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Sample records for milde ryszard przeweda

  1. Mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Katz, Douglas I; Cohen, Sara I; Alexander, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common but accurate diagnosis and defining criteria for mild TBI and its clinical consequences have been problematic. Mild TBI causes transient neurophysiologic brain dysfunction, sometimes with structural axonal and neuronal damage. Biomarkers, such as newer imaging technologies and protein markers, are promising indicators of brain injury but are not ready for clinical use. Diagnosis relies on clinical criteria regarding depth and duration of impaired consciousness and amnesia. These criteria are particularly difficult to confirm at the least severe end of the mild TBI continuum, especially when relying on subjective, retrospective accounts. The postconcussive syndrome is a controversial concept because of varying criteria, inconsistent symptom clusters and the evidence that similar symptom profiles occur with other disorders, and even in a proportion of healthy individuals. The clinical consequences of mild TBI can be conceptualized as two multidimensional disorders: (1) a constellation of acute symptoms that might be termed early phase post-traumatic disorder (e.g., headache, dizziness, imbalance, fatigue, sleep disruption, impaired cognition), that typically resolve in days to weeks and are largely related to brain trauma and concomitant injuries; (2) a later set of symptoms, a late phase post-traumatic disorder, evolving out of the early phase in a minority of patients, with a more prolonged (months to years), sometimes worsening set of somatic, emotional, and cognitive symptoms. The later phase disorder is highly influenced by a variety of psychosocial factors and has little specificity for brain injury, although a history of multiple concussions seems to increase the risk of more severe and longer duration symptoms. Effective early phase management may prevent or limit the later phase disorder and should include education about symptoms and expectations for recovery, as well as recommendations for activity modifications

  2. "White Privilege": A Mild Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    White privilege analysis has been influential in philosophy of education. I offer some mild criticisms of this largely salutary direction--its inadequate exploration of its own normative foundations, and failure to distinguish between "spared injustice", "unjust enrichment" and "non-injustice-related" privileges; its inadequate exploration of the…

  3. Educating Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyen, Edward L., Ed.; And Others

    The book contains 19 papers from the journal, "Focus on Exceptional Children," that discuss new perspectives and practices in educating students with mild disabilities. The first half of the book is titled "New Perspectives" and includes the following articles: "Beyond the Regular Education Initiative/Inclusion and the Resource Room Controversy"…

  4. Development of mild gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.I.C.; Gillespie, B.L.

    1987-11-01

    Under a previous contract with Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. AC21-84MC21108, UCC Research Corporation (UCCRC) built and tested a 1500 lb/day Mild Gasification Process Development Unit (MGU). The MGU, as tested under the previous contract, is shown in Figure 1. Testing completed under the previous contract showed that good quality hydrocarbon liquids and good quality char can be produced in the MGU. However, the MGU is not optimized. The primary objectives of the current project are to optimize the MGU and determine the suitability of char for several commercial applications. The program consists of four tasks; Task 1 -- Test Plan; Task 2 -- Optimization of Mild Gasification Process; Task 3 -- Evaluation of Char and Char/Coal Blends as a Boiler/Blast Furnace Fuel; and Task 4 -- Analysis of Data and Preparation of Final Report. Task 1 has been completed while work continued on Task 2.

  5. Development of mild gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.I.C.; Gillespie, B.L.

    1988-02-01

    Under a previous contract with Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC21-84MC21108, UCC Research Corporation (UCCRC) built and tested a 1500 lb/day Mild Gasification Process Development Unit (MGU). The MGU, as tested under the previous contract, is shown in Figure 1. Testing completed under the previous contract showed that good quality hydrocarbon liquids and good quality char can be produced in the MGU. However, the MGU is not optimized. The primary objectives of the current project are to optimize the MGU and determine the suitability of char for several commercial applications. The program consists of four tasks; Task 1-Test Plan; Task 2-Optimization of Mild Gasification Process; Task 3-Evaluation of Char and Char/Coal Blends as a Boiler/Blast Furnace Fuel; and Task 4-Analysis of Data and Preparation of Final Report. Task 1 has been completed while work continued on Task 2.

  6. Development of mild gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.I.C.; Derting, T.M.

    1988-07-01

    Under a previous contract with Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. AC21-84MC21108, UCC Research Corporation (UCCRC) built and tested a 1500 lb/day Mild Gasification Process Development Unit (MGU). The MGU, as tested under the previous contract, is shown in Figure 1. Testing completed under the previous contract showed that good quality hydrocarbon liquids and good quality char can be produced in the MGU. However, the MGU is not optimized. The primary objectives of the current project are to optimize the MGU and determine the suitability of char for several commercial applications. The program consists of four tasks; Task 1 -- Test Plan; Task 2 -- Optimization of Mild Gasification Process; Task 3 -- Evaluation of Char and Char/Coal Blends as a Boiler/Blast Furnace Fuel; and Task 4 -- Analysis of Data and Preparation of Final Report. Task 1 has been completed while work continued on Task 2.

  7. Development of mild gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.I.C.; Williams, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    Under a previous contract with Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. AC21-84MC21108, UCC Research Corporation (UCCRC) built and tested a 1500 lb/day Mild Gasification Process Development Unit (MGU). The MGU, as tested under the previous contract, is shown in Figure 1. Testing completed under the previous contract showed that good quality hydrocarbon liquids and good quality char can be produced in the MGU. However, the MGU is not optimized. The primary objectives of the current project are to optimize the MGU and determine the suitability of char for several commercial applications. The program consists of four tasks; Task 1 -- Test Plan; Task 2 -- Optimization of Mild Gasification Process; Task 3 -- Evaluation of Char and Char/Coal Blends as a Boiler/Blast Furnace Fuel; and Task 4 -- Analysis of Data and Preparation of Final Report. Task 1 has been completed while work continued on Task 2.

  8. Myocardial protection with mild hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Tissier, Renaud; Ghaleh, Bijan; Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M; Berdeaux, Alain

    2012-05-01

    Mild hypothermia, 32-35° C, is very potent at reducing myocardial infarct size in rabbits, dogs, sheep, pigs, and rats. The benefit is directly related to reduction in normothermic ischaemic time, supporting the relevance of early and rapid cooling. The cardioprotective effect of mild hypothermia is not limited to its recognized reduction of infarct size, but also results in conservation of post-ischaemic contractile function, prevention of no-reflow or microvascular obstruction, and ultimately attenuation of left ventricular remodelling. The mechanism of the anti-infarct effect does not appear to be related to diminished energy utilization and metabolic preservation, but rather to survival signalling that involves either the extracellular signal-regulated kinases and/or the Akt/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Initial clinical trials of hypothermia in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were disappointing, probably because cooling was too slow to shorten normothermic ischaemic time appreciably. New approaches to more rapid cooling have recently been described and may soon be available for clinical use. Alternatively, it may be possible to pharmacologically mimic the protection provided by cooling soon after the onset of ischaemia with an activator of mild hypothermia signalling, e.g. extracellular signal-regulated kinase activator, that could be given by emergency medical personnel. Finally, the protection afforded by cooling can be added to that of pre- and post-conditioning because their mechanisms differ. Thus, myocardial salvage might be greatly increased by rapidly cooling patients as soon as possible and then giving a pharmacological post-conditioning agent immediately prior to reperfusion. PMID:22131353

  9. Simulation of mildly unsaturated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letha, J.; Elango, K.

    1994-02-01

    In the study of unsaturated flow in the soil profile, the soil characteristic functions, one relating the pressure head to water saturation and the other relating the permeability to water saturation, are usually established with data covering a wide range. The application of these functions to situations with a mildly unsaturated range, such as encountered in a wet irrigation setting in a coarse soil, has been investigated. Certain shortcomings in using these soil characteristic functions directly have been identified, and modifications to the procedure of determining the characteristic functions have been proposed and tested. The improvements have been quantified in terms of the goodness of fit to published field measurements on the soil characteristics and also in terms of simulation results for an idealized test situation corresponding to irrigation practice in a relatively coarse soil. The special features of the C language have been utilized in developing a computer program for finite element modelling of the nonlinear Richards' equation describing unsaturated subsurface water flow. A weighted least-squares procedure improves the fit of the Brooks and Corey characteristic functions for pressure head vs. degree of saturation. A numerical integration procedure improves the fit of the Van Genuchten characteristic functions for permeability vs. degree of saturation. The present study indicates that even for sandy soil, the conventional Van Genuchten and Brooks and Corey soil characteristic functions need to be modified to yield acceptable results for the mildly unsaturated regime.

  10. Evaluation of mild skin cleansers.

    PubMed

    Wortzman, M S

    1991-01-01

    Each person makes the decision of how best to care for his or her own skin. Among the prime concerns, especially for facial skin, is the type of dirt, debris, or make-up to be removed. In most cases, all products do an adequate job in the removal of dirt; if not, the washing techniques can be modified to accomplish the task at hand. What cannot be controlled are the adverse side effects inherent in the use of that product. These adverse properties include damages to the barrier function of the skin; increased susceptibility to environmental sources of irritation and sensitization; frank irritation responses, such as erythema and edema; and reduction of the cosmetic qualities of the skin, such as degree of moisture and smoothness. Part of the problem is that most of these changes are subtle, occurring slowly over time. Often, the association of these problems with the use of a particular facial cleansing regimen is overlooked. The typical woman uses as many as 10 to 15 facial cosmetic and cleansing products each day, making the identification of a problem even more difficult. It is important to identify the risks associated with individual products and with product categories in general. Although the identification of a safe group of products to use for facial cleansing is desirable, the results of this investigation indicate that there are no simple answers. It has been assumed that because moisturizing cream formulations are routinely safe and mild in general use, a cleansing product in the same general form would share these attributes. We can see from the results in Table 2 and Figures 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9 that cleansing creams are not uniformly superior to cleansing bars in the key attributes that are used to evaluate mildness. In each evaluation there were individual cleansing creams that demonstrated statistically weaker performance than did cleansing bars in general. As a group, cleansing creams did well in the cosmetic categories of dryness and texture but

  11. [Definition and clinical characteristics of mild hypertension].

    PubMed

    Saruta, Takao

    2008-08-01

    Mild hypertension is defined as blood pressure level of 140-159 mmHg systolic and/or 90-99 mmHg diastolic. The patients with blood pressure level of mild hypertension occupy about 60% of total hypertensive patients in Japan, and most of them are free of subjective symptoms except elevated blood pressure. However, some of the patients with mild hypertension develop cardiovascular events, since thay have occasionally cardiovascular damages on this level of blood pressure and several risk factors of cardiovascular diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia.

  12. [Mild brain injuries in emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Liimatainen, Suvi; Niskakangas, Tero; Ohman, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostics and correct classification of mild brain injuries is challenging. Problems caused by insufficient documentation at the acute phase become more obvious in situations in which legal insurance issues are to be considered. A small proportion of patients with mild brain injury suffer from prolonged symptoms. Medical recording and classification of the brain injury at the initial phase should therefore be carried out in a structured manner. The review deals with the diagnostic problems of mild brain injuries and presents a treatment protocol for adult patients at the acute phase, aiming at avoiding prolonged problems.

  13. Comparing Cognitive Profiles of Licensed Drivers with Mild Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) constitute two of the most common forms of dementia in North America. Driving is a primary means of mobility among older adults and the risk of dementia increases with advanced age. The purpose of this paper is to describe the cognitive profile of licensed drivers with mild AD and mild DLB. Method. Licensed drivers with mild AD, mild DLB, and healthy controls completed neuropsychological tests measuring general cognition, attention, visuospatial/perception, language, and cognitive fluctuations. Results. The results showed differences between healthy controls and demented participants on almost all neuropsychological measures. Participants with early DLB were found to perform significantly worse on some measures of attention and visuospatial functioning in comparison with early AD. Discussion. Future research should examine the relationship between neuropsychological measures and driving outcomes among individuals with mild AD and mild DLB. PMID:27774333

  14. Do we over treat mild hypertension?

    PubMed

    Zanchetti, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    The important question whether 'mild' hypertension should or should not be treated by drugs is difficult to answer, because the only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating this question were conducted when the definition of 'mild' hypertension was based on diastolic blood pressure only, whereas the present definition of grade 1 hypertension includes both systolic and diastolic values (SBP/DBP), and the concept of 'mild' hypertension also includes that of low-moderate cardiovascular risk (< 5% cardiovascular death rate in 5 years). Due to the lack of evidence from specific RCTs, guidelines recommend drug treatment of mild hypertension only on the basis of expert opinion. However, recent meta-analyses have provided some support to drug treatment intervention in low-moderate risk grade 1 hypertensives and have shown that, when treatment is deferred until organ damage or cardiovascular disease occur, absolute residual risk (events occurring despite treatment) markedly increases. Although evidence favoring therapeutic intervention in mild hypertension is nowadays stronger than expert opinion, meta-analyses are not substitutes for specific RCTs, and the wide BP spans defining grade 1 hypertension as well as the span defining low-moderate risk leave a wide space for individualized or personalized decisions.

  15. Automatic Prosodic Analysis to Identify Mild Dementia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Moreira, Eduardo; Torres-Boza, Diana; Kairuz, Héctor Arturo; Ferrer, Carlos; Garcia-Zamora, Marlene; Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Hernandez-Gómez, Luis Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an exploratory technique to identify mild dementia by assessing the degree of speech deficits. A total of twenty participants were used for this experiment, ten patients with a diagnosis of mild dementia and ten participants like healthy control. The audio session for each subject was recorded following a methodology developed for the present study. Prosodic features in patients with mild dementia and healthy elderly controls were measured using automatic prosodic analysis on a reading task. A novel method was carried out to gather twelve prosodic features over speech samples. The best classification rate achieved was of 85% accuracy using four prosodic features. The results attained show that the proposed computational speech analysis offers a viable alternative for automatic identification of dementia features in elderly adults. PMID:26558287

  16. Automatic Prosodic Analysis to Identify Mild Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Moreira, Eduardo; Torres-Boza, Diana; Kairuz, Héctor Arturo; Ferrer, Carlos; Garcia-Zamora, Marlene; Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Hernandez-Gómez, Luis Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an exploratory technique to identify mild dementia by assessing the degree of speech deficits. A total of twenty participants were used for this experiment, ten patients with a diagnosis of mild dementia and ten participants like healthy control. The audio session for each subject was recorded following a methodology developed for the present study. Prosodic features in patients with mild dementia and healthy elderly controls were measured using automatic prosodic analysis on a reading task. A novel method was carried out to gather twelve prosodic features over speech samples. The best classification rate achieved was of 85% accuracy using four prosodic features. The results attained show that the proposed computational speech analysis offers a viable alternative for automatic identification of dementia features in elderly adults. PMID:26558287

  17. Neuropsychological function following mild exposure to pentaborane

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.P.; Silverman, J.J.; Garrettson, L.K.; Schulz, C.; Hamer, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Neuropsychological tests and self-report personality inventories were administered to 14 workers and rescue squad personnel approximately 2 months following mild exposure to pentaborane, a highly toxic volatile liquid boron hydride. Performance decrements were evident on 5 of 11 neuropsychological tests, including Block Design and measures of sustained attention and recent memory. Neuropsychological deficits were not related to emotional changes reported on the Hopkins Symptom Checklist nor to the presence of CT scan abnormality. These results indicate mild residual brain dysfunction following pentaborane intoxication, including possible dysfunction in subcortical regions mediating memory processes and in cortical areas mediating visuo-spatial abilities.

  18. Mild bleeding disorders: review of 120 patients.

    PubMed

    Bolton-Maggs, P; Wilkinson, L S

    1984-01-01

    Of 120 patients presenting with mild bleeding disorders, 63 were found to have a definite coagulopathy. The commonest disorders were haemophilia, Christmas disease and von Willebrand's disease (vWd), the latter being predominant. Diagnosis led to prophylactic treatment prior to surgery in 18 patients with prevention of excessive haemorrhage. Three patients who had received blood products developed hepatitis. DDAVP (desamino-cys-1-8-D-arginine vasopressin) is the treatment of choice in suitable mildly affected patients with haemophilia A and vWd. Examination of blood group distribution suggests an excess of group O among patients with bleeding disorders, especially those with vWd.

  19. Halfway Houses for the Mildly Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gia, Gilbert P.

    Investigated were number and location of community residences or halfway houses (of fewer than 61 persons) for the mildly retarded and their programing practices. Form letters and questionnaires uncovered 68 programs meeting internal delimitations of the study. Programs were categorized for analysis purposes into California Programs, New Programs…

  20. Mildly Retarded Adults: Their Attitudes Toward Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Jennifer; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Responses to a 40-item questionnaire distributed to 50 mildly mentally retarded (MR) adults indicate that the majority possess accurate information about MR, hold realistic attitudes toward their own needs and abilities, and advocate community integration of the retarded. (Author/JG)

  1. Learning Strategies for Adolescents with Mild Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Koman, Kara; Schibelka, Mary; Higgin, Karen; Cooper, Cody; Butler, Jordyn

    2013-01-01

    Learning strategy instruction is an evidence-based practice for teaching adolescents with mild disabilities. However, researchers have not developed strategies for every content area or skill. Therefore, teachers need to be able develop strategies based on the needs of their students. This article reviews the process for developing and teaching…

  2. Mild stimulation in in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Macklon, N S; Fauser, B C J M

    2003-11-01

    Current approaches to ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) are aimed at optimizing the number of oocytes retrieved in a treatment cycle. This approach is not without risks. Moreover, as the true costs of multiple pregnancy become clearer, the need to produce multiple embryos for transfer is increasingly questioned. Increasing knowledge of the physiological mechanisms involved in follicular development and dominance has led to new strategies in ovarian stimulation for IVF. The clinical availability of GnRH antagonists allows the normal cycle to be harnessed and manipulated by mild interventions to produce sufficient oocytes for successful IVF treatment. Recent evidence suggests that oocyte quality after mild stimulation may be superior to that after conventional stimulation regimens.

  3. The ENCOAL Mild Gasification Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The DOE plans to enter into a Cooperative Agreement with ENCOAL Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Shell Mining Company, for the cost-shared design, construction and operation of a mild gasification facility based on Liquids-from-Coal (LFC) technology. The facility is planned to be located at the Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The mild gasification process to be demonstrated will produce two new, low-sulfur fuel forms (a solid and a liquid) from subbituminous coal. The new fuel forms would be suitable for combustion in commercial, industrial, and utility boilers. This environmental assessment has been prepared by the DOE to comply with the requirements of the NEPA. Pollutant emissions, land use, water, and waste management are briefly discussed. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Disposable baby wipes: efficacy and skin mildness.

    PubMed

    Odio, M; Streicher-Scott, J; Hansen, R C

    2001-04-01

    The results of a series of four clinical studies demonstrated that disposable baby wipes were milder to the skin than use of a cotton washcloth and water, recognized as a "gold standard" for skin mildness. Importantly, the baby wipes caused no significant change from the baseline value in any of the skin parameters examined. This observation verified that the test wipes are minimally disruptive to the epidermal barrier and thus suitable for use on intact or compromised, irritated skin. PMID:11917305

  5. Perinatal Risk Factors for Mild Motor Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands, Beth; Kendall, Garth; Larkin, Dawne; Parker, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of mild motor disability (MMD) is a complex issue and as yet is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of perinatal risk factors in a cohort of 10-year-old boys and girls with (n = 362) and without (n = 1193) MMD. Among the males with MMD there was a higher prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage,…

  6. Subacute to chronic mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mott, Timothy F; McConnon, Michael L; Rieger, Brian P

    2012-12-01

    Although a universally accepted definition is lacking, mild traumatic brain injury and concussion are classified by transient loss of consciousness, amnesia, altered mental status, a Glasgow Coma Score of 13 to 15, and focal neurologic deficits following an acute closed head injury. Most patients recover quickly, with a predictable clinical course of recovery within the first one to two weeks following traumatic brain injury. Persistent physical, cognitive, or behavioral postconcussive symptoms may be noted in 5 to 20 percent of persons who have mild traumatic brain injury. Physical symptoms include headaches, dizziness, and nausea, and changes in coordination, balance, appetite, sleep, vision, and hearing. Cognitive and behavioral symptoms include fatigue, anxiety, depression, and irritability, and problems with memory, concentration and decision making. Women, older adults, less educated persons, and those with a previous mental health diagnosis are more likely to have persistent symptoms. The diagnostic workup for subacute to chronic mild traumatic brain injury focuses on the history and physical examination, with continuing observation for the development of red flags such as the progression of physical, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms, seizure, progressive vomiting, and altered mental status. Early patient and family education should include information on diagnosis and prognosis, symptoms, and further injury prevention. Symptom-specific treatment, gradual return to activity, and multidisciplinary coordination of care lead to the best outcomes. Psychiatric and medical comorbidities, psychosocial issues, and legal or compensatory incentives should be explored in patients resistant to treatment.

  7. Subacute to chronic mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mott, Timothy F; McConnon, Michael L; Rieger, Brian P

    2012-12-01

    Although a universally accepted definition is lacking, mild traumatic brain injury and concussion are classified by transient loss of consciousness, amnesia, altered mental status, a Glasgow Coma Score of 13 to 15, and focal neurologic deficits following an acute closed head injury. Most patients recover quickly, with a predictable clinical course of recovery within the first one to two weeks following traumatic brain injury. Persistent physical, cognitive, or behavioral postconcussive symptoms may be noted in 5 to 20 percent of persons who have mild traumatic brain injury. Physical symptoms include headaches, dizziness, and nausea, and changes in coordination, balance, appetite, sleep, vision, and hearing. Cognitive and behavioral symptoms include fatigue, anxiety, depression, and irritability, and problems with memory, concentration and decision making. Women, older adults, less educated persons, and those with a previous mental health diagnosis are more likely to have persistent symptoms. The diagnostic workup for subacute to chronic mild traumatic brain injury focuses on the history and physical examination, with continuing observation for the development of red flags such as the progression of physical, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms, seizure, progressive vomiting, and altered mental status. Early patient and family education should include information on diagnosis and prognosis, symptoms, and further injury prevention. Symptom-specific treatment, gradual return to activity, and multidisciplinary coordination of care lead to the best outcomes. Psychiatric and medical comorbidities, psychosocial issues, and legal or compensatory incentives should be explored in patients resistant to treatment. PMID:23198672

  8. The evolution of mild parkinsonian signs in aging.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Jeannette R; Verghese, Joe; Holtzer, Roee; Allali, Gilles

    2014-10-01

    The progression of mild parkinsonian signs in the absence of idiopathic Parkinson's disease in aging is unclear. This study aims to identify predictors of the evolution of mild parkinsonian signs in non-demented older adults. Two hundred ten participants (76.25 ± 7.10 years, 57% women) were assessed at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Mild parkinsonian signs were defined as the presence of bradykinesia, rigidity and/or rest tremor. Depending upon the presence of these features at baseline and follow-up, participants were divided into one of four groups (no, transient, persistent or new-onset mild parkinsonian signs). Physical function was assessed using gait velocity. Ninety-five participants presented with mild parkinsonian signs at baseline. At 1-year follow-up, 59 demonstrated persistent mild parkinsonian signs, while 36 recovered (i.e., transient). Participants with persistent mild parkinsonian signs were older (79.66 ± 7.15 vs. 75.81 ± 7.37 years, p = 0.01) and evidenced slower gait velocity (90.41 ± 21.46 vs. 109.92 ± 24.32 cm/s, p < 0.01) compared to those with transient mild parkinsonian signs. Gait velocity predicted persistence of mild parkinsonian signs, even after adjustments (OR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.94-0.98). Fifty-five participants demonstrated new-onset of mild parkinsonian signs. In comparison to participants without mild parkinsonian signs, presence of cardiovascular but not cerebrovascular disease at baseline was associated with new-onset mild parkinsonian signs. Our study reveals that gait velocity was the main predictor of persistent mild parkinsonian signs, whereas cardiovascular disease was associated with new-onset mild parkinsonian signs. These findings suggest a vascular mechanism for the onset of mild parkinsonian signs and a different mechanism, possibly neurodegenerative, for the persistence of mild parkinsonian signs. PMID:25047763

  9. The Effects of Mild Hearing Loss on Infant Auditory Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nozza, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A review of laboratory research estimating effects of mild hearing impairment on infant speech perception abilities, under conditions simulating mild hearing loss in normal hearing infants, suggests that even mild alterations of auditory input during infancy may have significant developmental consequences. Results support identification,…

  10. Writing Impairments in Japanese Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and with Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Atsuko; Nomura, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Ruriko; Ohnuma, Ayumu; Kimpara, Teiko; Suzuki, Kyoko; Mori, Etsuro

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims We investigated writing abilities in patients with the amnestic type of mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). To examine the earliest changes in writing function, we used writing tests for both words and sentences with different types of Japanese characters (Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji). Methods A total of 25 aMCI patients, 38 AD patients, and 22 healthy controls performed writing to dictation for Kana and Kanji words, copied Kanji words, and wrote in response to a picture story task. Analysis of variance was used to test the subject group effects on the scores in the above writing tasks. Results For the written Kanji words, the mild AD group performed worse than the aMCI group and the controls, but there was no difference between the aMCI group and the controls. For the picture story writing task, the mild AD and aMCI groups performed worse than the controls, but the difference between the AD and the aMCI groups was not significant. Conclusions The mild AD group showed defects in writing Kanji characters, and the aMCI group showed impairments in narrative writing. Our study suggests that narrative writing, which demands complex integration of multiple cognitive functions, can be used to detect the subtle writing deficits in aMCI patients. PMID:26483830

  11. Microfluidic culture platform for studying neuronal response to mild to very mild axonal stretch injurya)

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Yiing C.; Dickson, Tracey C.; King, Anna E.; Breadmore, Michael C.; Guijt, Rosanne M.

    2014-01-01

    A new model for studying localised axonal stretch injury is presented, using a microfluidic device to selectively culture axons on a thin, flexible poly (dimethylsiloxane) membrane which can be deflected upward to stretch the axons. A very mild (0.5% strain) or mild stretch injury (5% strain) was applied to primary cortical neurons after 7 days growth in vitro. The extent of distal degeneration was quantified using the degenerative index (DI, the ratio of fragmented axon area to total axon area) of axons fixed at 24 h and 72 h post injury (PI), and immunolabelled for the axon specific, microtubule associated protein-tau. At 24 h PI following very mild injuries (0.5%), the majority of the axons remained intact and healthy with no significant difference in DI when compared to the control, but at 72 h PI, the DI increased significantly (DI = 0.11 ± 0.03). Remarkably, dendritic beading in the somal compartment was observed at 24 h PI, indicative of dying back degeneration. When the injury level was increased (5% stretch, mild injury), microtubule fragmentation along the injured axons was observed, with a significant increase in DI at 24 h PI (DI = 0.17 ± 0.02) and 72 h PI (DI = 0.18 ± 0.01), relative to uninjured axons. The responses observed for both mild and very mild injuries are similar to those observed in the in vivo models of traumatic brain injury, suggesting that this model can be used to study neuronal trauma and will provide new insights into the cellular and molecular alterations characterizing the neuronal response to discrete axonal injury. PMID:25379095

  12. Serial position effects in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Howieson, Diane B; Mattek, Nora; Seeyle, Adriana M; Dodge, Hiroko H; Wasserman, Dara; Zitzelberger, Tracy; Jeffrey, Kaye

    2011-03-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is often associated with the preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Special scoring of word-list recall data for serial position has been suggested to improve discrimination of normal aging from dementia. We examined serial position effects in word-list recall for MCI participants compared to Alzheimer patients and controls. Individuals with MCI, like Alzheimer patients, had a diminished primacy effect in recalling words from a list. No alternative scoring system was better than standard scoring of word-list recall in distinguishing MCI patients from controls. Retention weighted scoring improved the discrimination of MCI and AD groups.

  13. Mild Neurocognitive Disorder: An Old Wine in a New Bottle

    PubMed Central

    Stokin, Gorazd B.; Krell-Roesch, Janina; Petersen, Ronald C.; Geda, Yonas E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The American Psychiatric Association has recently published the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The DSM-IV category “Dementia, Delirium, Amnestic, and Other Cognitive Disorders” has undergone extensive revision. DSM-5 has renamed this category as “Neurocognitive Disorders” (NCD), which now covers three entities: delirium, major NCD, and mild NCD. The DSM-IV version of mild NCD resembles the DSM-5 version in name only. DSM-IV defined mild NCD based on a single criterion, whereas DSM-5 defines mild NCD by using several cognitive and related criteria. The main difference between mild NCD and the Key International Symposium criteria of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is that the research work that led to the construct of MCI primarily involved elderly study participants (even though age was not part of the definition of MCI), whereas mild NCD includes acquired cognitive disorders of all age groups. DSM-5 essentially discusses the epidemiology and diagnostic markers of mild NCD by drawing congruence between MCI and mild NCD. The DSM-5 definition of mild NCD is anchored on four criteria and two specifiers. The four criteria refer to cognitive changes, functional activities, and exclusion of delirium and competing mental disorders. The two specifiers are the presumed etiologies of mild NCD and the presence or absence of behavioral problems. While the category “mild NCD” may improve reliability of diagnoses, it has yet to withstand scientific scrutiny to be considered a valid construct. This article reviews the DSM-5 criteria for mild NCD, compares them with the Key International Symposium MCI criteria, and discusses the pros and cons of the mild NCD construct. PMID:26332219

  14. Mild Neurocognitive Disorder: An Old Wine in a New Bottle.

    PubMed

    Stokin, Gorazd B; Krell-Roesch, Janina; Petersen, Ronald C; Geda, Yonas E

    2015-01-01

    The American Psychiatric Association has recently published the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The DSM-IV category "Dementia, Delirium, Amnestic, and Other Cognitive Disorders" has undergone extensive revision. DSM-5 has renamed this category as "Neurocognitive Disorders" (NCD), which now covers three entities: delirium, major NCD, and mild NCD. The DSM-IV version of mild NCD resembles the DSM-5 version in name only. DSM-IV defined mild NCD based on a single criterion, whereas DSM-5 defines mild NCD by using several cognitive and related criteria. The main difference between mild NCD and the Key International Symposium criteria of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is that the research work that led to the construct of MCI primarily involved elderly study participants (even though age was not part of the definition of MCI), whereas mild NCD includes acquired cognitive disorders of all age groups. DSM-5 essentially discusses the epidemiology and diagnostic markers of mild NCD by drawing congruence between MCI and mild NCD. The DSM-5 definition of mild NCD is anchored on four criteria and two specifiers. The four criteria refer to cognitive changes, functional activities, and exclusion of delirium and competing mental disorders. The two specifiers are the presumed etiologies of mild NCD and the presence or absence of behavioral problems. While the category "mild NCD" may improve reliability of diagnoses, it has yet to withstand scientific scrutiny to be considered a valid construct. This article reviews the DSM-5 criteria for mild NCD, compares them with the Key International Symposium MCI criteria, and discusses the pros and cons of the mild NCD construct.

  15. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter includes the investigation of the mild pyrolysis of unoxidized coals plus a selection of selectively oxidized coals. In addition the effect of particle size and extent of oxidation on pyrolysis was investigated. Some preliminary data concerning pyrolysis under vacuum and ambient pressure was also obtained. Work completed this quarter supports the following conclusions: (1) Desulfurization of unoxidized coals increases with increasing pyrolysis temperature and correlates with the loss of volatile matter. (2) Particle size did not influence the extent of desulfurization significantly. (3) Removing pyrite prior to pyrolysis helps to achieve a lower sulfur product beyond that expected from the removal of pyrite alone. (4) The extent of selective oxidation in teh pretreatment step did not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (5) Up to 84% of the sulfur has been removed from the IBC 101 coal by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (6) Evidence for regressive reactions between volatilized sulfur compounds and partially desulfurized products was obtained by studying how changes in pyrolysis pressure effected the product sulfur content.

  16. ENCOAL mild coal gasification project. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This document is the combination of the fourth quarter report (July--September 1993) and the 1993 annual report for the ENCOAL project. The following pages include the background and process description for the project, brief summaries of the accomplishments for the first three quarters, and a detailed fourth quarter report. Its purpose is to convey the accomplishments and current progress of the project. ENCOAL Corporation, has completed the construction of a mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company`s Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC) technology developed by SMC and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin coal to produce two new fuels, Process Derived Fuel (PDF) and Coal Derived Liquids (CDL). ENCOAL submitted an application to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the Clean Coal Technology Program. The project was selected by DOE in December, 1989 and the Cooperative Agreement approved in September, 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL mild coal gasification facility was completed in June of 1992, and the project is currently in the operations phase. Some plant modifications have been required and are discussed in this report.

  17. Mild behavioral impairment and risk of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Taragano, FE; Allegri, RF; Krupitzki, H; Sarasola, D; Serrano, CM; Loñ, L; Lyketsos, CG

    2009-01-01

    Background Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a transitional state between normal ageing and dementia, at least for some patients. Behavioral symptoms in MCI are associated with a higher risk of dementia, but their association with dementia risk in patients without MCI is unknown. Mild Behavioral Impairment (MBI) refers to a late life syndrome with prominent psychiatric and related behavioral symptoms in the absence of prominent cognitive symptoms, which may also be a dementia prodrome. Objective To compare MCI and MBI patients and to estimate the risk of dementia development in these two groups. Method A consecutive series of 358 patients (239 with MCI; and 119 with MBI) presenting to an outpatient general hospital specialty clinic were followed for up to 5 years until conversion to dementia or censoring. Results 34% of MCI patients and over 70% of patients with MBI developed dementia (Logrank p=0.011). MBI patients without cognitive symptoms were more likely to develop dementia (Logrank p<0.001). MBI patients were more likely to develop dementia due to frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) as opposed to Alzheimer’s dementia (AD). Conclusion MBI appears to be a transitional state between normal ageing and dementia. MBI (specifically those without cognitive symptoms) may confer a higher risk for dementia than MCI and is likely an FTD prodrome in many cases. These findings have implications for the early detection, prevention, and treatment of patients with dementia in late life, by focusing on the emergence of new behavioral symptoms. PMID:19323967

  18. South: in the mild southern tradition

    SciTech Connect

    Price, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Trends in the development of current and future energy resources in the southern states of the U.S. are reviewed. The south has the advantages of a mild climate and abundant sources of natural gas, coal, and hydro power, however, the supply and distribution of energy are primarily controlled by private and federal monopolies. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has a program for funding 100,000 solar domestic hot water systems plus low interest loans for wood heaters, zero interest conservation loans, and financing of passive solar homes. TVA will also construct a large passive solar complex. Other applications of solar technology discussed include installation in a brewery, apartment buildings, abandoned city housing, a duplex, an environmental center, a planned community, and a kiln company.

  19. Recent developments in Chevron mild isocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, M.J.; Powell, B.E.; Tolberg, R.S.; Saito, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The use of Chevron's dual-catalyst mild hydrocracking technology has enabled Nippon Petroleum Refining Company (NPRC) to produce excellent yields of good-quality mid-distillate from vacuum gas oil (VGO) in an existing VGO desulfurizer at its Muroran Refinery. This technology enables refiners to take advantage of underutilized desulfurization capacity for hydrocracking with minimal additional capital investment. The Muroran unit has been in this high-conversion mode since June 1982 and has operated in the range of 10-30 liquid volume (LV) percent synthetic conversion with yields up to 48 LV percent of 680 F cut-point diesel and lighter products. The details of this operation are discussed. Laboratory pilot plant data are also presented for two different feedbacks. The amount of recoverable diesel and its quality are strong functions of the feed boiling range, synthetic conversion, and plant pressure.

  20. Synchrotron emissivity from mildly relativistic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1981-01-01

    Approximate analytic expressions are presented for evaluation of the frequency and angular dependence of synchrotron emissivity from mildly relativistic particles with arbitrary energy spectrum and pitch angle distribution in a given magnetic field. Results agree with previous expressions for a nonrelativistic Maxwellian particle distribution, and when extrapolated to nonrelativistic and extreme relativistic regimes, they also agree with the previous expressions obtained under those limiting conditions. The results from the analytic expression are compared with results from detailed numerical evaluations. Excellent agreement is found not only at frequencies large compared to the gyro-frequency but also at lower frequencies, in fact, all the way down to the gyro-frequency, where the analytic approximations are expected to be less accurate.

  1. Mildly Recycled Pulsars at High-Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzoni, A.

    2011-08-01

    Mildly recyled pulsars (MRP), conventionally defined as neutron star having spin period in the 20-100 ms range and surface magnetic field <1011 Gauss, probably rise from binary systems (disrupted or not) with an intermediate or an high mass companion. Despite their relatively low spin-down energies compared to the ``fully'' recycled millisecond pulsars (arising from common low mass X-ray binaries), nearby MRPs can be detected by deep X-ray observations and by timing analysis of the very long data span provided by gamma-ray space detectors. The discovery of peculiar timing and spectral properties, possibly transitional, of the MRPs can be of the utmost importance to link different classes of neutron stars and study their evolution.

  2. Functional Hubs in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, Adrián; Papo, David; Boccaletti, Stefano; Del-Pozo, F.; Bajo, Ricardo; Maestú, Fernando; Martínez, J. H.; Gil, Pablo; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Buldú, Javier M.

    We investigate how hubs of functional brain networks are modified as a result of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a condition causing a slight but noticeable decline in cognitive abilities, which sometimes precedes the onset of Alzheimer's disease. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the functional brain networks of a group of patients suffering from MCI and a control group of healthy subjects, during the execution of a short-term memory task. Couplings between brain sites were evaluated using synchronization likelihood, from which a network of functional interdependencies was constructed and the centrality, i.e. importance, of their nodes was quantified. The results showed that, with respect to healthy controls, MCI patients were associated with decreases and increases in hub centrality respectively in occipital and central scalp regions, supporting the hypothesis that MCI modifies functional brain network topology, leading to more random structures.

  3. Recovery of responses during mild punishment1

    PubMed Central

    Rachlin, Howard

    1966-01-01

    Pigeons were punished with mild shock for pecking during one of two components of a multiple schedule. They eventually recovered so that they pecked at the same rate during both components. In one experiment they were extinguished after recovering. When punishment was maintained during extinction, they extinguished faster during the punished, than during the unpunished component. When punishment was stopped during extinction, they extinguished faster during the unpunished than during the previously punished component. In another experiment, punishment was programmed first during neither of the two components, then during one, then during both, and finally during the other component. The extent of recovery decreased with each successive cycle. It is concluded that, if transient emotional states are ignored, reward and punishment are symmetrical in their effects. PMID:16811293

  4. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes work completed during the fourth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. This work is part of a larger effort to develop a new coal liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing scheme consisting of three main process steps: (1) mile pretreatment of the feed coal to enhance dissolution reactivity and dry the coal, (2) low severity thermal dissolution of the pretreated coal to obtain a very reactive coal-derived residual material amenable to upgrading, and (3) catalytic upgrading of the residual products to distillate liquids.

  5. Mild desalination of various raw water streams.

    PubMed

    Groot, C K; van den Broek, W B P; Loewenberg, J; Koeman-Stein, N; Heidekamp, M; de Schepper, W

    2015-01-01

    For chemical industries, fresh water availability is a pre-requisite for sustainable operation. However, in many delta areas around the world, fresh water is scarce. Therefore, the E4 Water project (www.e4water.eu) comprises a case study at the Dow site in Terneuzen, The Netherlands, which is designed to develop commercial applications for mild desalination of brackish raw water streams from various origins to enable reuse in industry or agriculture. This study describes an effective two-stage work process, which was used to narrow down a broad spectrum of desalination technologies to a selection of the most promising techniques for a demonstration pilot at 2-4 m³/hour. Through literature study, laboratory experiments and multi-criteria analysis, nanofiltration and electrodialysis reversal were selected, both having the potential to attain the objectives of E4Water at full scale.

  6. The small chill: mild hypothermia for cardioprotection?

    PubMed

    Tissier, Renaud; Chenoune, Mourad; Ghaleh, Bijan; Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M; Berdeaux, Alain

    2010-12-01

    Reducing the heart's temperature by 2-5°C is a potent cardioprotective treatment in animal models of coronary artery occlusion. The anti-infarct benefit depends upon the target temperature and the time at which cooling is instituted. Protection primarily results from cooling during the ischaemic period, whereas cooling during reperfusion or beyond offers little protection. In animal studies, protection is proportional to both the depth and duration of cooling. An optimal cooling protocol must appreciably shorten the normothermic ischaemic time to effectively salvage myocardium. Patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction could be candidates for mild hypothermia since the current door-to-balloon time is typically 90 min. But they would have to be cooled quickly shortly after their arrival. Several strategies have been proposed for ultra-fast cooling, but most like liquid ventilation and pericardial perfusion are too invasive. More feasible strategies might include cutaneous cooling, peritoneal lavage with cold solutions, and endovascular cooling with intravenous thermodes. This last option has been investigated clinically, but the results have been disappointing possibly because the devices lacked capacity to cool the patient quickly or cooling was not implemented soon enough. The mechanism of hypothermia's protection has been assumed to be energy conservation. However, whereas deep hypothermia clearly preserves ATP, mild hypothermia has only a modest effect on ATP depletion during ischaemia. Some evidence suggests that intracellular signalling pathways might be responsible for the protection. It is unknown how cooling could trigger these pathways, but, if true, then it might be possible to duplicate cooling's protection pharmacologically. PMID:20621922

  7. [Status of mild hypertension guidelines in Japan and abroad].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hiroaki

    2008-08-01

    Historically patients with systolic blood pressure level 140 to 159 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure level 90 to 99 mmHg had been defined as mild hypertension. However, the word of mild hypertension is not used in recent guidelines, such as JNC 7 and ESH/ESC 2007, although it is still used in JSH2004 and BHS IV. Patients with mild hypertension in JSH2004 are diagnosed as high risk hypertension if these patients are complicated cardiovascular organ damage, cardiovascular disease, or diabetes mellitus etc. Personally, I think the word of mild hypertension should be changed to another word or applied to patients with low risk hypertension. PMID:18700542

  8. Get Well Care: Guidelines for Programs Serving Mildly Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montanari, Ellen Orton, Ed.

