument?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Elizabeth; Fox, Sarah; Wilkinson, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with mild aphasia often report significant disruption to their communication despite seemingly minor impairment. This study explored this phenomenon through examining conversations of a person with mild aphasia engaging in argumentation--a skill she felt had significantly deteriorated after her stroke. Method: A person with…

  20. Toxicity studies of mild gasification products

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, T.M.; Whong, W.Z.; Ma, J.; Zhong, B.Z.; Bryant, D.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to perform mutagenicity studies with the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay system on coal liquids produced by mild gasification from different coals and/or processing conditions, (2) to determine whether coal liquids which are mutagenic to bacteria are also genotoxic to mammalian cells, (3) to establish correlations between mutagenicity, aromaticity, and boiling point range of coal liquids, and (4) to identify the chemical classes which are likely to be responsible for the mutagenic activity of gasification products. Four of the seven samples tested so far failed to demonstrate any mutagenic activity under any conditions tested. Those samples were SHELL[number sign]830331, MG-122IBP-420[degree]F, MG-122 420--720[degree]F, and MG-122 720[degree]F+. Table 1 summarizes the results from all samples tested in DMSO and Tween 80. When solvated in DMSO, MG-119 and MG-120 composite materials displayed slight, but ultimately insignificant, genotoxic activity on TA98 and TA1OO in the presence of S9. When Tween 80 was used as the solvent, MG-119 and MG-120 displayed slight, but significant, geno-toxic activity on TA98 with S9 (Figure 4). CTC[number sign]11 in DMSO displayed significant genotoxic activity on both TA98 and TA1OO with and without S9. The activity was higher on TA98 than TA100, and higher with S9 than without, primarily indicating the presence of indirect-acting frameshift mutagen. The results of the testing on CTC[number sign]11 were similar for both solvents, DMSO and Tween 80 (Table 2).

  1. Toxicity studies of mild gasification products

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, T.M.; Whong, W.Z.; Ma, J.; Zhong, B.Z.; Bryant, D.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to perform mutagenicity studies with the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay system on coal liquids produced by mild gasification from different coals and/or processing conditions, (2) to determine whether coal liquids which are mutagenic to bacteria are also genotoxic to mammalian cells, (3) to establish correlations between mutagenicity, aromaticity, and boiling point range of coal liquids, and (4) to identify the chemical classes which are likely to be responsible for the mutagenic activity of gasification products. Four of the seven samples tested so far failed to demonstrate any mutagenic activity under any conditions tested. Those samples were SHELL{number_sign}830331, MG-122IBP-420{degree}F, MG-122 420--720{degree}F, and MG-122 720{degree}F+. Table 1 summarizes the results from all samples tested in DMSO and Tween 80. When solvated in DMSO, MG-119 and MG-120 composite materials displayed slight, but ultimately insignificant, genotoxic activity on TA98 and TA1OO in the presence of S9. When Tween 80 was used as the solvent, MG-119 and MG-120 displayed slight, but significant, geno-toxic activity on TA98 with S9 (Figure 4). CTC{number_sign}11 in DMSO displayed significant genotoxic activity on both TA98 and TA1OO with and without S9. The activity was higher on TA98 than TA100, and higher with S9 than without, primarily indicating the presence of indirect-acting frameshift mutagen. The results of the testing on CTC{number_sign}11 were similar for both solvents, DMSO and Tween 80 (Table 2).

  2. Sleep Habits in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Tamara L.; Riley, Thomas; Mattek, Nora; Pavel, Misha; Kaye, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    We explored the relationship between sleep disturbances and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in community-dwelling seniors. Recent evidence suggests that sleep habits are differentially compromised in different subtypes of MCI, but the relationship between sleep disruption and MCI remains poorly understood. We gathered daily objective measures of sleep disturbance from 45 seniors, including 16 with MCI (mean age 86.9 ± 4.3 years), over a six month period. We also collected self-report measures of sleep disturbance. Although there were no differences between groups in any of our self-report measures, we found that amnestic MCI (aMCI) volunteers had less disturbed sleep than both non-amnestic MCI (naMCI) and cognitively intact volunteers, as measured objectively by movement in bed at night (F2,1078=4.30, p=0.05), wake after sleep onset (F2,1078=41.6, p<0.001), and times up at night (F2,1078=26.7, p<0.001). The groups did not differ in total sleep time. In addition, the aMCI group had less day-to-day variability in these measures than the intact and naMCI volunteers. In general, the naMCI volunteers showed a level of disturbed sleep that was intermediate to that of aMCI and intact volunteers. These differences in sleep disruption between aMCI and naMCI may be related to differences in the pathology underlying these MCI subtypes. PMID:24145694

  3. Multimorbidity and Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed Central

    Vassilaki, Maria; Aakre, Jeremiah A.; Cha, Ruth H.; Kremers, Walter K.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Geda, Yonas E.; Machulda, Mary M.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Roberts, Rosebud O

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine the association of multiple chronic conditions with risk of incident mild cognitive impairment (MCI)/dementia. DESIGN Prospective cohort study SETTING Olmsted County, Minnesota. PARTICIPANTS Cognitively normal individuals (N=2,176) enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA). MEASUREMENTS Participants were randomly selected from the community and evaluated by a study coordinator, a physician, and underwent neuropsychometric testing at baseline and at 15-month intervals to assess diagnoses of MCI and dementia. We electronically captured information on International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision (ICD-9) codes for chronic conditions in the five years prior to enrollment using the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records linkage system. We defined multimorbidity as having two or more chronic conditions and examined the association of multimorbidity with MCI/dementia using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS Among 2,176 cognitively normal participants (mean [±SD] age 78.5 [±5.2] years; 50.6% men), 1,884 (86.6%) had multimorbidity. The risk of MCI/dementia was elevated in persons with multimorbidity (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.82). The HR was stronger in persons with ≥4 conditions (HR: 1.61; 95%CI, 1.21–2.13) compared to persons with only 0 or 1 conditions, and for men (HR: 1.53, 95% CI, 1.01– 2.31) than for women (HR: 1.20, 95% CI, 0.83– 1.74). CONCLUSION In older adults, having multiple chronic conditions is associated with an increased risk of MCI/dementia. This is consistent with the hypothesis that multiple etiologies may contribute to MCI and late-life dementia. Preventing chronic diseases may be beneficial in delaying or preventing MCI or dementia. PMID:26311270

  4. Inverse Compton Scattering in Mildly Relativistic Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, S. M.; Birkinshaw, M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effect of inverse Compton scattering in mildly relativistic static and moving plasmas with low optical depth using Monte Carlo simulations, and calculated the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the cosmic background radiation. Our semi-analytic method is based on a separation of photon diffusion in frequency and real space. We use Monte Carlo simulation to derive the intensity and frequency of the scattered photons for a monochromatic incoming radiation. The outgoing spectrum is determined by integrating over the spectrum of the incoming radiation using the intensity to determine the correct weight. This method makes it possible to study the emerging radiation as a function of frequency and direction. As a first application we have studied the effects of finite optical depth and gas infall on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (not possible with the extended Kompaneets equation) and discuss the parameter range in which the Boltzmann equation and its expansions can be used. For high temperature clusters (k(sub B)T(sub e) greater than or approximately equal to 15 keV) relativistic corrections based on a fifth order expansion of the extended Kompaneets equation seriously underestimate the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect at high frequencies. The contribution from plasma infall is less important for reasonable velocities. We give a convenient analytical expression for the dependence of the cross-over frequency on temperature, optical depth, and gas infall speed. Optical depth effects are often more important than relativistic corrections, and should be taken into account for high-precision work, but are smaller than the typical kinematic effect from cluster radial velocities.

  5. Skip the Antibiotics for Mild Eczema in Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164083.html Skip the Antibiotics for Mild Eczema in Kids Skin condition cleared ... March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Despite widespread use, antibiotics are not an effective treatment for milder cases ...

  6. Mildly Low Thyroid Function in Pregnancy Not a Threat

    MedlinePlus

    ... even mildly low thyroid function (so-called subclinical hypothyroidism) during pregnancy could also pose a threat to ... Health and Human Services. More Health News on: Hypothyroidism Pregnancy Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ...

  7. Mild, Moderate, Severe Asthma: What Do Grades Mean?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Mild, Moderate, Severe Asthma: What Do Grades Mean? Page Content Article Body ... is when assessed at follow-up visits. Intermittent Asthma A child who has symptoms of wheezing and ...

  8. Neurocognitive testing supports a broader concept of mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, C Thomas; Johnson, Lynda G

    2005-01-01

    The narrow concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) as an early form of Alzheimer s disease has been broadened by research that established the existence of alternative forms of the condition that may presage other forms of dementia. The research presented here was a naturalistic, cross-sectional study of patients in a community referral clinic-patients with MCI and mild dementia-compared to normal controls. A comprehensive, computerized neurocognitive screening battery developed by one of the authors (CNS Vital Signs) was administered to all of the subjects. Participants consisted of 36 patients with MCI and 53 patients with mild dementia, diagnosed by standard criteria, and 89 matched normal controls. Multivariate analysis indicated significant differences among the three groups for all 15 primary test variables and for all five of the domain scores. Tests of memory, processing speed, and cognitive flexibility were the most cogent discriminators between normal controls and MCI patients, and between MCI patients and patients with mild dementia. The same three tests also had the greatest sensitivity and specificity. The results of this study indicate that computerized testing can differentiate among normal controls, MCI patients, and patients with mild dementia. Also, in a diverse group of MCI and mild dementia patients, impairments in memory, processing speed, and cognitive flexibility were the most prominent observed deficits.

  9. Brain perfusion correlates of visuoperceptual deficits in Mild Cognitive Impairment and mild Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Alegret, Montserrat; Vinyes-Junqué, Georgina; Boada, Mercè; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Cuberas, Gemma; Espinosa, Ana; Roca, Isabel; Hernández, Isabel; Valero, Sergi; Rosende-Roca, Maitée; Mauleón, Ana; Becker, James T.; Tárraga, Lluís

    2012-01-01

    Background Visuoperceptual processing is impaired early in the clinical course of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The 15-Objects Test (15-OT) detects such subtle performance deficits in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and mild AD. Reduced brain perfusion in the temporal, parietal and prefrontal regions have been found in early AD and MCI patients. Objectives To confirm the role of the 15-OT in the diagnosis of MCI and AD, and to investigate the brain perfusion correlates of visuoperceptual dysfunction (15-OT) in subjects with MCI, AD and normal aging. Methods Forty-two AD, 42 MCI and 42 healthy elderly control (EC) subjects underwent a brain Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) and separately completed the 15-OT. An analysis of variance compared 15-OT scores between groups. SPM5 was used to analyse the SPECT data. Results 15-OT performace was impaired in the MCI and AD patients. In terms of the SPECT scans, AD patients showed reduced perfusion in temporal-parietal regions, while the MCI subjects had decreased perfusion in the middle and posterior cingulate. When MCI and AD groups were compared, a significant brain perfusion reduction was found in temporo-parietal regions. In the whole sample, 15-OT performance was significantly correlated with the clinical dementia rating scores, and with the perfusion in the bilateral posterior cingulate and the right temporal pole, with no significant correlation in each separate group. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the 15-OT performance provides a useful gradation of impairment from normal aging to AD, and it seems to be related to perfusion in the bilateral posterior cingulate and the right temporal pole. PMID:20555146

  10. Mild Bleeders: Diagnosis is Elusive in Large Number of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kotru, Mrinalini; Mutereja, Deepti; Purohit, Abhishek; Tyagi, Seema; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Saxena, Renu; Pati, Hara Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Background Bleeding is a common clinical presentation. Even patients with mild bleeding disorders are extensively investigated for ascertaining the cause. The present study was conducted in order to evaluate the extent of the possibility of diagnosis in mild bleeding disorders. Material and Methods This was a prospective study of patients referred for work up of mild bleeding for a period of 13 months. A complete blood count, peripheral smear examination, Prothrombin time, Partial Thromboplastin time and Thrombin Time, Platelet Aggregometry test, tests for von Willebrand’s disease and Platelet Factor 3 availability were measured. Results 164 patients presented with mild bleeding, in 114 of the patients a single site of bleeding was present. Epistaxis was the most common presentation (39%). Cutaneous bleeding (petechiae and purpura) was the next common site. History of a major bleeding tendency in the family was present only in 11 patients. The investigations showed that VWD (17/164), followed by clotting disorders (CD) mainly mild hemophilia (15/164) were the most common diagnosable cause. There were also 4 cases of hypofibrinogenemia. The disorders of platelets (Platelet function defects/PFD) were the least common (9/164). Rest 123 (75%) patients could not be diagnosed on the basis of these investigations and were labeled as Bleeding disorders – Unclassified (BDC). Conclusion n our study, 75% of the patients with mild bleeding remained undiagnosed even after extensive laboratory workup, thus raising a very pertinent question that is it necessary that all mild bleeders submit to a broad battery of investigations, as the diagnosis continues to be elusive despite extensive workup. PMID:27872729

  11. Prenatal natural history of isolated fetal mild bilateral pyelectasis

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Pereira, Gustavo; Bunduki, Victor; Hase, Eliane Azeka; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli Vieira; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prenatal outcomes in a cohort of fetuses with mild bilateral pyelectasis and determine whether performing serial ultrasounds is a good follow-up strategy. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal study was conducted on 62 fetuses with mild bilateral pyelectasis. Fetal mild bilateral pyelectasis was considered when the renal pelvis measured (in millimeters) ≥5.0 to 10.0, ≥7.0 to 10.0, and ≥10.0 to 15 at ≤23 weeks 6 days, 24 to 31 weeks 6 days, and ≥32 weeks, respectively, with no uretero-calyceal dilatation. Ultrasounds were performed every 3 weeks to assess whether the mild bilateral pyelectasis regressed, remained unchanged (Group 1) or progressed (Group 2). RESULTS: Group 1 consisted of 53 fetuses (85.4%), and progression was observed in 9 cases (Group 2, 14.6%). The initial renal pelvis diameter was significantly larger in fetuses with progression (p=0.028). Statistically significant differences in the renal pelvis diameter were also found at weeks 31 and 35 for both kidneys (p<0.05). The cases requiring intrauterine procedures or early delivery were not observed. CONCLUSION: Fetal mild bilateral pyelectasis with no calyceal dilatation is a benign condition that can be managed in the postnatal period. The initial renal pelvis diameter and the diameter in week 31 or 35 were valuable parameters for identifying cases that would eventually need specific postnatal procedures. PMID:27652832

  12. Neurobiology of chronic mild stress: Parallels to major depression

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Matthew N.; Hellemans, Kim G.C.; Verma, Pamela; Gorzalka, Boris B.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The chronic mild (or unpredictable/variable) stress (CMS) model was developed as an animal model of depression more than 20 years ago. The foundation of this model was that following long-term exposure to a series of mild, but unpredictable stressors, animals would develop a state of impaired reward salience that was akin to the anhedonia observed in major depressive disorder. In the time since its inception, this model has also been used for a variety of studies examining neurobiological variables that are associated with depression, despite the fact that this model has never been critically examined to validate that the neurobiological changes induced by CMS are parallel to those documented in depressive disorder. The aim of the current review is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of chronic mild stress on neurobiological variables, such as neurochemistry, neurochemical receptor expression and functionality, neurotrophin expression and cellular plasticity. These findings are then compared to those of clinical research examining common variables in populations with depressive disorders to determine if the changes observed following chronic mild stress are in fact consistent with those observed in major depression. We conclude that the chronic mild stress paradigm: (1) evokes an array of neurobiological changes that mirror those seen in depressive disorders and (2) may be a suitable tool to investigate novel systems that could be disturbed in depression, and thus aid in the development of novel targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:22776763

  13. Diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical management of mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Levin, Harvey S; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon R

    2015-05-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) are interchangeable terms to describe a common disorder with substantial effects on public health. Advances in brain imaging, non-imaging biomarkers, and neuropathology during the past 15 years have required researchers, clinicians, and policy makers to revise their views about mild TBI as a fully reversible insult that can be repeated without consequences. These advances have led to guidelines on management of mild TBI in civilians, military personnel, and athletes, but their widespread dissemination to clinical management in emergency departments and community-based health care is still needed. The absence of unity on the definition of mild TBI, the scarcity of prospective data concerning the long-term effects of repeated mild TBI and subconcussive impacts, and the need to further develop evidence-based interventions to mitigate the long-term sequelae are areas for future research that will improve outcomes, reduce morbidity and costs, and alleviate delayed consequences that have only recently come to light.

  14. Does mild COPD affect prognosis in the elderly?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects independence and survival in the general population, but it is unknown to which extent this conclusion applies to elderly people with mild disease. The aim of this study was to verify whether mild COPD, defined according to different classification systems (ATS/ERS, BTS, GOLD) impacts independence and survival in elderly (aged 65 to 74 years) or very elderly (aged 75 years or older) patients. Methods We used data coming from the Respiratory Health in the Elderly (Salute Respiratoria nell'Anziano, SaRA) study and compared the differences between the classification systems with regards to personal capabilities and 5-years survival, focusing on the mild stage of COPD. Results We analyzed data from 1,159 patients (49% women) with a mean age of 73.2 years (SD: 6.1). One third of participants were 75 years or older. Mild COPD, whichever was its definition, was not associated with worse personal capabilities or increased mortality after adjustment for potential confounders in both age groups. Conclusions Mild COPD may not affect survival or personal independence of patients over 65 years of age if the reference group consists of patients with a comparable burden of non respiratory diseases. Comorbidity and age itself likely are main determinants of both outcomes. PMID:20529281

  15. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. [Mild cognitive impairment. Survey of attitudes of specialists and general physicians. mild].

    PubMed

    Serrano, Cecilia M; Allegri, Ricardo F; Caramelli, Paulo; Taragano, Fernando E; Camera, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) refers to persons who are slightly cognitively impaired for age but do not meet the criteria for dementia. MCI has been related to a pre-dementia stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, other possible diagnoses such as cerebro-vascular disease, frontotemporal dementia or normal aging have been considered. Diagnosis, etiology and conversion to dementia are a source of ambiguity in MCI. The aim was to evaluate the opinion of experts on dementia and of general practitioners concerning MCI. A total of 24 experts from Argentina and Brazil (16 neurologists and 8 psychiatrists) and 30 general practitioners agreed to reply to a questionnaire on MCI (adapted from Dubois inventory, 2003). Of these, 92% of experts considered MCI as an ambiguous entity, not necessarily as a "pre-dementia" stage; 63% confirmed a tendency to worsen over the time and 83% of experts decided to initiate treatment using cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine and vitamin E. The opinion on MCI was that a priori it is not only an Alzheimer disease pre-dementia stage, but most of them consider the treatment against AD. MCI is a heterogeneous entity that should be classified as an open category and making it necessary to standardize definitions and design diagnosis guides to better understand Alzheimer disease pre-dementia stage.

  17. Mild hypoxia and visual performance with night vision goggles.

    PubMed

    Leber, L L; Roscoe, S N; Southward, G M

    1986-04-01

    Military night vision goggles (NVGs) are image intensifiers normally used when the human operator's visual capabilities are unimpaired by oxygen deprivation. However, mountain search team members and aviators sometimes operate with NVG augmentation at altitudes where hypoxic visual decrement is documented. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of mild hypoxia on monocular visual performance with NVGs. It was found that mild oxygen deprivation significantly affects unaided square-wave grating visual acuity but does not significantly affect NVG-augmented performance. Large differences between visual sensitivities at different spatial frequencies were not differentially affected by mild hypoxia. Supplemental oxygen did significantly improve naked-eye but not NVG-augmented night resolution acuity up to a simulated altitude of 13,000 ft (3,962 m) above sea level (ASL).

  18. Cognitive outcomes of multiple mild head injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Bijur, P E; Haslum, M; Golding, J

    1996-06-01

    This study assessed cumulative effects of multiple mild head injuries on cognitive functioning in children. Subjects included 1586 children with one mild head injury, 278 with two, and 51 with three or more head injuries between birth and age 10 years and controls without head injuries matched on gender and total number of injuries. The number of head injuries and injuries not to the head was associated with decreasing performance on measures of intelligence (p < .01), reading (p < .01), and math (p = .02). There was no interaction between case-control status and number of injuries, indicating a similar relationship between cognitive outcomes and number of injuries in head-injured cases and controls. After adjustment for covariates, the relationship between number of injuries and cognitive outcomes became nonsignificant. This study suggests that cognitive deficits associated with multiple mild head injury are due to social and personal factors related to multiple injuries and not to specific damage to the head.

  19. Johnson - Cook Strength Models for Mild and DP 590 Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantam, K.; Brar, N. S.; Bajaj, D.; Hill, S.

    2006-07-28

    Automotive steels, Mild and Dual Phase590 (DP590) are characterized in tension at room temperature, using the quasi-static and split Hopkinson bar techniques at various strain rates ranging from {approx}10-3/s to {approx}1800/s. Tension stress-strain data for both the steels are analyzed to determine the Johnson-Cook Strength model constants, J-C strength model constants for mild steel are A=217 MPa, B = 234 MPa, n = 0.643 and C = 0.076 and for DP590 steel are A = 430 MPa, B = 824 MPa, n = 0.510 and C = 0.017. Higher value of strain rate sensitivity constant C for mild steel (0.076) compared to DP 590 (0.017) is also reflected in the stress- strain data at various strain rates.

  20. Mild intrauterine hypoperfusion reproduces neurodevelopmental disorders observed in prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Makiko; Coq, Jacques-Olivier; Otani, Kentaro; Hattori, Yorito; Ogawa, Yuko; Sato, Yoshiaki; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Ihara, Masafumi; Tsuji, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Severe intrauterine ischemia is detrimental to the developing brain. The impact of mild intrauterine hypoperfusion on neurological development, however, is still unclear. We induced mild intrauterine hypoperfusion in rats on embryonic day 17 via arterial stenosis with metal microcoils wrapped around the uterine and ovarian arteries. All pups were born with significantly decreased birth weights. Decreased gray and white matter areas were observed without obvious tissue damage. Pups presented delayed newborn reflexes, muscle weakness, and altered spontaneous activity. The levels of proteins indicative of inflammation and stress in the vasculature, i.e., RANTES, vWF, VEGF, and adiponectin, were upregulated in the placenta. The levels of mRNA for proteins associated with axon and astrocyte development were downregulated in fetal brains. The present study demonstrates that even mild intrauterine hypoperfusion can alter neurological development, which mimics the clinical signs and symptoms of children with neurodevelopmental disorders born prematurely or with intrauterine growth restriction. PMID:27996031

  1. Combining three mild stresses in Drosophila melanogaster flies does not have a more positive effect on resistance to a severe cold stress than combining two mild stresses.

    PubMed

    Le Bourg, Éric

    2017-04-01

    Among other positive effects, mild stresses can increase resistance to severe stresses. Previous studies combining two mild stresses showed that when each mild stress had positive effects their combination had more positive effects than each mild stress. The present study tested whether combining three mild stresses could still provide positive additive effects, or whether this combination has negative effects because it is no longer a mild stress but rather a strong stress with negative effects. Flies were subjected to either fasting, hypergravity for one or two weeks, or cold shocks, to combinations of two or of the three mild stresses, and survival to a severe cold stress was observed at 13 or 20 days of age. Positive effects of each mild stress and of combining two stresses could be observed, but combining the three stresses provided a similar survival or a lower survival than the combination of two stresses. Thus, combining three stresses was not more efficient than combining two stresses.

  2. Mild Hypothermia Attenuates the Anesthetic Isoflurane-Induced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Dong, Yuanlin; Chen, Dan; Xie, Zhongcong; Zhang, Yiying

    2017-01-01

    The commonly used inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce DNA damage and cytotoxicity. However, the methods to attenuate these effects remain largely to be determined. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to assess whether mild hypothermia could protect the isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by assessing the effects of mild hypothermia on the isoflurane-induced changes in ATP levels. H4 human neuroglioma cells were treated with 2% isoflurane for 3 or 6 h with and without mild hypothermia (35°C). We assessed the cell viability by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. We determined DNA damage by measuring levels of phosphorylation of the histone protein H2A variant X at Ser139 (γH2A.X), the marker of DNA damage. We also measured ATP levels in the cells. Here we showed that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in the cells. Moreover, the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 3 h decreased ATP levels without inducing cytotoxicity. Mild hypothermia attenuated the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity, DNA damage, and ATP reduction in the cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels occurred before the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity. Isoflurane may induce DNA damage and cause cytotoxicity through reducing ATP levels. Mild hypothermia would ameliorate isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity by attenuating the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels. These pilot studies have established a system and will promote the future investigations of anesthesia neurotoxicity. PMID:28228717

  3. Mild Hypothermia Attenuates the Anesthetic Isoflurane-Induced Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Dong, Yuanlin; Chen, Dan; Xie, Zhongcong; Zhang, Yiying

    2017-01-01

    The commonly used inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce DNA damage and cytotoxicity. However, the methods to attenuate these effects remain largely to be determined. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to assess whether mild hypothermia could protect the isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by assessing the effects of mild hypothermia on the isoflurane-induced changes in ATP levels. H4 human neuroglioma cells were treated with 2% isoflurane for 3 or 6 h with and without mild hypothermia (35°C). We assessed the cell viability by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. We determined DNA damage by measuring levels of phosphorylation of the histone protein H2A variant X at Ser139 (γH2A.X), the marker of DNA damage. We also measured ATP levels in the cells. Here we showed that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in the cells. Moreover, the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 3 h decreased ATP levels without inducing cytotoxicity. Mild hypothermia attenuated the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity, DNA damage, and ATP reduction in the cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels occurred before the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity. Isoflurane may induce DNA damage and cause cytotoxicity through reducing ATP levels. Mild hypothermia would ameliorate isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity by attenuating the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels. These pilot studies have established a system and will promote the future investigations of anesthesia neurotoxicity.

  4. Depression and cognitive complaints following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Silver, Jonathan M; McAllister, Thomas W; Arciniegas, David B

    2009-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common occurrence with multiple possible neuropsychiatric sequelae, including problems with cognition, emotion, and behavior. While many individuals experience significant improvement over the first months following mild TBI, a nontrivial minority will develop persistent, functionally impairing post-TBI symptoms. Depression and cognitive impairment are among the most common such symptoms, and they may respond to a combination of rehabilitative and pharmacologic treatments. This article discusses the clinical approach to treating an individual with depression and cognitive complaints following mild TBI. Recommendations regarding the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of these problems are offered.

  5. Cumulative effects of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bailes, Julian E; Dashnaw, Matthew L; Petraglia, Anthony L; Turner, Ryan C

    2014-01-01

    The majority of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the USA are mild in severity. Sports, particularly American football, and military experience are especially associated with repetitive, mild TBI (mTBI). The consequences of repetitive brain injury have garnered increasing scientific and public attention following reports of altered mood and behavior, as well as progressive neurological dysfunction many years after injury. This report provides an up-to-date review of the clinical, pathological, and pathophysiological changes associated with repetitive mTBI, and their potential for cumulative effects in certain individuals.

  6. Development of an advanced continuous mild gasification process for the production of coproducts. Task 4, Mild gasification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.W.; Cha, C.Y.; Kang, T.W.; Vaillancourt, M.B.

    1990-12-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) teamed with the AMAX Research and Development Center and Riley Stoker Corporation on Development of an Advanced, Continuous Mild-Gasification Process for the Production of Coproducts under contract DE-AC21-87MC24268 with the Morgantown Energy Technology of the US Department of Energy. The strategy for this project is to produce electrode binder pitch and diesel fuel blending stock by mild gasification of Wyodak coal. The char is upgraded to produce anode-grade carbon, carbon black, and activated carbon. This report describes results of mild-gasification tests conducted by WRI. Char upgrading tests conducted by AMAX will be described in a separate report.

  7. Care Partner Responses to the Onset of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blieszner, Rosemary; Roberto, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We examined characteristics, responses, and psychological well-being of care partners who support and assist older adults recently diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Design and Methods: Based on a sample of 106 care partners of community residents diagnosed with MCI at memory clinics, we conducted face-to-face interviews…

  8. Review of Monitoring Procedures with Mildly Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of special and remedial education practice in formative evaluation of goal attainment among mildly handicapped students. First, the relationship of formative evaluation to the range of special education assessment practice and its importance to the field are described. Then, four critical issues in…

  9. Music Enhances Autobiographical Memory in Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Haj, Mohamad; Postal, Virginie; Allain, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown that the "Four Seasons" music may enhance the autobiographical performance of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We used a repeated measures design in which autobiographical recall of 12 mild AD patients was assessed using a free narrative method under three conditions: (a) in "Silence," (b) after being exposed to the opus "Four…

  10. Stressful Social Interactions Experienced by Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Sigan L.; MacLean, William E., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Adults with intellectual disability are vulnerable to stressful social interactions. We determined frequency and severity of various stressful social interactions, identified the social partners in these interactions, and examined the specific interpersonal skill difficulties of 114 adults with mild intellectual disability. Participants'…

  11. Teaching Social Studies to Students with Mild Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Marcee M.

    2005-01-01

    For a generation, national legislation has moved "vigorously" to compel schools to place students with disabilities in the "least restrictive environment." For students with mild disabilities, this placement usually means including them in general education classrooms and teaching them according to the general curriculum. Over the same period,…

  12. Congenital Syndromes and Mildly Handicapped Students: Implications for Special Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra M.

    1989-01-01

    Many learning disabilities or cases of mild retardation are due to medically diagnosable, congenital syndromes, such as fetal alcohol syndrome, sex chromosome abnormalities, multiple anomaly syndromes, phenylketonuria, and Tourette Syndrome. These syndromes are discussed, and suggestions are given for special education management. (Author/JDD)

  13. Numerical Magnitude Processing in Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brankaer, Carmen; Ghesquiere, Pol; De Smedt, Bert

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated numerical magnitude processing in children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and examined whether these children have difficulties in the ability to represent numerical magnitudes and/or difficulties in the ability to access numerical magnitudes from formal symbols. We compared the performance of 26 children…

  14. FAST Science: Teaching Science to Adolescents with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaki, Joyce; Serna, Loretta A.

    1995-01-01

    FAST I (Foundational Approach to Science Teaching I) is an inquiry and inductive-reasoning approach to learning physical science, ecology, and relational study. The program was successfully adapted for middle school students with mild disabilities. Teacher preparation, classroom groupings, behavior management procedures, evaluation, and…

  15. Late Diagnosis in Severe and Mild Intellectual Disability in Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verri, A. P.; Maraschio, P.; Uggetti, C.; Pucci, E.; Ronchi, G.; Nespoli, L.; Destefani, V.; Ramponi, A.; Federico, A.

    2004-01-01

    The diagnosis of intellectual disability (ID) is highly dependent on a comprehensive personal and family medical history, a complete physical examination and a careful developmental assessment of the patient. Our study intended to: (1) classify the aetiology of mild and severe ID in an adult population of 140 Italian subjects; (2) evaluate the…

  16. Cholinergic Enhancement of Frontal Lobe Activity in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saykin, Andrew J.; Wishart, Heather A.; Rabin, Laura A.; Flashman, Laura A.; McHugh, Tara L.; Mamourian, Alexander C.; Santulli, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors positively affect cognition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other conditions, but no controlled functional MRI studies have examined where their effects occur in the brain. We examined the effects of donepezil hydrochloride (Aricept[Registered sign]) on cognition and brain activity in patients with amnestic mild cognitive…

  17. Everyday Cognition among Mildly Mentally Retarded Adults: An Ethnographic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Harold G.; Langness, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results of participant-observation techniques used to study the everyday cognition and problem-solving process in marketing tasks defined and organized by mildly mentally retarded adults, revealed five "composites" of strategic behavior. An association between composite and early life experiences was also shown. (Author/CL)

  18. Career Planning Guidelines for Parents of Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Andrew V.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a guide for parents of children with mild disabilities to help those children plan and qualify for competitive employment. Presents suggestions in an elementary-middle-high school sequence to help parents decide what they can do with and for their children as they go through school and through the normal career development stages. (SR)

  19. The Gross Motor Skills of Children with Mild Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nonis, Karen P.; Jernice, Tan Sing Yee

    2014-01-01

    Many international studies have examined the gross motor skills of children studying in special schools while local studies of such nature are limited. This study investigated the gross motor skills of children with Mild Learning Disabilities (MLD; n = 14, M age = 8.93 years, SD = 0.33) with the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 (TGMD-2, Ulrich,…

  20. Separation of products from mild coal gasification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallman, P.H.

    1991-09-11

    The primary mild coal gasification product mixture containing noncondensible gas, high-boiling hydrocarbon vapors and entrained fines is difficult to process into the desired pure products: gas, liquids, and dry solids. This challenge for mild coal gasification process development has been studied by surveying the technical literature for suitable separations processes and for similar issues in related processes. The choice for a first-stage solids separation step is standard cyclones, arranged in parallel trains for large-volume applications in order to take advantage of the higher separation efficiency of smaller cyclones. However, mild gasification pilot-plant data show entrainment of ultrafine particles for which standard cyclones have poor separation efficiency. A hot secondary solids separation step is needed for the ultrafine entrainment in order to protect the liquid product from excessive amounts of contaminating solids. The secondary solids separation step is similar to many high-temperature flue-gas applications with an important complicating condition: Mild gasifier vapors form coke on surfaces in contact with the vapors. Plugging of the filter medium by coke deposition is concluded to be the main product separation problem for mild gasification. Three approaches to solution of this problem are discussed in the order of preference: (1) a barrier filter medium made of a perforated foil that is easy to regenerate, (2) a high-efficiency cyclone coupled with recycle of a solids-containing tar fraction for coking/cracking in the gasifier, and (3) a granular moving bed filter with regeneration of the bed material. The condensation of oil vapors diluted by noncondensible gas is analyzed thermodynamically, and the conclusion is that existing commercial oil fractionator designs are adequate as long as the vapor stream does not contain excessive amounts of solids. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Abundance analysis of barium and mild barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiljanic, R.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; da Silva, L.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:We compare and discuss abundances and trends in normal giants, mild barium, and barium stars, searching for differences and similarities between barium and mild barium stars that could help shed some light on the origin of these similar objects. Also, we search for nucleosynthetic effects possibly related to the s-process that were observed in the literature for elements like Cu in other types of s-process enriched stars. Methods: High signal to noise, high resolution spectra were obtained for a sample of normal, mild barium, and barium giants. Atmospheric parameters were determined from the Fe i and Fe ii lines. Abundances for Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd, were determined from equivalent widths and model atmospheres in a differential analysis, with the red giant ɛ Vir as the standard star. Results: The different levels of s-process overabundances of barium and mild barium stars were earlier suggested to be related to the stellar metallicity. Contrary to this suggestion, we found in this work no evidence of barium and mild barium having a different range in metallicity. However, comparing the ratio of abundances of heavy to light s-process elements, we found some evidence that they do not share the same neutron exposure parameter. The exact mechanism controlling this difference is still not clear. As a by-product of this analysis we identify two normal red giants misclassified as mild barium stars. The relevance of this finding is discussed. Concerning the suggested nucleosynthetic effects possibly related to the s-process, for elements like Cu, Mn, V and Sc, we found no evidence for an anomalous behavior in any of the s-process enriched stars analyzed here. However, further work is still needed since a clear [Cu/Fe] vs. [Ba/Fe] anticorrelation exists for other s-process enriched objects. Observations collected at ESO, La Silla, Chile, within the ON/ESO agreements. Tables 8-10 are only

  2. Mild Campomelic Dysplasia: Report on a Case and Review

    PubMed Central

    Corbani, S.; Chouery, E.; Eid, B.; Jalkh, N.; Abou Ghoch, J.; Mégarbané, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a 10.5-year-old girl with a mild form of campomelic dysplasia. She presented with short stature of prenatal onset, dysmorphic facial features, limitation of supination and pronation of the forearms, dysplastic nails, and bone abnormalities consisting especially of cone-shaped epiphyses of the middle phalanx of the 2nd fingers, brachydactyly and clinodactyly of the middle phalanx of both 5th fingers, short 4th metacarpals, radial and femoral head subluxation, hypoplastic scapulae, humeral and ulnar epiphyseal abnormalities, unossified symphysis pubis, and a significant delay in bone age. Molecular analysis of the SOX9 gene revealed the presence of a de novo missense mutation: p.P170L (c.509C>T). Mild and surviving cases of campomelic dysplasia are reviewed. PMID:21373255

  3. Differential Patterns of Hypoperfusion in Subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Caffarra, Paolo; Ghetti, Caterina; Concari, Letizia; Venneri, Annalena

    2008-01-01

    In this study the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) pattern of three Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) subtypes was measured with SPECT in 60 patients (nineteen with an amnestic deficit, sixteen with disexecutive deficits, and twenty five with mild multidomain deficits) and compared with that of 15 healthy matched older adults. The amnestic MCI subgroup showed significant hypoperfusion in the left hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and fronto-parieto-temporal areas. The disexecutive subgroup had significant hypoperfusion of the left superior, medial frontal and cingulate cortex. The multidomain subgroup had similar perfusion deficits to the amnestic subgroup, with an additional deficit in the left posterior cingulate gyrus. This study found differential patterns of hypoperfusion in MCI subtypes. Since all patients who progressed to dementia converted to probable Alzheimer’s disease, the different rCBF patterns most likely reflect the neuropathological heterogeneity at onset and differences in disease stage. PMID:19018314

  4. Imaging modalities in mild traumatic brain injury and sports concussion.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Peter G; Walker, Matthew T

    2011-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury is a significant public health issue that has been gaining considerable attention over the past few years. After injury, a large percentage of patients experience postconcussive symptoms that affect work and school performance and that carry significant medicolegal implications. Conventional imaging modalities (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) are insensitive to microstructural changes and underestimate the degree of diffuse axonal injury and metabolic changes. Newer imaging techniques have attempted to better diagnose and characterize diffuse axonal injury and the metabolic and functional aspects of traumatic brain injury. The following review article summarizes the currently available imaging studies and describes the novel and more investigational techniques available for mild traumatic brain injury. A suggested algorithm is offered.

  5. Eye movements and conservation acceleration in mildly retarded children.

    PubMed

    Boersma, F J; Wilton, K M

    1976-05-01

    Thirty mildly retarded elementary-school children, 15 of whom had received perceptual/attentional training, were tested on four Piagetian conservation tasks (number, length, and continuous quantity solid/liquid) presented on 16 mm movie film with taped instructions. Eye movements were recorded during the response period for each task. Subsequent analyses of eye-movement patterns showed clear differences between the training and control groups. Trained conservers showed more visual exploratory activity and less perceptual centration than control group subjects. Moreover the eye-movement patterns of trained conservers closely approximated those shown by natural (i.e., untrained) retarded conservers in a previous study. The findings were discussed in terms of possible cognitive structural changes resulting from training and possible cognitive structural differences between mildly retarded and nonretarded children.

  6. Developing Personally Relevant Goals for People with Mild Dementia.

    PubMed

    Khayum, Becky; Wynn, Rachel

    2015-08-01

    Many speech-language pathologists work in the skilled nursing facility setting and frequently treat patients in subacute rehabilitation who are experiencing mild cognitive deficits as a result of dementia. Treatment of these individuals needs to be carefully differentiated from rehabilitative treatment of a stroke or traumatic brain injury. A "habilitation" approach should be considered, focusing on an individual's preserved strengths and developing patient-centered goals that focus upon the integration of personally relevant stimuli into the care plan. Environmental modification, the use of visual memory aids, counseling, and ongoing family education are also essential components of this approach. This case study is a thorough example of how the habilitation approach can be used to provide intervention for a person with mild dementia. The case study will explain indication for treatment, assessment, goal selection, and research to support the treatment plan.

  7. Vegetarian diet in mild hypertension: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Margetts, B M; Beilin, L J; Vandongen, R; Armstrong, B K

    1986-01-01

    In a randomised crossover trial 58 subjects aged 30-64 with mild untreated hypertension were allocated either to a control group eating a typical omnivorous diet or to one of two groups eating an ovolactovegetarian diet for one of two six week periods. A fall in systolic blood pressure of the order of 5 mm Hg occurred during the vegetarian diet periods, with a corresponding rise on resuming a meat diet. The main nutrient changes with the vegetarian diet included an increase in the ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fats and intake of fibre, calcium, and magnesium and a decrease in the intake of protein and vitamin B12. There were no consistent changes in urinary sodium or potassium excretion or body weight. In untreated subjects with mild hypertension, changing to a vegetarian diet may bring about a worthwhile fall in systolic blood pressure. PMID:3026552

  8. Exercise for Mild Balance Dysfunction: Research into Practice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan; Meyer, Claudia; Batchelor, Frances; Hill, Keith

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether improved balance outcomes achieved in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) using balance screening to identify mild balance dysfunction and home exercises could be translated into community settings. Community-dwelling people aged over 65 who expressed concerns about their balance, had less than two falls in the preceding 12 months, and who had mild balance impairment on screening were given an individualized home-based balance and strengthening exercise program with intermittent home-visit support by a physiotherapist. Of 71 participants assessed (mean age 77.3 years, 76% female), 58 (82%) completed the six-month intervention. Twenty six percent of participants regained balance performance within normal limits--similar to those achieved in the previous RCT. Successful results from a previous RCT were able to be translated into community settings, with a similar magnitude of effect on balance and mobility.

  9. Concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: An Annotated Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology , 11(2), 139-145. Since no empirical evidence existed at the time for treatment concerning PSC...severity levels. Moser, R.S., and Schatz, P. 2002. Enduring effects of concussion in youth athletes. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology , 17, 91...Melnyk, A., and Nagy, J. 2002. Patient complaints within 1 month of mild traumatic brain injury: A controlled study. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology ,

  10. Formamide Synthesis through Borinic Acid Catalysed Transamidation under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Dine, Tharwat Mohy El; Evans, David; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2016-04-18

    A highly efficient and mild transamidation of amides with amines co-catalysed by borinic acid and acetic acid has been reported. A wide range of functionalised formamides was synthesized in excellent yields, including important chiral α-amino acid derivatives, with minor racemisation being observed. Experiments suggested that the reaction rely on a cooperative catalysis involving an enhanced boron-derived Lewis acidity rather than an improved Brønsted acidity of acetic acid.

  11. Mitotic apparatus: the selective extraction of protein with mild acid.

    PubMed

    Bibring, T; Baxandall, J

    1968-07-26

    The treatment of isolated mitotic apparatus with mild (pH 3) hydrochloric acid results in the extraction of less than 10 percent of its protein, accompanied by the selective morphological disappearance of the microtubules. The same extraction can be shown to dissolve outer doublet microtubules from sperm flagella. A protein with points of similarity to the flagellar microtubule protein is the major component of the extract from mitotic apparatus.

  12. Sustained mild hypergravity reduces spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Ryo; Ogawa, Yojiro; Ueda, Kaname; Aoki, Ken; Iwasaki, Ken-ichi

    2014-10-01

    Head-to-foot gravitational force >1G (+Gz hypergravity) augments venous pooling in the lower body and reduces central blood volume during exposure, compared with 1Gz. Central hypovolemia has been reported to reduce spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. However, no investigations have examined spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during exposure to sustained mild +Gz hypergravity. We therefore hypothesized that mild +Gz hypergravity would reduce spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, compared with 1Gz. To test this hypothesis, we examined spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in 16 healthy men during exposure to mild +Gz hypergravity using a short-arm centrifuge. Beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure (tonometry) and R-R interval (electrocardiography) were obtained during 1Gz and 1.5Gz exposures. Spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by sequence slope and transfer function gain. Stroke volume was calculated from the arterial pressure waveform using a three-element model. All indices of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity decreased significantly (up slope: 18.6±2.3→12.7±1.6ms/mmHg, P<0.001; down slope: 19.0±2.5→13.2±1.3ms/mmHg, P=0.002; transfer function gain in low frequency: 14.4±2.2→10.1±1.1ms/mmHg, P=0.004; transfer function gain in high frequency: 22.2±7.5→12.4±3.5ms/mmHg, P<0.001). Stroke volume decreased significantly (88±5→80±6ml, P=0.025). Moreover, although systolic arterial pressure variability increased, R-R interval variability did not increase. These results suggest that even mild +Gz hypergravity reduces spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disturbance during the exposure.

  13. Mild ciguatera poisoning: Case reports with neurophysiological evaluations.

    PubMed

    Butera, R; Prockop, L D; Buonocore, M; Locatelli, C; Gandini, C; Manzo, L

    2000-10-01

    Ciguatera poisoning causes mainly gastrointestinal and neurological effects of variable severity. However, symptoms of peripheral neuropathy with paresthesias and paradoxical disturbance of thermal sensation are the hallmark. Electrophysiological studies are often normal, except in severe cases. We report four people who developed mild ciguatera poisoning after barracuda ingestion. Electrophysiological studies documented normocalcemic latent tetany. These findings are consistent with ciguatoxin's mechanism of toxicity, which involves inactivation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and eventually increases nerve membrane excitability.

  14. A mouse model of human repetitive mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Michael J.; Pérez, Mariana Angoa; Briggs, Denise I.; Viano, David C.; Kreipke, Christian W.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for the study of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI) that models the most common form of head injury in humans is presented. Existing animal models of TBI impart focal, severe damage unlike that seen in repeated and mild concussive injuries, and few are configured for repetitive application. Our model is a modification of the Marmarou weight drop method and allows repeated head impacts to lightly anesthetized mice. A key facet of this method is the delivery of an impact to the cranium of an unrestrained subject allowing rapid acceleration of the free-moving head and torso, an essential characteristic known to be important for concussive injury in humans, and a factor that is missing from existing animal models of TBI. Our method does not require scalp incision, emplacement of protective skull helmets or surgery and the procedure can be completed in 1-2 minutes. Mice spontaneously recover the righting reflex and show no evidence of seizures, paralysis or impaired behavior. Skull fractures and intracranial bleeding are very rare. Minor deficits in motor coordination and locomotor hyperactivity recover over time. Histological analyses reveal mild astrocytic reactivity (increased expression of GFAP) and increased phospho-tau but a lack of blood-brain-barrier disruption, edema and microglial activation. This new animal model is simple and cost-effective and will facilitate characterization of the neurobiological and behavioral consequences of rmTBI. It is also ideal for high throughput screening of potential new therapies for mild concussive injuries as experienced by athletes and military personnel. PMID:21930157

  15. Click and release: fluoride cleavable linker for mild bioorthogonal separation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elia M; Zeltner, Martin; Zlateski, Vladimir; Grass, Robert N; Stark, Wendelin J

    2016-01-18

    Herein, we present a water dispersable, magnetic nanoparticle supported "click and release" system. The cleavable linker has been synthesized by using a strain-promoted copper-free "click" reagent to establish the specific link and a fluoride cleavable silane moiety for mild cleavage. Small organic molecules, azide-bearing dyes and functionalized enzymes have been bound to the magnetic particle and released in a bioorthogonal way.

  16. A mouse model of human repetitive mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kane, Michael J; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Briggs, Denise I; Viano, David C; Kreipke, Christian W; Kuhn, Donald M

    2012-01-15

    A novel method for the study of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI) that models the most common form of head injury in humans is presented. Existing animal models of TBI impart focal, severe damage unlike that seen in repeated and mild concussive injuries, and few are configured for repetitive application. Our model is a modification of the Marmarou weight drop method and allows repeated head impacts to lightly anesthetized mice. A key facet of this method is the delivery of an impact to the cranium of an unrestrained subject allowing rapid acceleration of the free-moving head and torso, an essential characteristic known to be important for concussive injury in humans, and a factor that is missing from existing animal models of TBI. Our method does not require scalp incision, emplacement of protective skull helmets or surgery and the procedure can be completed in 1-2 min. Mice spontaneously recover the righting reflex and show no evidence of seizures, paralysis or impaired behavior. Skull fractures and intracranial bleeding are very rare. Minor deficits in motor coordination and locomotor hyperactivity recover over time. Histological analyses reveal mild astrocytic reactivity (increased expression of GFAP) and increased phospho-tau but a lack of blood-brain-barrier disruption, edema and microglial activation. This new animal model is simple and cost-effective and will facilitate characterization of the neurobiological and behavioral consequences of rmTBI. It is also ideal for high throughput screening of potential new therapies for mild concussive injuries as experienced by athletes and military personnel.

  17. Current status of fluid biomarkers in mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kulbe, Jacqueline R.; Geddes, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) affects millions of people annually and is difficult to diagnose. Mild injury is insensitive to conventional imaging techniques and diagnoses are often made using subjective criteria such as self-reported symptoms. Many people who sustain a mTBI develop persistent post-concussive symptoms. Athletes and military personnel are at great risk for repeat injury which can result in second impact syndrome or chronic traumatic encephalopathy. An objective and quantifiable measure, such as a serum biomarker, is needed to aid in mTBI diagnosis, prognosis, return to play/duty assessments, and would further elucidate mTBI pathophysiology. The majority of TBI biomarker research focuses on severe TBI with few studies specific to mild injury. Most studies use a hypothesis-driven approach, screening biofluids for markers known to be associated with TBI pathophysiology. This approach has yielded limited success in identifying markers that can be used clinically, additional candidate biomarkers are needed. Innovative and unbiased methods such as proteomics, microRNA arrays, urinary screens, autoantibody identification and phage display would complement more traditional approaches to aid in the discovery of novel mTBI biomarkers. PMID:25981889

  18. Mild Dissonance Preferred Over Consonance in Single Chord Perception.

    PubMed

    Lahdelma, Imre; Eerola, Tuomas

    2016-05-01

    Previous research on harmony perception has mainly been concerned with horizontal aspects of harmony, turning less attention to how listeners perceive psychoacoustic qualities and emotions in single isolated chords. A recent study found mild dissonances to be more preferred than consonances in single chord perception, although the authors did not systematically vary register and consonance in their study; these omissions were explored here. An online empirical experiment was conducted where participants (N = 410) evaluated chords on the dimensions of Valence, Tension, Energy, Consonance, and Preference; 15 different chords were played with piano timbre across two octaves. The results suggest significant differences on all dimensions across chord types, and a strong correlation between perceived dissonance and tension. The register and inversions contributed to the evaluations significantly, nonmusicians distinguishing between triadic inversions similarly to musicians. The mildly dissonant minor ninth, major ninth, and minor seventh chords were rated highest for preference, regardless of musical sophistication. The role of theoretical explanations such as aggregate dyadic consonance, the inverted-U hypothesis, and psychoacoustic roughness, harmonicity, and sharpness will be discussed to account for the preference of mild dissonance over consonance in single chord perception.

  19. Increased production of inflammatory cytokines in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Magaki, Shino; Mueller, Claudius; Dickson, Cindy; Kirsch, Wolff

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that chronic inflammation plays a pathogenic role in both the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have screened for cytokines differentially produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and mild AD subjects who had progressed from MCI using a commercially available cytokine array. Following determination of expressed cytokines, we quantified levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-8, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 using flow cytometry. We have found a significant increase in the levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 produced by PBMCs stimulated for 24 h with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in MCI subjects compared to healthy elderly controls. However, in PBMCs stimulated for 48 h with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lower TNF-alpha/IL-10, IL-6/IL-10, and IL-8/IL-10 ratios were seen in MCI subjects. There were no differences in plasma levels of IL-8 between aged controls, MCI, and mild AD, and the levels of circulating IL-6 and IL-10 were below detection limits. Our data indicate that changes in cytokine production by PBMCs may be detected early in MCI, and an alteration of the immune response may precede clinical AD.