    Although child care programs for mildly ill children are proliferating around the country, very few states have developed regulations for these types of programs, and no states have developed standards or guidelines. Based upon this concern, a group of medical and early childhood professionals, parents, and directors of programs for mildly ill…

  9. Predicting Mild and Severe Husband-to-Wife Physical Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Helen S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Estimated odds of mild and severe husband-to-wife physical aggression in 11,870 white men. Being younger, having lower income, and having alcohol problem significantly increased odds of either mild or severe physical aggression. Drug problem uniquely increased risk of severe physical aggression. Marital discord and depression further increased…

  10. Mild Aphasia: Is This the Place for an Argument?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Elizabeth; Fox, Sarah; Wilkinson, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with mild aphasia often report significant disruption to their communication despite seemingly minor impairment. This study explored this phenomenon through examining conversations of a person with mild aphasia engaging in argumentation--a skill she felt had significantly deteriorated after her stroke. Method: A person with…

  11. Low Elevated Lead Levels and Mild Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Mike; And Others

    To investigate the relation between low level lead absorption and mild mental retardation, hair lead concentrations were compared in a group of 40 mildly retarded children "etiology unknown" with a control group of 20 children. Children with probable cause for retardation were excluded from the sample as were children with a history of lead…

  12. Impaired Verb Fluency: A Sign of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostberg, Per; Fernaeus, Sven-Erik; Hellstrom, Ake; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Wahlund, Lars Olof

    2005-01-01

    We assessed verb fluency vs. noun and letter-based fluency in 199 subjects referred for cognitive complaints including Subjective Cognitive Impairment, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. ANCOVAs and factor analyses identified verb, noun, and letter-based fluency as distinct tasks. Verb fluency performance in Mild Cognitive…

  13. Mild-split SUSY with flavor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliaz, Latif; Giveon, Amit; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Tsuk, Eitan

    2013-10-01

    In the framework of a gauge mediated quiver-like model, the standard model flavor texture can be naturally generated. The model — like the MSSM — has furthermore a region in parameter space where the lightest Higgs mass is fed by heavy stop loops, which in turn sets the average squark mass scale near 10 - 20TeV. We perform a careful flavor analysis to check whether this type of mild-split SUSY passes all flavor constraints as easily as envisioned in the original type of split SUSY. Interestingly, it turns out to be on the border of several constraints, in particular, the branching ratio of μ → eγ and, if order one complex phases are assumed, also ɛ K , neutron and electron EDM. Furthermore, we consider unification as well as dark matter candidates, especially the gravitino. Finally, we provide a closed-form formula for the soft masses of matter in arbitrary representations of any of the gauge groups in a generic quiver-like model with a general messenger sector.

  14. Mild cognitive impairment: a concept in evolution

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ronald C.; Caracciolo, Barbara; Brayne, Carol; Gauthier, Serge; Jelic, Vesna; Fratiglioni, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The construct of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has evolved over the past 10 years since the publication of the new MCI definition at the Key Symposium in 2003, but the core criteria have remained unchanged. The construct has been extensively used worldwide, both in clinical and research settings, to define the grey area between intact cognitive functioning and clinical dementia. A rich set of data regarding occurrence, risk factors, and progression of MCI has been generated. Discrepancies between studies can be mostly explained by differences in the operationalization of the criteria, differences in the setting where the criteria have been applied, selection of subjects, and length of follow-up in longitudinal studies. Major controversial issues that remain to be further explored are: algorithmic versus clinical classification, reliability of clinical judgment, temporal changes in cognitive performances, and predictivity of putative biomarkers. Some suggestions to further develop the MCI construct include the tailoring of the clinical criteria to specific populations and to specific contexts. The addition of biomarkers to the clinical phenotypes is promising but requires deeper investigation. Translation of findings from the specialty clinic to the population setting, although challenging, will enhance uniformity of outcomes. More longitudinal population-based studies on cognitive aging and MCI need to be performed to clarify all these issues. PMID:24605806

  15. Mild Cognitive Impairment: Pathology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mufson, Elliott J.; Binder, Lester; Counts, Scott E.; DeKosky, Steven T.; deTolledo-Morrell, Leyla; Ginsberg, Stephen D.; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Perez, Sylvia E.; Scheff, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is rapidly becoming one of the most common clinical manifestations affecting the elderly. The pathologic and molecular substrate of people diagnosed with MCI is not well established. Since MCI is a human specific disorder and neither the clinical nor the neuropathological course appears to follows a direct linear path, it is imperative to characterize neuropathology changes in the brains of people who came to autopsy with a well-characterized clinical diagnosis of MCI. Herein, we discuss findings derived from clinical pathologic studies of autopsy cases with various subtypes of MCI antemortem. The heterogeneity of clinical MCI imparts significant challenges to any review of this subject. The pathologic substrate of MCI is equally complex and must take into account not only conventional plaque and tangle pathology but also a wide range of cellular biochemical and molecular deficits many of which relate to cognitive decline as well as compensatory responses to the progressive disease process. The multifaceted nature of the neuronal disconnection syndrome associated with MCI, suggests that there is no single event, which precipitates this prodromal stage of AD. In fact, it can be argued that neuronal degeneration initiated at different levels of the central nervous system drive cognitive decline as a final common pathway at this stage of the dementing disease process. PMID:22101321

  16. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes work completed during the fifth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. Work this quarter focused on analytical characterization of untreated and treated Wyodak subbituminous coal and Illinois {number sign}6 bituminous coal. Mossbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques were used to study the effect of methanol/HCl pretreatment on the composition of each coal's inorganic phase. Results from these studies indicated that calcite is largely removed during pretreatment, but that other mineral species such as pyrite are unaffected. This finding is significant, since calcite removal appears to directly correlate with low severity liquefaction enhancement. Further work will be performed to study this phenomenon in more detail.

  17. Bacterial phosphating of mild (unalloyed) steel.

    PubMed

    Volkland, H P; Harms, H; Müller, B; Repphun, G; Wanner, O; Zehnder, A J

    2000-10-01

    Mild (unalloyed) steel electrodes were incubated in phosphate-buffered cultures of aerobic, biofilm-forming Rhodococcus sp. strain C125 and Pseudomonas putida mt2. A resulting surface reaction leading to the formation of a corrosion-inhibiting vivianite layer was accompanied by a characteristic electrochemical potential (E) curve. First, E increased slightly due to the interaction of phosphate with the iron oxides covering the steel surface. Subsequently, E decreased rapidly and after 1 day reached -510 mV, the potential of free iron, indicating the removal of the iron oxides. At this point, only scattered patches of bacteria covered the surface. A surface reaction, in which iron was released and vivianite precipitated, started. E remained at -510 mV for about 2 days, during which the vivianite layer grew steadily. Thereafter, E increased markedly to the initial value, and the release of iron stopped. Changes in E and formation of vivianite were results of bacterial activity, with oxygen consumption by the biofilm being the driving force. These findings indicate that biofilms may protect steel surfaces and might be used as an alternative method to combat corrosion.

  18. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Translation

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Claudia S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This Introduction to a Special Issue on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) highlights the methodological challenges in outcome studies and clinical trials involving patients who sustain mTBI. Recent advances in brain imaging and portable, computerized cognitive tasks have contributed to protocols that are sensitive to the effects of mTBI and efficient in time for completion. Investigation of civilian mTBI has been extended to single and repeated injuries in athletes and blast-related mTBI in service members and veterans. Despite differences in mechanism of injury, there is evidence for similar effects of acceleration-deceleration and blast mechanisms of mTBI on cognition. Investigation of repetitive mTBI suggests that the effects may be cumulative and that repeated mTBI and repeated subconcussive head trauma may lead to neurodegenerative conditions. Although animal models of mTBI using cortical impact and fluid percussion injury in rodents have been able to reproduce some of the cognitive deficits frequently exhibited by patients after mTBI, modeling post-concussion symptoms is difficult. Recent use of closed head and blast injury animal models may more closely approximate clinical mTBI. Translation of interventions that are developed in animal models to patients with mTBI is a priority for the research agenda. This Special Issue on mTBI integrates basic neuroscience studies using animal models with studies of human mTBI, including the cognitive sequelae, persisting symptoms, brain imaging, and host factors that facilitate recovery. PMID:23046349

  19. Sleep Habits in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Tamara L.; Riley, Thomas; Mattek, Nora; Pavel, Misha; Kaye, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    We explored the relationship between sleep disturbances and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in community-dwelling seniors. Recent evidence suggests that sleep habits are differentially compromised in different subtypes of MCI, but the relationship between sleep disruption and MCI remains poorly understood. We gathered daily objective measures of sleep disturbance from 45 seniors, including 16 with MCI (mean age 86.9 ± 4.3 years), over a six month period. We also collected self-report measures of sleep disturbance. Although there were no differences between groups in any of our self-report measures, we found that amnestic MCI (aMCI) volunteers had less disturbed sleep than both non-amnestic MCI (naMCI) and cognitively intact volunteers, as measured objectively by movement in bed at night (F2,1078=4.30, p=0.05), wake after sleep onset (F2,1078=41.6, p<0.001), and times up at night (F2,1078=26.7, p<0.001). The groups did not differ in total sleep time. In addition, the aMCI group had less day-to-day variability in these measures than the intact and naMCI volunteers. In general, the naMCI volunteers showed a level of disturbed sleep that was intermediate to that of aMCI and intact volunteers. These differences in sleep disruption between aMCI and naMCI may be related to differences in the pathology underlying these MCI subtypes. PMID:24145694

  20. Toxicity studies of mild gasification products

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, T.M.; Whong, W.Z.; Ma, J.; Zhong, B.Z.; Bryant, D.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to perform mutagenicity studies with the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay system on coal liquids produced by mild gasification from different coals and/or processing conditions, (2) to determine whether coal liquids which are mutagenic to bacteria are also genotoxic to mammalian cells, (3) to establish correlations between mutagenicity, aromaticity, and boiling point range of coal liquids, and (4) to identify the chemical classes which are likely to be responsible for the mutagenic activity of gasification products. Four of the seven samples tested so far failed to demonstrate any mutagenic activity under any conditions tested. Those samples were SHELL[number sign]830331, MG-122IBP-420[degree]F, MG-122 420--720[degree]F, and MG-122 720[degree]F+. Table 1 summarizes the results from all samples tested in DMSO and Tween 80. When solvated in DMSO, MG-119 and MG-120 composite materials displayed slight, but ultimately insignificant, genotoxic activity on TA98 and TA1OO in the presence of S9. When Tween 80 was used as the solvent, MG-119 and MG-120 displayed slight, but significant, geno-toxic activity on TA98 with S9 (Figure 4). CTC[number sign]11 in DMSO displayed significant genotoxic activity on both TA98 and TA1OO with and without S9. The activity was higher on TA98 than TA100, and higher with S9 than without, primarily indicating the presence of indirect-acting frameshift mutagen. The results of the testing on CTC[number sign]11 were similar for both solvents, DMSO and Tween 80 (Table 2).

  1. Toxicity studies of mild gasification products

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, T.M.; Whong, W.Z.; Ma, J.; Zhong, B.Z.; Bryant, D.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to perform mutagenicity studies with the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay system on coal liquids produced by mild gasification from different coals and/or processing conditions, (2) to determine whether coal liquids which are mutagenic to bacteria are also genotoxic to mammalian cells, (3) to establish correlations between mutagenicity, aromaticity, and boiling point range of coal liquids, and (4) to identify the chemical classes which are likely to be responsible for the mutagenic activity of gasification products. Four of the seven samples tested so far failed to demonstrate any mutagenic activity under any conditions tested. Those samples were SHELL{number_sign}830331, MG-122IBP-420{degree}F, MG-122 420--720{degree}F, and MG-122 720{degree}F+. Table 1 summarizes the results from all samples tested in DMSO and Tween 80. When solvated in DMSO, MG-119 and MG-120 composite materials displayed slight, but ultimately insignificant, genotoxic activity on TA98 and TA1OO in the presence of S9. When Tween 80 was used as the solvent, MG-119 and MG-120 displayed slight, but significant, geno-toxic activity on TA98 with S9 (Figure 4). CTC{number_sign}11 in DMSO displayed significant genotoxic activity on both TA98 and TA1OO with and without S9. The activity was higher on TA98 than TA100, and higher with S9 than without, primarily indicating the presence of indirect-acting frameshift mutagen. The results of the testing on CTC{number_sign}11 were similar for both solvents, DMSO and Tween 80 (Table 2).

  2. Multimorbidity and Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed Central

    Vassilaki, Maria; Aakre, Jeremiah A.; Cha, Ruth H.; Kremers, Walter K.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Geda, Yonas E.; Machulda, Mary M.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Roberts, Rosebud O

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine the association of multiple chronic conditions with risk of incident mild cognitive impairment (MCI)/dementia. DESIGN Prospective cohort study SETTING Olmsted County, Minnesota. PARTICIPANTS Cognitively normal individuals (N=2,176) enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA). MEASUREMENTS Participants were randomly selected from the community and evaluated by a study coordinator, a physician, and underwent neuropsychometric testing at baseline and at 15-month intervals to assess diagnoses of MCI and dementia. We electronically captured information on International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision (ICD-9) codes for chronic conditions in the five years prior to enrollment using the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records linkage system. We defined multimorbidity as having two or more chronic conditions and examined the association of multimorbidity with MCI/dementia using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS Among 2,176 cognitively normal participants (mean [±SD] age 78.5 [±5.2] years; 50.6% men), 1,884 (86.6%) had multimorbidity. The risk of MCI/dementia was elevated in persons with multimorbidity (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.82). The HR was stronger in persons with ≥4 conditions (HR: 1.61; 95%CI, 1.21–2.13) compared to persons with only 0 or 1 conditions, and for men (HR: 1.53, 95% CI, 1.01– 2.31) than for women (HR: 1.20, 95% CI, 0.83– 1.74). CONCLUSION In older adults, having multiple chronic conditions is associated with an increased risk of MCI/dementia. This is consistent with the hypothesis that multiple etiologies may contribute to MCI and late-life dementia. Preventing chronic diseases may be beneficial in delaying or preventing MCI or dementia. PMID:26311270

  3. Inferential reading abilities of mildly mentally retarded and nonretarded students.

    PubMed

    Bos, C S; Tierney, R J

    1984-07-01

    The inferential operations of mildly mentally retarded students reading at the intermediate level were investigated using methods based on discourse comprehension theory. We hypothesized that problems encountered in reading by these students are related to difficulties in generating logical inferences. Mildly retarded junior-high students and nonretarded third-grade students of the same reading comprehension level read and recalled a descriptive expository and a narrative passage. On the expository passage mildly retarded students generated the same quantity of inferences as did nonretarded students, but the inferences were qualitatively inferior. On the narrative passage the differences between the two groups were not significant. These findings were discussed in relation to the cognitive functioning of mildly retarded students.

  4. Cognitive vulnerability in moderate, mild, and low seasonality.

    PubMed

    Rohan, Kelly J; Nillni, Yael I; Mahon, Jennifer N; Roecklein, Kathryn A; Sitnikov, Lilya; Haaga, David A F

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the association between cognitive vulnerability factors and seasonality. Students (N = 88), classified based on the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire as experiencing moderate (n = 26) or mild (n = 32) seasonality, and nondepressed, low-seasonality controls (n = 30) completed explicit (i.e., dysfunctional attitudes, automatic negative thoughts, seasonal attitudes, and rumination) and implicit (i.e., implicit associations test) measures of cognitive vulnerability at one winter and one nonwinter assessment. Relative to low- and mild-seasonality participants, moderate-seasonality participants endorsed more automatic thoughts and rumination in winter and more dysfunctional attitudes across both seasons. Moderate- and mild-seasonality participants endorsed more maladaptive seasonal attitudes than did low-seasonality participants. All groups demonstrated increased dysfunctional attitudes, automatic thoughts, and rumination and stronger implicit associations about light and dark during the winter. The findings support a possible cognitive mechanism of winter depression onset and/or maintenance unique to individuals with moderate, as opposed to mild, seasonality.

  5. Mild, Moderate, Severe Asthma: What Do Grades Mean?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Mild, Moderate, Severe Asthma: What Do Grades Mean? Page Content Article Body ... is when assessed at follow-up visits. Intermittent Asthma A child who has symptoms of wheezing and ...

  6. Reading Improvement for Mainstreamed Children Who Are Mildly Mentally Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttery, Thomas J.; Mason, George E.

    1979-01-01

    Covers two major aspects of reading instruction for mildly mentally handicapped children in the regular classroom: a review of their reading characteristics and a presentation of questioning techniques useful for promoting their reading comprehension. (FL)

  7. Exertional compartment syndrome in covert mild hemophilia. A case report.

    PubMed

    Tountas, C P; Ferris, F O; Cobb, S W

    1992-07-01

    A 37-year-old white male experienced unexpected postoperative bleeding after fasciotomy and decompression for left pronator and compartment syndromes of the forearm. He was subsequently diagnosed with a mild form of hemophilia A. One year later, surgery was required for right pronator and compartment syndromes. Pre- and postoperative cryoprecipitate infusions controlled bleeding following the second operation until the patient discontinued his infusions, resulting in a wound hematoma. Covert mild hemophilia is implicated in the pathogenesis of his compartment syndromes.

  8. A better mild traumatic brain injury model in the rat.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Otani, Naoki; Osada, Hideo; Wada, Kojiro; Shima, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    The primary pathology associated with mild -traumatic brain injury (TBI) is selective axonal injury, which may characterize the vast majority of blast-induced TBIs. Axonal injuries in cases of mild TBI have been considered to be the main factors responsible for the long-lasting memory or attentional impairment in affected subjects. Among these axonal injuries, recent attention has been focused on the cingulum bundle (CB). Furthermore, recent studies with diffusion tensor MR imaging have shown the presence of injuries of the CB in cases of mild TBI in humans. This study aimed to provide a better laboratory model of mild TBI.Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to mild TBI using laser-induced shock waves (LISW) (sham, 0.5 J/cm(2), or 1.0 J/cm(2); n = 4 per group). Bodian-stained brain sections 14 days after LISW at 0.5 J/cm(2) or 1.0 J/cm(2) showed a decrease in the CB axonal density compared with the sham group, whereas there were no differences in the axonal density of the corpus callosum.The present study shows that this model is capable of reproducing the histological changes associated with mild TBI. PMID:23564112

  9. Mild extractability and bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.; Alexander, M.

    1999-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine the relationship between bioavailability of unaged and aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and the amounts detected by mild solvent extraction. More aged than unaged anthracene remained in Lima loam following introduction of earthworms (Eisenia foetida), a mixed culture containing anthracene-degrading microorganisms, or earthworms or wheat after bacterial biodegradation of the compound. Aging decreased the percentage of anthracene recovered by mild extraction with n-butanol from soil following introduction of earthworms, growth of wheat, biodegradation by bacteria, or when maintained sterile. Biodegradation resulted in a marked decrease in the percentage of aged and unaged anthracene recovered from soil by mild extraction with n-butanol or ethyl acetate. Aging of fluoranthene and pyrene decreased the amount removed by mild extraction with n-butanol, ethyl acetate, and propanol. The uptake of aged and unaged anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene by earthworms was correlated with the amounts recovered from soil by mild extraction with n-butanol, propanol, and ethyl acetate. The retention of aged and unaged anthracene by wheat and barley was correlated with the amounts recovered from soil by the same procedure. The authors suggest that mild extraction with organic solvents can be used to predict the bioavailability of PAHs in soil.

  10. Brain perfusion correlates of visuoperceptual deficits in Mild Cognitive Impairment and mild Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Alegret, Montserrat; Vinyes-Junqué, Georgina; Boada, Mercè; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Cuberas, Gemma; Espinosa, Ana; Roca, Isabel; Hernández, Isabel; Valero, Sergi; Rosende-Roca, Maitée; Mauleón, Ana; Becker, James T.; Tárraga, Lluís

    2012-01-01

    Background Visuoperceptual processing is impaired early in the clinical course of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The 15-Objects Test (15-OT) detects such subtle performance deficits in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and mild AD. Reduced brain perfusion in the temporal, parietal and prefrontal regions have been found in early AD and MCI patients. Objectives To confirm the role of the 15-OT in the diagnosis of MCI and AD, and to investigate the brain perfusion correlates of visuoperceptual dysfunction (15-OT) in subjects with MCI, AD and normal aging. Methods Forty-two AD, 42 MCI and 42 healthy elderly control (EC) subjects underwent a brain Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) and separately completed the 15-OT. An analysis of variance compared 15-OT scores between groups. SPM5 was used to analyse the SPECT data. Results 15-OT performace was impaired in the MCI and AD patients. In terms of the SPECT scans, AD patients showed reduced perfusion in temporal-parietal regions, while the MCI subjects had decreased perfusion in the middle and posterior cingulate. When MCI and AD groups were compared, a significant brain perfusion reduction was found in temporo-parietal regions. In the whole sample, 15-OT performance was significantly correlated with the clinical dementia rating scores, and with the perfusion in the bilateral posterior cingulate and the right temporal pole, with no significant correlation in each separate group. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the 15-OT performance provides a useful gradation of impairment from normal aging to AD, and it seems to be related to perfusion in the bilateral posterior cingulate and the right temporal pole. PMID:20555146

  11. NK Cells are Activated in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment but not in Mild Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Le Page, Aurélie; Bourgade, Karine; Lamoureux, Julie; Frost, Eric; Pawelec, Graham; Larbi, Anis; Witkowski, Jacek M; Dupuis, Gilles; Fülöp, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimerś disease (AD) is a progressive irreversible neurological brain disorder characterized by accumulation of amyloid-β, amyloid plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles. Inflammation and immune alterations have been linked to AD, suggesting that the peripheral immune system plays a role during the asymptomatic period of AD. NK cells participate in innate immune surveillance against intracellular pathogens and malignancy but their role in AD remains controversial. We have investigated changes in peripheral NK cell phenotypes and functions in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI, n = 10), patients with mild AD (mAD, n = 11), and healthy elderly controls (n = 10). Patients selected according to NINCDS-ADRDA criteria were classified using neuropsychological assessment tests. Phenotype analysis revealed differences in expression of CD16 (increased in mAD), NKG2A (decreased in aMCI), and TLR2 and TLR9 (both decreased in mAD). Functional assays revealed that NK cell killing activity and degranulation (CD107 expression) were unchanged in the three groups. In contrast, expression of the CD95 receptor was increased in aMCI and mAD. Granzyme B expression and cytokine production (TNFα, IFNγ) were increased in aMCI but not in mAD. CCL19- but not CCL21-dependent chemotaxis was decreased in aMCI and mAD, despite the fact that CCR7 expression was increased in aMCI. Our data suggest that the number of alterations observed in peripheral NK cells in aMCI represent an activation state compared to mAD patients and that may reflect an active immune response against a still to be defined aggression.

  12. Chronic mild stress impact: are females more vulnerable?

    PubMed

    Dalla, C; Antoniou, K; Drossopoulou, G; Xagoraris, M; Kokras, N; Sfikakis, A; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Z

    2005-01-01

    Despite the knowledge that women are more susceptible than men to stress-related mental illness, such as major depression, there is no comprehensive estimation of the role of gender in the detrimental effects of chronic stress that might cause depression. Sex differences regarding the association of behavioral parameters with serotonergic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activities were investigated in the chronic mild stress model of depression. Additionally, the impact of chronic mild stress exposure on an additional/novel short-term stressful procedure, such as the forced swim test was examined in male and female rats. Female rats were found to be more vulnerable to chronic mild stress and that was depicted with disruption of sucrose intake, decreases in open field activity, increased corticosterone levels, alteration in estrous cycle and decreased serotonergic activity in hippocampus and hypothalamus. On the contrary, in males the current chronic mild stress protocol elicited only behavioral changes, such as disruption in sucrose intake and decreased open field activity. Interestingly, in response to forced swim test, females previously subjected to chronic mild stress, were found to cope better by exhibiting increased active behavior in the second forced swim test session and higher hypothalamic serotonergic activity in comparison with corresponding males. On the other hand, males were more affected by previous chronic mild stress exposure and that was manifested by decreased active behavior in the first forced swim test session and increased corticosterone levels following second forced swim test session. These data indicate that although females are more vulnerable in the application of chronic mild stress than males, in response to an additional-novel stressor (forced swim test) they show better response. Therefore, both sex/gender and combination of stressful procedures should be carefully considered in the study of the pathophysiology of stress

  13. Effects of Mild Chronic Intermittent Cold Exposure on Rat Organs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Che, Honglei; Zhang, Wenbin; Wang, Jiye; Ke, Tao; Cao, Rui; Meng, Shanshan; Li, Dan; Weiming, Ouyang; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    Cold adaptation is a body's protective response to cold stress. Mild chronic intermittent cold (CIC) exposure has been used to generate animal models for cold adaptation studies. However, the effects of mild CIC exposure on vital organs are not completely characterized. In the present study, we exposed rats to mild CIC for two weeks, and then measured the body weights, the weights of brown adipose tissue (BAT), the levels of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brains, livers, hearts, muscles and BATs. Rats formed cold adaptation after exposure to CIC for two weeks. Compared to rats of the control group that were hosted under ambient temperature, rats exposed to mild CIC showed a lower average body weight, but a higher weight of brown adipose tissue (BAT). Rats exposed to CIC for two weeks also exhibited higher levels of ATP and ROS in all examined organs as compared to those of the control group. In addition, we determined the expression levels of cold-inducible RNA binding protein (Cirbp) and thioredoxin (TRX) in rat tissues after 2 weeks of CIC exposure. Both Cirbp and TRX were increased, suggesting a role of these two proteins for establishment of cold adaptation. Together, this study reveals the effects of mild CIC exposure on vital organs of rats during CIC exposure.

  14. Diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical management of mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Levin, Harvey S; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon R

    2015-05-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) are interchangeable terms to describe a common disorder with substantial effects on public health. Advances in brain imaging, non-imaging biomarkers, and neuropathology during the past 15 years have required researchers, clinicians, and policy makers to revise their views about mild TBI as a fully reversible insult that can be repeated without consequences. These advances have led to guidelines on management of mild TBI in civilians, military personnel, and athletes, but their widespread dissemination to clinical management in emergency departments and community-based health care is still needed. The absence of unity on the definition of mild TBI, the scarcity of prospective data concerning the long-term effects of repeated mild TBI and subconcussive impacts, and the need to further develop evidence-based interventions to mitigate the long-term sequelae are areas for future research that will improve outcomes, reduce morbidity and costs, and alleviate delayed consequences that have only recently come to light. PMID:25801547

  15. Should mild COPD be treated? Evidence for early pharmacological intervention.

    PubMed

    Elbehairy, Amany F; Webb, Katherine A; Neder, J Alberto; Alberto Neder, J; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2013-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common and often progressive inflammatory disease of the airways that is both preventable and treatable. It is well established that those with mild-to-moderate disease severity represent the majority of patients with COPD, yet this subpopulation is relatively under-studied. Because of an insidious pre-clinical phase, COPD is both under-diagnosed and under-treated. Recent studies have confirmed that even patients with mild, grade 1 COPD [i.e. those with a reduced forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity ratio but normal FEV1], have measurable physiological impairment with increased morbidity and a higher risk of mortality compared with non-smoking healthy controls. Beyond the imperative of smoking cessation-the pivotal intervention in all COPD stages-the role of pharmacotherapy for prevention of disease progression has yet to be established. The main objective of this review is to provide a concise overview of the heterogeneous pathophysiology of COPD with only mild airway obstruction on spirometry and obstacles for early diagnosis. We emphasize that the absence of sufficiently powered trials involving a large number of patients precludes definitive recommendations in support of (or against) long-term pharmacological treatment in mild COPD. Despite these limitations, we present a rationale for earlier pharmacological intervention derived from recent physiological studies performed in symptomatic patients with mild COPD.

  16. Effects of Mild Chronic Intermittent Cold Exposure on Rat Organs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Che, Honglei; Zhang, Wenbin; Wang, Jiye; Ke, Tao; Cao, Rui; Meng, Shanshan; Li, Dan; Weiming, Ouyang; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    Cold adaptation is a body's protective response to cold stress. Mild chronic intermittent cold (CIC) exposure has been used to generate animal models for cold adaptation studies. However, the effects of mild CIC exposure on vital organs are not completely characterized. In the present study, we exposed rats to mild CIC for two weeks, and then measured the body weights, the weights of brown adipose tissue (BAT), the levels of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brains, livers, hearts, muscles and BATs. Rats formed cold adaptation after exposure to CIC for two weeks. Compared to rats of the control group that were hosted under ambient temperature, rats exposed to mild CIC showed a lower average body weight, but a higher weight of brown adipose tissue (BAT). Rats exposed to CIC for two weeks also exhibited higher levels of ATP and ROS in all examined organs as compared to those of the control group. In addition, we determined the expression levels of cold-inducible RNA binding protein (Cirbp) and thioredoxin (TRX) in rat tissues after 2 weeks of CIC exposure. Both Cirbp and TRX were increased, suggesting a role of these two proteins for establishment of cold adaptation. Together, this study reveals the effects of mild CIC exposure on vital organs of rats during CIC exposure. PMID:26327811

  17. Neurobiology of chronic mild stress: Parallels to major depression

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Matthew N.; Hellemans, Kim G.C.; Verma, Pamela; Gorzalka, Boris B.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The chronic mild (or unpredictable/variable) stress (CMS) model was developed as an animal model of depression more than 20 years ago. The foundation of this model was that following long-term exposure to a series of mild, but unpredictable stressors, animals would develop a state of impaired reward salience that was akin to the anhedonia observed in major depressive disorder. In the time since its inception, this model has also been used for a variety of studies examining neurobiological variables that are associated with depression, despite the fact that this model has never been critically examined to validate that the neurobiological changes induced by CMS are parallel to those documented in depressive disorder. The aim of the current review is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of chronic mild stress on neurobiological variables, such as neurochemistry, neurochemical receptor expression and functionality, neurotrophin expression and cellular plasticity. These findings are then compared to those of clinical research examining common variables in populations with depressive disorders to determine if the changes observed following chronic mild stress are in fact consistent with those observed in major depression. We conclude that the chronic mild stress paradigm: (1) evokes an array of neurobiological changes that mirror those seen in depressive disorders and (2) may be a suitable tool to investigate novel systems that could be disturbed in depression, and thus aid in the development of novel targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:22776763

  18. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27193487

  19. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Activity restriction in mild COPD: a challenging clinical problem.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Denis E; Gebke, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    Dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and activity restriction are already apparent in mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, patients may not seek medical help until their symptoms become troublesome and persistent and significant respiratory impairment is already present; as a consequence, further sustained physical inactivity may contribute to disease progression. Ventilatory and gas exchange impairment, cardiac dysfunction, and skeletal muscle dysfunction are present to a variable degree in patients with mild COPD, and collectively may contribute to exercise intolerance. As such, there is increasing interest in evaluating exercise tolerance and physical activity in symptomatic patients with COPD who have mild airway obstruction, as defined by spirometry. Simple questionnaires, eg, the modified British Medical Research Council dyspnea scale and the COPD Assessment Test, or exercise tests, eg, the 6-minute or incremental and endurance exercise tests can be used to assess exercise performance and functional status. Pedometers and accelerometers are used to evaluate physical activity, and endurance tests (cycle or treadmill) using constant work rate protocols are used to assess the effects of interventions such as pulmonary rehabilitation. In addition, alternative outcome measurements, such as tests of small airway dysfunction and laboratory-based exercise tests, are used to measure the extent of physiological impairment in individuals with persistent dyspnea. This review describes the mechanisms of exercise limitation in patients with mild COPD and the interventions that can potentially improve exercise tolerance. Also discussed are the benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation and the potential role of pharmacologic treatment in symptomatic patients with mild COPD. PMID:24940054

  1. Could mild hypoxia impair pilot decision making in emergencies?

    PubMed

    Legg, Stephen; Hill, Stephen; Mundel, Toby; Gilbey, Andrew; Schlader, Zac; Raman, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    The decreased pressure in the cabin of a pressurised aircraft (typically equivalent to ~8000 ft) reduces the oxygen level so that the blood oxygen saturation of all occupants falls from >97% (normoxia) at sea-level to below 92% (mild hypoxia). Although exposure to mild hypoxia does not affect well-learned cognitive and motor performance of aircrew, it has been proposed that it can affect the performance of some complex cognitive performance tasks involving multiple demands typical of emergency tasks that may have to be performed by pilots. In order to simulate some of these complex cognitive demands, 25 student volunteers participated in an experiment which assessed performance of complex logical reasoning and and multiple memory tasks before and after 2 hours of exposure to normoxia and mild hypoxia. Performance for the more difficult components of the complex reasoning task, especially involving conflict decisions, were marginally significantly degraded by mild hypoxia. Since the effects were only marginally significant future studies should investigate the effects of mild hypoxia on more subtle complex decision-making tasks. PMID:22316722

  2. Prenatal natural history of isolated fetal mild bilateral pyelectasis

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Pereira, Gustavo; Bunduki, Victor; Hase, Eliane Azeka; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli Vieira; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prenatal outcomes in a cohort of fetuses with mild bilateral pyelectasis and determine whether performing serial ultrasounds is a good follow-up strategy. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal study was conducted on 62 fetuses with mild bilateral pyelectasis. Fetal mild bilateral pyelectasis was considered when the renal pelvis measured (in millimeters) ≥5.0 to 10.0, ≥7.0 to 10.0, and ≥10.0 to 15 at ≤23 weeks 6 days, 24 to 31 weeks 6 days, and ≥32 weeks, respectively, with no uretero-calyceal dilatation. Ultrasounds were performed every 3 weeks to assess whether the mild bilateral pyelectasis regressed, remained unchanged (Group 1) or progressed (Group 2). RESULTS: Group 1 consisted of 53 fetuses (85.4%), and progression was observed in 9 cases (Group 2, 14.6%). The initial renal pelvis diameter was significantly larger in fetuses with progression (p=0.028). Statistically significant differences in the renal pelvis diameter were also found at weeks 31 and 35 for both kidneys (p<0.05). The cases requiring intrauterine procedures or early delivery were not observed. CONCLUSION: Fetal mild bilateral pyelectasis with no calyceal dilatation is a benign condition that can be managed in the postnatal period. The initial renal pelvis diameter and the diameter in week 31 or 35 were valuable parameters for identifying cases that would eventually need specific postnatal procedures. PMID:27652832

  3. Prenatal natural history of isolated fetal mild bilateral pyelectasis

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Pereira, Gustavo; Bunduki, Victor; Hase, Eliane Azeka; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli Vieira; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prenatal outcomes in a cohort of fetuses with mild bilateral pyelectasis and determine whether performing serial ultrasounds is a good follow-up strategy. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal study was conducted on 62 fetuses with mild bilateral pyelectasis. Fetal mild bilateral pyelectasis was considered when the renal pelvis measured (in millimeters) ≥5.0 to 10.0, ≥7.0 to 10.0, and ≥10.0 to 15 at ≤23 weeks 6 days, 24 to 31 weeks 6 days, and ≥32 weeks, respectively, with no uretero-calyceal dilatation. Ultrasounds were performed every 3 weeks to assess whether the mild bilateral pyelectasis regressed, remained unchanged (Group 1) or progressed (Group 2). RESULTS: Group 1 consisted of 53 fetuses (85.4%), and progression was observed in 9 cases (Group 2, 14.6%). The initial renal pelvis diameter was significantly larger in fetuses with progression (p=0.028). Statistically significant differences in the renal pelvis diameter were also found at weeks 31 and 35 for both kidneys (p<0.05). The cases requiring intrauterine procedures or early delivery were not observed. CONCLUSION: Fetal mild bilateral pyelectasis with no calyceal dilatation is a benign condition that can be managed in the postnatal period. The initial renal pelvis diameter and the diameter in week 31 or 35 were valuable parameters for identifying cases that would eventually need specific postnatal procedures.

  4. Mild pediatric traumatic brain injury: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fay, G C; Jaffe, K M; Polissar, N L; Liao, S; Martin, K M; Shurtleff, H A; Rivara, J M; Winn, H R

    1993-09-01

    Using a prospective, cohort design, we investigated whether children with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) differed from individually matched controls on measures of intellectual, neuropsychological, academic, and "real world" functioning. Subjects included children between the ages of 6 and 15 years who sustained mild, moderate, and severe closed head injuries and were consecutively identified on presentation to the emergency departments of two regional, university medical centers. One hundred twenty-nine children were eligible for enrollment. Seventeen refused enrollment. Fifty-nine of the 112 enrolled children were classified as mildly injured. Six of these children dropped out, leaving 53 mildly injured cases for analysis. Individually matched controls from the classroom of the injured cases were identified based on age, gender, and premorbid academic achievement and behavior. Assessment measures included standardized intellectual, neuropsychological, and academic measures. Also, parent and teacher questionnaires, measuring social, educational, domestic, and community living skills were used. Among 51 outcome variables only five were significantly associated with injury at initial or 1-year testing after adjusting for multiple comparisons. However, these five associations were either very weak or implausible. Results from this study suggest that mild TBI produces virtually no clinically significant long-term deficits in intellectual, neuropsychological, academic, or "real world" functioning. PMID:8379832

  5. SPM-based count normalization provides excellent discrimination of mild Alzheimer's disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment from healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, Igor; Hammers, Alexander; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Schmidtmann, Irene; Scheurich, Armin; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Peters, Jürgen; Bartenstein, Peter; Lieb, Klaus; Schreckenberger, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Statistical comparisons of [(18)F]FDG PET scans between healthy subjects and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) usually require normalization of regional tracer uptake via ROIs defined using additional software. Here, we validate a simple SPM-based method for count normalization. FDG PET scans of 21 mild, 15 very mild AD, 11 aMCI patients and 15 age-matched controls were analyzed. First, we obtained relative increases in the whole patient sample compared to controls (i.e. areas relatively preserved in patients) with proportional scaling to the cerebral global mean (CGM). Next, average absolute counts within the cluster with the highest t-value were extracted. Statistical comparisons of controls versus three patients groups were then performed using count normalization to CGM, sensorimotor cortex (SMC) as standard, and to the cluster-derived counts. Compared to controls, relative metabolism in aMCI patients was reduced by 15%, 20%, and 23% after normalization to CGM, SMC, and cluster-derived counts, respectively, and 11%, 21%, and 25% in mild AD patients. Logistic regression analyses based on normalized values extracted from AD-typical regions showed that the metabolic values obtained using CGM, SMC, and cluster normalization correctly classified 81%, 89% and 92% of aMCI and controls; classification accuracies for AD groups (very mild and mild) were 91%, 97%, and 100%. The proposed algorithm of fully SPM-based count normalization allows for a substantial increase of statistical power in detecting very early AD-associated hypometabolism, and very high accuracy in discriminating mild AD and aMCI from healthy aging. PMID:18691659

  6. [Mild cognitive impairment. Survey of attitudes of specialists and general physicians. mild].

    PubMed

    Serrano, Cecilia M; Allegri, Ricardo F; Caramelli, Paulo; Taragano, Fernando E; Camera, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) refers to persons who are slightly cognitively impaired for age but do not meet the criteria for dementia. MCI has been related to a pre-dementia stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, other possible diagnoses such as cerebro-vascular disease, frontotemporal dementia or normal aging have been considered. Diagnosis, etiology and conversion to dementia are a source of ambiguity in MCI. The aim was to evaluate the opinion of experts on dementia and of general practitioners concerning MCI. A total of 24 experts from Argentina and Brazil (16 neurologists and 8 psychiatrists) and 30 general practitioners agreed to reply to a questionnaire on MCI (adapted from Dubois inventory, 2003). Of these, 92% of experts considered MCI as an ambiguous entity, not necessarily as a "pre-dementia" stage; 63% confirmed a tendency to worsen over the time and 83% of experts decided to initiate treatment using cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine and vitamin E. The opinion on MCI was that a priori it is not only an Alzheimer disease pre-dementia stage, but most of them consider the treatment against AD. MCI is a heterogeneous entity that should be classified as an open category and making it necessary to standardize definitions and design diagnosis guides to better understand Alzheimer disease pre-dementia stage.

  7. Johnson - Cook Strength Models for Mild and DP 590 Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantam, K.; Bajaj, D.; Brar, N. S.; Hill, S.

    2006-07-01

    Automotive steels, Mild and Dual Phase590 (DP590) are characterized in tension at room temperature, using the quasi-static and split Hopkinson bar techniques at various strain rates ranging from ˜10-3/s to ˜1800/s. Tension stress-strain data for both the steels are analyzed to determine the Johnson-Cook Strength model constants, J-C strength model constants for mild steel are A=217 MPa, B = 234 MPa, n = 0.643 and C = 0.076 and for DP590 steel are A = 430 MPa, B = 824 MPa, n = 0.510 and C = 0.017. Higher value of strain rate sensitivity constant C for mild steel (0.076) compared to DP 590 (0.017) is also reflected in the stress- strain data at various strain rates.

  8. [Arterial hypertension in special situations: mild, systolic and in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Luque Otero, M; Fernández Pinilla, C

    1990-01-01

    Mild hypertension is very common, 50% of hypertensives being with their diastolic BP between 90 and 104 mmHg. Many large studies, especially HDFP, had shown not only the deleterious cardiovascular effects of mild hypertension but also the benefits obtained with the therapy. The non-pharmacological approach should be the first step in the treatment of mild hypertension. Isolated systolic hypertension have a high prevalence in the elderly, increasing the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Sodium restriction and, if necessary, vasodilators increasing the arterial compliance seem to be the logical approach to treat isolated systolic hypertension. Finally, eclampsia is the most serious complication of pregnancy - induced hypertension. The treatment with bed rest and either betablockers or methyldopa is beneficial. If eclampsia occurs hydralazine, magnesium sulphate or nifedipine should be used.

  9. Hormetic modulation of aging and longevity by mild heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2006-05-22

    Aging is characterized by a stochastic accumulation of molecular damage, progressive failure of maintenance and repair, and consequent onset of age-related diseases. Applying hormesis in aging research and therapy is based on the principle of stimulation of maintenance and repair pathways by repeated exposure to mild stress. In a series of experimental studies we have shown that repetitive mild heat stress has anti-aging hormetic effects on growth and various other cellular and biochemical characteristics of human skin fibroblasts undergoing aging in vitro. These effects include the maintenance of stress protein profiles, reduction in the accumulation of oxidatively and glycoxidatively damaged proteins, stimulation of the proteasomal activities for the degradation of abnormal proteins, improved cellular resistance to ethanol, hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet-B rays, and enhanced levels of various antioxidant enzymes. Anti-aging hormetic effects of mild heat shock appear to be facilitated by reducing protein damage and protein aggregation by activating internal antioxidant, repair and degradation processes.

  10. Mild serotonin syndrome: A report of 12 cases

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Sanjay; Patel, Varsha; Kakked, Siddharth; Patel, Indravadan; Yadav, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is an under diagnosed and under reported condition. Mild SS is easily overlooked by physicians. Every patient with mild SS is a potential candidate for developing life-threatening severe SS because of inadvertent overdose or the addition of the second serotonergic drug. Herein, we describe 12 patients with mild SS observed over 12 months in neurology outpatient clinic. It is a retrospective chart review of 12 consecutive patients who had hyperreflexia with tremor (defined as mild SS Hunter's criteria) and had received serotonergic agents in the past 5 weeks. Only four patients (33%) reported tremor as a presenting or main feature. The presenting features in another eight patients were: Dizziness, generalized body pain, headache, and seizure. Five patients responded to the removal of the offending agents and got a complete response in 2-7 days. There were no or minimal responses in another seven patients to the removal of the serotonergic drugs. Cyproheptadine was started in these patients, at the dose of 8 mg three times daily. Response started within 1-3 days of initiation of the drug and the complete responses were noted in 5-14 days. There were no side effects from cyproheptadine in any patient. We suggest that any patient on serotonergic drug developing new symptoms should be examined for the presence of tremor, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, and clonus to look for mild SS. In addition, every patient on any serotonergic drug should be examined for the presence of mild SS before escalating the dose or before adding a new one. PMID:26019424

  11. Recent Analysis of UCAPs in Mild Hybrids (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2006-05-01

    This report presents the analysis of ultracapacitors for mild/moderate hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) performance. The objectives of this report are to: (1) review the fuel economy improvement trends of today's HEVs with respect to degree of hybridization; (2) perform analysis to see the extent of fuel economy improvement possible with various strategies in mild/moderate HEVs, with no engine downsizing, using either batteries or ultracapacitors; (3) identify energy requirements of various driving events/functions--what matches a limited ucap's energy; and (4) discuss potential roles for high-voltage ultracapacitors in HEVs, if any.

  12. Investigation of the combined effects of bedrest and mild hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.; Bungo, M. W.; Conkin, J.

    1982-01-01

    Subjects were exposed to an 8-h mild hypoxia exposure (8000 ft. equivalent, 2438 m) with and without a 28-h period of 6 deg headdown bedrest. Anticipated responses to the bedrest and the hypoxia were observed. There was no indication that bedrest affected the arterial oxygenation or the oxygen gradient across the lungs of the subjects undergoing mild hypoxia. It is concluded that there is no evidence that would preclude an alveolar O2 pressure as low as 69 torr during contingency spacecraft operation.

  13. [Lithium therapy in patients with mild mental retardation].

    PubMed

    Otter, M; van Amelsvoort, T A M J

    2015-01-01

    In the psychiatric treatment of patients with mild learning disabilities or borderline intellectual functioning, signs and symptoms of psychiatric disorders are sometimes misinterpreted as behaviour that reflects problems that are known to patients with mental retardation. We report on two case studies in which lithium therapy made a substantial contribution to (partial) recovery. One patient had bipolar disorder and the other had a major depressive disorder combined with suicidal behaviour. Each patient also had a mild learning disability or borderline intellectual functioning. PMID:26189422

  14. Development of an advanced continuous mild gasification process for the production of coproducts. Task 4, Mild gasification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.W.; Cha, C.Y.; Kang, T.W.; Vaillancourt, M.B.

    1990-12-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) teamed with the AMAX Research and Development Center and Riley Stoker Corporation on Development of an Advanced, Continuous Mild-Gasification Process for the Production of Coproducts under contract DE-AC21-87MC24268 with the Morgantown Energy Technology of the US Department of Energy. The strategy for this project is to produce electrode binder pitch and diesel fuel blending stock by mild gasification of Wyodak coal. The char is upgraded to produce anode-grade carbon, carbon black, and activated carbon. This report describes results of mild-gasification tests conducted by WRI. Char upgrading tests conducted by AMAX will be described in a separate report.

  15. Reduced Sympathetic Response to Head-Up Tilt in Subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment or Mild Alzheimer's Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mellingsæter, Marte Rognstad; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Ranhoff, Anette Hylen; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Wyller, Vegard Bruun

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic control was compared in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild Alzheimer's dementia (AD) as well as in healthy elderly subjects. Methods Noninvasive, continuous hemodynamic recordings were obtained from 14 patients and 48 controls during supine rest (tilt of 30 and 70°). Cardiac output, end-diastolic volume, total peripheral resistance, heart rate variability (HRV), systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV), and baroreceptor sensitivity were calculated. Results At 70° tilt, the HRV indices differed significantly, with higher high-frequency (HF) variability as well as lower low-frequency (LF) variability and LF/HF ratios in the patients. The patients had significantly lower SBPV in the LF range at 30° tilt. Conclusions The results indicate a poorer sympathetic response to orthostatic stress in MCI and mild AD. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:25873932

  16. SCANDIUM TRIFLATE CATALYZED ACETYLATION OF STARCH UNDER MILD CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scandium (III) trifluoromethan sulfonate (Sc(OTf)3) was investigated as a catalyst for the acetylation of starch in order to determine the potential for preparing new types of starch esters under mild conditions. At room temperature, dry granular corn starch reacts with acetic anhydride in the pres...

  17. Mild to moderate intra-abdominal hypertension: Does it matter?

    PubMed Central

    Maddison, Liivi; Starkopf, Joel; Reintam Blaser, Annika

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiology, pathophysiological consequences and impact on outcome of mild to moderate (Grade I to II) intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), points out possible pitfalls in available treatment recommendations and focuses on tasks for future research in the field. IAH occurs in about 40% of ICU patients. Whereas the prevalence of abdominal compartment syndrome seems to be decreasing, the prevalence of IAH does not. More than half of IAH patients present with IAH grade I and approximately a quarter with IAH grade II. However, most of the studies have addressed IAH as a yes-or-no variable, with little or no attention to different severity grades. Even mild IAH can have a negative impact on tissue perfusion and microcirculation and be associated with an increased length of stay and duration of mechanical ventilation. However, the impact of IAH and its different grades on mortality is controversial. The influence of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) on outcome most likely depends on patient and disease characteristics and the concomitant macro- and microcirculation. Therefore, management might differ significantly. Today, clear triggers for interventions in different patient groups with mild to moderate IAH are not defined. Further studies are needed to clarify the clinical importance of mild to moderate IAH identifying clear triggers for interventions to lower the IAP. PMID:26855899

  18. A mild, catalyst-free synthesis of 2-aminopyridines

    PubMed Central

    Poola, Bhaskar; Choung, Wonken; Nantz, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Alkylation of 2-mercaptopyridine with 1,2-dibromoethane affords a cyclic dihydrothiazolopyridinium salt that can serve as a precursor of 2-aminopyridines. Its reaction with primary or secondary amines, either neat or in DMSO, under mild conditions gives the title compounds. PMID:25165405

  19. FAST Science: Teaching Science to Adolescents with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaki, Joyce; Serna, Loretta A.

    1995-01-01

    FAST I (Foundational Approach to Science Teaching I) is an inquiry and inductive-reasoning approach to learning physical science, ecology, and relational study. The program was successfully adapted for middle school students with mild disabilities. Teacher preparation, classroom groupings, behavior management procedures, evaluation, and…

  20. Stressful Social Interactions Experienced by Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Sigan L.; MacLean, William E., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Adults with intellectual disability are vulnerable to stressful social interactions. We determined frequency and severity of various stressful social interactions, identified the social partners in these interactions, and examined the specific interpersonal skill difficulties of 114 adults with mild intellectual disability. Participants'…

  1. Congenital Syndromes and Mildly Handicapped Students: Implications for Special Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra M.

    1989-01-01

    Many learning disabilities or cases of mild retardation are due to medically diagnosable, congenital syndromes, such as fetal alcohol syndrome, sex chromosome abnormalities, multiple anomaly syndromes, phenylketonuria, and Tourette Syndrome. These syndromes are discussed, and suggestions are given for special education management. (Author/JDD)

  2. ADHD Symptoms in Children with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonoff, Emily; Pickles, Andrew; Wood, Nicky; Gringras, Paul; Chadwick, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether the nature and correlates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms are different in subjects with mild intellectual disability (ID) compared to subjects with average ability. Method: From a general population sample of 2,726 12- to 15-year-olds, a stratified subsample was selected to enrich for…

  3. Late Diagnosis in Severe and Mild Intellectual Disability in Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verri, A. P.; Maraschio, P.; Uggetti, C.; Pucci, E.; Ronchi, G.; Nespoli, L.; Destefani, V.; Ramponi, A.; Federico, A.

    2004-01-01

    The diagnosis of intellectual disability (ID) is highly dependent on a comprehensive personal and family medical history, a complete physical examination and a careful developmental assessment of the patient. Our study intended to: (1) classify the aetiology of mild and severe ID in an adult population of 140 Italian subjects; (2) evaluate the…

  4. N-fluorolactams: Rapid, mild, and regiospecific fluorinating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Satyamurthy, N.; Bida, G.T.; Phelps, M.E.; Barrio, J.R. Lab. of Nuclear Medicine, Los Angeles, CA )

    1990-05-11

    A method for the synthesis of fluorine-18 labelled N-fluorolactams by reaction with dilute fluorine-18 in freon has been developed. Chemical yields range from 33-79%. Fluorination of a number of Grignard reagents with these fluorolactams has also been achieved, with yields ranging as high as 51%. The reaction of the fluorolactams with Grignard reagents is mild, regiospecific, and facile.

  5. Music Enhances Autobiographical Memory in Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Haj, Mohamad; Postal, Virginie; Allain, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown that the "Four Seasons" music may enhance the autobiographical performance of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We used a repeated measures design in which autobiographical recall of 12 mild AD patients was assessed using a free narrative method under three conditions: (a) in "Silence," (b) after being exposed to the opus "Four…

  6. Teaching Area and Volume to Students with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hord, Casey; Xin, Yan Ping

    2015-01-01

    In the current educational climate, teachers are required to find methods to give all students, including students with mild intellectual disability, access to the general education curriculum. The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined effects of the concrete-semiconcrete-abstract instructional sequence and model-based problem…

  7. Care Partner Responses to the Onset of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blieszner, Rosemary; Roberto, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We examined characteristics, responses, and psychological well-being of care partners who support and assist older adults recently diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Design and Methods: Based on a sample of 106 care partners of community residents diagnosed with MCI at memory clinics, we conducted face-to-face interviews…

  8. The Gross Motor Skills of Children with Mild Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nonis, Karen P.; Jernice, Tan Sing Yee

    2014-01-01

    Many international studies have examined the gross motor skills of children studying in special schools while local studies of such nature are limited. This study investigated the gross motor skills of children with Mild Learning Disabilities (MLD; n = 14, M age = 8.93 years, SD = 0.33) with the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 (TGMD-2, Ulrich,…

  9. Cholinergic Enhancement of Frontal Lobe Activity in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saykin, Andrew J.; Wishart, Heather A.; Rabin, Laura A.; Flashman, Laura A.; McHugh, Tara L.; Mamourian, Alexander C.; Santulli, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors positively affect cognition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other conditions, but no controlled functional MRI studies have examined where their effects occur in the brain. We examined the effects of donepezil hydrochloride (Aricept[Registered sign]) on cognition and brain activity in patients with amnestic mild cognitive…

  10. Career Development of Young Adults with Mild Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapasalo, S.

    A Finnish study compared the career development, participation in vocational education, and working life 4 to 5 years after the completion of secondary school education of students with mild mental retardation (n=13) and students with other disabilities (n=72). Results found most of the subjects had completed their studies, however, only 25…

  11. Numerical Magnitude Processing in Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brankaer, Carmen; Ghesquiere, Pol; De Smedt, Bert

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated numerical magnitude processing in children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and examined whether these children have difficulties in the ability to represent numerical magnitudes and/or difficulties in the ability to access numerical magnitudes from formal symbols. We compared the performance of 26 children…

  12. Pufferfish poisoning: emergency diagnosis and management of mild human tetrodotoxication.

    PubMed

    Sims, J K; Ostman, D C

    1986-09-01

    A 45-year-old man ate the liver of the toxic pufferfish (Diodron hystrix) and developed mild tetrodotoxication consisting of hyperemesis, bradycardia, hypotension, generalized numbness, and a generalized paresis. He was treated with atropine, normal saline IV infusions, nasogastric suction, and oxygen, and he recovered after six days. PMID:3740600

  13. Separation of products from mild coal gasification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallman, P.H.

    1991-09-11

    The primary mild coal gasification product mixture containing noncondensible gas, high-boiling hydrocarbon vapors and entrained fines is difficult to process into the desired pure products: gas, liquids, and dry solids. This challenge for mild coal gasification process development has been studied by surveying the technical literature for suitable separations processes and for similar issues in related processes. The choice for a first-stage solids separation step is standard cyclones, arranged in parallel trains for large-volume applications in order to take advantage of the higher separation efficiency of smaller cyclones. However, mild gasification pilot-plant data show entrainment of ultrafine particles for which standard cyclones have poor separation efficiency. A hot secondary solids separation step is needed for the ultrafine entrainment in order to protect the liquid product from excessive amounts of contaminating solids. The secondary solids separation step is similar to many high-temperature flue-gas applications with an important complicating condition: Mild gasifier vapors form coke on surfaces in contact with the vapors. Plugging of the filter medium by coke deposition is concluded to be the main product separation problem for mild gasification. Three approaches to solution of this problem are discussed in the order of preference: (1) a barrier filter medium made of a perforated foil that is easy to regenerate, (2) a high-efficiency cyclone coupled with recycle of a solids-containing tar fraction for coking/cracking in the gasifier, and (3) a granular moving bed filter with regeneration of the bed material. The condensation of oil vapors diluted by noncondensible gas is analyzed thermodynamically, and the conclusion is that existing commercial oil fractionator designs are adequate as long as the vapor stream does not contain excessive amounts of solids. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Analysis of Functional Pathways Altered after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Redell, John B.; Moore, Anthony N.; Grill, Raymond J.; Johnson, Daniel; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Concussive injury (or mild traumatic brain injury; mTBI) can exhibit features of focal or diffuse injury patterns. We compared and contrasted the cellular and molecular responses after mild controlled cortical impact (mCCI; a focal injury) or fluid percussion injury (FPI; a diffuse injury) in rats. The rationale for this comparative analysis was to investigate the brain's response to mild diffuse versus mild focal injury to identify common molecular changes triggered by these injury modalities and to determine the functional pathways altered after injury that may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Microarrays containing probes against 21,792 unique messenger RNAs (mRNAs) were used to investigate the changes in cortical mRNA expression levels at 3 and 24 h postinjury. Of the 354 mRNAs with significantly altered expression levels after mCCI, over 89% (316 mRNAs) were also contained within the mild FPI (mFPI) data set. However, mFPI initiated a more widespread molecular response, with over 2300 mRNAs differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analysis of annotated Gene Ontology molecular function and biological pathway terms showed a significant overrepresentation of genes belonging to inflammation, stress, and signaling categories in both data sets. We therefore examined changes in the protein levels of a panel of 23 cytokines and chemokines in cortical extracts using a Luminex-based bead immunoassay and detected significant increases in macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α (CCL3), GRO-KC (CXCL1), interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Immunohistochemical localization of MIP-1α and IL-1β showed marked increases at 3 h postinjury in the cortical vasculature and microglia, respectively, that were largely resolved by 24 h postinjury. Our findings demonstrate that both focal and diffuse mTBI trigger many shared pathobiological processes (e.g., inflammatory responses) that could be targeted for mechanism-based therapeutic interventions

  15. Common management issues in pediatric patients with mild bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2012-10-01

    Type 1 von Willebrand disease and mild platelet function defects are among the most common disorders seen by pediatric hematologists. The management and prevention of bleeding in these patients can be challenging, as there are limited published data to guide clinical practice, and a complete lack of randomized clinical trials. Desmopressin (DDAVP) and antifibrinolytics are the mainstays of treatment in these patients, yet the optimal dosing and timing of these agents to prevent or resolve bleeding, while minimizing adverse side effects, is sometimes unclear. DDAVP-induced hyponatremia is a particularly under-recognized complication in children with bleeding disorders who undergo surgery. Clinicians need to be aware of local measures that are equally important in treating problems such as epistaxis and surgical bleeding. This review will discuss the published literature and provide practical suggestions regarding four common management issues in the care of children and adolescents with mild bleeding disorders: epistaxis, heavy menstrual bleeding, dental extractions, and tonsillectomy.

  16. [Experience with ciclesonide in patients with mild persistent bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Bartosíková, L; Necas, J; Frána, L; Bartosík, T

    2007-12-01

    Experience with ciclesonide in patients with mild persistent bronchial asthma The study aimed to monitor the effectiveness and safety of the treatment with ciclesonide, administered once a day in a 160 microg dose, over a 3-month period, to a group of 100 patients diagnosed with mild persistent bronchial asthma with deterioration of problems after exercise. The results of the study prove significant positive effects of the preparation used. A significant improvement of FEV1 and PEF values was observed, as well as a statistically significant remission of both day and nocturnal symptoms of the disease, a significantly lower consumption of short-acting beta2-sympathomimetics, and an improvement of all evaluated data relating to the quality of life of the asthmatic patients. No adverse effects were registered. PMID:18257418

  17. Alexander disease with mild dorsal brainstem atrophy and infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Yamaguchi-Takada, Yui; Yano, Tamami; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sawaishi, Yukio; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    We present the case of a Japanese male infant with Alexander disease who developed infantile spasms at 8 months of age. The patient had a cluster of partial seizures at 4 months of age. He presented with mild general hypotonia and developmental delay. Macrocephaly was not observed. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings fulfilled all MRI-based criteria for the diagnosis of Alexander disease and revealed mild atrophy of the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata with abnormal intensities. DNA analysis disclosed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.1154 C>T, p.S385F) in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. At 8 months of age, tonic spasms occurred, and electroencephalography (EEG) revealed hypsarrhythmia. Lamotrigine effectively controlled the infantile spasms and improved the abnormal EEG findings. Although most patients with infantile Alexander disease have epilepsy, infantile spasms are rare. This comorbid condition may be associated with the distribution of the brain lesions and the age at onset of Alexander disease.

  18. Respiratory status of stainless steel and mild steel welders.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, P L; Kalliomäki, K; Korhonen, O; Nordman, H; Rahkonen, E; Vaaranen, V

    1982-01-01

    Eighty-three full-time stainless steel and 29 mild steel welders from one shipyard were examined clinically, and their lung function was measured. The stainless steel welders had used both tungsten inert-gas (low-fume concentration) and manual metal-arc (MMA) (high-fume concentration) welding methods. The individual exposure of the welders was estimated based on the time spent doing MMA welding, the amount of retained contaminants in the lungs (magnetopulmography), and urinary chromium excretion. The results suggest that there is a greater prevalence of small airway disease among shipyard mild steel MMA welders than among stainless steel welders. Among the stainless steel welders the impairment of lung function parameters was associated with the MMA welding method. The type of welding, then, is important when the health hazards of welders are studied, and welders cannot be regarded as a single, homogeneous group. PMID:7100838

  19. Is surgery necessary for 'mild' or 'asymptomatic' hyperparathyroidism?

    PubMed

    Niederle, Bruno; Wémeau, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-01

    A large majority of the currently diagnosed patients with hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) are mild or asymptomatic, mainly women after menopause. Following the debate held at the 16th European Congress of Endocrinology in Wroclaw (Poland) from May 3-7, 2014, arguments are here presented by a surgeon and a medical practitioner considering these situations rather have to profit from surgery, or simply from survey. For the trained endocrine surgeon, it is evident that parathyroidectomy confirms the diagnosis and undoubtedly reduces the discomfort felt by certain patients, prevents all risks of complications, removes patients and medical teams from the monitoring and represents a real individual financial benefit. On the other hand, the medical practitioner considers that mild or asymptomatic PHPT is commonly stable, and very rare are the subjects at risk of complications, particularly of fractures; prevention of vascular and metabolic disorders, nephrolithiasis and bone rarefaction justify regular physical exercise, a safe alimentation, a sufficient calcium and high water intake, the correction of the frequent deficit in vitamin D; finally has also to be considered the impossibility to refer to specialized (endocrine) surgeons, the enormous cohort of subjects more than 50 years with 'mild' or 'asymptomatic' PHPT. The surgeon and the medical practitioner agree to consider that in patients with 'mild' or 'asymptomatic' disease, there is no place for medical treatments, in particular calcimimetics and bisphophonates. Both agree that further studies are needed to clarify the long-term prognosis of operated and non-operated PHPT in term of fractures, cardiovascular risk and mortality. Individual and collective cost/benefit ratios of surgery or survey are also still imperfectly evaluated.

  20. An ellipsometric study of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakenbury, W. R. E.; Grzeskowiak, R.

    1986-04-01

    An ellipsometric study has been made on mild steel in hydrochloric acid solutions, in a situation where film growth is not expected. The results are considered to be due to roughening and have been interpreted in terms of a Fenstermaker-McCrackin type roughening model. It appears that the ellipsometer is sensitive mainly to a small scale roughening consisting of etch pits of a few nanometers in dimensions rather than the larger roughened features easily seen by microscopic examination.

  1. Non syndromic gingival fibromatosis in a mild mental retardation child

    PubMed Central

    Duddu, Mahesh K.; Muppa, Radhika; Reddy, G. S. Prasad; Reddy, P. Veerendra Nath

    2012-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is a benign oral condition characterized by enlargement of gingival tissues. It usually develops as an isolated disorder but can be one of the features of a syndrome. This case report is of a 5-year-old male with severe gingival hyperplasia and mild mental retardation which was complicated by open bite, abnormal occlusion, open lip posture, and disabilities associated with mastication and speech. Full mouth gingivectomy in single sitting under general anesthesia was done with electrocautery. PMID:23230365

  2. Substantial Genetic Influence on Mild Mental Impairment in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinath, Frank M.; Harlaar, Nicole; Ronald, Angelica; Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    We report the first major genetic study of mild mental impairment. From a representative sample of 3,886 twins (1,314 monozygotic, 1,296 dizygotic same-sex, and 1,276 dizygotic opposite-sex), the lowest 5% were selected on a composite measure of verbal and nonverbal abilities assessed by parents when the twins were 2, 3, and 4 years of age. Twin…

  3. Mild Dissonance Preferred Over Consonance in Single Chord Perception.

    PubMed

    Lahdelma, Imre; Eerola, Tuomas

    2016-05-01

    Previous research on harmony perception has mainly been concerned with horizontal aspects of harmony, turning less attention to how listeners perceive psychoacoustic qualities and emotions in single isolated chords. A recent study found mild dissonances to be more preferred than consonances in single chord perception, although the authors did not systematically vary register and consonance in their study; these omissions were explored here. An online empirical experiment was conducted where participants (N = 410) evaluated chords on the dimensions of Valence, Tension, Energy, Consonance, and Preference; 15 different chords were played with piano timbre across two octaves. The results suggest significant differences on all dimensions across chord types, and a strong correlation between perceived dissonance and tension. The register and inversions contributed to the evaluations significantly, nonmusicians distinguishing between triadic inversions similarly to musicians. The mildly dissonant minor ninth, major ninth, and minor seventh chords were rated highest for preference, regardless of musical sophistication. The role of theoretical explanations such as aggregate dyadic consonance, the inverted-U hypothesis, and psychoacoustic roughness, harmonicity, and sharpness will be discussed to account for the preference of mild dissonance over consonance in single chord perception. PMID:27433333

  4. Cerebrovascular regulation, exercise, and mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, William P.; Iverson, Grant L.; Taylor, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A substantial number of people who sustain a mild traumatic brain injury report persistent symptoms. Most common among these symptoms are headache, dizziness, and cognitive difficulties. One possible contributor to sustained symptoms may be compromised cerebrovascular regulation. In addition to injury-related cerebrovascular dysfunction, it is possible that prolonged rest after mild traumatic brain injury leads to deconditioning that may induce physiologic changes in cerebral blood flow control that contributes to persistent symptoms in some people. There is some evidence that exercise training may reduce symptoms perhaps because it engages an array of cerebrovascular regulatory mechanisms. Unfortunately, there is very little work on the degree of impairment in cerebrovascular control that may exist in patients with mild traumatic brain injury, and there are no published studies on the subacute phase of recovery from this injury. This review aims to integrate the current knowledge of cerebrovascular mechanisms that might underlie persistent symptoms and seeks to synthesize these data in the context of exploring aerobic exercise as a feasible intervention to treat the underlying pathophysiology. PMID:25274845

  5. Mild Dissonance Preferred Over Consonance in Single Chord Perception

    PubMed Central

    Eerola, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on harmony perception has mainly been concerned with horizontal aspects of harmony, turning less attention to how listeners perceive psychoacoustic qualities and emotions in single isolated chords. A recent study found mild dissonances to be more preferred than consonances in single chord perception, although the authors did not systematically vary register and consonance in their study; these omissions were explored here. An online empirical experiment was conducted where participants (N = 410) evaluated chords on the dimensions of Valence, Tension, Energy, Consonance, and Preference; 15 different chords were played with piano timbre across two octaves. The results suggest significant differences on all dimensions across chord types, and a strong correlation between perceived dissonance and tension. The register and inversions contributed to the evaluations significantly, nonmusicians distinguishing between triadic inversions similarly to musicians. The mildly dissonant minor ninth, major ninth, and minor seventh chords were rated highest for preference, regardless of musical sophistication. The role of theoretical explanations such as aggregate dyadic consonance, the inverted-U hypothesis, and psychoacoustic roughness, harmonicity, and sharpness will be discussed to account for the preference of mild dissonance over consonance in single chord perception. PMID:27433333

  6. Brain imaging of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Changhao; Li, Siou; Zhao, Weina; Feng, Jiachun

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing prevalence of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease has the potential to create a major worldwide healthcare crisis. Structural MRI studies in patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment are currently attracting considerable interest. It is extremely important to study early structural and metabolic changes, such as those in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and gray matter structures in the medial temporal lobe, to allow the early detection of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The microstructural integrity of white matter can be studied with diffusion tensor imaging. Increased mean diffusivity and decreased fractional anisotropy are found in subjects with white matter damage. Functional imaging studies with positron emission tomography tracer compounds enable detection of amyloid plaques in the living brain in patients with Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we will focus on key findings from brain imaging studies in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, including structural brain changes studied with MRI and white matter changes seen with diffusion tensor imaging, and other specific imaging methodologies will also be discussed. PMID:25206685

  7. Mechanisms of hormesis through mild heat stress on human cells.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2004-06-01

    In a series of experimental studies, it was shown that repetitive mild heat stress has antiaging hormetic effects on growth and various other cellular and biochemical characteristics of human skin fibroblasts undergoing aging in vitro. We have reported the hormetic effects of repeated challenge at the levels of maintenance of stress protein profile; reduction in the accumulation of oxidatively and glycoxidatively damaged proteins; stimulation of the proteasomal activities for the degradation of abnormal proteins; improved cellular resistance to ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, and ultraviolet-B rays; and enhanced levels of various antioxidant enzymes. Detailed analysis of the signal transduction pathways to determine alterations in the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation states of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAP kinases as a measure of cellular responsiveness to mild and severe heat stress is in progress. Furthermore, comparative studies using nonaging immortal cell lines, such as SV40-transformed human fibroblasts, spontaneous osteosarcoma cells, and telomerase-immortalized human bone marrow cells are also in progress for establishing differences in normal and cancerous cells for their responsiveness to mild and severe stresses.

  8. The postconcussion syndrome and the sequelae of mild head injury.

    PubMed

    Evans, R W

    1992-11-01

    The postconcussion syndrome refers to a large number of symptoms and signs that may occur alone or in combination following usually mild head injury. The most common complaints are headaches, dizziness, fatigue, irritability, anxiety, insomnia, loss of consciousness and memory, and noise sensitivity. Mild head injury is a major public health concern because the annual incidence is about 150 per 100,000 population, accounting for 75% or more of all head injuries. The postconcussion syndrome has been recognized for at least the last few hundred years and has been the subject of intense controversy for more than 100 years. The Hollywood head injury myth has been an important contributor to persisting skepticism and might be countered by educational efforts and counter-examples from boxing. The organicity of the postconcussion syndrome has now become well documented. Abnormalities following mild head injury have been reported in neuropathologic, neurophysiologic, neuroimaging, and neuropsychologic studies. There are multiple sequelae of mild head injury, including headaches of multiple types, cranial nerve symptoms and signs, psychologic and somatic complaints, and cognitive impairment. Rare sequelae include hematomas, seizures, transient global amnesia, tremor, and dystonia. Neuroimaging and physiologic and psychologic testing should be used judiciously based on the problems of the particular patient rather than in a cookbook fashion. Prognostic studies clearly substantiate the existence of a postconcussion syndrome. Manifestations of the postconcussion syndrome are common, with resolution in most patients by 3 to 6 months after the injury. Persistent symptoms and cognitive deficits are present in a distinct minority of patients for additional months or years. Risk factors for persisting sequelae include age over 40 years; lower educational, intellectual, and socioeconomic level; female gender; alcohol abuse; prior head injury; and multiple trauma. Although a small

  9. Comparison of the serial position effect in very mild Alzheimer's disease, mild Alzheimer's disease, and amnesia associated with electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Bayley, P J; Salmon, D P; Bondi, M W; Bui, B K; Olichney, J; Delis, D C; Thomas, R G; Thal, L J

    2000-03-01

    Individuals given a series of words to memorize normally show better immediate recall for items from the beginning and end of the list than for mid-list items. This phenomenon, known as the serial position effect, is thought to reflect the concurrent contributions of secondary and primary memory, respectively, to recall performance. The present study compared the serial position effects produced on Trial 1 of the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) in mildly demented (N = 25; M MMSE = 20.0) and very mildly demented (N = 25; M MMSE = 25.5) patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and age- and education-matched normal control (NC) participants (N = 50). In addition, the serial position effects of the very mildly demented AD patients were compared to those of patients with a transient, circumscribed amnesia arising from a prescribed series of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) treatments for the relief of depressive illness (N = 11). While the NC group exhibited the typical serial position effect, AD patients recalled significantly fewer words than NC participants overall, and exhibited a significantly reduced primacy effect (i.e., recall of the first 2 list items) with a normal recency effect (i.e., recall of the last 2 list items). Patients with circumscribed amnesia due to ECT were as impaired as the very mildly demented AD patients on most standard CVLT measures of learning and memory, but exhibited primacy and recency effects, which were within normal limits. These results suggest that a reduction in the primacy effect, but not the recency effect, is an early and ubiquitous feature of the memory impairment of AD. It is not, however, a necessary feature of all causes of memory impairment.

  10. Characteristics of and Strategies for Teaching Students with Mild Disabilities. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Martin; Ramsey, Roberta S.; Algozzine, Robert F.

    This text is intended to introduce undergraduate or graduate general or special education majors to student characteristics and teaching strategies with students who have mild disabilities (mild mental retardation, behavior disorders, and learning disabilities). Part 1 addresses the characteristics of students with mild disabilities. Chapter 1…

  11. Recovery from Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Previously Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Losoi, Heidi; Silverberg, Noah D; Wäljas, Minna; Turunen, Senni; Rosti-Otajärvi, Eija; Helminen, Mika; Luoto, Teemu M; Julkunen, Juhani; Öhman, Juha; Iverson, Grant L

    2016-04-15

    This prospective longitudinal study reports recovery from mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) across multiple domains in a carefully selected consecutive sample of 74 previously healthy adults. The patients with MTBI and 40 orthopedic controls (i.e., ankle injuries) completed assessments at 1, 6, and 12 months after injury. Outcome measures included cognition, post-concussion symptoms, depression, traumatic stress, quality of life, satisfaction with life, resilience, and return to work. Patients with MTBI reported more post-concussion symptoms and fatigue than the controls at the beginning of recovery, but by 6 months after injury, did not differ as a group from nonhead injury trauma controls on cognition, fatigue, or mental health, and by 12 months, their level of post-concussion symptoms and quality of life was similar to that of controls. Almost all (96%) patients with MTBI returned to work/normal activities (RTW) within the follow-up of 1 year. A subgroup of those with MTBIs and controls reported mild post-concussion-like symptoms at 1 year. A large percentage of the subgroup who had persistent symptoms had a modifiable psychological risk factor at 1 month (i.e., depression, traumatic stress, and/or low resilience), and at 6 months, they had greater post-concussion symptoms, fatigue, insomnia, traumatic stress, and depression, and worse quality of life. All of the control subjects who had mild post-concussion-like symptoms at 12 months also had a mental health problem (i.e., depression, traumatic stress, or both). This illustrates the importance of providing evidence-supported treatment and rehabilitation services early in the recovery period.

  12. Idiopathic and mild subclinical hypothyroidism in childhood: clinical management.

    PubMed

    De Luca, F; Corica, D; Pitrolo, E; Santucci, S; Romeo, M

    2014-02-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) is a common clinical problem in children and adolescents, for which there are many controversial issues regarding natural course and management. Aim of this review is to report on the state of the art regarding these controversial points of idiopathic SH in pediatric age. We included in our search only full-length articles on natural history and treatment of SH in children with no associated diseases or genetic syndromes, thus identifying only 13 papers that were suitable for our analysis. According to the results of these retrospective or longitudinal studies a persistently mild TSH elevation (between 5 and 10 mIU/L) in SH children with no underlying disease is unable to affect growth and bone maturation or body mass index (two studies) or cognitive function (one study). Moreover, the risk of a deterioration over time of thyroid function in the untreated cases with mild and idiophatic SH is only 12% (one study). Progression odds increase with increasing baseline TSH, with goiter presence and with positive anti-thyroid antibodies (two studies in children). Although no broad consensus exists on whether children with mild SH require L-T4 therapy, nevertheless, on the basis of the results of the majority of included studies, it can be concluded that L-T4 treatment is not indicated when TSH is repeatedly between 5 and 10 mIU/L and an underlying disease has been excluded. By contrast, treatment is suitable in the cases with TSH>10 mIU/L and/or an underlying disease. PMID:24608582

  13. Teaching banking skills to mildly mentally retarded adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aeschleman, S R; Gedig, K S

    1985-01-01

    In this study, two experiments evaluated a classroom training program designed to teach basic banking skills to three mildly mentally retarded adolescents. The participants were taught to open savings and checking accounts during Experiment I and to conduct banking transactions during Experiment II. The banking transaction skills acquired in Experiment II maintained at high levels and generalized to two novel environments for two participants, whereas moderate generalization and maintenance scores were obtained by the third participant. The average performance of the mentally retarded participants compared favorably with the scores obtained by 10 college student volunteers in both the percentage of correct responses and the pattern of incorrect responses. PMID:4073890

  14. Regulatory aspects of mild cognitive impairment: toward a harmonized perspective

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    The development of the concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and its practical application have been intimately tied to attempts to produce therapeutic agents. Understanding the regulatory environment and determining the way in which it can be influenced are critical to the development of drugs and their eventual approval. In this article, we review some of the current challenges surrounding the concept of MCI relevant to drug development, summarize activities in various regions of the world, and conclude with some suggested next steps and an alternative framing for approving drugs for MCI and related conditions. PMID:22033834

  15. Cerebral infarction after mild head trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Hua; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Jun-Mei; Liang, Hong-Yuan

    2013-09-01

    We conducted this retrospective, case record review to determine the risk factors and clinical features associated with cerebral infarction after mild head trauma in children. The median age of the cohort was 2.18 years (range, 6 mo-8 y). Most (26/29) of the patients developed the neurological symptoms and signs within 72 hours after trauma, 51.7% within 30 minutes. The first symptoms included hemiparesis (20), facial paresis (7), and convulsion (7). 86.21% of the lesions lay in basal ganglia region. Pre-existing basal ganglia calcification was identified in 13 as a risk factor.

  16. Behavioral and Histopathological Alterations Resulting from Mild Fluid Percussion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hylin, Michael J.; Orsi, Sara A.; Zhao, Jing; Bockhorst, Kurt; Perez, Alec; Moore, Anthony N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The majority of people who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) have an injury that can be classified as mild (often referred to as concussion). Although head CT scans for most subjects who have sustained a mild TBI (mTBI) are negative, these persons may still suffer from neurocognitive and neurobehavioral deficits. In order to expedite pre-clinical research and develop therapies, there is a need for well-characterized animal models of mTBI that reflect the neurological, neurocognitive, and pathological changes seen in human patients. In the present study, we examined the motor, cognitive, and histopathological changes resulting from 1.0 and 1.5 atmosphere (atm) overpressure fluid percussion injury (FPI). Both 1.0 and 1.5 atm FPI injury caused transient suppression of acute neurological functions, but did not result in visible brain contusion. Animals injured with 1.0 atm FPI did not show significant motor, vestibulomotor, or learning and memory deficits. In contrast, 1.5 atm injury caused transient motor disturbances, and resulted in a significant impairment of spatial learning and short-term memory. In addition, 1.5 atm FPI caused a marked reduction in cerebral perfusion at the site of injury that lasted for several hours. Consistent with previous studies, 1.5 atm FPI did not cause visible neuronal loss in the hippocampus or in the neocortex. However, a robust inflammatory response (as indicated by enhanced GFAP and Iba1 immunoreactivity) in the corpus callosum and the thalamus was observed. Examination of fractional anisotropy color maps after diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) revealed a significant decrease of FA values in the cingulum, an area found to have increased silver impregnation, suggesting axonal injury. Increased silver impregnation was also observed in the corpus callosum, and internal and external capsules. These findings are consistent with the deficits and pathologies associated with mild TBI in humans, and support the use of mild FPI as

  17. Mild oxidative stress is beneficial for sperm telomere length maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Swetasmita; Kumar, Rajeev; Malhotra, Neena; Singh, Neeta; Dada, Rima

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate telomere length in sperm DNA and its correlation with oxidative stress (normal, mild, severe). METHODS: The study included infertile men (n = 112) and age matched fertile controls (n = 102). The average telomere length from the sperm DNA was measured using a quantitative real time PCR based assay. Seminal reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 8-Isoprostane (8-IP) levels were measured by chemiluminescence assay and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: Average sperm telomere length in infertile men and controls was 0.609 ± 0.15 and 0.789 ± 0.060, respectively (P < 0.0001). Seminal ROS levels in infertile was higher [66.61 ± 28.32 relative light units (RLU)/s/million sperm] than in controls (14.04 ± 10.67 RLU/s/million sperm) (P < 0.0001). The 8-IP level in infertile men was significantly higher (421.55 ± 131.29 pg/mL) than in controls (275.94 ± 48.13 pg/mL) (P < 0.001). When correlated to oxidative stress, in normal range of oxidative stress (ROS, 0-21.3 RLU/s/million sperm) the average telomere length in cases was 0.663 ± 0.14, in mild oxidative stress (ROS, 21.3-35 RLU/s/million sperm) it was elevated (0.684 ± 0.12) and in severe oxidative stress (ROS > 35 RLU/s/million sperm) average telomere length was decreased to 0.595 ± 0.15. CONCLUSION: Mild oxidative stress results in lengthening of telomere length, but severe oxidative stress results in shorter telomeres. Although telomere maintenance is a complex trait, the study shows that mild oxidative stress is beneficial in telomere length maintenance and thus a delicate balance needs to be established to maximize the beneficial effects of free radicals and prevent harmful effects of supra physiological levels. Detailed molecular evaluation of telomere structure, its correlation with oxidative stress would aid in elucidating the cause of accelerated telomere length attrition. PMID:27376021

  18. Mild approaches in assisted reproduction--better for the future?

    PubMed

    Frydman, René; Nargund, Geeta

    2014-12-01

    Mild approaches in assisted reproduction are aimed at achieving quality and not quantity of gametes, embryos, and endometrium with a view to protecting the long-term health and welfare of women and children at an affordable cost. The true success of IVF is in creating children who are full term and normal for gestational age without compromising the health of their mothers. Equal access to IVF treatment can only be achieved by reducing the cost and complications. The state and the society should not suffer as a consequence of IVF treatment. This is the time for change. PMID:25458619

  19. Teaching banking skills to mildly mentally retarded adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aeschleman, S R; Gedig, K S

    1985-01-01

    In this study, two experiments evaluated a classroom training program designed to teach basic banking skills to three mildly mentally retarded adolescents. The participants were taught to open savings and checking accounts during Experiment I and to conduct banking transactions during Experiment II. The banking transaction skills acquired in Experiment II maintained at high levels and generalized to two novel environments for two participants, whereas moderate generalization and maintenance scores were obtained by the third participant. The average performance of the mentally retarded participants compared favorably with the scores obtained by 10 college student volunteers in both the percentage of correct responses and the pattern of incorrect responses.