  20. Musculoskeletal manifestations of mild osteogenesis imperfecta in the adult.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Fergus E

    2005-12-01

    The musculoskeletal manifestations of mild forms of osteogenesis imperfecta are not well defined in the adult. The aim of this study was to characterize the musculoskeletal manifestations and resulting impairments reported by adults with mild osteogenesis imperfecta. For this task a survey of musculoskeletal symptoms and impairments was hosted on the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation web site for 6 weeks. Survey responses are reported herein. There were 111 unduplicated, adult respondents (78 female). Mean age was 40.8 years. More than one-quarter of 3,410 lifetime fractures occurred in adulthood. Nearly half of respondents reported an established diagnosis of "arthritis" (usually osteoarthritis), and the majority of these reported some degree of impairment attributable to arthritis. Articular pain, stiffness and instability were dominant in the large, weight-bearing joints of the lower extremities. Back pain and scoliosis were common. Of the respondents, 15% required assistance with light physical tasks and personal care. Two-thirds reported joint hyper-mobility, and one-third reported a previous tendon rupture. Complex regional pain syndrome was rare. Respondents reported frequent use of medications known to have potential adverse skeletal effects. In spite of these concerns the majority rated their overall physical health as good or excellent. Adults with mild osteogenesis imperfecta continue to sustain fractures into adulthood, and the majority reports some functional impairment due to musculoskeletal issues. Significant impairment is not rare.

  1. Polycystic ovary syndrome or hyperprolactinaemia: a study of mild hyperprolactinaemia.

    PubMed

    Su, Hung-wen; Chen, Ching-min; Chou, Szu-yuan; Liang, So-jung; Hsu, Chun-sen; Hsu, Ming-i

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and hyperprolactinaemia are both common causes of secondary amenorrhoea in reproductive women. The relationship between PCOS and hyperprolactinaemia has been reported with controversial results. To evaluate the clinical and laboratory features of women with mild hyperprolactinaemia and PCOS, we studied 474 Taiwan Chinese women: 101 had mild hyperprolactinaemia, 266 had PCOS and 107 were the control group. In this study, we found that 64% of the women with mild hyperprolactinaemia fulfilled the PCOS diagnostic criteria, regardless of their prolactin levels. Obese women with PCOS had significantly lower luteinising hormone (LH) and LH-to-FSH ratios than non-obese women with PCOS. Obese hyperprolactinaemic women had significantly lower follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), but higher LH-to-FSH ratios than the non-obese hyperprolactinaemic women. For women with PCOS, the BMIs were significantly negative with LH (γ = -0.253, p < 0.001), but not with FSH (γ = -0.061, p = 0.319). For the hyperprolactinaemic women, the BMIs were significantly negative with FSH (γ = -0.353, p < 0.001), but not with LH (γ = -0.021, p = 0.837). Although PCOS-related syndrome was very prevalent in women with hyperprolactinaemia, the patterns of disturbance in gonadotropin secretion were different between the PCOS and the hyperprolactinaemia patients.

  2. Mathematical modeling of MILD combustion of pulverized coal

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffel, N.; Mancini, M.; Weber, R.; Szlek, A.

    2009-09-15

    MILD (flameless) combustion is a new rapidly developing technology. The IFRF trials have demonstrated high potential of this technology also for N-containing fuels. In this work the IFRF experiments are analyzed using the CFD-based mathematical model. Both the Chemical Percolation Devolatilization (CPD) model and the char combustion intrinsic reactivity model have been adapted to Guasare coal combusted. The flow-field as well as the temperature and the oxygen fields have been accurately predicted by the CFD-based model. The predicted temperature and gas composition fields have been uniform demonstrating that slow combustion occurs in the entire furnace volume. The CFD-based predictions have highlighted the NO{sub x} reduction potential of MILD combustion through the following mechanism. Before the coal devolatilization proceeds, the coal jet entrains a substantial amount of flue gas so that its oxygen content is typically not higher than 3-5%. The volatiles are given off in a highly sub-stoichiometric environment and their N-containing species are preferentially converted to molecular nitrogen rather than to NO. Furthermore, there exists a strong NO-reburning mechanism within the fuel jet and in the air jet downstream of the position where these two jets merge. In other words, less NO is formed from combustion of volatiles and stronger NO-reburning mechanisms exist in the MILD combustion if compared to conventional coal combustion technology. (author)

  3. Mild Dissonance Preferred Over Consonance in Single Chord Perception

    PubMed Central

    Eerola, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on harmony perception has mainly been concerned with horizontal aspects of harmony, turning less attention to how listeners perceive psychoacoustic qualities and emotions in single isolated chords. A recent study found mild dissonances to be more preferred than consonances in single chord perception, although the authors did not systematically vary register and consonance in their study; these omissions were explored here. An online empirical experiment was conducted where participants (N = 410) evaluated chords on the dimensions of Valence, Tension, Energy, Consonance, and Preference; 15 different chords were played with piano timbre across two octaves. The results suggest significant differences on all dimensions across chord types, and a strong correlation between perceived dissonance and tension. The register and inversions contributed to the evaluations significantly, nonmusicians distinguishing between triadic inversions similarly to musicians. The mildly dissonant minor ninth, major ninth, and minor seventh chords were rated highest for preference, regardless of musical sophistication. The role of theoretical explanations such as aggregate dyadic consonance, the inverted-U hypothesis, and psychoacoustic roughness, harmonicity, and sharpness will be discussed to account for the preference of mild dissonance over consonance in single chord perception. PMID:27433333

  4. The postconcussion syndrome and the sequelae of mild head injury.

    PubMed

    Evans, R W

    1992-11-01

    The postconcussion syndrome refers to a large number of symptoms and signs that may occur alone or in combination following usually mild head injury. The most common complaints are headaches, dizziness, fatigue, irritability, anxiety, insomnia, loss of consciousness and memory, and noise sensitivity. Mild head injury is a major public health concern because the annual incidence is about 150 per 100,000 population, accounting for 75% or more of all head injuries. The postconcussion syndrome has been recognized for at least the last few hundred years and has been the subject of intense controversy for more than 100 years. The Hollywood head injury myth has been an important contributor to persisting skepticism and might be countered by educational efforts and counter-examples from boxing. The organicity of the postconcussion syndrome has now become well documented. Abnormalities following mild head injury have been reported in neuropathologic, neurophysiologic, neuroimaging, and neuropsychologic studies. There are multiple sequelae of mild head injury, including headaches of multiple types, cranial nerve symptoms and signs, psychologic and somatic complaints, and cognitive impairment. Rare sequelae include hematomas, seizures, transient global amnesia, tremor, and dystonia. Neuroimaging and physiologic and psychologic testing should be used judiciously based on the problems of the particular patient rather than in a cookbook fashion. Prognostic studies clearly substantiate the existence of a postconcussion syndrome. Manifestations of the postconcussion syndrome are common, with resolution in most patients by 3 to 6 months after the injury. Persistent symptoms and cognitive deficits are present in a distinct minority of patients for additional months or years. Risk factors for persisting sequelae include age over 40 years; lower educational, intellectual, and socioeconomic level; female gender; alcohol abuse; prior head injury; and multiple trauma. Although a small

  5. Who Do Students with Mild Disabilities Nominate as Cool in Inclusive General Education Classrooms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodkin, Philip C.; Farmer, Thomas W.; Acker, Richard V.; Pearl, Ruth; Thompson, Jana H.; Fedora, Pledger

    2006-01-01

    Examined the nominations that elementary students with mild disabilities made for peers they perceived as cool. The total sample was comprised of 948 students (496 girls, 452 boys) from the metropolitan Chicago area and North Carolina and included 107 (11.3%) students with mild disabilities. Overall, students with mild disabilities nominated…

  6. Post-traumatic Headache and Psychological Health: Mindfulness Training for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Mindfulness Training for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Sutapa Ford, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...other documentation. PT090084: “Post-traumatic Headache and Psychological Health: Mindfulness Training for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Contract...Psychological Health: 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Mindfulness Training for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH

  7. Mild hypothermia alters midazolam pharmacokinetics in normal healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hostler, David; Zhou, Jiangquan; Tortorici, Michael A; Bies, Robert R; Rittenberger, Jon C; Empey, Philip E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Callaway, Clifton W; Poloyac, Samuel M

    2010-05-01

    The clinical use of therapeutic hypothermia has been rapidly expanding due to evidence of neuroprotection. However, the effect of hypothermia on specific pathways of drug elimination in humans is relatively unknown. To gain insight into the potential effects of hypothermia on drug metabolism and disposition, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics of midazolam as a probe for CYP3A4/5 activity during mild hypothermia in human volunteers. A second objective of this work was to determine whether benzodiazepines and magnesium administered intravenously would facilitate the induction of hypothermia. Subjects were enrolled in a randomized crossover study, which included two mild hypothermia groups (4 degrees C saline infusions and 4 degrees C saline + magnesium) and two normothermia groups (37 degrees C saline infusions and 37 degrees C saline + magnesium). The lowest temperatures achieved in the 4 degrees C saline + magnesium and 4 degrees C saline infusions were 35.4 +/- 0.4 and 35.8 +/- 0.3 degrees C, respectively. A significant decrease in the formation clearance of the major metabolite 1'-hydroxymidazolam was observed during the 4 degrees C saline + magnesium compared with that in the 37 degrees C saline group (p < 0.05). Population pharmacokinetic modeling identified a significant relationship between temperature and clearance and intercompartmental clearance for midazolam. This model predicted that midazolam clearance decreases 11.1% for each degree Celsius reduction in core temperature from 36.5 degrees C. Midazolam with magnesium facilitated the induction of hypothermia, but shivering was minimally suppressed. These data provided proof of concept that even mild and short-duration changes in body temperature significantly affect midazolam metabolism. Future studies in patients who receive lower levels and a longer duration of hypothermia are warranted.

  8. The fate of sulfur in mild gasification liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.; Koncar, G.J.; Babu, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    This investigation addresses the determination of sulfur distribution in mild gasification liquids produced from untreated coal and from modified in two ways to reduce sulfur in the products: (a) physical mixing with a sulfur scavenger (CaO), and (b) pretreatment with aqueous alkali followed by mixing with CaO. Coal pyrolysis in the presence of CaO has previously been investigated, (3,5) showing that CaO can be effective in reducing the sulfur content of the fuel gas, and possibly that of the product liquids. Pretreatment of coals with alkaline chemicals has also been studied,(6,7) showing reduced sulfur and other changes in the liquid products.(8) Data on sulfur distribution in the liquid products could be useful for understanding the chemistry of alkali pretreatment and CaO interaction with coal sulfur during pyrolysis. In this work, a pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC) technique that simulates mild gasification on a milligram scale was used in conjunction with a carbon-specific flame ionization detector (FID) and a sulfur-specific flame photometric detector (FPD) to determine the sulfur distribution in oils/tars from Illinois No. 6 coal. A low-resolution packed GC column was employed to resolve oils/tars by carbon number, with ranges selected to approximate distillation fractions which might be recovered from a commercial mild gasification process. Oils/tars up to C{sub 18} were also collected from the pyro-probe effluent into dichloromethane for off-line study using a high-resolution GC with atomic emission detector (GC/AED) and with GC-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to measure specific sulfur compounds. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Cognitive bibliotherapy for mild and moderate adolescent depressive symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Ackerson, J; Scogin, F; McKendree-Smith, N; Lyman, R D

    1998-08-01

    The efficacy of cognitive bibliotherapy for adolescents experiencing mild and moderate depressive symptomatology was examined with a group of 22 community-dwelling adolescents. Cognitive bibliotherapy was determined to be superior to a delayed-treatment control condition. The treatment produced both statistically and clinically significant improvements in depressive symptoms. Treatment gains were maintained at 1-month follow-up. A significant decrease in dysfunctional thoughts, but not in negative automatic thoughts, was found after treatment. These results contribute to converging evidence on the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral treatments for adolescents experiencing depressive symptoms.

  10. Ethical Implications of the Mild Encephalitis Hypothesis of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Riedmüller, Rita; Müller, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious mental disease with a high mortality rate and severe social consequences. Due to insufficient knowledge about its etiopathogenesis, curative treatments are not available. One of the most promising new research concepts is the mild encephalitis hypothesis of schizophrenia, developed mainly by Karl Bechter and Norbert Müller. According to this hypothesis, a significant subgroup of schizophrenia patients suffer from a mild, but chronic, form of encephalitis with markedly different etiologies ranging from viral infections, traumas to autoimmune diseases. This inflammatory process is thought to occur in the beginning or during the course of the disease. In this article, we investigate the consequences of the mild encephalitis hypothesis of schizophrenia for the scientific community, and evaluate these consequences ethically. The mild encephalitis hypothesis implies that schizophrenia would no longer be considered an incurable psychiatric disorder. Instead, it would be considered a chronic, but treatable, neurological disease. This paradigm shift would doubtlessly have significant consequences: (1) major reforms would be necessary in the theoretical conceptualization of schizophrenia, which would challenge the psychiatric diagnostic systems, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders version 5 and ICD-10. (2) Psychotic patients should be treated in interdisciplinary teams, optimally in neuropsychiatric units; additionally, specialists for endocrinology, diabetology, and cardiology should be consulted for the frequently occuring somatic comorbidities. (3) Current diagnostic procedures and (4) therapies would have to be modified significantly. (5) There might be repercussions for the pharmaceutical industry as well: first, because old drugs with expired patent protection could partly replace expensive drugs and, second, because there would be a demand for the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs. (6) Legal evaluation of

  11. Mild oxidative stress is beneficial for sperm telomere length maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Swetasmita; Kumar, Rajeev; Malhotra, Neena; Singh, Neeta; Dada, Rima

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate telomere length in sperm DNA and its correlation with oxidative stress (normal, mild, severe). METHODS: The study included infertile men (n = 112) and age matched fertile controls (n = 102). The average telomere length from the sperm DNA was measured using a quantitative real time PCR based assay. Seminal reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 8-Isoprostane (8-IP) levels were measured by chemiluminescence assay and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: Average sperm telomere length in infertile men and controls was 0.609 ± 0.15 and 0.789 ± 0.060, respectively (P < 0.0001). Seminal ROS levels in infertile was higher [66.61 ± 28.32 relative light units (RLU)/s/million sperm] than in controls (14.04 ± 10.67 RLU/s/million sperm) (P < 0.0001). The 8-IP level in infertile men was significantly higher (421.55 ± 131.29 pg/mL) than in controls (275.94 ± 48.13 pg/mL) (P < 0.001). When correlated to oxidative stress, in normal range of oxidative stress (ROS, 0-21.3 RLU/s/million sperm) the average telomere length in cases was 0.663 ± 0.14, in mild oxidative stress (ROS, 21.3-35 RLU/s/million sperm) it was elevated (0.684 ± 0.12) and in severe oxidative stress (ROS > 35 RLU/s/million sperm) average telomere length was decreased to 0.595 ± 0.15. CONCLUSION: Mild oxidative stress results in lengthening of telomere length, but severe oxidative stress results in shorter telomeres. Although telomere maintenance is a complex trait, the study shows that mild oxidative stress is beneficial in telomere length maintenance and thus a delicate balance needs to be established to maximize the beneficial effects of free radicals and prevent harmful effects of supra physiological levels. Detailed molecular evaluation of telomere structure, its correlation with oxidative stress would aid in elucidating the cause of accelerated telomere length attrition. PMID:27376021

  12. Destination Memory in Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    El Haj, Mohamad; Postal, Virginie; Le Gall, Didier; Allain, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    In order to assess their destination memory, sixteen patients with probable mild Alzheimer Disease (AD), sixteen older adults and 16 young adults were asked to tell facts to pictures. On a subsequent task, they were asked to remember whether they had previously told that fact to that face or not. AD patients showed poorer destination recall than the older adults, and the older adults showed poorer destination recall than the young adults. Our results suggest that destination memory is highly impaired in AD. PMID:22713427

  13. [Current approaches to management of patients with mild cognitive impairment].

    PubMed

    Zakharov, V V; Gromova, D O

    2017-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an intermediate stage between normal aging and dementia. The prevalence of MCI among elderly people is 12-17% but the risk of progression of cognitive impairment and development of dementia during 5 years is up to 70%. Cerebral vascular diseases and initial stages of neurodegenerative processes are the cause of MCI. Clinical characteristics of MCI depend on the main etiological factor. To decrease the severity of symptoms and prevent the progression of cognitive impairment in MCI patients, pharmacotherapy and non-medication methods, including diet optimization, stimulation of mental and physical activity, are used. Dopaminergic and noradrenergic therapy is most prevalent among pharmacological methods.

  14. Induced mild hypothermia in post-cardiopulmonary bypass vasoplegia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Singh, Prabhat Kumar; Kumar, Naresh; Pant, Kailash Chandra

    2009-01-01

    The state of vasoplegia in immediate post-cardiopulmonary bypass period is characterized by severe hypotension, supranormal cardiac output, low systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and resistance to vasoconstrictors. We could successfully use induced mild hypothermia to increase SVR, and could avoid very high doses of nor-epinephrine (>0.3 mcg/kg/min) in the background of severe pulmonary hypertension (systolic pulmonary pressure> 90 mmHg). Its effects such as decreased oxygen demand, positive inotropy and better right ventricle performance probably helped to improve oxygenation in presence of pulmonary oedema.

  15. An update on topical therapies for mild-moderate psoriasis.

    PubMed

    van de Kerkhof, Peter C M

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapies are the mainstream treatment of psoriasis because most patients have mild disease. First-line treatments are vitamin D derivatives and corticosteroids. These treatments are usually given in combination schedules. For topical treatments the selection of the most appropriate vehicle is of major importance, thus improving adherence to the treatment, which frequently is impaired by the complexities of topical therapeutic choices. Evidence for efficacy and safety of topical treatments is readily available for vitamin D treatments and short-term treatment with corticosteroids. However, the scientific evidence for longer-term treatments is limited. Multiple new small molecules are in various stages of development and are reviewed.

  16. CSF cortisol in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Popp, Julius; Schaper, Karsten; Kölsch, Heike; Cvetanovska, Gabriela; Rommel, Fatima; Klingmüller, Dietrich; Dodel, Richard; Wüllner, Ullrich; Jessen, Frank

    2009-03-01

    Hypercortisolaemia occurs in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may be involved in the AD related neurodegenerative process. In order to determine whether brain structures are exposed to high cortisol concentrations early in AD, we measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol in 66 subjects with AD, 33 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 34 control subjects. CSF cortisol concentrations were higher in AD subjects compared to controls (p<0.001) and to MCI subjects (p=0.002). There was no significant increase of cortisol in MCI subjects compared with controls suggesting that the increase of CSF cortisol is not an early event in the course of AD.

  17. Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss and Mild Vasculopathy in Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase (Mthfr)-Deficient Mice: A Model of Mild Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Markand, Shanu; Saul, Alan; Roon, Penny; Prasad, Puttur; Martin, Pamela; Rozen, Rima; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (Mthfr) is a key enzyme in homocysteine-methionine metabolism. We investigated Mthfr expression in retina and asked whether mild hyperhomocysteinemia, due to Mthfr deficiency, alters retinal neurovascular structure and function. Methods. Expression of Mthfr was investigated at the gene and protein level using quantitative (q) RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The Mthfr+/+ and Mthfr+/− mice were subjected to comprehensive evaluation using ERG, funduscopy, fluorescein angiography (FA), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), HPLC, and morphometric and IHC analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) at 8 to 24 weeks. Results. Gene and protein analyses disclosed widespread retinal expression of Mthfr. Electroretinography (ERG) revealed a significant decrease in positive scotopic threshold response in retinas of Mthfr+/− mice at 24 weeks. Fundus examination in mice from both groups was normal; FA revealed areas of focal vascular leakage in 20% of Mthfr+/− mice at 12 to 16 weeks and 60% by 24 weeks. The SD-OCT revealed a significant decrease in nerve fiber layer (NFL) thickness at 24 weeks in Mthfr+/− compared to Mthfr+/+ mice. There was a 2-fold elevation in retinal hcy at 24 weeks in Mthfr+/− mice by HPLC and IHC. Morphometric analysis revealed an approximately 20% reduction in cells in the ganglion cell layer of Mthfr+/− mice at 24 weeks. The IHC indicated significantly increased GFAP labeling suggestive of Müller cell activation. Conclusions. Mildly hyperhomocysteinemic Mthfr+/− mice demonstrate reduced ganglion cell function, thinner NFL, and mild vasculopathy by 24 weeks. The retinal phenotype is similar to that of hyperhomocysteinemic mice with deficiency of cystathionine-β-synthase (Cbs) reported earlier. The data support the hypothesis that hyperhomocysteinemia may be causative in certain retinal neurovasculopathies. PMID:25766590

  18. Evidence for the Therapeutic Efficacy of Either Mild Hypothermia or Oxygen Radical Scavengers after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Takashi; Wei, Enoch P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Repetitive brain injury, particularly that occurring with sporting-related injuries, has recently garnered increased attention in both the clinical and public settings. In the laboratory, we have demonstrated the adverse axonal and vascular consequences of repetitive brain injury and have demonstrated that moderate hypothermia and/or FK506 exerted protective effects after repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) when administered within a specific time frame, suggesting a range of therapeutic modalities to prevent a dramatic exacerbation. In this communication, we revisit the utility of targeted therapeutic intervention to seek the minimal level of hypothermia needed to achieve protection while probing the role of oxygen radicals and their therapeutic targeting. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to repetitive mTBI by impact acceleration injury. Mild hypothermia (35°C, group 2), superoxide dismutase (group 3), and Tempol (group 4) were employed as therapeutic interventions administered 1 h after the repetitive mTBI. To assess vascular function, cerebral vascular reactivity to acetylcholine was evaluated 3 and 4 h after the repetitive mTBI, whereas to detect the burden of axonal damage, amyloid precursor protein (APP) density in the medullospinal junction was measured. Whereas complete impairment of vascular reactivity was observed in group 1 (without intervention), significant preservation of vascular reactivity was found in the other groups. Similarly, whereas remarkable increase in the APP-positive axon was observed in group 1, there were no significant increases in the other groups. Collectively, these findings indicate that even mild hypothermia or the blunting free radical damage, even when performed in a delayed period, is protective in repetitive mTBI. PMID:24341607

  19. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Kiderman, Alexander; Crawford, James; Murphy, Sara; Marshall, Kathryn; Pelusso, Constanza

    2016-01-01

    Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications. PMID:26727256

  20. Reducing biomass recalcitrance via mild sodium carbonate pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Mirmohamadsadeghi, Safoora; Chen, Zhu; Wan, Caixia

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the effects of mild sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis of different feedstocks (i.e., corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass). The results showed that sodium carbonate pretreatment markedly enhanced the sugar yields of the tested biomass feedstocks. The pretreated corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass gave the glucose yields of 95.1%, 62.3%, and 81.3%, respectively, after enzymatic hydrolysis. The above glucose yields of pretreated feedstocks were 2-4 times that of untreated ones. The pretreatment also enhanced the xylose yields, 4 times for corn stover and 20 times for both Miscanthus and switchgrass. Sodium carbonate pretreatment removed 40-59% lignin from the tested feedstocks while preserving most of cellulose (<5% cellulose loss). Corn stover appeared to be least resistant to breakdown by Na2CO3 and enzymatic hydrolysis. Our study indicated that mild sodium carbonate pretreatment was effective for reducing biomass recalcitrance and subsequently improving the digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass.

  1. Amnestic mild cognitive impairment with low myocardial metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Ogata, Takeshi; Haruta, Masayuki; Kishi, Masahiko; Tsuyusaki, Yohei; Tateno, Akihiko; Tateno, Fuyuki; Mouri, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: We reported cases of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) without the core clinical features of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) (dementia and spontaneous parkinsonism) with low uptake in 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy. Methods: During a 3-year period at a university clinic, we had 254 patients with memory complaints; 106 men, 148 women; mean age 72.5 years (48-95 years). In all patients we performed neurologic examination; memory tests including the MMSE, ADAScog, FAB and additional WMS-R; and imaging tests including brain MRI, SPECT and MIBG scintigraphy. Results: The criteria of amnestic MCI were fulfilled in 44 patients; and 13 of them (30%) showed low MIBG uptake. They had the following: uniformly elderly, with an equal sex ratio, have relatively slow progression, preserved general cognitive function (MMSE 24.8/30). In addition to memory impairment, they commonly showed low frontal function by FAB (12.5/18) and some had mild visual hallucination (5). Other than memory disorder, they had autonomic disorder (nocturia in 7, constipation in 2, postural hypotension in one), REM sleep behavioral disorder (in 3) and occipital hypoperfusion by SPECT (in 5). Conclusion: This cohort of multidomain amnestic MCI cases may present with early stage DLB because of the presence of low MIBG uptake. Clinically, they commonly have low FAB, and may have visual hallucination, autonomic and sleep disorders. PMID:23383388

  2. Chronic effect of ketanserin in mild to moderate essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Woittiez, A J; Wenting, G J; van den Meiracker, A H; Ritsema van Eck, H J; Man in't Veld, A J; Zantvoort, F A; Schalekamp, M A

    1986-02-01

    Ketanserin, an antagonist highly selective for 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) type 2 (S2) receptors, was given as monotherapy in a dose of 40 mg b.i.d. to 24 subjects with mild to moderate essential hypertension. Its effects were evaluated in a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover study. The effect on blood pressure in 18 subjects was monitored by 24-hour ambulatory intra-arterial measurements. Systolic and diastolic intra-arterial pressures were significantly lowered by ketanserin both during the day and at night, whereas heart rate was unchanged. Cuff pressure readings (triplicate measurements) with the London School of Hygiene sphygmomanometer and an automatic device (12 measurements in 1 hour) in the outpatient clinic also showed a significant effect on both supine and standing pressures. No postural hypotension was noted. Ketanserin had no effect on endogenous creatinine clearance, serum cholesterol levels, and the plasma levels of norepinephrine, renin, and aldosterone. The only side effect that was significantly more common with ketanserin than with placebo treatment was an increase in body weight. Ketanserin may have a place in the treatment of mild to moderate essential hypertension.

  3. Histopathological placental lesions in mild gestational hyperglycemic and diabetic women

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate and compare the incidence of histopathological placental lesions in mild gestational hyperglycemia, gestational diabetes and overt diabetes at term and preterm gestation. Research design and methods One-hundred-and-thirty-one placental samples were collected from Diabetes mellitus (DM) positive screened patients. Two diagnostic tests, glycemic profile and 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in parallel identified 4 groups normoglycemic, mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH), gestational DM (GDM) or overt DM (DM). Placental tissue specimens and sections from 4 groups were obtained by uniform random sampling and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Results Placentas from MGH group presented 17 types of histopathological change and higher rates of syncytial nodes and endarteritis. GDM placentas presented only nine types of histopathological change, high rates of dysmaturity, low rates of calcification and no syncytial nodes. Overt DM placentas showed 22 types of histopathological change, 21 of which were present in the preterm period. There were histopathological similarities between MGH and DM placentas, but the former exhibited a higher incidence of endarteritis, which has been described as a "post-mortem" phenomenon. Conclusion Our results confirmed that the distinct placental changes associated with DM and MGH depend on gestational period during which the diabetic insult occurs. It may reasonably be inferred that subclinical maternal hyperglycemia during pregnancy, as showed in MGH group, is responsible for increased placental endarteritis, a postmortem lesion in the live fetus. PMID:21831283

  4. Mild body cooling impairs attention via distraction from skin cooling.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Stephen S; Westwood, David A; Knox, Matthew K

    2007-02-01

    Many contemporary workers are routinely exposed to mild cold stress, which may compromise mental function and lead to accidents. A study investigated the effect of mild body cooling of 1.0 degree C rectal temperature (Tre) on vigilance (i.e. sustained attention) and the orienting of spatial attention (i.e. spatially selective processing of visual information). Vigilance and spatial attention tests were administered to 14 healthy males and six females at four stages (pre-immersion, deltaTre = 0, -0.5 and - 1.0 degree C ) of a gradual, head-out immersion cooling session (18-25 deltaC water), and in four time-matched stages of a contrast session, in which participants sat in an empty tub and no cooling took place. In the spatial attention test, target discrimination times were similar for all stages of the contrast session, but increased significantly in the cooling phase upon immersion (deltaTre = 0 degrees C), with no further increases at deltaTre = -0.5 and - 1.0 degree C. Despite global response slowing, cooling did not affect the normal pattern of spatial orienting. In the vigilance test, the variability of detection time was adversely affected in the cooling but not the contrast trials: variability increased at immersion but did not increase further with additional cooling. These findings suggest that attentional impairments are more closely linked to the distracting effects of cold skin temperature than decreases in body core temperature.

  5. [Mild forms of multi-infarct dementia: effectiveness of cerebrolysin].

    PubMed

    Vereshchagin, N V; Nekrasova, E M; Lebedeva, N V; Suslina, Z A; Solov'ev, O I; Piradov, M A; Altunina, M N

    1991-01-01

    The randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study of the effectiveness of cerebrolysin in a mild form of multi-infarct dementia was carried out. Sixty patients were divided in two equal groups differing significantly at the beginning of the study by none of the compared parameters. They received for 28 days daily drop intravenous doses of cerebrolysin (15 ml of the drug in 200 ml of a 0.85% NaCl solution: 10 ml in the morning and 5 ml in the evening) or placebo in the same amount of the solution. The control of the therapy effectiveness was instituted clinically (by means of a special scale), electroencephalographically, and using the psychological test of Arnold-Kohlmann and the test for response time. The study found a significant improvement of the memory (p-0.01), abstract thinking and time of reaction in the patients on cerebrolysin, confirmed also by the EEG-mapping. It is believed advisable to use the drug cerebrolysin in mild forms of multi-infarct dementia.

  6. Sex differences in the chronic mild stress model of depression.

    PubMed

    Franceschelli, Anthony; Herchick, Samantha; Thelen, Connor; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zeta; Pitychoutis, Pothitos M

    2014-09-01

    A large volume of clinical and experimental evidence documents sex differences in brain anatomy, chemistry, and function, as well as in stress and drug responses. The chronic mild stress model (CMS) is one of the most extensively investigated animal models of chronic stress. However, only a limited number of studies have been conducted in female rodents despite the markedly higher prevalence of major depression among women. Herein, we review CMS studies conducted in rats and mice of both sexes and further discuss intriguing sex-dependent behavioral and neurobiological findings. The PubMed literature search engine was used to find and collect all relevant articles analyzed in this review. Specifically, a multitermed search was performed with 'chronic mild stress', 'chronic unpredictable stress' and 'chronic variable stress' as base terms and 'sex', 'gender', 'females' and 'depression' as secondary terms in various combinations. Male and female rodents appear to be differentially affected by CMS application, depending on the behavioral, physiological, and neurobiological indices that are being measured. Importantly, the CMS paradigm, despite its limitations, has been successfully used to assess a constellation of interdisciplinary research questions in the sex differences field and has served as a 'silver bullet' in assessing the role of sex in the neurobiology of major depression.

  7. The Effects of Mild Gestational Hyperglycemia on Exclusive Breastfeeding Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Verd, Sergio; de Sotto, Diego; Fernández, Consuelo; Gutiérrez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes increases the risk of a range of adverse perinatal outcomes, including breastfeeding failure, but the best cut-off point for gestational diabetes is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between mild gestational glucose tolerance impairment and the early cessation of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF). This is an observational study of 768 women with full term pregnancies that were screened for gestational diabetes at 24–28 weeks gestation. Subjects were divided into two groups: those with a normal 1-h glucose challenge test and those with an elevated 1-h glucose challenge test but still did not qualify for gestational diabetes. We constructed multivariable logistic regression models using data from 616 women with normal gestational glucose tolerance and 152 women with an isolated positive 1-h glucose challenge test. The risk of early exclusive breastfeeding cessation was found to increase in women with mildly impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy (adjusted OR, 1.65; 95% CI: 1.11, 2.45). Risks of early EBF cessation were also independently associated with the amount of neonatal weight loss and admission to the neonatal ward. Instead, parity was associated with a decreased risk for shorter EBF duration. Insulin resistance—even in the absence of gestational diabetes mellitus—may be an impeding factor for EBF. PMID:27869777

  8. Visuomotor adaptability in older adults with mild cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Schaffert, Jeffrey; Lee, Chi-Mei; Neill, Rebecca; Bo, Jin

    2017-02-01

    The current study examined the augmentation of error feedback on visuomotor adaptability in older adults with varying degrees of cognitive decline (assessed by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment; MoCA). Twenty-three participants performed a center-out computerized visuomotor adaptation task when the visual feedback of their hand movement error was presented in a regular (ratio=1:1) or enhanced (ratio=1:2) error feedback schedule. Results showed that older adults with lower scores on the MoCA had less adaptability than those with higher MoCA scores during the regular feedback schedule. However, participants demonstrated similar adaptability during the enhanced feedback schedule, regardless of their cognitive ability. Furthermore, individuals with lower MoCA scores showed larger after-effects in spatial control during the enhanced schedule compared to the regular schedule, whereas individuals with higher MoCA scores displayed the opposite pattern. Additional neuro-cognitive assessments revealed that spatial working memory and processing speed were positively related to motor adaptability during the regular scheduled but negatively related to adaptability during the enhanced schedule. We argue that individuals with mild cognitive decline employed different adaptation strategies when encountering enhanced visual feedback, suggesting older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may benefit from enhanced visual error feedback during sensorimotor adaptation.

  9. Numerical and experimental investigation of a mild combustion burner

    SciTech Connect

    Galletti, Chiara; Parente, Alessandro; Tognotti, Leonardo

    2007-12-15

    An industrial burner operating in the MILD combustion regime through internal recirculation of exhaust gases has been characterized numerically. To develop a self-sufficient numerical model of the burner, two subroutines are coupled to the CFD solver to model the air preheater section and heat losses from the burner through radiation. The resulting model is validated against experimental data on species concentration and temperature. A 3-dimensional CFD model of the burner is compared to an axisymmetric model, which allows considerable computational saving, but neglects some important burner features such as the presence of recirculation windows. Errors associated with the axisymmetric model are evaluated and discussed, as well as possible simplified procedures for engineering purposes. Modifications of the burner geometry are investigated numerically and suggested in order to enhance its performances. Such modifications are aimed at improving exhaust gases recirculation which is driven by the inlet air jet momentum. The burner is found to produce only 30 ppm{sub v} of NO when operating in MILD combustion mode. For the same air preheating the NO emissions would be of approximately 1000 ppm{sub v} in flame combustion mode. It is also shown that the burner ensures more homogeneous temperature distribution in the outer surfaces with respect to flame operation, and this is attractive for burners used in furnaces devoted to materials' thermal treatment processes. The effect of air excess on the combustion regime is also discussed. (author)

  10. Mild cognitive impairment: a subset of minor neurocognitive disorder?

    PubMed

    Geda, Yonas E; Nedelska, Zuzana

    2012-10-01

    The field of aging and dementia is increasingly preoccupied with identification of the asymptomatic phenotype of Alzheimer disease (AD). A quick glance at historical landmarks in the field indicates that the agenda and priorities of the field have evolved over time. The initial focus of research was dementia. In the late 1980s and 1990s, dementia researchers reported that some elderly persons are neither demented nor cognitively normal. Experts coined various terms to describe the gray zone between normal cognitive aging and dementia, including mild cognitive impairment. Advances made in epidemiologic, neuroimaging, and biomarkers research emboldened the field to seriously pursue the avenue of identifying asymptomatic AD. Accurate "diagnosis" of the phenotype has also evolved over time. For example, the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) Task Force is contemplating to use the terms major and minor neurocognitive disorders. The six papers published in this edition of the journal pertain to mild cognitive impairment, which is envisaged to become a subset of minor neurocognitive disorders. These six studies have three points in common: 1) All of them are observational studies; 2) they have generated useful hypotheses or made important observations without necessarily relying on expensive biomarkers; and 3) Based on the new National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association guidelines, all the studies addressed the symptomatic phase of AD. Questionnaire-based observational studies will continue to be useful until such a time that validated biomarkers, be it chemical or neuroimaging, become widely available and reasonably affordable.

  11. Elevated Rates of Mild Cognitive Impairment in HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, David P.; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Bondi, Mark W.; Doyle, Katie L.; Morgan, Erin E.; Massman, Paul J.; Gilbert, Paul E.; Woods, Steven Paul

    2015-01-01

    With the rising number of individuals in their 50s and 60s who are infected with HIV, concerns have emerged about possible increases in the rates of non-HIV-associated dementias. The current study examined the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older HIV-infected adults, since MCI is an intermediate state between typical cognitive aging and dementia that emerges in this age range. Participants included 75 adults with HIV disease aged 50 years and older who were on cART and had undetectable plasma viral loads and 80 demographically similar HIV seronegative comparison subjects. Participants completed a research neuropsychological evaluation that was used to classify MCI according to the comprehensive diagnostic scheme described by Bondi et al. (2014). HIV-infected persons were over seven times more likely to have an MCI designation (16%) than their seronegative counterparts (2.5%). Within the HIV+ cohort, MCI had minimal overlap with diagnoses of Asymptomatic Neurocognitive Impairment and was significantly associated with older age, lower Karnofsky Scale of Performance Scores, and mild difficulties performing instrumental activities of daily living (iADLs). HIV infection in older adults is associated with a notably elevated concurrent risk of MCI, which may increase the likelihood of developing non-HIV-associated dementias as this population ages further. PMID:26139019

  12. Corrosion behavior of mild steel in acetic acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.M.; Gupta, A.

    2000-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of mild steel in acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH) solutions was studied by weight loss and potentiostatic polarization techniques. The variation in corrosion rate of mild steel with concentrations of CH{sub 3}COOH, evaluated by weight loss and electrochemical techniques, showed marked resemblance. From both techniques, the maximum corrosion rate was observed for 20% CH{sub 3}COOH solution at all three experimental temperatures (25, 35, and 45 C). Anodic polarization curves showed active-passive behavior at each concentration, except at 80% CH{sub 3}COOH. Critical current density (i{sub c}) passive current density (I{sub n}), primary passivation potential (E{sub pp}), and potential for passivity (E{sub p}) had their highest values in 20% CH{sub 3}COOH solution. With an increase in temperature, while the anodic polarization curves shifted toward higher current density region at each concentration, the passive region became progressively less distinguishable. With the addition of sodium acetate (NaCOOCH{sub 3}) as a supporting electrolyte, the passive range was enlarged substantially. However, the transpassive region commenced at more or less the same potential. Cathodic polarization curves were almost identical irrespective of the concentration of CH{sub 3}COOH or temperature.

  13. Cortical asymmetries in normal, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hun; Lee, Jong Weon; Kim, Geon Ha; Roh, Jee Hoon; Kim, Min-Jeong; Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Sung Tae; Jeon, Seun; Lee, Jong-Min; Heilman, Kenneth M; Na, Duk L

    2012-09-01

    There are functional and structural neocortical hemispheric asymmetries in people with normal cognition. These asymmetries may be altered in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) because there is a loss of neuronal connectivity in the heteromodal cortex. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), mild AD, and moderate to severe AD have progressive reductions in thickness asymmetries of the heteromodal neocortex. Right-handed elderly volunteers including normal cognition (NC), aMCI, and AD underwent 3-D volume imaging for cortical thickness. Although the cortical asymmetry pattern observed in normal cognition brains was generally maintained in aMCI and AD, there was a progressive decrease in the degree of asymmetry, especially in the inferior parietal lobule. A reduction of neocortical asymmetries may be a characteristic sign that occurs in patients with AD. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether this loss is specific to AD and if measurements of asymmetry can be used as diagnostic markers and for monitoring disease progression.

  14. Mild hypoxia affects synaptic connectivity in cultured neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Mulder, Alex T B; Farinha, Ana C; van Putten, Michel J A M; le Feber, Joost

    2014-04-04

    Eighty percent of patients with chronic mild cerebral ischemia/hypoxia resulting from chronic heart failure or pulmonary disease have cognitive impairment. Overt structural neuronal damage is lacking and the precise cause of neuronal damage is unclear. As almost half of the cerebral energy consumption is used for synaptic transmission, and synaptic failure is the first abrupt consequence of acute complete anoxia, synaptic dysfunction is a candidate mechanism for the cognitive deterioration in chronic mild ischemia/hypoxia. Because measurement of synaptic functioning in patients is problematic, we use cultured networks of cortical neurons from new born rats, grown over a multi-electrode array, as a model system. These were exposed to partial hypoxia (partial oxygen pressure of 150Torr lowered to 40-50Torr) during 3 (n=14) or 6 (n=8) hours. Synaptic functioning was assessed before, during, and after hypoxia by assessment of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses to electrical stimulation. Action potential heights and shapes and non-synaptic stimulus responses were used as measures of individual neuronal integrity. During hypoxia of 3 and 6h, there was a statistically significant decrease of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses, whereas direct responses and action potentials remained unchanged. These changes were largely reversible. Our results indicate that in cultured neuronal networks, partial hypoxia during 3 or 6h causes isolated disturbances of synaptic connectivity.

  15. Afterglows of Mildly Relativistic Supernovae: Baryon Loaded Blastwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Ray, Alak

    2011-08-01

    Relativistic supernovae have been discovered until recently only through their association with long duration Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). As the ejecta mass is negligible in comparison to the swept up mass, the blastwaves of such explosions are well described by the Blandford-McKee (in the ultra relativistic regime) and Sedov-Taylor (in the non-relativistic regime) solutions during their afterglows. However, the recent discovery of the relativistic supernova SN 2009bb, without a detected GRB, has indicated the possibility of highly baryon loaded mildly relativistic outflows which remains in nearly free expansion phase during the radio afterglow. In this work, we consider the dynamics and emission from a massive, relativistic shell, launched by a Central Engine Driven EXplosion (CEDEX), decelerating adiabatically due to its collision with the pre-explosion circumstellar wind profile of the progenitor. We show that this model explains the observed radio evolution of the prototypical SN 2009bb and demonstrate that SN 2009bb had a highly baryon loaded, mildly relativistic outflow.

  16. A simple rat model of mild traumatic brain injury: a device to reproduce anatomical and neurological changes of mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury typically involves temporary impairment of neurological function. Previous studies used water pressure or rotational injury for designing the device to make a rat a mild traumatic brain injury model. The objective of this study was to make a simple model of causing mild traumatic brain injury in rats. The device consisted of a free-fall impactor that was targeted onto the rat skull. The weight (175 g) was freely dropped 30 cm to rat’s skull bregma. We installed a safety device made of acrylic panel. To confirm a mild traumatic brain injury in 36 Sprague-Dawley rats, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain within 24 h after injury. We evaluated behavior and chemical changes in rats before and after mild traumatic brain injury. The brain MRI did not show high or low signal intensity in 34 rats. The mobility on grid floor was decreased after mild traumatic brain injury. The absolute number of foot-fault and foot-fault ratio were decreased after mild traumatic brain injury. However, the difference of the ratio was a less than absolute number of foot-fault. These results show that the device is capable of reproducing mild traumatic brain injury in rats. Our device can reduce the potential to cause brain hemorrhage and reflect the mechanism of real mild traumatic brain injury compared with existing methods and behaviors. This model can be useful in exploring physiology and management of mild traumatic brain injury. PMID:28070456

  17. Cleaning Carbon Nanotubes by Use of Mild Oxygen Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petkov, Mihail

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have shown that it is feasible to use oxygen radicals (specifically, monatomic oxygen) from mild oxygen plasmas to remove organic contaminants and chemical fabrication residues from the surfaces of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and metal/CNT interfaces. A capability for such cleaning is essential to the manufacture of reproducible CNT-based electronic devices. The use of oxygen radicals to clean surfaces of other materials is fairly well established. However, previously, cleaning of CNTs and of graphite by use of oxygen plasmas had not been attempted because both of these forms of carbon were known to be vulnerable to destruction by oxygen plasmas. The key to success of the present technique is, apparently, to ensure that the plasma is mild . that is to say, that the kinetic and internal energies of the oxygen radicals in the plasma are as low as possible. The plasma oxygen-radical source used in the experiments was a commercial one marketed for use in removing hydrocarbons and other organic contaminants from vacuum systems and from electron microscopes and other objects placed inside vacuum systems. In use, the source is installed in a vacuum system and air is leaked into the system at such a rate as to maintain a background pressure of .0.56 torr (.75 Pa). In the source, oxygen from the air is decomposed into monatomic oxygen by radio-frequency excitation of a resonance of the O2 molecule (N2 is not affected). Hence, what is produced is a mild (non-energetic) oxygen plasma. The oxygen radicals are transported along with the air molecules in the flow created by the vacuum pump. In the experiments, exposure to the oxygen plasma in this system was shown to remove organic contaminants and chemical fabrication residues from several specimens. Many high-magnification scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of CNTs were taken before and after exposure to the oxygen plasma. As in the example shown in the figure, none of these images showed evidence of degradation

  18. The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-03-15

    This report is a post-project assessment of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Mild Coal Gasification Project, which was selected under Round III of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program. The CCT Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of commercial-scale facilities. The ENCOAL{reg_sign} Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bluegrass Coal Development Company (formerly SMC Mining Company), which is a subsidiary of Ziegler Coal Holding Company, submitted an application to the DOE in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the CCT Program. The project was selected by DOE in December 1989, and the Cooperative Agreement (CA) was approved in September 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} mild coal gasification facility was completed in June 1992. In October 1994, ENCOAL{reg_sign} was granted a two-year extension of the CA with the DOE, that carried through to September 17, 1996. ENCOAL{reg_sign} was then granted a six-month, no-cost extension through March 17, 1997. Overall, DOE provided 50 percent of the total project cost of $90,664,000. ENCOAL{reg_sign} operated the 1,000-ton-per-day mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, for over four years. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC{trademark}) technology originally developed by SMC Mining Company and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal to produce two new fuels, Process-Derived Fuel (PDF{trademark}) and Coal-Derived Liquids (CDL{trademark}). The products, as alternative fuel sources, are capable of significantly lowering current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation thus reducing pollutants causing acid rain. In support of this overall objective

  19. Leishmania infantum Induces Mild Unfolded Protein Response in Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    De Santi, Mauro; Ceccarelli, Marcello; Vitale, Fabrizio; Brandi, Giorgio; Magnani, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The Leishmaniases are a group of parasitic diseases caused by protozoa of the Leishmania genus affecting both humans and other vertebrates. Leishmania is an intracellular pathogen able to confer resistance to apoptosis in the early phase of macrophages infection by activation of host PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibition of caspase-3 activation. Intracellular pathogens hijack organelles such as ER to facilitate survival and replication, thus eliciting ER stress and activating/modulating the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the host cell. The UPR is aimed to mitigate ER stress, thereby promoting cell survival. However, prolonged ER stress will activate the apoptotic pathway. The aim of this study was to investigate the ER stress response in Leishmania-infected macrophages to gain insights about the mechanisms underlying the apoptosis resistance in parasitized cells. Macrophages differentiated from human monocytic cell lines (U937 and THP-1) and murine primary macrophages were infected with Leishmania infantum MHOM/TN/80/IPT1 (WHO international reference strain). Several ER stress/autophagy expression markers, as well as cell survival/apoptosis markers (phospho-Akt and cleaved caspase-3) were evaluated by qPCR and/or by western blotting. As ER stress positive control, cells were treated with tunicamycin or dithiothreitol (DTT). The gene expression analyses showed a mild but significant induction of the ER stress/autophagy markers. The western blot analyses revealed that the Leishmania infection induced Akt phosphorylation and significantly inhibited the induction of caspase-3 cleavage, eIF2α phosphorylation and DDIT3/CHOP expression in tunicamycin and DTT treated cells. The mild but significant increase in ER stress expression markers and the delay/attenuation of the effects of ER stress inducers in infected cells support the hypothesis that L. infantum could promote survival of host cells by inducing a mild ER stress response. The host ER stress response could be not

  20. Nova outbursts in the case of mild hibernation

    SciTech Connect

    Livio, M.; Shankar, A.; Truran, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    The necessary conditions for the production of strong thermonuclear runaways in the hibernation scenario are identified and explored. It is found that a reduction in the accretion rate by a factor of about 100, for a period longer than a few thousand years, is generally sufficient to ensure nova-type outbursts, even in the presence of rather high preoutburst accretion rates. Nova outbursts can be obtained under mild hibernation conditions on 1 solar mass white dwarfs as well as on very massive ones. A reduction in the accretion rate by a factor of 10 only is insufficient to produce a nova outburst, if the preoutburst accretion rate is as high as 10 to the -8th solar mass/yr. 28 references.

  1. Mild Cognitive Impairment: Diagnosis, Longitudinal Course, and Emerging Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Jennifer N.; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is widely regarded as the intermediate stage of cognitive impairment between the changes seen in normal cognitive aging and those associated with dementia. Elderly patients with MCI constitute a high-risk population for developing dementia, in particular Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although the core clinical criteria for MCI have remained largely unchanged, the operational definition of MCI has undergone several revisions over the course of the last decade and remains an evolving diagnosis. Prognostic implications of this diagnosis are becoming clearer with regard to the risk of progressive cognitive deterioration. Although patients with MCI may represent an optimal target population for pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, results from clinical trials have been mixed and a definitive effective treatment remains elusive. This article provides a brief overview of the evolution of the concept of MCI and reviews current diagnostic criteria, the longitudinal course of the disorder, and current and emerging treatments for MCI. PMID:25160795

  2. Marital Quality in the Context of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Garand, Linda; Dew, Mary Amanda; Urda, Bridget; Lingler, Jennifer Hagerty; DeKosky, Steven T.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    The behavioral changes in people with dementia often negatively affect marital relationships. Yet little is known about how the marital relationship is affected when the care recipient has mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This study characterizes marital quality among adults who live with a spouse with MCI. Data were drawn from interviews with 27 spouses of people with a recent diagnosis of MCI. Even at early stages of MCI, many spouses report the frequent occurrence of distressing behaviors. This study demonstrates that MCI may degrade the quality of the marital relationship. These results have implications for clinical practice and the delivery of health care and social services to these families. It is important to develop interventions to address the needs of these individuals and their caregivers. Results of this study suggest the need for mental health interventions designed to preserve the quality of these marital relationships. PMID:17984481

  3. Impaired tracheobronchial clearance in patients with mild stable asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, J R; Pavia, D; Sheahan, N F; Agnew, J E; Clarke, S W

    1983-01-01

    Tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance was measured with the radioaerosol technique in 25 patients with stable, mild asthma, none of whom was taking systemic corticosteroids. The results were compared with those obtained from a control group of 25 healthy subjects matched for age and sex. All patients and healthy subjects were non-smokers. Ventilatory function was significantly impaired in the asthmatic group, which resulted in a more central initial tracheobronchial deposition of inhaled radioaerosol than in the control group. Despite the shorter transit path along the ciliated airways for the tracer radioaerosol in the asthmatic group, mucociliary clearance was found to be significantly poorer than in the healthy control group. This may be important with respect to bronchial mucus plugging. PMID:6879499

  4. Biomechanical Risk Estimates for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Funk, J. R.; Duma, S. M.; Manoogian, S. J.; Rowson, S.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the risk of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in living humans based on a large set of head impact data taken from American football players at the collegiate level. Real-time head accelerations were recorded from helmet-mounted accelerometers designed to stay in contact with the player’s head. Over 27,000 head impacts were recorded, including four impacts resulting in MTBI. Parametric risk curves were developed by normalizing MTBI incidence data by head impact exposure data. An important finding of this research is that living humans, at least in the setting of collegiate football, sustain much more significant head impacts without apparent injury than previously thought. The following preliminary nominal injury assessment reference values associated with a 10% risk of MTBI are proposed: a peak linear head acceleration of 165 g, a HIC of 400, and a peak angular head acceleration of 9000 rad/s2. PMID:18184501

  5. Persistent vertigo and dizziness after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fife, Terry D; Kalra, Deepak

    2015-04-01

    Vertigo, dizziness, and disequilibrium are common symptoms following concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Dizziness and vertigo may be the result of trauma to the peripheral vestibular system or the central nervous system, or, in some cases, may be due to anxiety, depression, or posttraumatic stress disorder; these mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. While most peripheral vestibular disorders can be identified by testing and examination, those without inner-ear causes that have persisting complaints of dizziness and motion sickness are more difficult to understand and to manage. Some of these patients exhibit features compatible with vestibular migraine and may be treated successfully with migraine-preventative medications. This paper reviews the nonotogenic causes of persisting dizziness, the possible mechanisms, and the pathophysiology, as a framework for patient management and for future research.

  6. Profiles of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Peraita, Herminia; Chacón, José; Díaz-Mardomingo, Carmen; Martínez-Arias, Rosario

    2015-11-20

    We applied latent class analysis (LCA) to a set of neuropsychological data with the aim of corroborating the three cognitive profiles of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) described in the literature, namely: healthy, amnestic, non-amnestic, and multidomain. The ultimate purpose of the LCA was to try to find the underlying classification of MCI and related pathologies by means of the participants' response patterns, rather than on more classical psychometric criteria, such as the standard deviation of the mean. We computed 547 neuropsychological assessments derived from 223 participants who were assessed annually for three consecutive years. The battery included tests of memory, language, executive function, and praxis. The results obtained by means of LCA, with a four-group solution and using the 40th percentile as the criterion, confirm prior classifications obtained with more questionable psychometric criteria, while providing longitudinal data on the course of MCI and the stability of group assignment over time.

  7. Chronic mild cerebrovascular dysfunction as a cause for Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Humpel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive chronic disorder and is characterized by β-amyloid plaques and angiopathy, tau pathology, neuronal cell death, and inflammatory responses. The reasons for this disease are not known. This review proposes the hypothesis that a chronic mild longlasting cerebrovascular dysfunction could initiate a cascade of events leading to AD. It is suggested that (vascular) risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia) causes either damage of the cerebrovascular system including silent strokes or causes dysregulation of beta-amyloid clearance at the blood-brain barrier resulting in increased brain beta-amyloid. A cascade of subsequent downstream events may lead to disturbed metabolic changes, and neuroinflammation and tau pathology. The role of NGF on the cell death of cholinergic neurons is discussed. Additional risk factors (e.g. acidosis, metals) contribute to plaque development. PMID:21112383

  8. Scaleup of mild gasification to a process development unit

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.L.; Carty, R.H.; Saladin, N.; Mead, J.; Foster, H.

    1992-11-01

    The overall objectives of this project is to develop the IGT Mild-Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program are to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scaleup obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. During the first ten months of this project. the NEPA Application for construction and operation of the PDU facility at the SIUC site was written and submitted for approval. In addition, the process design for the PDU was completed, bid packages for the PDU modules were prepared and sent to a slate of prospective bidders, and bids were received from the participating bidders.

  9. Characteristics of Mild Dengue Virus Infection in Thai Children

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, In-Kyu; Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Hermann, Laura; Buddhari, Darunee; Scott, Thomas W.; Jarman, Richard G.; Aldstadt, Jared; Nisalak, Ananda; Thammapalo, Suwich; Bhoomiboonchoo, Piraya; Mammen, Mammen P.; Green, Sharone; Gibbons, Robert V.; Endy, Timothy P.; Rothman, Alan L.

    2013-01-01

    A four-year longitudinal cohort and geographic cluster study in rural Thailand was conducted to characterize the clinical spectrum of dengue virus (DENV) infection. Symptomatic DENV infections in the cohort were detected by active school absence–based surveillance that triggered cluster investigations around ill cohort children. Data from 189 cohort children with symptomatic DENV infection and 126 contact children in the clusters with DENV infection were analyzed. Of infected contacts, only 19% were asymptomatic; 81% were symptomatic, but only 65.9% reported fever. Symptom-based case definitions were unreliable for diagnosis. Symptomatic infections in contacts were milder with lower DENV RNA levels than the cohort. Infections in contacts with fever history were more likely to have detectable DENV RNA than infections without fever history. Mild infections identified by cluster investigations account for a major proportion of all DENV infections. These findings are relevant for disease burden assessments, transmission modeling, and determination of vaccine impact. PMID:24127167

  10. DNA-repair in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bucholtz, Nina; Demuth, Ilja

    2013-10-01

    While the pathogenesis of the sporadic form of Alzheimer disease (late onset Alzheimer disease, LOAD) is not fully understood, it seems to be clear that a combination of genetic and environmental factors are involved and influence the course of the disease. Among these factors, elevated levels of oxidative stress have been recognized and individual differences in the capacity to deal with DNA damage caused by its effects have been the subject of numerous studies. This review summarizes the research on DNA repair proteins and genes in the context of LOAD pathogenesis and its possible prodromal stage, mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The current status of the research in this field is discussed with respect to methodological issues which might have compromised the outcome of some studies and future directions of investigation on this subject are depicted.

  11. Mild ammonium stress increases chlorophyll content in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Zabala, Joseba; González-Murua, Carmen; Marino, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) and ammonium (NH4(+)) are the main forms of nitrogen available in the soil for plants. Excessive NH4(+) accumulation in tissues is toxic for plants and exclusive NH4(+)-based nutrition enhances this effect. Ammonium toxicity syndrome commonly includes growth impairment, ion imbalance and chlorosis among others. In this work, we observed high intraspecific variability in chlorophyll content in 47 Arabidopsis thaliana natural accessions grown under 1 mM NH4(+) or 1 mM NO3(-) as N-source. Interestingly, chlorophyll content increased in every accession upon ammonium nutrition. Moreover, this increase was independent of ammonium tolerance capacity. Thus, chlorosis seems to be an exclusive effect of severe ammonium toxicity while mild ammonium stress induces chlorophyll accumulation.

  12. Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

  13. A mild removal of Fmoc group using sodium azide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Rajagopal, Basker; Liu, Xuan Yu; Chen, Kuan Lin; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Lin, Fui; Lin, Po-Chiao

    2014-02-01

    A mild method for effectively removing the fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) group using sodium azide was developed. Without base, sodium azide completely deprotected N (α)-Fmoc-amino acids in hours. The solvent-dependent conditions were carefully studied and then optimized by screening different sodium azide amounts and reaction temperatures. A variety of Fmoc-protected amino acids containing residues masked with different protecting groups were efficiently and selectively deprotected by the optimized reaction. Finally, a biologically significant hexapeptide, angiotensin IV, was successfully synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis using the developed sodium azide method for all Fmoc removals. The base-free condition provides a complement method for Fmoc deprotection in peptide chemistry and modern organic synthesis.

  14. Should mild stimulation be the order of the day?

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    Mild stimulation protocols aim to reduce the physical, financial and emotional burden associated with the conventional IVF protocol without compromising the pregnancy rate. Such protocols help to decrease the complications and the discomfort related to the prolonged administration of agonist and large doses of gonadotrophins, by limiting the number of oocytes recruited to no more than eight. The per cycle pregnancy rates are lower though the cumulative pregnancy rate in a year is equivalent. This CPR comes by going through earlier repeat cycles. Whether this reduces the physical, emotional or financial burden remains a matter of debate. There is need to standardize these protocol and do more trials to compare the two effectively. Till such time there is a clear benefit above the conventional protocol it will not be the protocol of choice with most physicians. PMID:24672159

  15. Encoal mild coal gasification project: Commercial plant feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    In order to determine the viability of any Liquids from Coal (LFC) commercial venture, TEK-KOL and its partner, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), have put together a technical and economic feasibility study for a commercial-size LFC Plant located at Zeigler Coal Holding Company`s North Rochelle Mine site. This resulting document, the ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Plant: Commercial Plant Feasibility Study, includes basic plant design, capital estimates, market assessment for coproducts, operating cost assessments, and overall financial evaluation for a generic Powder River Basin based plant. This document and format closely resembles a typical Phase II study as assembled by the TEK-KOL Partnership to evaluate potential sites for LFC commercial facilities around the world.

  16. Training self-advocacy skills to adults with mild handicaps.

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, A L; Cuvo, A J; Davis, P K

    1988-01-01

    We developed and empirically evaluated an instructional program to teach self-advocacy skills to eight young adults with mild handicaps. Participants were taught to discriminate whether or not possible violations of legal rights occurred in socially validated scenarios and, if so, to role-play how to redress rights violations. Experimental control was demonstrated with a multiple probe design across four general legal rights categories for the discrimination component of training, and a multiple probe across groups of subjects for the redressing legal rights component of training. Participants' behavior was probed in simulations and deceptions of legal rights violations in natural settings. There were marked increases in dependent measures after instruction. Difficulties in assessing generalization and maintenance of low-rate behaviors and suggestions for future research are presented. PMID:3198550

  17. LES of Mild Combustion using Pareto-efficient Combustion Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Evans, Michael; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Moderate or Intense Low-Oxygen Dilution (MILD) combustion is a combustion regime that provides opportunities for improved thermal efficiency and reduced pollutant emissions. In this study, large-eddy simulation is used to investigate the ignition, mixing, and stabilization of a jet flame in this kinetics-controlled combustion regime. The combustion process is modeled by a Pareto-efficient combustion (PEC) formulation that optimally combines reaction-transport and chemistry combustion models. In this approach, a three-stream flamelet/progress variable model is used as a computationally efficient description of equilibrated flame regions, and a finite-rate chemistry representation is employed to accurately represent the ignition behavior and flame stabilization. Through comparisons with experiments and simulations with single-regime combustion models, it will be shown that this Pareto-efficient combustion submodel assignment accurately captures important dynamics in complex turbulent flame configurations.

  18. Electrochemical Treatment of Textile Dye Wastewater by Mild Steel Anode.

    PubMed

    Bhavya, J G; Rekha, H B; Murthy, Usha N

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the results of the treatment of textile dye wastewater generated from a textile processing industry by electrochemical method. Experiments were conducted at current densities of 12, 24 and 48 A/m2 using mild steel as anode and cathode. During the various stages of electrolysis, parameters such as COD, color and BOD5 were determined in order to know the feasibility of electrochemical treatment. It was observed that increasing the electrolysis time and increased current density bring down the concentration of pollutants. Also COD removal rate and energy consumption during the electrolysis were calculated and presented in this paper. The present study proves the effectiveness of electrochemical treatment using MS as anode for TDW oxidation.

  19. Melatonin ameliorates chronic mild stress induced behavioral dysfunctions in mice.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Seenu; Kumar, Mayank; Manda, Kailash

    2013-07-02

    Melatonin, a neurohormone, is known to regulate several physiological functions, especially the circadian homeostasis, mood and behavior. Chronic exposure to stress is involved in the etiology of human affective disorders, and depressed patients have been reported to show changes in the circadian rhythms and nocturnal melatonin concentration. The present study was conducted to evaluate a possible beneficial action of chronic night-time melatonin treatment against chronic mild stress (CMS) induced behavioral impairments. As expected in the present study, the stress exposed mice showed reduced weight gain, hedonic deficit, cognitive deficits and decreased mobility in behavioral despair test. Interestingly, CMS exposed mice showed less anxiety. Chronic night-time melatonin administration significantly ameliorated the stress-induced behavioral disturbances, especially the cognitive dysfunction and depressive phenotypes. In conclusion, the present findings suggest the mitigating role of melatonin against CMS-induced behavioral changes, including the cognitive dysfunctions and reaffirm its potential role as an antidepressant.

  20. Omental transplantation in a patient with mild ALS

    PubMed Central

    Rafael, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is not a neurodegenerative disease. The patient, a 33-year-old man began with symptoms of the bulbar form of ALS, characterized by burning pain in both feet during two months and then, he presented right crural monoparesis, fasciculations, slight dysarthria and he walked with help of orthopedic devices. A preoperative MRI scans showed atherosclerosis at the V4 segment of the left vertebral artery. On May 2012, he received an omental transplantation on the anterior, left lateral and posterior surface of the medulla oblongata. About 48 hours after surgery, the dysarthria disappeared and the voluntary movement of the right foot improved. Three days later, he walked without aid of orthopedic device. At present, four years after operation he present complete reversal of symptoms. In conclusión, this patient confirms that bulbar ALS is of ischemic origin and therefore, mild ALS can be cured. PMID:27508110

  1. Mild Diabetes Models and Their Maternal-Fetal Repercussions

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, D. C.; Sinzato, Y. K.; Bueno, A.; Netto, A. O.; Dallaqua, B.; Gallego, F. Q.; Iessi, I. L.; Corvino, S. B.; Serrano, R. G.; Marini, G.; Piculo, F.; Calderon, I. M. P.; Rudge, M. V. C.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of diabetes in pregnancy leads to hormonal and metabolic changes making inappropriate intrauterine environment, favoring the onset of maternal and fetal complications. Human studies that explore mechanisms responsible for changes caused by diabetes are limited not only for ethical reasons but also by the many uncontrollable variables. Thus, there is a need to develop appropriate experimental models. The diabetes induced in laboratory animals can be performed by different methods depending on dose, route of administration, and the strain and age of animal used. Many of these studies are carried out in neonatal period or during pregnancy, but the results presented are controversial. So this paper, addresses the review about the different models of mild diabetes induction using streptozotocin in pregnant rats and their repercussions on the maternal and fetal organisms to propose an adequate model for each approached issue. PMID:23878822

  2. Physical activity and mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Cox, Kay; Kurz, Alexander F

    2010-09-01

    Regular physical activity undoubtedly has many health benefits for all age groups. In the past decade, researchers and clinicians have begun to focus their attention on whether physical activity also can improve health outcomes of older adults who experience mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia. This ongoing question is gaining relevance in light of the aging of the world population and with it the rise of age-related conditions, such as cognitive impairment. Not surprisingly, physical activity is among the potential protective lifestyle factors mentioned when strategies to delay or prevent dementia are discussed. The first large-scale multidomain intervention trials are under way to put this to the test. This review aims to give an overview of recent trials of physical activity in patients with MCI or dementia.

  3. Mild coal gasification screw pyrolyzer development and design

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, D.W.

    1990-08-01

    Our objective is to produce information and design recommendations needed for the development of an efficient continuous process for the mild gasification of caking bituminous coals. We have focused on the development of an externally heated pyrolyzer in which the sticky, reacting coal is conveyed by one or more screws. We have taken a multifaceted approach to forwarding the development of the externally-heated screw pyrolyzer. Small scale process experiments on a 38-mm single screw pyrolyzer have been a major part of our effort. Engineering analyses aimed at producing design and scaleup equations have also been important. Process design recommendations follow from these. We critically review our experimental data and experience, and information from the literature and equipment manufactures for the purpose of making qualitative recommendations for improving practical pyrolyzer design and operation. Benchscale experiments are used to supply needed data and test some preliminary concepts. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Predictable chronic mild stress in adolescence increases resilience in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Suo, Lin; Zhao, Liyan; Si, Jijian; Liu, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weili; Chai, Baisheng; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Jiajia; Ding, Zengbo; Luo, Yixiao; Shi, Haishui; Shi, Jie; Lu, Lin

    2013-07-01

    Stress in adolescence has been widely demonstrated to have a lasting impact in humans and animal models. Developmental risk and protective factors play an important role in the responses to stress in adulthood. Mild-to-moderate stress in adolescence may resist the negative impacts of adverse events in adulthood. However, little research on resilience has been conducted. In this study, we used a predictable chronic mild stress (PCMS) procedure (5 min of daily restraint stress for 28 days) in adolescent rats (postnatal days (PNDs) 28-55) to test the resilience effect of PCMS on depressive-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and forced swim test and anxiety-like behavior in the novelty-suppressed feeding test and elevated plus maze in adulthood. We also investigated the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the brain during the PCMS procedure in adolescence. Moreover, we investigated the effect of PCMS in adolescence on subsequent responses to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS; PNDs 63-83) in adulthood. The results demonstrated that PCMS during adolescence produced antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects and increased mTOR signaling activity in the prefrontal cortex in early adulthood. Either systemic administration or intra-PFC infusion of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin completely blocked the behavioral effects produced by PCMS in adolescence. PCMS during adolescence resisted depressive- and anxiety-like behavior caused by CUS in adulthood. These findings indicate that PCMS in adolescence can contribute to resilience against depression and anxiety caused by stress in adulthood.

  5. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Diffuse Axonal Injury in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Kevin D.; Chen, Xiao-Han; Meaney, David F.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Until recently, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or “concussion” was generally ignored as a major health issue. However, emerging evidence suggests that this injury is by no means mild, considering it induces persisting neurocognitive dysfunction in many individuals. Although little is known about the pathophysiological aspects of mTBI, there is growing opinion that diffuse axonal injury (DAI) may play a key role. To explore this possibility, we adapted a model of head rotational acceleration in swine to produce mTBI by scaling the mechanical loading conditions based on available biomechanical data on concussion thresholds in humans. Using these input parameters, head rotational acceleration was induced in either the axial plane (transverse to the brainstem; n=3), causing a 10- to 35-min loss of consciousness, or coronal plane (circumferential to the brainstem; n=2), which did not produce a sustained loss of consciousness. Seven days following injury, immunohistochemical analyses of the brains revealed that both planes of head rotation induced extensive axonal pathology throughout the white matter, characterized as swollen axonal bulbs or varicosities that were immunoreactive for accumulating neurofilament protein. However, the distribution of the axonal pathology was different between planes of head rotation. In particular, more swollen axonal profiles were observed in the brainstems of animals injured in the axial plane, suggesting an anatomic substrate for prolonged loss of consciousness in mTBI. Overall, these data support DAI as an important pathological feature of mTBI, and demonstrate that surprisingly overt axonal pathology may be present, even in cases without a sustained loss of consciousness. PMID:21740133

  6. Metabolic consequences of chronic intermittent mild stress exposure.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Abigail K; Fourman, Sarah; Packard, Amy E B; Egan, Ann E; Ryan, Karen K; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M

    2015-10-15

    Chronic stress in humans has divergent effects on food intake, with some individuals reporting increased vs. decreased food intake during stress. This divergence may depend in part on stress intensity, with higher-intensity stressors preferentially promoting anorexia. Consistent with this idea, rodents given a high-intensity chronic variable stress paradigm have robustly decreased food intake and body weight gain. However, the metabolic effects of a less intense chronic stress paradigm are not clear. Thus in the present study, adult male rats were given chronic intermittent mild stress (CIMS) exposure (3 cycles, in which each cycle consists of once daily mild stress for 5 days/week for 2 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of no stress) vs. non-stress controls, combined with ongoing access to a palatable diet (PD; choice of chow, high-fat diet, 30% sucrose drink, and water) vs. control diet (chow and water). As expected, access to PD increased caloric intake, body weight gain, and adiposity, and impaired glucose tolerance. CIMS decreased body weight gain only during the first cycle of stress and did not affect body weight gain thereafter, regardless of diet. Moreover, CIMS did not alter total food intake, adiposity or glucose tolerance regardless of diet. Lastly, CIMS transiently increased high-fat diet preference in PD-fed rats during the first stress cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that CIMS has relatively modest metabolic effects that occur primarily during initial stress exposure. These results support the hypothesis that the metabolic consequences of chronic stress vary with stress intensity and/or frequency.

  7. Management of Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Britta

    2015-09-14

    Managing mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis on the first view appears to be a simple task. However, real life often proofs the opposite and creates a challenging situation. In theory, mild-to-moderate disease should be sufficiently treated by mesalamine or alternatively by a probiotic. Insufficient treatment comprises the danger of leading to a flare, and hence, an exacerbation of the entire disease, with risk of progressing to severe disease. What are the considerations with regard to patient management in this situation? Certainly, disease distribution is the critical information, since it allows for planning the optimal route of administration, namely local versus systemic treatment. Novel pharmacological strategies might allow for reaching high local concentrations even at the left side of the colon or alternatively administer locally active budesonide throughout the entire colon frame, thus avoiding systemic side effects. Therapy planning has to involve the patient to identify how this can be included in daily life. Including the patient implies that depending on the condition, disease activity and even life quality, the individual therapy requires timely adaption. A recent study by Pedersen et al. [Inflamm Bowel Dis 2014;20:2276-2285] provides evidence that this strategy can be followed and leads to an overall better outcome. A last thought, besides the patient not taking the appropriate dose or lacking adherence to therapy, should consider that a worsening of disease could be due to infectious complications including Clostridium difficile or cytomegalovirus colitis. If all considerations fail within a reasonable time frame, therapy should be escalated. Patients in this situation often hesitate in accepting the need of immunosuppression. Future options, potentially including phosphatidylcholine, might bridge the gap between mesalamine, probiotics and immunosuppressive strategies.

  8. Pain Sensitivity and Recovery From Mild Chronic Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Roehrs, Timothy A.; Harris, Erica; Randall, Surilla; Roth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether an extended bedtime in sleepy and otherwise healthy volunteers would increase alertness and thereby also reduce pain sensitivity. Setting: Outpatient with sleep laboratory assessments. Participants and Interventions: Healthy volunteers (n = 18), defined as having an average daily sleep latency on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) < 8 min, were randomized to 4 nights of extended bedtime (10 hr) (EXT) or 4 nights of their diary-reported habitual bedtimes (HAB). On day 1 and day 4 they received a standard MSLT (10:00, 12:00, 14:00, and 16:00 hr) and finger withdrawal latency pain testing to a radiant heat stimulus (10:30 and 14:30 hr). Results: During the four experimental nights the EXT group slept 1.8 hr per night more than the HAB group and average daily sleep latency on the MSLT increased in the EXT group, but not the HAB group. Similarly, finger withdrawal latency was increased (pain sensitivity was reduced) in the EXT group but not the HAB group. The nightly increase in sleep time during the four experimental nights was correlated with the improvement in MSLT, which in turn was correlated with reduced pain sensitivity. Conclusions: These are the first data to show that an extended bedtime in mildly sleepy healthy adults, which resulted in increased sleep time and reduced sleepiness, reduces pain sensitivity. Citation: Roehrs TA; Harris E; Randall S; Roth T. Pain sensitivity and recovery from mild chronic sleep loss. SLEEP 2012;35(12):1667-1672. PMID:23204609

  9. Clinical differences among mild cognitive impairment subtypes in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Jennifer G; Weis, Holly; Stebbins, Glenn; Bernard, Bryan; Goetz, Christopher G

    2012-08-01

    Mild cognitive impairment is increasingly recognized as a construct in Parkinson's disease (PD) and occurs in about 25% of nondemented PD patients. Although executive dysfunction is the most frequent type of cognitive deficit in PD, the cognitive phenotype of PD mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) is broad. PD-MCI subtypes are represented by amnestic and nonamnestic domain impairment as well as single- and multiple-domain impairment. However, it is unclear whether patients with different PD-MCI subtypes also differ in other clinical characteristics in addition to cognitive profile. We studied 128 PD-MCI subjects at our Movement Disorders center, comparing clinical, motor, and behavioral characteristics across the PD-MCI subtypes. We found varying proportions of impairment subtypes: nonamnestic single domain, 47.7%; amnestic multiple domain, 24.2%; amnestic single domain, 18.8%; and nonamnestic multiple domain, 9.5%. Attentional/executive functioning and visuospatial abilities were the most frequently impaired domains. PD-MCI subtypes differed in their motor features, with nonamnestic multiple-domain PD-MCI subjects showing particularly pronounced problems with postural instability and gait. Differences among PD-MCI subtypes in age, PD duration, medication use, mood or behavioral disturbances, and vascular disease were not significant. Thus, in addition to differing cognitive profiles, PD-MCI subtypes differed in motor phenotype and severity but not in mood, behavioral, or vascular comorbidities. Greater postural instability and gait disturbances in the nonamnestic multiple-domain subtype emphasize shared nondopaminergic neural substrates of gait and cognition in PD. Furthermore, increased burden of cognitive dysfunction, rather than type of cognitive deficit, may be associated with greater motor impairment in PD-MCI.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of mild hypoxia in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seh Hyun; Lee, Woo Soon; Lee, Na Mi; Yun, Sin Weon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of mild hypoxia in the mature and immature brain. Methods We prepared organotypic slice cultures of the hippocampus and used hippocampal tissue cultures at 7 and 14 days in vitro (DIV) to represent the immature and mature brain, respectively. Tissue cultures were exposed to 10% oxygen for 60 minutes. Twenty-four hours after this hypoxic insult, propidium iodide fluorescence images were obtained, and the damaged areas in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1), CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) were measured using image analysis. Results In the 7-DIV group compared to control tissue, hypoxia-exposed tissue showed decreased damage in two regions (CA1: 5.59%±2.99% vs. 4.80%±1.37%, P=0.900; DG: 33.88%±12.53% vs. 15.98%±2.37%, P=0.166), but this decrease was not statistically significant. In the 14-DIV group, hypoxia-exposed tissue showed decreased damage compared to control tissues; this decrease was not significant in the CA3 (24.51%±6.05% vs. 18.31%±3.28%, P=0.373) or DG (15.72%±3.47% vs. 9.91%±2.11%, P=0.134), but was significant in the CA1 (50.91%±5.90% vs. 32.30%±3.34%, P=0.004). Conclusion Although only CA1 tissues cultured for 14 DIV showed significantly less damage after exposure to hypoxia, the other tissues examined in this study showed a tendency towards less damage after hypoxic exposure. Therefore, mild hypoxia might play a protective role in the brain. PMID:25932036

  11. Antiviral Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis B With Mild Acute Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Su; Ye, Qiaoxia; Wang, Mingfang; Wu, Yinlian; Weng, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Yueyong

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of peginterferon α-2a (pegIFN) and nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) treatments in patients with hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg)-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) with mild acute exacerbation (AE). Methods Treatment-naive HBeAg-positive CHB patients with AE who received pegIFN or NA (entecavir (ETV) or telbivudine (LDT)) therapies were retrospectively selected. The HBeAg seroconversion rate, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) loss rate and the cost-effectiveness of different treatments were compared. Results A total of 63 patients with pegIFN therapy and 78 with NA (38 with ETV and 40 with LDT) therapy were included. The HBsAg loss rate was significantly higher in the pegIFN group when compared with the NA group (on week 96: 9/63 (14.29%) vs. 1/78 (1.28%), P = 0.005). No significant difference in hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA negativity or the HBeAg/HBsAg seroconversion rate was found between ETV and LDT group. One year of pegIFN therapy resulted in 18.56 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) per patient, and the incremental cost per additional QALY gained was $3,709. Conclusions PegIFN therapy is safe in HBeAg-positive CHB patients with mild AE, as it results in a higher HBsAg loss rate and longer QALYs than NA therapy. PMID:28270871

  12. Smoking habits in adolescents with mild to moderate asthma.

    PubMed

    Zimlichman, Eyal; Mandel, Dror; Mimouni, Francis B; Shochat, Tzippora; Grotto, Itamar; Kreiss, Yitshak

    2004-09-01

    To study the impact of mild to moderate asthma on smoking habits in adolescents. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that asthma does not prevent adolescents from smoking. A research questionnaire, filled by a systematic sample of military personnel upon enrollment to service in the Israeli Defense Force (IDF), was analyzed. Conscripts were asked to voluntarily fill (after obtaining a signed informed consent) a research questionnaire about their medical history, and several health related topics including smoking. This database was matched with the military medical profile of the soldier, which includes the patient asthma status. Overall, 38,047 young adults were included in this study. There was a significant increase in the rate of mild to moderate asthma, from the mid-1980's to date. During the 1980's and early 1990's, asthmatics smoked significantly less frequently (20-22%) than non-asthmatics (25-27%). In the mid- to late-1990's, the smoking rates increased relatively more in asthmatics, to the point that in the last 8 years of this study, they were found to be almost identical in both groups, at a rate of approximately 30%. The presence of asthma is not a powerful motivating agent to prevent from smoking. It is likely that smoking asthmatic teenagers are at risk for suboptimal lung growth, and as young adults, they will become at greater risk of lung function deterioration. We suggest that primary care physicians, caring for asthma in children, adolescents, and young adults, should explain the particular risks generated by tobacco smoking.

  13. Mild MPP(+) exposure impairs autophagic degradation through a novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyara, Masatsugu; Kotake, Yaichiro; Tokunaga, Wataru; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, but its underlying cause remains unknown. Although recent studies using PD-related neurotoxin MPP(+) suggest autophagy involvement in the pathogenesis of PD, the effect of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of PD, remains largely unclear. We examined the effect of mild MPP(+) exposure (10 and 200 μM for 48 h), which induces a more slowly developing cell death, on autophagic processes and the mechanistic differences with acute MPP(+) toxicity (2.5 and 5 mM for 24 h). In SH-SY5Y cells, mild MPP(+) exposure predominantly inhibited autophagosome degradation, whereas acute MPP(+) exposure inhibited both autophagosome degradation and basal autophagy. Mild MPP(+) exposure reduced lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D activity without changing lysosomal acidity, whereas acute exposure decreased lysosomal density. Lysosome biogenesis enhancers trehalose and rapamycin partially alleviated mild MPP(+) exposure induced impaired autophagosome degradation and cell death, but did not prevent the pathogenic response to acute MPP(+) exposure, suggesting irreversible lysosomal damage. We demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation by MPP(+) exposure and mechanistic differences between mild and acute MPP(+) toxicities. Mild MPP(+) toxicity impaired autophagosome degradation through novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanisms. Sustained mild lysosomal damage may contribute to PD. We examined the effects of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of Parkinson's disease, in SH-SY5Y cells. This study demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation through a reduction in lysosomal cathepsin D activity without altering lysosomal acidity by mild MPP(+) exposure. Mechanistic differences between acute and mild MPP(+) toxicity were also observed. Sustained mild damage of lysosome may be an underlying cause

  14. The Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygen on Symptoms after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-20

    Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) Aug 2008 – Dec 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygen on Symptoms after Mild...absolute (ATA) hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) on post-concussion symptoms in 50 military service members with at least one combat-related, mild traumatic brain...symptoms after mild TBI. 15. SUBJECT TERMS: hyperbaric oxygen, HBOT, HBO, HBO2, traumatic brain injury, TBI, mTBI, post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD

  15. Development of an advanced continuous mild gasification process for the production of coproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.W.; Jha, M.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report is a final brief summary of development of a mild-gasification and char conversion process. Morgantown Energy Technology Center developed a concept called mild gasification. In this concept, devolatilization of coal under nonoxidizing and relatively mild temperature and pressure conditions can yield three marketable products: (1) a high-heating-value gas, (2) a high-aromatic coal liquid, and (3) a high-carbon char. The objective of this program is to develop an advanced, continuous, mild-gasification process to produce products that will make the concept economically and environmentally viable. (VC)

  16. Development of an advanced continuous mild gasification process for the production of coproducts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.W.; Jha, M.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report is a final brief summary of development of a mild-gasification and char conversion process. Morgantown Energy Technology Center developed a concept called mild gasification. In this concept, devolatilization of coal under nonoxidizing and relatively mild temperature and pressure conditions can yield three marketable products: (1) a high-heating-value gas, (2) a high-aromatic coal liquid, and (3) a high-carbon char. The objective of this program is to develop an advanced, continuous, mild-gasification process to produce products that will make the concept economically and environmentally viable. (VC)

  17. Acetaminophen versus Ibuprofen in Young Children with Mild Persistent Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, W.J.; Mauger, D.T.; Paul, I.M.; Moy, J.N.; Boehmer, S.J.; Szefler, S.J.; Fitzpatrick, A.M.; Jackson, D.J.; Bacharier, L.B.; Cabana, M.D.; Covar, R.; Holguin, F.; Lemanske, R.F.; Martinez, F.D.; Pongracic, J.A.; Beigelman, A.; Baxi, S.N.; Benson, M.; Blake, K.; Chmiel, J.F.; Daines, C.L.; Daines, M.O.; Gaffin, J.M.; Gentile, D.A.; Gower, W.A.; Israel, E.; Kumar, H.V.; Lang, J.E.; Lazarus, S.C.; Lima, J.J.; Ly, N.; Marbin, J.; Morgan, W.J.; Myers, R.E.; Olin, J.T.; Peters, S.P.; Raissy, H.H.; Robison, R.G.; Ross, K.; Sorkness, C.A.; Thyne, S.M.; Wechsler, M.E.; Phipatanakul, W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies have suggested an association between frequent acetaminophen use and asthma-related complications among children, leading some physicians to recommend that acetaminophen be avoided in children with asthma; however, appropriately designed trials evaluating this association in children are lacking. METHODS In a multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial, we enrolled 300 children (age range, 12 to 59 months) with mild persistent asthma and assigned them to receive either acetaminophen or ibuprofen when needed for the alleviation of fever or pain over the course of 48 weeks. The primary outcome was the number of asthma exacerbations that led to treatment with systemic glucocorticoids. Children in both treatment groups received standardized asthma-controller therapies that were used in a simultaneous, factorially linked trial. RESULTS Participants received a median of 5.5 doses (interquartile range, 1.0 to 15.0) of trial medication; there was no significant between-group difference in the median number of doses received (P = 0.47). The number of asthma exacerbations did not differ significantly between the two groups, with a mean of 0.81 per participant with acetaminophen and 0.87 per participant with ibuprofen over 46 weeks of follow-up (relative rate of asthma exacerbations in the acetaminophen group vs. the ibuprofen group, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.69 to 1.28; P = 0.67). In the acetaminophen group, 49% of participants had at least one asthma exacerbation and 21% had at least two, as compared with 47% and 24%, respectively, in the ibuprofen group. Similarly, no significant differences were detected between acetaminophen and ibuprofen with respect to the percentage of asthma-control days (85.8% and 86.8%, respectively; P = 0.50), use of an albuterol rescue inhaler (2.8 and 3.0 inhalations per week, respectively; P = 0.69), unscheduled health care utilization for asthma (0.75 and 0.76 episodes per participant

  18. Suspected non-AD pathology in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Wisse, Laura E M; Butala, Nirali; Das, Sandhitsu R; Davatzikos, Christos; Dickerson, Bradford C; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev N; Yushkevich, Paul A; Wolk, David A

    2015-12-01

    We aim to better characterize mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with suspected non-Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (SNAP) based on their longitudinal outcome, cognition, biofluid, and neuroimaging profile. MCI participants (n = 361) from ADNI-GO/2 were designated "amyloid positive" with abnormal amyloid-beta 42 levels (AMY+) and "neurodegeneration positive" (NEU+) with abnormal hippocampal volume or hypometabolism using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. SNAP was compared with the other MCI groups and with AMY- controls. AMY-NEU+/SNAP, 16.6%, were older than the NEU- groups but not AMY- controls. They had a lower conversion rate to AD after 24 months than AMY+NEU+ MCI participants. SNAP-MCI participants had similar amyloid-beta 42 levels, florbetapir and tau levels, but larger white matter hyperintensity volumes than AMY- controls and AMY-NEU- MCI participants. SNAP participants performed worse on all memory domains and on other cognitive domains, than AMY-NEU- participants but less so than AMY+NEU+ participants. Subthreshold levels of cerebral amyloidosis are unlikely to play a role in SNAP-MCI, but pathologies involving the hippocampus and cerebrovascular disease may underlie the neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment in this group.

  19. Dysexecutive Functioning in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Derailment in Temporal Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Eppig, Joel; Wambach, Denene; Nieves, Christine; Price, Catherine C.; Lamar, Melissa; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Giovannetti, Tania; Bettcher, Brianne M.; Penney, Dana L.; Swenson, Rod; Lippa, Carol; Kabasakalian, Anahid; Bondi, Mark W.; Libon, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Libon et al. (2010) provided evidence for three statistically determined clusters of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI): amnesic (aMCI), dysexecutive (dMCI), and mixed (mxMCI). The current study further examined dysexecutive impairment in MCI using the framework of Fuster's (1997) derailed temporal gradients, that is, declining performance on executive tests over time or test epoch. Temporal gradients were operationally defined by calculating the slope of aggregate letter fluency output across 15-s epochs and accuracy indices for initial, middle, and latter triads from the Wechsler Memory Scale-Mental Control subtest (Boston Revision). For letter fluency, slope was steeper for dMCI compared to aMCI and NC groups. Between-group Mental Control analyses for triad 1 revealed worse dMCI performance than NC participants. On triad 2, dMCI scored lower than aMCI and NCs; on triad 3, mxMCI performed worse versus NCs. Within-group Mental Control analyses yielded equal performance across all triads for aMCI and NC participants. mxMCI scored lower on triad 1 compared to triads 2 and 3. dMCI participants also performed worse on triad 1 compared to triads 2 and 3, but scored higher on triad 3 versus triad 2. These data suggest impaired temporal gradients may provide a useful heuristic for understanding dysexecutive impairment in MCI. PMID:22014116

  20. Interference Impacts Working Memory in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Aurtenetxe, Sara; García-Pacios, Javier; del Río, David; López, María E.; Pineda-Pardo, José A.; Marcos, Alberto; Delgado Losada, Maria L.; López-Frutos, José M.; Maestú, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered a transitional stage between healthy aging and dementia, specifically Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most common cognitive impairment of MCI includes episodic memory loss and difficulties in working memory (WM). Interference can deplete WM, and an optimal WM performance requires an effective control of attentional resources between the memoranda and the incoming stimuli. Difficulties in handling interference lead to forgetting. However, the interplay between interference and WM in MCI is not well-understood and needs further investigation. The current study investigated the effect of interference during a WM task in 20 MCIs and 20 healthy elder volunteers. Participants performed a delayed match-to-sample paradigm which consisted in two interference conditions, distraction and interruption, and one control condition without any interference. Results evidenced a disproportionate impact of interference on the WM performance of MCIs, mainly in the presence of interruption. These findings demonstrate that interference, and more precisely interruption, is an important proxy for memory-related deficits in MCI. Thus, the current findings reveal novel evidence regarding the causes of WM forgetting in MCI patients, associated with difficulties in the mechanisms of attentional control. PMID:27790082

  1. Cognitive rehabilitation in patients with nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Barekatain, Majid; Alavirad, Maryam; Tavakoli, Mahgol; Emsaki, Golita; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nonamnesic type of mild cognitive impairment (na-MCI) is predementia state with subtle decline incognitive domains except memory. Although cognitive rehabilitation (CR) has been investigated in amnesic type of MCI, we could not find any trial that rehabilitated na-MCI exclusively. We studied the effectiveness of CR on na-MCI. Materials and Methods: This study was a blinded, randomized clinical trial. Individuals with age of 60 years or more, complete self-directedness and diagnosis of na-MCI, based on Neuropsychiatry Unit Cognitive assessment tool, were selected. The 51 patients were randomly assigned into three groups: CR, lifestyle (LS) modification, and the control group (CG). Neuropsychological tests for executive functioning were assessed at the baseline, after the interventions, and 6 months later. Results: The mean score of the “design fluency” test increased significantly in CR, compared to LS and CG (P = 0.007). In “five-point” test, mean score increased significantly in CR (P = 0.03). There was higher mean score of Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function for adults in CR (P = 0.01). Conclusion: Consideration of the MCI subtypes allows us to target specific cognitive domains, such as information processing, for better CR outcome. CR may result in better performance of executive functioning of daily living. PMID:28250778

  2. Ash Reduction of Corn Stover by Mild Hydrothermal Preprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    M. Toufiq Reza; Rachel Emerson; M. Helal Uddin; Garold Gresham; Charles J. Coronella

    2014-04-22

    Lignocellulosic biomass such as corn stover can contain high ash content, which may act as an inhibitor in downstream conversion processes. Most of the structural ash in biomass is located in the cross-linked structure of lignin, which is mildly reactive in basic solutions. Four organic acids (formic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric) were evaluated for effectiveness in ash reduction, with limited success. Because of sodium citrate’s chelating and basic characteristics, it is effective in ash removal. More than 75 % of structural and 85 % of whole ash was removed from the biomass by treatment with 0.1 g of sodium citrate per gram of biomass at 130 °C and 2.7 bar. FTIR, fiber analysis, and chemical analyses show that cellulose and hemicellulose were unaffected by the treatment. ICP–AES showed that all inorganics measured were reduced within the biomass feedstock, except sodium due to the addition of Na through the treatment. Sodium citrate addition to the preconversion process of corn stover is an effective way to reduced physiological ash content of the feedstock without negatively impacting carbohydrate and lignin content.

  3. Precuneus Structure Changes in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Haussmann, Robert; Werner, Annett; Gruschwitz, Antonia; Osterrath, Antje; Lange, Jan; Donix, Katharina L; Linn, Jennifer; Donix, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) are at risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. Due to their prominent memory impairment, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often focuses on the hippocampal region. However, recent positron-emission tomography data suggest that within a network of frontal and temporal changes, patients with aMCI show metabolic alterations in the precuneus, a key region for higher cognitive functions. Using high-resolution MRI and whole-brain cortical thickness analyses in 28 patients with aMCI and 25 healthy individuals, we wanted to investigate whether structural changes in the precuneus would be associated with cortical thickness reductions in frontal and temporal brain regions in patients with aMCI. In contrast to healthy people, patients with aMCI showed an association of cortical thinning in the precuneus with predominantly left-hemispheric thickness reductions in medial temporal and frontal cortices. Our data highlight structural neuronal network characteristics among patients with aMCI.

  4. Caregivers in China: knowledge of mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Dai, Baozhen; Mao, Zongfu; Mei, John; Levkoff, Sue; Wang, Huali; Pacheco, Misty; Wu, Bei

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the experience and knowledge of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among Chinese family caregivers of individuals with MCI. The sample was recruited from memory clinics in Zhongnan Hospital in Wuhan, China. In-depth semi-structured interviews were used. Thirteen family members of individuals diagnosed with MCI participated in the study. Data analysis revealed three themes: 1) initial recognition of cognitive decline; 2) experience of the diagnosis of MCI; 3) perception of cognitive decline as a normal part of aging. While family members recognized the serious consequences of memory loss (e.g. getting lost), they would typically not take their family members to see a doctor until something specific triggered their access to the medical care system. The Chinese traditional perception of dementia as part of normal aging may serve to lessen the stigma of individuals with MCI, while the term "laonian chidai" which literally translates to "stupid, demented elderly" may exacerbate the stigma associated with individuals with MCI. It is suggested that family members' worries may be relieved by improving their access to accurate knowledge of the disease, community-based and institutional care services, and culturally appropriately words are needed for MCI.

  5. Cost Template for Meaningful Activity Intervention for Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Yueh-Feng Lu, Yvonne; Bakas, Tamilyn; Haase, Joan E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe and compare cost estimates for a pilot study of the Daily Enhancement of Meaningful Activity (DEMA) intervention for persons with mild cognitive impairment (PwMCI)-caregiver dyads. Background The increasing complexity of the health care system and rising health care costs, have forced nurse scientists to find ways to effectively improve health care quality and control cost, but no studies have examined costs for new programs that target PwMCI-caregiver dyads. Description of the project Pilot study data were used to develop a cost template and calculate the cost of implementing the DEMA. Outcomes Mean cost per dyad was estimated to be $1,327.97 in the clinical setting, compared with $1,069.06 if a telephone delivery mode had been used for four of the six face-to-face sessions. This difference was largely due to transportation-related expenses and staff cost. Implications DEMA should be evaluated further with larger and more diverse samples as a technology-delivered health promotion program that could reduce costs. PMID:23392066

  6. Marine corrosion of mild steel at Lumut, Perak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Ong Shiou; Potty, Narayanan Sambu; Liew, Mohd. Shahir

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion rate of structural steels in the adverse marine and offshore environments affects the economic interest of offshore structures since the loss of steel may have significant impact on structural safety and performance. With more emphasis to maintain existing structures in service for longer time and hence to defer replacement costs, there is increasing interest in predicting corrosion rate at a given location for a given period of exposure once the protection coating or cathodic protection is lost. The immersion depth, salinity, steel composition and water pollution will be taken into account. Various corrosion allowances are prescribed for structural members by different standards. There are no studies to determine the appropriate corrosion allowance for steel structures in marine environment in Malaysia. The objectives of the research are to determine the nature and rate of corrosion in mm/year for steel structures in marine environment. It also tries to identify whether the corrosion rate is affected by differences in the chemical composition of the steels, and microalgae. Two sets of corrosion coupons of Type 3 Steel consisting of mild steel were fabricated and immersed in seawater using steel frames. The corrosion rate of the coupon in mm/ per year is estimated based on the material weight loss with time in service. The results are compared with recommendations of the code.

  7. Epidemiology of concussion and mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Laker, Scott R

    2011-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common public health concern that affects millions of people each year. The available epidemiology of mTBI may contain insights that can guide future identification, prevention, and treatment efforts. This article discusses epidemiology of both non-sports-related mTBI and sports-related concussion. Specific occupational factors, emergency department data, and meta-analysis regarding mTBI are reviewed and discussed. With regard to sports concussion, the article will discuss data related to the sport played, the individual's position, level of play, and gender differences. Although males make up a larger percentage of cases than do females throughout the majority of reviewed non-sports-related mTBI data, the sports literature indicates that rates are higher in women when similar sports are compared. Identifiable risk factors within sports include female gender, sport, and position played. Emerging trends across mTBI include increased incidence and decreased rate of hospitalization for mTBI.

  8. Elevated Osteopontin Levels in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuan; Yin, Xue Song; Guo, Hong; Han, Rong Kun; He, Rui Dong; Chi, Li Jun

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators are closely associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Osteopontin (OPN) is a proinflammatory cytokine that has been shown to play an important role in various neuroinflammatory diseases. However, the function of OPN in AD and MCI progression is not well defined. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma samples were obtained from 35 AD patients, 31 MCI patients, and 20 other noninflammatory neurologic diseases (OND). Concentrations of OPN in the CSF and plasma were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. During a 3-year clinical followup, 13 MCI patients converted to AD (MCI converters), and 18 were clinically stable (MCI nonconverters). CSF OPN concentrations were significantly increased in AD and MCI converters compared to OND, and increased levels of OPN in AD were associated with MMSE score; OPN protein levels both in the CSF and plasma of newly diagnosed AD patients were higher than that of chronical patients. In MCI converters individuals tested longitudinally, both plasma and CSF OPN concentrations were significantly elevated when they received a diagnosis of AD during followup. Further wide-scale studies are necessary to confirm these results and to shed light on the etiopathogenic role of osteopontin in AD. PMID:23576854

  9. NOX Activity Is Increased in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sunita; Parrino, Taryn E.; Knight, Alecia G.; Ebenezer, Philip J.; Weidner, Adam M.; LeVine, Harry; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Markesbery, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This study was undertaken to investigate the profile of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in the clinical progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Specifically, NOX activity and expression of the regulatory subunit p47phox and the catalytic subunit gp91phox was evaluated in affected (superior and middle temporal gyri) and unaffected (cerebellum) brain regions from a longitudinally followed group of patients. This group included both control and late-stage AD subjects, and also subjects with preclinical AD and with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to evaluate the profile of NOX in the earliest stages of dementia. Data show significant elevations in NOX activity and expression in the temporal gyri of MCI patients as compared with controls, but not in preclinical or late-stage AD samples, and not in the cerebellum. Immunohistochemical evaluations of NOX expression indicate that whereas microglia express high levels of gp91phox, moderate levels of gp91phox also are expressed in neurons. Finally, in vitro experiments showed that NOX inhibition blunted the ability of oligomeric amyloid beta peptides to injure cultured neurons. Collectively, these data show that NOX expression and activity are upregulated specifically in a vulnerable brain region of MCI patients, and suggest that increases in NOX-associated redox pathways in neurons might participate in the early pathogenesis of AD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 1371–1382. PMID:19929442

  10. Acetazolamide Mitigates Astrocyte Cellular Edema Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturdivant, Nasya M.; Smith, Sean G.; Ali, Syed F.; Wolchok, Jeffrey C.; Balachandran, Kartik

    2016-09-01

    Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema. We hypothesized that mTBI-mediated astrocyte dysfunction, initiated by increased intracellular volume, could be reduced when treated with AZA. We tested our hypothesis in a three-dimensional in vitro astrocyte model of mTBI. Samples were subject to no stretch (control) or one high-speed stretch (mTBI) injury. AQP4 expression was significantly increased 24 hours after mTBI. mTBI resulted in a significant increase in the cell swelling within 30 min of mTBI, which was significantly reduced in the presence of AZA. Cell death and expression of S100B was significantly reduced when AZA was added shortly before mTBI stretch. Overall, our data point to occurrence of astrocyte swelling immediately following mTBI, and AZA as a promising treatment to mitigate downstream cellular mortality.