  20. Dealing with mild cognitive impairment: help for patients and caregivers.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Donald L

    2013-11-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a unique entity in the spectrum of syndromes of cognitive loss. Many patients referred for evaluation of memory loss come with an assumption that they already have dementia. When patients are diagnosed with MCI, they and their caregivers have to deal with the challenge of uncertainties. Patient and family education must stress the uncertainty of whether the deficits will progress. This article aims to guide the clinician who has reached a diagnosis of MCI and is working with the patient and family on coping with the uncertainties of MCI.

  1. Mild behavioral impairment: Ethical, methodological and clinical reflections.

    PubMed

    Canevelli, Marco; Blasimme, Alessandro; Vanacore, Nicola; Bruno, Giuseppe; Cesari, Matteo

    2016-10-01

    The concept of "mild behavioral impairment" (MBI) has been recently introduced and tentatively operationalized. The rationale supporting the need of such novel construct is that neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), even when they do not configure major psychiatric disorders, may still constitute early manifestations of neurodegenerative diseases, potentially anticipating the onset of dementia. The conception of MBI as a potential pre-dementia phenotype is surely of interest because posing special attention to neuropsychiatric symptoms and their negative implications. Nevertheless, several issues should be carefully considered in the definition of MBI and are discussed in the present Commentary. PMID:27570153

  2. Mild form of treacher collins syndrome imitating juvenile otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zeleník, Karol; Komínek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an inherited developmental disorder. More than 40% of individuals with TCS have conductive hearing loss attributed to external and middle ear anomalies. Mild cases of TCS often pass undiagnosed at birth or early childhood. The disease may be manifested as conductive hearing loss in teenagers and may resemble juvenile otosclerosis. Patients could suffer from slight facial variabilities including retrognathia (as in our case) and others, which point out to a possible middle ear anomaly. Surgical corrections of middle ear anomalies including TCS generally lead to poorer outcomes comparing with juvenile otosclerosis, which should be discussed with parents during preoperative counselling.

  3. Documenting the developmental origins of mild mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Reschly, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Evidence of the developmental origins (by age 18) of mild mental retardation (MMR) in adults is discussed. Multiple sources of evidence are reviewed and evaluated. The availability and uses of evidence from the developmental period are cited in the context of evaluations for Social Security income (SSI) eligibility and death penalty appeals due to MMR. The use of records from educational, social services, medical, and juvenile justice settings are cited in the context of specific cases. The convergent validity principle is described as a means to make decisions in the typical situation of ambiguous information.

  4. An update on topical therapies for mild-moderate psoriasis.

    PubMed

    van de Kerkhof, Peter C M

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapies are the mainstream treatment of psoriasis because most patients have mild disease. First-line treatments are vitamin D derivatives and corticosteroids. These treatments are usually given in combination schedules. For topical treatments the selection of the most appropriate vehicle is of major importance, thus improving adherence to the treatment, which frequently is impaired by the complexities of topical therapeutic choices. Evidence for efficacy and safety of topical treatments is readily available for vitamin D treatments and short-term treatment with corticosteroids. However, the scientific evidence for longer-term treatments is limited. Multiple new small molecules are in various stages of development and are reviewed.

  5. [Research progress in mild hypothermia treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Cheng, Guo-Qiang

    2013-10-01

    Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of mild hypothermia in the treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), which can reduce mortality or the incidence of severe neurological sequelae. Mild hypothermia has been used in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a routine treatment method for neonatal HIE in many developed countries, and it is increasingly applied in some NICUs in China. However, 40%-50% of the neonates treated with mild hypothermia die or develop severe neurological disability. Thus, to achieve the best neuroprotective effect, issues such as selection of patients with indications for mild hypothermia, cooling method, optimal time for mild hypothermia, duration of mild hypothermia, optimal target temperature, and the safety and long-term effects of mild hypothermia combined with other therapies, need to be further discussed. This article reviews the latest progress in clinical research on these issues.

  6. Knowingly not wanting to know: Discourses of people diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Sian; Lamers, Carolien; Salisbury, Katie

    2016-09-01

    Mild cognitive impairment is a heterogeneous clinical state whereby assessed cognitive changes over time may progress to dementia, remain stable or revert to back to normal. This study aimed to identify, through discourse analysis, how people with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment used language in order to reveal the societal views and shared meanings of the diagnosis, and the positions taken by people. Seven people with mild cognitive impairment were interviewed, and three discourses emerged during analysis. One of the discourses revealed was 'Not Knowing' about mild cognitive impairment. Furthermore, in the absence of a coherent discourse related to mild cognitive impairment, participants went on to position themselves between two more familiar discourse; 'Knowing' about ageing and dying and 'Not Wanting to Know' about dementia. Clinicians must consider how information is presented to people about mild cognitive impairment, including where mild cognitive impairment is positioned in respect to normal ageing and dementia.

  7. Evidence for the Therapeutic Efficacy of Either Mild Hypothermia or Oxygen Radical Scavengers after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Takashi; Wei, Enoch P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Repetitive brain injury, particularly that occurring with sporting-related injuries, has recently garnered increased attention in both the clinical and public settings. In the laboratory, we have demonstrated the adverse axonal and vascular consequences of repetitive brain injury and have demonstrated that moderate hypothermia and/or FK506 exerted protective effects after repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) when administered within a specific time frame, suggesting a range of therapeutic modalities to prevent a dramatic exacerbation. In this communication, we revisit the utility of targeted therapeutic intervention to seek the minimal level of hypothermia needed to achieve protection while probing the role of oxygen radicals and their therapeutic targeting. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to repetitive mTBI by impact acceleration injury. Mild hypothermia (35°C, group 2), superoxide dismutase (group 3), and Tempol (group 4) were employed as therapeutic interventions administered 1 h after the repetitive mTBI. To assess vascular function, cerebral vascular reactivity to acetylcholine was evaluated 3 and 4 h after the repetitive mTBI, whereas to detect the burden of axonal damage, amyloid precursor protein (APP) density in the medullospinal junction was measured. Whereas complete impairment of vascular reactivity was observed in group 1 (without intervention), significant preservation of vascular reactivity was found in the other groups. Similarly, whereas remarkable increase in the APP-positive axon was observed in group 1, there were no significant increases in the other groups. Collectively, these findings indicate that even mild hypothermia or the blunting free radical damage, even when performed in a delayed period, is protective in repetitive mTBI. PMID:24341607

  8. Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss and Mild Vasculopathy in Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase (Mthfr)-Deficient Mice: A Model of Mild Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Markand, Shanu; Saul, Alan; Roon, Penny; Prasad, Puttur; Martin, Pamela; Rozen, Rima; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (Mthfr) is a key enzyme in homocysteine-methionine metabolism. We investigated Mthfr expression in retina and asked whether mild hyperhomocysteinemia, due to Mthfr deficiency, alters retinal neurovascular structure and function. Methods. Expression of Mthfr was investigated at the gene and protein level using quantitative (q) RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The Mthfr+/+ and Mthfr+/− mice were subjected to comprehensive evaluation using ERG, funduscopy, fluorescein angiography (FA), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), HPLC, and morphometric and IHC analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) at 8 to 24 weeks. Results. Gene and protein analyses disclosed widespread retinal expression of Mthfr. Electroretinography (ERG) revealed a significant decrease in positive scotopic threshold response in retinas of Mthfr+/− mice at 24 weeks. Fundus examination in mice from both groups was normal; FA revealed areas of focal vascular leakage in 20% of Mthfr+/− mice at 12 to 16 weeks and 60% by 24 weeks. The SD-OCT revealed a significant decrease in nerve fiber layer (NFL) thickness at 24 weeks in Mthfr+/− compared to Mthfr+/+ mice. There was a 2-fold elevation in retinal hcy at 24 weeks in Mthfr+/− mice by HPLC and IHC. Morphometric analysis revealed an approximately 20% reduction in cells in the ganglion cell layer of Mthfr+/− mice at 24 weeks. The IHC indicated significantly increased GFAP labeling suggestive of Müller cell activation. Conclusions. Mildly hyperhomocysteinemic Mthfr+/− mice demonstrate reduced ganglion cell function, thinner NFL, and mild vasculopathy by 24 weeks. The retinal phenotype is similar to that of hyperhomocysteinemic mice with deficiency of cystathionine-β-synthase (Cbs) reported earlier. The data support the hypothesis that hyperhomocysteinemia may be causative in certain retinal neurovasculopathies. PMID:25766590

  9. Topical rebamipide improves the ocular surface in mild lagophthalmos

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Mariko; Itakura, Hirotaka; Kashima, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Administration of topical rebamipide improves the ocular surface in dry eye. We consecutively studied seven eyes in seven cases (three males and four females) with mild lagophthalmos (three cases after eyelid surgery, two cases of incomplete facial nerve palsy, and two cases of senile ectropion) during the treatment of corneal disorders with rebamipide eye drops four times daily for 2 weeks. The fluorescein corneal staining (FCS) score, tear film break-up time (TBUT), Schirmer’s test, and decimal visual acuity were examined. Ocular symptoms were examined and scored by questioning each patient before and after administration of the drug. In all seven eyes, inferior corneal erosion decreased or disappeared within 2 weeks after administration of topical rebamipide. The FCS score was significantly improved (P < 0.05). The TBUT was significantly extended from 2.9 ± 0.5 seconds to 5.2 ± 0.4 seconds (P < 0.05). The scores of ocular symptoms, such as eye pain, dryness, blurred vision, and foreign body sensations, were significantly improved (P < 0.05).Topical rebamipide was effective for corneal disorders in mild lagophthalmos. This drug may provide a novel approach to treat lagophthalmos. PMID:23836962

  10. Mildly negative social encounters reduce physical pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Borsook, Terry K; MacDonald, Geoff

    2010-11-01

    While previous research has demonstrated a reduction in physical pain sensitivity in response to social exclusion, the manipulations employed have arguably been far removed from typical daily experience. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of relatively ordinary social encounters on the perception of pain. Healthy participants rated the intensity and unpleasantness of painful stimuli before and after engaging in a structured interaction with a confederate who was instructed to either be warm and friendly or indifferent. A control group was asked to perform a similar structured activity, but alone. Consistent with predictions, participants who experienced the mildly negative social exchange reported lower pain intensity and unpleasantness after the encounter relative to baseline, whereas those exposed to the positive social exchange did not evidence any change in pain ratings. These results were not mediated by changes in mood or perceived connectedness. If mildly negative social encounters can provoke an analgesic effect, it is possible that social hypoalgesia may be considerably more commonplace than previously realized. Discussion focuses on the role of stress-induced hypoalgesia, and the implications of the results for clinical assessments of pain.

  11. Smoking further increases platelet activity in patients with mild hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1996-01-01

    In this study the authors examine whether smoking further heightens platelet activity and reduces fibrinolysis above that already present in mild hypertension. Ten smokers and 11 non-smokers, all with mild hypertension (defined as a diastolic pressure between 90 and 110 mm Hg) were compared for their platelet activity in vitro and in vivo and for their fibrinolytic activity. Successive measurements were made with the patients lying at rest after they had assumed the erect posture for 10 min and at the end of a 5-min moderately strenuous exercise test. The threshold for platelet aggregation by ADP in vitro was significantly lower in samples taken from the smokers at rest (1.4 +/- 0.9 mumol L(-1)) than in the non-smokers (3.5 +/- 2.5 mumol L(-1)), and the difference persisted both in the upright posture and after exercise. The level of platelet release of beta-thromboglobulin was, likewise, higher in the smokers in the upright posture. Neither standing up nor physical exercise had any significant influence on either of these two indices of platelet activity. The euglobulin clot lysis time was slightly longer in the smokers than in the non-smokers in all three experimental situations, but the differences were not significant. Inhibitor of tissue plasminogen activator was not materially different in the two groups (Table 2). The results indicate that smoking adds a further element of heightened platelet activity to that inherently present in hypertension.

  12. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Kiderman, Alexander; Crawford, James; Murphy, Sara; Marshall, Kathryn; Pelusso, Constanza

    2016-01-01

    Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications. PMID:26727256

  13. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Update: Forensic Neuropsychiatric Implications.

    PubMed

    Wortzel, Hal S; Granacher, Robert P

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) involves a wide range of potential neuropsychiatric outcomes, from death or profound impairment to full and fast recovery. This circumstance has contributed to an atmosphere with considerable potential for both clinical confusion and unjustified medicolegal outcomes. Given that mild (m)TBI accounts for most (∼80%) TBI events and is generally associated with an excellent prognosis, the risk for erroneous clinical formulations and unmerited legal outcomes seems particularly high in cases involving mTBI. In this article, we summarize the recent results published by the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis (ICMTBIP) and the new approach of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, to TBI, and we explore the clinical and medicolegal implications. Symptoms that emerge after mTBI remain nonspecific, and potential etiologies are diverse. Clinicians and medicolegal experts should be familiar with the natural history of mTBI, able to recognize atypical outcomes, and willing to search for alternative explanations when confronted with persistent or severe impairment.

  14. Is Mild Dementia Related to Unsafe Street-Crossing Decisions?

    PubMed

    Dommes, Aurélie; Wu, Ya-Huei; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Pitti-Ferrandi, Hélène; Soleille, Martine; Martineau-Fleury, Sophie; Samson, Michel; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The overrepresentation of very old people (75 or older) in pedestrian crash statistics raises the issue of the effects of normal and pathologic ageing on gap-selection difficulties during street crossing. The present study focused on Alzheimer disease, a condition commonly associated with cognitive declines detrimental to daily life activities such as crossing the street. Twenty-five participants with mild dementia and 33 controls carried out a street-crossing task in a simulated environment. They also took a battery of cognitive tests. The mild-dementia group was more likely than the control group to make decisions that led to collisions with approaching cars, especially when the traffic was coming from 2 directions and they were in the far lane. Regression analyses demonstrated that the increased likelihood of collisions in the dementia group was associated with impairments in processing-speed and visual-attention abilities assessed on the Useful Field of View test. This test has already proven useful for predicting driving outcomes, falls, and street-crossing difficulties in healthy old adults, and among drivers with Alzheimer disease. Clinicians are encouraged to use it to help estimate whether a patient can drive, walk, and cross a street safely.

  15. Mild hydrotreating of heavy oils with modified alumina based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, E.P.; Campbell, C.N.

    1994-12-31

    The decreasing demand for heavy fuels oils requires that refiners find ways for converting heavy hydrocarbon feedstocks to higher value mid-distillate products. To increase mid-distillate production, the refiner can choose from several processing options such as hydrocracking, fluid catalytic cracking, and coking. All of these options, however, require heavy capital investments. Because of these high investment costs, refiners are continually searching for conversion processes which may be utilized in existing units. One such process is mild hydrocracking (MHC). The general objective of this work is to identify an MHC catalyst which gives a higher conversion level for heavy hydrocarbon feedstocks, especially that fraction of the feedstock that boils above 1,000 F (538 C), while maintaining the same amount of sediment production. The conventional hydrocracking catalysts that consist of acidic cracking components such as Y zeolite, though exhibiting conversion improvements over alumina based catalysts, were not suitable for processing of heavy oils in the mild hydrocracking mode because of high sediment formation. In contrast, alumina catalysts containing basic oxides (alkali metal and alkaline earth metal) not only improve heavy oil conversion but, also maintain the sediment make at the same level as alumina based catalysts. The sediment make generally decreased with increasing macroporosity.

  16. alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors augment thermal hyperalgesia in mildly burnt skin.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D

    2009-03-01

    The effect of the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine on sensitivity to heat was investigated at three sites of mild burn injury in the cutaneous forearm of 19 healthy participants. Two of the sites were pre-treated with the alpha(1)-antagonist terazosin, to determine whether the effect of phenylephrine was mediated by alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. Terazosin was administered before the burn injury at one site, and after the burn injury at the other site. In another 15 participants, the nociceptive effect of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine was investigated with and without prior treatment with the alpha(2)-antagonist rauwolscine. Drugs were introduced into the skin by iontophoresis, and burns were induced by heating the skin to 48 degrees C for 2min. Heat pain thresholds to a temperature ramp (0.5 degrees C/s), and heat pain ratings to a thermal stimulus (45 degrees C, 7s), were determined before and after the administration of each drug. Thermal hyperalgesia provoked by phenylephrine was inhibited by terazosin administered after the burn injury, but not by terazosin administered before the burn injury. However, neither alpha(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation nor blockade affected sensitivity to heat in the mildly burnt skin. These findings suggest that stimulation of cutaneous alpha(1)-adrenoceptors increased the excitability of heat-sensitized nociceptive afferents. As terazosin was more effective when administered in burnt skin, an inflammatory response induced by the burn injury may have facilitated access of adrenergic agents to alpha(1)-adrenoceptors.

  17. Diffusion tensor imaging in mild traumatic brain injury litigation.

    PubMed

    Wortzel, Hal S; Kraus, Marilyn F; Filley, Christopher M; Anderson, C Alan; Arciniegas, David B

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of literature addresses the application of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to traumatic brain injury (TBI). Most TBIs are of mild severity, and their diagnosis and prognosis are often challenging. These challenges may be exacerbated in medicolegal contexts, where plaintiffs seek to present objective evidence that supports a clinical diagnosis of mild (m)TBI. Because DTI permits quantification of white matter integrity and because TBI frequently involves white matter injury, DTI represents a conceptually appealing method of demonstrating white matter pathology attributable to mTBI. However, alterations in white matter integrity are not specific to TBI, and their presence does not necessarily confirm a diagnosis of mTBI. Guided by rules of evidence shaped by Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc., we reviewed and analyzed the literature describing DTI findings in mTBI and related neuropsychiatric disorders. Based on this review, we suggest that expert testimony regarding DTI findings will seldom be appropriate in legal proceedings focused on mTBI. PMID:22159979

  18. College students' conceptualizations of deficits involved in mild intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Musso, Mandi W; Barker, Alyse A; Proto, Daniel A; Gouvier, Wm Drew

    2012-01-01

    Precedential rulings in recent capital murder trials may, in some cases, leave it up to a jury to determine whether or not an individual meets criteria for an intellectual disability (ID) and should be spared from the death penalty. Despite the potential for misconceptions about ID to bias decisions, few empirical studies have examined the public's conceptualizations of individuals with ID. This study sought to examine 890 college students' conceptualizations of the deficits involved in mild ID. Students were asked to respond to two online surveys about the cognitive and adaptive behavior deficits that people with mild ID may experience. While most students were correct about basic facts, such as ID is not contagious and not curable, there was no clear consensus regarding beliefs about individuals with ID getting married, having children, or engaging in other mainstream activities of adult living. Students' responses are examined in light of results of studies that identify and examine bona fide deficits and areas of successful mainstreaming among persons with ID. Implications of misconceptions are discussed.

  19. College students' conceptualizations of deficits involved in mild intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Musso, Mandi W; Barker, Alyse A; Proto, Daniel A; Gouvier, Wm Drew

    2012-01-01

    Precedential rulings in recent capital murder trials may, in some cases, leave it up to a jury to determine whether or not an individual meets criteria for an intellectual disability (ID) and should be spared from the death penalty. Despite the potential for misconceptions about ID to bias decisions, few empirical studies have examined the public's conceptualizations of individuals with ID. This study sought to examine 890 college students' conceptualizations of the deficits involved in mild ID. Students were asked to respond to two online surveys about the cognitive and adaptive behavior deficits that people with mild ID may experience. While most students were correct about basic facts, such as ID is not contagious and not curable, there was no clear consensus regarding beliefs about individuals with ID getting married, having children, or engaging in other mainstream activities of adult living. Students' responses are examined in light of results of studies that identify and examine bona fide deficits and areas of successful mainstreaming among persons with ID. Implications of misconceptions are discussed. PMID:22093668

  20. Elevated Rates of Mild Cognitive Impairment in HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, David P.; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Bondi, Mark W.; Doyle, Katie L.; Morgan, Erin E.; Massman, Paul J.; Gilbert, Paul E.; Woods, Steven Paul

    2015-01-01

    With the rising number of individuals in their 50s and 60s who are infected with HIV, concerns have emerged about possible increases in the rates of non-HIV-associated dementias. The current study examined the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older HIV-infected adults, since MCI is an intermediate state between typical cognitive aging and dementia that emerges in this age range. Participants included 75 adults with HIV disease aged 50 years and older who were on cART and had undetectable plasma viral loads and 80 demographically similar HIV seronegative comparison subjects. Participants completed a research neuropsychological evaluation that was used to classify MCI according to the comprehensive diagnostic scheme described by Bondi et al. (2014). HIV-infected persons were over seven times more likely to have an MCI designation (16%) than their seronegative counterparts (2.5%). Within the HIV+ cohort, MCI had minimal overlap with diagnoses of Asymptomatic Neurocognitive Impairment and was significantly associated with older age, lower Karnofsky Scale of Performance Scores, and mild difficulties performing instrumental activities of daily living (iADLs). HIV infection in older adults is associated with a notably elevated concurrent risk of MCI, which may increase the likelihood of developing non-HIV-associated dementias as this population ages further. PMID:26139019

  1. Mild hypoxia affects synaptic connectivity in cultured neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Mulder, Alex T B; Farinha, Ana C; van Putten, Michel J A M; le Feber, Joost

    2014-04-01

    Eighty percent of patients with chronic mild cerebral ischemia/hypoxia resulting from chronic heart failure or pulmonary disease have cognitive impairment. Overt structural neuronal damage is lacking and the precise cause of neuronal damage is unclear. As almost half of the cerebral energy consumption is used for synaptic transmission, and synaptic failure is the first abrupt consequence of acute complete anoxia, synaptic dysfunction is a candidate mechanism for the cognitive deterioration in chronic mild ischemia/hypoxia. Because measurement of synaptic functioning in patients is problematic, we use cultured networks of cortical neurons from new born rats, grown over a multi-electrode array, as a model system. These were exposed to partial hypoxia (partial oxygen pressure of 150Torr lowered to 40-50Torr) during 3 (n=14) or 6 (n=8) hours. Synaptic functioning was assessed before, during, and after hypoxia by assessment of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses to electrical stimulation. Action potential heights and shapes and non-synaptic stimulus responses were used as measures of individual neuronal integrity. During hypoxia of 3 and 6h, there was a statistically significant decrease of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses, whereas direct responses and action potentials remained unchanged. These changes were largely reversible. Our results indicate that in cultured neuronal networks, partial hypoxia during 3 or 6h causes isolated disturbances of synaptic connectivity.

  2. Cleaning Carbon Nanotubes by Use of Mild Oxygen Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petkov, Mihail

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have shown that it is feasible to use oxygen radicals (specifically, monatomic oxygen) from mild oxygen plasmas to remove organic contaminants and chemical fabrication residues from the surfaces of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and metal/CNT interfaces. A capability for such cleaning is essential to the manufacture of reproducible CNT-based electronic devices. The use of oxygen radicals to clean surfaces of other materials is fairly well established. However, previously, cleaning of CNTs and of graphite by use of oxygen plasmas had not been attempted because both of these forms of carbon were known to be vulnerable to destruction by oxygen plasmas. The key to success of the present technique is, apparently, to ensure that the plasma is mild . that is to say, that the kinetic and internal energies of the oxygen radicals in the plasma are as low as possible. The plasma oxygen-radical source used in the experiments was a commercial one marketed for use in removing hydrocarbons and other organic contaminants from vacuum systems and from electron microscopes and other objects placed inside vacuum systems. In use, the source is installed in a vacuum system and air is leaked into the system at such a rate as to maintain a background pressure of .0.56 torr (.75 Pa). In the source, oxygen from the air is decomposed into monatomic oxygen by radio-frequency excitation of a resonance of the O2 molecule (N2 is not affected). Hence, what is produced is a mild (non-energetic) oxygen plasma. The oxygen radicals are transported along with the air molecules in the flow created by the vacuum pump. In the experiments, exposure to the oxygen plasma in this system was shown to remove organic contaminants and chemical fabrication residues from several specimens. Many high-magnification scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of CNTs were taken before and after exposure to the oxygen plasma. As in the example shown in the figure, none of these images showed evidence of degradation

  3. The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-03-15

    This report is a post-project assessment of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Mild Coal Gasification Project, which was selected under Round III of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program. The CCT Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of commercial-scale facilities. The ENCOAL{reg_sign} Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bluegrass Coal Development Company (formerly SMC Mining Company), which is a subsidiary of Ziegler Coal Holding Company, submitted an application to the DOE in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the CCT Program. The project was selected by DOE in December 1989, and the Cooperative Agreement (CA) was approved in September 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} mild coal gasification facility was completed in June 1992. In October 1994, ENCOAL{reg_sign} was granted a two-year extension of the CA with the DOE, that carried through to September 17, 1996. ENCOAL{reg_sign} was then granted a six-month, no-cost extension through March 17, 1997. Overall, DOE provided 50 percent of the total project cost of $90,664,000. ENCOAL{reg_sign} operated the 1,000-ton-per-day mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, for over four years. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC{trademark}) technology originally developed by SMC Mining Company and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal to produce two new fuels, Process-Derived Fuel (PDF{trademark}) and Coal-Derived Liquids (CDL{trademark}). The products, as alternative fuel sources, are capable of significantly lowering current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation thus reducing pollutants causing acid rain. In support of this overall objective

  4. Biomechanical Risk Estimates for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Funk, J. R.; Duma, S. M.; Manoogian, S. J.; Rowson, S.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the risk of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in living humans based on a large set of head impact data taken from American football players at the collegiate level. Real-time head accelerations were recorded from helmet-mounted accelerometers designed to stay in contact with the player’s head. Over 27,000 head impacts were recorded, including four impacts resulting in MTBI. Parametric risk curves were developed by normalizing MTBI incidence data by head impact exposure data. An important finding of this research is that living humans, at least in the setting of collegiate football, sustain much more significant head impacts without apparent injury than previously thought. The following preliminary nominal injury assessment reference values associated with a 10% risk of MTBI are proposed: a peak linear head acceleration of 165 g, a HIC of 400, and a peak angular head acceleration of 9000 rad/s2. PMID:18184501

  5. Prospective memory impairment in mild cognitive impairment: an analytical review.

    PubMed

    Costa, Alberto; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto

    2011-12-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by the presence in an otherwise healthy elderly individual of cognitive deficits involving specific domains in the absence of significant functional impairments. Reports indicate that prospective memory (PM), that is, the ability to remember to execute delayed intentions, is impaired in individuals with MCI. The present review discusses the current debate in the literature on PM functioning in MCI by focusing on the relationship between prospective retrieval and retrospective memory functioning. Analysis of the reported evidence revealed that both the prospective component and the retrospective component of PM can be impaired in MCI. Declarative memory dysfunction may account for the retrospective memory impairment, while either reduced executive abilities or a deficit of reflexive mechanisms could explain the prospective component impairment.

  6. A selective and mild glycosylation method of natural phenolic alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Poláková, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Summary Several bioactive natural p-hydroxyphenylalkyl β-D-glucopyranosides, such as vanillyl β-D-glucopyranoside, salidroside and isoconiferin, and their glycosyl analogues were prepared by a simple reaction sequence. The highly efficient synthetic approach was achieved by utilizing acetylated glycosyl bromides as well as aromatic moieties and mild glycosylation promoters. The aglycones, p-O-acetylated arylalkyl alcohols, were prepared by the reduction of the corresponding acetylated aldehydes or acids. Various stereoselective 1,2-trans-O-glycosylation methods were studied, including the DDQ–iodine or ZnO–ZnCl2 catalyst combination. Among them, ZnO–iodine has been identified as a new glycosylation promoter and successfully applied to the stereoselective glycoside synthesis. The final products were obtained by conventional Zemplén deacetylation. PMID:27340444

  7. Melatonin ameliorates chronic mild stress induced behavioral dysfunctions in mice.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Seenu; Kumar, Mayank; Manda, Kailash

    2013-07-01

    Melatonin, a neurohormone, is known to regulate several physiological functions, especially the circadian homeostasis, mood and behavior. Chronic exposure to stress is involved in the etiology of human affective disorders, and depressed patients have been reported to show changes in the circadian rhythms and nocturnal melatonin concentration. The present study was conducted to evaluate a possible beneficial action of chronic night-time melatonin treatment against chronic mild stress (CMS) induced behavioral impairments. As expected in the present study, the stress exposed mice showed reduced weight gain, hedonic deficit, cognitive deficits and decreased mobility in behavioral despair test. Interestingly, CMS exposed mice showed less anxiety. Chronic night-time melatonin administration significantly ameliorated the stress-induced behavioral disturbances, especially the cognitive dysfunction and depressive phenotypes. In conclusion, the present findings suggest the mitigating role of melatonin against CMS-induced behavioral changes, including the cognitive dysfunctions and reaffirm its potential role as an antidepressant.

  8. Nova outbursts in the case of mild hibernation

    SciTech Connect

    Livio, M.; Shankar, A.; Truran, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    The necessary conditions for the production of strong thermonuclear runaways in the hibernation scenario are identified and explored. It is found that a reduction in the accretion rate by a factor of about 100, for a period longer than a few thousand years, is generally sufficient to ensure nova-type outbursts, even in the presence of rather high preoutburst accretion rates. Nova outbursts can be obtained under mild hibernation conditions on 1 solar mass white dwarfs as well as on very massive ones. A reduction in the accretion rate by a factor of 10 only is insufficient to produce a nova outburst, if the preoutburst accretion rate is as high as 10 to the -8th solar mass/yr. 28 references.

  9. Intellectual Disability, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Risk for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Wayne P.; Zigman, Warren B.; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Ryan, Robert; Schupf, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    People with intellectual disability (ID) are living longer than ever before, raising concerns about old-age associated disorders. Dementia is among the most serious of these disorders, and theories relating cognitive reserve to risk predict that older adults with ID should be particularly vulnerable. Previous estimates of relative risk for dementia associated with ID have been inconsistent, and the present analyses examined the possible influence of variation in diagnostic criteria on findings. As expected, relaxation in the stringency of case definition for adults with ID increased relative risk, underscoring the importance of developing valid criteria for defining mild cognitive impairment, early dementia, and distinguishing between the two in adults with ID. Once available, these standards will contribute to more effective evidence-based planning. PMID:24273589

  10. Unilateral buckling of elastically restrained rectangular mild steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. T.; Bradford, M. A.; Oehlers, D. J.

    This paper considers the elastic unilateral buckling of rectangular mild steel plates that are restrained elastically and subjected to bending and axial actions. A variational formulation of the Ritz method using linear combinations of harmonic functions for the buckling deformations is used to establish an eigenproblem to determine the plate local buckling coefficients. The motivation for the study is the retrofit of reinforced concrete beams by gluing and then bolting steel plates to the sides of the beam. Such plates, when acting compositely with the concrete beam, are subjected to predominantly bending and axial actions which may cause unilateral local buckling. Whereas the bolts provide complete restraint against buckling at discrete points, the glue may also inhibit local buckling between these nodal points since it acts as a continuous elastic restraint. The influence of the glue stiffness, support conditions and plate proportions on the unilateral buckling of such plates are assessed.

  11. Omental transplantation in a patient with mild ALS.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is not a neurodegenerative disease. The patient, a 33-year-old man began with symptoms of the bulbar form of ALS, characterized by burning pain in both feet during two months and then, he presented right crural monoparesis, fasciculations, slight dysarthria and he walked with help of orthopedic devices. A preoperative MRI scans showed atherosclerosis at the V4 segment of the left vertebral artery. On May 2012, he received an omental transplantation on the anterior, left lateral and posterior surface of the medulla oblongata. About 48 hours after surgery, the dysarthria disappeared and the voluntary movement of the right foot improved. Three days later, he walked without aid of orthopedic device. At present, four years after operation he present complete reversal of symptoms. In conclusión, this patient confirms that bulbar ALS is of ischemic origin and therefore, mild ALS can be cured. PMID:27508110

  12. Structural Neuroimaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy J; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J; Black, Garrett; Christensen, Zachary P; Huff, Trevor; Wood, Dawn-Marie G; Hesselink, John R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Max, Jeffrey E

    2016-09-01

    Common neuroimaging findings in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), including sport-related concussion (SRC), are reviewed based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common abnormalities radiologically identified on the day of injury, typically a computed tomographic scan, are in the form of contusions, small subarachnoid or intraparenchymal hemorrhages as well as subdural and epidural collections, edema, and skull fractures. Common follow-up neuroimaging findings with MRI include white matter hyperintensities, hypointense signal abnormalities that reflect prior hemorrhage, focal encephalomalacia, presence of atrophy and/or dilated Virchow-Robins perivascular space. The MRI findings from a large pediatric mTBI study show low frequency of positive MRI findings at 6 months postinjury. The review concludes with an examination of some of the advanced MRI-based image analysis methods that can be performed in the patient who has sustained an mTBI. PMID:27482782

  13. Symptoms following mild head injury: expectation as aetiology.

    PubMed Central

    Mittenberg, W; DiGiulio, D V; Perrin, S; Bass, A E

    1992-01-01

    An affective, somatic, and memory check-list of symptoms was administered to subjects who had no personal experience or knowledge of head injury. Subjects indicated their current experiences of symptoms, then imagined having sustained a mild head injury in a motor vehicle accident, and endorsed symptoms they expected to experience six months after the injury. The checklist of symptoms was also administered to a group of patients with head injuries for comparison. Imaginary concussion reliably showed expectations in controls of a coherent cluster of symptoms virtually identical to the postconcussion syndrome reported by patients with head trauma. Patients consistently underestimated the premorbid prevalence of these symptoms compared with the base rate in controls. Symptom expectations appear to share as much variance with postconcussion syndrome as head injury itself. An aetiological role is suggested. PMID:1564481

  14. Mild ammonium stress increases chlorophyll content in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Zabala, Joseba; González-Murua, Carmen; Marino, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) and ammonium (NH4(+)) are the main forms of nitrogen available in the soil for plants. Excessive NH4(+) accumulation in tissues is toxic for plants and exclusive NH4(+)-based nutrition enhances this effect. Ammonium toxicity syndrome commonly includes growth impairment, ion imbalance and chlorosis among others. In this work, we observed high intraspecific variability in chlorophyll content in 47 Arabidopsis thaliana natural accessions grown under 1 mM NH4(+) or 1 mM NO3(-) as N-source. Interestingly, chlorophyll content increased in every accession upon ammonium nutrition. Moreover, this increase was independent of ammonium tolerance capacity. Thus, chlorosis seems to be an exclusive effect of severe ammonium toxicity while mild ammonium stress induces chlorophyll accumulation.

  15. Bronchodilators for treatment of mild bronchiolitis: a factorial randomised trial.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, E E; Milner, R; Allen, U; Maj, H

    1992-01-01

    A randomised double blind trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of inhaled bronchodilators, salbutamol and ipratropium bromide, compared with placebo in the treatment of bronchiolitis. Patients, who were 2 months to 2 years of age and without underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease, received drug 1 (salbutamol or saline placebo) followed one hour later by drug 2 (ipratropium bromide or placebo). Both agents were administered every four hours. The patients were allocated to one of four groups according to a factorial design. The four groups were similar in demographic characteristics, initial oxygenation, and clinical score. The change in oxygen saturation of recipients of both agents was significantly better than that of recipients of salbutamol alone or ipratropium bromide alone. This change, however, was not statistically different from that of the control group. No difference was observed in the clinical score or hospital duration. Inhaled bronchodilators did not improve the condition of hospitalised mild bronchiolitis. PMID:1533504

  16. Sleep disturbances and mild cognitive impairment: A review

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Renata Alves Pachota Chaves

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mild cognitive impaired (MCI) is viewed as a transitional stage from normal to dementia. The aim of this study is analyze the sleep disturbances in subjects diagnosed as carries MCI. Methods A review of the literature was conducted in order to document sleeps problems in the context of MCI. Results Among the studies that compares the prevalence of sleep disturbances between subjects with MCI and those with normal cognition demonstrated that night time behaviors are more common in MCI patients (18.3–45.5%) than in normal population (10.9–23.3%). Conclusions Sleep disturbance is prevalent and predictive of cognitive decline in older people and in those with neurodegenerative disorders. The sleep problems have to be identified and treat to preserve the cognition and the MCI subjects with sleep disturbances have to be follow more closely to identify the initial signs of dementia. PMID:26483941

  17. Social skills training with mildly retarded young adults.

    PubMed

    Meredith, R L; Saxon, S; Doleys, D M; Kyzer, B

    1980-10-01

    Described a social skills assessment and training model for use with mildly retarded young adults (N = 20). The assessment procedure examined social behavior in three types of social situations (e.g., conversational situation, cooperative task and assertive situation) with both male and female respondents. Group behavioral social skills training was compared with a no treatment control condition using various dependent measures collected in the in-vivo social situations. Group behavioral social skills training was more effective than the control condition in increasing positive social behavior, attention to the transaction, and degree of empathy. It was also more effective than a control condition in decreasing negative social skill behavior. A situation effect also was observed, which suggests a need for more focus on particular social skills and a need to address issues of generalization. A comprehensive social skills assessment and training model is discussed. PMID:7440726

  18. Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

  19. Electrochemical Treatment of Textile Dye Wastewater by Mild Steel Anode.

    PubMed

    Bhavya, J G; Rekha, H B; Murthy, Usha N

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the results of the treatment of textile dye wastewater generated from a textile processing industry by electrochemical method. Experiments were conducted at current densities of 12, 24 and 48 A/m2 using mild steel as anode and cathode. During the various stages of electrolysis, parameters such as COD, color and BOD5 were determined in order to know the feasibility of electrochemical treatment. It was observed that increasing the electrolysis time and increased current density bring down the concentration of pollutants. Also COD removal rate and energy consumption during the electrolysis were calculated and presented in this paper. The present study proves the effectiveness of electrochemical treatment using MS as anode for TDW oxidation.

  20. Mild Diabetes Models and Their Maternal-Fetal Repercussions

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, D. C.; Sinzato, Y. K.; Bueno, A.; Netto, A. O.; Dallaqua, B.; Gallego, F. Q.; Iessi, I. L.; Corvino, S. B.; Serrano, R. G.; Marini, G.; Piculo, F.; Calderon, I. M. P.; Rudge, M. V. C.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of diabetes in pregnancy leads to hormonal and metabolic changes making inappropriate intrauterine environment, favoring the onset of maternal and fetal complications. Human studies that explore mechanisms responsible for changes caused by diabetes are limited not only for ethical reasons but also by the many uncontrollable variables. Thus, there is a need to develop appropriate experimental models. The diabetes induced in laboratory animals can be performed by different methods depending on dose, route of administration, and the strain and age of animal used. Many of these studies are carried out in neonatal period or during pregnancy, but the results presented are controversial. So this paper, addresses the review about the different models of mild diabetes induction using streptozotocin in pregnant rats and their repercussions on the maternal and fetal organisms to propose an adequate model for each approached issue. PMID:23878822

  1. Marital Quality in the Context of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Garand, Linda; Dew, Mary Amanda; Urda, Bridget; Lingler, Jennifer Hagerty; DeKosky, Steven T.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    The behavioral changes in people with dementia often negatively affect marital relationships. Yet little is known about how the marital relationship is affected when the care recipient has mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This study characterizes marital quality among adults who live with a spouse with MCI. Data were drawn from interviews with 27 spouses of people with a recent diagnosis of MCI. Even at early stages of MCI, many spouses report the frequent occurrence of distressing behaviors. This study demonstrates that MCI may degrade the quality of the marital relationship. These results have implications for clinical practice and the delivery of health care and social services to these families. It is important to develop interventions to address the needs of these individuals and their caregivers. Results of this study suggest the need for mental health interventions designed to preserve the quality of these marital relationships. PMID:17984481

  2. Is there a mildly relativistic jet in SN2007gr?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paragi, Z.; van der Horst, A. J.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. B.; Kouveliotou, C.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Pidopryhora, Y.; Bourke, S.; Campbell, R. M.; Garrett, M. A.; van Langevelde, H. J.

    2011-02-01

    SN2007gr was an ordinary type Ic supernova, with a hint of asymmetric explosion seen in the optical polarization spectrum. This type of SNe is occasionally associated with long duration gamma-ray bursts which generate ultra-relativistic jets; no relativistic outflows have yet been found by direct imaging in SNe Ib/c explosions. High resolution very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data and simultaneous total radio flux density measurements indicated that SN2007gr has expanded mildly relativistically. We performed late time Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) observations to measure the level of the underlying extended emission. Comparison of the VLBI and the background-subtracted WSRT and independent VLA data indicate an at least partially resolved source with an average expansion velocity of >=0.4c, although the VLBI data could be consistent with a fainter source with an expansion velocity of ~0.2c as well.

  3. Training self-advocacy skills to adults with mild handicaps.

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, A L; Cuvo, A J; Davis, P K

    1988-01-01

    We developed and empirically evaluated an instructional program to teach self-advocacy skills to eight young adults with mild handicaps. Participants were taught to discriminate whether or not possible violations of legal rights occurred in socially validated scenarios and, if so, to role-play how to redress rights violations. Experimental control was demonstrated with a multiple probe design across four general legal rights categories for the discrimination component of training, and a multiple probe across groups of subjects for the redressing legal rights component of training. Participants' behavior was probed in simulations and deceptions of legal rights violations in natural settings. There were marked increases in dependent measures after instruction. Difficulties in assessing generalization and maintenance of low-rate behaviors and suggestions for future research are presented. PMID:3198550

  4. Enhanced effective connectivity in mild occipital stroke patients with hemianopia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoli; Jin, Zheng; Feng, Xinyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-11-01

    Plasticity-based spontaneous recovery and rehabilitation intervention of stroke-induced hemianopia have drawn great attention in recent years. However, the underlying neural mechanism remains unknown. This study aims to investigate brain network disruption and reorganization in hemianopia patients due to mild occipital stroke. Resting-state networks were constructed from 12 hemianopia patients with right occipital infarct by partial directed coherence analysis of multi-channel electroencephalograms. Compared with control subjects, the patients presented enhanced connectivity owing to newly formed connections. Compensational connections mostly originated from the peri-infarct area and targeted contralesional frontal, central, and parietal cortices. These new ipsilesional-to-contralesional inter-hemispheric connections coordinately presented significant correlation with the extent of vision loss. The enhancement of connectivity might be the neural substrate for brain plasticity in stroke-induced hemianopia and may shed light on plasticity-based recovery or rehabilitation. PMID:24876132

  5. Chronic mild cerebrovascular dysfunction as a cause for Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Humpel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive chronic disorder and is characterized by β-amyloid plaques and angiopathy, tau pathology, neuronal cell death, and inflammatory responses. The reasons for this disease are not known. This review proposes the hypothesis that a chronic mild longlasting cerebrovascular dysfunction could initiate a cascade of events leading to AD. It is suggested that (vascular) risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia) causes either damage of the cerebrovascular system including silent strokes or causes dysregulation of beta-amyloid clearance at the blood-brain barrier resulting in increased brain beta-amyloid. A cascade of subsequent downstream events may lead to disturbed metabolic changes, and neuroinflammation and tau pathology. The role of NGF on the cell death of cholinergic neurons is discussed. Additional risk factors (e.g. acidosis, metals) contribute to plaque development. PMID:21112383

  6. Development of microbands in mild steel during cross loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, S.; Rauch, E. F.

    1994-06-01

    Mild steel specimens are submitted to a complex strain path (tension-shear sequence). The stress decrease recorded at the beginning of the second path is associated at the grain scale with a localization of the deformation in microbands. These microbands are associated with a single crystallographic slip system and carry the main part of the imposed strain. The prediction of the active slip systems during both the prestrain and the second path with the Taylor and static models leads to a necessary condition for the development of microbands: the slip system having the maximum Schmid factor must have been latent during the prestrain. At high strain level, the material resumes strain hardening and the dislocation structure is then composed of sheets parallel and/or perpendicular to the shear direction. The origin of the flow localization and the transition between the two types of structures, i.e. microbands and dislocation sheets, are then discussed.

  7. Neuroimaging biomarkers in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D

    2013-09-01

    Reviewed herein are contemporary neuroimaging methods that detect abnormalities associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Despite advances in demonstrating underlying neuropathology in a subset of individuals who sustain mTBI, considerable disagreement persists in neuropsychology about mTBI outcome and metrics for evaluation. This review outlines a thesis for the select use of sensitive neuroimaging methods as potential biomarkers of brain injury recognizing that the majority of individuals who sustain an mTBI recover without neuroimaging signs or neuropsychological sequelae detected with methods currently applied. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides several measures that could serve as mTBI biomarkers including the detection of hemosiderin and white matter abnormalities, assessment of white matter integrity derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and quantitative measures that directly assess neuroanatomy. Improved prediction of neuropsychological outcomes in mTBI may be achieved with the use of targeted neuroimaging markers.

  8. Neuropathology of mild traumatic brain injury: relationship to neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D; Maxwell, William L

    2012-06-01

    Neuroimaging identified abnormalities associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are but gross indicators that reflect underlying trauma-induced neuropathology at the cellular level. This review examines how cellular pathology relates to neuroimaging findings with the objective of more closely relating how neuroimaging findings reveal underlying neuropathology. Throughout this review an attempt will be made to relate what is directly known from post-mortem microscopic and gross anatomical studies of TBI of all severity levels to the types of lesions and abnormalities observed in contemporary neuroimaging of TBI, with an emphasis on mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, it is impossible to discuss the neuropathology of mTBI without discussing what occurs with more severe injury and viewing pathological changes on some continuum from the mildest to the most severe. Historical milestones in understanding the neuropathology of mTBI are reviewed along with implications for future directions in the examination of neuroimaging and neuropathological correlates of TBI.

  9. Structural Neuroimaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy J; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J; Black, Garrett; Christensen, Zachary P; Huff, Trevor; Wood, Dawn-Marie G; Hesselink, John R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Max, Jeffrey E

    2016-09-01

    Common neuroimaging findings in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), including sport-related concussion (SRC), are reviewed based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common abnormalities radiologically identified on the day of injury, typically a computed tomographic scan, are in the form of contusions, small subarachnoid or intraparenchymal hemorrhages as well as subdural and epidural collections, edema, and skull fractures. Common follow-up neuroimaging findings with MRI include white matter hyperintensities, hypointense signal abnormalities that reflect prior hemorrhage, focal encephalomalacia, presence of atrophy and/or dilated Virchow-Robins perivascular space. The MRI findings from a large pediatric mTBI study show low frequency of positive MRI findings at 6 months postinjury. The review concludes with an examination of some of the advanced MRI-based image analysis methods that can be performed in the patient who has sustained an mTBI.

  10. Persistent vertigo and dizziness after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fife, Terry D; Kalra, Deepak

    2015-04-01

    Vertigo, dizziness, and disequilibrium are common symptoms following concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Dizziness and vertigo may be the result of trauma to the peripheral vestibular system or the central nervous system, or, in some cases, may be due to anxiety, depression, or posttraumatic stress disorder; these mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. While most peripheral vestibular disorders can be identified by testing and examination, those without inner-ear causes that have persisting complaints of dizziness and motion sickness are more difficult to understand and to manage. Some of these patients exhibit features compatible with vestibular migraine and may be treated successfully with migraine-preventative medications. This paper reviews the nonotogenic causes of persisting dizziness, the possible mechanisms, and the pathophysiology, as a framework for patient management and for future research.

  11. Characteristics of mild dengue virus infection in Thai children.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Kyu; Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Hermann, Laura; Buddhari, Darunee; Scott, Thomas W; Jarman, Richard G; Aldstadt, Jared; Nisalak, Ananda; Thammapalo, Suwich; Bhoomiboonchoo, Piraya; Mammen, Mammen P; Green, Sharone; Gibbons, Robert V; Endy, Timothy P; Rothman, Alan L

    2013-12-01

    A four-year longitudinal cohort and geographic cluster study in rural Thailand was conducted to characterize the clinical spectrum of dengue virus (DENV) infection. Symptomatic DENV infections in the cohort were detected by active school absence-based surveillance that triggered cluster investigations around ill cohort children. Data from 189 cohort children with symptomatic DENV infection and 126 contact children in the clusters with DENV infection were analyzed. Of infected contacts, only 19% were asymptomatic; 81% were symptomatic, but only 65.9% reported fever. Symptom-based case definitions were unreliable for diagnosis. Symptomatic infections in contacts were milder with lower DENV RNA levels than the cohort. Infections in contacts with fever history were more likely to have detectable DENV RNA than infections without fever history. Mild infections identified by cluster investigations account for a major proportion of all DENV infections. These findings are relevant for disease burden assessments, transmission modeling, and determination of vaccine impact.

  12. Omental transplantation in a patient with mild ALS

    PubMed Central

    Rafael, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is not a neurodegenerative disease. The patient, a 33-year-old man began with symptoms of the bulbar form of ALS, characterized by burning pain in both feet during two months and then, he presented right crural monoparesis, fasciculations, slight dysarthria and he walked with help of orthopedic devices. A preoperative MRI scans showed atherosclerosis at the V4 segment of the left vertebral artery. On May 2012, he received an omental transplantation on the anterior, left lateral and posterior surface of the medulla oblongata. About 48 hours after surgery, the dysarthria disappeared and the voluntary movement of the right foot improved. Three days later, he walked without aid of orthopedic device. At present, four years after operation he present complete reversal of symptoms. In conclusión, this patient confirms that bulbar ALS is of ischemic origin and therefore, mild ALS can be cured. PMID:27508110

  13. Should mild stimulation be the order of the day?

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    Mild stimulation protocols aim to reduce the physical, financial and emotional burden associated with the conventional IVF protocol without compromising the pregnancy rate. Such protocols help to decrease the complications and the discomfort related to the prolonged administration of agonist and large doses of gonadotrophins, by limiting the number of oocytes recruited to no more than eight. The per cycle pregnancy rates are lower though the cumulative pregnancy rate in a year is equivalent. This CPR comes by going through earlier repeat cycles. Whether this reduces the physical, emotional or financial burden remains a matter of debate. There is need to standardize these protocol and do more trials to compare the two effectively. Till such time there is a clear benefit above the conventional protocol it will not be the protocol of choice with most physicians. PMID:24672159

  14. Mild dehydration affects mood in healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Lawrence E; Ganio, Matthew S; Casa, Douglas J; Lee, Elaine C; McDermott, Brendon P; Klau, Jennifer F; Jimenez, Liliana; Le Bellego, Laurent; Chevillotte, Emmanuel; Lieberman, Harris R

    2012-02-01

    Limited information is available regarding the effects of mild dehydration on cognitive function. Therefore, mild dehydration was produced by intermittent moderate exercise without hyperthermia and its effects on cognitive function of women were investigated. Twenty-five females (age 23.0 ± 0.6 y) participated in three 8-h, placebo-controlled experiments involving a different hydration state each day: exercise-induced dehydration with no diuretic (DN), exercise-induced dehydration plus diuretic (DD; furosemide, 40 mg), and euhydration (EU). Cognitive performance, mood, and symptoms of dehydration were assessed during each experiment, 3 times at rest and during each of 3 exercise sessions. The DN and DD trials in which a volunteer attained a ≥1% level of dehydration were pooled and compared to that volunteer's equivalent EU trials. Mean dehydration achieved during these DN and DD trials was -1.36 ± 0.16% of body mass. Significant adverse effects of dehydration were present at rest and during exercise for vigor-activity, fatigue-inertia, and total mood disturbance scores of the Profile of Mood States and for task difficulty, concentration, and headache as assessed by questionnaire. Most aspects of cognitive performance were not affected by dehydration. Serum osmolality, a marker of hydration, was greater in the mean of the dehydrated trials in which a ≥1% level of dehydration was achieved (P = 0.006) compared to EU. In conclusion, degraded mood, increased perception of task difficulty, lower concentration, and headache symptoms resulted from 1.36% dehydration in females. Increased emphasis on optimal hydration is warranted, especially during and after moderate exercise.

  15. Mild dehydration impairs cognitive performance and mood of men.

    PubMed

    Ganio, Matthew S; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Casa, Douglas J; McDermott, Brendon P; Lee, Elaine C; Yamamoto, Linda M; Marzano, Stefania; Lopez, Rebecca M; Jimenez, Liliana; Le Bellego, Laurent; Chevillotte, Emmanuel; Lieberman, Harris R

    2011-11-01

    The present study assessed the effects of mild dehydration on cognitive performance and mood of young males. A total of twenty-six men (age 20·0 (sd 0·3) years) participated in three randomised, single-blind, repeated-measures trials: exercise-induced dehydration plus a diuretic (DD; 40 mg furosemide); exercise-induced dehydration plus placebo containing no diuretic (DN); exercise while maintaining euhydration plus placebo (EU; control condition). Each trial included three 40 min treadmill walks at 5·6 km/h, 5 % grade in a 27·7°C environment. A comprehensive computerised six-task cognitive test battery, the profile of mood states questionnaire and the symptom questionnaire (headache, concentration and task difficulty) were administered during each trial. Paired t tests compared the DD and DN trials resulting in >1 % body mass loss (mean 1·59 (sd 0·42) %) with the volunteer's EU trial (0·01 (sd 0·03) %). Dehydration degraded specific aspects of cognitive performance: errors increased on visual vigilance (P = 0·048) and visual working memory response latency slowed (P = 0·021). Fatigue and tension/anxiety increased due to dehydration at rest (P = 0·040 and 0·029) and fatigue during exercise (P = 0·026). Plasma osmolality increased due to dehydration (P < 0·001) but resting gastrointestinal temperature was not altered (P = 0·238). In conclusion, mild dehydration without hyperthermia in men induced adverse changes in vigilance and working memory, and increased tension/anxiety and fatigue.

  16. Predictors of driving cessation in mild-to-moderate dementia

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Nathan; Rapoport, Mark J.; Sambrook, Robert; Hébert, Réjean; McCracken, Peter; Robillard, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Background Although physicians in most provinces are mandated to report patients whose driving ability is impaired by illness, little is known about dementia-related factors associated with driving cessation. The purpose of our study was to explore factors that may affect the likelihood of driving cessation in a sample of elderly, community-dwelling patients with dementia. Methods A 3-year prospective study, the Canadian Outcomes Study in Dementia (COSID) has enrolled 883 patients with mild-to-moderate dementia at 32 centres across Canada. Assessment tools included the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) for cognition, the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS) for staging (severity), the Functional Autonomy Measurement System (SMAF) for function, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) for behaviour. Factors associated with the decision to quit driving after the baseline assessment were tested with Cox survival analysis. Results Of 719 subjects who were or had been drivers, 203 (28.2%) were still driving at baseline. Over an observation period that averaged 23 months, 97 (48.5%) of 200 patients quit driving. Factors predictive of driving cessation included GDS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–2.45), MMSE score (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.83– 0.97) and NPI findings (HR 1.63 for presence of ≥ 3 behaviours, 95% CI 1.01– 2.62). Among the NPI behaviours, when they were analyzed separately, agitation led to a decreased likelihood of driving cessation (p = 0.019), whereas apathy (p = 0.031) and hallucinations (p = 0.050) led to an increased likelihood. Interpretation Cognitive impairment and behaviours such as agitation, apathy and hallucinations were significant predictors of driving cessation in patients with a mild to moderate degree of dementia. These findings should be considered when one counsels patients and their families. PMID:16966661

  17. Pain Sensitivity and Recovery From Mild Chronic Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Roehrs, Timothy A.; Harris, Erica; Randall, Surilla; Roth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether an extended bedtime in sleepy and otherwise healthy volunteers would increase alertness and thereby also reduce pain sensitivity. Setting: Outpatient with sleep laboratory assessments. Participants and Interventions: Healthy volunteers (n = 18), defined as having an average daily sleep latency on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) < 8 min, were randomized to 4 nights of extended bedtime (10 hr) (EXT) or 4 nights of their diary-reported habitual bedtimes (HAB). On day 1 and day 4 they received a standard MSLT (10:00, 12:00, 14:00, and 16:00 hr) and finger withdrawal latency pain testing to a radiant heat stimulus (10:30 and 14:30 hr). Results: During the four experimental nights the EXT group slept 1.8 hr per night more than the HAB group and average daily sleep latency on the MSLT increased in the EXT group, but not the HAB group. Similarly, finger withdrawal latency was increased (pain sensitivity was reduced) in the EXT group but not the HAB group. The nightly increase in sleep time during the four experimental nights was correlated with the improvement in MSLT, which in turn was correlated with reduced pain sensitivity. Conclusions: These are the first data to show that an extended bedtime in mildly sleepy healthy adults, which resulted in increased sleep time and reduced sleepiness, reduces pain sensitivity. Citation: Roehrs TA; Harris E; Randall S; Roth T. Pain sensitivity and recovery from mild chronic sleep loss. SLEEP 2012;35(12):1667-1672. PMID:23204609

  18. Mild Dehydration and Cycling Performance During 5-Kilometer Hill Climbing

    PubMed Central

    Bardis, Costas N.; Kavouras, Stavros A.; Arnaoutis, Giannis; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Sidossis, Labros S.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Hydration has been shown to be an important factor in performance; however, the effects of mild dehydration during intense cycling are not clear. Objective: To determine the influence of mild dehydration on cycling performance during an outdoor climbing trial in the heat (ambient temperature = 29.0°C ± 2.2°C). Design: Crossover study. Setting: Outdoor. Patients or Other Participants: Ten well-trained, male endurance cyclists (age = 28 ± 5 years, height = 182 ± 0.4 cm, mass = 73 ± 4 kg, maximal oxygen uptake = 56 ± 9 mL·min−1·kg−1, body fat = 23% ± 2%, maximal power = 354 ± 48 W). Intervention(s): Participants completed 1 hour of steady-state cycling with or without drinking to achieve the desired pre-exercise hydration level before 5-km hill-climbing cycling. Participants started the 5-km ride either euhydrated (EUH) or dehydrated by −1% of body mass (DEH). Main Outcome Measure(s): Performance time, core temperature, sweat rate, sweat sensitivity, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Results: Participants completed the 5-km ride 5.8% faster in the EUH (16.6 ± 2.3 minutes) than DEH (17.6 ± 2.9 minutes) trial (t1 = 10.221, P = .001). Postexercise body mass was −1.4% ± 0.3% for the EUH trial and −2.2% ± 0.2% for the DEH trial (t1 = 191.384, P < .001). Core temperature after the climb was greater during the DEH (39.2°C ± 0.3°C) than EUH (38.8°C ± 0.2°C) trial (t1 = 8.04, P = .005). Sweat rate was lower during the DEH (0.44 ± 0.16 mg·m−2·s−1) than EUH (0.51 ± 0.16 mg·m−2·s−1) trial (t8 = 2.703, P = .03). Sweat sensitivity was lower during the DEH (72.6 ± 32 g·°C−1·min−1) than EUH (102.6 ± 54.2 g·°C−1·min−1) trial (t8 = 3.072, P = .02). Lastly, RPE after the exercise performance test was higher for the DEH (19.0 ± 1.0) than EUH (17.0 ± 1.0) participants (t9 = −3.36, P = .008). Conclusions: We found mild dehydration decreased cycling performance during a 5-km outdoor hill course, probably due to

  19. Autophagy alleviates neurodegeneration caused by mild impairment of oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ya; Yong, Yue; Yang, Guang; Ding, Hanqing; Fan, Zhiqin; Tang, Yifen; Luo, Jia; Ke, Zun-Ji

    2013-09-01

    Thiamine deficiency (TD) causes mild impairment of oxidative metabolism and region-selective neuronal loss in the brain, which may be mediated by neuronal oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and neuroinflammation. TD-induced brain damage is used to model neurodegenerative disorders, and the mechanism for the neuronal death is still unclear. We hypothesized that autophagy might be activated in the TD brain and play a protective role in TD-induced neuronal death. Our results demonstrated that TD induced the accumulation of autophagosomes in thalamic neurons measured by transmission electron microscopy, and the up-regulation of autophagic markers LC3-II, Atg5, and Beclin1 as measured with western blotting. TD also increased the expression of autophagic markers and induced LC3 puncta in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. TD-induced expression of autophagic markers was reversed once thiamine was re-administered. Both inhibition of autophagy by wortmannin and Beclin1 siRNA potentiated TD-induced death of SH-SY5Y cells. In contrast, activation of autophagy by rapamycin alleviated cell death induced by TD. Intraperitoneal injection of rapamycin stimulated neuronal autophagy and attenuated TD-induced neuronal death and microglia activation in the submedial thalamus nucleus (SmTN). TD inhibited the phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase, suggesting mTOR/p70S6 kinase pathway was involved in the TD-induced autophagy. These results suggest that autophagy is neuroprotective in response to TD-induced neuronal death in the central nervous system. This opens a potential therapeutic avenue for neurodegenerative diseases caused by mild impairment of oxidative metabolism. Autophagy is neuroprotective in response to thiamine deficiency (TD)-induced neuronal death. TD caused neuronal damage and induced the formation of autophagosome, and increased the expression of autophagy-related proteins. Autophagy sequestered damaged and dysfunctional organelles/protein, and transported them to

  20. A mortality study among mild steel and stainless steel welders.

    PubMed

    Moulin, J J; Wild, P; Haguenoer, J M; Faucon, D; De Gaudemaris, R; Mur, J M; Mereau, M; Gary, Y; Toamain, J P; Birembaut, Y

    1993-03-01

    A mortality study was carried out in conjunction with the European mortality study among welders coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The study was aimed at assessing risks for lung cancer in relation to exposure to asbestos, welding fumes containing chromium and nickel, and tobacco smoke. The study included a cohort of 2721 welders and an internal comparison group of 6683 manual workers employed in 13 factories in France. The mortality of the two cohorts was studied from 1975 to 1988 by the historical prospective method. Job histories of welders were traced including welding processes used, metals welded, and proportion of worktime spent in welding. Data on smoking habits were collected from medical records. The observed number of deaths were compared with those expected (standardised mortality ratio (SMR)) based on national rates with adjustments for age, sex, and calendar time. The smoking habits of 87% of the whole study population were known. The distribution of welders and controls according to smoking was not statistically different. The overall mortality was slightly higher for welders (SMR = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.89-1.18) than for controls (SMR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.99). For lung cancer, the SMR was 1.24 (95% CI 0.75-1.94) for welders, whereas the corresponding value was lower for controls (SMR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.68-1.26). The SMR for lung cancer was 1.59 among non-shipyard mild steel welders (95% CI 0.73-3.02). This contrasted with the results for all stainless steel welders (SMR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.19-2.69), and for stainless steel welders predominantly exposed to chromium VI (SMR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.12-3.71). Moreover, SMRs for lung cancer for mild steel welders tended to increase with duration of exposure and time since first exposure, leading to significant excesses for duration > or = 20 years and latency > or = 20 years. Such a pattern was not found for stainless steel welders.

  1. Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Laura D.; Frank, Laura L.; Foster-Schubert, Karen; Green, Pattie S.; Wilkinson, Charles W.; McTiernan, Anne; Plymate, Stephen R.; Fishel, Mark A.; Stennis Watson, G.; Cholerton, Brenna A.; Duncan, Glen E.; Mehta, Pankaj D.; Craft, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effects of aerobic exercise on cognition and other biomarkers associated with Alzheimer disease pathology for older adults with mild cognitive impairment, and assess the role of sex as a predictor of response. Design Six-month, randomized, controlled, clinical trial. Setting Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System clinical research unit. Participants Thirty-three adults (17 women) with amnestic mild cognitive impairment ranging in age from 55 to 85 years (mean age,70 years). Intervention Participants were randomized either to a high-intensity aerobic exercise or stretching control group. The aerobic group exercised under the supervision of a fitness trainer at 75% to 85% of heart rate reserve for 45 to 60 min/d, 4 d/wk for 6 months. The control group carried out supervised stretching activities according to the same schedule but maintained their heart rate at or below 50% of their heart rate reserve. Before and after the study, glucometabolic and treadmill tests were performed and fat distribution was assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. At baseline, month 3, and month 6, blood was collected for assay and cognitive tests were administered. Main Outcome Measures Performance measures on Symbol-Digit Modalities, Verbal Fluency, Stroop, Trails B, Task Switching, Story Recall, and List Learning. Fasting plasma levels of insulin, cortisol, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulinlike growth factor-I, and β-amyloids 40 and 42. Results Six months of high-intensity aerobic exercise had sex-specific effects on cognition, glucose metabolism, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and trophic activity despite comparable gains in cardiorespiratory fitness and body fat reduction. For women, aerobic exercise improved performance on multiple tests of executive function, increased glucose disposal during the metabolic clamp, and reduced fasting plasma levels of insulin, cortisol, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. For men

  2. A mortality study among mild steel and stainless steel welders.

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, J J; Wild, P; Haguenoer, J M; Faucon, D; De Gaudemaris, R; Mur, J M; Mereau, M; Gary, Y; Toamain, J P; Birembaut, Y

    1993-01-01

    A mortality study was carried out in conjunction with the European mortality study among welders coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The study was aimed at assessing risks for lung cancer in relation to exposure to asbestos, welding fumes containing chromium and nickel, and tobacco smoke. The study included a cohort of 2721 welders and an internal comparison group of 6683 manual workers employed in 13 factories in France. The mortality of the two cohorts was studied from 1975 to 1988 by the historical prospective method. Job histories of welders were traced including welding processes used, metals welded, and proportion of worktime spent in welding. Data on smoking habits were collected from medical records. The observed number of deaths were compared with those expected (standardised mortality ratio (SMR)) based on national rates with adjustments for age, sex, and calendar time. The smoking habits of 87% of the whole study population were known. The distribution of welders and controls according to smoking was not statistically different. The overall mortality was slightly higher for welders (SMR = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.89-1.18) than for controls (SMR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.99). For lung cancer, the SMR was 1.24 (95% CI 0.75-1.94) for welders, whereas the corresponding value was lower for controls (SMR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.68-1.26). The SMR for lung cancer was 1.59 among non-shipyard mild steel welders (95% CI 0.73-3.02). This contrasted with the results for all stainless steel welders (SMR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.19-2.69), and for stainless steel welders predominantly exposed to chromium VI (SMR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.12-3.71). Moreover, SMRs for lung cancer for mild steel welders tended to increase with duration of exposure and time since first exposure, leading to significant excesses for duration > or = 20 years and latency > or = 20 years. Such a pattern was not found for stainless steel welders. PMID:8457490

  3. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depressed Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Esbensen, Anna J.; Shalev, Rebecca; Vincent, Lori B.; Mihaila, Iulia; Bussanich, Paige

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on psychosocial treatments for depression in adults with intellectual disability (ID). In this pilot study, we explored the efficacy of a group CBT treatment that involved a caregiver component in adults with mild ID with a depressive disorder. Sixteen adults with mild ID and a depressive disorder participated in a…

  4. Implementing a Problem-Solving Intervention with Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Debra L.

    2011-01-01

    Students with mild and moderate disabilities need to be skillful at problem solving. This article provides an overview of a problem-solving intervention designed to teach students with mild and moderate disabilities the skills of problem solving. An explanation of the assessments, materials, instructional outline, and methods is presented.…

  5. Effect of biomineralized manganese on the corrosion behavior of C1008 mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Olesen, B.H.; Nielsen, P.H.; Lewandowski, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The possibility that biomineralized manganese dioxide (MnO{sub 2}) might serve as an efficient cathodic reactant in mild steel corrosion was studied using stainless steel (SS) covered with microbially or electrochemically deposited MnO{sub 2} and galvanically coupled to mild steel and mild steel covered with microbially deposited MnO{sub 2}. Biofilms of the manganese-oxidizing bacteria, Leptothrix discophora SP-6, were used to deposit biomineralized MnO{sub 2}. When MnO{sub 2} was biologically deposited on the SS, the corrosion rate of the galvanically coupled mild steel was initially about eight times higher than that in a control experiment without depositing manganese. After a few minutes, the MnO{sub 2} discharged and the corrosion rate of the mild steel decreased to values comparable with biofouled cathodes without manganese. When MnO{sub 2} was electroplated on SS, a linear relation between the amount of MnO{sub 2} and the duration of the elevated corrosion rate of mild steel was observed. However, when MnO{sub 2} was biologically deposited directly onto the mild steel, the corrosion rate did not increase, possibly because the corrosion product buildup on the mild steel surface prevented electrical contact between the manganese oxide and the underlying metal.

  6. The Use of "Mild" Aversive Stimuli for Control of Stereotypic and Self-Injurious Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberto, Paul A.

    The use of mild aversives to control self-injurious and stereotypic behaviors of severely emotionally disturbed children is considered. Research is reviewed on the ethics and effectiveness of aversive stimuli. Mild aversives include a form of nonseclusionary timeout known as facial screening, the administration of certain irritating substances…

  7. Coping Strategies of Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability for Stressful Social Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Sigan L.; MacLean, William E., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Adults with mild intellectual disability (ID) experience stressful social interactions and often utilize maladaptive coping strategies to manage these interactions. We investigated the specific types of "Active and Avoidant" coping strategies reported by 114 adults with mild ID to deal with stressful social interactions. Open-ended responses to a…

  8. Exploring the Self-concept of Adults with Mild Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pestana, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to add to the research on the self-concept of adults with mild learning disabilities and to generate a deeper understanding of their self-perceptions rather than draw generalised quantitative conclusions. Eight adults diagnosed with mild learning disabilities receiving support from a supported living project were…

  9. Functional Curriculum and Students with Mild Intellectual Disability: Exploring Postschool Outcomes through the NLTS2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Joshi, Gauri

    2012-01-01

    While students with mild intellectual disability receive less attention in research, their educational programming is still important, including the curriculum they receive in school. This study analyzed the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) as to the curriculum students with mild intellectual disability received in high school as…

  10. The Influence of Hearing Aid Use on Outcomes of Children with Mild Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Holte, Lenore; McCreery, Ryan W.; Spratford, Meredith; Page, Thomas; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of consistent hearing aid (HA) use on outcomes in children with mild hearing loss (HL). Method: Five- or 7-year-old children with mild HL were separated into 3 groups on the basis of patterns of daily HA use. Using analyses of variance, we compared outcomes between groups on speech and language tests and a…

  11. Children with Mild Bilateral and Unilateral Hearing Loss: Parents' Reflections on Experiences and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Grandpierre, Viviane; Durieux-Smith, Andrée; Gaboury, Isabelle; Coyle, Doug; Na, Eunjung; Sallam, Nusaiba

    2016-01-01

    Children with mild bilateral and unilateral hearing loss are now commonly identified early through newborn hearing screening initiatives. There remains considerable uncertainty about how to support parents and about which services to provide for children with mild bilateral and unilateral hearing loss. The goal of this study was to learn about…

  12. Nonverbal Social Skills of Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability Diagnosed with Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Birgenheir, Denis G.

    2009-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in adults with intellectual disability (ID), yet little is known about depressive behaviors in an ID population. This study examined the nonverbal social skills of 18 adults with mild ID diagnosed with depression and a matched sample of adults with mild ID without depression. Nonverbal…

  13. Transition Services for Students with Mild Intellectual Disability in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnahdi, Ghaleb

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teachers' attitudes and perceptions toward transition services for students with mild intellectual disability in Saudi Arabia, and also examined the relationship between teachers' attitudes regarding transition services for students with mild intellectual disability and teachers' gender and educational…

  14. Making Sense of Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Qualitative Exploration of the Patient's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingler, Jennifer Hagerty; Nightingale, Marcie C.; Erlen, Judith A.; Kane, April L.; Reynolds, Charles F.; Schulz, Richard; DeKosky, Steven T.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The proposed dementia precursor state of mild cognitive impairment is emerging as a primary target of aging research. Yet, little is known about the subjective experience of living with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. This study examines, from the patient's perspective, the experience of living with and making sense of the…

  15. Behavior Problems in Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities: An Initial Step towards Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; du Bois, Marleen Grimbel; Graef, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    To develop prevention activities, an analysis is conducted of child and parent characteristics that occur significantly more often among children with a mild intellectual disability and behavior problems than among children with a mild intellectual disability and no behavior problems and their families. The sample consisted of 45 children…

  16. Social Status and Social Perceptual Abilities of Mildly Handicapped Learners: Methodological and Substantive Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Gale M.

    In an examination of the notion of person-environment fit as it applies to the socioempathy-social status for mildly handicapped children in mainstreamed and special class settings, 38 mildly learning handicapped (LH) and 234 nonhandicapped students were administered social status instruments. Results revealed that LH Ss in special placements were…

  17. Predicting Change in Emotional and Behavioural Problems during Inpatient Treatment in Clients with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, Nienke; Didden, Robert; Koot, Hans M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known about client characteristics that are related to outcome during inpatient treatment of adults with mild intellectual disability (ID) and severe behavioural problems. Method: We explored variables that were related to a change in behavioural problems in 87 individuals with mild ID during inpatient treatment in facilities…

  18. Procedures for Increasing Sustained Attention in Adults with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Adam H.; Williams, Dean C.

    2013-01-01

    This research compared the effects of several factors on sustained attention in four participants with mild or mild-to-moderate intellectual disabilities. In each session, each participant received an extended number of conditional discriminations that required a differential response to infrequently occurring target stimuli. We assessed sustained…

  19. Everyday Memory and Working Memory in Adolescents with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Molen, M. J.; Van Luit, J. E. H.; Van der Molen, Maurits W.; Jongmans, Marian J.

    2010-01-01

    Everyday memory and its relationship to working memory was investigated in adolescents with mild intellectual disability and compared to typically developing adolescents of the same age (CA) and younger children matched on mental age (MA). Results showed a delay on almost all memory measures for the adolescents with mild intellectual disability…

  20. Use of a Mild Gain Amplifier with Preschoolers with Language Delay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flexer, Carol; Hallie, Savage

    1993-01-01

    This study examined effects on test-taking performance of enhancing the examiner's speech by means of an inexpensive mild gain hard-wired assistive listening device. Subjects were 11 preschoolers with mild expressive language delays. Results revealed a significant reduction in test-taking time in the amplified condition. (Author/DB)

  1. Semantic Knowledge for Famous Names in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Seidenberg, Michael; Guidotti, Leslie; Nielson, Kristy A.; Woodard, John L.; Durgerian, Sally; Zhang, Qi; Gander, Amelia; Antuono, Piero; Rao, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Person identification represents a unique category of semantic knowledge that is commonly impaired in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), but has received relatively little investigation in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The current study examined the retrieval of semantic knowledge for famous names from three time epochs (recent, remote, and enduring) in two participant groups; 23 aMCI patients and 23 healthy elderly controls. The aMCI group was less accurate and produced less semantic knowledge than controls for famous names. Names from the enduring period were recognized faster than both recent and remote names in both groups, and remote names were recognized more quickly than recent names. Episodic memory performance was correlated with greater semantic knowledge particularly for recent names. We suggest that the anterograde memory deficits in the aMCI group interferes with learning of recent famous names and as a result produces difficulties with updating and integrating new semantic information with previously stored information. The implications of these findings for characterizing semantic memory deficits in MCI are discussed. PMID:19128524

  2. Mild traumatic brain injury and neural recovery: rethinking the debate.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Ronald M

    2011-01-01

    A debate exists concerning whether a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) can cause permanent brain-based residuals. This debate is examined by reviewing meta-analytic studies that found no significant effect sizes between large samples of patients with and without MTBI at three months post-accident. In contrast, research studies with MTBI patients have captured cognitive deficits corroborated by positive neuroimaging, which supports the viewpoint that brain-based postconcussive disorders likely exist in a small minority of individuals. Ongoing hurdles that likely contribute to this debate are identified. This includes the lack of agreed upon definitions; substantial differences exist between the ICD-10 definition for Postconcussion Syndrome and the DSM-IV-TR definition for Postconcussional Disorder. Confining the debate to brain-based versus psychologically-based viewpoints results in a false dichotomy. Instead, a more refined sub-classification of the postconcussive complex is proposed that captures different constellations across the physical, emotional, and cognitive symptoms complex. Moreover, this diagnostic framework attempts to expand discipline-based approaches with a patient-based understanding. PMID:21558623

  3. Mild gut inflammation modulates the proteome of intestinal Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Sara; Alpert, Carl; Engst, Wolfram; Klopfleisch, Robert; Loh, Gunnar; Bleich, André; Blaut, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Using interleukin 10-deficient (IL-10(-/-) ) and wild-type mice monoassociated with either the adherent-invasive Escherichia coli UNC or the probiotic E. coli Nissle, the effect of a mild intestinal inflammation on the bacterial proteome was studied. Within 8 weeks, IL-10(-/-) mice monoassociated with E. coli UNC exhibited an increased expression of several proinflammatory markers in caecal mucosa. Escherichia coli Nissle-associated IL-10(-/-) mice did not do so. As observed previously for E. coli from mice with acute colitis, glycolytic enzymes were downregulated in intestinal E. coli UNC from IL-10(-/-) mice. In addition, the inhibitor of vertebrate C-type lysozyme, Ivy, was upregulated on messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein level in E. coli Nissle from IL-10(-/-) mice compared with E. coli UNC from these mice. Higher expression of Ivy in E. coli Nissle correlated with an improved growth of this probiotic strain in the presence of lysozyme-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). By overexpressing Ivy, we demonstrated that Ivy contributes to a higher lysozyme resistance of E. coli, supporting the role of Ivy as a potential fitness factor. However, deletion of Ivy did not alter the growth phenotype of E. coli Nissle in the presence of lysozyme-EDTA, suggesting the existence of additional lysozyme inhibitors that can take over the function of Ivy. PMID:23855897

  4. Making sense of nonsense: experiences of mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Beard, Renée L; Neary, Tara M

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a stigmatised condition popularly assumed to be a death sentence for diagnosed individuals. Consequently, people with AD are often deemed incapable (and perhaps unworthy) of contributing to the social discourse surrounding their illness experience. Data from qualitative interviews with 18 people diagnosed with the potential precursor of AD known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are examined. Using grounded theory methods, analysis revealed overarching themes of uncertainty concerning definitions of memory loss, MCI, and AD as well as distinctions between normal ageing and dementia. While this confusion over the terminology and prognosis mirrors the lack of scientific consensus about nosology and appropriate treatment regimens, such ambiguity creates social and psychological tensions for diagnosed individuals. Arguably, participants' unequivocal fear of and subsequent desire to differentiate their experiences from Alzheimer's, however, stems from the exclusively negative social constructions of AD. Drawing from Goffman, these findings demonstrate the psychosocial impact of 'framing contests' and how 'courtesy stigma' can apply not only to associated persons but also associated conditions, such as MCI to AD. Given the underlying nosological creep - or medicalisation - of the recent diagnostic guidelines proposing two new pre-dementia stages, understanding the illness narratives of MCI is critical.

  5. Dynamics of mild strombolian activity on Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pering, T. D.; Tamburello, G.; McGonigle, A. J. S.; Aiuppa, A.; James, M. R.; Lane, S. J.; Sciotto, M.; Cannata, A.; Patanè, D.

    2015-07-01

    Here we report the first measurements of gas masses released during a rare period of strombolian activity at the Bocca Nuova crater, Mt. Etna, Sicily. UV camera data acquired for 195 events over an ≈ 27 minute period (27th July 2012) indicate erupted SO2 masses ranging from ≈ 0.1 to ≈ 14 kg per event, with corresponding total gas masses of ≈ 0.1 to 74 kg. Thus, the activity was characterised by more frequent and smaller events than typically associated with strombolian activity on volcanoes such as Stromboli. Events releasing larger measured gas masses were followed by relatively long repose periods before the following burst, a feature not previously reported on from gas measurement data. If we assume that gas transport within the magma can be represented by a train of rising gas pockets or slugs, then the high frequency of events indicates that these slugs must have been in close proximity. In this case the longer repose durations associated with the larger slugs would be consistent with interactions between adjacent slugs leading to coalescence, a process expedited close to the surface by rapid slug expansion. We apply basic modelling considerations to the measured gas masses in order to investigate potential slug characteristics governing the observed activity. We also cross correlated the acquired gas fluxes with contemporaneously obtained seismic data but found no relationship between the series in line with the mild form of manifest explosivity.