  11. Dietary ketosis enhances memory in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Krikorian, Robert; Shidler, Marcelle D; Dangelo, Krista; Couch, Sarah C; Benoit, Stephen C; Clegg, Deborah J

    2010-01-01

    We randomly assigned 23 older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment to either a high carbohydrate or very low carbohydrate diet. Following the six-week intervention period, we observed improved verbal memory performance for the low carbohydrate subjects (p = 0.01) as well as reductions in weight (p < 0.0001), waist circumference (p < 0.0001), fasting glucose (p = 0.009), and fasting insulin (p = 0.005). Level of depressive symptoms was not affected. Change in calorie intake, insulin level, and weight were not correlated with memory performance for the entire sample, although a trend toward a moderate relationship between insulin and memory was observed within the low carbohydrate group. Ketone levels were positively correlated with memory performance (p = 0.04). These findings indicate that very low carbohydrate consumption, even in the short-term, can improve memory function in older adults with increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. While this effect may be attributable in part to correction of hyperinsulinemia, other mechanisms associated with ketosis such as reduced inflammation and enhanced energy metabolism also may have contributed to improved neurocognitive function. Further investigation of this intervention is warranted to evaluate its preventive potential and mechanisms of action in the context of early neurodegeneration. PMID:21130529

  12. A systematic review of treatments for Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Claudia; Li, Ryan; Lyketsos, Constantine; Livingston, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Background More people are presenting with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), frequently a precursor to dementia but we do not know how to reduce deterioration. Aims To systematically review Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) evaluating effects of any intervention for MCI on cognitive, neuropsychiatric, functional, global outcomes, life quality, or incident dementia. Methods We reviewed the 41 studies fitting predetermined criteria, assessed validity using a checklist, calculated standardised outcomes, and prioritised primary outcome findings in placebo-controlled studies. Results The strongest evidence was that cholinesterase inhibitors did not reduce incident dementia. Cognition improved in single trials of: a heterogeneous psychological group intervention over 6 months; piribedil, a dopamine agonist over 3 months; and donepezil over 48 weeks. Nicotine improved attention over 6 months. There was equivocal evidence that Huannao Yicong improved cognition and social functioning. Conclusions There was no replicated evidence that any intervention was effective. Cholinesterase inhibitors and rofecoxib are ineffective in preventing dementia. Further good quality RCTs are necessary and preliminary evidence suggests these should include trials of psychological group interventions and piribedil. PMID:24085737

  13. Reversible neuropsychological deficits after mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Keller, M; Hiltbrunner, B; Dill, C; Kesselring, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the influence of motivation on performance in a divided attention test of patients after mild traumatic brain injury (MBI).
METHODS—Comparison of the performance of 12 patients with MBI with 10 patients with severe brain injury (SBI) and 11 healthy controls in a computer supported divided attention task before (T1) and after (T2) verbal motivation.
RESULTS—At T1, the MBI group performed the same as the SBI group but significantly worse than the controls in all variables. At T2, the MBI group performed worse than the controls at T2 but the results were equal to the results of the controls at T1 and significantly better than the SBI group at T1 or T2. At T2 the MBI group performed at the level of published norms for the rest.
CONCLUSION—Before verbal motivation the MBI group's results in the divided attention task were comparable with those from patients with severe brain injury. They failed to exploit their performance potential when it depended on self motivation but were able to perform at the level of the control group when external motivation was applied.

 PMID:10811701

  14. The Early Indicators of Functional Decrease in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kubicki, Alexandre; Fautrelle, Lilian; Bourrelier, Julien; Rouaud, Olivier; Mourey, France

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Motor deficiency is associated with cognitive frailty in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairments (MCI). In this study we aimed to test the integrity in muscle synergies involved in an arm-pointing movement in functionally unimpaired MCI patients. We hypothesized that early motor indicators exist in this population at a preclinical level. Methods: Electromyographic signals were collected for 11 muscles in 3 groups: Young Adults (YA), Older Adults (OA), and MCI patients. The OA and MCI groups presented the same functional status. Each subject performed 20 arm-pointing movements from a standing position. Results: The main differences were (1) an earlier activation of the left Obliquus internus in MCI compared with OA group, (2) an earlier activation for the MCI compared with both OA and YA. The temporal differences in muscle synergies between MCI and OA groups were linked with executive functions of MCI patients, assessed by the trail making test. Moreover, the results show a delayed activation of the right Biceps Femoris and the right Erector Spinae at l3 in MCI and OA compared with YA. Interpretation: The motor program changes highlighted in our patient MCI group suggest that discrete modifications of the motor command seem to exist even in the absence of functional impairment. Instead of showing an indication of delayed muscle activation in the MCI patients, our results highlight some early activation of several trunk muscles. PMID:27570509

  15. Thalamic Shape and Cognitive Performance in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Changtae; Lee, Chang-Uk; Won, Wang Yeon; Joo, Soo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate thalamic shape alterations and their relationships with various episodic memory impairments in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Methods We compared volumes and morphological alterations of the thalamus between aMCI subjects and healthy controls. In addition, we investigated the correlation between thalamic deformations and various memory impairments in aMCI subjects using a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Results The normalized left thalamic volumes of the aMCI group were significantly smaller than those of the healthy control group (p<0.0001). aMCI subjects exhibited significant thalamic deformations in the left thalamic dorso-medial and antero-medial areas compared with healthy individuals. CERAD-K Word List Memory scores were significantly correlated with the left dorso-medial areas in aMCI subjects. There were no significant correlations between verbal fluency, Boston naming test, constructional praxis, Word List Recognition, and Visuospatial Recall scores and thalamic shape in aMCI subjects. Verbal delayed recall scores were also significantly correlated with the left dorso-medial areas in the aMCI group. Conclusion Structural alterations in the thalamic deformations in the left dorso-medial and antero-medial areas might be core underlying neurobiological mechanisms of thalamic dysfunction related to Word List Memory and delayed verbal recall in individuals with aMCI. PMID:27757128

  16. Ileal adenocarcinoma in a mild phenotype of abetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shali, K; Wang, J; Rosen, F; Hegele, R A

    2003-02-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by defective assembly and secretion of plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins. This disorder results from mutations in the MTP gene encoding the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein. We report a 58-year-old male homozygote for a missense mutation, S590I, in MTP. The patient had a lifelong history of fat malabsorption, but was only diagnosed with ABL at age 52, based upon such classic features as absence of apo B-containing lipoproteins, acanthocytosis, atypical retinitis pigmentosa and markedly depressed serum beta-carotene concentration. However, his presentation was notable not only by survival to the sixth decade of life without specific treatment, but also by the absence of neurological involvement and by normal serum vitamin E concentration. He subsequently developed adenocarcinoma of the ileum, which required ileal resection. Therefore, this missense mutation appears to be associated with a late-presenting and relatively mild ABL phenotype that lacks some classical features, particularly neuropathy, but appears to be associated with other atypical features, specifically small intestinal cancer.

  17. Microstructure characteristics of laser MIG hybrid welded mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Jun; Hu, Qianwu

    2008-07-01

    To deepen the understanding of laser-arc hybrid welding, the weld shape and microstructure characteristics of laser-metal inert gas hybrid welded mild steel were analyzed. The results showed typical hybrid weld could be classified as two parts: the wide upper zone and the narrow nether zone, which were defined as arc zone and laser zone, respectively. In the hybrid weld, the microstructure, alloy element distribution and microhardness all have evident difference between laser zone and arc zone. The microstructure of arc zone consists of coarse columnar dendrite and fine acicular dendrite between the columnar dendrites, but that of laser zone is composed of fine equiaxed dendrite in weld center and columnar dendrite around the equiaxed dendrite. Compared to arc zone, laser zone has finer grain size, higher microhardness, smaller alloy element content in the fusion zone and narrower heat affected zone. The discussions demonstrated that the observed difference was caused by the difference of temperature gradient, crystallizing and the effects of arc pressure on the molten pool between laser zone and arc zone.

  18. Mild traumatic brain injury in the occupational setting.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor H; Lombard, Lisa A; Greher, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    The evaluation and management of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in the occupational setting may pose significant challenges for even the most-seasoned practitioner. Providers must simultaneously address the clinical management of mTBI and be familiar with the systematic and administrative requirements related to the management of injured workers with mTBI who are covered by workers' compensation insurance, including causation, return to work, and the potential of permanent impairment. Given the primarily subjective nature of many mTBI symptoms, an injured worker with a delayed recovery may raise the question, if not suspicion, of symptom magnification and secondary gain. This review discusses the evaluation and treatment of the injured worker with mTBI, and focuses on the medicolegal issues that are present in the workers' compensation system, especially the role of neuropsychological evaluations. Although significant differences exist regarding classification schema, for the purposes of this discussion, mTBI is used to encompass the terms concussion, postconcussive syndrome, and persistent postconcussive syndrome.

  19. Effects of mild cognitive impairment on emotional scene memory.

    PubMed

    Waring, J D; Dimsdale-Zucker, H R; Flannery, S; Budson, A E; Kensinger, E A

    2017-02-01

    Young and older adults experience benefits in attention and memory for emotional compared to neutral information, but this memory benefit is greatly diminished in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Little is known about whether this impairment arises early or late in the time course between healthy aging and AD. This study compared memory for positive, negative, and neutral items with neutral backgrounds between patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy older adults. We also used a divided attention condition in older adults as a possible model for the deficits observed in MCI patients. Results showed a similar pattern of selective memory for emotional items while forgetting their backgrounds in older adults and MCI patients, but MCI patients had poorer memory overall. Dividing attention during encoding disproportionately reduced memory for backgrounds (versus items) relative to a full attention condition. Participants performing in the lower half on the divided attention task qualitatively and quantitatively mirrored the results in MCI patients. Exploratory analyses comparing lower- and higher-performing MCI patients showed that only higher-performing MCI patients had the characteristic scene memory pattern observed in healthy older adults. Together, these results suggest that the effects of emotion on memory are relatively well preserved for patients with MCI, although emotional memory patterns may start to be altered once memory deficits become more pronounced.

  20. Automatic Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment Using Electroencephalogram Spectral Features

    PubMed Central

    Kashefpoor, Masoud; Rabbani, Hossein; Barekatain, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most expensive and fatal diseases in the elderly population. Up to now, no cure have been found for AD, so early stage diagnosis is the only way to control it. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) usually is the early stage of AD which is defined as decreasing in mental abilities such a cognition, memory, and speech not too severe to interfere daily activities. MCI diagnosis is rather hard and usually assumed as normal consequences of aging. This study proposes an accurate, mobile, and nonexpensive diagnostic approach based on electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. EEG signals were recorded using 19 electrodes positioned according to the 10–20 International system at resting eyes closed state from 16 normal and 11 MCI participants. Nineteen Spectral features are computed for each channel and examined using a correlation based algorithm to select the best discriminative features. Selected features are classified using a combination of neurofuzzy system and k-nearest neighbor classifier. Final results reach 88.89%, 100%, and 83.33% for accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively, which shows the potential of proposed method to be used as an MCI diagnostic tool, especially for screening a large population. PMID:27014609

  1. Advances in imaging explosive blast mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hetherington, H; Bandak, A; Ling, G; Bandak, F A

    2015-01-01

    In the past, direct physical evidence of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from explosive blast has been difficult to obtain through conventional imaging modalities such as T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Here, we review current progress in detecting evidence of brain injury from explosive blast using advanced imaging, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and the metabolic imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), where each targets different aspects of the pathology involved in mTBI. DTI provides a highly sensitive measure to detect primary changes in the microstructure of white matter tracts. fMRI enables the measurement of changes in brain activity in response to different stimuli or tasks. Remarkably, all three of these paradigms have found significant success in conventional mTBI where conventional clinical imaging frequently fails to provide definitive differences. Additionally, although used less frequently for conventional mTBI, PET has the potential to characterize a variety of neurotransmitter systems using target agents and will undoubtedly play a larger role, once the basic mechanisms of injury are better understood and techniques to identify the injury are more common. Finally, our MRSI imaging studies, although acquired at much lower spatial resolution, have demonstrated selectivity to different metabolic and physiologic processes, uncovering some of the most profound differences on an individual by individual basis, suggesting the potential for utility in the management of individual patients.

  2. Discriminant analysis of multiple cortical changes in mild cognitive impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Congling; Guo, Shengwen; Lai, Chunren; Wu, Yupeng; Zhao, Di; Jiang, Xingjun

    2017-02-01

    To reveal the differences in brain structures and morphological changes between the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and the normal control (NC), analyze and predict the risk of MCI conversion. First, the baseline and 2-year longitudinal follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) images of 73 NC, 46 patients with stable MCI (sMCI) and 40 patients with converted MCI (cMCI) were selected. Second, the FreeSurfer was used to extract the cortical features, including the cortical thickness, surface area, gray matter volume and mean curvature. Third, the support vector machine-recursive feature elimination method (SVM-RFE) were adopted to determine salient features for effective discrimination. Finally, the distribution and importance of essential brain regions were described. The experimental results showed that the cortical thickness and gray matter volume exhibited prominent capability in discrimination, and surface area and mean curvature behaved relatively weak. Furthermore, the combination of different morphological features, especially the baseline combined with the longitudinal changes, can be used to evidently improve the performance of classification. In addition, brain regions with high weights predominately located in the temporal lobe and the frontal lobe, which were relative to emotional control and memory functions. It suggests that there were significant different patterns in the brain structure and changes between the compared group, which could not only be effectively applied for classification, but also be used to evaluate and predict the conversion of the patients with MCI.

  3. Multimodal MRI classification in vascular mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Diciotti, Stefano; Ciulli, Stefano; Ginestroni, Andrea; Salvadori, Emilia; Poggesi, Anna; Pantoni, Leonardo; Inzitari, Domenico; Mascalchi, Mario; Toschi, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Vascular mild cognitive impairment (VMCI) is a disorder in which multimodal MRI can add significant value by combining diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with brain morphometry. In this study we implemented and compared machine learning techniques for multimodal classification between 58 VMCI patients and 29 healthy subjects as well as for discrimination (within the VMCI group) between patients with different cognitive performances. For each subject, a cortical feature vector was constructed based on cortical parcellation and cortical and subcortical volumetric segmentation and a DTI feature vector was formed by combining descriptive statistical metrics related to the distribution of DTI invariants within white matter. We employed both a sequential minimal optimization and a functional tree classifier, using feature selection and 10-fold cross-validation, and compared their performances in monomodal and multimodal classification for both classification problems (healthy subjects vs VMCI and prediction of cognitive performance). While monomodal classification resulted in satisfactory performance in most cases, turning from monomodal to multimodal classification resulted in an improvement of the performance in the discrimination between VMCI patients with low cognitive performance and healthy subjects by up to 10% in sensitivity (leaving specificity unchanged). We therefore are able to confirm the usefulness of machine learning techniques in discriminating diseased states based on neuroimaging data.

  4. Numerical Simulation of a Small-Scale Mild Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veríssimo, A.; Oliveira, R.; Coelho, P. J.; Costa, M.

    2012-11-01

    This work reports numerical simulations of a small-scale cylindrical combustor operating in the mild combustion regime. Preheated air is supplied by a central nozzle, while the fuel (methane) is injected through 16 holes placed equidistantly in a circumference concentric with the air nozzle. The calculations were carried out using the commercial code Ansys-Fluent. Turbulence was modelled using the realizable k-epsilon model. Two different combustion models were employed, namely the eddy dissipation concept and the joint composition pdf transport model. In both cases, a chemical mechanism comprising 13 transported species and 73 chemical reactions was used, as well as a global single-step reaction. A thorough comparison of the predictions obtained using the pdf transport model and the eddy dissipation concept with detailed experimental data is presented. Both models are able to accurately predict the temperature and the O2 and CO2 molar fractions over most of the combustor, but the temperature field is overestimated in the vicinity of the burner. Discrepancies are found in the prediction of the CO molar fraction, particularly when the eddy dissipation concept is used.

  5. Dynamics of mild strombolian activity on Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pering, T. D.; Tamburello, G.; McGonigle, A. J. S.; Aiuppa, A.; James, M. R.; Lane, S. J.; Sciotto, M.; Cannata, A.; Patanè, D.

    2015-07-01

    Here we report the first measurements of gas masses released during a rare period of strombolian activity at the Bocca Nuova crater, Mt. Etna, Sicily. UV camera data acquired for 195 events over an ≈ 27 minute period (27th July 2012) indicate erupted SO2 masses ranging from ≈ 0.1 to ≈ 14 kg per event, with corresponding total gas masses of ≈ 0.1 to 74 kg. Thus, the activity was characterised by more frequent and smaller events than typically associated with strombolian activity on volcanoes such as Stromboli. Events releasing larger measured gas masses were followed by relatively long repose periods before the following burst, a feature not previously reported on from gas measurement data. If we assume that gas transport within the magma can be represented by a train of rising gas pockets or slugs, then the high frequency of events indicates that these slugs must have been in close proximity. In this case the longer repose durations associated with the larger slugs would be consistent with interactions between adjacent slugs leading to coalescence, a process expedited close to the surface by rapid slug expansion. We apply basic modelling considerations to the measured gas masses in order to investigate potential slug characteristics governing the observed activity. We also cross correlated the acquired gas fluxes with contemporaneously obtained seismic data but found no relationship between the series in line with the mild form of manifest explosivity.

  6. Hydrodynamical Interaction of Mildly Relativistic Ejecta with an Ambient Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Maeda, Keiichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2017-01-01

    The hydrodynamical interaction of spherical ejecta freely expanding at mildly relativistic speeds into an ambient cold medium is studied in semianalytical and numerical ways to investigate how ejecta produced in energetic stellar explosions dissipate their kinetic energy through the interaction with the surrounding medium. We especially focus on the case in which the circumstellar medium (CSM) is well represented by a steady wind at a constant mass-loss rate, having been ejected from the stellar surface prior to the explosion. As a result of the hydrodynamical interaction, the ejecta and CSM are swept by the reverse and forward shocks, leading to the formation of a geometrically thin shell. We present a semianalytical model describing the dynamical evolution of the shell and compare the results with numerical simulations. The shell can give rise to bright emission as it gradually becomes transparent to photons. We develop an emission model for the expected emission from the optically thick shell, in which photons in the shell gradually diffuse out to the interstellar space. Then we investigate the possibility that radiation powered by the hydrodynamical interaction is the origin of an underluminous class of gamma-ray bursts.

  7. Semantic Knowledge for Famous Names in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Seidenberg, Michael; Guidotti, Leslie; Nielson, Kristy A.; Woodard, John L.; Durgerian, Sally; Zhang, Qi; Gander, Amelia; Antuono, Piero; Rao, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Person identification represents a unique category of semantic knowledge that is commonly impaired in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), but has received relatively little investigation in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The current study examined the retrieval of semantic knowledge for famous names from three time epochs (recent, remote, and enduring) in two participant groups; 23 aMCI patients and 23 healthy elderly controls. The aMCI group was less accurate and produced less semantic knowledge than controls for famous names. Names from the enduring period were recognized faster than both recent and remote names in both groups, and remote names were recognized more quickly than recent names. Episodic memory performance was correlated with greater semantic knowledge particularly for recent names. We suggest that the anterograde memory deficits in the aMCI group interferes with learning of recent famous names and as a result produces difficulties with updating and integrating new semantic information with previously stored information. The implications of these findings for characterizing semantic memory deficits in MCI are discussed. PMID:19128524

  8. Detecting Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Resting State Magnetoencephalographic Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Leodante; Jetly, Rakesh; Pang, Elizabeth W.; Taylor, Margot J.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate means to detect mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using objective and quantitative measures remain elusive. Conventional imaging typically detects no abnormalities despite post-concussive symptoms. In the present study, we recorded resting state magnetoencephalograms (MEG) from adults with mTBI and controls. Atlas-guided reconstruction of resting state activity was performed for 90 cortical and subcortical regions, and calculation of inter-regional oscillatory phase synchrony at various frequencies was performed. We demonstrate that mTBI is associated with reduced network connectivity in the delta and gamma frequency range (>30 Hz), together with increased connectivity in the slower alpha band (8–12 Hz). A similar temporal pattern was associated with correlations between network connectivity and the length of time between the injury and the MEG scan. Using such resting state MEG network synchrony we were able to detect mTBI with 88% accuracy. Classification confidence was also correlated with clinical symptom severity scores. These results provide the first evidence that imaging of MEG network connectivity, in combination with machine learning, has the potential to accurately detect and determine the severity of mTBI. PMID:27906973

  9. Chronic permanent hypoxemia predisposes to mild elevation of liver stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Tahiri, Mohamed; Drighil, Abdenasser; Jalal, Yasmine; Ghellab, Dounia; Hliwa, Wafaa; Fouad, Haddad; Badre, Wafaa; Bellabah, Ahmad; Habbal, Rachida; Alaoui, Rhimou

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of long term permanent hypoxemia noticed in patients with non operated congenital cyanogenic cyanotic cardiopathy on liver stiffness. METHODS: We included ten adult patients with non operated inoperate cyanotic cardiopathy and ten matched patients for age and gender admitted to the gastroenterology department for proctologic diseases; Clinical and laboratory data were collected [age, gender, body mass index, oxygen saturation, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), glycemia and cholesterol]. Measurement of hepatic stiffness by transient elastography was carried out in all patients using the Fibroscan device. All patients underwent an echocardiography to eliminate congestive heart failure. RESULTS: Among the patients with cyanotic cardiopathy, median liver stiffness 5.9 ± 1.3 kPa was greater than control group (4.7 ± 0.4 kPa) (P = 0.008). Median levels of GOT, GPT, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glycemia and cholesterol were comparable in cardiopathy and control group. In regression analysis including age, gender, body mass index, oxygen saturation, GOT, GPT, glycemia, cholesterol showed that only oxygen saturation was related to liver stiffness (r = -0.63 P = 0.002). CONCLUSION: Chronic permanent hypoxemia can induce mild increase of liver stiffness, but further studies are needed to explore the histological aspects of liver injury induced by chronic permanent hypoxemia. PMID:25132776

  10. VOC destruction by water diluted hydrogen mild combustion.

    PubMed

    Sabia, P; Romeo, F; de Joannon, M; Cavaliere, A

    2007-06-01

    This study represents a preliminary numerical evaluation of the effect of steam dilution and hydrogen addition on the oxidation of formaldehyde and benzene, chosen as representative of the volatile organic compounds (VOC), in mild condition by evaluating the autoignition time and the steady state attainment. These parameters are important in the design of thermal VOC destruction plants since they influence the abatement efficiency and, therefore, the plant dimension. It has come out that, in comparison with the system diluted in nitrogen, steam induces lower autoignition times and, on the other hand, longer times for the attainment of the steady state. In contrast, for very high water content the autoignition time slightly increases. In particular results have shown that is possible to identify an optimum value of steam content that allows for the attainment of the steady state condition by the lowest residence time. Hydrogen addition to systems diluted in nitrogen promotes the oxidation reactions and anticipates the steady state condition. In steam diluted systems hydrogen delays the autoignition of the mixtures even though anticipates the attainment of the complete destruction of the VOC. The rate of production analysis has showed that the H(2)/O(2) reactions, that promote the ignition and the destruction of VOC, are sensibly modified by the presence of water and hydrogen.

  11. Operational characteristics of a parallel jet MILD combustion burner system

    SciTech Connect

    Szegoe, G.G.; Dally, B.B.; Nathan, G.J.

    2009-02-15

    This study describes the performance and stability characteristics of a parallel jet MILD (Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution) combustion burner system in a laboratory-scale furnace, in which the reactants and exhaust ports are all mounted on the same wall. Thermal field measurements are presented for cases with and without combustion air preheat, in addition to global temperature and emission measurements for a range of equivalence ratio, heat extraction, air preheat and fuel dilution levels. The present furnace/burner configuration proved to operate without the need for external air preheating, and achieved a high degree of temperature uniformity. Based on an analysis of the temperature distribution and emissions, PSR model predictions, and equilibrium calculations, the CO formation was found to be related to the mixing patterns and furnace temperature rather than reaction quenching by the heat exchanger. The critical equivalence ratio, or excess air level, which maintains low CO emissions is reported for different heat exchanger positions, and an optimum operating condition is identified. Results of CO and NO{sub x} emissions, together with visual observations and a simplified two-dimensional analysis of the furnace aerodynamics, demonstrate that fuel jet momentum controls the stability of this multiple jet system. A stability diagram showing the threshold for stable operation is reported, which is not explained by previous stability criteria. (author)

  12. Acetazolamide Mitigates Astrocyte Cellular Edema Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sturdivant, Nasya M.; Smith, Sean G.; Ali, Syed F.; Wolchok, Jeffrey C.; Balachandran, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema. We hypothesized that mTBI-mediated astrocyte dysfunction, initiated by increased intracellular volume, could be reduced when treated with AZA. We tested our hypothesis in a three-dimensional in vitro astrocyte model of mTBI. Samples were subject to no stretch (control) or one high-speed stretch (mTBI) injury. AQP4 expression was significantly increased 24 hours after mTBI. mTBI resulted in a significant increase in the cell swelling within 30 min of mTBI, which was significantly reduced in the presence of AZA. Cell death and expression of S100B was significantly reduced when AZA was added shortly before mTBI stretch. Overall, our data point to occurrence of astrocyte swelling immediately following mTBI, and AZA as a promising treatment to mitigate downstream cellular mortality. PMID:27623738

  13. Borderlines between Sarcopenia and Mild Late-Onset Muscle Disease

    PubMed Central

    Palmio, Johanna; Udd, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    Numerous natural or disease-related alterations occur in different tissues of the body with advancing age. Sarcopenia is defined as age-related decrease of muscle mass and strength beginning in mid-adulthood and accelerating in people older than 60 years. Pathophysiology of sarcopenia involves both neural and muscle dependent mechanisms and is enhanced by multiple factors. Aged muscles show loss in fiber number, fiber atrophy, and gradual increase in the number of ragged red fibers and cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers. Generalized loss of muscle tissue and increased amount of intramuscular fat are seen on muscle imaging. However, the degree of these changes varies greatly between individuals, and the distinction between normal age-related weakening of muscle strength and clinically significant muscle disease is not always obvious. Because some of the genetic myopathies can present at a very old age and be mild in severity, the correct diagnosis is easily missed. We highlight this difficult borderline zone between sarcopenia and muscle disease by two examples: LGMD1D and myotonic dystrophy type 2. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful tool to help differentiate myopathies from sarcopenia and to reach the correct diagnosis also in the elderly. PMID:25324776

  14. Learning temporal statistics for sensory predictions in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Di Bernardi Luft, Caroline; Baker, Rosalind; Bentham, Peter; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2015-08-01

    Training is known to improve performance in a variety of perceptual and cognitive skills. However, there is accumulating evidence that mere exposure (i.e. without supervised training) to regularities (i.e. patterns that co-occur in the environment) facilitates our ability to learn contingencies that allow us to interpret the current scene and make predictions about future events. Recent neuroimaging studies have implicated fronto-striatal and medial temporal lobe brain regions in the learning of spatial and temporal statistics. Here, we ask whether patients with mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease (MCI-AD) that are characterized by hippocampal dysfunction are able to learn temporal regularities and predict upcoming events. We tested the ability of MCI-AD patients and age-matched controls to predict the orientation of a test stimulus following exposure to sequences of leftwards or rightwards orientated gratings. Our results demonstrate that exposure to temporal sequences without feedback facilitates the ability to predict an upcoming stimulus in both MCI-AD patients and controls. However, our fMRI results demonstrate that MCI-AD patients recruit an alternate circuit to hippocampus to succeed in learning of predictive structures. In particular, we observed stronger learning-dependent activations for structured sequences in frontal, subcortical and cerebellar regions for patients compared to age-matched controls. Thus, our findings suggest a cortico-striatal-cerebellar network that may mediate the ability for predictive learning despite hippocampal dysfunction in MCI-AD.

  15. The Effect of Bilingualism on Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bialystok, Ellen; Craik, Fergus I. M.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Troyer, Angela K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Previous reports have found that lifelong bilingualism is associated with a delay in the onset of dementia, including Dementia of the Alzheimer’s Type (DAT). Because amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is often a transition stage between normal aging and DAT, our aim in this paper was to establish whether this delay in symptom onset for bilinguals would also be seen in the onset of symptoms of aMCI and whether this delay would be consistent in different subtypes of aMCI. Method. We examined the effect of bilingualism on the age of diagnosis in individuals with single- or multiple-domain aMCI who were administered a battery of neuropsychological tests and questionnaires about their language and social background. Results. Our results showed an interaction between aMCI type and language history. Only individuals diagnosed with single-domain aMCI demonstrated a later age of diagnosis for bilinguals (M = 79.4 years) than monolinguals (M = 74.9 years). Discussion. This preliminary evidence suggests that the early protective advantage of bilingualism may be specific to single-domain aMCI, which is the type of aMCI most specifically associated with progression to DAT. PMID:22454387

  16. Study on the genotoxicity of 13 mild coal gasification products

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, B.Z.; Robbins, S.; Bryant, D.; Ong, T.; Ma, J.

    1994-12-31

    Mild gasification of coal is a technology being developed by the United States Department of Energy and private industry with the hope that a cleaner use of coal can help meet future energy needs. The mutagenicity of 13 gasification product samples from various coal mine sources, with different processing conditions and boiling point ranges, was studied using bacteria. The results show that 9 of the 13 composite samples displayed mutagenic activity in the Ames assay. Six mutagenic samples were further fractionated into basic, acidic nonpolar and polar neutral subfractions. All samples displayed mutagenic activity in the Ames assay with S9 in the nonpolar neutral subfraction. Five mutagenic samples were also tested for genotoxicity in three mammalian cell assays. None of the samples tested caused gene mutations in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells in the HGPRT assay system. However, all five samples were found to induce micronuclei and sister chromatid exchange in V79 cells. Chemical characterization of the subfractions indicates that the nonpolar neutral subfractions contain aromatic hydrocarbons. These compounds may be responsible for the genotoxic activity of samples.

  17. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrew R; Bellgowan, Patrick S F; Hanlon, Faith M

    2015-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) offers great promise for elucidating the neuropathology associated with a single or repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The current review discusses the physiological underpinnings of the blood-oxygen level dependent response and how trauma affects the signal. Methodological challenges associated with fMRI data analyses are considered next, followed by a review of current mTBI findings. The majority of evoked studies have examined working memory and attentional functioning, with results suggesting a complex relationship between cognitive load/attentional demand and neuronal activation. Researchers have more recently investigated how brain trauma affects functional connectivity, and the benefits/drawbacks of evoked and functional connectivity studies are also discussed. The review concludes by discussing the major clinical challenges associated with fMRI studies of brain-injured patients, including patient heterogeneity and variations in scan-time post-injury. We conclude that the fMRI signal represents a complex filter through which researchers can measure the physiological correlates of concussive symptoms, an important goal for the burgeoning field of mTBI research.

  18. [Dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: a review].

    PubMed

    Bocanegra, Yamile; Trujillo-Orrego, Natalia; Pineda, David

    2014-12-16

    INTRODUCTION. The cognitive disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD) have traditionally been associated with the presence of dementia in later stages of the disease. Recent studies, however, consider that cognitive impairment can appear as of early stages. Knowing the cognitive profile of PD furthers our understanding of the clinical phenotype, making it easier to reach a timely diagnosis and favouring intervention on the symptoms from the initial stages. AIM. To present a review of the literature on mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia associated with PD. DEVELOPMENT. Several studies report that patients with PD who have a prolonged time to progression develop dementia. Yet, there have also been reports claiming that, as of the early stages, patients can present subtle cognitive alterations known as MCI. The initial neuropsychological profile is mainly of a non-amnesic type, characterised by executive dysfunction, alterations affecting attention, operative memory deficit and faulty retrieval of information. When patients develop dementia, disorders will arise in the storage of information, in semantic fluency, and in visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. Currently there are criteria available for diagnosing the MCI and dementia associated with PD, as well as valid reliable instruments for detecting those disorders. CONCLUSIONS. Cognitive symptoms are frequent in PD. From the initial stages of the disease onwards patients may present MCI that is mainly characterised by a fronto-subcortical cognitive profile, whereas dementia usually develops at later stages, when a pattern of posterior cortical cognitive disorder is also observed.

  19. Radithor and the era of mild radium therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Macklis, R.M. )

    1990-08-01

    Soon after the discovery of radium, a school of practitioners arose who were interested primarily in the physiological rather than the tumoricidal powers of this new radioactive element. This treatment philosophy was called mild radium therapy and involved the oral or parenteral administration of microgram quantities of radium and its daughter isotopes, often as cures for rheumatic diseases, hypertension, and metabolic disorders. Manufacturers of patent medicines responded to this market by producing a variety of over-the-counter radioactive preparations including pills, elixirs, and salves. One such nostrum was Radithor, a popular and expensive mixture of radium 226 and radium 228 in distilled water. Radithor was advertised as an effective treatment for over 150 endocrinologic diseases, especially lassitude and sexual impotence. Over 400,000 bottles, each containing over 2 muCi (74 kBq) of radium, were apparently marketed and sold worldwide between 1925 and 1930. The death of the Pittsburgh millionaire sportsman Eben M. Byers, who was an avid Radithor user, by radium poisoning in 1932 brought an end to this era and prompted the development of regulatory controls for all radiopharmaceuticals.

  20. Thermally Stable Mesoporous Silica Spheres synthesized under Mild Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Christopher; You, Eunyoung; Watkins, James

    2009-03-01

    Thermally stable, mesoporous silica spheres were synthesized using a one-pot technique under mild conditions. As-calcined silica spheres were shown to be highly porous with surface areas greater than 1000 m^2/g and pore volumes on the order of 1 cc/g. Pore walls were found to be highly resistant to collapse as a consequence of thermal treatment at temperatures exceeding 750 C or hydrothermal treatment in boiling water at temperatures exceeding 100 C for over 100 hours. ^29Si-^1H cross polarization NMR data indicate that the silica is highly condensed at the surface providing rationale for the exceptional pore wall stability observed. The mesoporous silica spheres were synthesized from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) at room temperature and near-neutral pH using cysteamine and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in a mixed water and ethanol system. Sphere size was shown to be tunable by altering the relative amounts of ethanol, CTAB, or TEOS. Sphere diameters ranging from 30 nm to 560 nm were observed. The preparation method and characterization of these highly condensed, thermally stable, mesoporous silica spheres for applications including sensing, catalysis, purification, and payload encapsulation is presented.

  1. Verbal learning strategy following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Geary, Elizabeth K; Kraus, Marilyn F; Rubin, Leah H; Pliskin, Neil H; Little, Deborah M

    2011-07-01

    That learning and memory deficits persist many years following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is controversial due to inconsistent objective evidence supporting subjective complaints. Our prior work demonstrated significant reductions in performance on the initial trial of a verbal learning task and overall slower rate of learning in well-motivated mTBI participants relative to demographically matched controls. In our previous work, we speculated that differences in strategy use could explain the differences in rate of learning. The current study serves to test this hypothesis by examining strategy use on the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition. Our present findings support the primary hypothesis that mTBI participants under-utilize semantic clustering strategies during list-learning relative to control participants. Despite achieving comparable total learning scores, we posit that the persisting learning and memory difficulties reported by some mTBI patients may be related to reduced usage of efficient internally driven strategies that facilitate learning. Given that strategy training has demonstrated improvements in learning and memory in educational and occupational settings, we offer that these findings have translational value in offering an additional approach in remediation of learning and memory complaints reported by some following mTBI.

  2. Predictable chronic mild stress improves mood, hippocampal neurogenesis and memory.

    PubMed

    Parihar, V K; Hattiangady, B; Kuruba, R; Shuai, B; Shetty, A K

    2011-02-01

    Maintenance of neurogenesis in adult hippocampus is important for functions such as mood and memory. As exposure to unpredictable chronic stress (UCS) results in decreased hippocampal neurogenesis, enhanced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, and memory dysfunction, it is believed that declined hippocampal neurogenesis mainly underlies the behavioral and cognitive abnormalities after UCS. However, the effects of predictable chronic mild stress (PCMS) such as the routine stress experienced in day-to-day life on functions such as mood, memory and hippocampal neurogenesis are unknown. Using FST and EPM tests on a prototype of adult rats, we demonstrate that PCMS (comprising 5 min of daily restraint stress for 28 days) decreases depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors for prolonged periods. Moreover, we illustrate that decreased depression and anxiety scores after PCMS are associated with ~1.8-fold increase in the production and growth of new neurons in the hippocampus. Additionally, we found that PCMS leads to enhanced memory function in WMT as well as NORT. Collectively, these findings reveal that PCMS is beneficial to adult brain function, which is exemplified by increased hippocampal neurogenesis and improved mood and cognitive function.

  3. Interference Impacts Working Memory in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Aurtenetxe, Sara; García-Pacios, Javier; Del Río, David; López, María E; Pineda-Pardo, José A; Marcos, Alberto; Delgado Losada, Maria L; López-Frutos, José M; Maestú, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered a transitional stage between healthy aging and dementia, specifically Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most common cognitive impairment of MCI includes episodic memory loss and difficulties in working memory (WM). Interference can deplete WM, and an optimal WM performance requires an effective control of attentional resources between the memoranda and the incoming stimuli. Difficulties in handling interference lead to forgetting. However, the interplay between interference and WM in MCI is not well-understood and needs further investigation. The current study investigated the effect of interference during a WM task in 20 MCIs and 20 healthy elder volunteers. Participants performed a delayed match-to-sample paradigm which consisted in two interference conditions, distraction and interruption, and one control condition without any interference. Results evidenced a disproportionate impact of interference on the WM performance of MCIs, mainly in the presence of interruption. These findings demonstrate that interference, and more precisely interruption, is an important proxy for memory-related deficits in MCI. Thus, the current findings reveal novel evidence regarding the causes of WM forgetting in MCI patients, associated with difficulties in the mechanisms of attentional control.

  4. Semantic knowledge for famous names in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Seidenberg, Michael; Guidotti, Leslie; Nielson, Kristy A; Woodard, John L; Durgerian, Sally; Zhang, Qi; Gander, Amelia; Antuono, Piero; Rao, Stephen M

    2009-01-01

    Person identification represents a unique category of semantic knowledge that is commonly impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but has received relatively little investigation in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The current study examined the retrieval of semantic knowledge for famous names from three time epochs (recent, remote, and enduring) in two participant groups: 23 amnestic MCI (aMCI) patients and 23 healthy elderly controls. The aMCI group was less accurate and produced less semantic knowledge than controls for famous names. Names from the enduring period were recognized faster than both recent and remote names in both groups, and remote names were recognized more quickly than recent names. Episodic memory performance was correlated with greater semantic knowledge particularly for recent names. We suggest that the anterograde memory deficits in the aMCI group interferes with learning of recent famous names and as a result produces difficulties with updating and integrating new semantic information with previously stored information. The implications of these findings for characterizing semantic memory deficits in MCI are discussed. (JINS, 2009, 15, 9-18.).

  5. Risk factors for mild cognitive impairment among Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    O’Bryant, Sid E.; Johnson, Leigh; Reisch, Joan; Edwards, Melissa; Hall, James; Barber, Robert; Devous, Michael; Royall, Donald; Singh, Meharvan

    2013-01-01

    Background While a great deal of literature has focused on risk factors for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), little published work examines risk for MCI among Mexican Americans. Methods Data from 1628 participants (non-Hispanic n= 1002; Mexican American n=626) were analyzed from two ongoing studies of cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s disease, Project FRONTIER and TARCC. Results When looking at the full cohorts (non-Hispanic and Mexican American), age, education, APOE ε4 status and gender were consistently related to MCI diagnosis across the two cohorts. However, when split by ethnicity advancing age was the only significant risk factor for MCI among Mexican Americans across both cohorts. Conclusions The current data suggests that many of the previously established risk factors for MCI among non-Hispanic cohorts may not be predictive of MCI among Mexican Americans and point to the need for additional work aimed at understanding factors related to cognitive aging among this underserved segment of the population. PMID:23643456

  6. Anosognosia and Anosodiaphoria in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lindau, Maria; Bjork, Randall

    2014-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the occurrence of anosognosia (lack of awareness) and anosodiaphoria (insouciance) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to evaluate the influence of a worsening of dementia on these phenomena. Methods A self-evaluation scale was used assessing degrees of anosognosia and anosodiaphoria; furthermore, a neuropsychological assessment and statistical analyses with nonparametric tests which could cope with data on an ordinal scale level and small samples were employed. Results Cognitive ability was lower in AD (n = 9) than in MCI patients (n = 12), but AD patients self-rated lower cognitive disabilities, which is interpreted as one relative sign of anosognosia in AD. Awareness of the reasons for cognitive problems was also lower in AD, which is considered as another sign of anosognosia. The main pattern in MCI found that the higher the awareness, the lower the cognitive ability. In AD low awareness paralleled low cognitive functioning. Anosodiaphoria was present in AD but not in MCI. Conclusion According to the literature anosognosia and anosodiaphoria seem to increase with progression of dementia from MCI as a result of right hemispheric alterations. PMID:25759713

  7. Recycling supercapacitors based on shredding and mild thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guozhan; Pickering, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    Supercapacitors are widely used in electric and hybrid vehicles, wind farm and low-power equipment due to their high specific power density and huge number of charge-discharge cycles. Waste supercapacitors should be recycled according to EU directive 2002/96/EC on waste electric and electronic equipment. This paper describes a recycling approach for end-of-life supercapacitors based on shredding and mild thermal treatment. At first, supercapacitors are shredded using a Retsch cutting mill. The shredded mixture is then undergone thermal treatment at 200°C to recycle the organic solvent contained in the activated carbon electrodes. After the thermal treatment, the mixture is roughly separated using a fluidized bed method to remove the aluminium foil particles and paper particles from the activated carbon particles, which is subsequently put into water for a wet shredding into fine particles that can be re-used. The recycled activated carbon has a BET surface area of up to 1200m(2)/g and the recycled acetonitrile has a high purity.

  8. Ophthalmologic Psychophysical Tests Support OCT Findings in Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salobrar-Garcia, Elena; de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramirez, Ana I.; Yubero, Raquel; Gil, Pedro; Triviño, Alberto; Ramirez, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze in mild Alzheimer's disease (MAD) patients, GDS-4 (Reisberg Scale), whether or not some psychophysical tests (PTs) support OCT macular findings in the same group of MAD patients reported previously. Methods. Twenty-three MAD patients and 28 age-matched control subjects with mean Mini Mental State Examination of 23.3 and 28.2, respectively, with no ocular disease or systemic disorders affecting vision were included. Best-corrected visual acuity (VA), contrast sensitivity (CS) (3, 6, 12, and 18 cpds), color perception (CP), and perception digital test (PDT) were tested in one eye of each patient. Results. In comparison with the controls, MAD patients presented (i) a significant decrease in VA, PDT, and CS for all spatial frequencies analyzed, especially the higher ones, and (ii) a significant increase in unspecific errors on the blue axis (P < 0.05 in all instances). In MAD patients, a wide aROC curve was plotted in all PTs. Conclusions. In MAD, CS, VA, and the tritan axis in CP were impaired. The PTs with the greatest predictive value are the higher spatial frequencies in CS and tritan unspecific errors in CP. PT abnormalities are consistent with the structural findings reported in the same MAD patients using OCT. PMID:26106485

  9. Pain Catastrophizing Correlates with Early Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Geneviève; Lajoie, Susanne P.; Naismith, Laura M.; Lavigne, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Background. Identifying which patients are most likely to be at risk of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a difficult clinical challenge. Objectives. To examine the relationship between pain catastrophizing, defined as the exaggerated negative appraisal of a pain experience, and early MTBI outcome. Methods. This cross-sectional design included 58 patients diagnosed with a MTBI. In addition to medical chart review, postconcussion symptoms were assessed by self-report at 1 month (Time 1) and 8 weeks (Time 2) after MTBI. Pain severity, psychological distress, level of functionality, and pain catastrophizing were measured by self-report at Time 2. Results. The pain catastrophizing subscales of rumination, magnification, and helplessness were significantly correlated with pain severity (r = .31 to .44), number of postconcussion symptoms reported (r = .35 to .45), psychological distress (r = .57 to .67), and level of functionality (r = −.43 to −.29). Pain catastrophizing scores were significantly higher for patients deemed to be at high risk of postconcussion syndrome (6 or more symptoms reported at both Time 1 and Time 2). Conclusions. Higher levels of pain catastrophizing were related to adverse early MTBI outcomes. The early detection of pain catastrophizing may facilitate goal-oriented interventions to prevent or minimize the development of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms. PMID:27445604

  10. Visuospatial memory and neuroimaging correlates in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mitolo, Micaela; Gardini, Simona; Fasano, Fabrizio; Crisi, Girolamo; Pelosi, Annalisa; Pazzaglia, Francesca; Caffarra, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Spatial abilities decline in normal aging and decrease faster and earlier in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but these deficits are under investigated. The main goals of this study were to assess visuospatial memory abilities in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), in order to verify whether these tasks might be valid as the standard cognitive test to differentiate MCI individuals from normal controls and to investigate the brain structural correlates of visuospatial deficits. Twenty MCI patients and fourteen healthy elderly controls underwent an experimental visuospatial battery, which also included self-rating spatial questionnaires, and structural MRI brain imaging. Compared to healthy elderly controls, MCI patients scored significantly worse in almost all visuospatial tasks. ROC analysis showed that visuospatial tasks had an elevated discriminant power between groups (AUC >0.90). Voxel-based morphometry analysis, compared to controls, disclosed a higher level of atrophy in frontal and medio-temporal regions and a different pattern of correlation between grey matter values and visuospatial performance, with wider distributed areas of the occipital and middle temporal cortex in the map and route learning. This study indicates that visuospatial memory tests are valid tools in completing the diagnostic evaluation of MCI.

  11. Weld pool oscillation during GTA welding of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y.H.; Ouden, G. den . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the results are reported of a study dealing with the oscillation behavior of weld pools in the case of GTA bead-on-plate welding of mild steel, Fe 360. During welding, the weld pool was brought into oscillation by applying short current pulses, and the oscillation frequency and amplitude were measured by monitoring the arc voltage. It was found that the oscillation of the partially penetrated weld pool is dominated by one of two different oscillation modes (Mode 1 and Mode 2) depending on the welding conditions, whereas the oscillation of the fully penetrated weld pool is characterized by a third oscillation mode (Mode 3). It is possible to maintain partially penetrated weld pool oscillation in Mode 1 by choosing appropriate welding conditions. Under these conditions, an abrupt decrease in oscillation frequency occurs when the weld pool transfers from partial penetration to full penetration. Thus, weld penetration can be in-process controlled by monitoring the oscillation frequency during welding.

  12. Epidemiology of mild traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Raquel C; Yaffe, Kristine

    2015-05-01

    Every year an estimated 42 million people worldwide suffer a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or concussion. More severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well-established risk factor for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recently, large epidemiological studies have additionally identified MTBI as a risk factor for dementia. The role of MTBI in risk of PD or ALS is less well established. Repetitive MTBI and repetitive sub-concussive head trauma have been linked to increased risk for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a unique neurodegenerative tauopathy first described in boxers but more recently described in a variety of contact sport athletes, military veterans, and civilians exposed to repetitive MTBI. Studies of repetitive MTBI and CTE have been limited by referral bias, lack of consensus clinical criteria for CTE, challenges of quantifying MTBI exposure, and potential for confounding. The prevalence of CTE is unknown and the amount of MTBI or sub-concussive trauma exposure necessary to produce CTE is unclear. This review will summarize the current literature regarding the epidemiology of MTBI, post-TBI dementia and Parkinson's disease, and CTE while highlighting methodological challenges and critical future directions of research in this field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Traumatic Brain Injury.

  13. Enhancing low severity coal liquefaction reactivity using mild chemical pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shams, K.G.; Miller, R.L.; Baldwin, R.M.

    1992-07-13

    In this paper, we describe results from a study in which mild chemical pretreatment of coal has been used to enhance low severity liquefaction reactivity. We have found that ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid improves THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt% (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt% for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt% for liquefaction of the eight coals at 623 K (350{degree}C) reaction temperature and 30 min. reaction time. Similar enhancement results occurred using, hexane or acetone in place of methanol. Pretreatment with methanol and HCI separately indicated that both reagents were necessary to achieve maximum liquefaction improvement. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol%. No appreciable effect on reactivity was observed at higher acid concentrations. Although vapor phase alcohol/HCI mixtures have been shown to partially alkylate bituminous coals, analysis of Wyodak and Illinois {number sign}6 coal samples indicated that no organic phase alteration occurred during pretreatment; however, over 90 wt% of the calcium was removed from each coal. Calcium is thought to catalyze retrogressive reactions during coal pyrolysis, and thus calcium removal prior to low severity liquefaction minimizes the rate of THF-insoluble product formation.

  14. Behavior Problems in Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities: An Initial Step towards Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; du Bois, Marleen Grimbel; Graef, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    To develop prevention activities, an analysis is conducted of child and parent characteristics that occur significantly more often among children with a mild intellectual disability and behavior problems than among children with a mild intellectual disability and no behavior problems and their families. The sample consisted of 45 children…

  15. Procedures for Increasing Sustained Attention in Adults with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Adam H.; Williams, Dean C.

    2013-01-01

    This research compared the effects of several factors on sustained attention in four participants with mild or mild-to-moderate intellectual disabilities. In each session, each participant received an extended number of conditional discriminations that required a differential response to infrequently occurring target stimuli. We assessed sustained…

  16. The Influence of Hearing Aid Use on Outcomes of Children with Mild Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Holte, Lenore; McCreery, Ryan W.; Spratford, Meredith; Page, Thomas; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of consistent hearing aid (HA) use on outcomes in children with mild hearing loss (HL). Method: Five- or 7-year-old children with mild HL were separated into 3 groups on the basis of patterns of daily HA use. Using analyses of variance, we compared outcomes between groups on speech and language tests and a…

  17. Communicative Interactions of Mildly Delayed and Normally Developing Preschool Children: Effects of Listener's Developmental Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J.; Paul-Brown, Diane

    1986-01-01

    The communicative interactions of 32 mildly delayed and normally developing preschoolers were recorded during free play in a mainstreamed program. Analyses of syntactic complexity, semantic diversity, functional aspects of speech, and the use of selected discourse devices indicated that mildly delayed children adjusted important characteristics of…

  18. Social Status and Social Perceptual Abilities of Mildly Handicapped Learners: Methodological and Substantive Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Gale M.

    In an examination of the notion of person-environment fit as it applies to the socioempathy-social status for mildly handicapped children in mainstreamed and special class settings, 38 mildly learning handicapped (LH) and 234 nonhandicapped students were administered social status instruments. Results revealed that LH Ss in special placements were…

  19. Parenting with Mild Intellectual Deficits: Parental Expectations and the Educational Attainment of Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Julie Lounds; Hurd, Heather Doescher; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Greenberg, Jan S.; Floyd, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    We examined how the educational expectations that parents with mild intellectual deficits had for their children shaped their children's attainment, and how parents' own intellectual limitations affected this process. We identified 612 parents with mild intellectual deficits and 2,712 comparison parents from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a…

  20. Biodesulfurization of mild gasification liquid products. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II

    1993-12-31

    The mild gasification of coal, as being developed at IGT and elsewhere, is a promising new technology that can convert coal to multiple products: gas, solid, and liquids. Mild gasification liquids can be used as feedstock to make transportation fuels and chemicals. However, the sulfur content and aromaticity of mild gasification liquids limits their usefulness and biodesulfurization can potentially decrease both sulfur content and aromaticity. The objective of this project is to investigate and feasibility of using biodesulfurization to upgrade the quality of mild gasification liquids. During this project, it was shown that the middle distillate (360--440 F) fraction of liquids derived from the mild gasification of coal, and unfractionated liquids can be biodesulfurized. Moreover, it was demonstrated that lysed cell preparations and freeze-dried cells can be used to biodesulfurize mild coal gasification liquids. The importance of the finding that freeze-dried biocatalysts can be used to biodesulfurize mild coal gasification liquids is that freeze-dried cells can be produced at one location, stored indefinitely, and then shipped (at reduced weight, volume, and cost) to another location for coal biodesulfurization. Moreover, freeze-dried biocatalysts can be added directly to mild coal gasification liquids with only minimal additions of water so that reactor volumes can be minimized.

  1. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depressed Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Esbensen, Anna J.; Shalev, Rebecca; Vincent, Lori B.; Mihaila, Iulia; Bussanich, Paige

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on psychosocial treatments for depression in adults with intellectual disability (ID). In this pilot study, we explored the efficacy of a group CBT treatment that involved a caregiver component in adults with mild ID with a depressive disorder. Sixteen adults with mild ID and a depressive disorder participated in a…

  2. The Use of "Mild" Aversive Stimuli for Control of Stereotypic and Self-Injurious Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberto, Paul A.