  6. Automatic Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment Using Electroencephalogram Spectral Features

    PubMed Central

    Kashefpoor, Masoud; Rabbani, Hossein; Barekatain, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most expensive and fatal diseases in the elderly population. Up to now, no cure have been found for AD, so early stage diagnosis is the only way to control it. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) usually is the early stage of AD which is defined as decreasing in mental abilities such a cognition, memory, and speech not too severe to interfere daily activities. MCI diagnosis is rather hard and usually assumed as normal consequences of aging. This study proposes an accurate, mobile, and nonexpensive diagnostic approach based on electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. EEG signals were recorded using 19 electrodes positioned according to the 10–20 International system at resting eyes closed state from 16 normal and 11 MCI participants. Nineteen Spectral features are computed for each channel and examined using a correlation based algorithm to select the best discriminative features. Selected features are classified using a combination of neurofuzzy system and k-nearest neighbor classifier. Final results reach 88.89%, 100%, and 83.33% for accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively, which shows the potential of proposed method to be used as an MCI diagnostic tool, especially for screening a large population. PMID:27014609

  7. Epidemiology of mild traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Raquel C.; Yaffe, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Every year an estimated 42 million people worldwide suffer a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or concussion. More severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well-established risk factor for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recently, large epidemiological studies have additionally identified MTBI as a risk factor for dementia. The role of MTBI in risk of PD or ALS is less well established. Repetitive MTBI and repetitive sub-concussive head trauma has been linked to increased risk for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a unique neurodegenerative tauopathy first described in boxers but more recently described in a variety of contact sport athletes, military veterans, and civilians exposed to repetitive MTBI. Studies of repetitive MTBI and CTE have been limited by referral bias, lack of consensus clinical criteria for CTE, challenges of quantifying MTBI exposure, and potential for confounding. The prevalence of CTE is unknown and the amount of MTBI or sub-concussive trauma exposure necessary to produce CTE is unclear. This review will summarize the current literature regarding the epidemiology of MTBI, post-TBI dementia and Parkinson's disease, and CTE while highlighting methodological challenges and critical future directions of research in this field. PMID:25748121

  8. Multimodal MRI classification in vascular mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Diciotti, Stefano; Ciulli, Stefano; Ginestroni, Andrea; Salvadori, Emilia; Poggesi, Anna; Pantoni, Leonardo; Inzitari, Domenico; Mascalchi, Mario; Toschi, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Vascular mild cognitive impairment (VMCI) is a disorder in which multimodal MRI can add significant value by combining diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with brain morphometry. In this study we implemented and compared machine learning techniques for multimodal classification between 58 VMCI patients and 29 healthy subjects as well as for discrimination (within the VMCI group) between patients with different cognitive performances. For each subject, a cortical feature vector was constructed based on cortical parcellation and cortical and subcortical volumetric segmentation and a DTI feature vector was formed by combining descriptive statistical metrics related to the distribution of DTI invariants within white matter. We employed both a sequential minimal optimization and a functional tree classifier, using feature selection and 10-fold cross-validation, and compared their performances in monomodal and multimodal classification for both classification problems (healthy subjects vs VMCI and prediction of cognitive performance). While monomodal classification resulted in satisfactory performance in most cases, turning from monomodal to multimodal classification resulted in an improvement of the performance in the discrimination between VMCI patients with low cognitive performance and healthy subjects by up to 10% in sensitivity (leaving specificity unchanged). We therefore are able to confirm the usefulness of machine learning techniques in discriminating diseased states based on neuroimaging data. PMID:26737240

  9. Interference Impacts Working Memory in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Aurtenetxe, Sara; García-Pacios, Javier; del Río, David; López, María E.; Pineda-Pardo, José A.; Marcos, Alberto; Delgado Losada, Maria L.; López-Frutos, José M.; Maestú, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered a transitional stage between healthy aging and dementia, specifically Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most common cognitive impairment of MCI includes episodic memory loss and difficulties in working memory (WM). Interference can deplete WM, and an optimal WM performance requires an effective control of attentional resources between the memoranda and the incoming stimuli. Difficulties in handling interference lead to forgetting. However, the interplay between interference and WM in MCI is not well-understood and needs further investigation. The current study investigated the effect of interference during a WM task in 20 MCIs and 20 healthy elder volunteers. Participants performed a delayed match-to-sample paradigm which consisted in two interference conditions, distraction and interruption, and one control condition without any interference. Results evidenced a disproportionate impact of interference on the WM performance of MCIs, mainly in the presence of interruption. These findings demonstrate that interference, and more precisely interruption, is an important proxy for memory-related deficits in MCI. Thus, the current findings reveal novel evidence regarding the causes of WM forgetting in MCI patients, associated with difficulties in the mechanisms of attentional control. PMID:27790082

  10. Acetazolamide Mitigates Astrocyte Cellular Edema Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturdivant, Nasya M.; Smith, Sean G.; Ali, Syed F.; Wolchok, Jeffrey C.; Balachandran, Kartik

    2016-09-01

    Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema. We hypothesized that mTBI-mediated astrocyte dysfunction, initiated by increased intracellular volume, could be reduced when treated with AZA. We tested our hypothesis in a three-dimensional in vitro astrocyte model of mTBI. Samples were subject to no stretch (control) or one high-speed stretch (mTBI) injury. AQP4 expression was significantly increased 24 hours after mTBI. mTBI resulted in a significant increase in the cell swelling within 30 min of mTBI, which was significantly reduced in the presence of AZA. Cell death and expression of S100B was significantly reduced when AZA was added shortly before mTBI stretch. Overall, our data point to occurrence of astrocyte swelling immediately following mTBI, and AZA as a promising treatment to mitigate downstream cellular mortality.

  11. Impaired cognitive function and mental performance in mild dehydration.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M-M G; Morley, J E

    2003-12-01

    Dehydration is a reliable predictor of impaired cognitive status. Objective data, using tests of cortical function, support the deterioration of mental performance in mildly dehydrated younger adults. Dehydration frequently results in delirium as a manifestation of cognitive dysfunction. Although, the occurrence of delirium suggests transient acute global cerebral dysfunction, cognitive impairment may not be completely reversible. Animal studies have identified neuronal mitochondrial damage and glutamate hypertransmission in dehydrated rats. Additional studies have identified an increase in cerebral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase activity (nitric oxide synthase, NOS) with dehydration. Available evidence also implicates NOS as a neurotransmitter in long-term potentiation, rendering this a critical enzyme in facilitating learning and memory. With ageing, a reduction of NOS activity has been identified in the cortex and striatum of rats. The reduction of NOs synthase activity that occurs with ageing may blunt the rise that occurs with dehydration, and possibly interfere with memory processing and cognitive function. Dehydration has been shown to be a reliable predictor of increasing frailty, deteriorating mental performance and poor quality of life. Intervention models directed toward improving outcomes in dehydration must incorporate strategies to enhance prompt recognition of cognitive dysfunction.

  12. Zinc translocation accelerates infarction after mild transient focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, J-M; Zipfel, G J; Park, K H; He, Y Y; Hsu, C Y; Choi, D W

    2002-01-01

    Excess release of chelatable zinc (Zn(2+)) from central synaptic vesicles may contribute to the pathogenesis of selective neuronal cell death following transient forebrain ischemia, but a role in neurodegeneration after focal ischemia has not been defined. Adult male Long-Evans rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 30 min followed by reperfusion developed delayed cerebral infarction reaching completion 3 days after the insult. One day after the insult, many degenerating cerebral neurons exhibited increased intracellular Zn(2+), and some labeled with the antibody against activated caspase-3. I.c.v. administration of the Zn(2+) chelator, EDTA saturated with equimolar Ca(2+) (CaEDTA), 15 min prior to ischemia attenuated subsequent Zn(2+) translocation into cortical neurons, and reduced infarct volume measured 3 days after ischemia. Although the protective effect of CaEDTA at this endpoint was substantial (about 70% infarct reduction), it was lost when insult severity was increased (from 30 to 60 min MCAO), or when infarct volume was measured at a much later time point (14 days instead of 3 days after ischemia). These data suggest that toxic Zn(2+) translocation, from presynaptic terminals to post-synaptic cell bodies, may accelerate the development of cerebral infarction following mild transient focal ischemia.

  13. Mild Cognitive Impairment and Susceptibility to Scams in Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Han, S. Duke; Boyle, Patricia A.; James, Bryan D.; Yu, Lei; Bennett, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Falling victim to financial scams can have a significant impact upon social and financial wellbeing and independence. A large proportion of scam victims are older adults, but whether older victims with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are at higher risk remains unknown. Objective We tested the hypothesis that older persons with MCI exhibit greater susceptibility to scams compared to those without cognitive impairment. Methods Seven hundred and thirty older adults without dementia were recruited from the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a community-based epidemiologic study of aging. Participants completed a five-item self-report measure of susceptibility to scams, a battery of cognitive measures, and clinical diagnostic evaluations. Results In models adjusted for age, education, and gender, the presence of MCI was associated with greater susceptibility to scams (B = 0.125, SE = 0.063, p-value = 0.047). Further, in analyses of the role of specific cognitive systems in susceptibility to scams among persons with MCI (n = 144), the level of performance in two systems, episodic memory and perceptual speed abilities, were associated with susceptibility. Conclusions Adults with MCI may be more susceptible to scams in old age than older persons with normal cognition. Lower abilities in specific cognitive systems, particularly perceptual speed and episodic memory, may contribute to greater susceptibility to scams in those with MCI. PMID:26519434

  14. Predictable chronic mild stress improves mood, hippocampal neurogenesis and memory.

    PubMed

    Parihar, V K; Hattiangady, B; Kuruba, R; Shuai, B; Shetty, A K

    2011-02-01

    Maintenance of neurogenesis in adult hippocampus is important for functions such as mood and memory. As exposure to unpredictable chronic stress (UCS) results in decreased hippocampal neurogenesis, enhanced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, and memory dysfunction, it is believed that declined hippocampal neurogenesis mainly underlies the behavioral and cognitive abnormalities after UCS. However, the effects of predictable chronic mild stress (PCMS) such as the routine stress experienced in day-to-day life on functions such as mood, memory and hippocampal neurogenesis are unknown. Using FST and EPM tests on a prototype of adult rats, we demonstrate that PCMS (comprising 5 min of daily restraint stress for 28 days) decreases depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors for prolonged periods. Moreover, we illustrate that decreased depression and anxiety scores after PCMS are associated with ~1.8-fold increase in the production and growth of new neurons in the hippocampus. Additionally, we found that PCMS leads to enhanced memory function in WMT as well as NORT. Collectively, these findings reveal that PCMS is beneficial to adult brain function, which is exemplified by increased hippocampal neurogenesis and improved mood and cognitive function.

  15. Supervised Discriminative Group Sparse Representation for Mild Cognitive Impairment Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Suk, Heung-Il; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-07-01

    Research on an early detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), a prodromal stage of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), with resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (rs-fMRI) has been of great interest for the last decade. Witnessed by recent studies, functional connectivity is a useful concept in extracting brain network features and finding biomarkers for brain disease diagnosis. However, it still remains challenging for the estimation of functional connectivity from rs-fMRI due to the inevitable high dimensional problem. In order to tackle this problem, we utilize a group sparse representation along with a structural equation model. Unlike the conventional group sparse representation method that does not explicitly consider class-label information, which can help enhance the diagnostic performance, in this paper, we propose a novel supervised discriminative group sparse representation method by penalizing a large within-class variance and a small between-class variance of connectivity coefficients. Thanks to the newly devised penalization terms, we can learn connectivity coefficients that are similar within the same class and distinct between classes, thus helping enhance the diagnostic accuracy. The proposed method also allows the learned common network structure to preserve the network specific and label-related characteristics. In our experiments on the rs-fMRI data of 37 subjects (12 MCI; 25 healthy normal control) with a cross-validation technique, we demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method, showing the diagnostic accuracy of 89.19 % and the sensitivity of 0.9167.

  16. Recycling supercapacitors based on shredding and mild thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guozhan; Pickering, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    Supercapacitors are widely used in electric and hybrid vehicles, wind farm and low-power equipment due to their high specific power density and huge number of charge-discharge cycles. Waste supercapacitors should be recycled according to EU directive 2002/96/EC on waste electric and electronic equipment. This paper describes a recycling approach for end-of-life supercapacitors based on shredding and mild thermal treatment. At first, supercapacitors are shredded using a Retsch cutting mill. The shredded mixture is then undergone thermal treatment at 200°C to recycle the organic solvent contained in the activated carbon electrodes. After the thermal treatment, the mixture is roughly separated using a fluidized bed method to remove the aluminium foil particles and paper particles from the activated carbon particles, which is subsequently put into water for a wet shredding into fine particles that can be re-used. The recycled activated carbon has a BET surface area of up to 1200m(2)/g and the recycled acetonitrile has a high purity. PMID:26542830

  17. Dietary ketosis enhances memory in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Krikorian, Robert; Shidler, Marcelle D; Dangelo, Krista; Couch, Sarah C; Benoit, Stephen C; Clegg, Deborah J

    2010-01-01

    We randomly assigned 23 older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment to either a high carbohydrate or very low carbohydrate diet. Following the six-week intervention period, we observed improved verbal memory performance for the low carbohydrate subjects (p = 0.01) as well as reductions in weight (p < 0.0001), waist circumference (p < 0.0001), fasting glucose (p = 0.009), and fasting insulin (p = 0.005). Level of depressive symptoms was not affected. Change in calorie intake, insulin level, and weight were not correlated with memory performance for the entire sample, although a trend toward a moderate relationship between insulin and memory was observed within the low carbohydrate group. Ketone levels were positively correlated with memory performance (p = 0.04). These findings indicate that very low carbohydrate consumption, even in the short-term, can improve memory function in older adults with increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. While this effect may be attributable in part to correction of hyperinsulinemia, other mechanisms associated with ketosis such as reduced inflammation and enhanced energy metabolism also may have contributed to improved neurocognitive function. Further investigation of this intervention is warranted to evaluate its preventive potential and mechanisms of action in the context of early neurodegeneration. PMID:21130529

  18. The Early Indicators of Functional Decrease in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kubicki, Alexandre; Fautrelle, Lilian; Bourrelier, Julien; Rouaud, Olivier; Mourey, France

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Motor deficiency is associated with cognitive frailty in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairments (MCI). In this study we aimed to test the integrity in muscle synergies involved in an arm-pointing movement in functionally unimpaired MCI patients. We hypothesized that early motor indicators exist in this population at a preclinical level. Methods: Electromyographic signals were collected for 11 muscles in 3 groups: Young Adults (YA), Older Adults (OA), and MCI patients. The OA and MCI groups presented the same functional status. Each subject performed 20 arm-pointing movements from a standing position. Results: The main differences were (1) an earlier activation of the left Obliquus internus in MCI compared with OA group, (2) an earlier activation for the MCI compared with both OA and YA. The temporal differences in muscle synergies between MCI and OA groups were linked with executive functions of MCI patients, assessed by the trail making test. Moreover, the results show a delayed activation of the right Biceps Femoris and the right Erector Spinae at l3 in MCI and OA compared with YA. Interpretation: The motor program changes highlighted in our patient MCI group suggest that discrete modifications of the motor command seem to exist even in the absence of functional impairment. Instead of showing an indication of delayed muscle activation in the MCI patients, our results highlight some early activation of several trunk muscles. PMID:27570509

  19. Hydrodefluorination and hydrogenation of fluorobenzene under mild aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Rebekka; McNeill, Kristopher

    2012-09-18

    Fluorinated organic compounds are increasingly used in many applications, and their release to the environment is expected. It is therefore important to find suitable methods for degradation of fluorinated compounds under environmentally relevant conditions. In this study, a simple heterogeneous rhodium-based catalytic system (Rh/Al(2)O(3) and H(2)) for hydrodefluorination and hydrogenation of fluorobenzene under mild aqueous conditions (1 atm of H(2), ambient temperature) was developed and the underlying reaction mechanism was investigated. Fluorobenzene degraded rapidly (t(1/2) ≈ 0.2 h) to form cyclohexane and fluoride (F(-)) as the stable end products, with benzene and cyclohexene observed as intermediates. Cyclohexadiene intermediates were not observed but were expected to form during the hydrogenation of benzene. Three postulated but unobserved fluorinated intermediates were subjected to the catalytic reaction conditions, and it was concluded that they most likely do not form during the fluorobenzene degradation reaction. Isotope labeling experiments showed that the unsaturated intermediates undergo rapid and reversible hydrogenation/dehydrogenation under the reaction conditions and also that fully saturated compounds are unreactive in the catalytic system. Both molecular hydrogen and water were sources of hydrogen in the final cyclohexane product. Kinetic fitting indicated that sorption/desorption of fluorobenzene onto the catalyst surface plays an important role in the mechanism. PMID:22871102

  20. Acetazolamide Mitigates Astrocyte Cellular Edema Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sturdivant, Nasya M.; Smith, Sean G.; Ali, Syed F.; Wolchok, Jeffrey C.; Balachandran, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema. We hypothesized that mTBI-mediated astrocyte dysfunction, initiated by increased intracellular volume, could be reduced when treated with AZA. We tested our hypothesis in a three-dimensional in vitro astrocyte model of mTBI. Samples were subject to no stretch (control) or one high-speed stretch (mTBI) injury. AQP4 expression was significantly increased 24 hours after mTBI. mTBI resulted in a significant increase in the cell swelling within 30 min of mTBI, which was significantly reduced in the presence of AZA. Cell death and expression of S100B was significantly reduced when AZA was added shortly before mTBI stretch. Overall, our data point to occurrence of astrocyte swelling immediately following mTBI, and AZA as a promising treatment to mitigate downstream cellular mortality. PMID:27623738

  1. Recycling supercapacitors based on shredding and mild thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guozhan; Pickering, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    Supercapacitors are widely used in electric and hybrid vehicles, wind farm and low-power equipment due to their high specific power density and huge number of charge-discharge cycles. Waste supercapacitors should be recycled according to EU directive 2002/96/EC on waste electric and electronic equipment. This paper describes a recycling approach for end-of-life supercapacitors based on shredding and mild thermal treatment. At first, supercapacitors are shredded using a Retsch cutting mill. The shredded mixture is then undergone thermal treatment at 200°C to recycle the organic solvent contained in the activated carbon electrodes. After the thermal treatment, the mixture is roughly separated using a fluidized bed method to remove the aluminium foil particles and paper particles from the activated carbon particles, which is subsequently put into water for a wet shredding into fine particles that can be re-used. The recycled activated carbon has a BET surface area of up to 1200m(2)/g and the recycled acetonitrile has a high purity.

  2. A systematic review of treatments for Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Claudia; Li, Ryan; Lyketsos, Constantine; Livingston, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Background More people are presenting with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), frequently a precursor to dementia but we do not know how to reduce deterioration. Aims To systematically review Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) evaluating effects of any intervention for MCI on cognitive, neuropsychiatric, functional, global outcomes, life quality, or incident dementia. Methods We reviewed the 41 studies fitting predetermined criteria, assessed validity using a checklist, calculated standardised outcomes, and prioritised primary outcome findings in placebo-controlled studies. Results The strongest evidence was that cholinesterase inhibitors did not reduce incident dementia. Cognition improved in single trials of: a heterogeneous psychological group intervention over 6 months; piribedil, a dopamine agonist over 3 months; and donepezil over 48 weeks. Nicotine improved attention over 6 months. There was equivocal evidence that Huannao Yicong improved cognition and social functioning. Conclusions There was no replicated evidence that any intervention was effective. Cholinesterase inhibitors and rofecoxib are ineffective in preventing dementia. Further good quality RCTs are necessary and preliminary evidence suggests these should include trials of psychological group interventions and piribedil. PMID:24085737

  3. Communication after mild traumatic brain injury--a spouse's perspective.

    PubMed

    Crewe-Brown, Samantha Jayne; Stipinovich, Alexandra Maria; Zsilavecz, Ursula

    2011-10-01

    Individuals with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) often perform within normal limits on linguistic and cognitive assessments. However, they may present with debilitating communicative difficulties in daily life. A multifaceted approach to MTBI with a focus on everyday communication in natural settings is required. Significant others who interact with the individual with MTBI in a variety of settings may be sensitive to communicative difficulties experienced by the individual with MTBI. This article examines communication after MTBI from the perspective of the spouse. A case study design was implemented. The spouses of two individuals with MTBI served as the participants for this study. Semi-structured interviews were held, during which each participant was requested to describe the communication of their spouse with MTBI. The content obtained from the interviews was subjected to a discourse analysis. The results show that both participants perceived changes in the communication of their spouse following the MTBI. The results further show that MTBI affected communication of the two individuals in different ways. The value of a 'significant other' in providing information regarding communication in natural settings is highlighted. The implications of these findings for the assessment and management of the communication difficulties associated with MTBI are discussed. PMID:22216558

  4. Prevalence and Subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Blake J; Gasson, Natalie; Loftus, Andrea M

    2016-09-21

    The current study examined the prevalence and subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an Australian sample of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Seventy participants with PD completed neuropsychological assessments of their cognitive performance, using MDS Task Force Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. A cut-off score of less than one standard deviation (SD) below normative data determined impaired performance on a neuropsychological test. Of 70 participants, 45 (64%) met Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. Among those with PD-MCI, 42 (93%) were identified as having multiple domain impairment (28 as amnestic multiple domain and 14 as nonamnestic multiple domain). Single domain impairment was less frequent (2 amnestic/1 nonamnestic). Significant differences were found between the PD-MCI and Normal Cognition groups, across all cognitive domains. Multiple domain cognitive impairment was more frequent than single domain impairment in an Australian sample of people with PD. However, PD-MCI is heterogeneous and current prevalence and subtyping statistics may be an artifact of variable application methods of the criteria (e.g., cut off scores and number of tests). Future longitudinal studies refining the criteria will assist with subtyping the progression of PD-MCI, while identifying individuals who may benefit from pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions.

  5. Pain Catastrophizing Correlates with Early Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Geneviève; Lajoie, Susanne P.; Naismith, Laura M.; Lavigne, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Background. Identifying which patients are most likely to be at risk of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a difficult clinical challenge. Objectives. To examine the relationship between pain catastrophizing, defined as the exaggerated negative appraisal of a pain experience, and early MTBI outcome. Methods. This cross-sectional design included 58 patients diagnosed with a MTBI. In addition to medical chart review, postconcussion symptoms were assessed by self-report at 1 month (Time 1) and 8 weeks (Time 2) after MTBI. Pain severity, psychological distress, level of functionality, and pain catastrophizing were measured by self-report at Time 2. Results. The pain catastrophizing subscales of rumination, magnification, and helplessness were significantly correlated with pain severity (r = .31 to .44), number of postconcussion symptoms reported (r = .35 to .45), psychological distress (r = .57 to .67), and level of functionality (r = −.43 to −.29). Pain catastrophizing scores were significantly higher for patients deemed to be at high risk of postconcussion syndrome (6 or more symptoms reported at both Time 1 and Time 2). Conclusions. Higher levels of pain catastrophizing were related to adverse early MTBI outcomes. The early detection of pain catastrophizing may facilitate goal-oriented interventions to prevent or minimize the development of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms. PMID:27445604

  6. Neurobehavioral aspects of postconcussive symptoms after mild head injury.

    PubMed

    Bohnen, N; Jolles, J

    1992-11-01

    The sequelae of severe closed head injury have received much attention in the literature, but the effects of mild closed head injury (MHI) are less well established. There is a subgroup of patients who complain of persisting postconcussive symptoms (PCS) beyond the first weeks of recovery. Although the symptoms generally develop in the absence of clear neurological abnormalities, the condition of PCS can be chronic and disabling. It has been assumed that PCS result from an interaction between organic and psychological factors. Differentiating between the effect of primary neurological injury and secondary psychosocial problems is often difficult for clinicians and engenders controversy. Neuropsychological, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging measures can be helpful in selecting patients at risk of developing PCS. Assessment of the level of cognitive functioning, individual susceptibility to stress, and environmental demands may be beneficial in treating symptomatic patients. It is true that the vague and aspecific nature of the postconcussion syndrome may have given rise to the controversy over this entity, but the many methodological inconsistencies in the experimental approaches to the syndrome have certainly enhanced the confusion about this issue. The ensuing controversy surrounding research on the outcome of MHI and the postconcussion syndrome reflects ambiguities in definition, inconsistencies in criteria for patient selection, variation in procedures for neurobehavioral assessment, and difficulty in obtaining follow-up data. PMID:1431820

  7. Mild Metal-Free Hydrosilylation of Secondary Amides to Amines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Qiang; Lang, Qi-Wei; Wang, Yan-Rong

    2016-05-20

    The combination of amide activation by Tf2O with B(C6F5)3-catalyzed hydrosilylation with TMDS constitutes a method for the one-pot reduction of secondary amides to amines under mild conditions. The method displays a broad applicability for the reduction of many types of substrates, and shows good compatibility and excellent chemoselectivity for many sensitive functional groups. Reductions of a multifunctionalized α,β-unsaturated amide obtained from another synthetic methodology, and a C-H functionalization product produced the corresponding amines in good to excellent yield. Chemoselective reduction of enantiomeric pure (ee >99%) tetrahydro-5-oxo-2-furaneamides yielded 5-(aminomethyl)dihydrofuran-2(3H)-ones in a racemization-free manner. The latter were converted in one pot to N-protected 5-hydroxypiperidin-2-ones, which are building blocks for the synthesis of many natural products. Further elaboration of an intermediate led to a concise four-step synthesis of (-)-epi-pseudoconhydrine. PMID:27100232

  8. Mild cognitive impairment: a cross-national comparison

    PubMed Central

    Arnaiz, E; Almkvist, O; Ivnik, R; Tangalos, E; Wahlund, L; Winblad, B; Petersen, R

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this collaborative study was to assess the comparability of the most commonly used criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) by comparing the cognitive performance of patients with MCI from the Mayo Clinic (USA) and the Karolinska Institutet (Sweden). Methods: Standardised neuropsychological test scores were used to compare the two samples from the two institutions with regard to the number of cognitive domains in which performance was below 1.5 SD. Possible predictors for the conversion from MCI to Alzheimer's disease (AD) were assessed. Results: When the two institutions were considered together in the Cox proportional hazard model, the number of affected cognitive domains below 1.5 SD was a significant predictor of time to AD diagnosis with age, education, and APOE ε4 genotype entered into the same model as covariates. The number of affected cognitive areas remained as a significant predictor when the institutions were considered separately. The logistic regression model of conversion to AD showed that only tests assessing learning and retention were predictors of developing AD. Conclusions: Differences in population as well as in methodology of case ascertainment as well as other aspects may account for the observed variability between samples of patients with MCI. The number of impaired cognitive factors at baseline can predict the progression from MCI to AD. Furthermore, tests assessing learning and retention are the best predictors for progression to AD. PMID:15314114

  9. Ash Reduction of Corn Stover by Mild Hydrothermal Preprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    M. Toufiq Reza; Rachel Emerson; M. Helal Uddin; Garold Gresham; Charles J. Coronella

    2014-04-22

    Lignocellulosic biomass such as corn stover can contain high ash content, which may act as an inhibitor in downstream conversion processes. Most of the structural ash in biomass is located in the cross-linked structure of lignin, which is mildly reactive in basic solutions. Four organic acids (formic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric) were evaluated for effectiveness in ash reduction, with limited success. Because of sodium citrate’s chelating and basic characteristics, it is effective in ash removal. More than 75 % of structural and 85 % of whole ash was removed from the biomass by treatment with 0.1 g of sodium citrate per gram of biomass at 130 °C and 2.7 bar. FTIR, fiber analysis, and chemical analyses show that cellulose and hemicellulose were unaffected by the treatment. ICP–AES showed that all inorganics measured were reduced within the biomass feedstock, except sodium due to the addition of Na through the treatment. Sodium citrate addition to the preconversion process of corn stover is an effective way to reduced physiological ash content of the feedstock without negatively impacting carbohydrate and lignin content.

  10. Does mild cognitive impairment always lead to dementia? A review.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Seema Y; Clem, Matthew A; Silva, Lynette M; Woon, Fu L

    2016-10-15

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has often been studied in its association with dementia, yet higher rates of reversion to normal cognition than progression to dementia suggest that MCI does not necessarily lead to dementia. Compared to the numerous studies on MCI progression, relatively few have examined reversion. This paper highlights the current literature on characteristics and predictive factors of MCI reversion, along with an overview of studies on MCI patients who remain diagnostically stable (i.e., MCI stability). Of the available studies, predictors of reversion have been noted in areas of cognitive/global functioning, demographic/genetic/biomarker data, and personality/lifestyle factors. However, there is a need for increased study of MCI reversion, considering that patients in this group can fluctuate between different trajectories of MCI (e.g., normal cognition back to MCI or even progression to dementia) within a given follow-up time period. Further examination of reversion via a longitudinal, multifactorial approach would better inform clinicians regarding the likelihood of reversion amongst MCI patients and subsequently modify treatment methods accordingly. Furthermore, researchers would have greater power in detecting treatment effects in their clinical intervention studies of early dementia by improving selection criteria to exclude MCI participants who are more likely to revert and remain cognitively normal than progress to a dementia.

  11. Suspected non-AD pathology in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Wisse, Laura E M; Butala, Nirali; Das, Sandhitsu R; Davatzikos, Christos; Dickerson, Bradford C; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev N; Yushkevich, Paul A; Wolk, David A

    2015-12-01

    We aim to better characterize mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with suspected non-Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (SNAP) based on their longitudinal outcome, cognition, biofluid, and neuroimaging profile. MCI participants (n = 361) from ADNI-GO/2 were designated "amyloid positive" with abnormal amyloid-beta 42 levels (AMY+) and "neurodegeneration positive" (NEU+) with abnormal hippocampal volume or hypometabolism using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. SNAP was compared with the other MCI groups and with AMY- controls. AMY-NEU+/SNAP, 16.6%, were older than the NEU- groups but not AMY- controls. They had a lower conversion rate to AD after 24 months than AMY+NEU+ MCI participants. SNAP-MCI participants had similar amyloid-beta 42 levels, florbetapir and tau levels, but larger white matter hyperintensity volumes than AMY- controls and AMY-NEU- MCI participants. SNAP participants performed worse on all memory domains and on other cognitive domains, than AMY-NEU- participants but less so than AMY+NEU+ participants. Subthreshold levels of cerebral amyloidosis are unlikely to play a role in SNAP-MCI, but pathologies involving the hippocampus and cerebrovascular disease may underlie the neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment in this group.

  12. Thalamic Shape and Cognitive Performance in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Changtae; Lee, Chang-Uk; Won, Wang Yeon; Joo, Soo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate thalamic shape alterations and their relationships with various episodic memory impairments in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Methods We compared volumes and morphological alterations of the thalamus between aMCI subjects and healthy controls. In addition, we investigated the correlation between thalamic deformations and various memory impairments in aMCI subjects using a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Results The normalized left thalamic volumes of the aMCI group were significantly smaller than those of the healthy control group (p<0.0001). aMCI subjects exhibited significant thalamic deformations in the left thalamic dorso-medial and antero-medial areas compared with healthy individuals. CERAD-K Word List Memory scores were significantly correlated with the left dorso-medial areas in aMCI subjects. There were no significant correlations between verbal fluency, Boston naming test, constructional praxis, Word List Recognition, and Visuospatial Recall scores and thalamic shape in aMCI subjects. Verbal delayed recall scores were also significantly correlated with the left dorso-medial areas in the aMCI group. Conclusion Structural alterations in the thalamic deformations in the left dorso-medial and antero-medial areas might be core underlying neurobiological mechanisms of thalamic dysfunction related to Word List Memory and delayed verbal recall in individuals with aMCI. PMID:27757128

  13. Approach to Assessment of Risk Factors in Mild Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, K. L.; Desai, Patricia; Lalsingh, Adella

    1974-01-01

    Criteria are urgently needed for the early detection of subjects with only mildly raised blood pressure who may be at high risk of developing the complications of hypertension. As a step towards the establishment of such criteria we have examined the association of certain possible “risk” factors—namely, x-ray evidence of cardiac enlargement, high serum cholesterol levels, effort pain, E.C.G. abnormalities, and high systolic blood pressure—with fatal or morbid endpoints in a five-year follow-up study of subjects whose diastolic pressure had been found initially to be between 95 and 114 mm Hg. The index group consisted of 22 patients in whom these end-points occurred. They comprised death from cardiovascular disease, clinical or E.C.G. deterioration, and either an increase in diastolic pressure of at least 10 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure of 115 mm Hg or both. The control group consisted of 22 subjects chosen at random from other respondents with the same range of diastolic pressures and the same age and sex distribution. “Any two or more” of the possible risk factors examined were found to occur significantly more often in the index group than in the controls, suggesting a possible approach to the early detection of high-risk subjects. The value of longterm studies along these lines and the urgent need for them are emphasized. PMID:4275518

  14. Mild cognitive impairment: Conceptual, assessment, ethical, and social issues

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Perla; Korczyn, Amos D

    2008-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is defined as a condition characterized by newly acquired cognitive decline to an extent that is beyond that expected for age or educational background, yet not causing significant functional impairment. The concept of MCI has received considerable attention in the literature over the past few years, and aspects related to its definition, prevalence, and evolution have been extensively studied and reviewed. Here we attempt to synthesize the implications of the current status of this entity, focusing on the conceptual, methodological, and, in particular, the social and ethical aspects of MCI which have attracted less attention. We discuss the weaknesses of the concept of MCI, which is heterogeneous in etiology, manifestations, and outcomes, and suggest that the emergence of the syndrome at this stage reflects industrial interests related to possible development of drugs for this disorder. On the other hand, the formal diagnosis of MCI, with its implications that the person may develop dementia, may have a grave impact on the psychological state of the individual, at a stage when prediction of outcome is tenuous and possibilities of useful interventions are meager. We present suggestions for the direction of future research in these areas. PMID:18982912

  15. Prefrontal contributions to relational encoding in amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Chris M.; Addis, Donna Rose; Ford, Jaclyn H.; Kaufer, Daniel I.; Burke, James R.; Browndyke, Jeffrey N.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Giovanello, Kelly S.

    2016-01-01

    Relational memory declines are well documented as an early marker for amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Episodic memory formation relies on relational processing supported by two mnemonic mechanisms, generation and binding. Neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have primarily focused on binding deficits which are thought to be mediated by medial temporal lobe dysfunction. In this study, prefrontal contributions to relational encoding were also investigated using fMRI by parametrically manipulating generation demands during the encoding of word triads. Participants diagnosed with aMCI and healthy control subjects encoded word triads consisting of a category word with either, zero, one, or two semantically related exemplars. As the need to generate increased (i.e., two- to one- to zero-link triads), both groups recruited a core set of regions associated with the encoding of word triads including the parahippocampal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, and superior parietal lobule. Participants diagnosed with aMCI also parametrically recruited several frontal regions including the inferior frontal gyrus and middle frontal gyrus as the need to generate increased, whereas the control participants did not show this modulation. While there is some functional overlap in regions recruited by generation demands between the groups, the recruitment of frontal regions in the aMCI participants coincides with worse memory performance, likely representing a form of neural inefficiency associated with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26937384

  16. Connectivity network measures predict volumetric atrophy in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Nir, Talia M; Jahanshad, Neda; Toga, Arthur W; Bernstein, Matt A; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by cortical atrophy and disrupted anatomic connectivity, and leads to abnormal interactions between neural systems. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and graph theory can be used to evaluate major brain networks and detect signs of a breakdown in network connectivity. In a longitudinal study using both DWI and standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we assessed baseline white-matter connectivity patterns in 30 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, mean age 71.8 ± 7.5 years, 18 males and 12 females) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Using both standard MRI-based cortical parcellations and whole-brain tractography, we computed baseline connectivity maps from which we calculated global "small-world" architecture measures, including mean clustering coefficient and characteristic path length. We evaluated whether these baseline network measures predicted future volumetric brain atrophy in MCI subjects, who are at risk for developing AD, as determined by 3-dimensional Jacobian "expansion factor maps" between baseline and 6-month follow-up anatomic scans. This study suggests that DWI-based network measures may be a novel predictor of AD progression.

  17. Hippocampal complex atrophy in poststroke and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Selnes, Per; Grambaite, Ramune; Rincon, Mariano; Bjørnerud, Atle; Gjerstad, Leif; Hessen, Erik; Auning, Eirik; Johansen, Krisztina; Almdahl, Ina S; Due-Tønnessen, Paulina; Vegge, Kjetil; Bjelke, Börje; Fladby, Tormod

    2015-11-01

    To investigate putative interacting or distinct pathways for hippocampal complex substructure (HCS) atrophy and cognitive affection in early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD), we recruited healthy controls, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and poststroke patients. HCSs were segmented, and quantitative white-matter hyperintensity (WMH) load and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-β concentrations were determined. The WMH load was higher poststroke. All examined HCSs were smaller in amyloid-positive MCI than in controls, and the subicular regions were smaller poststroke. Memory was reduced in amyloid-positive MCI, and psychomotor speed and executive function were reduced in poststroke and amyloid-positive MCI. Size of several HCS correlated with WMH load poststroke and with CSF amyloid-β concentrations in MCI. In poststroke and amyloid-positive MCI, neuropsychological function correlated with WMH load and hippocampal volume. There are similar patterns of HCS atrophy in CVD and early-stage AD, but different HCS associations with WMH and CSF biomarkers. WMHs add to hippocampal atrophy and the archetypal AD deficit delayed recall. In line with mounting evidence of a mechanistic link between primary AD pathology and CVD, these additive effects suggest interacting pathologic processes.

  18. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases: Focus on mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2016-01-01

    The mild cognitive impairment (MCI) concept was developed to identify the earliest stages of cognitive impairment. MCI and, more specifically, amnestic MCI were initially proposed as transitional states that ultimately progress to full blown Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, MCI subjects do not uniformly progress to dementia (either AD or another) and may revert back to normal cognitive state. The MCI as concept has been borrowed from AD to other neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease (PD). However the operational definition of MCI may not adequately convey the intended concept. Additional modifications to the concept and its operationalization are needed in order to better identify patients with incipient cognitive impairment and to guide clinical and research practices. Patients with PD have a very high likelihood of developing dementia, insidiously over many years. Cognitive impairment may start even before other symptoms. No constellation of cognitive symptoms in an otherwise healthy individual will herald development of AD or indeed will progress to dementia, including PD-dementia, in high likelihood. At present, identification of subtle cognitive dysfunction even in a person with diagnosed PD does not benefit the patient and should be avoided, except for research purposes. PMID:26516060

  19. Radithor and the era of mild radium therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Macklis, R.M. )

    1990-08-01

    Soon after the discovery of radium, a school of practitioners arose who were interested primarily in the physiological rather than the tumoricidal powers of this new radioactive element. This treatment philosophy was called mild radium therapy and involved the oral or parenteral administration of microgram quantities of radium and its daughter isotopes, often as cures for rheumatic diseases, hypertension, and metabolic disorders. Manufacturers of patent medicines responded to this market by producing a variety of over-the-counter radioactive preparations including pills, elixirs, and salves. One such nostrum was Radithor, a popular and expensive mixture of radium 226 and radium 228 in distilled water. Radithor was advertised as an effective treatment for over 150 endocrinologic diseases, especially lassitude and sexual impotence. Over 400,000 bottles, each containing over 2 muCi (74 kBq) of radium, were apparently marketed and sold worldwide between 1925 and 1930. The death of the Pittsburgh millionaire sportsman Eben M. Byers, who was an avid Radithor user, by radium poisoning in 1932 brought an end to this era and prompted the development of regulatory controls for all radiopharmaceuticals.

  20. Prevalence and Subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Blake J; Gasson, Natalie; Loftus, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the prevalence and subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an Australian sample of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Seventy participants with PD completed neuropsychological assessments of their cognitive performance, using MDS Task Force Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. A cut-off score of less than one standard deviation (SD) below normative data determined impaired performance on a neuropsychological test. Of 70 participants, 45 (64%) met Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. Among those with PD-MCI, 42 (93%) were identified as having multiple domain impairment (28 as amnestic multiple domain and 14 as nonamnestic multiple domain). Single domain impairment was less frequent (2 amnestic/1 nonamnestic). Significant differences were found between the PD-MCI and Normal Cognition groups, across all cognitive domains. Multiple domain cognitive impairment was more frequent than single domain impairment in an Australian sample of people with PD. However, PD-MCI is heterogeneous and current prevalence and subtyping statistics may be an artifact of variable application methods of the criteria (e.g., cut off scores and number of tests). Future longitudinal studies refining the criteria will assist with subtyping the progression of PD-MCI, while identifying individuals who may benefit from pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. PMID:27650569

  1. Advances in imaging explosive blast mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hetherington, H; Bandak, A; Ling, G; Bandak, F A

    2015-01-01

    In the past, direct physical evidence of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from explosive blast has been difficult to obtain through conventional imaging modalities such as T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Here, we review current progress in detecting evidence of brain injury from explosive blast using advanced imaging, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and the metabolic imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), where each targets different aspects of the pathology involved in mTBI. DTI provides a highly sensitive measure to detect primary changes in the microstructure of white matter tracts. fMRI enables the measurement of changes in brain activity in response to different stimuli or tasks. Remarkably, all three of these paradigms have found significant success in conventional mTBI where conventional clinical imaging frequently fails to provide definitive differences. Additionally, although used less frequently for conventional mTBI, PET has the potential to characterize a variety of neurotransmitter systems using target agents and will undoubtedly play a larger role, once the basic mechanisms of injury are better understood and techniques to identify the injury are more common. Finally, our MRSI imaging studies, although acquired at much lower spatial resolution, have demonstrated selectivity to different metabolic and physiologic processes, uncovering some of the most profound differences on an individual by individual basis, suggesting the potential for utility in the management of individual patients.