    The use of mild aversives to control self-injurious and stereotypic behaviors of severely emotionally disturbed children is considered. Research is reviewed on the ethics and effectiveness of aversive stimuli. Mild aversives include a form of nonseclusionary timeout known as facial screening, the administration of certain irritating substances…

  3. Nonverbal Social Skills of Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability Diagnosed with Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Birgenheir, Denis G.

    2009-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in adults with intellectual disability (ID), yet little is known about depressive behaviors in an ID population. This study examined the nonverbal social skills of 18 adults with mild ID diagnosed with depression and a matched sample of adults with mild ID without depression. Nonverbal…

  4. Transition Services for Students with Mild Intellectual Disability in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnahdi, Ghaleb

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teachers' attitudes and perceptions toward transition services for students with mild intellectual disability in Saudi Arabia, and also examined the relationship between teachers' attitudes regarding transition services for students with mild intellectual disability and teachers' gender and educational background. Three hundred…

  5. Exploring the Self-concept of Adults with Mild Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pestana, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to add to the research on the self-concept of adults with mild learning disabilities and to generate a deeper understanding of their self-perceptions rather than draw generalised quantitative conclusions. Eight adults diagnosed with mild learning disabilities receiving support from a supported living project were…

  6. Functional Curriculum and Students with Mild Intellectual Disability: Exploring Postschool Outcomes through the NLTS2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Joshi, Gauri

    2012-01-01

    While students with mild intellectual disability receive less attention in research, their educational programming is still important, including the curriculum they receive in school. This study analyzed the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) as to the curriculum students with mild intellectual disability received in high school as…

  7. Assessing the Employment-Related Interpersonal Competence of Mildly Mentally Retarded Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullis, Michael; Foss, Gilbert

    1986-01-01

    The Test of Interpersonal Competence for Employment (TICE) designed to assess a mildly retarded worker's knowledge of interpersonal skills in the employment setting, was developed based on analysis of problems that mildly retarded workers experience and identification of correct responses to those problems by competitive employers. Initial…

  8. Children with Mild Bilateral and Unilateral Hearing Loss: Parents' Reflections on Experiences and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Grandpierre, Viviane; Durieux-Smith, Andrée; Gaboury, Isabelle; Coyle, Doug; Na, Eunjung; Sallam, Nusaiba

    2016-01-01

    Children with mild bilateral and unilateral hearing loss are now commonly identified early through newborn hearing screening initiatives. There remains considerable uncertainty about how to support parents and about which services to provide for children with mild bilateral and unilateral hearing loss. The goal of this study was to learn about…

  9. Effect of mild conjunctivitis complication on tear balance in dry eye.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hiroko; Imanaga, Yoshichika

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation of the ocular surface influences the stability of tear fluid. Mild conjunctivitis is often associated with dry-eye patients. The effect of mild conjunctivitis complication on tear break-up time (BUT) in patients with dry eyes was investigated. A total of 93 patients with dry eyes, excluding those having moderate to severe conjunctivitis, atopic keratoconjunctivitis, vernal conjunctivitis, previous ocular surgery, or who use contact lenses, were divided into those with and without mild conjunctivitis, and the BUT was compared. Fifty-four cases were complicated by mild conjunctivitis, conjunctival papilla formation was observed in 40 of these, and the mean BUT was 3.54±1.02 s. The mean BUT in 39 patients without conjunctivitis was 3.41±1.04 s, showing no significant difference between the groups (p=0.56). Allergic conjunctivitis was frequently observed in patients with dry eyes, but the complication of mild conjunctivitis had no influence on BUT.

  10. Oxygen cost of treadmill and over-ground walking in mildly disabled persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; Suh, Yoojin; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Weikert, Madeline; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Fernhall, Bo; Goldman, Myla

    2011-04-01

    Walking impairment is a ubiquitous feature of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the O(2) cost of walking might quantify this dysfunction in mild MS. This paper examined the difference in O(2) cost of walking between persons with MS who have mild disability and healthy controls and the correlation between the O(2) cost of walking and disability. Study 1 included 18 persons with mild MS and 18 controls and indicated that the O(2) cost of walking was significantly higher in MS than controls and that disability was significantly associated with the O(2) cost of slow, moderate, and fast treadmill walking. Study 2 included 24 persons with mild MS and indicated that disability was significantly correlated with O(2) cost of comfortable, fast, and slow over-ground walking. We provide evidence that the O(2) cost of walking is an indicator of walking dysfunction in mildly disabled persons with MS and should be considered in clinical research and practice.

  11. Mild cognitive impairment with suspected nonamyloid pathology (SNAP)

    PubMed Central

    Caroli, Anna; Prestia, Annapaola; Galluzzi, Samantha; Ferrari, Clarissa; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Van Berckel, Bart; Barkhof, Frederik; Teunissen, Charlotte; Wall, Anders E.; Carter, Stephen F.; Schöll, Michael; Choo, Il Han; Grimmer, Timo; Redolfi, Alberto; Nordberg, Agneta; Scheltens, Philip; Drzezga, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate predictors of progressive cognitive deterioration in patients with suspected non–Alzheimer disease pathology (SNAP) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: We measured markers of amyloid pathology (CSF β-amyloid 42) and neurodegeneration (hippocampal volume on MRI and cortical metabolism on [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose–PET) in 201 patients with MCI clinically followed for up to 6 years to detect progressive cognitive deterioration. We categorized patients with MCI as A+/A− and N+/N− based on presence/absence of amyloid pathology and neurodegeneration. SNAPs were A−N+ cases. Results: The proportion of progressors was 11% (8/41), 34% (14/41), 56% (19/34), and 71% (60/85) in A−N−, A+N−, SNAP, and A+N+, respectively; the proportion of APOE ε4 carriers was 29%, 70%, 31%, and 71%, respectively, with the SNAP group featuring a significantly different proportion than both A+N− and A+N+ groups (p ≤ 0.005). Hypometabolism in SNAP patients was comparable to A+N+ patients (p = 0.154), while hippocampal atrophy was more severe in SNAP patients (p = 0.002). Compared with A−N−, SNAP and A+N+ patients had significant risk of progressive cognitive deterioration (hazard ratio = 2.7 and 3.8, p = 0.016 and p < 0.001), while A+N− patients did not (hazard ratio = 1.13, p = 0.771). In A+N− and A+N+ groups, none of the biomarkers predicted time to progression. In the SNAP group, lower time to progression was correlated with greater hypometabolism (r = 0.42, p = 0.073). Conclusions: Our findings support the notion that patients with SNAP MCI feature a specific risk progression profile. PMID:25568301

  12. Depression of cortical activity in humans by mild hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Thesen, Thomas; Leontiev, Oleg; Song, Tao; Dehghani, Nima; Hagler, Donald J; Huang, Mingxiong; Buxton, Richard; Halgren, Eric

    2012-03-01

    The effects of neural activity on cerebral hemodynamics underlie human brain imaging with functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. However, the threshold and characteristics of the converse effects, wherein the cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic milieu influence neural activity, remain unclear. We tested whether mild hypercapnia (5% CO2 ) decreases the magnetoencephalogram response to auditory pattern recognition and visual semantic tasks. Hypercapnia induced statistically significant decreases in event-related fields without affecting behavioral performance. Decreases were observed in early sensory components in both auditory and visual modalities as well as later cognitive components related to memory and language. Effects were distributed across cortical regions. Decreases were comparable in evoked versus spontaneous spectral power. Hypercapnia is commonly used with hemodynamic models to calibrate the blood oxygenation level-dependent response. Modifying model assumptions to incorporate the current findings produce a modest but measurable decrease in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen change with activation. Because under normal conditions, low cerebral pH would arise when bloodflow is unable to keep pace with neuronal activity, the cortical depression observed here may reflect a homeostatic mechanism by which neuronal activity is adjusted to a level that can be sustained by available bloodflow. Animal studies suggest that these effects may be mediated by pH-modulating presynaptic adenosine receptors. Although the data is not clear, comparable changes in cortical pH to those induced here may occur during sleep apnea, sleep, and exercise. If so, these results suggest that such activities may in turn have generalized depressive effects on cortical activity.

  13. Depression of Cortical Activity in Humans by Mild Hypercapnia

    PubMed Central

    Thesen, Thomas; Leontiev, Oleg; Song, Tao; Dehghani, Nima; Hagler, Donald J; Huang, Mingxiong; Buxton, Richard; Halgren, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The effects of neural activity on cerebral hemodynamics underlie human brain imaging with functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. However, the threshold and characteristics of the converse effects, wherein the cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic milieu influence neural activity, remain unclear. We tested whether mild hypercapnia (5% CO2) decreases the magnetoencephalogram response to auditory pattern recognition and visual semantic tasks. Hypercapnia induced statistically significant decreases in event-related fields without affecting behavioral performance. Decreases were observed in early sensory components in both auditory and visual modalities as well as later cognitive components related to memory and language. Effects were distributed across cortical regions. Decreases were comparable in evoked versus spontaneous spectral power. Hypercapnia is commonly used with hemodynamic models to calibrate the blood oxygenation level-dependent response. Modifying model assumptions to incorporate the current findings produce a modest but measurable decrease in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen change with activation. Because under normal conditions, low cerebral pH would arise when bloodflow is unable to keep pace with neuronal activity, the cortical depression observed here may reflect a homeostatic mechanism by which neuronal activity is adjusted to a level that can be sustained by available bloodflow. Animal studies suggest that these effects may be mediated by pH-modulating presynaptic adenosine receptors. Although the data is not clear, comparable changes in cortical pH to those induced here may occur during sleep apnea, sleep, and exercise. If so, these results suggest that such activities may in turn have generalized depressive effects on cortical activity. PMID:21500313

  14. Maporal Hantavirus Causes Mild Pathology in Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus).

    PubMed

    McGuire, Amanda; Miedema, Kaitlyn; Fauver, Joseph R; Rico, Amber; Aboellail, Tawfik; Quackenbush, Sandra L; Hawkinson, Ann; Schountz, Tony

    2016-10-18

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses can cause two human diseases with many pathological similarities: hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the western hemisphere and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in the eastern hemisphere. Each virus is hosted by specific reservoir species without conspicuous disease. HCPS-causing hantaviruses require animal biosafety level-4 (ABSL-4) containment, which substantially limits experimental research of interactions between the viruses and their reservoir hosts. Maporal virus (MAPV) is a South American hantavirus not known to cause disease in humans, thus it can be manipulated under ABSL-3 conditions. The aim of this study was to develop an ABSL-3 hantavirus infection model using the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), the natural reservoir host of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), and a virus that is pathogenic in another animal model to examine immune response of a reservoir host species. Deer mice were inoculated with MAPV, and viral RNA was detected in several organs of all deer mice during the 56 day experiment. Infected animals generated both nucleocapsid-specific and neutralizing antibodies. Histopathological lesions were minimal to mild with the peak of the lesions detected at 7-14 days postinfection, mainly in the lungs, heart, and liver. Low to modest levels of cytokine gene expression were detected in spleens and lungs of infected deer mice, and deer mouse primary pulmonary cells generated with endothelial cell growth factors were susceptible to MAPV with viral RNA accumulating in the cellular fraction compared to infected Vero cells. Most features resembled that of SNV infection of deer mice, suggesting this model may be an ABSL-3 surrogate for studying the host response of a New World hantavirus reservoir.

  15. The Characterization of Biological Rhythms in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Mardomingo, Carmen; García-Herranz, Sara; Pereda-Pérez, Inmaculada; Peraita, Herminia; Venero, César; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Rol, Maria Angeles

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease, present several circadian impairments related to an accelerated perturbation of their biological clock that is caused by the illness itself and not merely age-related. Thus, the objective of this work was to elucidate whether these circadian system alterations were already present in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as compared to healthy age-matched subjects. Methods. 40 subjects (21 patients diagnosed with MCI, 74.1 ± 1.5 y.o., and 19 healthy subjects, 71.7 ± 1.4 y.o.) were subjected to ambulatory monitoring, recording wrist skin temperature, motor activity, body position, and the integrated variable TAP (including temperature, activity, and position) for one week. Nonparametrical analyses were then applied. Results. MCI patients exhibited a significant phase advance with respect to the healthy group for the following phase markers: temperature M5 (mean ± SEM: 04:20 ± 00:21 versus 02:52 ± 00:21) and L10 (14:35 ± 00:27 versus 13:24 ± 00:16) and TAP L5 (04:18 ± 00:14 versus 02:55 ± 00:30) and M10 (14:30 ± 00:18 versus 13:28 ± 00:23). Conclusions. These results suggest that significant advances in the biological clock begin to occur in MCI patients, evidenced by an accelerated aging of the circadian clock, as compared to a healthy population of the same age. PMID:25157363

  16. Maporal Hantavirus Causes Mild Pathology in Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus)

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Amanda; Miedema, Kaitlyn; Fauver, Joseph R.; Rico, Amber; Aboellail, Tawfik; Quackenbush, Sandra L.; Hawkinson, Ann; Schountz, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses can cause two human diseases with many pathological similarities: hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the western hemisphere and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in the eastern hemisphere. Each virus is hosted by specific reservoir species without conspicuous disease. HCPS-causing hantaviruses require animal biosafety level-4 (ABSL-4) containment, which substantially limits experimental research of interactions between the viruses and their reservoir hosts. Maporal virus (MAPV) is a South American hantavirus not known to cause disease in humans, thus it can be manipulated under ABSL-3 conditions. The aim of this study was to develop an ABSL-3 hantavirus infection model using the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), the natural reservoir host of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), and a virus that is pathogenic in another animal model to examine immune response of a reservoir host species. Deer mice were inoculated with MAPV, and viral RNA was detected in several organs of all deer mice during the 56 day experiment. Infected animals generated both nucleocapsid-specific and neutralizing antibodies. Histopathological lesions were minimal to mild with the peak of the lesions detected at 7–14 days postinfection, mainly in the lungs, heart, and liver. Low to modest levels of cytokine gene expression were detected in spleens and lungs of infected deer mice, and deer mouse primary pulmonary cells generated with endothelial cell growth factors were susceptible to MAPV with viral RNA accumulating in the cellular fraction compared to infected Vero cells. Most features resembled that of SNV infection of deer mice, suggesting this model may be an ABSL-3 surrogate for studying the host response of a New World hantavirus reservoir. PMID:27763552

  17. Mild hyperthermia influence on Herceptin® properties

    PubMed Central

    Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Deckers, Roel; Sasaki, Noboru; Bos, Clemens; Moonen, Chrit

    2015-01-01

    Background Mild hyperthermia (mHT) increases the tumor perfusion and vascular permeability, and reduces the interstitial fluid pressure, resulting in better intra-tumoral bioavailability of low molecular weight drugs. This approach is potentially also attractive for delivery of therapeutic macromolecules, such as antibodies. Here, we investigated the effects of mHT on the stability, immunological and pharmacological properties of Herceptin®, a clinically approved antibody, targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) overexpressed in breast cancer. Results Herceptin® was heated to 37°C (control) and 42°C (mHT) for 1 hour. Formation of Herceptin® aggregates was measured using Nile Red assay. mHT did not result in additional Herceptin® aggregates compared to 37°C, showing the Herceptin® stability is unchanged. Immunological and pharmacological properties of Herceptin® were evaluated following mHT using HER-2 positive breast cancer cells (BT-474). Exposure of Herceptin® to mHT preserved recognition and binding affinity of Herceptin® to HER-2. Western-blot and cell proliferation assays on BT-474 cells showed that mHT left the inhibitory activities of Herceptin® unchanged. Conclusions The stability, and the immunological and pharmacological properties of Herceptin® are not negatively affected by mHT. Further in-vivo studies are required to evaluate the influence of mHT on intra-tumoral bioavailability and therapeutic effectiveness of Herceptin®. PMID:25810700

  18. Evidence for mild thyroidal impairment in women undergoing endurance training

    SciTech Connect

    Boyden, T.W.; Pamenter, R.W.; Stanforth, P.; Rotkis, T.; Wilmore, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of endurance training on body composition and the pituitary-thyroid axis were studied in 29 healthy, young (mean age, 28.7 yr), regularly menstruating women. Women who were initially jogging a mean of 13.5 miles/week were selected for this study to minimize dropouts. Body composition, measured by hydrostatic weighing, and nonfasting plasma concentrations of T/sub 4/, T/sub 3/, rT/sub 3/, TSH, and TRH-stimulated TSH, measured by RIA, were examined initially and after each subject's weekly mileage had increased to 30 miles (..delta..30, mean total body weight did not change, mean fat weight decreased (-1.02 kg/ P<0.005), and mean lean weight increased (+0.75 kg; P<0.05). T/sub 4/ and unstimulated TSH did not change. However, mean (+/- SE) T/sub 3/ decreased from 107.2 +/- 4.4 to 97.9 +/- 3.4 ng/dl (P<0.025), and mean rT/sub 3/ decreased from 170.9 +/- 13.9 to 154.6 +/- 13.2 pg/ml (P<0.025). The decrease in T/sub 3/ and rT/sub 3/ were accompanied by significantly greater TSH responses to TRH stimulation (mean (+/- SE) area under TSH curve, 1381.4 +/- 123 vs. 1712.8 +/- 202 ..mu..IU/ml-min; P < 0.01). These results indicate that physically active women who undergo additional endurance training 1) become more lean without a change in total body weight, and 2) have changes in T/sub 3/, rT/sub 3/, and TRH-stimulated TSH indicative of mild thyroidal impairment.

  19. Sparse multivariate autoregressive modeling for mild cognitive impairment classification.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Jie, Biao; Peng, Ziwen; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-07-01

    Brain connectivity network derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is becoming increasingly prevalent in the researches related to cognitive and perceptual processes. The capability to detect causal or effective connectivity is highly desirable for understanding the cooperative nature of brain network, particularly when the ultimate goal is to obtain good performance of control-patient classification with biological meaningful interpretations. Understanding directed functional interactions between brain regions via brain connectivity network is a challenging task. Since many genetic and biomedical networks are intrinsically sparse, incorporating sparsity property into connectivity modeling can make the derived models more biologically plausible. Accordingly, we propose an effective connectivity modeling of resting-state fMRI data based on the multivariate autoregressive (MAR) modeling technique, which is widely used to characterize temporal information of dynamic systems. This MAR modeling technique allows for the identification of effective connectivity using the Granger causality concept and reducing the spurious causality connectivity in assessment of directed functional interaction from fMRI data. A forward orthogonal least squares (OLS) regression algorithm is further used to construct a sparse MAR model. By applying the proposed modeling to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) classification, we identify several most discriminative regions, including middle cingulate gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, lingual gyrus and caudate regions, in line with results reported in previous findings. A relatively high classification accuracy of 91.89 % is also achieved, with an increment of 5.4 % compared to the fully-connected, non-directional Pearson-correlation-based functional connectivity approach.

  20. Association of C-reactive protein with mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosebud O.; Geda, Yonas E.; Knopman, David S.; Christianson, Teresa J.H.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammation is suggested to play a role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, and may also be involved in the pathogenesis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This study examined the association of inflammatory markers in serum or plasma with prevalent MCI and MCI subtypes in a population-based sample. Methods Olmsted County, MN, residents aged 70–89 years on October 1, 2004, were evaluated using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. Information ascertained for each participant was reviewed by an expert panel of neuropsychologists, physicians, and nurses, and a diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI, or dementia was made by consensus. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα), and adiponectin were measured at baseline. Results Among 313 subjects with MCI and 1,570 cognitively normal subjects, a CRP level in the upper quartile (> 3.3 mg/L) was significantly associated with MCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00–2.01) and with non-amnestic MCI (na-MCI; OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.12–3.78) after adjusting for age, sex, and years of education. However, there was no association with amnestic MCI (a-MCI; OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.81–1.82). No association was observed with the other inflammatory markers. Conclusions Plasma CRP is associated with prevalent MCI and with na-MCI in elderly, non-demented persons in the population-based setting. These findings suggest an involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of MCI. PMID:19751919

  1. Spontaneous Improvement of Untreated Mild Graves' Ophthalmopathy: Rundle's Curve Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Menconi, Francesca; Profilo, Maria Antonietta; Leo, Marenza; Sisti, Eleonora; Altea, Maria Antonietta; Rocchi, Roberto; Latrofa, Francesco; Nardi, Marco; Vitti, Paolo; Marcocci, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Background: According to Rundle's curve, Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) worsens during an initial phase up to a peak of maximum severity, then improves and reaches a static plateau, with the activity curve preceding the severity curve by a few months. To our knowledge, no studies have tried to replicate Rundle's curve, and very few have investigated the natural history of GO. Here, we studied GO natural history retrospectively and tried to identify factors that may affect it. Methods: A total of 65 patients with untreated GO underwent an eye assessment after a median of seven months after the appearance of GO and then after a median of 40 months. The primary endpoints were the variation of the single GO features and of the NOSPECS score, as well as the overall outcome of GO. The secondary endpoint was the influence of several variables (age, sex, smoking, GO and thyroid disease duration, thyroid treatment, thyroid status, thyroid volume, anti-TSH receptor autoantibodies) on the outcome of GO. Results: The majority of patients had mild, minimally active GO, and only five had a Clinical Activity Score (CAS) >3. There was a significant reduction of CAS (p<0.0001) and NOSPECS (p=0.01) between the first and last observation, with a timing pattern resembling Rundle's curve. This difference was confirmed even when patients with a CAS >3 at first observation were excluded. At the last observation, 50.8% of patients had improved, 33.8% had remained stable, and 15.4% had worsened moderately or substantially. The overall outcome of GO was not affected by any of the variables under examination. Conclusions: In confirmation of Rundle's observations, untreated GO improves spontaneously with time in the majority of patients, with an activity peak between 13 and 24 months, which may have implications in determining the proper timing of GO treatments. PMID:23980907

  2. Supervised Discriminative Group Sparse Representation for Mild Cognitive Impairment Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Heung-Il; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Research on an early detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), a prodromal stage of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), with resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (rs-fMRI) has been of great interest for the last decade. Witnessed by recent studies, functional connectivity is a useful concept in extracting brain network features and finding biomarkers for brain disease diagnosis. However, it still remains challenging for the estimation of functional connectivity from rs-fMRI due to the inevitable high dimensional problem. In order to tackle this problem, we utilize a group sparse representation along with a structural equation model. Unlike the conventional group sparse representation method that does not explicitly consider class-label information, which can help enhance the diagnostic performance, in this paper, we propose a novel supervised discriminative group sparse representation method by penalizing a large within-class variance and a small between-class variance of connectivity coefficients. Thanks to the newly devised penalization terms, we can learn connectivity coefficients that are similar within the same class and distinct between classes, thus helping enhance the diagnostic accuracy. The proposed method also allows the learned common network structure to preserve the network specific and label-related characteristics. In our experiments on the rs-fMRI data of 37 subjects (12 MCI; 25 healthy normal control) with a cross-validation technique, we demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method, showing the diagnostic accuracy of 89.19% and the sensitivity of 0.9167. PMID:25501275

  3. [Schooling and care of mild intellectual disability children].

    PubMed

    David, M; Billette de Villemeur, A; Devillard, F; Dieterich, K; Jouk, P-S; Prado, C; Descotes, A; Guillon, J-L; Counillon, J; Bloch, J; Cans, C

    2015-03-01

    Studies on mild intellectual disability (MID) are scarce. The aim of this study was to describe the educational and medical care trajectories and their determinants in children with MID. The study population concerned children born in 1997 and resident in a French county (Isère) in 2008. MID was defined as an overall IQ score between 50 and 69. For the present study, this definition was adjusted by integrating the IQ confidence intervals so that the risk of IQ measurement relativity and possible score discrepancy could be taken into account. Of the 267 children included, 180 (67%) were identified through an institute that decides upon special education and allowances (MDPH) and 87 (33%) through the educational system. The parents of 181 children (68%) accepted to answer a telephone questionnaire, describing their child's educational and medical history. Children with MID frequently presented clinical signs and comorbidities. Educational trajectories were quite varied: a majority of the children (52.9%) were oriented toward sections with adapted general and professional education (SEGPA) after finishing primary school, a minority (41.3%) were oriented towards specialized schools, such as medical-educational institutions, and a small proportion of children (5.8%) stayed in ordinary school. Children followed the SEGPA orientation more frequently when a relative written language disorder was present, and autism-spectrum disorders or other clinical signs were absent. Concerning follow-up care and rehabilitation, children mostly took part in speech therapy (76.2%) and psychotherapy (55.8%). The French law dating from 2005, ensuring equal opportunity for people with disabilities, has borne fruit in the diversification of educational trajectories.

  4. Assessment of cognition in mild cognitive impairment: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Peter J.; Jackson, Colleen E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Khachaturian, Ara S.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Albert, Marilyn S.; Weintraub, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The demand for rapidly administered, sensitive, and reliable cognitive assessments that are specifically designed for identifying individuals in the earliest stages of cognitive decline (and to measure subtle change over time) has escalated as the emphasis in Alzheimer’s disease clinical research has shifted from clinical diagnosis and treatment toward the goal of developing presymptomatic neuroprotective therapies. To meet these changing clinical requirements, cognitive measures or tailored batteries of tests must be validated and determined to be fit-for-use for the discrimination between cognitively healthy individuals and persons who are experiencing very subtle cognitive changes that likely signal the emergence of early mild cognitive impairment. We sought to collect and review data systematically from a wide variety of (mostly computer-administered) cognitive measures, all of which are currently marketed or distributed with the claims that these instruments are sensitive and reliable for the early identification of disease or, if untested for this purpose, are promising tools based on other variables. The survey responses for 16 measures/batteries are presented in brief in this review; full survey responses and summary tables are archived and publicly available on the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease by 2020 Web site (http://pad2020.org). A decision tree diagram highlighting critical decision points for selecting measures to meet varying clinical trials requirements has also been provided. Ultimately, the survey questionnaire, framework, and decision guidelines provided in this review should remain as useful aids for the evaluation of any new or updated sets of instruments in the years to come. PMID:21575877

  5. Associations of Mild Cognitive Impairment with Hospitalization and Readmission

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Kathryn E.; Lovato, James F.; Miller, Michael E.; Easterling, Doug; Snitz, Beth; Williamson, Jeff D.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a condition not previously explored as a risk factor, experience increased hospitalizations and 30-day readmission compared to those with normal cognition. Frequent hospitalizations and unplanned readmissions are recognized as markers of poor quality care for older adults. DESIGN Post-hoc analysis of prospectively gathered data on incident hospitalization and readmission from the Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory Study (GEMS), a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial designed to assess the impact of Ginkgo biloba on incidence of dementia. SETTING GEMS was conducted in 5 academic medical centers in the United States. PARTICIPANTS 2742 community-dwelling adults age 75 or older with normal cognition (n=2314) or MCI (n=428) at baseline cognitive testing. MEASUREMENTS Index hospitalization and 30-day hospital readmission, adjusted for age, sex, race, education, clinic site, trial assignment status, comorbidities, number of prescription medications, and living with an identified proxy. RESULTS MCI was associated with a 17% increase in the hazard of index hospitalization as compared with normal cognition (adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR)=1.17 (1.02 – 1.34)). In participants who lived with their proxy, MCI was associated with a 39% increased hazard of index hospitalization (adjusted HR=1.392 (1.169 – 1.657)). Baseline MCI was not associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (adjusted Odds Ratio=0.90 (0.60 – 1.36)). CONCLUSION MCI may represent a target condition for healthcare providers to coordinate support services in an effort to reduce hospitalization and subsequent disability. PMID:26313420

  6. Therapeutic application of melatonin in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Vigo, Daniel E; Olivar, Natividad; Vidal, María F; Furio, Analía M; Brusco, Luis I

    2012-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an etiologically heterogeneous syndrome defined by cognitive impairment in advance of dementia. We previously reported in a retrospective analysis that daily 3 - 9 mg of a fast-release melatonin preparation given p. o. at bedtime for up to 3 years significantly improved cognitive and emotional performance and daily sleep/wake cycle in MCI patients. In a follow up of that study we now report data from another series of 96 MCI outpatients, 61 of who had received daily 3 - 24 mg of a fast-release melatonin preparation p. o. at bedtime for 15 to 60 months. Melatonin was given in addition to the standard medication prescribed by the attending psychiatrist. Patients treated with melatonin exhibited significantly better performance in Mini–Mental State Examination and the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer’s disease Assessment Scale. After application of a neuropsychological battery comprising a Mattis´ test, Digit-symbol test, Trail A and B tasks and the Rey´s verbal test, better performance was found in melatonin-treated patients for every parameter tested. Abnormally high Beck Depression Inventory scores decreased in melatonin-treated patients, concomitantly with the improvement in the quality of sleep and wakefulness. The comparison of the medication profile in both groups of MCI patients indicated that 9.8% in the melatonin group received benzodiazepines vs. 62.8% in the non-melatonin group. The results further support that melatonin can be a useful add-on drug for treating MCI in a clinic environment. PMID:23383398

  7. Purkinje cell vulnerability to mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, K; Aihara, N; Sagar, S M; Sharp, F R; Pitts, L H; Honkaniemi, J; Noble, L J

    1996-05-01

    In this study we examined the cerebellar response to mild traumatic brain injury by assessing microglial activation and Purkinje cell loss. Activated microglia were identified using the antibodies OX-42 and ED-1 as well as isolectin B4. The anti-Purkinje cell antibody PEP-19 was used to evaluate Purkinje cell loss after injury. The mechanism of cell injury was examined using a monoclonal antibody to the inducible 72-kDa heat shock protein. A monoclonal antibody to the N-terminal sequence of Fos was used as a marker for neuronal activation. There was progressive activation of microglia in the cerebellar vermis within a few days after forebrain injury. In coronal sections the processes of activated microglia were oriented in "stripes" perpendicular to the cortical surface. In sagittal sections the activated microglia were in irregularly shaped clusters or in a fan-like distribution that radiated from the Purkinje cell layer toward the cortical surface. There was a significant loss of Purkinje cells 7 days postinjury as compared to the control group. There was no evidence of induction of heat shock protein in the cerebellum. In addition, there was no evidence of induction of c-Fos protein in either the cerebellar cortex or inferior olivary nuclei within the first 3 h after injury. These studies demonstrate that a fluid percussive impact to the forebrain results in cerebellar damage. The close anatomical association between activated microglia and Purkinje cells suggests that Purkinje cell injury is the cause of the microglial activation. The mechanism of Purkinje cell death, however, remains unclear.

  8. Gray matter abnormalities in pediatric mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrew R; Hanlon, Faith M; Ling, Josef M

    2015-05-15

    Pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (pmTBI) is the most prevalent neurological insult in children and is associated with both acute and chronic neuropsychiatric sequelae. However, little is known about underlying pathophysiology changes in gray matter diffusion and atrophy from a prospective stand-point. Fifteen semi-acute pmTBI patients and 15 well-matched healthy controls were evaluated with a clinical and neuroimaging battery, with a subset of participants returning for a second visit. Clinical measures included tests of attention, processing speed, executive function, working memory, memory, and self-reported post-concussive symptoms. Measures of diffusion (fractional anisotropy [FA]) and atrophy were also obtained for cortical and subcortical gray matter structures to characterize effects of injury as a function of time. Patients exhibited decreased scores in the domains of attention and processing speed relative to controls during the semi-acute injury stage, in conjunction with increased anisotropic diffusion in the left superior temporal gyrus and right thalamus. Evidence of increased diffusion in these regions was also present at four months post-injury, with performance on cognitive tests partially normalizing. In contrast, signs of cortical atrophy in bilateral frontal areas and other left-hemisphere cortical areas only emerged at four months post-injury for patients. Current results suggest potentially differential time-courses of recovery for neurobehavioral markers, anisotropic diffusion and atrophy following pmTBI. Importantly, these data suggest that relying on patient self-report or standard clinical assessments may underestimate the time for true injury recovery.

  9. Long-term neuropsychological outcomes following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Vanderploeg, Rodney D; Curtiss, Glenn; Belanger, Heather G

    2005-05-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is common, yet few studies have examined neuropsychological outcomes more than 1 year postinjury. Studies of nonreferred individuals with MTBI or studies with appropriate control groups are lacking, but necessary to draw conclusions regarding natural recovery from MTBI. We examined the long-term neuropsychological outcomes of a self-reported MTBI an average of 8 years postinjury in a nonreferred community-dwelling sample of male veterans. This was a cross-sectional cohort study derived from the Vietnam Experience Study. Three groups matched on premorbid cognitive ability were examined, those who (1) had not been injured in a MVA nor had a head injury (Normal Control; n = 3214), (2) had been injured in a motor vehicle accident (MVA) but did not have a head injury (MVA Control; n = 539), and (3) had a head injury with altered consciousness (MTBI; n = 254). A MANOVA found no group differences on a standard neuropsychological test battery of 15 measures. Across 15 measures, the average neuropsychological effect size of MTBI compared with either control group was -.03. Subtle aspects of attention and working memory also were examined by comparing groups on Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) continuation rate and California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) proactive interference (PI). Compared with normal controls, the MTBI group evidenced attention problems in their lower rate of continuation to completion on the PASAT (odds ratio = 1.32, CI = 1.0-1.73) and in excessive PI (odds ratio = 1.66, CI = 1.11-2.47). Unique to the MTBI group, PASAT continuation problems were associated with left-sided visual imperceptions and excessive PI was associated with impaired tandem gait. These results show that MTBI can have adverse long-term neuropsychological outcomes on subtle aspects of complex attention and working memory.

  10. Sparse Multivariate Autoregressive Modeling for Mild Cognitive Impairment Classification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Jie, Biao; Peng, Ziwen

    2014-01-01

    Brain connectivity network derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is becoming increasingly prevalent in the researches related to cognitive and perceptual processes. The capability to detect causal or effective connectivity is highly desirable for understanding the cooperative nature of brain network, particularly when the ultimate goal is to obtain good performance of control-patient classification with biological meaningful interpretations. Understanding directed functional interactions between brain regions via brain connectivity network is a challenging task. Since many genetic and biomedical networks are intrinsically sparse, incorporating sparsity property into connectivity modeling can make the derived models more biologically plausible. Accordingly, we propose an effective connectivity modeling of resting-state fMRI data based on the multivariate autoregressive (MAR) modeling technique, which is widely used to characterize temporal information of dynamic systems. This MAR modeling technique allows for the identification of effective connectivity using the Granger causality concept and reducing the spurious causality connectivity in assessment of directed functional interaction from fMRI data. A forward orthogonal least squares (OLS) regression algorithm is further used to construct a sparse MAR model. By applying the proposed modeling to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) classification, we identify several most discriminative regions, including middle cingulate gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, lingual gyrus and caudate regions, in line with results reported in previous findings. A relatively high classification accuracy of 91.89 % is also achieved, with an increment of 5.4 % compared to the fully-connected, non-directional Pearson-correlation-based functional connectivity approach. PMID:24595922

  11. Autobiographical and episodic memory deficits in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wammes, Jeffrey D; Good, Tyler J; Fernandes, Myra A

    2017-02-01

    Those who have suffered a concussion, otherwise known as a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), often complain of lingering memory problems. However, there is little evidence in the behavioral literature reliably demonstrating memory deficits. Thus, in the present study, cognitive profiles including measures of general executive functioning and processing speed, as well as episodic and semantic memory were collected in younger and older adult participants with or without a remote (>1year prior to testing) mTBI. We first investigated whether there were observable episodic and autobiographical memory impairments associated with mTBI within an otherwise healthy young group. Next, because previous work had demonstrated some overlap in patterns of behavioral impairment in normally aging adults and younger adults with a history of mTBI (e.g. Ozen, Fernandes, Clark, & Roy, 2015), we sought to determine whether these groups displayed similar cognitive profiles. Lastly, we conducted an exploratory analysis to test whether having suffered an mTBI might exacerbate age-related cognitive decline. Results showed the expected age-related decline in episodic memory performance, coupled with a relative preservation of semantic memory in older adults. Importantly, this pattern was also present in younger adults with a history of remote mTBI. No differences were observed across older adult groups based on mTBI status. Logistic regression analyses, using each measure in our battery as a predictor, successfully classified mTBI status in younger participants with a high degree of specificity (79.5%). These results indicate that those who have had an mTBI demonstrate a distinct cognitive signature, characterized by impairment in episodic and autobiographical memory, coupled with a relative preservation of semantic memory.

  12. Coping strategies as a predictor of post-concussive symptoms in children with mild traumatic brain injury versus mild orthopedic injury.

    PubMed

    Woodrome, Stacey E; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H Gerry; Rusin, Jerome; Bangert, Barbara; Dietrich, Ann; Nuss, Kathryn; Wright, Martha

    2011-03-01

    This study examined whether children's coping strategies are related to post-concussive symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) versus orthopedic injury (OI). Participants were 8- to 15-year-old children with mild TBI (n = 167) or OI (n = 84). They rated their current preferred coping strategies and post-injury symptoms at 2 weeks (baseline) and 1, 3, and 12 months post-injury. Children's reported use of coping strategies did not vary significantly over time, so their baseline coping ratings were examined as predictors of post-concussive symptoms across time. Self-ratings of symptoms were positively related to emotion-focused strategies and negatively related to problem-focused engagement after both mild TBI and OI. Higher problem-focused disengagement predicted larger group differences in children's ratings of symptoms, suggesting that problem-focused disengagement moderates the effects of mild TBI. Coping strategies collectively accounted for approximately 10-15% of the variance in children's post-concussive symptoms over time. The findings suggest that coping may play an important role in accounting for children's perceptions of post-concussive symptoms after mild TBI.

  13. Structural imaging of mild traumatic brain injury may not be enough: overview of functional and metabolic imaging of mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Samuel S; Bales, James W; Edward Dixon, C; Hwang, Misun

    2017-02-13

    A majority of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) present as mild injury with no findings on conventional clinical imaging methods. Due to this difficulty of imaging assessment on mild TBI patients, there has been much emphasis on the development of diffusion imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, basic science research in TBI shows that many of the functional and metabolic abnormalities in TBI may be present even in the absence of structural damage. Moreover, structural damage may be present at a microscopic and molecular level that is not detectable by structural imaging modality. The use of functional and metabolic imaging modalities can provide information on pathological changes in mild TBI patients that may not be detected by structural imaging. Although there are various differences in protocols of positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), and magnetoencephalography (MEG) methods, these may be important modalities to be used in conjunction with structural imaging in the future in order to detect and understand the pathophysiology of mild TBI. In this review, studies of mild TBI patients using these modalities that detect functional and metabolic state of the brain are discussed. Each modality's advantages and disadvantages are compared, and potential future applications of using combined modalities are explored.

  14. Oculomotor, Vestibular, and Reaction Time Tests in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Snapp, Hillary; Crawford, James; Murphy, Sara; Marshall, Kathryn; Pelusso, Constanza; Knowles, Sean; Kiderman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mild traumatic brain injury is a major public health issue and is a particular concern in sports. One of the most difficult issues with respect to mild traumatic brain injury involves the diagnosis of the disorder. Typically, diagnosis is made by a constellation of physical exam findings. However, in order to best manage mild traumatic brain injury, it is critically important to develop objective tests that substantiate the diagnosis. With objective tests the disorder can be better characterized, more accurately diagnosed, and studied more effectively. In addition, prevention and treatments can be applied where necessary. Methods Two cohorts each of fifty subjects with mild traumatic brain injury and one hundred controls were evaluated with a battery of oculomotor, vestibular and reaction time related tests applied to a population of individuals with mild traumatic brain injury as compared to controls. Results We demonstrated pattern differences between the two groups and showed how three of these tests yield an 89% sensitivity and 95% specificity for confirming a current diagnosis of mild traumatic brain injury. Interpretation These results help better characterize the oculomotor, vestibular, and reaction time differences between those the mild traumatic brain injury and non-affected individuals. This characterization will allow for the development of more effective point of care neurologic diagnostic techniques and allow for more targeted treatment which may allow for quicker return to normal activity. PMID:27654131

  15. Biodesulfurization of mild gasification liquid products. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II

    1993-09-01

    The mild gasification of coal is a promising new technology that can convert coal to multiple products: gas, solid, and liquids. However, the sulfur content and aromaticity of mild gasification liquids limits their usefulness. Biodesulfurization can potentially decrease both sulfur content and aromaticity. The objective of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using biodesulfurization to upgrade the quality of mild gasification liquids. Previously it was shown that the middle distillate (360--440{degrees}F) fraction of liquids derived from the mild gasification of coal could be biodesulfurized. During this quarter it was demonstrated that unfractionated liquids can be biodesulfurized. Moreover, it was demonstrated that lysed cell preparations and freeze-dried cells can be used to biodesulfurize mild coal gasification liquids. The importance of the finding that freeze-dried biocatalysts can be used to biodesulfurize mild coal gasification liquids is that freezedried cells can be produced at one location, stored indefinitely, and then shipped to another location for coal biodesulfurization. Moreover, freeze-dried biocatalysts can be added directly to mild coal gasification liquids with only minimal additions of water so that reactor volumes can be minimized.

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depressed Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Sigan L; Esbensen, Anna J; Shalev, Rebecca; Vincent, Lori B; Mihaila, Iulia; Bussanich, Paige

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of research on psychosocial treatments for depression in adults with intellectual disability (ID). In this pilot study, we explored the efficacy of a group CBT treatment that involved a caregiver component in adults with mild ID with a depressive disorder. Method Sixteen adults with mild ID and a depressive disorder participated in a 10-week group CBT treatment and 8 adults with mild ID with a depressive disorder served as a treatment as usual (TAU) control group. Adults with mild ID and caregivers completed measures of depressive symptoms, behavior problems, and social skills at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and a 3-month follow-up. Adults with mild ID also completed a series of tasks to measure their understanding of the principles of cognitive therapy pre- and post-treatment. Results The CBT group demonstrated significant decreases in depressive symptoms and behavior problems from pre-treatment to post-treatment and these effects were maintained at a 3-month follow-up. The CBT group demonstrated significant improvements in their ability to infer emotions and thoughts based on various situation-thought-emotion pairings from pre-treatment to post-treatment. Conclusions Findings indicate that adults with mild ID with a depressive disorder benefitted from a group CBT treatment with a caregiver component. Moreover, adults with mild ID appeared to benefit, at least in part, from the cognitive therapy components of the treatment, in addition to the behavior therapy components. PMID:26925187

  17. Leaf Responses to Mild Drought Stress in Natural Variants of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Clauw, Pieter; Coppens, Frederik; De Beuf, Kristof; Dhondt, Stijn; Van Daele, Twiggy; Maleux, Katrien; Storme, Veronique; Clement, Lieven; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Although the response of plants exposed to severe drought stress has been studied extensively, little is known about how plants adapt their growth under mild drought stress conditions. Here, we analyzed the leaf and rosette growth response of six Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions originating from different geographic regions when exposed to mild drought stress. The automated phenotyping platform WIWAM was used to impose stress early during leaf development, when the third leaf emerges from the shoot apical meristem. Analysis of growth-related phenotypes showed differences in leaf development between the accessions. In all six accessions, mild drought stress reduced both leaf pavement cell area and number without affecting the stomatal index. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis (using RNA sequencing) of early developing leaf tissue identified 354 genes differentially expressed under mild drought stress in the six accessions. Our results indicate the existence of a robust response over different genetic backgrounds to mild drought stress in developing leaves. The processes involved in the overall mild drought stress response comprised abscisic acid signaling, proline metabolism, and cell wall adjustments. In addition to these known severe drought-related responses, 87 genes were found to be specific for the response of young developing leaves to mild drought stress. PMID:25604532

  18. Cytoprotective effects of mild plasma-activated medium against oxidative stress in human skin fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Horiba, Minori; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTAPP) has recently been applied to living cells and tissues and has emerged as a novel technology for medical applications. NTAPP affects cells not only directly, but also indirectly with previously prepared plasma-activated medium (PAM). The objective of this study was to demonstrate the preconditioning effects of “mild PAM” which was prepared under relatively mild conditions, on fibroblasts against cellular injury generated by a high dose of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We observed the preconditioning effects of mild PAM containing approximately 50 μM H2O2. Hydrogen peroxide needs to be the main active species in mild PAM for it to exert preconditioning effects because the addition of catalase to mild PAM eliminated these effects. The nuclear translocation and recruitment of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to antioxidant response elements (ARE) in heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) promoters and the up-regulation of HO-1 were detected in fibroblasts treated with mild PAM. The addition of ZnPP, a HO-1-specific inhibitor, or the knockdown of Nrf2 completely abrogated the preconditioning effects. Our results demonstrate that mild PAM protects fibroblasts from oxidative stress by up-regulating HO-1, and the H2O2-induced activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway needs to be involved in this reaction. PMID:28169359

  19. Relationship of Circulating CXCR4+ EPC with Prognosis of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunpeng; Luo, Lan Lan; Sun, Jian; Gao, Weiwei; Tian, Ye; Park, Eugene; Baker, Andrew; Chen, Jieli; Jiang, Rongcai; Zhang, Jianning

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the changes of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)/CXCR4 expression in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the correlation between EPC level and the prognosis of mild TBI. 72 TBI patients (57 mild TBI, 15 moderate TBI patients) and 25 healthy subjects (control) were included. The number of circulating EPCs, CD34+, and CD133+ cells and the percentage of CXCR4+ cells in each cell population at 1,4,7,14,21 days after TBI were counted by flow cytometer. SDF-1α levels in serum were detected by ELISA assay. The patients were divided into poor and good prognosis groups based on Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale and Activity of Daily Living Scale at 3 months after TBI. Correlation analysis between each detected index and prognosis of mild TBI was performed. Moderate TBI patients have higher levels of SDF-1α and CXCR4 expression than mild TBI patients (P < 0.05). The percentage of CXCR4+ EPCs at day 7 post-TBI was significantly higher in mild TBI patients with poor prognosis than the ones with good prognosis (P < 0.05). HAMA and HAMD scores in mild TBI patients were significantly lower than moderate TBI patients (P < 0.05) in early term. The percentage of CXCR4+ EPCs at day 7 after TBI was significantly correlated with the prognosis outcome at 3 months. The mobilization of circulating EPCs can be induced in mild TBI. The expression of CXCR4+ in EPCs at 7 days after TBI reflects the short-term prognosis of brain injury, and could be a potential biological marker for prognosis prediction of mild TBI. PMID:28203485

  20. Posttraumatic stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder-like symptoms and mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jan E; Jaffee, Michael S; Leskin, Gregory A; Stokes, James W; Leal, Felix O; Fitzpatrick, Pamela J

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we review the literature on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and PTSD-like symptoms that can occur along with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and concussion, with specific reference to concussive injuries in the military. We address four major areas: (1) clinical aspects of TBI and PTSD, including diagnostic criteria, incidence, predictive factors, and course; (2) biological overlap between PTSD and TBI; (3) comorbidity between PTSD and other mental disorders that can occur after mild TBI; and (4) current treatments for PTSD, with specific considerations related to treatment for patients with mild TBI or concussive injuries.

  1. Saccade sequences as markers for cerebral dysfunction following mild closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Heitger, M H; Anderson, T J; Jones, R D

    2002-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury caused by mild closed head injury (CHI) is likely to affect the neural networks concerned with the planning and execution of sequences of memory-guided saccades. Thirty subjects with mild CHI and thirty controls were tested on 2- and 3-step sequences of memory-guided saccades. CHI subjects showed more directional errors, larger position errors, and hypermetria of primary saccades and final eye position. No deficits were seen in temporal accuracy (timing and rhythm). These results suggest that computerized tests of saccade sequences can provide sensitive markers of cerebral dysfunction after mild CHI.

  2. Residual effects of combat-related mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anthony P; Kotwal, Russ S; Elbin, R J; Lutz, Robert H; Forsten, Robert D; Benson, Peter J; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2013-04-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has gained considerable notoriety during the past decade of conflict in Afghanistan and Iraq. However, the relationship between combat-related mTBI and residual mTBI symptoms, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and neurocognitive deficits remains unclear. The purpose of the study was to compare residual mTBI and PTSD symptoms, and neurocognitive deficits among U.S. Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) personnel with diagnosed blunt, blast, and blast-blunt combination mTBIs. This study involved a retrospective medical records review of 27,169 USASOC personnel who completed a military version of the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment Cognitive Test (ImPACT), Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS), and PTSD Checklist (PCL) between November 2009 and December 2011. Of the 22,203 personnel who met criteria for the study, 2,813 (12.7%) had a diagnosis of at least one mTBI. A total of 28% (n=410) of USASOC personnel with a history of diagnosed mTBI reported clinical levels of PTSD symptoms. Personnel with a history of diagnosed blunt (OR=3.58), blast (OR=4.23) or combination (OR=5.73) mTBI were at significantly (p=0.001) greater risk of reporting clinical levels of PTSD symptoms than those with no history of mTBI. A dose-response gradient for exposure to blast/combination mTBI on clinical levels of PTSD symptoms was also significant (p=0.001). Individuals with blast/combination mTBIs scored higher in residual mTBI (p=0.001) and PTSD symptoms (p=0.001), and performed worse on tests of visual memory (p=0.001), and reaction time (p=0.001) than those with blunt or no mTBI history. Individuals with combination mTBIs scored lower in verbal memory (p=0.02) than those with blunt mTBIs. Residual PTSD and mTBI symptoms appear to be more prevalent in personnel with blast mTBI. A dose-response gradient for blast mTBI and symptoms suggests that repeated exposures to these injuries may have lingering effects.

  3. Spatial and dynamical handwriting analysis in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Kawa, Jacek; Bednorz, Adam; Stępień, Paula; Derejczyk, Jarosław; Bugdol, Monika

    2017-03-01

    Background and Objectives Standard clinical procedure of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) assessment employs time-consuming tests of psychological evaluation and requires the involvement of specialists. The employment of quantitative methods proves to be superior to clinical judgment, yet reliable, fast and inexpensive tests are not available. This study was conducted as a first step towards the development of a diagnostic tool based on handwriting. Methods In this paper the handwriting sample of a group of 37 patients with MCI (mean age 76.1±5.8) and 37 healthy controls (mean age 74.8±5.7) was collected using a Livescribe Echo Pen while completing three tasks: (1) regular writing, (2) all-capital-letters writing, and (3) single letter multiply repeated. Parameters differentiating both groups were selected in each task. Results Subjects with confirmed MCI needed more time to complete task one (median 119.5s, IQR - interquartile range - 38.1 vs. 95.1s, IQR 29.2 in control and MCI group, p-value <0.05) and two (median 84.2s, IQR 49.2 and 53.7s, IQR 30.5 in control and MCI group) as their writing was significantly slower. These results were associated with a longer time to complete a single stroke of written text. The written text was also noticeably larger in the MCI group in all three tasks (e.g. median height of the text block in task 2 being 22.3mm, IQR 12.9 in MCI and 20.2mm, IQR 8.7 in control group). Moreover, the MCI group showed more variation in the dynamics of writing: longer pause between strokes in task 1 and 2. The all-capital-letters task produced most of the discriminating features. Conclusion Proposed handwriting features are significant in distinguishing MCI patients. Inclusion of quantitative handwriting analysis in psychological assessment may be a step forward towards a fast MCI diagnosis.

  4. Bismuth-based oxide semiconductors: Mild synthesis and practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmaji, Hari Krishna

    In this dissertation study, bismuth based oxide semiconductors were prepared using 'mild' synthesis techniques---electrodeposition and solution combustion synthesis. Potential environmental remediation and solar energy applications of the prepared oxides were evaluated. Bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) was prepared by electrodeposition and solution combustion synthesis. A two step electrosynthesis strategy was developed and demonstrated for the first time. In the first step, a Bi film was first electrodeposited on a Pt substrate from an acidic BiCl3 medium. Then, this film was anodically stripped in a medium containing hydrolyzed vanadium precursor, to generate Bi3+, and subsequent BiVO4 formation by in situ precipitation. The photoelectrochemical data were consistent with the in situ formation of n-type semiconductor films. In the solution combustion synthesis procedure, BiVO4 powders were prepared using bismuth nitrate pentahydrate as the bismuth precursor and either vanadium chloride or vanadium oxysulfate as the vanadium precursor. Urea, glycine, or citric acid was used as the fuel. The effect of the vanadium precursor on the photocatalytic activity of combustion synthesized BiVO 4 was evaluated in this study. Methyl orange was used as a probe to test the photocatalytic attributes of the combustion synthesized (CS) samples, and benchmarked against a commercial bismuth vanadate sample. The CS samples showed superior activity to the commercial benchmark sample, and samples derived from vanadium chloride were superior to vanadium oxysulfate counterparts. The photoelectrochemical properties of the various CS samples were also studied and these samples were shown to be useful both for environmental photocatalytic remediation and water photooxidation applications. Silver bismuth tungstate (AgBiW2O8) nanoparticles were prepared for the first time by solution combustion synthesis by using silver nitrate, bismuth nitrate, sodium tungstate as precursors for Ag, Bi, and W

  5. How Achievement Error Patterns of Students with Mild Intellectual Disability Differ from Low IQ and Low Achievement Students without Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Root, Melissa M.; Marchis, Lavinia; White, Erica; Courville, Troy; Choi, Dowon; Bray, Melissa A.; Pan, Xingyu; Wayte, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the differences in error factor scores on the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement-Third Edition between individuals with mild intellectual disabilities (Mild IDs), those with low achievement scores but average intelligence, and those with low intelligence but without a Mild ID diagnosis. The two control groups were…

  6. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, C.Y.; Merriam, N.W.; Jha, M.C.; Breault, R.W.

    1988-06-01

    Research on mild gasification is discussed. The report is divided into three sections: literature survey of mild gasification processes; literature survey of char, condensibles, and gas upgrading and utilization methods; and industrial market assessment of products of mild gasification. Recommendations are included in each section. (CBS) 248 refs., 58 figs., 62 tabs.

  7. Time Orientation in the Positive and Negative Free Phantasies of Mildly Abnormal Versus Normal High School Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rychlak, Joseph F.

    1973-01-01

    This study contrasts a group of mildly'' abnormal high school males with matched normals in a two-session free phantasy procedure. Mildly abnormal boys phantasized more negative contents than normal boys. Normal boys projected more positive phantasies into the future than mildly abnormal boys. A logical learning theory'' embracing the…

  8. 40 CFR 180.1276 - Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus (TMGMV); temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1276 Tobacco mild green mosaic... requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus in or on...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1276 - Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus (TMGMV); temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1276 Tobacco mild green mosaic... requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus in or on...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1276 - Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus (TMGMV); temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1276 Tobacco mild green mosaic... requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus in or on...

  11. Brief Report: Adults with Mild Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)--Scores on the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) and Comorbid Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketelaars, Cees; Horwitz, Ernst; Sytema, Sjoerd; Bos, Johan; Wiersma, Durk; Minderaa, Ruud; Hartman, Catharina A.

    2008-01-01

    While knowledge about symptom presentation of adults with mild ASD, including comorbid psychopathology, is limited, referral of adults with suspected mild PDD is increasing. We report on pilot research investigating whether patients diagnosed with mild ASD (n = 15) and patients who were not diagnosed with ASD (n = 21) differed in terms of (a) AQ…

  12. 40 CFR 180.1276 - Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus (TMGMV); temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1276 Tobacco mild green mosaic... requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus in or on...

  13. Neurocognitive outcomes of children secondary to mild iodine deficiency in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Iodine deficiency is the most important preventable cause of brain damage worldwide. During pregnancy, severe iodine deficiency causes endemic cretinism, whereas mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency impairs neurocognitive function of the offspring. Numerous reports demonstrate the impact of iodine supplementation on prevention of cretinism, and recent studies evaluate the effects of iodine prophylaxis on neurocognitive development in children of women with mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency. Iodine prophylaxis is generally well tolerated without side effects for the pregnant women and the offspring. In France, the iodine status was recently considered as satisfactory in children and adult population, but regional studies conducted during the last two decades have shown that healthy women are mild-to-moderately iodine deficient during pregnancy. According to recent World Heath Organization guidelines, systematic iodine prophylaxis is recommended in women planning a pregnancy, during gestation and lactation in order to prevent maternal, neonatal and infantile consequences of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency.

  14. Tannin bark Melalauca cajuputi powell (gelam) as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Nur Atiqah Abu; Zakaria, Sarani; Hua, Chia Chin; Othman, Norinsan Kamil

    2014-09-01

    Tannin was extracted from gelam bark and used to produce corrosion inhibitor for mild steel. Tannin was extracted from gelam bark using 70% aqueous acetone for 6 hour. Tannin powder was characterization using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to analyse chemical component in tannin and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) for tannin physical structure. The tannin effect on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel has been investigated in 1Mol HCl solution for 6 hour followed ASTM. The weight loss method were applied to study the mild steel corrosion behavior in the present and absend of different concentration of tannin (250, 300, 350)ppm. Tannin act good inhibitor as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in acid medium. Surface morphology of carbon steel with and without inhibitor was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  15. A mild and selective method for cleavage of O-acetyl groups with dibutyltin oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Min; Yan, Xuebin; Li, Wen; Huang, Conghai

    2002-10-11

    A mild and efficient neutral method for the cleavage of O-acetyl groups with dibutyltin oxide has been developed. This method is especially useful in the synthesis of glycosides containing base- or acid-sensitive multifunctional groups.

  16. A Brief Group Counseling Model To Increase Resiliency of Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arman, John F.

    2002-01-01

    School counselors often provide counseling services for special education students. The author presents a model for a brief counseling group that focuses on the development of resiliency in middle school students with mild disabilities. (Contains 25 references.) (Author)

  17. Tannin bark Melalauca cajuputi powell (gelam) as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Talib, Nur Atiqah Abu; Zakaria, Sarani; Hua, Chia Chin; Othman, Norinsan Kamil

    2014-09-03

    Tannin was extracted from gelam bark and used to produce corrosion inhibitor for mild steel. Tannin was extracted from gelam bark using 70% aqueous acetone for 6 hour. Tannin powder was characterization using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to analyse chemical component in tannin and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) for tannin physical structure. The tannin effect on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel has been investigated in 1Mol HCl solution for 6 hour followed ASTM. The weight loss method were applied to study the mild steel corrosion behavior in the present and absend of different concentration of tannin (250, 300, 350)ppm. Tannin act good inhibitor as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in acid medium. Surface morphology of carbon steel with and without inhibitor was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Proactive Interference and Its Release in Short-Term Memory of Mildly Retarded Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cody, William J.; Borkowski, John G.

    1977-01-01

    Release from proactive interference in mildly retarded adolescents due to taxonomic shifts and rest periods prior to the final, critical-word triad was investigated with 40 educable mentally handicapped persons 18 years old. (Author/MH)

  19. Exchange Reactions of Organotin and Organosilicon Compounds with Mild Fluorinating Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    AD-A251 352 CHEMICfIL RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT i ENGINEERING CENTER CRDEC- EXCHANGE REACTIONS OF ORGANOTIN AND ORGANOSILICON COMPOUNDS WITH MILD...of Organotin and PR- 1C162622A554 Organosilicon Compounds with Mild Fluorinating Agents 6.AUTHOR(S) Roseman, David I., and Muller, August J. 7...methylphosphonic difluoride, boron trifluoride etherate, and perfluoroisobutene all react with both organosilicon and organotin . alkoxides to give

  20. Impact of mild exacerbation on COPD symptoms in a Japanese cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Minako; Chubachi, Shotaro; Sasaki, Mamoru; Haraguchi, Mizuha; Kameyama, Naofumi; Tsutsumi, Akihiro; Takahashi, Saeko; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Asano, Koichiro; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with COPD might not report mild exacerbation. The frequency, risk factors, and impact of mild exacerbation on COPD status are unknown. Objectives The present study was performed to compare features between mild exacerbation and moderate or severe exacerbation in Japanese patients with COPD. Patients and methods An observational COPD cohort was designed at Keio University and affiliated hospitals to prospectively investigate the management of COPD comorbidities. This study analyzes data only from patients with COPD who had completed annual examinations and questionnaires over a period of 2 years (n=311). Results Among 59 patients with mild exacerbations during the first year, 32.2% also experienced only mild exacerbations in the second year. Among 60 patients with moderate or severe exacerbations during the first year, 40% also had the same severity of exacerbation during the second year. Findings of the COPD assessment test and the symptom component of the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire at steady state were worse in patients with mild exacerbations than in those who were exacerbation free during the 2-year study period, although the severity of the ratio of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second did not differ between them. Severe airflow limitation (the ratio of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second <50%) and experience of mild exacerbations independently advanced the likelihood of an elevated COPD assessment test score to ≥2 per year. Conclusion The severity of COPD exacerbation seemed to be temporally stable over 2 years, and even mild exacerbations adversely impacted the health-related quality of life of patients with COPD. PMID:27354785

  1. Nasal hemophilic pseudotumor in a patient with mild hemophilia A and allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshiyasu; Monji, Mikio; Kai, Keita; Matsuo, Muneaki

    2017-02-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor is a rare complication, even in patients with severe hemophilia. Herein we report on a case of hemophilic pseudotumor in a patient with mild hemophilia A and allergic rhinitis, initially suspected to be a nasal tumor. The pseudotumor was cured by supplementation with recombinant factor VIII concentrates, and medication for allergic rhinitis. Pseudotumor should always be considered in hemophiliac patients, even in those with only mild deficiency of coagulation factors.

  2. Very mild Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by increased sensitivity to mnemonic interference

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Jim M.; Balota, David A.; Warren, David E.; Cohen, Neal J.

    2014-01-01

    Early pathology and tissue loss in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) occurs in the hippocampus, a brain region that has recently been implicated in relational processing irrespective of delay. Thus, tasks that involve relational processing will especially tax the hippocampal memory system, and should be sensitive to even mild dysfunction typical of early AD. Here we used a short-lag, short-delay memory task previously shown to be sensitive to hippocampal integrity in an effort to discriminate cognitive changes due to healthy aging from those associated with very mild AD. Young adults, healthy older adults, and individuals with very mild AD (N = 30 for each group) participated in our investigation, which entailed attempting to find an exact match to a previously presented target among a series of stimuli that varied in perceptual similarity to the target stimulus. Older adults with very mild AD were less accurate than healthy older adults, who, in turn, were impaired relative to young adults. Older adults with very mild AD were also particularly susceptible to interference from intervening lure stimuli. A measure based on this finding was able to explain additional variance in differentiating those in the very mild stage of AD from healthy older adults after accounting for episodic memory and global cognition composite scores in logistic regression models. Our findings suggest that cognitive changes in early stage AD reflect aging along with an additional factor potentially centered on sensitivity to interference, thereby supporting multifactorial models of aging. PMID:24747209

  3. Very mild Alzheimer׳s disease is characterized by increased sensitivity to mnemonic interference.

    PubMed

    Monti, Jim M; Balota, David A; Warren, David E; Cohen, Neal J

    2014-07-01

    Early pathology and tissue loss in Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) occurs in the hippocampus, a brain region that has recently been implicated in relational processing irrespective of delay. Thus, tasks that involve relational processing will especially tax the hippocampal memory system, and should be sensitive to even mild dysfunction typical of early AD. Here we used a short-lag, short-delay memory task previously shown to be sensitive to hippocampal integrity in an effort to discriminate cognitive changes due to healthy aging from those associated with very mild AD. Young adults, healthy older adults, and individuals with very mild AD (N=30 for each group) participated in our investigation, which entailed attempting to find an exact match to a previously presented target among a series of stimuli that varied in perceptual similarity to the target stimulus. Older adults with very mild AD were less accurate than healthy older adults, who, in turn, were impaired relative to young adults. Older adults with very mild AD were also particularly susceptible to interference from intervening lure stimuli. A measure based on this finding was able to explain additional variance in differentiating those in the very mild stage of AD from healthy older adults after accounting for episodic memory and global cognition composite scores in logistic regression models. Our findings suggest that cognitive changes in early stage AD reflect aging along with an additional factor potentially centered on sensitivity to interference, thereby supporting multifactorial models of aging.

  4. No Relationship between Neurocognitive Functioning and Mild Sleep Disordered Breathing in a Community Sample of Children

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Susan L.; Mayes, Susan D.; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Tsaoussoglou, Marina; Shifflett, Laura J.; Bixler, Edward O.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: Our objective was to examine the relationship between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and neurocognitive functioning in a large general-population sample of children who underwent a full-night polysomnogram and comprehensive neuropsychological testing. Methods: A population-based study of 571 school-aged children (6-12 years) underwent a 9-hour polysomnogram and a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Results: No significant relationship was found between children with a mild apnea-hypopnea index (1 ≤ apnea-hypopnea index < 5) and any measure of neuropsychological functioning (intelligence, verbal and nonverbal reasoning ability, attention, executive functioning, memory, processing speed, and visual-motor skill). Partial correlations between apnea-hypopnea index and neuropsychological test scores and polynominal trend analysis were all nonsignificant. Conclusions: Children with mild SDB showed no significant neuropsychological impairment compared to children without SDB. This study suggests that children with mild SDB are not at risk for neuropsychological impairment and that the coexistence of mild SDB with any neuropsychological impairment should be considered comorbid and not causal. However, the association between neurobehavioral issues and children with mild SDB remains uncertain. Citation: Calhoun SL; Mayes SD; Vgontzas AN; Tsaoussoglou M; Shifflett LJ; Bixler EO. No relationship between neurocognitive functioning and mild sleep disordered breathing in a community sample of children. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(3):228-234. PMID:19960643

  5. Risk of inhibitor development in mild haemophilia A increases with age.

    PubMed

    Mauser-Bunschoten, E P; Den Uijl, I E M; Schutgens, R E G; Roosendaal, G; Fischer, K

    2012-03-01

    Mild haemophilia A is a rare disease with a relatively mild phenotype. Treatment with factor VIII (FVIII) is indicated after trauma or for surgery only. FVIII infusion may result in the development of inhibiting antibodies against FVIII. This study describes the relation between age and other risk factors for inhibitor development in mild haemophilia. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among all patients with mild haemophilia (FVIII 0.05-0.40 IU mL(-1)) registered at the van Creveldkliniek, University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands. Data on peak treatment with FVIII, gene mutation and history of inhibitor development were obtained from patient files from the period between 1st January 1970 and 31st December 2009. A total of 231 out of 297 (78%) patients had at least one exposure to FVIII, of whom 14 (6.1%) developed an inhibitor to FVIII at a median age of 66 years after a median of 50 exposure days (ED). Age at first exposure, age at peak treatment, number of peak treatments and Arg593Cys mutation were significantly associated with the development of an inhibitor, while continuous infusion with FVIII was not. Although the incidence of inhibitors in mild haemophilia is low, it increases with age and peak treatments. With increasing age patients with mild haemophilia will suffer from co-morbidity more frequently, requiring surgical interventions and exposing them to an increased risk of inhibitor development. Especially patients with a change of arginine in cysteine at 593 are at risk for inhibitor development.

  6. Adolescents with Mild Stunting Show Alterations in Glucose and Insulin Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    da Luz Santos, Carla Danusa; Clemente, Ana Paula Grotti; Martins, Vinicius José Baccin; Albuquerque, Maria Paula; Sawaya, Ana Lydia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate glucose and insulin profiles in adolescents with mild stunting and overweight in order to assess the possibility of increased predisposition to diabetes. Subjects and Methods. The study population consisted of 66 pubertal adolescents classified as mildly stunted (height-for-age z scores ≥−2 and <−1) or of normal stature, as well as overweight (body mass index ≥85th percentile) or normal weight. Beta-cell function and insulin resistance were evaluated according to the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Results. In the group with mild stunting, glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR levels were significantly higher in overweight adolescents compared with those of normal weight, whereas HOMA-B levels were significantly lower. Adolescents with mild stunting showed significantly higher accumulations of body and abdominal fat than their normal stature counterparts. Conclusions. The presence of mild stunting was associated with higher levels of glucose and insulin, diminished function of beta cells, and increased insulin resistance. These results reinforce the need for intervention in adolescents with mild stunting. PMID:21318152

  7. The clock drawing test as a screening tool in mild cognitive impairment and very mild dementia: a new brief method of scoring and normative data in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Monica; Pigliautile, Martina; D'Ambrosio, Valeria; Ercolani, Sara; Bianchini, Cinzia; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Vanacore, Nicola; Mecocci, Patrizia

    2016-06-01

    many studies sustained that the clock drawing test (CDT) was not able to accurately detect people with CDR = 0.5. Other researchers have promoted the use of scoring approaches with multiple scales that rate quantitative and qualitative features of the production. Nevertheless, these scoring systems are complex and time-consuming. We propose a new brief CDT' scoring system in order to find a good measure for mild cognitive decline which is at the same time easy to administer. we enrolled 719 subjects: n. 181 with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD); n. 200 with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and n. 338 healthy elderly subjects (C). our CDT-three-cluster scoring system demonstrated a good sensitivity and an excellent specificity to discriminate MCI subjects from normal elderly (76 and 84 %, respectively) and an excellent sensitivity and specificity to discriminate patients affected by mild Alzheimer disease (CDR: 1) from normal elderly (91 and 90 %, respectively). We found that CDT' score = 1.30 discriminate people with MCI, whereas a score = 4.38 discriminate AD patients. The three-cluster-scoring-system demonstrated a good diagnostic accuracy, taking into account those error-items more predictive of cognitive decline: omission of numbers or hands, writing numbers or hands in a wrong position and writing numbers or hands in a different code. Our CDT' scoring system is very short and easy method which can be used also by non-specialist.

  8. A Standardized Protocol for the Initial Evaluation and Documentation of Mild Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kenneth L.; Yunker, Craig A.; Austin, Marchell C.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To present a protocol for the initial assessment and documentation of mild brain injury, a protocol that is used within the Department of Physical Education at the United States Military Academy. Background: Recently, much attention has been given to the assessment and management of mild brain injury by the sports medicine community. Although the classification of and management strategies for mild brain injury have been well disputed, most experts agree on the essentials of the sideline or initial evaluation. According to leading experts, if an athlete has experienced an episode of mild brain injury, the initial signs and symptoms, as well as the course of those signs and symptoms, should be documented. Description: Although many athletic training texts formerly discussed techniques for evaluating an episode of mild brain injury, few present an objective protocol to follow. Our protocol includes 3 components. The first component is the initial evaluation, which incorporates serial observations during the first 20 minutes after injury, with neurologic checks every 5 minutes. The second component includes a take-home sheet for athletes not referred to a physician for further evaluation. The third part of the protocol is a 24-hour postinjury follow-up examination for any signs or symptoms of postconcussion syndrome. Finally, we present the indications for referral to a physician for further evaluation. Clinical Advantages/Recommendations: Using a standard protocol to guide evaluation and to document the initial course of signs and symptoms after mild brain injury allows the sports medicine staff to make better management decisions. In addition, patient instructions and the course of follow-up evaluations can be improved if a standard protocol is employed. Our protocol has been developed to meet the needs both of athletes who are exposed to mild brain injury on a daily basis and of the certified athletic trainers who initially evaluate them; the protocol

  9. Comparison of SNOMED CT versus Medcin Terminology Concept Coverage for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Montella, Diane; Brown, Steven H.; Elkin, Peter L.; Jackson, James C.; Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind; Welsh, Gail; Cotton, Bryan; Guillamondegui, Oscar D.; Lew, Henry; Taber, Katherine H.; Tupler, Larry A.; Vanderploeg, Rodney; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-01-01

    Background: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a “signature” injury of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Structured electronic data regarding TBI findings is important for research, population health and other secondary uses but requires appropriate underlying standard terminologies to ensure interoperability and reuse. Currently the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) uses the terminology SNOMED CT and the Department of Defense (DOD) uses Medcin. Methods: We developed a comprehensive case definition of mild TBI composed of 68 clinical terms. Using automated and manual techniques, we evaluated how well the mild TBI case definition terms could be represented by SNOMED CT and Medcin, and compared the results. We performed additional analysis stratified by whether the concepts were rated by a TBI expert panel as having High, Medium, or Low importance to the definition of mild TBI. Results: SNOMED CT sensitivity (recall) was 90% overall for coverage of mild TBI concepts, and Medcin sensitivity was 49%, p < 0.001 (using McNemar’s chi square). Positive predictive value (precision) for each was 100%. SNOMED CT outperformed Medcin for concept coverage independent of import rating by our TBI experts. Discussion: SNOMED CT was significantly better able to represent mild TBI concepts than Medcin. This finding may inform data gathering, management and sharing, and data exchange strategies between the VA and DOD for active duty soldiers and veterans with mild TBI. Since mild TBI is an important condition in the civilian population as well, the current study results may be useful also for the general medical setting. PMID:22195156

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Mild and Severe Pneumonia: Insights from RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sai; Feng, Cong; Chen, Li; Huang, Zhi; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Bei; Wang, Li-Li; Chen, Wei; Lv, Fa-Qin; Li, Tan-Shi

    2017-04-06

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying mild and severe pneumonia by use of mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq). MATERIAL AND METHODS RNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of patients with mild pneumonia, severe pneumonia, and healthy controls. Sequencing was performed on the HiSeq4000 platform. After filtering, clean reads were mapped to the human reference genome hg19. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between the control group and the mild or severe group. A transcription factor-gene network was constructed for each group. Biological process (BP) terms enriched by DEGs in the network were analyzed and these genes were also mapped to the Connectivity map to search for small-molecule drugs. RESULTS A total of 199 and 560 DEGs were identified from the mild group and severe group, respectively. A transcription factor-gene network consisting of 215 nodes and another network consisting of 451 nodes were constructed in the mild group and severe group, respectively, and 54 DEGs (e.g., S100A9 and S100A12) were found to be common, with consistent differential expression changes in the 2 groups. Genes in the transcription factor-gene network for the mild group were mainly enriched in 13 BP terms, especially defense and inflammatory response (e.g., S100A8) and spermatogenesis, while the top BP terms enriched by genes in the severe group include response to oxidative stress (CCL5), wound healing, and regulation of cell differentiation (CCL5), and of the cellular protein metabolic process. CONCLUSIONS S100A9 and S100A12 may have a role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia: S100A9 and CXCL1 may contribute solely in mild pneumonia, and CCL5 and CXCL11 may contribute in severe pneumonia.

  11. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption among Special School Students with Mild Intellectual Disability in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Mok, W. K.; Ling, T. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to predict the fruit and vegetable consumption intention of students with mild intellectual disability in Hong Kong by the application of Ajzen’s Theory of Planned Behaviour. Methods: 50 students with mild intellectual disability (30 male and 20 female), ranging in age from 15 to 38 years, were participated in this study. By means of face-to-face interviews, demographic data, Food Preference and variables of Theory of Planned Behaviour, such as Attitude, Subjective Norm and Perceived Behavioural Control were measured. Results: 20%, 28% and 10% students with mild intellectual disability were rated to be overweight, obese and severely obese respectively. The rest of 10% were classified to be underweight. Regarding the daily intake of fruit and vegetable, 96% students with mild intellectual disability failed to consume sufficient amount. The variables of Theory of Planned Behaviour explained 47.7% of fruit and vegetable consumption intention with significant factors of Attitude, Subjective Norm and Perceived Behavioural Control. Food Preference was found to be a useful construct and further improve the prediction by about 7% after incorporating into the model. Conclusions: Results of this study indicated that Theory of Planned Behaviour is a useful model to predict dietary intention of students with mild intellectual disability in Hong Kong. Food Preference was a significant predictor to model the intention of fruit and vegetable consumption among students other than Attitude, Subjective Norm and Perceived Behavioural Control. PMID:27045396

  12. Mild coarctation of the aorta: to touch or not to touch the patient?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Randles, Amanda; Rikhtegar Nezami, Farhad; Partida, Ramon; Nakamura, Kenta; Staziaki, Pedro V.; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Bhatt, Ami; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2015-11-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (COA) is an aortic obstruction. A peak-to-peak trans-coarctation pressure gradient (PKdP) of greater than 20 mmHg warns severe COA and the need for interventional/surgical repair. The optimal method and timing of intervention remain uncertain especially for mild COA (PKdP <20 mmHg); even it is unclear if mild COA should be treated at all. Although it was recently suggested that treatment strategies for mild COA may need to be redefined as transcatheter interventions emerge, benefits of such interventions are unclear. We investigated the effects of transcatheter interventions on the aorta and left ventricle (LV) hemodynamics in 11 patients with mild COA using a developed computational fluid dynamics and lumped parameter modeling framework along with particle image velocimetry and clinical measurements. Such interventions can improve aortic hemodynamics to some extent (e.g., time-averaged wall shear stress and kinetic energy were reduced by about 20%). However there is no concomitant effect on the LV hemodynamics (e.g., stroke work and LV pressure were reduced by only less than 4%). Our computational approach can effectively predict clinical conditions. Herein one must question intervention for mild COA, as it has limited utility in reducing myocardial strain.

  13. Time Course of Mild Arm Lymphedema After Breast Conservation Treatment for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Cheville, Andrea; Solin, Lawrence J.; Dutta, Pinaki; Both, Stefan; Harris, Eleanor

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Arm lymphedema is a potential consequence of the treatment for breast carcinoma. The objective of this retrospective study was to characterize the progression of mild arm lymphedema after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The study cohort was drawn from 1,713 consecutive Stage I or II breast cancer patients who underwent breast conservation therapy, including axillary staging followed by radiation. Arm lymphedema was documented in 266 (16%) of 1,713 patients. One hundred nine patients, 6% of the overall group and 40% of the patients with arm lymphedema, presented with mild arm lymphedema, defined as a difference of 2 cm or less between the measured circumferences of the affected and unaffected arms. Results: Among the 109 patients with mild arm lymphedema at the time of arm lymphedema diagnosis, the rate of freedom from progression to more severe lymphedema was 79% at 1 year, 66% at 3 years, and 52% at 5 years. The patients who were morbidly obese, had positive axillary lymph nodes, or received supraclavicular irradiation at the time of breast cancer treatment were at higher risk of progression from mild arm lymphedema to more severe edema. Conclusions: Mild arm lymphedema, generally considered to be a minor complication after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer, was associated with a risk of progression to a more severe grade of arm lymphedema in a substantial fraction of patients.

  14. Oxidative Stress in Maternal Blood and Placenta From Mild Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Ana Paula Machado; Sinzato, Yuri Karen; Campos, Kleber Eduardo; Faria, Priscila Afonso; Dallaqua, Bruna; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Rodrigues, Tiago

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was at evaluating the effects of oxidative stress in blood and placenta of mild diabetic Wistar rats. At birth, Wistar rats received citrate buffer (nondiabetic group, n = 15) and another group received streptozotocin (100 mg/kg, subcutaneous) to induce mild diabetes (diabetic, n = 15). The glycemia of these pregnant adult female rats were evaluated at days 0, 7, 14, and 21 of pregnancy, and at term pregnancy, the blood and placental samples were collected for oxidative stress measurements. The mild diabetes caused glycemia superior to 120 mg/dL during pregnancy, increased superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase activities, and malondialdehyde levels in the blood, and catalase activity in the placenta. Thus, mild diabetes increased activities of antioxidant substances aiming at defending against the exacerbated oxidative stress but were not enough. The placenta also answered to diabetic milieu and increased antioxidant defense, showing that even a mild hyperglycemia was enough to cause placental and maternal blood changes. PMID:24458484

  15. Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency impairs hippocampal myelinated growth in lactational rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Min, Hui; Song, Binbin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xi, Qi; Chen, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency causes neurological deficits and impairments of brain function in offspring. Hypothyroxinemia is prevalent in developing and developed countries alike. However, the mechanism underlying these deficits remains less well known. Given that the myelin plays an important role in learning and memory function, we hypothesize that hippocampal myelinated growth may be impaired in rat offspring exposed to hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency. To test this hypothesis, the female Wistar rats were used and four experimental groups were prepared: (1) control; (2) maternal mild iodine deficiency diet inducing hypothyroxinemia; (3) hypothyroidism induced by maternal severe iodine deficiency diet; (4) hypothyroidism induced by maternal methimazole water. The rats were fed the diet from 3 months before pregnancy to the end of lactation. Our results showed that the physiological changes occuring in the hippocampal myelin were altered in the mild iodine deficiency group as indicated by the results of immunofluorescence of myelin basic proteins on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Moreover, hypothyroxinemia reduced the expressions of oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 and myelin-related proteins in the treatments on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Our data suggested that hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency may impair myelinated growth of the offspring.

  16. Beneficial effects of mild stress (hormetic effects): dietary restriction and health.

    PubMed

    Kouda, Katsuyasu; Iki, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    Hormesis is defined as a dose-response phenomenon characterized by low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition, and has been recognized as representing an overcompensation for mild environmental stress. The beneficial effects of mild stress on aging and longevity have been studied for many years. In experimental animals, mild dietary stress (dietary restriction, DR) without malnutrition delays most age-related physiological changes, and extends maximum and average lifespan. Animal studies have also demonstrated that DR can prevent or lessen the severity of cancer, stroke, coronary heart disease, autoimmune disease, allergy, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. The effects of DR are considered to result from hormetic mechanisms. These effects were reported by means of various DR regimens, such as caloric restriction, total-nutrient restriction, alternate-day fasting, and short-term fasting. Mild dietary stress, including restriction of amount or frequency of intake, is the essence of DR. For more than 99% of their history, humans lived as hunter-gatherers and adapted to restrictions in their food supply. On the other hand, an oversufficiency of food for many today has resulted in the current global epidemic of obesity and obesity-related diseases. DR may be used, therefore, as a novel approach for therapeutic intervention in several diseases, when detailed information about effects of mild dietary stress on human health is obtained from clinical trials.

  17. Multiple resting state network functional connectivity abnormalities in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael C; Lovejoy, David; Kim, Jinsuh; Oakes, Howard; Kureshi, Inam; Witt, Suzanne T

    2012-06-01

    Several reports show that traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in abnormalities in the coordinated activation among brain regions. Because most previous studies examined moderate/severe TBI, the extensiveness of functional connectivity abnormalities and their relationship to postconcussive complaints or white matter microstructural damage are unclear in mild TBI. This study characterized widespread injury effects on multiple integrated neural networks typically observed during a task-unconstrained "resting state" in mild TBI patients. Whole brain functional connectivity for twelve separate networks was identified using independent component analysis (ICA) of fMRI data collected from thirty mild TBI patients mostly free of macroscopic intracerebral injury and thirty demographically-matched healthy control participants. Voxelwise group comparisons found abnormal mild TBI functional connectivity in every brain network identified by ICA, including visual processing, motor, limbic, and numerous circuits believed to underlie executive cognition. Abnormalities not only included functional connectivity deficits, but also enhancements possibly reflecting compensatory neural processes. Postconcussive symptom severity was linked to abnormal regional connectivity within nearly every brain network identified, particularly anterior cingulate. A recently developed multivariate technique that identifies links between whole brain profiles of functional and anatomical connectivity identified several novel mild TBI abnormalities, and represents a potentially important new tool in the study of the complex neurobiological sequelae of TBI.

  18. Improving the accuracy and precision of cognitive testing in mild dementia.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Hans; Appels, Bregje; van der Flier, Wiesje M; van Campen, Jos; Klein, Martin; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Schmand, Ben; van Gool, Willem A; Scheltens, Philip; Lindeboom, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The CAMCOG, ADAS-cog, and MMSE, designed to grade global cognitive ability in dementia have inadequate precision and accuracy in distinguishing mild dementia from normal ageing. Adding neuropsychological tests to their scale might improve precision and accuracy in mild dementia. We, therefore, pooled neuropsychological test-batteries from two memory clinics (ns = 135 and 186) with CAMCOG data from a population study and 2 memory clinics (n = 829) and ADAS-cog data from 3 randomized controlled trials (n = 713) to estimate a common dimension of global cognitive ability using Rasch analysis. Item difficulties and individuals' global cognitive ability levels were estimated. Difficulties of 57 items (of 64) could be validly estimated. Neuropsychological tests were more difficult than the CAMCOG, ADAS-cog, and MMSE items. Most neuropsychological tests had difficulties in the ability range of normal ageing to mild dementia. Higher than average ability levels were more precisely measured when neuropsychological tests were added to the MMSE than when these were measured with the MMSE alone. Diagnostic accuracy in mild dementia was consistently better after adding neuropsychological tests to the MMSE. We conclude that extending dementia specific instruments with neuropsychological tests improves measurement precision and accuracy of cognitive impairment in mild dementia.

  19. Should men with mild erectile dysfunction be closely evaluated for cardiovascular diseases in the Korean population?

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Yong; Son, Hwancheol; Kim, Soo Woong; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2014-06-01

    This study compared demographic characteristics and prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities between men with mild erectile dysfunction (ED) and men with more severe ED. Men with 6-month history of ED and in monogamous heterosexual relationships were included. Non-responders to type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibitors or patients receiving regular treatment with nitrate, anticoagulants, androgens, and anti-androgens were excluded. ED was defined according to the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire score: no ED (≥26), mild ED (22-25), and others (<22). The review identified 70 patients with mild ED (6.0%, group A) and 1098 patients with more severe ED (94.0%, group B) were included. Of the patients in group B, 365 had mild-to-moderate ED (30.5%), 505 had moderate ED (43.2%), and 233 had severe ED (20.0%). Mean ages and body mass indices showed no differences between groups A and B. Group A had shorter mean duration of ED (p = 0.025). Although patients in group A had milder ED with shorter duration than group B patients, cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension and lipid disorder were still common for group A. The most common comorbidity was diabetes, which was twice as likely for patients in group B. Except for diabetes the prevalence of all diseases was comparable between the two groups. In conclusion, patients with mild ED should be closely evaluated for cardiovascular comorbidities.

  20. Oxygen cost of treadmill and over-ground walking in mildly disabled persons with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yoojin; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Weikert, Madeline; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Fernhall, Bo; Goldman, Myla

    2011-01-01

    Walking impairment is a ubiquitous feature of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the O2 cost of walking might quantify this dysfunction in mild MS. This paper examined the difference in O2 cost of walking between persons with MS who have mild disability and healthy controls and the correlation between the O2 cost of walking and disability. Study 1 included 18 persons with mild MS and 18 controls and indicated that the O2 cost of walking was significantly higher in MS than controls and that disability was significantly associated with the O2 cost of slow, moderate, and fast treadmill walking. Study 2 included 24 persons with mild MS and indicated that disability was significantly correlated with O2 cost of comfortable, fast, and slow over-ground walking. We provide evidence that the O2 cost of walking is an indicator of walking dysfunction in mildly disabled persons with MS and should be considered in clinical research and practice. PMID:20798968

  1. Microbiologically mediated reduction in the pitting of mild steel overlaid with plywood

    SciTech Connect

    Soracco, R J; Berger, L R; Berger, J A; Mayack, L A; Pope, D H; Wilde, E W

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the role of microorganisms in the pitting of mild steel flooring, which had been overlaid with plywood. The experimental setups consisted of 4.8 mm (3/16 in.) mild steel plates covered with 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) thick pieces of plywood which were exposed to several different aqueous media supplemented with various combinations of a soil suspension and selected inorganic and organic compounds. Half of the replicate metal-wood-water setups were sterilized and aseptically maintained during incubation after which they were checked for the presence of viable microorganisms and pitting of the mild steel. Results of the first set of experiments showed that pitting of the mild steel specimens in many of these setups occurred after a reasonably short incubation period (3 to 6 months). However, the method used to exclude microorganisms by sterilizing the components separately was unsuccessful. In a second set of experiments, setups were sterilized by exposure to gamma irradiation after they had been assembled. The sterilized setups remained sterile after incubation while those which were not originally sterile still contained viable microorganisms. Pitting of the mild steel specimens was more severe when they were exposed to sterile conditions than when viable microorganisms were present. These experiments showed that while microorganisms are known to enhance corrosion processes in some circumstances, their presence can reduce corrosion in others.

  2. Performance of Terminalia catappa on mild steel corrosion in HCl medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Loto, Cleophas Akintoye; Popoola, Abimbola Patricia Idowu; Obi, Chukwunonso Ezekiel; Sonoiki, Oluwatobi Oluwasegun Oluwagbenga; Oni, Adeoluwa Barnabas; Alabi, Ayomide Samuel; Olarewaju, Abisola Ebunoluwa

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates Terminalia catappa leaf-extract performance on mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl). Electrochemical linear-sweep-voltametry (LSV) and gravimetric techniques were employed for assessing the mild steel corrosion in the HCl test-environment of immersion having different concentrations of the leaf-extract. Results showed that all the concentrations of the Terminalia catappa leaf-extract employed inhibited mild steel corrosion from the electrochemical (potentiodynamic) and the gravimetric considerations. Also, corrosion rate from LSV exhibited excellent correlation (R = 95.77%, Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) = 91.72% and p-value = 0.02383) with linear function of the corrosion rate from gravimetric method, for the leaf-extract concentrations employed. From the experimental model, 6 g/L Terminalia catappa exhibited optimal inhibition efficiency, η = 78.07%, while 8 g/L Terminalia catappa was predicted as optimally effective, η = 75.41%, by the correlation fitting model, at inhibiting mild steel corrosion in the medium. However, adsorption isotherm modelling showed that the experimental gravimetric, experimental potentiodynamic and predicted potentiodynamic data exhibited agreements in following the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. All the three data models indicated favourable adsorption and identified physisorption as the prevalent adsorption mechanism of Terminalia catappa leaf-extract on mild steel immersed in the 0.5 M HCl medium.

  3. Multimodal Cognitive Enhancement Therapy for Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Mild Dementia: A Multi- Center, Randomized, Controlled, Double-Blind, Crossover Trial.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji Won; Lee, Hyeonggon; Hong, Jong Woo; Kim, Kayoung; Kim, Taehyun; Byun, Hye Jin; Ko, Ji Won; Youn, Jong Chul; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Lee, Nam-Jin; Pae, Chi-Un; Kim, Ki Woong

    2017-01-01

    We developed and evaluated the effect of Multimodal Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (MCET) consisting of cognitive training, cognitive stimulations, reality orientation, physical therapy, reminiscence therapy, and music therapy in combination in older people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild dementia. This study was a multi-center, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, two-period cross-over study (two 8-week treatment phases separated by a 4-week wash-out period). Sixty-four participants with MCI or dementia whose Clinical Dementia Rating was 0.5 or 1 were randomized to the MCET group or the mock-therapy (placebo) group. Outcomes were measured at baseline, week 9, and week 21. Fifty-five patients completed the study. Mini-Mental State Examination (effect size = 0.47, p = 0.013) and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (effect size = 0.35, p = 0.045) scores were significantly improved in the MCET compared with mock-therapy group. Revised Memory and Behavior Problems Checklist frequency (effect size = 0.38, p = 0.046) and self-rated Quality of Life - Alzheimer's Disease (effect size = 0.39, p = 0.047) scores were significantly improved in the MCET compared with mock-therapy. MCET improved cognition, behavior, and quality of life in people with MCI or mild dementia more effectively than conventional cognitive enhancing activities did.

  4. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.A.; Wright, R.E.; Im, C.J.; Henkelman, M.R.; O`Neal, G.W.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a continuous mild gasification process to convert highly caking coals to coal liquids, char and coke for near term commercial application. Task 3, Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study, has been underway since September 1989. In char upgrading studies, ``green`` uncured char briquettes have been prepared and calcined in 20-pound batches to evaluate the effects of char, binders, and heating conditions on final coke properties. A total of 150. formulations have been tested thus far in this work. Work on Task 4, Process Development Unit (PDU) Mild Gasification Study, has been in progress since February 1991, with the completion of a Continuous Mild Gasification Unit (CMGU) with a design rate of 1000 lb./hr. Since start-up of the CMGU, there have been 72 runs with a variety of operating conditions and coal types.

  5. Development of an advanced continuous mild gasification process for the production of coproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.W.; Cha, C.Y.; Kang, T.W.; Vaillancourt, M.B.

    1990-12-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) teamed with the AMAX Research and Development Center and Riley Stoker Corporation on Development of an Advanced, Continuous Mild-Gasification Process for the Production of Coproducts under contract DE-AC21-87MC24268 with the Morgantown Energy Technology of the US Department of Energy. The strategy for this project is to produce electrode binder pitch and diesel fuel blending stock by mild gasification of Wyodak coal. The char is upgraded to produce anode-grade carbon, carbon black, and activated carbon. This report describes results of mild-gasification tests conducted by WRI. Char upgrading tests conducted by AMAX will be described in a separate report.

  6. Fulminant form of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in a child treated with mild hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Kazushi; Motoi, Hirotaka; Oyama, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Takeshita, Saoko

    2013-12-01

    We describe the case of a 3-year-old boy diagnosed with the fulminant form of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). He developed general fatigue, fever, drowsiness and difficulty in walking. He had extensive multiple high-intensity lesions in the white matter of the cerebrum and cerebellum, which are typical findings of ADEM. He became comatose and developed decerebrate rigidity with severe brain edema despite high-dose methylprednisolone therapy, and then was subjected to mild hypothermia therapy, and given i.v. immunoglobulin. The patient recovered remarkably with the sequela of only mild action tremor. The patient was considered to have acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHLE), an extremely severe form of ADEM, in terms of the rapidly deteriorating clinical course and neuroimaging features. It was speculated that AHLE and ADEM might be a continuous disease spectrum. It is considered that the severe brain edema associated with ADEM or AHLE is a suitable indication for mild hypothermia therapy.

  7. Dichotic-listening task performance of mildly mentally retarded and nonretarded individuals.

    PubMed

    Hornstein, H A; Mosley, J L

    1986-03-01

    An investigation of hemispheric lateralization of mildly mentally retarded individuals was undertaken employing the dichotic-listening paradigm. Exclusively right-handed, right-eyed, and right-footed equal-CA, equal-MA, and mildly retarded subjects were required to recognize and reject dichotic presentation-probe stimulus combinations of words and tones correctly. The dichotic presentation-probe stimulus technique was employed to minimize the influence of memory and to equate methodologically for the handling of the verbal (spoken digits) and nonverbal (complex tones) stimuli. The findings revealed a pattern of dichotic performance that was similar for the three subject groups. A right-ear advantage was obtained for the verbal stimuli; and a left-ear advantage, for the nonverbal stimuli. Performance accuracy, however, was significantly poorer for the mildly retarded subjects relative to the nonretarded subjects. Structural vs. control process differences in the information-processing system were discussed.

  8. Tau Reduction Diminishes Spatial Learning and Memory Deficits after Mild Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jason S.; Craft, Ryan; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Ho, Kaitlyn; Wang, Xin; Mohan, Geetha; Mangnitsky, Sergey; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Mucke, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Objective Because reduction of the microtubule-associated protein Tau has beneficial effects in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy, we wanted to determine whether this strategy can also improve the outcome of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods We adapted a mild frontal impact model of TBI for wildtype C57Bl/6J mice and characterized the behavioral deficits it causes in these animals. The Barnes maze, Y maze, contextual and cued fear conditioning, elevated plus maze, open field, balance beam, and forced swim test were used to assess different behavioral functions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 7 Tesla) and histological analysis of brain sections were used to look for neuropathological alterations. We also compared the functional effects of this TBI model and of controlled cortical impact in mice with two, one or no Tau alleles. Results Repeated (2-hit), but not single (1-hit), mild frontal impact impaired spatial learning and memory in wildtype mice as determined by testing of mice in the Barnes maze one month after the injury. Locomotor activity, anxiety, depression and fear related behaviors did not differ between injured and sham-injured mice. MRI imaging did not reveal focal injury or mass lesions shortly after the injury. Complete ablation or partial reduction of tau prevented deficits in spatial learning and memory after repeated mild frontal impact. Complete tau ablation also showed a trend towards protection after a single controlled cortical impact. Complete or partial reduction of tau also reduced the level of axonopathy in the corpus callosum after repeated mild frontal impact. Interpretation Tau promotes or enables the development of learning and memory deficits and of axonopathy after mild TBI, and tau reduction counteracts these adverse effects. PMID:25551452

  9. Neural Correlates of True and False Memory in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M.; Riddell, Patricia M.; Ellis, Judi A.; Freeman, Jayne E.; Nasuto, Slawomir J.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate the changes in neural processing in mild cognitive impairment. We measured phase synchrony, amplitudes, and event-related potentials in veridical and false memory to determine whether these differed in participants with mild cognitive impairment compared with typical, age-matched controls. Empirical mode decomposition phase locking analysis was used to assess synchrony, which is the first time this analysis technique has been applied in a complex cognitive task such as memory processing. The technique allowed assessment of changes in frontal and parietal cortex connectivity over time during a memory task, without a priori selection of frequency ranges, which has been shown previously to influence synchrony detection. Phase synchrony differed significantly in its timing and degree between participant groups in the theta and alpha frequency ranges. Timing differences suggested greater dependence on gist memory in the presence of mild cognitive impairment. The group with mild cognitive impairment had significantly more frontal theta phase locking than the controls in the absence of a significant behavioural difference in the task, providing new evidence for compensatory processing in the former group. Both groups showed greater frontal phase locking during false than true memory, suggesting increased searching when no actual memory trace was found. Significant inter-group differences in frontal alpha phase locking provided support for a role for lower and upper alpha oscillations in memory processing. Finally, fronto-parietal interaction was significantly reduced in the group with mild cognitive impairment, supporting the notion that mild cognitive impairment could represent an early stage in Alzheimer’s disease, which has been described as a ‘disconnection syndrome’. PMID:23118992

  10. Combining Cognitive Screening Tests for the Evaluation of Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ladeira, Rodolfo B.; Diniz, Breno S.; Nunes, Paula V.; Forlenza, Orestes V.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the accuracy of the Mini-Mental State Examination combined with the Verbal Fluency Test and Clock Drawing Test for the identification of patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). METHOD These tests were used to evaluate cognitive function in 247 older adults. Subjects were divided into three groups according to their cognitive state: mild cognitive impairment (n=83), AD (n=81), cognitively unimpaired controls (n=83), based on clinical and neuropsychological data. The diagnostic accuracy of each test for discriminating between these diagnostic groups (mild cognitive impairment or AD vs. controls) was examined with the aid of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves. Additionally, we evaluated the benefit of the combination of tests on diagnostic accuracy. RESULTS Although they were accurate enough for the identification of Alzheimer’s disease, neither test alone proved adequate for the correct separation of patients with mild cognitive impairment from healthy subjects. Combining these tests did not improve diagnostic accuracy, as compared to the Mini-Mental State Examination alone, in the identification of patients with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease. CONCLUSIONS The present data do not warrant the combined use of the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Verbal Fluency Test and the Clock Drawing Test as a sufficient diagnostic schedule in screening for mild cognitive impairment. The present data do not support the notion that the combination of test scores is better that the use of Mini-Mental State Examination scores alone in the screening for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:19841703

  11. Distinct antibody responses of patients with mild and severe leptospirosis determined by whole proteome microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lessa-Aquino, Carolina; Lindow, Janet C.; Randall, Arlo; Wunder, Elsio; Pablo, Jozelyn; Nakajima, Rie; Jasinskas, Algis; Cruz, Jaqueline S.; Damião, Alcineia O.; Nery, Nívison; Ribeiro, Guilherme S.; Costa, Federico; Hagan, José E.; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Ko, Albert I.; Medeiros, Marco Alberto; Felgner, Philip L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is an important zoonotic disease worldwide. Humans usually present a mild non-specific febrile illness, but a proportion of them develop more severe outcomes, such as multi-organ failure, lung hemorrhage and death. Such complications are thought to depend on several factors, including the host immunity. Protective immunity is associated with humoral immune response, but little is known about the immune response mounted during naturally-acquired Leptospira infection. Methods and principal findings Here, we used protein microarray chip to profile the antibody responses of patients with severe and mild leptospirosis against the complete Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni predicted ORFeome. We discovered a limited number of immunodominant antigens, with 36 antigens specific to patients, of which 11 were potential serodiagnostic antigens, identified at acute phase, and 33 were potential subunit vaccine targets, detected after recovery. Moreover, we found distinct antibody profiles in patients with different clinical outcomes: in the severe group, overall IgM responses do not change and IgG responses increase over time, while both IgM and IgG responses remain stable in the mild patient group. Analyses of individual patients’ responses showed that >74% of patients in the severe group had significant IgG increases over time compared to 29% of patients in the mild group. Additionally, 90% of IgM responses did not change over time in the mild group, compared to ~51% in the severe group. Conclusions In the present study, we detected antibody profiles associated with disease severity and speculate that patients with mild disease were protected from severe outcomes due to pre-existing antibodies, while patients with severe leptospirosis demonstrated an antibody profile typical of first exposure. Our findings represent a significant advance in the understanding of the humoral immune response to Leptospira infection, and we have identified new

  12. Lack of Impact of Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleepiness, Mood and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Budhiraja, Rohit; Batool-Anwar, Salma; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Eichling, Phillip; Patel, Sanjay; Shen, Wei; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with sleepiness, depression and reduced quality of life. However, it is unclear whether mild OSA has these negative impacts. Using data from the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), this study determined whether participants with mild OSA had greater sleepiness, more depressive symptoms and poorer quality of life in comparison to those without OSA. Methods 239 individuals evaluated for participation in APPLES with a baseline apnea hypopnea index (AHI) < 15 /hour were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: No OSA (N=40, AHI < 5 /hour) or Mild OSA (N=199, 5 to <15 /hour) based on their screening polysomnogram. Scores on their Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI) were compared between groups. Results There were no significant differences between the No OSA and Mild OSA groups on any of the 5 measures: ESS (No OSA, 9.8 ± 3.5 vs Mild OSA, 10.6 ± 4.3, p=0.26), SSS,(2.8 ± 0.9 vs. 2.9 ± 1.0, p=0.52), HAM-D (4.6 ± 3.0 vs. 4.9 ± 4.7, p=0.27), POMS (33.5 ± 22.3 vs. 28.7 ± 22.0, p=0.70), SAQLI (4.5 ± 0.8 vs. 4.7 ± 0.7, p=0.39). Conclusion Individuals with mild OSA in this cohort do not have worse sleepiness, mood or quality of life in comparison to those without OSA. PMID:25232509

  13. Levothyroxine treatment of mild subclinical hypothyroidism: a review of potential risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Zeeshan; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with normal levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4). SCH is further classified into a milder condition with TSH levels between 4.0 and 10.0 milli-international units (mIU)/l (mild-SCH) and a severe form with TSH >10.0 mIU/l (severe-SCH). SCH is a common problem (prevalence is greater in women than men), which increases further with increasing age and TSH levels. Even though the risk of progression to overt hypothyroidism is higher in patients with severe-SCH, the risk is also significant in patients having mild-SCH; it has been suggested that every twofold rise in serum TSH would increase the risk from 1 to 4%, which further increases to 38% if thyroid antibodies are positive. Current data have shown increased cardiovascular risk in patients with mild-SCH and have demonstrated some benefits of levothyroxine treatment in reducing these events. However, evidence on the association of mild-SCH and musculoskeletal system, cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and goitre is conflicting. Similarly, the discussion regarding the exact upper limit of normal for serum TSH remains controversial. The data have also shown increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in patient with mild-SCH, with some benefits of thyroxine treatment. The recent available guidelines related to management of patients with serum TSH <10 mIU/l have suggested decisions should be made taking into account the age of the patient, associated risk factors and comorbid conditions. This chronicle review assesses current evidence regarding the risks associated and the recommendations related to benefits of levothyroxine treatment in patients having mild-SCH. PMID:26885359

  14. Yellow tailflower mild mottle virus: a new tobamovirus described from Anthocercis littorea (Solanaceae) in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Stephen J; Li, Hua; Jones, Michael G K

    2014-04-01

    The complete genome sequence of a tobamovirus was determined from a wild plant of yellow tailflower (Anthocercis littorea, family Solanaceae) that exhibited mild mottling and chlorosis on the leaves. The virus induced severe symptoms including systemic necrosis when inoculated to plants of three other solanaceous species. The viral genome was resequenced after passage in Nicotiana benthamiana. The two genomes were 6379 nucleotides in length, and they differed by three nucleotides. Phylogenetic analysis and the deduced architecture of the genome place the virus, provisionally named yellow tailflower mild mottle virus, with other tobamoviruses that infect solanaceous hosts.