  2. Abstract Word Definition in Patients with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Ryon; Kim, SangYun; Baek, Min Jae; Kim, HyangHee

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate concrete and abstract word definition ability (1) between patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and normal adults and (2) between the aMCI subtypes (i.e., amnestic single-domain MCI and amnestic multidomain MCI; asMCI and amMCI) and normal controls. The 68 patients with aMCI (29 asMCI and 39 amMCI) and 93 age- and education-matched normal adults performed word definition tasks composed of five concrete (e.g., train) and five abstract nouns (e.g., jealousy). Task performances were analyzed on total score, number of core meanings, and number of supplementary meanings. The results were as follows. First, the aMCI patients scored significantly poorer than the normal controls in only abstract word definition. Second, both subtypes of aMCI performed worse than the controls in only abstract word definition. In conclusion, a definition task of abstract rather than concrete concepts may provide richer information to show semantic impairment of aMCI.

  3. Does mild cognitive impairment always lead to dementia? A review.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Seema Y; Clem, Matthew A; Silva, Lynette M; Woon, Fu L

    2016-10-15

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has often been studied in its association with dementia, yet higher rates of reversion to normal cognition than progression to dementia suggest that MCI does not necessarily lead to dementia. Compared to the numerous studies on MCI progression, relatively few have examined reversion. This paper highlights the current literature on characteristics and predictive factors of MCI reversion, along with an overview of studies on MCI patients who remain diagnostically stable (i.e., MCI stability). Of the available studies, predictors of reversion have been noted in areas of cognitive/global functioning, demographic/genetic/biomarker data, and personality/lifestyle factors. However, there is a need for increased study of MCI reversion, considering that patients in this group can fluctuate between different trajectories of MCI (e.g., normal cognition back to MCI or even progression to dementia) within a given follow-up time period. Further examination of reversion via a longitudinal, multifactorial approach would better inform clinicians regarding the likelihood of reversion amongst MCI patients and subsequently modify treatment methods accordingly. Furthermore, researchers would have greater power in detecting treatment effects in their clinical intervention studies of early dementia by improving selection criteria to exclude MCI participants who are more likely to revert and remain cognitively normal than progress to a dementia. PMID:27653867

  4. Anosognosia and Anosodiaphoria in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lindau, Maria; Bjork, Randall

    2014-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the occurrence of anosognosia (lack of awareness) and anosodiaphoria (insouciance) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to evaluate the influence of a worsening of dementia on these phenomena. Methods A self-evaluation scale was used assessing degrees of anosognosia and anosodiaphoria; furthermore, a neuropsychological assessment and statistical analyses with nonparametric tests which could cope with data on an ordinal scale level and small samples were employed. Results Cognitive ability was lower in AD (n = 9) than in MCI patients (n = 12), but AD patients self-rated lower cognitive disabilities, which is interpreted as one relative sign of anosognosia in AD. Awareness of the reasons for cognitive problems was also lower in AD, which is considered as another sign of anosognosia. The main pattern in MCI found that the higher the awareness, the lower the cognitive ability. In AD low awareness paralleled low cognitive functioning. Anosodiaphoria was present in AD but not in MCI. Conclusion According to the literature anosognosia and anosodiaphoria seem to increase with progression of dementia from MCI as a result of right hemispheric alterations. PMID:25759713

  5. Serum Bilirubin and Disease Progression in Mild COPD

    PubMed Central

    Apperley, Scott; Park, Hye Yun; Holmes, Daniel T.; Wise, Robert A.; Connett, John E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD is a chronic inflammatory disorder associated with oxidative stress. Serum bilirubin has potent antioxidant actions, and higher concentrations have been shown to protect against oxidative stress. The relation between serum bilirubin and COPD progression is unknown. METHODS: Serum bilirubin was measured in 4,680 smokers aged 35 to 60 years old with mild to moderate airflow limitation. The relationship of serum bilirubin to postbronchodilator FEV1 and rate of FEV1 decline over 3 to 9 years was determined using regression modeling. Total and disease-specific mortality were also ascertained. RESULTS: Serum bilirubin was positively related to FEV1 (P < .001). Serum bilirubin was also negatively related to the annual decline in FEV1 when adjusted for baseline demographics, pack-years smoked, and baseline measures of lung function (P = .01). Additionally, serum bilirubin was negatively associated with risk of death from coronary heart disease (P = .03); however, the relationships between bilirubin and other mortality end points were not statistically significant (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: Bilirubin is inversely related to COPD disease severity and progression. Higher serum bilirubin concentration was associated with a higher FEV1 and less annual decline in FEV1. Bilirubin was also associated with less coronary heart disease mortality. These data support the hypothesis that bilirubin has a protective effect on COPD disease progression, possibly through its antioxidant actions. Bilirubin may prove useful as an easily accessible and readily available blood-based COPD biomarker. PMID:25539285

  6. Acetazolamide Mitigates Astrocyte Cellular Edema Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Sturdivant, Nasya M; Smith, Sean G; Ali, Syed F; Wolchok, Jeffrey C; Balachandran, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema. We hypothesized that mTBI-mediated astrocyte dysfunction, initiated by increased intracellular volume, could be reduced when treated with AZA. We tested our hypothesis in a three-dimensional in vitro astrocyte model of mTBI. Samples were subject to no stretch (control) or one high-speed stretch (mTBI) injury. AQP4 expression was significantly increased 24 hours after mTBI. mTBI resulted in a significant increase in the cell swelling within 30 min of mTBI, which was significantly reduced in the presence of AZA. Cell death and expression of S100B was significantly reduced when AZA was added shortly before mTBI stretch. Overall, our data point to occurrence of astrocyte swelling immediately following mTBI, and AZA as a promising treatment to mitigate downstream cellular mortality. PMID:27623738

  7. Enhancing low severity coal liquefaction reactivity using mild chemical pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shams, K.G.; Miller, R.L.; Baldwin, R.M.

    1992-07-13

    In this paper, we describe results from a study in which mild chemical pretreatment of coal has been used to enhance low severity liquefaction reactivity. We have found that ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid improves THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt% (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt% for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt% for liquefaction of the eight coals at 623 K (350{degree}C) reaction temperature and 30 min. reaction time. Similar enhancement results occurred using, hexane or acetone in place of methanol. Pretreatment with methanol and HCI separately indicated that both reagents were necessary to achieve maximum liquefaction improvement. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol%. No appreciable effect on reactivity was observed at higher acid concentrations. Although vapor phase alcohol/HCI mixtures have been shown to partially alkylate bituminous coals, analysis of Wyodak and Illinois {number sign}6 coal samples indicated that no organic phase alteration occurred during pretreatment; however, over 90 wt% of the calcium was removed from each coal. Calcium is thought to catalyze retrogressive reactions during coal pyrolysis, and thus calcium removal prior to low severity liquefaction minimizes the rate of THF-insoluble product formation.

  8. Suspected non-AD pathology in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Wisse, Laura E M; Butala, Nirali; Das, Sandhitsu R; Davatzikos, Christos; Dickerson, Bradford C; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev N; Yushkevich, Paul A; Wolk, David A

    2015-12-01

    We aim to better characterize mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with suspected non-Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (SNAP) based on their longitudinal outcome, cognition, biofluid, and neuroimaging profile. MCI participants (n = 361) from ADNI-GO/2 were designated "amyloid positive" with abnormal amyloid-beta 42 levels (AMY+) and "neurodegeneration positive" (NEU+) with abnormal hippocampal volume or hypometabolism using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. SNAP was compared with the other MCI groups and with AMY- controls. AMY-NEU+/SNAP, 16.6%, were older than the NEU- groups but not AMY- controls. They had a lower conversion rate to AD after 24 months than AMY+NEU+ MCI participants. SNAP-MCI participants had similar amyloid-beta 42 levels, florbetapir and tau levels, but larger white matter hyperintensity volumes than AMY- controls and AMY-NEU- MCI participants. SNAP participants performed worse on all memory domains and on other cognitive domains, than AMY-NEU- participants but less so than AMY+NEU+ participants. Subthreshold levels of cerebral amyloidosis are unlikely to play a role in SNAP-MCI, but pathologies involving the hippocampus and cerebrovascular disease may underlie the neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment in this group. PMID:26422359

  9. Caregivers in China: Knowledge of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Baozhen; Mao, Zongfu; Mei, John; Levkoff, Sue; Wang, Huali; Pacheco, Misty; Wu, Bei

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the experience and knowledge of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among Chinese family caregivers of individuals with MCI. The sample was recruited from memory clinics in Zhongnan Hospital in Wuhan, China. In-depth semi-structured interviews were used. Thirteen family members of individuals diagnosed with MCI participated in the study. Data analysis revealed three themes: 1) initial recognition of cognitive decline; 2) experience of the diagnosis of MCI; 3) perception of cognitive decline as a normal part of aging. While family members recognized the serious consequences of memory loss (e.g. getting lost), they would typically not take their family members to see a doctor until something specific triggered their access to the medical care system. The Chinese traditional perception of dementia as part of normal aging may serve to lessen the stigma of individuals with MCI, while the term “laonian chidai” which literally translates to “stupid, demented elderly” may exacerbate the stigma associated with individuals with MCI. It is suggested that family members’ worries may be relieved by improving their access to accurate knowledge of the disease, community-based and institutional care services, and culturally appropriately words are needed for MCI. PMID:23326541

  10. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases: Focus on mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2016-01-01

    The mild cognitive impairment (MCI) concept was developed to identify the earliest stages of cognitive impairment. MCI and, more specifically, amnestic MCI were initially proposed as transitional states that ultimately progress to full blown Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, MCI subjects do not uniformly progress to dementia (either AD or another) and may revert back to normal cognitive state. The MCI as concept has been borrowed from AD to other neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease (PD). However the operational definition of MCI may not adequately convey the intended concept. Additional modifications to the concept and its operationalization are needed in order to better identify patients with incipient cognitive impairment and to guide clinical and research practices. Patients with PD have a very high likelihood of developing dementia, insidiously over many years. Cognitive impairment may start even before other symptoms. No constellation of cognitive symptoms in an otherwise healthy individual will herald development of AD or indeed will progress to dementia, including PD-dementia, in high likelihood. At present, identification of subtle cognitive dysfunction even in a person with diagnosed PD does not benefit the patient and should be avoided, except for research purposes.

  11. Paediatric sports-related mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Keightley, Michelle; Duggan, Catrin Theresa; Reed, Nick; McAuliffe, Jim; Taha, Tim; Faught, Brent; McPherson, Moira; Baker, Joseph; Montelpare, William

    2009-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common but relatively understudied childhood injury that can impact cognitive functioning and development. The present report describes a case study of a 14-year-old boy who sustained two consecutive sports-related mTBIs within a 24 h period. Neurocognitive functioning at 2, 6, 8, 55 and 225 days after injury is compared to baseline prior to injury assessment on the same measures. Results from Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT), Conner Continuous Performance Test 2 (CPT-II) and the Attention Network Test (ANT) revealed decreased performance in attention, visual memory functioning and impulsivity, with some measures still not returning to baseline at 225 days post injury. The results are discussed with respect to return to normal activities at 4 days post injury. This case study highlights the need for increased research regarding the clinical management of mTBI in the paediatric population, particularly the potential deleterious effects of cumulative injuries. PMID:21686913

  12. Atrial natriuretic factor during hypoxia and mild exercise.

    PubMed

    Story, D A; Miller, B R; Shield, C M; Bowes, G

    1991-04-01

    The effect of hypoxia on plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), plasma renin activity (PRA), and plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) was evaluated during 2 h of treadmill exercise at 2 km/h, 0 grade at sea level. Six male subjects exercised on 2 separate days during normoxia (21% O2) and hypoxia (13.3 +/- 0.3% O2). No significant changes in ANF or PRA occurred during either normoxic or hypoxic exercise. However, PAC fell significantly during normoxic exercise (17.5 +/- 3.6 vs. 12.7 +/- 2.6 ng/dl, p less than 0.05) but not during hypoxic exercise. Serum potassium concentration fell during hypoxic exercise (5.0 +/- 0.1 vs. 4.4 +/- 0.1 mmol/l, p less than 0.05) along with bicarbonate (27.8 +/- 0.7 vs. 25.8 +/- 0.6 mmol/l, p less than 0.01). Between normoxic and hypoxic studies there was a significantly higher heart rate during hypoxic exercise (78 +/- 5 vs. 90 +/- 6 b/min, p less than 0.01). The major conclusion of this study is that hypoxia resulting in arterial oxygen saturations of 81 +/- 0.7% does not affect plasma atrial natriuretic factor levels during mild exercise in normal male subjects.

  13. Mild cognitive impairment and its management in older people

    PubMed Central

    Eshkoor, Sima Ataollahi; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Mun, Chan Yoke; Ng, Chee Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a common condition in the elderly. It is characterized by deterioration of memory, attention, and cognitive function that is beyond what is expected based on age and educational level. MCI does not interfere significantly with individuals’ daily activities. It can act as a transitional level of evolving dementia with a range of conversion of 10%–15% per year. Thus, it is crucial to protect older people against MCI and developing dementia. The preventive interventions and appropriate treatments should improve cognitive performance, and retard or prevent progressive deficits. The avoidance of toxins, reduction of stress, prevention of somatic diseases, implementation of mental and physical exercises, as well as the use of dietary compounds like antioxidants and supplements can be protective against MCI. The modification of risk factors such as stopping smoking, as well as the treatment of deficiency in vitamins and hormones by correcting behaviors and lifestyle, can prevent cognitive decline in the elderly. The progressive increase in the growth rate of the elderly population can enhance the rate of MCI all over the world. There is no exact cure for MCI and dementia; therefore, further studies are needed in the future to determine causes of MCI and risk factors of progression from MCI to dementia. This will help to find better ways for prevention and treatment of cognitive impairment worldwide. PMID:25914527

  14. Marine corrosion of mild steel at Lumut, Perak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Ong Shiou; Potty, Narayanan Sambu; Liew, Mohd. Shahir

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion rate of structural steels in the adverse marine and offshore environments affects the economic interest of offshore structures since the loss of steel may have significant impact on structural safety and performance. With more emphasis to maintain existing structures in service for longer time and hence to defer replacement costs, there is increasing interest in predicting corrosion rate at a given location for a given period of exposure once the protection coating or cathodic protection is lost. The immersion depth, salinity, steel composition and water pollution will be taken into account. Various corrosion allowances are prescribed for structural members by different standards. There are no studies to determine the appropriate corrosion allowance for steel structures in marine environment in Malaysia. The objectives of the research are to determine the nature and rate of corrosion in mm/year for steel structures in marine environment. It also tries to identify whether the corrosion rate is affected by differences in the chemical composition of the steels, and microalgae. Two sets of corrosion coupons of Type 3 Steel consisting of mild steel were fabricated and immersed in seawater using steel frames. The corrosion rate of the coupon in mm/ per year is estimated based on the material weight loss with time in service. The results are compared with recommendations of the code.

  15. [Dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: a review].

    PubMed

    Bocanegra, Yamile; Trujillo-Orrego, Natalia; Pineda, David

    2014-12-16

    INTRODUCTION. The cognitive disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD) have traditionally been associated with the presence of dementia in later stages of the disease. Recent studies, however, consider that cognitive impairment can appear as of early stages. Knowing the cognitive profile of PD furthers our understanding of the clinical phenotype, making it easier to reach a timely diagnosis and favouring intervention on the symptoms from the initial stages. AIM. To present a review of the literature on mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia associated with PD. DEVELOPMENT. Several studies report that patients with PD who have a prolonged time to progression develop dementia. Yet, there have also been reports claiming that, as of the early stages, patients can present subtle cognitive alterations known as MCI. The initial neuropsychological profile is mainly of a non-amnesic type, characterised by executive dysfunction, alterations affecting attention, operative memory deficit and faulty retrieval of information. When patients develop dementia, disorders will arise in the storage of information, in semantic fluency, and in visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. Currently there are criteria available for diagnosing the MCI and dementia associated with PD, as well as valid reliable instruments for detecting those disorders. CONCLUSIONS. Cognitive symptoms are frequent in PD. From the initial stages of the disease onwards patients may present MCI that is mainly characterised by a fronto-subcortical cognitive profile, whereas dementia usually develops at later stages, when a pattern of posterior cortical cognitive disorder is also observed.

  16. Dietary lipid modification for mild and severe dyslipidaemias.

    PubMed

    Marais, A David

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this review is to place a historical perspective on linking dyslipidaemia with atherosclerosis and emphasises previous knowledge about the impact on the lipoprotein profile and health in persons with mild dyslipidaemia and in those with defined genetic disorders. CVD is becoming the leading cause of death and disability in developed and developing countries and is strongly related to lifestyle factors that influence plasma lipoprotein concentrations. It is established that risk of complications from atherosclerosis increases with increasing LDL and decreasing HDL and that there is potentiation of risk when these and other risk factors co-exist. High-fat diets used for losing body mass may increase risk through dyslipidaemia. Pharmaceutical modulation of the lipoproteins has lowered risk powerfully but residual risk persists, possibly relating to existing disease as well as progression relating in many instances to dietary lipids. The impact of various dietary lipids is reviewed as they relate to the conventional lipoprotein profile in persons who do not have significant metabolic defects, as well as the impact on inherited metabolic disease such as familial hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia and phytosterolaemia. For most persons with dyslipidaemias a significant benefit will be seen on the lipid profile by adopting a low saturated fat diet with less cholesterol intake. PMID:23680392

  17. Cholinesterase inhibitors affect brain potentials in amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Irimajiri, Rie; Michalewski, Henry J; Golob, Edward J; Starr, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an isolated episodic memory disorder that has a high likelihood of progressing to Alzheimer’s disease. Auditory sensory cortical responses (P50, N100) have been shown to be increased in amplitude in MCI compared to older controls. We tested whether (1) cortical potentials to other sensory modalities (somatosensory and visual) were also affected in MCI and (2) cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), one of the therapies used in this disorder, modulated sensory cortical potentials in MCI. Somatosensory cortical potentials to median nerve stimulation and visual cortical potentials to reversing checkerboard stimulation were recorded from 15 older controls and 15 amnestic MCI subjects (single domain). Results were analyzed as a function of diagnosis (Control, MCI) and ChEIs treatment (Treated MCI, Untreated MCI). Somatosensory and visual potentials did not differ significantly in amplitude in MCI subjects compared to controls. When ChEIs use was considered, somatosensory potentials (N20, P50) but not visual potentials (N70, P100, N150) were of larger amplitude in untreated MCI subjects compared to treated MCI subjects. Three individual MCI subjects showed increased N20 amplitude while off ChEIs compared to while on ChEIs. An enhancement of N20 somatosensory cortical activity occurs in amnestic single domain MCI and is sensitive to modulation by ChEIs. PMID:17320833

  18. Exceptionally cold and mild winters in Europe (1951-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twardosz, Robert; Kossowska-Cezak, Urszula

    2016-07-01

    Extreme thermal conditions appear to occupy an important place among research subjects at a time of climate warming. This study investigates the frequency, duration and spatial extent of thermally anomalous winters in Europe during the 60 years between 1951 and 2010. Exceptionally cold winters (ECWs) and exceptionally mild winters (EMWs) were identified using the statistical criterion of plus/minus two standard deviations from the long-term winter temperature (January-December) recorded at 60 weather stations. It was demonstrated that ECWs have occurred more frequently and covered larger territories than EMWs and that they may occur anywhere in Europe, while EMWs were limited to its southern and western parts. ECWs are characterised by greater absolute temperature anomalies, as anomalies greater than |6.0 °C| account for 35 % of ECWs, but only for 8 % of EMWs. The greatest anomalies are found in the east of the continent. The largest territory affected by an ECW included 24 stations in 1962/1963, while the equivalent among the EMWs included 11 stations in 2006/2007. The study also confirmed an expected trend whereby ECWs diminished in frequency in favour of EMWs in the second half of the 60-year study period.

  19. Abstract Word Definition in Patients with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Ryon; Kim, SangYun; Baek, Min Jae; Kim, HyangHee

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate concrete and abstract word definition ability (1) between patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and normal adults and (2) between the aMCI subtypes (i.e., amnestic single-domain MCI and amnestic multidomain MCI; asMCI and amMCI) and normal controls. The 68 patients with aMCI (29 asMCI and 39 amMCI) and 93 age- and education-matched normal adults performed word definition tasks composed of five concrete (e.g., train) and five abstract nouns (e.g., jealousy). Task performances were analyzed on total score, number of core meanings, and number of supplementary meanings. The results were as follows. First, the aMCI patients scored significantly poorer than the normal controls in only abstract word definition. Second, both subtypes of aMCI performed worse than the controls in only abstract word definition. In conclusion, a definition task of abstract rather than concrete concepts may provide richer information to show semantic impairment of aMCI. PMID:26347214

  20. Neurobehavioral outcome of children's mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Parker, R S

    1994-03-01

    Brain damage is underestimated as a public health and personal problem. The common belief in a good prognosis for childhood brain damage is unsubstantiated. It is based on lack of rigorous study and examiner satisfaction with a low response level. Occult brain trauma plagues victims into maturity. Above a rather low threshold of injury (even without focal neurologic findings), cognitive, personality, and adaptive dysfunctions are common and impairing. Child abuse signals were described. Brain lesions impair both matured functions and those expressed later. Dysfunctions were discussed for these neurobehavioral systems: consciousness, attention and tonic motor level; sensorimotor and body schema; neurophysiologic; cerebral personality; intelligence; memory; language; information processing; posttraumatic stress and mood; identity and insight; adaptivity in the community. Outcome evolves from complex pathologic, neurologic, anatomic, and personality parameters, the postinjury interval and child's age, the maturity and developmental trajectory of the function, social support, and emotional reaction to impairment. Assessment should study the entire range of functions, utilizing records, collaterals, observation, and qualitative and psychometric measurement. Complex, challenging, and ecologically relevant tasks are appropriate. There are several patterns of outcome: immediate permanent deficits; improvement through compensatory mechanisms, but with subclinical deficits; and initial progress with delayed expression (premature plateau of cognitive and personality maturity; physiologic developmental deficits). Confirmation of mild TBI may require several years of observation to determine late dysfunctions and deviation from preinjury or postinjury performance or expected level of development. PMID:8029562

  1. Pain Catastrophizing Correlates with Early Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Outcome.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Geneviève; Lajoie, Susanne P; Naismith, Laura M; Lavigne, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Background. Identifying which patients are most likely to be at risk of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a difficult clinical challenge. Objectives. To examine the relationship between pain catastrophizing, defined as the exaggerated negative appraisal of a pain experience, and early MTBI outcome. Methods. This cross-sectional design included 58 patients diagnosed with a MTBI. In addition to medical chart review, postconcussion symptoms were assessed by self-report at 1 month (Time 1) and 8 weeks (Time 2) after MTBI. Pain severity, psychological distress, level of functionality, and pain catastrophizing were measured by self-report at Time 2. Results. The pain catastrophizing subscales of rumination, magnification, and helplessness were significantly correlated with pain severity (r = .31 to .44), number of postconcussion symptoms reported (r = .35 to .45), psychological distress (r = .57 to .67), and level of functionality (r = -.43 to -.29). Pain catastrophizing scores were significantly higher for patients deemed to be at high risk of postconcussion syndrome (6 or more symptoms reported at both Time 1 and Time 2). Conclusions. Higher levels of pain catastrophizing were related to adverse early MTBI outcomes. The early detection of pain catastrophizing may facilitate goal-oriented interventions to prevent or minimize the development of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms. PMID:27445604

  2. Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: subtypes and motor characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sollinger, Ann B; Goldstein, Felicia C; Lah, James J; Levey, Allan I; Factor, Stewart A

    2010-03-01

    The aims of this project were to determine the risk factors for and clinical characteristics of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in Parkinson's disease (PD). We performed a retrospective record review of 72 non-demented PD patients (age: 57.79 +/- 10.57, duration of PD: 7.32 +/- 4.97) who completed a standardized neurological assessment, including a full neuropsychological battery, as part of their diagnostic work-up. Of these participants, 47.2% were cognitively normal and 52.8% met criteria for MCI. The majority of MCI patients had single domain MCI (23/38), the affected domains being memory (n = 9), executive function (n = 6), visuospatial skills (n = 6), and language (n = 2). The MCI group had longer duration of disease and higher postural instability and gait disorder subscale scores than the cognitively normal group. This report provides further support for use of the concept of MCI in PD research. There may be certain disease characteristics that could alert practitioners to the emergence of cognitive changes in patients. Future studies should focus on additional risk factors for MCI subtypes and their possible progression to frank dementia.

  3. Cognitive complaint in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Clément, Francis; Belleville, Sylvie; Gauthier, Serge

    2008-03-01

    Whereas the presence of a subjective memory complaint is a central criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), little work has been done to empirically measure its nature and severity. The Self-Evaluation Questionnaire (QAM) assessed memory complaints relative to 10 domains of concrete activities of daily life in 68 persons with MCI, 26 persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 81 healthy older adults. In addition, a neuropsychological battery was administered to assess whether subjective complaints were linked to actual cognitive performance. The findings indicate that individuals with MCI report more memory complaints than controls for a range of specific materials/circumstances. MCI and AD individuals did not differ in their level of memory complaints. Correlational analyses indicated that a higher level of memory complaints relative to conversations and to movies and books were associated with a higher level of objective cognitive deficits in persons with MCI but not in AD. Furthermore, complaints increased in parallel with global cognitive deficits in MCI. These results suggest that persons with MCI report more memory complaints than healthy older controls, but only in specific domains and circumstances, and that anosognosia is more characteristic of the demented than of the MCI phase of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Microstructure characteristics of laser MIG hybrid welded mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Jun; Hu, Qianwu

    2008-07-01

    To deepen the understanding of laser-arc hybrid welding, the weld shape and microstructure characteristics of laser-metal inert gas hybrid welded mild steel were analyzed. The results showed typical hybrid weld could be classified as two parts: the wide upper zone and the narrow nether zone, which were defined as arc zone and laser zone, respectively. In the hybrid weld, the microstructure, alloy element distribution and microhardness all have evident difference between laser zone and arc zone. The microstructure of arc zone consists of coarse columnar dendrite and fine acicular dendrite between the columnar dendrites, but that of laser zone is composed of fine equiaxed dendrite in weld center and columnar dendrite around the equiaxed dendrite. Compared to arc zone, laser zone has finer grain size, higher microhardness, smaller alloy element content in the fusion zone and narrower heat affected zone. The discussions demonstrated that the observed difference was caused by the difference of temperature gradient, crystallizing and the effects of arc pressure on the molten pool between laser zone and arc zone.

  5. Office management of mild head injury in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rodriguez, Juan Antonio; Thomas, Roger E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide family physicians with updated, practical, evidence-based information about mild head injury (MHI) and concussion in the pediatric population. Sources of information MEDLINE (1950 to February 2013), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2005 to 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2005 to 2013), and DARE (2005 to 2013) were searched using terms relevant to concussion and head trauma. Guidelines, position statements, articles, and original research relevant to MHI were selected. Main message Trauma is the main cause of death in children older than 1 year of age, and within this group head trauma is the leading cause of disability and death. Nine percent of reported athletic injuries in high school students involve MHI. Family physicians need to take a focused history, perform physical and neurologic examinations, use standardized evaluation instruments (Glasgow Coma Scale; the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool, version 3; the child version of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool; and the Balance Error Scoring System), instruct parents how to monitor their children, decide when caregivers are not an appropriately responsible resource, follow up with patients promptly, guide a safe return to play and to learning, and decide when neuropsychological testing for longer-term follow-up is required. Conclusion A thorough history, physical and neurologic assessment, the use of validated tools to provide an objective framework, and periodic follow-up are the basis of family physician management of pediatric MHI. PMID:24925941

  6. Clustering mild cognitive impairment by mini-mental state examination.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Young; Lim, Tae Sung; Lee, Hyun Young; Moon, So Young

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate whether the performance of the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) could identify risky mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We recruited 122 amnestic MCI-single domain (ASM), 303 amnestic MCI-multiple domains (AMM), and 94 non-amnestic MCI (NAM). Two-step cluster and linear discriminant analyses were used for identifying the clusters of the MMSE with age and education, as well as establishing prediction models for each cluster. Conversion into dementia was compared among clusters. Cluster analyses revealed the following three: cluster 1 = 205 AMM (100 %); cluster 2 = 61 NAM (33.3 %) and 122 ASM (66.7 %); and cluster 3 = 33 NAM (25.2 %) and 98 AMM (74.8 %). Cluster 3 showed a significantly lower ability with regards to orientation to time and place, registration of three words, attention/calculation, language, and copying interlocking pentagons, than clusters 1 and 2. However, for delayed recall, cluster 1 was significantly more impaired than cluster 2. Patients in the cluster 1 showed the most common conversion into dementia [odds ratio (OR) = 2.940 vs. cluster 2, OR = 2.271 vs. cluster 3]. This study showed that clustering by performance in MMSE could help define groups at higher risk for conversion to dementia. Therefore, MMSE can be considered as a promising screening tool including subtyping for MCI when detailed neuropsychological tests are not feasible. PMID:24643579

  7. Glucuronyl transferase deficiency and mild hereditary spherocytosis: effect of splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Eber, S W; Ullrich, D; Speer, C P; Armbrust, R; Schröter, W

    1988-08-01

    In a 6-year-old girl an association of hereditary spherocytosis and a defect in hepatic bilirubin metabolism has been found. The patient suffered from mild compensated haemolytic anaemia and excessive hyperbilirubinaemia (maximum concentration 581 mumol/l), the serum activity of liver enzymes was slightly increased. Examination of the erythrocyte membrane proteins revealed a deficiency of the major membrane skeletal protein, spectrin (about 75% of normal) which is probably the basic genetic defect of hereditary spherocytosis. Examination of the patient's family revealed a recessive mode of inheritance. The concentration of bilirubin conjugates in the patient's serum was decreased due to a reduced UDP-glucuronyl transferase activity found in homogenates of liver tissue. Histological liver examination showed an intrahepatic cholestasis, which is a secondary and reversible alteration resulting from severe hyperbilirubinaemia. After splenectomy, normalization of the increased haemolysis and hepatic dysfunction was observed. The excessive hyperbilirubinaemia can be explained by the association of an increased bilirubin load due to haemolytic anaemia and the diminished hepatic conjugation of bilirubin.

  8. Effect of mild conjunctivitis complication on tear balance in dry eye.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hiroko; Imanaga, Yoshichika

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation of the ocular surface influences the stability of tear fluid. Mild conjunctivitis is often associated with dry-eye patients. The effect of mild conjunctivitis complication on tear break-up time (BUT) in patients with dry eyes was investigated. A total of 93 patients with dry eyes, excluding those having moderate to severe conjunctivitis, atopic keratoconjunctivitis, vernal conjunctivitis, previous ocular surgery, or who use contact lenses, were divided into those with and without mild conjunctivitis, and the BUT was compared. Fifty-four cases were complicated by mild conjunctivitis, conjunctival papilla formation was observed in 40 of these, and the mean BUT was 3.54±1.02 s. The mean BUT in 39 patients without conjunctivitis was 3.41±1.04 s, showing no significant difference between the groups (p=0.56). Allergic conjunctivitis was frequently observed in patients with dry eyes, but the complication of mild conjunctivitis had no influence on BUT.

  9. Hippocampal and cortical atrophy in amyloid-negative mild cognitive impairments: comparison with amyloid-positive mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Ye, Byoung Seok; Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Chi Hun; Jeon, Seun; Kim, Geon Ha; Noh, Young; Cho, Hanna; Yoon, Cindy W; Kim, Hee Jin; Jang, Eun Young; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Chin, Juhee; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Seong, Joon-kyung; Kim, Chang-Hun; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Na, Duk L

    2014-02-01

    Although patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) are at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), their pathologies could be heterogeneous. We aimed to evaluate structural changes in amyloid-negative and amyloid-positive aMCI patients. Forty-eight aMCI patients who underwent Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography were recruited. They were classified as PiB (-) aMCI (N = 16) and PiB (+) (N = 32). Hippocampal shape and regional cortical thickness were compared with 41 subjects with normal cognition (NC). Relative to NC, PiB(-) aMCI exhibited hippocampal deformity in the right cornu ammonis 1, whereas PiB(+) aMCI exhibited hippocampal deformity in bilateral subiculum and cornu ammonis 1 subregions. Relative to NC, PiB(-) aMCI showed cortical thinning in the left medial prefrontal and right anterior temporal regions, whereas PiB(+) aMCI exhibited cortical thinning in bilateral medial temporal regions, temporoparietal junctions and precuneus, and prefrontal cortices. Our findings suggest that structural changes in PiB(-) aMCI might be due to several possible pathologic changes, whereas structural changes in PiB(+) aMCI reflect AD-like structural changes.

  10. Which part of the Quick mild cognitive impairment screen (Qmci) discriminates between normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment and dementia?

    PubMed Central

    O'Caoimh, Rónán; Gao, Yang; Gallagher, Paul Francis; Eustace, Joesph; McGlade, Ciara; Molloy, D. William

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: the Qmci is a sensitive and specific test to differentiate between normal cognition (NC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of the subtests of the Qmci to determine which best discriminated NC, MCI and dementia. Objective: the objective was to determine the contribution each subtest of the Qmci makes, to its sensitivity and specificity in differentiating MCI from NC and dementia, to refine and shorten the instrument. Methods: existing data from our previous study of 965 subjects, testing the Qmci, was analysed to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the Qmci subtests. Results: all the subtests of the Qmci differentiated MCI from NC. Logical memory (LM) performed the best (area under the receiver operating curve of 0.80), registration the worst, (0.56). LM and verbal fluency had the largest median differences (expressed as percentage of total score) between MCI and NC, 20 and 25%, respectively. Other subtests did not have clinically useful differences. LM was best at differentiating MCI from NC, irrespective of age or educational status. Conclusion: the Qmci incorporates several important cognitive domains making it useful across the spectrum of cognitive impairment. LM is the best performing subtest for differentiating MCI from NC. PMID:23612864

  11. Supplemental fat for dairy calves during mild cold stress.

    PubMed

    Litherland, N B; Da Silva, D N L; LaBerge, R J; Schefers, J; Kertz, A

    2014-05-01

    Eighty-one Holstein and Holstein-cross dairy calves fed calf milk replacer (CMR) were used to determine response to increasing amounts of supplemental fat during mild cold stress. Calves (n=27) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: (1) low fat [LF; 28% crude protein:15% fat milk replacer (28:15 MR)]; (2) medium fat [MF; 28:15 MR+113 g/d of commercial fat supplement (FS)]; (3) high fat (HF; 28:15 MR+227 g/d of FS). The MF and HF calves received FS from d 2 to 21, and all calves were fed LF from d 22 to 49. The CMR was fed at 1.4% of birth body weight (BBW) from d 1 to 10, at 1.8% of BBW from d 11 to 42, and at 0.9% of BBW from d 43 to 49. Calves were weaned on d 49 and remained in hutches until d 56. The CMR was reconstituted to 13% solids. Calves were fed a commercial starter grain (19.2% crude protein on a dry matter basis) ad libitum and offered warm water after CMR feeding. Calves were fed CMR twice daily at 0630 and 1730 h in hutches bedded with straw. Starter intake, CMR intake, and ambient temperature were measured daily, and body weight (BW), hip height, and body length were measured weekly. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED in SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) as a randomized design with linear and quadratic contrasts. Calf BBW averaged 42.0 ± 1.0 kg, total serum protein averaged 5.8 ± 0.1mg/dL, and birth ambient temperature averaged 5.0 ± 1.1°C. Feeding FS increased metabolizable energy intake (MEI) over maintenance but decreased efficiency of conversion of BW gain:MEI. Starter intake by LF calves was greatest until the beginning of weaning, after which starter intake was similar among treatments. Because of higher starter intake, total MEI was similar among treatments. Feed efficiency through d 49 was greater for calves fed MF and HF. Average daily gain during fat supplementation was greater for MF and HF than for LF. Lack of increase in BW gain and feed efficiency between MF and HF treatments indicated that HF did not result in advantages

  12. Supplemental fat for dairy calves during mild cold stress.

    PubMed

    Litherland, N B; Da Silva, D N L; LaBerge, R J; Schefers, J; Kertz, A

    2014-05-01

    Eighty-one Holstein and Holstein-cross dairy calves fed calf milk replacer (CMR) were used to determine response to increasing amounts of supplemental fat during mild cold stress. Calves (n=27) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: (1) low fat [LF; 28% crude protein:15% fat milk replacer (28:15 MR)]; (2) medium fat [MF; 28:15 MR+113 g/d of commercial fat supplement (FS)]; (3) high fat (HF; 28:15 MR+227 g/d of FS). The MF and HF calves received FS from d 2 to 21, and all calves were fed LF from d 22 to 49. The CMR was fed at 1.4% of birth body weight (BBW) from d 1 to 10, at 1.8% of BBW from d 11 to 42, and at 0.9% of BBW from d 43 to 49. Calves were weaned on d 49 and remained in hutches until d 56. The CMR was reconstituted to 13% solids. Calves were fed a commercial starter grain (19.2% crude protein on a dry matter basis) ad libitum and offered warm water after CMR feeding. Calves were fed CMR twice daily at 0630 and 1730 h in hutches bedded with straw. Starter intake, CMR intake, and ambient temperature were measured daily, and body weight (BW), hip height, and body length were measured weekly. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED in SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) as a randomized design with linear and quadratic contrasts. Calf BBW averaged 42.0 ± 1.0 kg, total serum protein averaged 5.8 ± 0.1mg/dL, and birth ambient temperature averaged 5.0 ± 1.1°C. Feeding FS increased metabolizable energy intake (MEI) over maintenance but decreased efficiency of conversion of BW gain:MEI. Starter intake by LF calves was greatest until the beginning of weaning, after which starter intake was similar among treatments. Because of higher starter intake, total MEI was similar among treatments. Feed efficiency through d 49 was greater for calves fed MF and HF. Average daily gain during fat supplementation was greater for MF and HF than for LF. Lack of increase in BW gain and feed efficiency between MF and HF treatments indicated that HF did not result in advantages

  13. Maporal Hantavirus Causes Mild Pathology in Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus)

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Amanda; Miedema, Kaitlyn; Fauver, Joseph R.; Rico, Amber; Aboellail, Tawfik; Quackenbush, Sandra L.; Hawkinson, Ann; Schountz, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses can cause two human diseases with many pathological similarities: hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the western hemisphere and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in the eastern hemisphere. Each virus is hosted by specific reservoir species without conspicuous disease. HCPS-causing hantaviruses require animal biosafety level-4 (ABSL-4) containment, which substantially limits experimental research of interactions between the viruses and their reservoir hosts. Maporal virus (MAPV) is a South American hantavirus not known to cause disease in humans, thus it can be manipulated under ABSL-3 conditions. The aim of this study was to develop an ABSL-3 hantavirus infection model using the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), the natural reservoir host of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), and a virus that is pathogenic in another animal model to examine immune response of a reservoir host species. Deer mice were inoculated with MAPV, and viral RNA was detected in several organs of all deer mice during the 56 day experiment. Infected animals generated both nucleocapsid-specific and neutralizing antibodies. Histopathological lesions were minimal to mild with the peak of the lesions detected at 7–14 days postinfection, mainly in the lungs, heart, and liver. Low to modest levels of cytokine gene expression were detected in spleens and lungs of infected deer mice, and deer mouse primary pulmonary cells generated with endothelial cell growth factors were susceptible to MAPV with viral RNA accumulating in the cellular fraction compared to infected Vero cells. Most features resembled that of SNV infection of deer mice, suggesting this model may be an ABSL-3 surrogate for studying the host response of a New World hantavirus reservoir. PMID:27763552

  14. The Characterization of Biological Rhythms in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Mardomingo, Carmen; García-Herranz, Sara; Pereda-Pérez, Inmaculada; Peraita, Herminia; Venero, César; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Rol, Maria Angeles

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease, present several circadian impairments related to an accelerated perturbation of their biological clock that is caused by the illness itself and not merely age-related. Thus, the objective of this work was to elucidate whether these circadian system alterations were already present in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as compared to healthy age-matched subjects. Methods. 40 subjects (21 patients diagnosed with MCI, 74.1 ± 1.5 y.o., and 19 healthy subjects, 71.7 ± 1.4 y.o.) were subjected to ambulatory monitoring, recording wrist skin temperature, motor activity, body position, and the integrated variable TAP (including temperature, activity, and position) for one week. Nonparametrical analyses were then applied. Results. MCI patients exhibited a significant phase advance with respect to the healthy group for the following phase markers: temperature M5 (mean ± SEM: 04:20 ± 00:21 versus 02:52 ± 00:21) and L10 (14:35 ± 00:27 versus 13:24 ± 00:16) and TAP L5 (04:18 ± 00:14 versus 02:55 ± 00:30) and M10 (14:30 ± 00:18 versus 13:28 ± 00:23). Conclusions. These results suggest that significant advances in the biological clock begin to occur in MCI patients, evidenced by an accelerated aging of the circadian clock, as compared to a healthy population of the same age. PMID:25157363

  15. Updating Memory after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Orthopedic Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoqi; Ibarra, Alyssa; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Barnes, Amanda; McCauley, Stephen R.; McCarthy, James; Hoxhaj, Shkelzen; Mendez, Donna; Hunter, Jill V.; Levin, Harvey S.; Smith, Douglas H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have examined the trajectory of recovery of executive function (EF) after mild TBI (mTBI). Therefore, consensus has not been reached on the incidence and extent of EF impairment after mTBI. The present study investigated trajectory of change in executive memory over 3 months after mTBI on 59 right-handed participants with mTBI, as defined by Centers for Disease Control criteria, ages 14–30 years, recruited within 96 hours post-injury and tested <1 week (baseline), 1 month, and 3 months after injury. Also included were 58 participants with orthopedic injury (OI) and 27 typically developing (TD) non-injured participants with similar age, socioeconomic status, sex, and ethnicity. MRI data were acquired at baseline and 3 months. Although criteria included a normal CT scan, lesions were detected by MRI in 19 mTBI patients. Participants completed the KeepTrack task, a verbal recall task placing demands on goal maintenance, semantic memory, and memory updating. Scores reflected items recalled and semantic categories maintained. The mTBI group was divided into two groups: high (score ≥12) or low (score <12) symptoms based on the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPQ). Mixed model analyses revealed the trajectory of change in mTBI patients (high and low RPQ), OI patients, and TD subjects were similar over time (although the TD group differed from other groups at baseline), suggesting no recovery from mTBI up to 90 days. For categories maintained, differences in trajectory of recovery were discovered, with the OI comparison group surprisingly performing similar to those in the mTBI group with high RPQ symptoms, and different from low RPQ and the TD groups, bringing up questions about utility of OIs as a comparison group for mTBI. Patients with frontal lesions (on MRI) were also found to perform worse than those without lesions, a pattern that became more pronounced with time. PMID:23227898

  16. Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Ponnada A.; Yu, Xintian; Hasan, Khader M.; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Levin, Harvey S.; Hunter, Jill V.; Miller, Emmy R.; Patel, Vipul Kumar S.; Robertson, Claudia S.; McCarthy, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI) group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h) and at follow-up (~90 days). DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS). Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM). MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD) was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM) regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE) correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI. PMID:25610770

  17. Subjective cognitive complaints contribute to misdiagnosis of mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Emily C; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Galasko, Douglas R; Salmon, David P; Bondi, Mark W

    2014-09-01

    Subjective cognitive complaints are a criterion for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), despite their uncertain relationship to objective memory performance in MCI. We aimed to examine self-reported cognitive complaints in subgroups of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) MCI cohort to determine whether they are a valuable inclusion in the diagnosis of MCI or, alternatively, if they contribute to misdiagnosis. Subgroups of MCI were derived using cluster analysis of baseline neuropsychological test data from 448 ADNI MCI participants. Cognitive complaints were assessed via the Everyday Cognition (ECog) questionnaire, and discrepancy scores were calculated between self- and informant-report. Cluster analysis revealed Amnestic and Mixed cognitive phenotypes as well as a third Cluster-Derived Normal subgroup (41.3%), whose neuropsychological and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarker profiles did not differ from a "robust" normal control group. This cognitively intact phenotype of MCI participants overestimated their cognitive problems relative to their informant, whereas Amnestic MCI participants with objective memory impairment underestimated their cognitive problems. Underestimation of cognitive problems was associated with positive CSF AD biomarkers and progression to dementia. Overall, there was no relationship between self-reported cognitive complaints and objective cognitive functioning, but significant correlations were observed with depressive symptoms. The inclusion of self-reported complaints in MCI diagnostic criteria may cloud rather than clarify diagnosis and result in high rates of misclassification of MCI. Discrepancies between self- and informant-report demonstrate that overestimation of cognitive problems is characteristic of normal aging while underestimation may reflect greater risk for cognitive decline.