  15. De Lange syndrome: subjective and objective comparison of the classical and mild phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Allanson, J E; Hennekam, R C; Ireland, M

    1997-01-01

    Classical de Lange syndrome presents with a striking face, pronounced growth and mental retardation, and variable limb deficiencies. Over the past five years, a mild variant has been defined, with less significant psychomotor retardation, less marked pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, and an uncommon association with major malformations, although mild limb anomalies may be present. We have evaluated 43 subjects with de Lange syndrome, 30 with classical features, aged from birth to 21 years, and 13 with the mild phenotype, aged from 18 months to 30 years. In addition to assessment of gestalt and facial change with time, detailed craniofacial measurements have been obtained on each subject and composite pattern profiles compiled. The characteristic face of classical de Lange syndrome is present at birth and changes little throughout life, although there is some lengthening of the face with age and the jaw becomes squared. In mild de Lange syndrome, the characteristic classical appearance may be present at birth, but in some subjects it may be two or three years before the typical face is obvious. In general, the overall impression is less striking, perhaps because of increased facial expression and greater alertness. With age, the face loses the characteristic appearance, the nasal height increases, the philtrum does not seem as long, and the upper vermilion is full and everted, although the crescent shaped mouth with downturned corners remains. Eyebrows may be full and bushy. Objective comparison of the face in mild and classical de Lange syndrome, through the use of craniofacial pattern profiles, shows marked similarity of patterns at 4 to 9 years; both groups have microbrachycephaly, but the individual dimensions of the mild group are slightly closer to normal than their classical counterparts. The correlation coefficient is high (0.83). In the adult groups, similarity of patterns remains but is less marked. The normalisation of scores in the mild group is more

  16. Update on the Epidemiology of Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Voss, Jameson D; Connolly, Joseph; Schwab, Karen A; Scher, Ann I

    2015-07-01

    Mild traumatic injuries to the brain (e.g., concussion) are common and have been recognized since antiquity, although definitions have varied historically. Nonetheless, studying the epidemiology of concussion helps clarify the overall importance, risk factors, and at-risk populations for this injury. The present review will focus on recent findings related to the epidemiology of concussion including definition controversies, incidence, and patterns in the population overall and in the military and athlete populations specifically. Finally, as this is an area of active research, we will discuss how future epidemiologic observations hold promise for gaining greater clarity about concussion and mild traumatic brain injury.

  17. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of coproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; McCormick, R.L.; Hogsett, R.F.; Rowe, R.M.

    1990-10-23

    Research continued on the production of coproducts from continuous mild gasification. During the third quarter of 1990, work focused on start-up and operation of the 50 pound/hour char-to-carbon (CTC) process research unit (PRU). Start-up procedures have been finalized for the methane production reactor, and the design temperature has been achieved. Flows and pressures for the overall process have been balanced and optimized. We have achieved temperatures above 1500{degree}F in the carbon formation reactor. Upgrading experiments on mild gasification pitch have also continued on a pitch produced in run MG-122. Results of heat treating and catalytic treating tests are reported.

  18. An update of corrosion inhibitors for mild steel exposed to 32-0-0 UAN solution

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.; Nichols, D.E.; Lohry, E.J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a continuation of corrosion studies on the effectiveness of commercial and newly-developed corrosion inhibitors for use with mild steel exposed to urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) solution. This paper provides updated information on five newly-developed corrosion inhibitors. Tests were conducted with mild steel exposed to 32-0-0 UAN solution containing each corrosion inhibitor at ambient temperature and under static conditions. Real-time corrosion of the test specimens was monitored using AC impedance techniques. Corrosion performance of the inhibitors was evaluated based on comparison of the corrosion rate of specimens exposed to 32-0-0 UAN solution with and without a corrosion inhibitor.

  19. Effect of Sodium Alginate on Staphylococcus aureus During Mild Heating and Freezing1

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Lelia G.; Strong, Dorothy H.

    1964-01-01

    The effects of sodium alginate on Staphyiococcus aureus 196 exposed to mild heating or to freezing at -21 C were studied. The addition of sodium alginate to a diluent appeared to confer some protection of viable cells during mild heating. The effect of the presence of sodium alginate in the suspending media during freezing was less clear. There was a slight trend, not statistically significant, for greater reduction in numbers of viable cells at the low temperature when 4% alginate was present in phosphate buffer. Results indicated that the value of sodium alginate in controlling this food-poisoning microorganism in frozen food is questionable. PMID:14131363

  20. Repeated Retrieval During Working Memory Is Sensitive to Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Broster, Lucas S.; Li, Juan; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Jiang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Study of repeated learning mechanisms has been limited in amnestic mild cognitive impairment, a preclinical stage of Alzheimer disease modifiable by cognitive rehabilitation. We assessed repeated contextual working memory decline as an indicator of amnestic mild cognitive impairment in a sample of 45 older adults recruited from the tertiary care setting. Results indicated that contextual working memory impairment distinguished adults with preclinical disease from those without impairment despite similar overall cognitive performance, and comparison of the indicator with standard-of-care neuropsychological measures indicated discriminant validity. Contextual working memory impairment may represent a novel predictor of Alzheimer disease conversion risk. PMID:24074205

  1. Mild fetal cerebral ventriculomegaly as a prenatal sonographic marker for Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Marja W; den Hollander, Nicolette S; Willems, Patrick J

    2003-03-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), also referred to as immotile-cilia syndrome or Kartagener syndrome, is a group of genetic disorders caused by defective cilia leading to chronic sinupulmonary infection, situs inversus and reduced fertility. Some PCD patients also have cerebral ventriculomegaly or hydrocephalus. We report here two fetuses and one newborn with mild cerebral ventriculomegaly and a suspected and/or confirmed diagnosis of PCD. These cases demonstrate that mild fetal cerebral ventriculomegaly can be a prenatal sonographic marker of PCD, certainly in fetuses with situs inversus or a history of a previous sib with PCD.

  2. Pathological and Pathophysiological Alterations in Temporal Lobe Structures After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-31

    disease 200:749-57 30. Borg J, Holm L, Cassidy JD, Peloso PM, Carroll LJ, et al. 2004. Diagnostic procedures in mild traumatic brain injury: results...European Board of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine:61-7 5 31. Borg J, Holm L, Peloso PM, Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ, et al. 2004. Non-surgical...Journal of comparative neurology 234: 155-67 45. Carroll LJ, Cassidy JD, Peloso PM, Borg J, von Holst H, et al. 2004. Prognosis for mild traumatic brain

  3. Diminished supraspinal pain modulation in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shivshil; Yang, Eric; Canlas, Bryan; Kadokana, Mawj; Heald, Jason; Davani, Ariea; Song, David; Lin, Lisa; Polston, Greg; Tsai, Alice; Lee, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic pain conditions are highly prevalent in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Supraspinal diffuse axonal injury is known to dissociate brain functional connectivity in these patients. The effect of this dissociated state on supraspinal pain network is largely unknown. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study was conducted to compare the supraspinal pain network in patients with mild traumatic brain injury to the gender and age-matched healthy controls with the hypothesis that the functional connectivities of the medial prefrontal cortices, a supraspinal pain modulatory region to other pain-related sensory discriminatory and affective regions in the mild traumatic brain injury subjects are significantly reduced in comparison to healthy controls. Results The mild traumatic brain injury group (N = 15) demonstrated significantly (P < 0.01, cluster threshold > 150 voxels) less activities in the thalamus, pons, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortices than the healthy control group (N = 15). Granger Causality Analyses (GCA) indicated while the left medial prefrontal cortices of the healthy control group cast a noticeable degree of outward (to affect) causality inference to multiple pain processing related regions, this outward inference pattern was not observed in the mild traumatic brain injury group. On the other hand, only patients’ bilateral anterior cingulate cortex received multiple inward (to be affected) causality inferences from regions including the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices and the inferior parietal lobe. Resting state functional connectivity analyses indicated that the medial prefrontal cortices of the mild traumatic brain injury group demonstrated a significantly (P < 0.01, F = 3.6, cluster size > 150 voxels) higher degree of functional connectivity to the inferior parietal lobe, premotor and secondary somatosensory cortex

  4. Effects of very mild versus overt diabetes on vascular haemodynamics and barrier function in rats.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, G; Tilton, R G; Speedy, A; Chang, K; Santarelli, E; Province, M A; Eades, D; Sherman, W R; Williamson, J R

    1989-12-01

    Rats injected i.p. with a single dose of nicotinamide (250 mg/kg) 15 min prior to i.v. injection of streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) develop a very mild form of diabetes characterized by slight elevations of plasma glucose, increased levels of HbA1, and reduced insulin secretion in response to an i.v. glucose tolerance test. These rats gain weight normally and they are not hyperphagic, glycosuric, or polyuric. The effects of this very mild form of diabetes vs overt streptozotocin diabetes of three months duration on regional vascular 131I-albumin clearance, blood flow (assessed by 15 microns 85Sr-microspheres), and renal filtration function were examined in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Plasma glucose levels of rats with mild diabetes were 7.4 +/- 0.9 (mean +/- SD) (mmol/l) vs 6.5 +/- 0.6 for control rats and 31.3 +/- 6.0 for overtly diabetic rats. HbA1 levels were increased 1.4 fold in mildly diabetic and 2.3 fold in overtly diabetic rats. Vascular clearance of 131I-albumin was markedly increased in ocular tissues (anterior uvea, retina, and choroid), sciatic nerve, aorta, new (subcutaneous) granulation tissue, and kidney of both diabetic groups, although increases in overtly diabetic rats exceeded those in the mildly diabetic group (2.2-4.6 times control animals vs 1.6-3.3 times, respectively). Likewise, both overt and very mild diabetes markedly increased glomerular filtration rate (approximately 1.8 times and 1.2 times control animals, respectively), urinary excretion of endogenous albumin (approximately 9 times and 4 times) and IgG (approximately 15 times and 4 times), as well as regional blood flow in the anterior uvea, choroid, and sciatic nerve. Increases in tissue sorbitol levels were much larger in overtly diabetic rats (generally 10-20 times control animals) than in mildly diabetic rats (1.5-3 times controls). myo-Inositol levels were significantly decreased only in lens and sciatic nerve of overtly diabetic rats. These observations indicate that even very mild

  5. Short-Term Longitudinal Study of Central Auditory Function in Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Idrizbegovic, Esma; Hederstierna, Christina; Dahlquist, Martin; Rosenhall, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Central auditory function can be studied to monitor the progression of mild cognitive impairment to dementia. Our aim was to address this issue in a prospective longitudinal setting. Methods Tests of central hearing function were performed on 70 subjects with either Alzheimer's disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment, and in controls with subjective memory complaints but normal cognition. The time span until follow-up was 1.5 years. Results The dichotic digit free recall test showed a significant decline in the AD group compared with the controls (left ear). Conclusion The short time span was long enough to disclose a central auditory processing decline in AD. PMID:24516414

  6. Mild phenotypic manifestation of a 7p15.3p21.2 deletion.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C; Maynard, S; Glover, T W; Biesecker, L G

    1993-01-01

    A 28 month old girl with dysmorphic features was found to have an interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 7p15.3-7p21.2. The patient had ptosis, dacryostenosis, pectus excavatum, short hands, and her development was normal or mildly delayed. Craniosynostosis and growth retardation, which were present in two other patients with similar deletions, were not present. Because of the mild manifestations, this case expands the clinical spectrum of the 7p15-7p21 deletion phenotype. Images PMID:8411039

  7. Preventing Progression in Men with Mild Symptoms of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Potential Role for Phytotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Yan Kit; Marihart, Sibylle; Harik, Mike; Djavan, Bob

    2004-01-01

    Prevalence of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is increasing with the aging population worldwide. Throughout the 20th century, men with minimally symptomatic BPH were generally advised to defer treatment. Treatment deferral or watchful waiting has always appeared reasonable because mild lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of bladder outlet obstruction are not bothersome and are often regarded as part of the aging process, progression is usually slow, and symptoms often regress spontaneously. This review examines the evidence of the natural history of BPH, highlighting the group of patients with mild symptoms, the risk factors for progression, and the potential role of phytotherapy in this group of men. PMID:16985600

  8. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars has been used to suggest that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. However, if early Mars was neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then "large" carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. The critical question is: Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? We suggest that Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would inhibit the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of this work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions. The stability of smectites under mildly acidic conditions is attributed to elevated Fe/Mg activities that inhibit smectite dissolution. Beidelite and saponite have been shown to form from hydrothermal alteration of basaltic glass at pH 3.5-4.0 in seawater solutions. Nontronite is also known to be stable in mildly acidic systems associated with mafic and ultramafic rock. Nontronite was shown to form in acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain, Thailand due to oxidation of Fe-sulfides that transformed saponite to nontronite. Smectite is known to transform to kaolinite in naturally acid soils due to selective leaching of Mg. However, if Mg removal is limited, then based on equilibrium relationships, the dissolution of smectite should be minimized. If Fe and Mg solution activities are sufficiently high, such as might be found in a low water/rock ratio system that is poorly drained, smectite could form and remain stable under mildly acidic conditions on Mars. The sources of mild acidity on early Mars includes elevated atmospheric CO2 levels, Fe-hydrolysis reactions, and the presence of volcanic SO2 aerosols. Equilibrium calculations dictate that water equilibrated with an early Mars CO2 atmosphere at 1 to 4 bar yields a pH of 3.6 to 3

  9. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Brad; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars has been used to suggest that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. However, if early Mars was neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then large carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. The critical question is: Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? We suggest that Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would inhibit the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of this work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions. The stability of smectites under mildly acidic conditions is attributed to elevated Fe/Mg activities that inhibit smectite dissolution. Beidelite and saponite have been shown to form from hydrothermal alteration of basaltic glass at pH 3.5-4.0 in seawater solutions. Nontronite is also known to be stable in mildly acidic systems associated with mafic and ultramafic rock. Nontronite was shown to form in acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain, Thailand due to oxidation of Fe-sulfides that transformed saponite to nontronite. Smectite is known to transform to kaolinite in naturally acid soils due to selective leaching of Mg. However, if Mg removal is limited, then based on equilibrium relationships, the dissolution of smectite should be minimized. If Fe and Mg solution activities are sufficiently high, such as might be found in a low water/rock ratio system that is poorly drained, smectite could form and remain stable under mildly acidic conditions on Mars. The sources of mild acidity on early Mars includes elevated atmospheric CO2 levels, Fe-hydrolysis reactions, and the presence of volcanic SO2 aerosols. Equilibrium calculations dictate that water equilibrated with an early Mars CO2 atmosphere at 1 to 4 bar yields a pH of 3.6 to 3

  10. Mild Intellectual Disabilities: Legacies and Trends in Concepts and Educational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polloway, Edward A.; Lubin, Jacqueline; Smith, J. David; Patton, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Intellectual disability has been considered a high incidence disability in special education since the inception of the field in the United States. The purpose of this article is to evaluate current educational programs and practices for students who historically and commonly have been referred to as having mild mental retardation. The article…

  11. Detecting and Treating Depression in People with Mild Intellectual Disability: The Views of Key Stakeholders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGillivray, Jane A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2010-01-01

    There is a pressing need for the development of programs for the early identification and treatment of depression in individuals with mild intellectual disability. The aim of this study was to ascertain the perspective of 64 key stakeholders (people with intellectual disability, healthcare professionals, family/caregivers & support workers)…

  12. Early Detection of Depression and Associated Risk Factors in Adults with Mild/Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGillivray, Jane A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presentation and risk factors for depression in adults with mild/moderate intellectual disability (ID). A sample of 151 adults (83 males and 68 females) participated in a semi-structured interview. According to results on the Beck Depression Inventory II, 39.1% of participants evinced symptoms of…

  13. A Demonstration of Helping Adolescents with Mild Intellectual Disability Climb Ladders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kok Hoe Anthony; Varahan, Jayashree Lakshmi; Loh, Peng Loong Daniel; Tan, Sey Ing

    2011-01-01

    A research team at a vocational school in Singapore, catering mainly to students between the ages of 17-21 with mild intellectual disability, studied how to best address the challenge of enabling students to learn how to climb ladders (a skill necessary at many job placements). They documented the approach used and suggested extrapolations and…

  14. Positive Effects of Computer-Based Cognitive Training in Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, C.; Chambon, C.; Michel, B. F.; Paban, V.; Alescio-Lautier, B.

    2012-01-01

    Considering the high risk for individuals with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (A-MCI) to progress towards Alzheimer's disease (AD), we investigated the efficacy of a non-pharmacological intervention, that is, cognitive training that could reduce cognitive difficulties and delay the cognitive decline. For this, we evaluated the efficacy of a…

  15. Selective hydrogen production from methanol with a defined iron pincer catalyst under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Alberico, Elisabetta; Sponholz, Peter; Cordes, Christoph; Nielsen, Martin; Drexler, Hans-Joachim; Baumann, Wolfgang; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2013-12-23

    Molecularly well-defined iron pincer complexes promote the aqueous-phase reforming of methanol to carbon dioxide and hydrogen, which is of interest in the context of a methanol and hydrogen economy. For the first time, the use of earth-abundant iron complexes under mild conditions for efficient hydrogen generation from alcohols is demonstrated.

  16. The Croydon Assessment of Learning Study: Prevalence and Educational Identification of Mild Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonoff, Emily; Pickles, Andrew; Chadwick, Oliver; Gringras, Paul; Wood, Nicky; Higgins, Siobhan; Maney, Julie-Ann; Karia, Nisha; Iqbal, Huma; Moore, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Background: Mild mental retardation is an enduring and impairing condition. Its prevalence has varied widely across different studies from 0.5 to over 8%, with higher rates in completely ascertained samples. The current study estimates the prevalence of low IQ in the mental retardation range (intellectual disability) in a population sample and…

  17. Propositional Density in Spoken and Written Language of Czech-Speaking Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolík, Filip; Stepankova, Hana; Vyhnálek, Martin; Nikolai, Tomáš; Horáková, Karolína; Matejka, Štepán

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Propositional density (PD) is a measure of content richness in language production that declines in normal aging and more profoundly in dementia. The present study aimed to develop a PD scoring system for Czech and use it to compare PD in language productions of older people with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and control…

  18. A mildly relativistic radio jet from the otherwise normal type Ic supernova 2007gr.

    PubMed

    Paragi, Z; Taylor, G B; Kouveliotou, C; Granot, J; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Bietenholz, M; van der Horst, A J; Pidopryhora, Y; van Langevelde, H J; Garrett, M A; Szomoru, A; Argo, M K; Bourke, S; Paczyński, B

    2010-01-28

    The class of type Ic supernovae have drawn increasing attention since 1998 owing to their sparse association (only four so far) with long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although both phenomena originate from the core collapse of a massive star, supernovae emit mostly at optical wavelengths, whereas GRBs emit mostly in soft gamma-rays or hard X-rays. Though the GRB central engine generates ultra-relativistic jets, which beam the early emission into a narrow cone, no relativistic outflows have hitherto been found in type Ib/c supernovae explosions, despite theoretical expectations and searches. Here we report radio (interferometric) observations that reveal a mildly relativistic expansion in a nearby type Ic supernova, SN 2007gr. Using two observational epochs 60 days apart, we detect expansion of the source and establish a conservative lower limit for the average apparent expansion velocity of 0.6c. Independently, a second mildly relativistic supernova has been reported. Contrary to the radio data, optical observations of SN 2007gr indicate a typical type Ic supernova with ejecta velocities approximately 6,000 km s(-1), much lower than in GRB-associated supernovae. We conclude that in SN 2007gr a small fraction of the ejecta produced a low-energy mildly relativistic bipolar radio jet, while the bulk of the ejecta were slower and, as shown by optical spectropolarimetry, mildly aspherical.

  19. A Sequence for Helping Children Having Mild to Moderate Functional Articulation Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayek, Robert A.

    Presented are specific sequential procedures for use by paraprofessionals in correcting children's mild to moderate articulation problems. The sequence consists of eight activities to prepare the child for the program, five steps in the area of ear training, and ten steps to teach speech production. Activities and minimum teaching times are…

  20. Novel mild strains of Citrus tristeza virus from California and Peru.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) has caused great economic losses to citrus worldwide. CTV isolates from California were identified which reacted to MCA13 but were mild in biological indexing tests. Molecular markers were developed to differentiate these isolates from established CTV genotypes and the is...

  1. A Boy with a Mild Case of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome with Above Average Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacassie, Yves; Bobadilla, Olga; Cambias, Ron D., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of an 11-year-old boy who represents the only documented case of an individual with Cornelia de Lange syndrome who also has above average cognitive functioning. Major diagnostic criteria for de Lange syndrome and comparisons with other severe and mild cases are discussed. (Author/CR)

  2. Catalase activity as a biomarker for mild-stress-induced robustness in Bacillus weihenstephanensis.

    PubMed

    den Besten, Heidy M W; Effraimidou, Styliani; Abee, Tjakko

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to survive and grow in changing environments by activating stress adaptation mechanisms which may enhance bacterial robustness. Stress-induced enhanced robustness complicates the predictability of microbial inactivation. Using psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis strain KBAB4 as a model, we investigated the impact of the culturing temperature on mild-oxidative-stress-induced (cross-)protection toward multiple stresses, including severe oxidative, heat, and acid stresses. Culturing at a refrigeration temperature (7°C) compared to the optimal growth temperature (30°C) affected both the robustness level of B. weihenstephanensis and the oxidative stress adaptive response. Scavengers of reactive oxygen species have a crucial role in adaptation to oxidative stresses, and this points to a possible predictive role in mild-oxidative-stress-induced robustness. Therefore, the catalase activity was determined upon mild oxidative stress treatment and was demonstrated to be significantly correlated with the robustness level of mild-stress-treated cells toward severe oxidative and heat stresses but not toward severe acid stress for cells grown at both refrigeration and optimal temperatures. The quantified correlations supported the predictive quality of catalase activity as a biomarker and also underlined that the predictive quality is stress specific. Biomarkers that are able to predict stress-induced enhanced robustness can be used to better understand stress adaptation mechanisms and might allow the design of effective combinations of hurdles to control microbial behavior.

  3. Using CAI To Enhance the Peer Acceptance of Mainstreamed Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culliver, Concetta; Obi, Sunday

    This study applied computer-assisted instruction (CAI) techniques to improve peer acceptance among 92 mainstreamed students with mild disabilities from 10 to 13 years of age. Participants in the treatment group received their generalized curriculum program (including mathematics, language arts, reading, health, social studies, and science)…

  4. School-Aged Transition Services: Options for Adolescents with Mild Handicaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Brian; Hasazi, Susan Brody

    1987-01-01

    Secondary special education programs should include employment or postsecondary education placement outcomes in the curricula for mainstreamed mildly handicapped students. Program elements that support these goals are: individualized transition plans; paid work experience; job-seeking skills curriculum; flexible staffing patterns; active…

  5. [Toxicity studies of mild gasification products]. [Quarterly report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Mild gasification of coal is a technology being developed by the United States Department of Energy and private industry with the hope that a cleaner method of coal use can help meet future energy needs. As the technology develops and its commercial use becomes a more viable possibility, efforts are being made to study the safety or possible toxicity of the mild gasification products. DOE and the National Institute for occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) are cooperating through an interagency agreement to examine some of these products for their genotoxic potential. NIOSH has studied the mutagenicity of several mild gasification product samples using the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay. As reported earlier PSIS{number_sign}830331 failed to demonstrate genotoxic activity in the Ames assay under all conditions tested. Since the mild gasification products are complex mixtures, interactions between various components are likely to occur. Such interactions between various components of complex mixtures may increase or decrease genotoxic activity in short-term assays like the Ames test. Although all synergistic interactions may not be detailed, the separate analysis of those components in several classes provides a more accurate view of the genotoxicity of each component and better allows for chemical characterization of the possible mutagens in the mixture. NIOSH has performed mutagenicity studies on the subfractions of PSIS{number_sign}830331. The results of those studies are detailed in this report.

  6. Differences in Performance between Students with Learning Disabilities and Mild Mental Retardation: Implications for Categorical Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caffrey, Erin; Fuchs, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    We reviewed eight studies that described learning differences between students with learning disabilities (LD) and students with mild mental retardation (MMR). A total of 639 students, 6-20 years old, participated in these studies. Study authors examined students' inductive reasoning and their performance during guided inquiry and more lengthy…

  7. Decreased Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Pediatric Mild TBI: An MRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; West, John D.; Bailey, Jessica N.; Westfall, Daniel R.; Xiao, Hui; Arnold, Todd W.; Kersey, Patrick A.; Saykin, Andrew J.; McDonald, Brenna C.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated cerebral blood flow (CBF) in chronic pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging perfusion. mTBI patients showed lower CBF than controls in bilateral frontotemporal regions, with no between-group cognitive differences. Findings suggest ASL may be useful to assess functional abnormalities in pediatric mTBI. PMID:25649779

  8. The Emergent Charter School Model for Ninth Grade Mildly Disabled United States Students: Extending to Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Emmanuel Teah

    2009-01-01

    An ethnographic, descriptive research methodology was used to explore the service delivery of three U.S. charter schools (one independent and two dependent secondary public charter schools) in Southern New England, United States as they relate to grade nine mildly disabled special needs students. Field research was also conducted in Costa Rica and…

  9. Working Memory Development in Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Molen, M. J.; Henry, L. A.; Van Luit, J. E. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the current cross-sectional study was to examine the developmental progression in working memory (WM) between the ages of 9 and 16 years in a large sample of children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities (MBID). Baddeley's influential WM model was used as a theoretical framework. Furthermore, the…

  10. Berberine as a natural source inhibitor for mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Peng; Liang, Qiang; Hou, Baorong

    2005-12-01

    Berberine was abstracted from coptis chinensis and its inhibition efficiency on corrosion of mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4 was investigated through weight loss experiment, electrochemical techniques and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) with energy disperse spectrometer (EDS). The weight loss results showed that berberine is an excellent corrosion inhibitor for mild steel immersed in 1 M H 2SO 4. Potentiodynamic curves suggested that berberine suppressed both cathodic and anodic processes for its concentrations higher than 1.0 × 10 -4 M and mainly cathodic reaction was suppressed for lower concentrations. The Nyquist diagrams of impedance for mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4 containing berberine with different concentrations showed one capacitive loop, and the polarization resistance increased with the inhibitor concentration rising. A good fit to Flory-Huggins isotherm was obtained between surface coverage degree and inhibitor concentration. The surface morphology and EDS analysis for mild steel specimens in sulfuric acid in the absence and presence of the inhibitor also proved the results obtained by the weight loss and electrochemical experiments. The correlation of inhibition effect and molecular structure of berberine was then discussed by quantum chemistry study.

  11. The Challenge of Caring for Mildly Ill Children: A Canadian National Childcare Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polyzoi, E.; Babb, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    This Canadian study of the care of mildly ill children in licensed childcare facilities compares director and parent preferences for eight models of care, exclusionary practices for ill children by directors, and preferred backup care options of parents. It also investigates anticipated usage and willingness of parents to pay for emergency…

  12. The Association between Mild Traumatic Brain Injury History and Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontifex, Matthew B.; O'Connor, Phillip M.; Broglio, Steven P.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of multiple mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) on neuroelectric and task performance indices of the cognitive control of action monitoring was assessed in individuals with and without a history of concussion. Participants completed a standard clinical neurocognitive assessment and the error-related negativity of the…

  13. The Relation of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury to Chronic Lapses of Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontifex, Matthew B.; Broglio, Steven P.; Drollette, Eric S.; Scudder, Mark R.; Johnson, Chris R.; O'Connor, Phillip M.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the extent to which failures in sustained attention were associated with chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) deficits in cognitive control among college-age young adults with and without a history of sport-related concussion. Participants completed the ImPACT computer-based assessment and a modified flanker task. Results…

  14. Early Detection of Cognitive-Linguistic Change Associated with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Valarie B.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may present with subtle declines in linguistic ability that go undetected by tasks not challenging enough to tax a relatively intact cognitive-linguistic system. This study was designed to replicate and extend a previous study of cognitive-linguistic ability in MCI using a complex discourse…

  15. Integrated Eye Tracking and Neural Monitoring for Enhanced Assessment of Mild TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    DATES COVERED 8 Mar 2015 - 7 Mar 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Integrated Eye Tracking and Neural Monitoring for Enhanced Assessment of Mild TBI 5a...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During the Year 3 POP (08 MAR 2015 – 07 MAR 2016), data collection for the pilot study (n=30) was completed. HRPO approval

  16. NLRP3 Inflammasome Mediates Chronic Mild Stress-Induced Depression in Mice via Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Lei; Liu, Yun-Zi; Shen, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Teng-Yun; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yun-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence from both clinical and experimental research indicates that the immune-brain interaction plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of depression. A multi-protein complex of the innate immune system, the NLRP3 inflammasome regulates cleavage and secretion of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β. The inflammasome detects various pathogen-associated molecule patterns and damage-associated molecule patterns, which then leads to a series of immune-inflammatory reactions. Methods: To explore the role of inflammasome activation in the underlying biological mechanisms of depression, we established a mouse model of depression with unpredictable chronic mild stress. Results: Mice subjected to chronic mild stress for 4 weeks had significantly higher serum corticosterone levels, serum interleukin-1β levels, and hippocampal active interleukin-1β protein levels. They also displayed depressive-like symptoms, including decreased sucrose preference and increased immobility time. Moreover, the hippocampi of chronic mild stress-exposed mice had significantly higher activity of caspase-1, which accompanied by higher protein levels of NLRP3 and the apoptotic speck-containing protein with a card. Pretreatment with the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor VX-765 decreased serum and hippocampal levels of interleukin-1β protein and significantly moderated the depressive-like behaviors induced by chronic mild stress. Conclusions: These data suggest the NLRP3 inflammasome mediates stress-induced depression via immune activation. Future procedures targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome may have promising effects in the prevention and treatment of depression. PMID:25603858

  17. Understanding Discrepancy in Perceptions of Values: Individuals with Mild to Moderate Dementia and Their Family Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reamy, Allison M.; Kim, Kyungmin; Zarit, Steven H.; Whitlatch, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: We explore discrepancies in perceptions of values and care preferences between individuals with dementia (IWDs) and their family caregivers. Design and Methods: We interviewed 266 dyads consisting of an individual with mild to moderate dementia and his or her family caregiver to determine IWDs' beliefs for 5 values related to…

  18. Bench-scale development of mild gasification char desulfurization. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of this project is to scale up a process, developed under a previous ICCI grant, for desulfurization of mild gasification char by treatment with hydrogen-rich process-derived fuel gas at 650--760 C and 7--15 atm. The char can be converted into a low-sulfur metallurgical form coke. In the prior study, IBC-105 coal with 4.0 wt% sulfur was converted to chars with less than 1.0 wt% sulfur in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. The susceptibility of the char to desulfurization was correlated with physicochemical char properties and mild gasification conditions. Acid pretreatment of the coal prior to mild gasification was also shown to significantly enhance subsequent sulfur removal. In this study, IGT is conducting continuous bench-scale tests in a 1-lb/h fluidized-bed reactor to determine the preferred process conditions and obtain steady-state data necessary for process design and scale-up. The desulfurized chars are to be used to produce low-sulfur form coke, which will be evaluated for density, reactivity, and strength properties relevant to utilization in blast furnaces. This quarter, 2,500 g of mild gasification char was produced from untreated IBC-105 coal in the bench-scale reactor. Half of this char will be subjected to sulfuric acid treatment to enhance subsequent desulfurization. Char-producing runs were also initiated with acid-pretreated coal, which will produce about 1,250 g of char.

  19. Introducing and Developing Map Skills with Persons Having Mild or Moderate Learning Difficulties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfrew, Tom

    1997-01-01

    A British project found that appropriate training in map skills enabled children and adults with mild mental retardation to complete a white color-coded orienteering course with minimal assistance but that persons with moderate mental retardation required more assistance and instruction time to complete course objectives. Describes approaches to…

  20. Effectiveness of Treatment Programmes for Depression among Adults with Mild/Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, M. P.; McGillivray, J. A.; Newton, D. C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The current study describes the development and evaluation of group treatment programme for people with mild/moderate intellectual disability (ID). Methods: A total of 34 participants (16 males, 18 females) completed the treatment programme and 15 participants (six males, nine females) comprised a control group. Results: Compared to…

  1. Ultrasound findings of mild neonatal periventricular-intraventricular hemorrhage after different treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sida; Liao, Chunyan; Liang, Shuyuan; Zhong, Danni; Liu, Junjie; Li, Zhixian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the ultrasound findings of mild neonatal periventricular-intraventricular hemorrhage (PIVH) after different treatments, and to evaluate the neurological outcomes of mild PIVH with Gesell Development Diagnosis Scale (GDDS). Methods: A total of 194 newborns with grade I-II PIVH were recruited, and findings of cranial ultrasound examination before and 1 month after birth were included for analysis. The echo intensity and size of the lesions were recorded. Results: There was no significant difference in the echo intensity among three groups of grade I PIVH patients (P>0.05). There was significant difference in the echo intensity among three groups of grade II PIVH patients, and the ganglioside had the best therapeutic efficacy (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed in the area change among three groups of grade I PIVH patients (P>0.05). However, significant difference was observed in the area change among three groups of grade II PIVH patients, and ganglioside had a better efficacy than cerebrolysin and control agent (P<0.05), but there was no significant difference between cerebrolysin and control groups (P>0.05). GDDS evaluation showed no significant difference among three groups (P>0.05), and all the patients recovered completely. Conclusion: The efficacy of different treatments for mild PIVH can be reflected in the ultrasound findings. Mild PIVH children generally have a good neurological prognosis. PMID:26131081

  2. Skill Sequences for Mildly Handicapped Resource Room Students (Grades K through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercy, David; And Others

    The document describes the development and use of skill sequences in individualized education programs (IEPs) for mildly handicapped students. Developed to standardize format and terminology among teachers and parents, the sequences promote the continuity of instruction and the maintenance of consistent records. Sequences were developed for use…

  3. Pilot Models for Mainstreaming Secondary Students Who Are Mild to Moderate Behaviorally Disordered. Resource Teacher Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toker, Mary Lou; And Others

    The resource teacher manual describes a program model for delivery of services, within the concept of mainstreaming, to secondary students who are mild to moderate behaviorally disordered. Following introductory and overview sections, a student placement section discusses student screening, diagnosis, and placement procedures and gives examples…

  4. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Aimee M; Stephenson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) (and concussion) occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the “dark neuron” (DN) as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours) total sleep deprivation (TSD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day) affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons), and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%). Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%), and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%). Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. PMID:26124685

  5. Motor Performance of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability and Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuijk, P. J.; Hartman, E.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is a relatively small body of research on the motor performance of children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Adequate levels of motor skills may contribute to lifelong enjoyment of physical activity, participation in sports and healthy lifestyles. The present study compares…

  6. Bomb blast, mild traumatic brain injury and psychiatric morbidity: a review.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Ford, Nick L

    2010-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) arising from blast exposure during war is common, and frequently complicated by psychiatric morbidity. There is controversy as to whether mild TBI from blast is different from other causes of mild TBI. Anxiety and affective disorders such as Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and depression are common accompaniments of blast injury with a significant overlap in the diagnostic features of PTSD with post-concussive syndrome (PCS). This review focuses on this overlap and the effects of mild TBI due to bomb blast. Mild TBI may have been over diagnosed by late retrospective review of returned servicemen and women using imprecise criteria. There is therefore a requirement for clear and careful documentation by health professionals of a TBI due to bomb blast shortly after the event so that the diagnosis of TBI can be made with confidence. There is a need for the early recognition of symptoms of PCS, PTSD and depression and early multi-disciplinary interventions focussed on expected return to duties. There also needs to be a continued emphasis on the de-stigmatization of psychological conditions in military personnel returning from deployment.

  7. Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease Among Inpatients Who Have Mild Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, S.; Haw, C.; Kirk, J.; Stubbs, J.

    2005-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. The aim of this study was to screen inpatients with mild or borderline intellectual disability, many of whom also have mental illness, for risk factors for CHD. Participants were interviewed, measured and had blood samples taken. Of the 53 participants, 20 (37.7%)…

  8. Assistive Technology for Students with Mild Disabilities: Update 2002. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrmann, Michael; Jerome, Marci Kinas

    This digest discusses six identified areas of instruction in which assistive technology can aid students with mild disabilities. It begins by discussing how assistive technology can help the student's organization. Low-tech solutions are explained, including teaching students to organize their thoughts or work using flow-charting, task analysis,…

  9. Detective Questions: A Strategy for Improving Inference-Making in Children With Mild Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiménez-Fernández, Gracia

    2015-01-01

    One of the most frequent problems in reading comprehension is the difficulty in making inferences from the text, especially for students with mild disabilities (i.e., children with learning disabilities or with high-functioning autism). It is essential, therefore, that educators include the teaching of reading strategies to improve their students'…

  10. Assessing Fears and Related Anxieties in Children and Adolescents with Learning Disabilities or Mild Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Huijun; Morris, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine self-reported fears and related anxieties in children and adolescents (7-18 years of age) having learning disabilities (LD) or mild mental retardation (MIMR), and whether these fears and related anxieties differ based on gender and age. Students responded to two well validated instruments, The…

  11. Functional Curriculum = Evidence-Based Education?: Considering Secondary Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Flanagan, Sara M.

    2010-01-01

    Education is currently in an evidence-based era, demanding as well as assuming all educational practices are evidence-based. In the case of a functional curriculum for secondary students with mild intellectual disabilities, despite existing professional wisdom, the state of empirical evidence is unclear. This study represents a systematic review…

  12. Solution-Focused Brief Therapy with People with Mild Intellectual Disabilities: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeden, John M.; Maaskant, Marian A.; Bannink, Fredrike P.; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2011-01-01

    Solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) is a form of behavior therapy that focuses on evoking desired behavior rather than on the existing problem behavior. To illustrate the use of this form of therapy, the authors undertook a study of 10 case studies of applications of SFBT with people with a mild intellectual disability (MID). For all 10 cases,…

  13. Mild maternal stress disrupts associative learning and increases aggression in offspring.

    PubMed

    Eaton, L; Edmonds, E J; Henry, T B; Snellgrove, D L; Sloman, K A

    2015-05-01

    Maternal stress has been shown to affect behaviour of offspring in a wide range of animals, but this evidence has come from studies that exposed gestating mothers to acute or severe stressors, such as restraint or exposure to synthetic stress hormones. Here we show that exposure of mothers to even a mild stressor reduces associative learning and increases aggression in offspring. Female guppies were exposed to routine husbandry procedures that produced only a minimal, non-significant, elevation of the stress hormone cortisol. In contrast to controls, offspring from mothers that experienced this mild stress failed to learn to associate a colour cue and food reward, and showed a greater amount of inter-individual variation in behaviour compared with control offspring. This mild stress also resulted in offspring that were more aggressive towards their own mirror image than controls. While it is possible that these results could represent the transmission of beneficial maternal characteristics to offspring born into unpredictable environments, the potential for mild maternal stress to affect offspring performance also has important implications for research into the trans-generational effects of stress.

  14. Co-Teaching Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities Using Literature-Based Reading Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swicegood, Philip; Miller, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Literacy instruction for students with mild to moderate special needs should include authentic literature. Literature-based reading instruction provides time for students to develop new knowledge and strategies in a supportive context. When reading instruction occurs in an inclusion classroom, it also allows time for general education and special…

  15. Prevalence and Characteristics of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability in a French County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, M.; Dieterich, K.; Billette de Villemeur, A.; Jouk, P.-S.; Counillon, J.; Larroque, B.; Bloch, J.; Cans, C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Studies conducted on mild intellectual disability (MID) in children are infrequent and the prevalence rates vary widely. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of MID in children in a French county (Isère), to describe the clinical signs and associated comorbidities, and to specify the aetiologies of this disability. Methods: The…

  16. Meeting Transition Needs of the Mildly Handicapped in Rural Areas: Personnel and Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Donald

    The Rural Transition Teacher Preparation Project was designed to train rural special educators to be clinical instructors for the University of Utah's Department of Special Education. These trained educators then serve as delivery agents of courses designed to improve transition services to mildly and moderately handicapped students in rural…

  17. Benefits of treating highly disabled migraine patients with zolmitriptan while pain is mild.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J; Lucas, C; Røsjø, Ø; Charlesworth, B

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials of migraine therapy often require treatment when migraine pain intensity is moderate or severe, but many physicians find this practice artificial and patients often prefer to treat while pain is mild. This randomized, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy of zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in treating migraine while pain is mild, in patients who typically experience migraine attacks that are initially mild, but progress to moderate or severe. The intent-to-treat population comprised 280 patients (138 zolmitriptan; 148 placebo), with mean MIDAS grades of 29.6 (zolmitriptan) and 27.6 (placebo). Zolmitriptan 2.5 mg provided a significantly higher pain-free rate at 2 h (43.4% vs. 18.4% placebo; P < 0.0001). Significantly fewer zolmitriptan patients reported progression of headache pain to moderate or severe intensity 2 h postdose (53.7% vs. 70.4% placebo; P < 0.01), or required further medication within 24 h (46.4% vs. 71.1% placebo; P < 0.0001). The efficacy of zolmitriptan was more pronounced in patients treating during the first 15 min following pain onset. Adverse events were reported in 31.2% of patients treated with zolmitriptan (vs. 11.3% for placebo), and the incidence was lower in patients who treated early after attack onset. Zolmitriptan provides high efficacy when treating migraine while pain is mild, with the clinical benefits being more pronounced when treating early after migraine onset.

  18. Lessons for Inclusion: Classroom Experiences of Students with Mild and Moderate Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Up to 15 % of the student population in integrated classrooms has mild or moderate hearing loss (MMHL) (Niskar et al., 2001), a communication disability that can impact language development, academic performance, and social-emotional quality of life. Due to the mostly intelligible speech of these students, teachers may easily overlook their…

  19. Can Mild Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Affect Developmental Abilities in Younger School-Age Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ðokovic, Sanja; Gligorovic, Milica; Ostojic, Sanja; Dimic, Nadežda; Radic-Šestic, Marina; Slavnic, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    The research study was conducted for the purpose of examining the influence of mild bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (MBSNHL) on developmental abilities of younger school-age children. The sample encompassed 144 children with MBSNHL, aged 7.5-11 (M = 8.85). MBSNHL (20-40 dB HL) was identified by pure tone audiometry. The control group…

  20. Transition and Students with Mild Intellectual Disability: Findings From the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Joshi, Gauri S.

    2016-01-01

    Students with intellectual disability historically struggle with post-school outcomes. However, much of the research on students with intellectual disability relative to post-school outcomes and transition services is aggregated for students with mild, moderate, and severe intellectual disability. This secondary analysis of the National…

  1. Is There Really a Difference? Distinguishing Mild Intellectual Disability from "Similar" Disability Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Satsangi, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Students with mild intellectual disability generally garner less individual attention in research, as they are often aggregated with students with moderate and severe intellectual disability or students with other high incidence disabilities. This study used the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) to look at the personal…

  2. Mild cognitive impairment in different functional domains and incident Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, N; Wilson, R; Beck, T; Bienias, J; Bennett, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Little is known about factors that predict transition from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Objective: To examine the relation of impairment in different cognitive systems to risk of developing AD in persons with mild cognitive impairment. Methods: Participants are 218 older Catholic clergy members from the Religious Orders Study. At baseline, they met criteria for mild cognitive impairment based on a uniform clinical evaluation that included detailed cognitive testing. Evaluations were repeated annually for up to 10 years. Analyses were controlled for age, sex, and education. Results: Eighty two persons (37.6%) developed AD. In separate analyses, episodic memory, semantic memory, working memory, and perceptual speed, but not visuospatial ability, were associated with risk of AD, but when analysed together only episodic memory and perceptual speed were associated with AD incidence, with the effect for episodic memory especially strong. Overall, those with impaired episodic memory were more than twice as likely to develop AD as those with impairment in other cognitive domains (relative risk (RR) = 2.45; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.53 to 3.92), and they experienced more rapid cognitive decline. Lower episodic memory performance was associated with increased risk of AD throughout the observation period, whereas impairment in other cognitive domains was primarily associated with risk during the following year but not thereafter. Conclusion: Among persons with mild cognitive impairment, episodic memory impairment is associated with a substantial and persistent elevation in risk of developing AD compared to impairment in other cognitive systems. PMID:16227534

  3. Promising Practices in Dropout Prevention and Transition for Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, Jeanne B.; Pankaskie, Sara C.; De Palma-Hankins, Anne; Schwartz, Stuart E.; Perry, Laura

    1997-01-01

    Using a Delphi approach, 10 experts identified 186 practices from the fields of transition and dropout prevention that would be effective with high-risk students, including those with mild disabilities. Rating these practices indicates that many prevention practices are important and feasible to implement. (SLD)

  4. Memory Profiles in Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities: Strengths and Weaknesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Molen, Mariet J.; Van Luit, Johannes E. H.; Jongmans, Marian J.; Van der Molen, Maurits W.

    2009-01-01

    Strengths and weaknesses in short-term memory (STM) and working memory (WM) were identified in children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) by comparing their performance to typically developing children matched on chronological age (CA children) and to younger typically developing children with similar mental capacities (MA children).…

  5. Examine Counting Procedure among Students with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Case of Penang Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taibat, Adiat B.; Ahmad, Aznan Che; Ghazali, Munirah

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates counting procedure in number counting based on gender among students with mild intellectual disability. Quantitative approach was used for testing counting procedure in number counting among these students. The samples for the study comprise fifteen male and fifteen female students with intellectual disability. Descriptive…

  6. Intrinsic Motivation and Learning Performance: Implications for Individual Educational Programming for Learners with Mild Handicaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzky, Harvey N.; Schultz, Geoffrey F.

    1988-01-01

    The implications of current theories of intrinsic motivation for educational practices for mildly handicapped learners are reviewed. The interaction of classroom demand environments, the effects of teacher reward and punishment, and individual differences in intrinsic motivation are discussed in relation to behavioral effectiveness and to academic…

  7. Nitrogen oxides emissions from the MILD combustion with the conditions of recirculation gas.

    PubMed

    Park, Min; Shim, Sung Hoon; Jeong, Sang Hyun; Oh, Kwang-Joong; Lee, Sang-Sup

    2017-04-01

    The nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduction technology by combustion modification which has economic benefits as a method of controlling NOx emitted in the combustion process, has recently been receiving a lot of attention. Especially, the moderate or intense low oxygen dilution (MILD) combustion which applied high temperature flue gas recirculation has been confirmed for its effectiveness with regard to solid fuel as well. MILD combustion is affected by the flue gas recirculation ratio and the composition of recirculation gas, so its NOx reduction efficiency is determined by them. In order to investigate the influence of factors which determine the reduction efficiency of NOx in MILD coal combustion, this study changed the flow rate and concentration of nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and steam (H2O) which simulate the recirculation gas during the MILD coal combustion using our lab-scale drop tube furnace and performed the combustion experiment. As a result, its influence by the composition of recirculation gas was insignificant and it was shown that flue gas recirculation ratio influences the change of NOx concentration greatly.

  8. Structural Dissociation of Attentional Control and Memory in Adults with and without Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niogi, Sumit N.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Ghajar, Jamshid; Johnson, Carl E.; Kolster, Rachel; Lee, Hana; Suh, Minah; Zimmerman, Robert D.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; McCandliss, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Memory and attentional control impairments are the two most common forms of dysfunction following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and lead to significant morbidity in patients, yet these functions are thought to be supported by different brain networks. This 3 T magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study investigates whether…

  9. Computer-Based Working Memory Training in Children with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delavarian, Mona; Bokharaeian, Behrouz; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    We designed a working memory (WM) training programme in game framework for mild intellectually disabled students. Twenty-four students participated as test and control groups. The auditory and visual-spatial WM were assessed by primary test, which included computerised Wechsler numerical forward and backward sub-tests and secondary tests, which…

  10. Mild Memory Impairment in Healthy Older Adults Is Distinct from Normal Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargin, J. Weaver; Maruff, P.; Collie, A.; Masters, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mild memory impairment was detected in 28% of a sample of healthy community-dwelling older adults using the delayed recall trial of a word list learning task. Statistical analysis revealed that individuals with memory impairment also demonstrated relative deficits on other measures of memory, and tests of executive function, processing speed and…

  11. Fruits, vegetables and their components and mild cognitive impairment and dementia: A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the current literature on the role of fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption and their components in the prevention of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. The components investigated include vitamins C and E, carotenoids, polyphenols, and B-vitamins. Th...

  12. A Pyrosequencing Investigation of Differences in the Feline Subgingival Microbiota in Health, Gingivitis and Mild Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Stephen; Croft, Julie; O’Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Allsopp, Judi; Milella, Lisa; Davis, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in cats yet little is known about the bacterial species important for the disease. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis (<25% attachment loss) in feline plaque. Knowledge of these species is a first step in understanding the potential for improving oral health of cats via dietary interventions that alter the proportions of influential species. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from 92 cats with healthy gingiva, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA from these plaque samples generated more than one million reads and identified a total of 267 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all gingival health categories, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Fusobacteria. The Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant family in gingivitis and mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from various genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. The species identified were very similar to those observed in canine plaque in the corresponding health and disease states. Such similarities were not observed between cat and human at the bacterial species level but with disease progression similarities did emerge at the phylum level. This suggests that interventions targeted at human pathogenic species will not be effective for use in cats but there is more potential for commonalities in interventions for cats and dogs. PMID:26605793

  13. Measuring Stress in the Mildly Intellectually Handicapped: The Factorial Structure of the Subjective Stress Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramston, Paul; Fogarty, Gerard J.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the underlying structure of the Subjective Stress Scale (SSS) by analyzing responses of 221 intellectually disabled adults. Results suggest that, although actual stressors vary, persons with mild intellectual disability are affected by the same major stress dimensions as the general population. Results also found the SSS…

  14. Various MRS application tools for Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Gao, F; Barker, P B

    2014-06-01

    MR spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique that allows the detection of several naturally occurring compounds (metabolites) from well-defined regions of interest within the human brain. Alzheimer disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. During the past 20 years, multiple studies have been performed on MR spectroscopy in patients with both mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease. Generally, MR spectroscopy studies have found decreased N-acetylaspartate and increased myo-inositol in both patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease, with greater changes in Alzheimer disease than in mild cognitive impairment. This review summarizes the information content of proton brain MR spectroscopy and its related technical aspects, as well as applications of MR spectroscopy to mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease. While MR spectroscopy may have some value in the differential diagnosis of dementias and assessing prognosis, more likely its role in the near future will be predominantly as a tool for monitoring disease response or progression in treatment trials. More work is needed to evaluate the role of MR spectroscopy as a biomarker in Alzheimer disease and its relationship to other imaging modalities.

  15. Luteinized unruptured follicle syndrome in mild endometriosis. Assessment with biochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Holtz, G; Williamson, H O; Mathur, R S; Landgrebe, S C; Moore, E E

    1985-09-01

    Failure to extrude an ovum, with subsequent luteinization of the unruptured follicle (LUF), has been proposed as a cause of infertility in women with mild endometriosis. To assess the incidence of this process we performed laparoscopies in the early luteal phase on 16 women with mild endometriosis and 8 control subjects. Peritoneal fluid was aspirated and a plasma sample obtained concurrently. Estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) concentrations were determined. A review of the literature suggested that the following hormonal criteria correlated with follicular rupture: fluid E2 greater than or equal to 500 pg/ml, E2 fluid/plasma ratio greater than or equal to 3.1, fluid P greater than or equal to 3,000 ng/dl and P fluid/plasma ratio greater than or equal to 5:1. All control subjects met at least one E2 and one P criterion: 75% met all. In contrast, less than one-third with mild endometriosis met all, and three (19%) met none. Five met only E2 criteria. These findings suggest that LUF occurs occasionally in association with mild endometriosis. Additionally, ovarian steroidogenesis, particularly P secretion, was impaired frequently in the absence of LUF in women with endometriosis.

  16. Impact of Mild Stroke on the Quality of Life of Spouses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellier, Myriam; Rochette, Annie; Lefebvre, Helene

    2011-01-01

    Clients with mild stroke may present subtle deficits that have an impact on complex activities and roles. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceived quality of life of spouses, 3 months after the client with stroke was discharged to go home from acute care. A qualitative design based on a constructivist paradigm was used. Interviews…

  17. Emission, absorption and polarization of gyrosynchrotron radiation of mildly relativistic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Mctiernan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Approximate analytic expressions are presented for the emissivity and absorption coefficient of synchrotron radiation of mildly relativistic particles with an arbitrary energy spectrum and pitch angle distribution. From these, an expression for the degree of polarization is derived. The analytic results are compared with numerical results for both thermal and non-thermal (power law) distributions of particles.

  18. Brain Substrates of Learning and Retention in Mild Cognitive Impairment Diagnosis and Progression to Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Ling; Bondi, Mark W.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; McEvoy, Linda K.; Hagler, Donald J., Jr.; Jacobson, Mark W.; Dale, Anders M.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the underlying qualitative features of memory deficits in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can provide critical information for early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study sought to investigate the utility of both learning and retention measures in (a) the diagnosis of MCI, (b) predicting progression to AD, and (c)…

  19. Mild blast events alter anxiety, memory, and neural activity patterns in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kun; Kuang, Hui; Tsien, Joe Z

    2013-01-01

    There is a general interest in understanding of whether and how exposure to emotionally traumatizing events can alter memory function and anxiety behaviors. Here we have developed a novel laboratory-version of mild blast exposure comprised of high decibel bomb explosion sound coupled with strong air blast to mice. This model allows us to isolate the effects of emotionally fearful components from those of traumatic brain injury or bodily injury typical associated with bomb blasts. We demonstrate that this mild blast exposure is capable of impairing object recognition memory, increasing anxiety in elevated O-maze test, and resulting contextual generalization. Our in vivo neural ensemble recording reveal that such mild blast exposures produced diverse firing changes in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region processing emotional memory and inhibitory control. Moreover, we show that these real-time neural ensemble patterns underwent post-event reverberations, indicating rapid consolidation of those fearful experiences. Identification of blast-induced neural activity changes in the frontal brain may allow us to better understand how mild blast experiences result in abnormal changes in memory functions and excessive fear generalization related to post-traumatic stress disorder.

  20. The Establishment of Learned Reinforcers in Mildly Retarded Children. IMRID Behavioral Science Monograph No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worley, John C., Jr.

    Research regarding the establishment of learned reinforcement with mildly retarded children is reviewed. Noted are findings which indicate that educable retarded students, possibly due to cultural differences, are less responsive to social rewards than either nonretarded or more severely retarded children. Characteristics of primary and secondary…

  1. A Comparison of Support for Two Groups of Young Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soenen, Sarah; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina; Scholte, Evert

    2016-01-01

    Young adults with mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID) have varying profiles of cognitive, adaptive and behavioural functioning. There is also variability in their educational and therapeutic needs. This study compares recommended and actual provision of support for two groups of young adults with MBID and looks at young adults'…

  2. Investment vs. Return: Outcomes of Special Education Technology Research in Literacy for Students with Mild Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Cindy L.; Anderson, Kevin M.; Cherup, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a review of the research on technology integration in the area of literacy for individuals with mild disabilities. It describes relevant legislation, including how special education technology is impacted by the No Child Left Behind Act (2001). Included studies focus on research in the core content areas of reading and…

  3. An Interview Study of Young Adults Born to Mothers with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindblad, Ida; Billstedt, Eva; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    A group of 10 young adults from a population-based series in Sweden, of originally 42 individuals, born to mothers with mild intellectual disability (ID), were interviewed with regard to their experiences during childhood, adolescence, and their current situation. The interview revealed that 6 of the 10 individuals had been removed from their…

  4. Response to Intervention for Young Children with Mild, Moderate/Severe Cognitive Disabilities: Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almalki, Nabil; Abaoud, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    This study has discussed in-depth information about understanding the Response to Intervention (RTI) linking with children from pre-school to kindergarten (three to eight years old) who have Cognitive Disabilities (CD), including different levels from mild to moderate and/or severe. The study consists of five main sections--RTI, CD, RTI Linking…

  5. Oocyte quality is decreased in women with minimal or mild endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bo; Guo, Nan; Zhang, Xiao-min; Shi, Wei; Tong, Xian-hong; Iqbal, Furhan; Liu, Yu-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis, a pathological condition in which the endometrium grows outside the uterus, is one of the most common causes of female infertility; it is diagnosed in 25–40% of infertile women. The mechanism by which endometriosis affects the fertility of females remains largely unknown. We examined the ultrastructure of oocytes from patients with minimal or mild endometriosis and control females undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the physiological significance of oocyte quality for patients with minimal or mild endometriosis. The TEM results revealed that the oocytes from women with minimal or mild endometriosis exhibited abnormal mitochondrial structure and decreased mitochondria mass. Quantitative real time PCR analysis revealed that the mitochondrial DNA copy number was significantly reduced in the oocytes from women with minimal or mild endometriosis compared with those of the control subjects. Our results suggest that decreased oocyte quality because of impaired mitochondrial structure and functions probably an important factor affecting the fertility of endometriosis patients. PMID:26022105

  6. Effects of a Mindfulness-Based Smoking Cessation Program for an Adult with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Winton, Alan S. W.; Singh, Ashvind N. A.; Singh, Judy; Singh, Angela D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for a number of health conditions and many smokers find it difficult to quit smoking without specific interventions. We developed and used a mindfulness-based smoking cessation program with a 31-year-old man with mild intellectual disabilities who had been a smoker for 17 years. The mindfulness-based smoking…

  7. A Model of Phonological Processing, Language, and Reading for Students with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, R. Michael; Sevcik, Rose A.; Morris, Robin D.; Romski, MaryAnn

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the relationships between phonological processing, language, and reading in children with intellectual disability (ID). We examined the structure of phonological processing in 294 school-age children with mild ID and the relationships between its components and expressive and receptive language and reading skills using…

  8. Numerical study of influence of molecular diffusion in the Mild combustion regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardani, Amir; Tabejamaat, Sadegh; Ghamari, Mohsen

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, the importance of molecular diffusion versus turbulent transport in the moderate or intense low-oxygen dilution (Mild) combustion mode has been numerically studied. The experimental conditions of Dally et al. [Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 1147-1154] were used for modelling. The EDC model was used to describe the turbulence-chemistry interaction. The DRM-22 reduced mechanism and the GRI 2.11 full mechanism were used to represent the chemical reactions of an H2/methane jet flame. The importance of molecular diffusion for various O2 levels, jet Reynolds numbers and H2 fuel contents was investigated. Results show that the molecular diffusion in Mild combustion cannot be ignored in comparison with the turbulent transport. Also, the method of inclusion of molecular diffusion in combustion modelling has a considerable effect on the accuracy of numerical modelling of Mild combustion. By decreasing the jet Reynolds number, decreasing the oxygen concentration in the airflow or increasing H2 in the fuel mixture, the influence of molecular diffusion on Mild combustion increases.

  9. The Sexual Knowledge, Experience, Feelings and Needs of People with Mild Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Marita P.; Cummins, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    Thirty adults with mild mental retardation and 50 first-year psychology students were surveyed regarding their sexual knowledge, experience, feelings, and needs. Subjects with mental retardation had less knowledge, more negative attitudes toward sexual issues, and less experience in intimacy and sexual intercourse, but more experience in…

  10. Responses of Female Fire-Setters with Mild and Borderline Intellectual Disabilities to a Group Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John L.; Robertson, Alison; Thorne, Ian; Belshaw, Tracy; Watson, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Background: This report describes a cognitive behavioural group intervention for women with mild and borderline intellectual disabilities detained in a secure hospital setting because of their fire-setting behaviour. The study aimed to examine participants' motivations for setting fires, their responses to an intervention designed specifically for…

  11. Predictors of Hearing Aid Use Time in Children with Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Spratford, Meredith; Moeller, Mary Pat; Oleson, Jacob; Ou, Hua; Roush, Patricia; Jacobs, Shana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated predictors of hearing aid (HA) use time for children with mild-to-severe hearing loss (HL). Barriers to consistent HA use and reliability of parent report measures were also examined. Method: Participants included parents of 272 children with HL. Parents estimated the amount of time the child used HAs daily.…

  12. A radical addition/cyclization of diverse ethers to 2-isocyanobiaryls under mildly basic aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Anton-Torrecillas, Cintia; Felipe-Blanco, Diego; Gonzalez-Gomez, Jose C

    2016-12-07

    Mildly basic aqueous conditions facilitated the tert-butyl peroxybenzoate (TBPB) mediated dehydrogenative addition of a range of ethers, including acetals, to diverse substituted 2-isocyanobiaryls. Mechanistic studies suggest that this radical cascade is an example of base promoted homolytic aromatic substitution (BHAS).

  13. Self-Reported versus Informant-Reported Depressive Symptoms in Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mileviciute, I.; Hartley, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Virtually nothing is known about potential differences in the types of depression symptoms reported by adults with mild intellectual disability (ID) on self-reported questionnaires as compared with the types of symptoms reported by caregivers on informant questionnaires. Moreover, little is known about how the presentation of…

  14. (Social) Cognitive Skills and Social Information Processing in Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.; Vriens, A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the unique contributions of (social) cognitive skills such as inhibition, working memory, perspective taking, facial emotion recognition, and interpretation of situations to the variance in social information processing in children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities. Respondents were 79…

  15. Reading Comprehension Strategy Instruction and Attribution Retraining for Secondary Students with Learning and Other Mild Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeley, Sheri; Mastropieri, Margo A.; Scruggs, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    A pre-post experimental design with 6-week delayed posttest was implemented to investigate the effects of reading comprehension strategy (RCS) instruction with and without attribution retraining (AR) on reading outcomes for seventh, eighth, and ninth graders with learning and other mild disabilities. Students were randomly assigned to one of three…

  16. A Pyrosequencing Investigation of Differences in the Feline Subgingival Microbiota in Health, Gingivitis and Mild Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stephen; Croft, Julie; O'Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Allsopp, Judi; Milella, Lisa; Davis, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in cats yet little is known about the bacterial species important for the disease. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis (<25% attachment loss) in feline plaque. Knowledge of these species is a first step in understanding the potential for improving oral health of cats via dietary interventions that alter the proportions of influential species. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from 92 cats with healthy gingiva, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA from these plaque samples generated more than one million reads and identified a total of 267 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all gingival health categories, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Fusobacteria. The Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant family in gingivitis and mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from various genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. The species identified were very similar to those observed in canine plaque in the corresponding health and disease states. Such similarities were not observed between cat and human at the bacterial species level but with disease progression similarities did emerge at the phylum level. This suggests that interventions targeted at human pathogenic species will not be effective for use in cats but there is more potential for commonalities in interventions for cats and dogs.

  17. Model Underpinning Treatment for Sex Offenders with Mild Intellectual Disability: Current Theories of Sex Offending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.

    2005-01-01

    Although many writers have provided a theoretical framework for treatment of mainstream sex offenders, this research has not been extended to sex offenders with mild intellectual disability. My purpose here is to bring together several research strands to provide a theoretical model for working in this field, including theories of sex offending,…

  18. Mild Intellectual Disability in Children in Lahore, Pakistan: Aetiology and Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaqoob, M.; Bashir, A.; Zaman, S.; Ferngren, H.; von Dobeln, U.; Gustavson, K.-H.

    2004-01-01

    One of the main objectives of studying intellectual disability (ID) in children is to explore its causes. A specific aetiological diagnosis is important in determining the prognosis, nature and extent of services needed to support affected children. Aetiology and risk factors in mild ID were studied in a cohort of longitudinally followed children…

  19. People with Mild to Moderate Intellectual Disability Talking about Their Diabetes and How They Manage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardol, M.; Rijken, M.; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of diabetes is relatively high in people with intellectual disability (ID). However, little is known about how people with ID experience having diabetes and how they manage the condition. Method: Seventeen people with mild to moderate ID who have diabetes were interviewed. A framework on illness perceptions having an…

  20. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Poor Functioning after Isolated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Children

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, Dennis R.; Koepsell, Thomas D.; Wang, Jin; Temkin, Nancy R.; Dorsch, Andrea M.; Vavilala, Monica S.; Jaffe, Kenneth M.; Rivara, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of poor 3 and 12 month quality of life outcomes in a cohort of pediatric patients with isolated mild TBI. We conducted a prospective cohort study of children and adolescents <18 years of age treated for an isolated mild TBI, defined as “no radiographically apparent intracranial injury” or “an isolated skull fracture, and no other clinically significant non-brain injuries.” The main outcome measure was the change in quality of life from baseline at 3 and 12 months following injury, as measured by the Pediatric Quality of Life index (PedsQL). Poor functioning was defined as a decrease in total PedsQL score of >15 points between baseline and follow-up scores (at 3 and 12 months). Of the 329 patients who met inclusion criteria, 11.3% (95% CI 8.3–15.3%) at 3 months and 12.9% (95% CI 9.6–17.2%) at 12 months following injury had relatively poor functioning. Significant predictors of poor functioning included less parental education, Hispanic ethnicity (at 3 months following injury, but not at 12 months); low household income (at 3 and 12 months), and Medicaid insurance (at 12 months only). Children and adolescents sustaining a mild TBI who are socioeconomically disadvantaged may require additional intervention to mitigate the effects of mild TBI on their functioning. PMID:24294826

  1. The Prevalence and Characteristics of Psychiatric Disorders among Adolescent Bedouin with Mild to Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manor-Binyamini, Iris

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and types of psychiatric disorders among Bedouin adolescents with mild to moderate intellectual disability. This is the first study ever conducted on this topic within the Bedouin community in the Negev in Israel. The issue of psychiatric disorders among adolescents with intellectual disability…

  2. Chemo- and regioselective monosulfonylation of nonprotected carbohydrates catalyzed by organotin dichloride under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Wataru

    2012-09-21

    The catalytic regioselective monosulfonylation of nonprotected carbohydrates using organotin dichloride under mild conditions is examined. The carbohydrates were chemo- and regioselectively converted to the corresponding monosulfonates in the presence of monoalcohols using catalytic dibutyltin dichloride. The regioselectivity of the sulfonylation is attributed to the intrinsic character of the carbohydrates derived from the relative stereochemistry between their hydroxy groups.

  3. Connecting the GPE and APE Curricula for Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.

    2011-01-01

    Many physical educators today face the challenge of including students with mild and moderate disabilities in their general physical education (GPE) programs. While most GPE teachers are willing to modify their instructional methods and activities to accommodate students with disabilities, this may not be enough to adequately address the students'…

  4. Clock Drawing Performance and Brain Morphology in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomann, Philipp A.; Toro, Pablo; Santos, Vasco Dos; Essig, Marco; Schroder, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a widely used instrument in the neuropsychological assessment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As CDT performance necessitates several cognitive functions (e.g., visuospatial and constructional abilities, executive functioning), an interaction of multiple brain regions is likely. Fifty-one subjects with mild cognitive…

  5. Mild Intellectual Disability Associated with a Progeny of Father-Daughter Incest: Genetic and Environmental Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansermet, Francois; Lespinasse, James; Gimelli, Stefania; Bena, Frederique; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old female resulting from a father-daughter sexual abuse and presenting a phenotype of mild intellectual disability with minor dysmorphic features. Karyotyping showed a normal 46, XX constitution. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) revealed a heterozygote 320kb 6p22.3 microdeletion in the…

  6. The Social-Sexual Voice of Adults with Mild Intellectual Disabilities: A Qualitative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, George W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how adults with mild intellectual disabilities live out their social-sexual lives. Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) are often assumed to be asexual or incapable of having sexual lives, resulting in a paucity of research-based knowledge. Research and educational efforts with this…

  7. The lightest market in the world: light and mild cigarettes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Assunta, Mary; Chapman, Simon

    2008-05-01

    This article reviews the history of the introduction and use of light and mild labeled cigarettes in Japan, the "lightest" market in the world. Systematic keyword and opportunistic Web site searches were conducted on tobacco industry internal documents relevant to Japan, supplemented with relevant material from the tobacco trade and sociological literatures. Certain "market quirks" of the Japanese society benefited the tobacco industry in promoting its light and mild cigarettes. Japan's is a trend-conscious society with a penchant for new fashion and products. The Japanese are innovative, with the propensity to transform concepts into something characteristically their own marked by a distinct cultural style, such as the concept of keihaku tansho ("light-thin-short-small"). With big-budget sophisticated advertising, tobacco companies developed a lucrative market for mild, light, and ultra-low-tar cigarettes. Smokers had a preference for charcoal filters, which they believed protected them. Tar numbers meant little to smokers. The transnational tobacco companies capitalized on consumer concerns about the health hazards of smoking to promote low-tar cigarettes as a safer alternative. This may be one factor that explains why smoking prevalence in Japan remains high. Light and mild cigarettes are popular in Japan because Japanese smokers believe low tar/nicotine cigarette with charcoal filters protect them and help mollify their health concerns about smoking.

  8. Pentop Computers as Tools for Teaching Multiplication to Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Bassette, Laura; Taber-Doughty, Teresa; Flanagan, Sara M.; Szwed, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of a pentop computer when teaching multiplication facts to three middle school students with mild intellectual disabilities was examined. A multiple probe design was used to assess the students learning of one and two digit multiplication facts over a 2-3 week intervention period. During the intervention phase, students used a…

  9. Effectiveness of a Computerised Working Memory Training in Adolescents with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Molen, M. J.; Van Luit, J. E. H.; Van der Molen, M. W.; Klugkist, I.; Jongmans, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerised working memory (WM) training on memory, response inhibition, fluid intelligence, scholastic abilities and the recall of stories in adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities attending special education. Method: A total of 95 adolescents with…

  10. Development of Science Simulations for Mildly Mentally Retarded or Learning Disabled Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macro Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This final report describes the development of eight computer based science simulations designed for use with middle school mainstreamed students having learning disabilities or mild mental retardation. The total program includes software, a teacher's manual, 3 videos, and a set of 30 activity worksheets. Special features of the software for…

  11. Pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sei Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are one of the most important causes of postoperative morbidity and mortality after abdominal surgery. Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been considered a risk factor for PPCs, it remains unclear whether mild-to-moderate COPD is a risk factor. This retrospective cohort study included 387 subjects who underwent abdominal surgery with general anesthesia in a tertiary referral hospital. PPCs included pneumonia, pulmonary edema, pulmonary thromboembolism, atelectasis, and acute exacerbation of COPD. Among the 387 subjects, PPCs developed in 14 (12.0%) of 117 patients with mild-to-moderate COPD and in 13 (15.1%) of 86 control patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that mild-to-moderate COPD was not a significant risk factor for PPCs (odds ratio [OR] =0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.31–2.03; P=0.628). However, previous hospitalization for respiratory problems (OR =4.20; 95% CI =1.52–11.59), emergency surgery (OR =3.93; 95% CI =1.75–8.82), increased amount of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion (OR =1.09; 95% CI =1.05–1.14 for one pack increase of RBC transfusion), and laparoscopic surgery (OR =0.41; 95% CI =0.18–0.93) were independent predictors of PPCs. These findings suggested that mild-to-moderate COPD may not be a significant risk factor for PPCs after abdominal surgery. PMID:27877032

  12. Adults with Mild Intellectual Disabilities: Can Their Reading Comprehension Ability Be Improved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bos, K. P.; Nakken, H.; Nicolay, P. G.; van Houten, E. J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adults with a mild intellectual disability (ID) often show poor decoding and reading comprehension skills. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of teaching text comprehension strategies to these adults. Specific research goals were to determine (1) the effects of two instruction conditions, i.e. strategy instruction to…

  13. Synthesis of Functionalized Dihydrobenzofurans by Direct Aryl C-O Bond Formation under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Joseph; Fournier, Jeremy; Zakarian, Armen

    2016-09-12

    A method for the synthesis of dihydrobenzofurans by a direct aryl C-O bond formation is described. A mechanistic pathway for the reaction, distinct from previously described similar transformations, allows for mild reaction conditions that are expected to be compatible with functionalized substrates.

  14. Ascorbate as a pro-oxidant: mild N-terminal modification with vinylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Jun; Ball, Zachary T

    2017-02-04

    We describe divergent reactivity of vinylboronic acids for protein modification. In addition to previously reported copper-catalyzed backbone N-H modification, ascorbate in air mediates N-terminal functionalization with the same vinylboronate reagents. This mild and selective aqueous reactivity enables selective single-modification of the B chain of human insulin.

  15. An Investigation Of Students With Mild Learning Disabilities Reactions To Participating In Sexuality Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Gail; Kroese, Biza Stenfert

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates 35 students with mild learning disabilities reactions to participating in a research project exploring their sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. Students completed an informed consent procedure prior to their participation in the sexuality research and all were interviewed using a confidential interview procedure.…

  16. Treating Attention in Mild Aphasia: Evaluation of Attention Process Training-II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Laura L.; Keeton, R. Jessica; Karcher, Laura

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether attention processing training-II [Sohlberg, M. M., Johnson, L., Paule, L., Raskin, S. A., & Mateer, C. A. (2001). "Attention Process Training-II: A program to address attentional deficits for persons with mild cognitive dysfunction" (2nd ed.). Wake Forest, NC: Lash & Associates.; APT-II], when applied in the context of…

  17. Occupational asthma due to gas metal arc welding on mild steel.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, O.; Dargent, F.; Auverdin, J. J.; Boulanger, J.; Bossiroy, J. M.; Roosels, D.; Vande Weyer, R.

    1995-01-01

    Occupational asthma has been documented in electric arc welders exposed to manual metal arc welding on stainless steel. A subject is described who developed late and dual asthmatic reactions after occupational-type challenge exposure to gas metal arc welding on uncoated mild steel. PMID:7597679

  18. Using Text-to-Speech Reading Support for an Adult with Mild Aphasia and Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Judy; Hux, Karen; Snell, Jeffry

    2013-01-01

    This single case study served to examine text-to-speech (TTS) effects on reading rate and comprehension in an individual with mild aphasia and cognitive impairment. Findings showed faster reading, given TTS presented at a normal speaking rate, but no significant comprehension changes. TTS may support reading in people with aphasia when time…

  19. The Takeda Three Colors Combination Test: A Screening Test for Detection of Very Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tajime, Kayo; Taniguchi, Toshiatsu

    2014-01-01

    Background. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and is prevalent worldwide. It is expected that AD, for which aging is a risk factor, will increase in the future. Because early detection of AD has become increasingly important, promoting demand for screening tests with adequate sensitivity. In this study, we examined the usefulness of the Takeda Three Colors Combination Test (TTCC) for screening of the very mild AD and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Methods. 154 senior persons participated in the research: 55 with very mild AD, 45 with aMCI, and 54 control group. The TTCC, which was a colored cards configuration memory task, was examined for sensitivity and specificity. Results. The sensitivity of the TTCC was 76% and 47% for the very mild AD and aMCI groups, and the specificity was 83%. Conducting TTCC (including instruction and evaluation) was accomplished within 2 minutes for all subjects. Conclusion. The TTCC is useful screening test for early detection of AD. Furthermore, administration time is short and requires no special training or skills. Thus, we believe the TTCC shows great potential for use as an AD screening test by a general practitioner in communities worldwide. PMID:25386623

  20. Cognitive Biases in Individuals with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability and Alcohol Use-Related Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Duijvenbode, Neomi; Didden, Robert; Voogd, Hubert; Korzilius, Hubert P. L. M.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of the present pilot study was to examine cognitive biases in individuals with mild to borderline ID and alcohol use-related problems. Participants (N = 57) performed the approach avoidance task, picture rating task and visual dot probe task, which was combined with eye-tracking methodology. They were admitted to a forensic setting…

  1. 50 Essential Web Sites for Teachers of Students with Mild or Moderate Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Linda

    2007-01-01

    The author presents 50 Web sites identified by preservice teachers as helpful in serving students with mild or moderate disabilities and their families. The Web sites cover the topics of academic supports; advocacy and family supports; professional organizations; social, emotional, and behavioral supports; technology; and transition support.

  2. Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury: mechanisms of injury and impact on clinical care.

    PubMed

    Elder, Gregory A; Cristian, Adrian

    2009-04-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury has been called the signature injury of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In both theaters of operation, traumatic brain injury has been a significant cause of mortality and morbidity, with blast-related injury the most common cause. Improvised explosive devices have been the major cause of blast injuries. It is estimated that 10% to 20% of veterans returning from these operations have suffered a traumatic brain injury, and there is concern that blast-related injury may produce adverse long-term health affects and affect the resilience and in-theater performance of troops. Blast-related injury occurs through several mechanisms related to the nature of the blast overpressure wave itself as well as secondary and tertiary injuries. Animal studies clearly show that blast overpressure waves are transmitted to the brain and can cause changes that neuropathologically are most similar to diffuse axonal injury. One striking feature of the mild traumatic brain injury cases being seen in veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is the high association of mild traumatic brain injury with posttraumatic stress disorder. The overlap in symptoms between the disorders has made distinguishing them clinically challenging. The high rates of mild traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder in the current operations are of significant concern for the long-term health of US veterans with associated economic implications.

  3. A single subcutaneous dose of tramadol for mild to moderate musculoskeletal trauma in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Alejandro; Silva, Carlos; Dominguez, Luis; Botero, Beatriz; Zambrano, Paulo; Bareno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mild to moderate musculoskeletal trauma is a common cause for an emergency room visit, and frequent pain is one of the cardinal symptoms of consultation. The objective of this study is to assess the perception of a single subcutaneous dose of 50 mg tramadol for pain management in patients with mild to moderate musculoskeletal trauma, likewise to appraise the perception of pain by subcutaneous injection. METHODS: A total of 77 patients, who met inclusion criteria, received a single subcutaneous dose of tramadol. Pain control was evaluated based on the verbal numerical pain scale (0–10) at baseline, 20 and 60 minutes; similarly, pain perception was evaluated secondary to subcutaneous injection of the analgesic. RESULTS: On admission, the average pain perceived by patients was 8; twenty minutes later, 89% of the patients reported five or less, and after sixty minutes, 94% had three or less on the verbal numerical pain scale. Of the patients, 88% reported pain perception by verbal numeric scale of 3 or less by injection of the drug, and 6.5% required a second analgesic for pain control. Two events with drug administration (soft tissue infection and mild abdominal rectus injection) were reported. CONCLUSION: We conclude that a single subcutaneous dose of tramadol is a safe and effective option for the management of patients with mild to moderate pain and musculoskeletal disease in the emergency department. PMID:25548601

  4. Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Patients Have Worse Sleep Quality Compared to Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    de Godoy, Luciana Balester Mello; Luz, Gabriela Pontes; Palombini, Luciana Oliveira; e Silva, Luciana Oliveira; Hoshino, Wilson; Guimarães, Thaís Moura; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia; Togeiro, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare sleep quality and sustained attention of patients with Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and normal individuals. Methods UARS criteria were presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale—ESS—≥ 10) and/or fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale—MFIS—≥ 38) associated to Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≤ 5 and Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) > 5 events/hour of sleep or more than 30% of total sleep time with flow limitation. Mild OSA was considered if the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS ≥ 10) and/or fatigue (MFIS ≥ 38) associated to AHI ≥ 5 and ≤ 15 events/hour. “Control group” criteria were AHI < 5 events/hour and RDI ≤ 5 events/hour and ESS ≤ 9, without any sleep, clinical, neurological or psychiatric disorder. 115 individuals (34 UARS and 47 mild OSA patients and 34 individuals in “control group”), adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and schooling years, performed sleep questionnaires and sustained attention evaluation. Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) was performed five times (each two hours) from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Results UARS patients had worse sleep quality (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire—FOSQ—and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index—PSQI: p < 0.05) and more fatigue than mild OSA patients (p = 0.003) and scored significantly higher in both Beck inventories than “control group” (p < 0.02). UARS patients had more lapses early in the morning (in time 1) compared to the results in the afternoon (time 5) than mild OSA (p = 0.02). Mild OSA patients had more lapses in times 2 than in time 5 compared to “control group” (p = 0.04). Conclusions UARS patients have a worse sleep quality, more fatigue and a worse early morning sustained attention compared to mild OSA. These last had a worse sustained attention than controls. PMID:27228081

  5. Effect of acute mild dehydration on cognitive-motor performance in golf.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark F; Newell, Alex J; Baker, Mistrelle R

    2012-11-01

    Whether mild dehydration (-1 to 3% body mass change [ΔBM]) impairs neurophysiological function during sport-specific cognitive-motor performance has yet to be fully elucidated. To investigate this within a golfing context, 7 low-handicap players (age: 21 ± 1.1 years; mass: 76.1 ± 11.8 kg; stature: 1.77 ± 0.07 m; handicap: 3.0 ± 1.2) completed a golf-specific motor and cognitive performance task in a euhydrated condition (EC) and dehydrated condition (DC) (randomized counterbalanced design; 7-day interval). Dehydration was controlled using a previously effective 12-hour fluid restriction, monitored through ΔBM and urine color assessment (UCOL). Mild dehydration reduced the mean BM by 1.5 ± 0.5% (p = 0.01), with UCOL increasing from 2 (EC) to 4 (DC) (p = 0.02). Mild dehydration significantly impaired motor performance, expressed as shot distance (114.6 vs. 128.6 m; p < 0.001) and off-target accuracy (7.9 vs. 4.1 m; p = 0.001). Cognitive performance, expressed as the mean error in distance judgment to target increased from 4.1 ± 3.0 m (EC) to 8.8 ± 4.7 m (DC) (p < 0.001). The findings support those of previous research that indicates mild dehydration (-1 to 2% ΔBM) significantly impairs cognitive-motor task performance. This study is the first to show that mild dehydration can impair distance, accuracy, and distance judgment during golf performance.

  6. Dual Tasking for the Differentiation between Depression and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Florian G.; Hobert, Markus A.; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Hasmann, Sandra E.; Hahn, Tim; Eschweiler, Gerhard W.; Berg, Daniela; Fallgatter, Andreas J.; Maetzler, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of mild cognitive impairment from depression in elderly adults is a clinically relevant issue which is not sufficiently solved. Gait and dual task (DT) parameters may have the potential to complement current diagnostic work-up, as both dementia and depression are associated with changes of gait and DT parameters. Methods: Seven hundred and four participants of the TREND study (Tübinger evaluation of Risk factors for Early detection of NeuroDegeneration) aged 50–80 years were assessed using the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease Plus test battery for testing cognition and Beck's Depression Inventory for evaluation of depression. Based on these results, four groups were defined: acute depressed (N = 53), cognitively mildly impaired (N = 97), acute depressed, and cognitively mildly impaired (N = 15), and controls (N = 536). Participants underwent a 20 m walk and checking boxes task under single (ST) and DT conditions. ST and DT performance and dual task costs (DTC) were calculated. Due to the typical age of increasing incidence of depressive and also cognitive symptoms, the 7th decade was calculated separately. Results: ST speeds of gait and checking boxes, DT walking speed, and walking DTC were significantly different between groups. Healthy controls were the fastest in all paradigms and cognitively mildly impaired had higher DTC than depressed individuals. Additionally, we constructed a multivariate predictive model differentiating the groups on a single-subject level. Conclusion: DT parameters are simply and comfortably measureable, and DTC can easily be determined. The combination of these parameters allows a differentiation of depressed and cognitively mildly impaired elderly adults. PMID:27790136

  7. Evaluation of neonatally-induced mild diabetes in rats: Maternal and fetal repercussions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Many experimental studies have been performed to evaluate mild diabetes effects. However, results are divergent regarding glycemia and insulin measurement, fetal macrossomia, and placental weights. The aim was to investigate repercussions of neonatally-induced mild diabetes on the maternal organism and presence of congenital defects in their offspring in other mild diabetes model. On the day of birth, female offspring were distributed into two groups: Group streptozotocin (STZ): received 100 mg STZ/kg body weight, and Control Group: received vehicle in a similar time period. Maternal weights and glycemias were determined at days 0, 7, 14 and 21 of pregnancy. At day 21 of pregnancy, the rats were anesthetized and a laparotomy was performed to weigh and analyze living fetuses and placentas. The fetuses were classified as small (SPA), appropriate (APA) and large (LPA) for pregnancy age. Fetuses were also analyzed for the presence of external anomalies and processed for skeletal anomaly and ossification sites analysis. Statistical significance was considered as p < 0.05. In STZ group, there was increased glycemia at 0 and 14 days of pregnancy, lower weights throughout pregnancy, higher placental weight and index, an increased proportion of fetuses classified as SPA and LPA, and their fetuses presented with an increased frequency of abnormal sternebra, and absent cervical nuclei, which were not enough to cause the emergence of skeletal anomalies. Thus, this study shows that mild diabetes altered fetal development, characterized by intrauterine growth restriction. Further, the reached glycemia does not lead to any major congenital defects in the fetuses of streptozotocin-induced mild diabetic rats. PMID:20529353

  8. Cardiorespiratory and sensory responses to exercise in adults with mild cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Bradley S.; Wilkie, Sabrina S.; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Schaeffer, Michele R.; Ramsook, Andrew H.; Wilcox, Pearce G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiorespiratory fitness and reasons for exercise curtailment in a contemporary adult cystic fibrosis (CF) cohort with mild lung disease. Adults with mild CF (n = 19, forced expiratory volume in 1 s = 95 ± 17% predicted) were age-, sex-, ethnicity-, and body mass index-matched to healthy controls (n = 19) and underwent a detailed cardiopulmonary cycle exercise test. While CF subjects had a reduced peak oxygen uptake compared with controls, the values were normal when expressed as %predicted in 14/19 (74%) of subjects. Both groups demonstrated a normal cardiovascular limitation to exercise and stopped exercise primarily because of leg fatigue. Despite not being exercise-limited by respiratory factors, there was some evidence of ventilatory abnormalities as patients with mild CF had increased end-inspiratory lung volumes and reached an inflection/plateau in tidal volume relative to minute ventilation at lower exercise intensities compared with controls. Subjects with CF were not more likely to demonstrate expiratory flow limitation compared with controls and did not have evidence of dynamic hyperinflation during exercise. Despite increased end-inspiratory lung volumes and an earlier tidal volume inflection/plateau, CF subjects did not experience higher levels of dyspnea. In an exploratory analysis, a significant inverse correlation was observed between sweat chloride and peak work rate. Adult CF subjects with relatively well preserved spirometry have normal exercise performance relative to reference values and are primarily limited by nonrespiratory factors. However, ventilatory abnormalities were detected even in this mild CF cohort and should be evaluated in future therapeutic trials focused on disease-modifying therapies in mild CF. PMID:26429870

  9. [Efficacy and safety of azithromycin infusion in patients with mild or moderate community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shingo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yamasaki, Kei; Uchimura, Keigo; Hata, Ryosuke; Tachiwada, Takashi; Oda, Keishi; Hara, Kanako; Suzuki, Yu; Akata, Kentarou; Ogoshi, Takaaki; Tokuyama, Susumu; Inoue, Naoyuki; Nishida, Chinatsu; Orihashi, Takeshi; Yoshida, Yugo; Kawanami, Yukiko; Taura, Yusuke; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Obata, Hideto; Tsuda, Toru; Yoshii, Chiharu; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) is one of 15-membered rings macrolide antibiotics with wide spectrum of antimicrobial efficacy for Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and also atypical bacteria. So far, there had been no reports of the prospective studies evaluating efficacy and safety of AZM infusion in patients with mild or moderate community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This study was conducted to evaluate prospectively the efficacy and safety of AZM in patients with mild or moderate CAP. AZM 500 mg was intravenously administered once daily, and the clinical efficacy were evaluated by clinical symptoms, peripheral blood laboratory findings and chest X-rays. Sixty-four patients were firstly registered, and eventually 61 and 62 patients were enrolled for the evaluation of clinical efficacy and safety of AZM, respectively. The efficacy of AZM in 61 patients evaluated was 88.5%. In addition, the efficacies of AZM in each pneumonia severity index by A-DROP system by the Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS) guideline in CAP were 85.2% in mild and 91.2% in moderate. Furthermore, the efficacy of AZM in each differentiation between suspicion of bacterial pneumonia and that of atypical pneumonia by JRS guideline in CAP were 91.7% in suspicion of atypical pneumonia, and its efficacy was high than that of bacterial pneumonia. Nineteen patients (20 cases; 15 with liver dysfunction, 4 with diarrhea, 1 with vascular pain) out of 62 patients were reported to have possible adverse effects of AZM. All of the patients with these adverse effects demonstrated mild dysfunction and continued AZM treatment, and these dysfunctions normalized soon after cessation of AZM. In conclusion, AZM is effective drug for patients with mild or moderate CAP, and we believe that it may be one of effective choice in the treatment of CAP patients who need hospitalization.

  10. Assay discrepancy in mild haemophilia A: entire population study in a National Haemophilia Centre.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, A L; Pedersen, L H; Hvas, A-M; Poulsen, L H; Thykjaer, H; Ingerslev, J

    2009-01-01

    Assay discrepancy in mild haemophilia, here defined by a significantly higher factor VIII (FVIII):C response by the one-stage procoagulant assay as compared with a two-stage enzymatic method, has repeatedly been reported in literature. The purpose of this study was to determine the overall prevalence of this phenomenon amongst mild haemophilia families from a population of 2.95 million inhabitants in the Western Danish region. Information was collected retrospectively through a thorough search of archives of the National Haemophilia Centre in Aarhus. We identified 109 patients with mild haemophilia A amongst whom 92 were eligible to enter the study. These represent a total of 53 unrelated families. Our data illustrate that this assay discrepancy pattern is found quite frequently amongst our mild haemophilia A families. While the ratio of FVIII:C chromogenic/FVIII:C clot values was quite consistent amongst patients belonging to same family pattern, ratios in the entire cohort of families ranged from 0.18 to 1.00. Selecting a cut-off level for the FVIII:C chromogenic/FVIII:C clot ratios at 0.7, 0.6 and 0.5, respectively, we found that 38 (72%), 27 (51%) and 19 (36%) of families, respectively, displayed this assay discrepancy. In 10 patients, the FVIII:C chromogenic level was inside the category of moderate haemophilia at >0.01-<0.05 IU mL(-1), pointing to a class-shift in the biochemical phenotype. In conclusion, our data illustrate a substantial prevalence of the assay discrepancy phenomenon amongst mild haemophilia A patients in our geographical area.

  11. Risk factors for FEV1 decline in mild COPD and high-risk populations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shujing; Wang, Changhui; Li, Bing; Shi, Guochao; Li, Huiping; Zhang, Jing; Gu, Yutong; Zhou, Jian; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2017-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of COPD is often not achieved due to limited recognition and limited access to the pulmonary function test. Our hypothesis was that lung function decline may be different between populations with mild COPD and those who are at high risk and do not receive treatment. Patients and methods Subjects with mild COPD and those from a high-risk COPD population were recruited from a community-based COPD epidemiological study after obtaining consent. Baseline clinical characteristics, symptom questionnaire, spirometry, low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) chest scan, and blood plasma biomarker data were collected initially and then 1 year later. Results A total of 617 participants were recruited, and 438 eventually completed the first-year follow-up visit; 72 participants (46 males) were in the mild COPD group, and 225 participants (165 males) were in the high-risk group. The mean forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration (FEV1) decline in the mild COPD group was 129 mL, which was significantly higher than the 30 mL decline in the high-risk population group (P=0.005). Group category (odds ratio [OR] =0.230) and COPD Assessment Test (CAT) score (OR =9.912) were independent risk factors for an FEV1% predicted decline of >15% for all participants. In the mild COPD group, patients with a higher CAT (OR =5.310) and Emphysema Index (OR =5.681) were associated with a FEV1% predicted decline of >15% at the first-year follow-up. No factor showed a significantly predictive effect on FEV1 decline in the high-risk COPD group. Conclusion Group category was an independent influential factor associated with FEV1 decline. PMID:28184155

  12. A blood-based biomarker panel to risk-stratify mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Richa; Rosenberg, Alexandra; Bennett, Ellen R.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Acheson, Shawn K.

    2017-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) accounts for the vast majority of the nearly two million brain injuries suffered in the United States each year. Mild TBI is commonly classified as complicated (radiographic evidence of intracranial injury) or uncomplicated (radiographically negative). Such a distinction is important because it helps to determine the need for further neuroimaging, potential admission, or neurosurgical intervention. Unfortunately, imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are costly and not without some risk. The purpose of this study was to screen 87 serum biomarkers to identify a select panel of biomarkers that would predict the presence of intracranial injury as determined by initial brain CT. Serum was collected from 110 patients who sustained a mild TBI within 24 hours of blood draw. Two models were created. In the broad inclusive model, 72kDa type IV collagenase (MMP-2), C-reactive protein (CRP), creatine kinase B type (CKBB), fatty acid binding protein—heart (hFABP), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and malondialdehyde modified low density lipoprotein (MDA-LDL) significantly predicted injury visualized on CT, yielding an overall c-statistic of 0.975 and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 98.6. In the parsimonious model, MMP-2, CRP, and CKBB type significantly predicted injury visualized on CT, yielding an overall c-statistic of 0.964 and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 97.2. These results suggest that a serum based biomarker panel can accurately differentiate patients with complicated mild TBI from those with uncomplicated mild TBI. Such a panel could be useful to guide early triage decisions, including the need for further evaluation or admission, especially in those environments in which resources are limited. PMID:28355230

  13. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Recognizing Face Expressions in Mild Stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sapey-Triomphe, Laurie-Anne; Heckemann, Rolf A; Boublay, Nawele; Dorey, Jean-Michel; Hénaff, Marie-Anne; Rouch, Isabelle; Padovan, Catherine; Hammers, Alexander; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Early Alzheimer's disease can involve social disinvestment, possibly as a consequence of impairment of nonverbal communication skills. This study explores whether patients with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia stage have impaired recognition of emotions in facial expressions, and describes neuroanatomical correlates of emotion processing impairment. As part of the ongoing PACO study (personality, Alzheimer's disease and behaviour), 39 patients with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia stage and 39 matched controls completed tests involving discrimination of four basic emotions-happiness, fear, anger, and disgust-on photographs of faces. In patients, automatic volumetry of 83 brain regions was performed on structural magnetic resonance images using MAPER (multi-atlas propagation with enhanced registration). From the literature, we identified for each of the four basic emotions one brain region thought to be primarily associated with the function of recognizing that emotion. We hypothesized that the volume of each of these regions would be correlated with subjects' performance in recognizing the associated emotion. Patients showed deficits of basic emotion recognition, and these impairments were correlated with the volumes of the expected regions of interest. Unexpectedly, most of these correlations were negative: better emotional facial recognition was associated with lower brain volume. In particular, recognition of fear was negatively correlated with the volume of amygdala, disgust with pallidum, and happiness with fusiform gyrus. Recognition impairment in mild stages of Alzheimer's disease for a given emotion was thus associated with less visible atrophy of functionally responsible brain structures within the patient group. Possible explanations for this counterintuitive result include neuroinflammation, regional β-amyloid deposition, or transient overcompensation during early stages of

  14. Mild perinatal adversities moderate the association between maternal harsh parenting and hair cortisol: Evidence for differential susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Windhorst, Dafna A; Rippe, Ralph C A; Mileva-Seitz, Viara R; Verhulst, Frank C; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Noppe, Gerard; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C; van den Akker, Erica L T; Tiemeier, Henning; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2017-03-13

    It has been shown that following exposure to mild perinatal adversity, children have greater susceptibility to both the negative and positive aspects of their subsequent environment. In a large population-based cohort study (N = 1,776), we investigated whether mild perinatal adversity moderated the association between maternal harsh parenting and children's hair cortisol levels, a biomarker of chronic stress. Mild perinatal adversity was defined as late preterm birth (gestational age at birth of 34-37 weeks, 6 days) or small for gestational age (birth weight between the 2.5th and 10th percentile for full term gestational age). Harsh parenting was assessed by maternal self-report at 3 years. Children's hair cortisol concentrations were measured from hair samples collected at age 6. There were no significant bivariate associations between mild perinatal adversities and harsh parenting and hair cortisol. However, mild perinatal adversities moderated the association between maternal harsh parenting and hair cortisol levels. Children with mild perinatal adversity had lower cortisol levels if parented more harshly and higher cortisol levels in the absence of harsh parenting than children who did not experience mild perinatal adversity. These results provide further evidence that mild perinatal adversity is a potential marker of differential susceptibility to environmental influences.

  15. Profiles and Cognitive Predictors of Motor Functions among Early School-Age Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wuang, Y.-P.; Wang, C.-C.; Huang, M.-H.; Su, C.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the study was to describe sensorimotor profile in children with mild intellectual disability (ID), and to examine the association between cognitive and motor function. Methods: A total of 233 children with mild ID aged 7 to 8 years were evaluated with measures of cognitive, motor and sensory integrative functioning.…

  16. A mild and facile synthesis of aryl and alkenyl sulfides via copper-catalyzed deborylthiolation of organoborons with thiosulfonates.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Suguru; Sugimura, Yasuyuki; Hazama, Yuki; Nishiyama, Yoshitake; Yano, Takahisa; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Hosoya, Takamitsu

    2015-12-04

    An efficient deborylthiolation of aryl- and alkenylborons with thiosulfonates has been achieved under mild conditions using a copper catalyst. All steps of the experimental process were free from unpleasant odors. The mild reaction conditions as well as ready availability of boron compounds and thiosulfonates enabled easy access to an array of sulfides, including those bearing sensitive functional groups.

  17. Evidence-Base of a Functional Curriculum for Secondary Students with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Satsangi, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    This study represents a follow-up to a review of research on functional curriculum for secondary students with mild intellectual disability by Bouck and Flanagan (2010), which focused on the years 1994-2009. This systematic review focused on research involving functional curriculum for secondary students with mild intellectual disability published…

  18. How Are They Really Doing? Observation of Inclusionary Classroom Participation for Children with Mild-to-Moderate Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, Christina M.; Barnett, David; Bauer, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Direct observation was utilized to study how 5 children with mild-to-moderate deafness participated within inclusive classroom settings. Responses to practice and prompt opportunities, levels of prompting required to follow classroom directions, and engagement were analyzed across students with mild-to-moderate deafness and were compared to…

  19. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Task 1), Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H. ); Duthie, R.G. ); Wootten, J.M. )

    1991-09-01

    Under US DOE sponsorship, a project team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology, Peabody Holding Company, and Bechtel Group, Inc. has been developing an advanced, mild gasification process to process all types of coal and to produce solid and condensable liquid co-products that can open new markets for coal. The three and a half year program (September 1987 to June 1991) consisted of investigations in four main areas. These areas are: (1) Literature Survey of Mild Gasification Processes, Co-Product Upgrading and Utilization, and Market Assessment; (2) Mild Gasification Technology Development: Process Research Unit Tests Using Slipstream Sampling; (3) Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study; (4) Mild Gasification Technology Development: System Integration Studies. In this report, the literature and market assessment of mild gasification processes are discussed.

  20. A Reanalysis of Cognitive-Functional Performance in Older Adults: Investigating the Interaction Between Normal Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Mild Alzheimer's Disease Dementia, and Depression.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Jonas J; Bicalho, Maria A; Ávila, Rafaela T; Cintra, Marco T G; Diniz, Breno S; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro F

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are associated with cognitive-functional impairment in normal aging older adults (NA). However, less is known about this effect on people with mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and mild Alzheimer's disease dementia (AD). We investigated this relationship along with the NA-MCI-AD continuum by reanalyzing a previously published dataset. Participants (N = 274) underwent comprehensive neuropsychological assessment including measures of Executive Function, Language/Semantic Memory, Episodic Memory, Visuospatial Abilities, Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and the Geriatric Depression Scale. MANOVA, logistic regression and chi-square tests were performed to assess the association between depression and cognitive-functional performance in each group. In the NA group, depressed participants had a lower performance compared to non-depressed participants in all cognitive and functional domains. However, the same pattern was not observed in the MCI group or in AD. The results suggest a progressive loss of association between depression and worse cognitive-functional performance along the NA-MCI-AD continuum.