  18. Octreotide ameliorates gastric lesions in chronically mild stressed rats

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Noha N; Schaalan, Mona F; Zaki, Hala F; Abdallah, Dalaal M

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of chronic mild stress (CMS) on the emergence of gastric ulcers and possible modulation by octreotide, a synthetic somatostatin analogue. METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to nine different unpredictable random stress procedures for 21 d, a multifactorial interactional animal model for CMS. Octreotide was administered daily for 21 d at two dose levels (50 and 90 μg/kg) before exposure to stress procedure. Macro- and microscopical assessments were made, in addition to quantification of plasma corticosterone and gastric mucosal inflammatory, oxidative stress, and apoptotic biomarkers. RESULTS: Exposure to CMS elevated plasma corticosterone (28.3 ± 0.6 μg/dL, P = 0.002), an event that was accompanied by gastric lesions (6.4 ± 0.16 mm, P = 0.01) and confirmed histopathologically. Moreover, the insult elevated gastric mucosal lipid peroxides (13 ± 0.5 nmol/g tissue, P = 0.001), tumor necrosis factor-α (3008.6 ± 78.18 pg/g tissue, P < 0.001), prostaglandin E2 (117.1 ± 4.31 pg/g tissue, P = 0.002), and caspase-3 activity (2.4 ± 0.14 OD/mg protein, P = 0.002). Conversely, CMS mitigated interleukin-10 (627.9 ± 12.82 pg/g tissue, P = 0.001). Furthermore, in animals exposed to CMS, octreotide restored plasma corticosterone (61% and 71% from CMS, P = 0.002) at both dose levels. These beneficial effects were associated with a remarkable suppression of gastric lesions (38% and 9% from CMS, P = 0.01) and reversal of derangements in gastric mucosa. CONCLUSION: The current investigation provides evidence that exposure to CMS induces gastric ulceration, which was alleviated by administration of octreotide possibly possessing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic actions. PMID:21448417

  19. [Schooling and care of mild intellectual disability children].

    PubMed

    David, M; Billette de Villemeur, A; Devillard, F; Dieterich, K; Jouk, P-S; Prado, C; Descotes, A; Guillon, J-L; Counillon, J; Bloch, J; Cans, C

    2015-03-01

    Studies on mild intellectual disability (MID) are scarce. The aim of this study was to describe the educational and medical care trajectories and their determinants in children with MID. The study population concerned children born in 1997 and resident in a French county (Isère) in 2008. MID was defined as an overall IQ score between 50 and 69. For the present study, this definition was adjusted by integrating the IQ confidence intervals so that the risk of IQ measurement relativity and possible score discrepancy could be taken into account. Of the 267 children included, 180 (67%) were identified through an institute that decides upon special education and allowances (MDPH) and 87 (33%) through the educational system. The parents of 181 children (68%) accepted to answer a telephone questionnaire, describing their child's educational and medical history. Children with MID frequently presented clinical signs and comorbidities. Educational trajectories were quite varied: a majority of the children (52.9%) were oriented toward sections with adapted general and professional education (SEGPA) after finishing primary school, a minority (41.3%) were oriented towards specialized schools, such as medical-educational institutions, and a small proportion of children (5.8%) stayed in ordinary school. Children followed the SEGPA orientation more frequently when a relative written language disorder was present, and autism-spectrum disorders or other clinical signs were absent. Concerning follow-up care and rehabilitation, children mostly took part in speech therapy (76.2%) and psychotherapy (55.8%). The French law dating from 2005, ensuring equal opportunity for people with disabilities, has borne fruit in the diversification of educational trajectories. PMID:25656456

  20. Early identification and heritability of mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kremen, William S; Jak, Amy J; Panizzon, Matthew S; Spoon, Kelly M; Franz, Carol E; Thompson, Wesley K; Jacobson, Kristen C; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Xian, Hong; Toomey, Rosemary; Lyons, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Backgound Identifying mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in midlife could improve early identification of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Also, AD is highly heritable, but the heritability of MCI has not been established. We estimated prevalence rates, association with premorbid general cognitive ability (GCA) and heritability for different definitions of neuropsychologically defined MCI in adults in their 50s. Method We examined 1126 twins aged 51–59 years when recruited into the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging (VETSA). Six neurocognitive domains were assessed using tests designed to avoid ceiling effects. To differentiate MCI from low overall ability, criteria included adjustment for GCA measured at approximately age 20 years. Results As in older adults, prevalence rates varied widely. Among the lower prevalence rates were some definitions of multiple-domain MCI and single-domain amnestic MCI, which may be less likely than other MCI categories to revert to normal on follow-up. Low prevalence rates in middle-aged adults are also more likely to be valid. MCI was also associated with lower premorbid GCA. Heritability estimates for any MCI and amnestic MCI averaged .40–.48. Conclusions By testing multiple cognitive domains and avoiding ceiling effects, MCI can be identified before age 60 years. Premorbid GCA is a risk/protective factor, but deficits after adjusting for early adult GCA suggest additional processes leading to declining trajectories. Heritabilities were comparable to AD, suggesting MCI as an appropriate phenotype for genetic association studies. Full validation will require follow-up assessments (currently under way). Community-based studies are important for this early identification because adults of this age are unlikely to present in clinics. PMID:24370560

  1. Sex Differences in Outcome after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Blyth, Brian; Mookerjee, Sohug; He, Hua; McDermott, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to estimate the independent association of sex with outcome after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). We performed an analysis of a subset of an established cohort involving 1425 mTBI patients presenting to an academic emergency department (ED). The associations between sex and three outcomes determined 3 months after the initial ED visit were examined: post-concussive symptom (PCS) score (0, 1–5, 6–16, and >16), the number of days to return of normal activities (0, 1–7, and >7), and the number of days of work missed (0, 1–7,and >7). Logistic regression analyses were used to determine the relationship between sex and each outcome after controlling for 12 relevant subject-level variables. Of the 1425 subjects, 643 (45.1%) were female and 782 (54.9%) were male. Three months after mTBI, males had significantly lower odds of being in a higher PCS score category (odds ratio [OR] 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.50, 0.78); this association appeared to be more prominent during child-bearing years for females. Males and females did not significantly differ with respect to the odds of poorer outcome as defined by the number of days to return of normal activities or the number of days of work missed. Female sex is associated with significantly higher odds of poor outcome after mTBI, as measured by PCS score, after control for appropriate confounders. The observed pattern of peak disability for females during the child-bearing years suggests disruption of endogenous estrogen or progesterone production. Attempts to better understand how mTBI affects production of these hormones acutely after injury and during the recovery period may shed light on the mechanism behind poorer outcome among females and putative therapeutic interventions. PMID:19938945

  2. Gray matter atrophy patterns of mild cognitive impairment subtypes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haobo; Sachdev, Perminder S; Wen, Wei; Kochan, Nicole A; Crawford, John D; Brodaty, Henry; Slavin, Melissa J; Reppermund, Simone; Draper, Brian; Zhu, Wanlin; Kang, Kristan; Trollor, Julian N

    2012-04-15

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a heterogeneous neurocognitive disorder that can be classified into various subtypes. The present study aims to examine the gray matter (GM) atrophy patterns of MCI subtypes in comparison with a cognitively healthy group. Participants, including 135 MCI subjects and 120 cognitively healthy controls, were drawn from the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study. The MCI subjects were first categorized into amnestic (aMCI) and non-amnestic (naMCI) subtypes, which were then divided into single-domain (aMCI-SD and naMCI-SD) and multiple-domain subtypes (aMCI-MD and naMCI-MD). Furthermore, naMCI-SD was divided into three subgroups (language, processing speed, and executive function) according to individual cognitive impairment. Voxel-wise GM volumes were then compared between MCI subtypes and controls. The aMCI group had significantly lower GM volumes in the bilateral hippocampi and temporal cortices than the controls. This was mainly due to GM reduction of aMCI-MD but not aMCI-SD, as the latter did not show any significant GM reduction. GM reduction of naMCI and its two subdivisions was shown in widespread brain regions compared to controls. GM volumes of the multiple-domain subtypes (aMCI-MD and naMCI-MD) were lower than their single-domain counterparts (aMCI-SD and naMCI-SD) in the frontal and temporal lobes, respectively. Moreover, the language subgroup of naMCI-SD showed GM reduction in the frontal and temporal lobes compared to controls. MCI subtypes displayed specific patterns of GM atrophy that appear to be related to their various clinical presentations, which implies that underlying mechanisms of MCI subtypes are different.

  3. Spontaneous Improvement of Untreated Mild Graves' Ophthalmopathy: Rundle's Curve Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Menconi, Francesca; Profilo, Maria Antonietta; Leo, Marenza; Sisti, Eleonora; Altea, Maria Antonietta; Rocchi, Roberto; Latrofa, Francesco; Nardi, Marco; Vitti, Paolo; Marcocci, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Background: According to Rundle's curve, Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) worsens during an initial phase up to a peak of maximum severity, then improves and reaches a static plateau, with the activity curve preceding the severity curve by a few months. To our knowledge, no studies have tried to replicate Rundle's curve, and very few have investigated the natural history of GO. Here, we studied GO natural history retrospectively and tried to identify factors that may affect it. Methods: A total of 65 patients with untreated GO underwent an eye assessment after a median of seven months after the appearance of GO and then after a median of 40 months. The primary endpoints were the variation of the single GO features and of the NOSPECS score, as well as the overall outcome of GO. The secondary endpoint was the influence of several variables (age, sex, smoking, GO and thyroid disease duration, thyroid treatment, thyroid status, thyroid volume, anti-TSH receptor autoantibodies) on the outcome of GO. Results: The majority of patients had mild, minimally active GO, and only five had a Clinical Activity Score (CAS) >3. There was a significant reduction of CAS (p<0.0001) and NOSPECS (p=0.01) between the first and last observation, with a timing pattern resembling Rundle's curve. This difference was confirmed even when patients with a CAS >3 at first observation were excluded. At the last observation, 50.8% of patients had improved, 33.8% had remained stable, and 15.4% had worsened moderately or substantially. The overall outcome of GO was not affected by any of the variables under examination. Conclusions: In confirmation of Rundle's observations, untreated GO improves spontaneously with time in the majority of patients, with an activity peak between 13 and 24 months, which may have implications in determining the proper timing of GO treatments. PMID:23980907

  4. Mild hyperthermia influence on Herceptin® properties

    PubMed Central

    Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Deckers, Roel; Sasaki, Noboru; Bos, Clemens; Moonen, Chrit

    2015-01-01

    Background Mild hyperthermia (mHT) increases the tumor perfusion and vascular permeability, and reduces the interstitial fluid pressure, resulting in better intra-tumoral bioavailability of low molecular weight drugs. This approach is potentially also attractive for delivery of therapeutic macromolecules, such as antibodies. Here, we investigated the effects of mHT on the stability, immunological and pharmacological properties of Herceptin®, a clinically approved antibody, targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) overexpressed in breast cancer. Results Herceptin® was heated to 37°C (control) and 42°C (mHT) for 1 hour. Formation of Herceptin® aggregates was measured using Nile Red assay. mHT did not result in additional Herceptin® aggregates compared to 37°C, showing the Herceptin® stability is unchanged. Immunological and pharmacological properties of Herceptin® were evaluated following mHT using HER-2 positive breast cancer cells (BT-474). Exposure of Herceptin® to mHT preserved recognition and binding affinity of Herceptin® to HER-2. Western-blot and cell proliferation assays on BT-474 cells showed that mHT left the inhibitory activities of Herceptin® unchanged. Conclusions The stability, and the immunological and pharmacological properties of Herceptin® are not negatively affected by mHT. Further in-vivo studies are required to evaluate the influence of mHT on intra-tumoral bioavailability and therapeutic effectiveness of Herceptin®. PMID:25810700

  5. Evidence for mild thyroidal impairment in women undergoing endurance training

    SciTech Connect

    Boyden, T.W.; Pamenter, R.W.; Stanforth, P.; Rotkis, T.; Wilmore, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of endurance training on body composition and the pituitary-thyroid axis were studied in 29 healthy, young (mean age, 28.7 yr), regularly menstruating women. Women who were initially jogging a mean of 13.5 miles/week were selected for this study to minimize dropouts. Body composition, measured by hydrostatic weighing, and nonfasting plasma concentrations of T/sub 4/, T/sub 3/, rT/sub 3/, TSH, and TRH-stimulated TSH, measured by RIA, were examined initially and after each subject's weekly mileage had increased to 30 miles (..delta..30, mean total body weight did not change, mean fat weight decreased (-1.02 kg/ P<0.005), and mean lean weight increased (+0.75 kg; P<0.05). T/sub 4/ and unstimulated TSH did not change. However, mean (+/- SE) T/sub 3/ decreased from 107.2 +/- 4.4 to 97.9 +/- 3.4 ng/dl (P<0.025), and mean rT/sub 3/ decreased from 170.9 +/- 13.9 to 154.6 +/- 13.2 pg/ml (P<0.025). The decrease in T/sub 3/ and rT/sub 3/ were accompanied by significantly greater TSH responses to TRH stimulation (mean (+/- SE) area under TSH curve, 1381.4 +/- 123 vs. 1712.8 +/- 202 ..mu..IU/ml-min; P < 0.01). These results indicate that physically active women who undergo additional endurance training 1) become more lean without a change in total body weight, and 2) have changes in T/sub 3/, rT/sub 3/, and TRH-stimulated TSH indicative of mild thyroidal impairment.

  6. Static and Dynamic Intrinsic Connectivity following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Josef M.; Allen, Elena A.; Klimaj, Stefan D.; Yeo, Ronald A.; Hanlon, Faith M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is the most common neurological disorder and is typically characterized by temporally limited cognitive impairment and emotional symptoms. Previous examinations of intrinsic resting state networks in mTBI have primarily focused on abnormalities in static functional connectivity, and deficits in dynamic functional connectivity have yet to be explored in this population. Resting-state data was collected on 48 semi-acute (mean=14 days post-injury) mTBI patients and 48 matched healthy controls. A high-dimensional independent component analysis (N=100) was utilized to parcellate intrinsic connectivity networks (ICN), with a priori hypotheses focusing on the default-mode network (DMN) and sub-cortical structures. Dynamic connectivity was characterized using a sliding window approach over 126 temporal epochs, with standard deviation serving as the primary outcome measure. Finally, distribution-corrected z-scores (DisCo-Z) were calculated to investigate changes in connectivity in a spatially invariant manner on a per-subject basis. Following appropriate correction for multiple comparisons, no significant group differences were evident on measures of static or dynamic connectivity within a priori ICN. Reduced (HC>mTBI patients) static connectivity was observed in the DMN at uncorrected (p<0.005) thresholds. Finally, a trend (p=0.07) for decreased dynamic connectivity in patients across all ICN was observed during spatially invariant analyses (DisCo-Z). In the semi-acute phase of recovery, mTBI was not reliably associated with abnormalities in static or dynamic functional connectivity within the DMN or sub-cortical structures. PMID:25318005

  7. Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Ponnada A; Yu, Xintian; Hasan, Khader M; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Levin, Harvey S; Hunter, Jill V; Miller, Emmy R; Patel, Vipul Kumar S; Robertson, Claudia S; McCarthy, James J

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI) group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h) and at follow-up (~90 days). DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS). Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM). MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD) was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM) regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE) correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI.

  8. [Schooling and care of mild intellectual disability children].

    PubMed

    David, M; Billette de Villemeur, A; Devillard, F; Dieterich, K; Jouk, P-S; Prado, C; Descotes, A; Guillon, J-L; Counillon, J; Bloch, J; Cans, C

    2015-03-01

    Studies on mild intellectual disability (MID) are scarce. The aim of this study was to describe the educational and medical care trajectories and their determinants in children with MID. The study population concerned children born in 1997 and resident in a French county (Isère) in 2008. MID was defined as an overall IQ score between 50 and 69. For the present study, this definition was adjusted by integrating the IQ confidence intervals so that the risk of IQ measurement relativity and possible score discrepancy could be taken into account. Of the 267 children included, 180 (67%) were identified through an institute that decides upon special education and allowances (MDPH) and 87 (33%) through the educational system. The parents of 181 children (68%) accepted to answer a telephone questionnaire, describing their child's educational and medical history. Children with MID frequently presented clinical signs and comorbidities. Educational trajectories were quite varied: a majority of the children (52.9%) were oriented toward sections with adapted general and professional education (SEGPA) after finishing primary school, a minority (41.3%) were oriented towards specialized schools, such as medical-educational institutions, and a small proportion of children (5.8%) stayed in ordinary school. Children followed the SEGPA orientation more frequently when a relative written language disorder was present, and autism-spectrum disorders or other clinical signs were absent. Concerning follow-up care and rehabilitation, children mostly took part in speech therapy (76.2%) and psychotherapy (55.8%). The French law dating from 2005, ensuring equal opportunity for people with disabilities, has borne fruit in the diversification of educational trajectories.

  9. Sparse Multivariate Autoregressive Modeling for Mild Cognitive Impairment Classification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Jie, Biao; Peng, Ziwen

    2014-01-01

    Brain connectivity network derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is becoming increasingly prevalent in the researches related to cognitive and perceptual processes. The capability to detect causal or effective connectivity is highly desirable for understanding the cooperative nature of brain network, particularly when the ultimate goal is to obtain good performance of control-patient classification with biological meaningful interpretations. Understanding directed functional interactions between brain regions via brain connectivity network is a challenging task. Since many genetic and biomedical networks are intrinsically sparse, incorporating sparsity property into connectivity modeling can make the derived models more biologically plausible. Accordingly, we propose an effective connectivity modeling of resting-state fMRI data based on the multivariate autoregressive (MAR) modeling technique, which is widely used to characterize temporal information of dynamic systems. This MAR modeling technique allows for the identification of effective connectivity using the Granger causality concept and reducing the spurious causality connectivity in assessment of directed functional interaction from fMRI data. A forward orthogonal least squares (OLS) regression algorithm is further used to construct a sparse MAR model. By applying the proposed modeling to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) classification, we identify several most discriminative regions, including middle cingulate gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, lingual gyrus and caudate regions, in line with results reported in previous findings. A relatively high classification accuracy of 91.89 % is also achieved, with an increment of 5.4 % compared to the fully-connected, non-directional Pearson-correlation-based functional connectivity approach. PMID:24595922

  10. Assessment of cognition in mild cognitive impairment: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Peter J.; Jackson, Colleen E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Khachaturian, Ara S.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Albert, Marilyn S.; Weintraub, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The demand for rapidly administered, sensitive, and reliable cognitive assessments that are specifically designed for identifying individuals in the earliest stages of cognitive decline (and to measure subtle change over time) has escalated as the emphasis in Alzheimer’s disease clinical research has shifted from clinical diagnosis and treatment toward the goal of developing presymptomatic neuroprotective therapies. To meet these changing clinical requirements, cognitive measures or tailored batteries of tests must be validated and determined to be fit-for-use for the discrimination between cognitively healthy individuals and persons who are experiencing very subtle cognitive changes that likely signal the emergence of early mild cognitive impairment. We sought to collect and review data systematically from a wide variety of (mostly computer-administered) cognitive measures, all of which are currently marketed or distributed with the claims that these instruments are sensitive and reliable for the early identification of disease or, if untested for this purpose, are promising tools based on other variables. The survey responses for 16 measures/batteries are presented in brief in this review; full survey responses and summary tables are archived and publicly available on the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease by 2020 Web site (http://pad2020.org). A decision tree diagram highlighting critical decision points for selecting measures to meet varying clinical trials requirements has also been provided. Ultimately, the survey questionnaire, framework, and decision guidelines provided in this review should remain as useful aids for the evaluation of any new or updated sets of instruments in the years to come. PMID:21575877

  11. Mild cognitive impairment with suspected nonamyloid pathology (SNAP)

    PubMed Central

    Caroli, Anna; Prestia, Annapaola; Galluzzi, Samantha; Ferrari, Clarissa; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Van Berckel, Bart; Barkhof, Frederik; Teunissen, Charlotte; Wall, Anders E.; Carter, Stephen F.; Schöll, Michael; Choo, Il Han; Grimmer, Timo; Redolfi, Alberto; Nordberg, Agneta; Scheltens, Philip; Drzezga, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate predictors of progressive cognitive deterioration in patients with suspected non–Alzheimer disease pathology (SNAP) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: We measured markers of amyloid pathology (CSF β-amyloid 42) and neurodegeneration (hippocampal volume on MRI and cortical metabolism on [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose–PET) in 201 patients with MCI clinically followed for up to 6 years to detect progressive cognitive deterioration. We categorized patients with MCI as A+/A− and N+/N− based on presence/absence of amyloid pathology and neurodegeneration. SNAPs were A−N+ cases. Results: The proportion of progressors was 11% (8/41), 34% (14/41), 56% (19/34), and 71% (60/85) in A−N−, A+N−, SNAP, and A+N+, respectively; the proportion of APOE ε4 carriers was 29%, 70%, 31%, and 71%, respectively, with the SNAP group featuring a significantly different proportion than both A+N− and A+N+ groups (p ≤ 0.005). Hypometabolism in SNAP patients was comparable to A+N+ patients (p = 0.154), while hippocampal atrophy was more severe in SNAP patients (p = 0.002). Compared with A−N−, SNAP and A+N+ patients had significant risk of progressive cognitive deterioration (hazard ratio = 2.7 and 3.8, p = 0.016 and p < 0.001), while A+N− patients did not (hazard ratio = 1.13, p = 0.771). In A+N− and A+N+ groups, none of the biomarkers predicted time to progression. In the SNAP group, lower time to progression was correlated with greater hypometabolism (r = 0.42, p = 0.073). Conclusions: Our findings support the notion that patients with SNAP MCI feature a specific risk progression profile. PMID:25568301

  12. [Guiding principles of clinical research on mild cognitive impairment (protocol)].

    PubMed

    Tian, Jin-Zhou; Shi, Jing; Zhang, Xin-Qing; Bi, Qi; Ma, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Liang; Li, Xiao-Bin; Sheng, Shu-Li; Li, Lin; Wu, Zhen-Yun; Fang, Li-Yan; Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Miao, Ying-Chun; Wang, Peng-Wen; Ren, Ying; Yin, Jun-Xiang; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2008-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as a nosological entity referring to elderly people with MCI but without dementia, was proposed as a warning signal of dementia occurrence and a novel therapeutic target. MCI clinical criteria and diagnostic procedure from the MCI Working Group of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium (EADC) may better reflect the heterogeneity of MCI syndrome. Beijing United Study Group on MCI funded by the Capital Foundation of Medical Developments (CFMD) proposed the guiding principles of clinical research on MCI. The diagnostic methods include clinical, neuropsychological, functional, neuroimaging and genetic measures. The diagnostic procedure includes three stages. Firstly, MCI syndrome must be defined, which should correspond to: (1) cognitive complaints coming from the patients or their families; (2) reporting of a relative decline in cognitive functioning during the past year by the patient or informant; (3) cognitive disorders evidenced by clinical evaluation; (4) activities of daily living preserved and complex instrumental functions either intact or minimally impaired; and (5) absence of dementia. Secondly, subtypes of MCI have to be recognized as amnestic MCI (aMCI), single non-memory MCI (snmMCI) and multiple-domains MCI (mdMCI). Finally, the subtype causes could be identified commonly as Alzheimer disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), and other degenerative diseases such as frontal-temporal dementia (FTD), Lewy body disease (LBD), semantic dementia (SM), as well as trauma, infection, toxicity and nutrition deficiency. The recommended special tests include serum vitamin B12 and folic acid, plasma insulin, insulin-degrading enzyme, Abeta40, Abeta42, inflammatory factors. Computed tomography (or preferentially magnetic resonance imaging, when available) is mandatory. As measurable therapeutic outcomes, the primary outcome should be the probability of progression to dementia, the secondary outcomes should be cognition and function

  13. Reaction Characteristic for Various Scale Explosive under Mild Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yushi; Dai, Xiaogan; Han, Yong; Xiang, Yong

    2014-05-01

    This work presents a varying trend of impact ignition threshold denoted by minimum impact velocity to trigger an ignition when the scale of the explosive changes. The effects of explosive scale factors on impact-induced reaction degree were investigated using Steven tests and numerical simulation for polymer-bonded explosive-C03 (a cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine [HMX]-based explosive) impacted by projectiles of various velocities. Two scale factors-that is, axial thickness and radius-were studied through various scale samples including Φ98 mm × 13 mm, Φ98 mm × 39 mm, Φ140 mm × 13 mm, and Φ140 mm × 39 mm. The velocities of projectiles and the impact and ignition processes were analyzed using a high-speed camera. The pressure histories were measured by embedded manganin pressure gauges and poly vinylidene fluoride stress gauges. The reaction overpressures of the explosive were obtained by blast pressure gauges to evaluate the reaction degree. The effects of explosive scale factor on reaction degree and characteristics under mild impact were summarized. In a certain range (larger than the diameter of the impact projectile), different sample diameters do not influence the velocity threshold, but the thickness of the samples does; that is, the velocity threshold increases with the thickness of the sample. The study also indicates that the ignition and explosion in Steven tests are mainly triggered by the overlapping of direct impact and reflected stress waves. Our numerical simulations results of pressure and ignition times are consistent with the experimental data. The obtained knowledge can be used to evaluate the safety of different scale HMX-based explosives under accidental impact or falls.

  14. Task-dependent posterior cingulate activation in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Michele L.; Schmitz, Taylor W.; Kawahara-Baccus, Tisha N.; Torgerson, Britta M.; Trivedi, Mehul A.; Johnson, Sterling C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging research has demonstrated that the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) is functionally compromised in individuals diagnosed with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), a major risk factor for the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies with healthy participants, this same region is active during self-appraisal (requiring retrieval of semantic knowledge about the self) as well as episodic recognition of recently-learned information. Administering both types of tasks to people with MCI may reveal important information regarding the role of the PCC in recollection. This study investigated fMRI activation in the PCC in individuals with MCI and age, gender, and education-matched controls across two tasks. The first task was a visual episodic recognition task in which participants indicated whether pictures had or had not been presented during a study session. The second task was an autobiographical self-appraisal task in which subjects rated themselves on a set of trait adjectives. Results of a conjunction analysis revealed the PCC as the sole region commonly active during both tasks in the healthy older adults. Furthermore, additional analysis revealed an interaction in the PCC indicating a task-dependent response in the MCI group. MCI participants showed PCC activation during self-appraisal, but not during episodic retrieval. These results suggest in MCI that the PCC shows functional degradation during episodic retrieval of visual information learned in the laboratory. In contrast, the PCC’s role in retrieval and evaluation of highly-elaborated information regarding the self is more well-preserved. PMID:16102979

  15. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depressed Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Sigan L; Esbensen, Anna J; Shalev, Rebecca; Vincent, Lori B; Mihaila, Iulia; Bussanich, Paige

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of research on psychosocial treatments for depression in adults with intellectual disability (ID). In this pilot study, we explored the efficacy of a group CBT treatment that involved a caregiver component in adults with mild ID with a depressive disorder. Method Sixteen adults with mild ID and a depressive disorder participated in a 10-week group CBT treatment and 8 adults with mild ID with a depressive disorder served as a treatment as usual (TAU) control group. Adults with mild ID and caregivers completed measures of depressive symptoms, behavior problems, and social skills at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and a 3-month follow-up. Adults with mild ID also completed a series of tasks to measure their understanding of the principles of cognitive therapy pre- and post-treatment. Results The CBT group demonstrated significant decreases in depressive symptoms and behavior problems from pre-treatment to post-treatment and these effects were maintained at a 3-month follow-up. The CBT group demonstrated significant improvements in their ability to infer emotions and thoughts based on various situation-thought-emotion pairings from pre-treatment to post-treatment. Conclusions Findings indicate that adults with mild ID with a depressive disorder benefitted from a group CBT treatment with a caregiver component. Moreover, adults with mild ID appeared to benefit, at least in part, from the cognitive therapy components of the treatment, in addition to the behavior therapy components. PMID:26925187

  16. Leaf Responses to Mild Drought Stress in Natural Variants of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Clauw, Pieter; Coppens, Frederik; De Beuf, Kristof; Dhondt, Stijn; Van Daele, Twiggy; Maleux, Katrien; Storme, Veronique; Clement, Lieven; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Although the response of plants exposed to severe drought stress has been studied extensively, little is known about how plants adapt their growth under mild drought stress conditions. Here, we analyzed the leaf and rosette growth response of six Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions originating from different geographic regions when exposed to mild drought stress. The automated phenotyping platform WIWAM was used to impose stress early during leaf development, when the third leaf emerges from the shoot apical meristem. Analysis of growth-related phenotypes showed differences in leaf development between the accessions. In all six accessions, mild drought stress reduced both leaf pavement cell area and number without affecting the stomatal index. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis (using RNA sequencing) of early developing leaf tissue identified 354 genes differentially expressed under mild drought stress in the six accessions. Our results indicate the existence of a robust response over different genetic backgrounds to mild drought stress in developing leaves. The processes involved in the overall mild drought stress response comprised abscisic acid signaling, proline metabolism, and cell wall adjustments. In addition to these known severe drought-related responses, 87 genes were found to be specific for the response of young developing leaves to mild drought stress. PMID:25604532

  17. Differential effects of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid antagonism on anxiety behavior in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fox, Laura C; Davies, Daniel R; Scholl, Jamie L; Watt, Michael J; Forster, Gina L

    2016-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) comprise three-quarters of all TBIs occurring in the United States annually, and psychological symptoms arising from them can last years after injury. One commonly observed symptom following mild TBI is generalized anxiety. Most mild TBIs happen in stressful situations (sports, war, domestic violence, etc.) when glucocorticoids are elevated in the brain at the time of impact, and glucocorticoids have negative effects on neuronal health following TBI. Therefore, blocking glucocorticoid receptors might prevent emergence of anxiety symptoms post-injury. Adult male rats received mifepristone (20mg/kg) or spironolactone (50mg/kg) to block glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, respectively, 40min prior to being exposed to acute social defeat stress followed immediately by mild TBI. In defeated rats with concomitant mild TBI, mifepristone restored time spent in the open arms of an elevated plus maze to control levels, demonstrating for the first time that glucocorticoid receptors play a critical role in the development of anxiety after mild TBI. Future treatments could target these receptors, alleviating anxiety as a major side effect in victims of mild TBI sustained in stressful situations. PMID:27363926

  18. Differential effects of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid antagonism on anxiety behavior in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fox, Laura C; Davies, Daniel R; Scholl, Jamie L; Watt, Michael J; Forster, Gina L

    2016-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) comprise three-quarters of all TBIs occurring in the United States annually, and psychological symptoms arising from them can last years after injury. One commonly observed symptom following mild TBI is generalized anxiety. Most mild TBIs happen in stressful situations (sports, war, domestic violence, etc.) when glucocorticoids are elevated in the brain at the time of impact, and glucocorticoids have negative effects on neuronal health following TBI. Therefore, blocking glucocorticoid receptors might prevent emergence of anxiety symptoms post-injury. Adult male rats received mifepristone (20mg/kg) or spironolactone (50mg/kg) to block glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, respectively, 40min prior to being exposed to acute social defeat stress followed immediately by mild TBI. In defeated rats with concomitant mild TBI, mifepristone restored time spent in the open arms of an elevated plus maze to control levels, demonstrating for the first time that glucocorticoid receptors play a critical role in the development of anxiety after mild TBI. Future treatments could target these receptors, alleviating anxiety as a major side effect in victims of mild TBI sustained in stressful situations.

  19. Oculomotor, Vestibular, and Reaction Time Tests in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Snapp, Hillary; Crawford, James; Murphy, Sara; Marshall, Kathryn; Pelusso, Constanza; Knowles, Sean; Kiderman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mild traumatic brain injury is a major public health issue and is a particular concern in sports. One of the most difficult issues with respect to mild traumatic brain injury involves the diagnosis of the disorder. Typically, diagnosis is made by a constellation of physical exam findings. However, in order to best manage mild traumatic brain injury, it is critically important to develop objective tests that substantiate the diagnosis. With objective tests the disorder can be better characterized, more accurately diagnosed, and studied more effectively. In addition, prevention and treatments can be applied where necessary. Methods Two cohorts each of fifty subjects with mild traumatic brain injury and one hundred controls were evaluated with a battery of oculomotor, vestibular and reaction time related tests applied to a population of individuals with mild traumatic brain injury as compared to controls. Results We demonstrated pattern differences between the two groups and showed how three of these tests yield an 89% sensitivity and 95% specificity for confirming a current diagnosis of mild traumatic brain injury. Interpretation These results help better characterize the oculomotor, vestibular, and reaction time differences between those the mild traumatic brain injury and non-affected individuals. This characterization will allow for the development of more effective point of care neurologic diagnostic techniques and allow for more targeted treatment which may allow for quicker return to normal activity. PMID:27654131

  20. Emergency department management of mild traumatic brain injury in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Bazarian, J; McClung, J; Cheng, Y; Flesher, W; Schneider, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To describe the emergency department (ED) management of isolated mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the USA and to examine variation in care across age and insurance types. Methods: A secondary analysis of ED visits for isolated mild TBI in the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey 1998–2000 was performed. Mild TBI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9) codes for skull fracture, concussion, intracranial injury (unspecified), and head injury (unspecified). Available ED care variables were analysed by patient age and insurance categories using multivariate logistic regression. Results: The incidence of isolated mild TBI cases attending ED was 153 296 per year, or 56.4/100 000 people. Of the patients with isolated mild TBI, 44.3% underwent computed tomography, 23.9% underwent other non-extremity, non-chest x rays, 17.1% received wound care and 14.1% received intravenous fluids. However, only 43.8% had an assessment of pain. Of those with documented pain, only 45.5% received analgesics in the ED. Nearly 38% were discharged without recommendations for specific follow up. Several aspects of ED care varied by age but not by insurance type. Conclusion: Substantial ED resources are devoted to the care of isolated mild TBI. The present study identified deficiencies in and variation around several important aspects of ED care. The development of guidelines specific for mild TBI could reduce variation and improve emergency care for this injury. PMID:15983080

  1. Performance-based testing in mild stroke: identification of unmet opportunity for occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrison, M Tracy; Edwards, Dorothy F; Giles, Gordon Muir

    2015-01-01

    Age at first stroke is decreasing, and most strokes are mild to moderate in severity. Executive function (EF) deficits are increasingly recognized in the stroke population, but occupational therapists have not altered their evaluation methods to fully accommodate changing patient needs. We present a hierarchical performance-based testing (PBT) pathway using data to illustrate how PBT could identify patients with mild stroke-related EF deficits in need of occupational therapy intervention. Data suggest that a substantial number of patients with EF deficits after mild stroke could benefit from occupational therapy services.

  2. Repeat mild heat shock increases dermal fibroblast activity and collagen production.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Andrew E; Holyoak, Caroline D

    2008-04-01

    Repeat mild heat shock (RMHS) has been shown to have anti-aging effects on cellular and biological processes within human dermal fibroblasts. We have investigated the potential of an abridged mild heat shock regime to impact upon the functional properties of human dermal fibroblasts derived from three donors (male, 12 years; female, 22 years; female, 65 years). For each donor mild heat shock increased the rate of contraction of fibroblast-containing collagen gels and increased the de novo synthesis of collagen. Thus, hormetic mechanisms are proposed to provide functional anti-aging benefits to skin cells.

  3. Preinjury Emotional-Behavioral Functioning of Children With Lingering Problems After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Robin L; Connery, Amy K; Baker, David A; Kirkwood, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize preinjury emotional-behavioral functioning in pediatric patients with lingering problems after mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). The clinical case series design included 278 patients 8-17 years old. Parents retrospectively rated children's preinjury emotional-behavioral functioning on a broadband questionnaire. The rate of clinically significant preinjury anxiety was elevated compared with national norms. The number of previous TBIs was associated with clinically significant preinjury externalizing problems, suggesting a link between externalizing disorders and mild TBI exposure. Premorbid emotional-behavioral difficulties may play an important role in the establishment or maintenance of lingering symptoms after pediatric mild TBI. PMID:26258490

  4. Multimodal classification of Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daoqiang; Wang, Yaping; Zhou, Luping; Yuan, Hong; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-04-01

    Effective and accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as its prodromal stage (i.e., mild cognitive impairment (MCI)), has attracted more and more attention recently. So far, multiple biomarkers have been shown to be sensitive to the diagnosis of AD and MCI, i.e., structural MR imaging (MRI) for brain atrophy measurement, functional imaging (e.g., FDG-PET) for hypometabolism quantification, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for quantification of specific proteins. However, most existing research focuses on only a single modality of biomarkers for diagnosis of AD and MCI, although recent studies have shown that different biomarkers may provide complementary information for the diagnosis of AD and MCI. In this paper, we propose to combine three modalities of biomarkers, i.e., MRI, FDG-PET, and CSF biomarkers, to discriminate between AD (or MCI) and healthy controls, using a kernel combination method. Specifically, ADNI baseline MRI, FDG-PET, and CSF data from 51AD patients, 99 MCI patients (including 43 MCI converters who had converted to AD within 18 months and 56 MCI non-converters who had not converted to AD within 18 months), and 52 healthy controls are used for development and validation of our proposed multimodal classification method. In particular, for each MR or FDG-PET image, 93 volumetric features are extracted from the 93 regions of interest (ROIs), automatically labeled by an atlas warping algorithm. For CSF biomarkers, their original values are directly used as features. Then, a linear support vector machine (SVM) is adopted to evaluate the classification accuracy, using a 10-fold cross-validation. As a result, for classifying AD from healthy controls, we achieve a classification accuracy of 93.2% (with a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 93.3%) when combining all three modalities of biomarkers, and only 86.5% when using even the best individual modality of biomarkers. Similarly, for classifying MCI from healthy controls, we achieve a

  5. MILD OBESITY IS PROTECTIVE AFTER SEVERE BURN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Emdad, Fatemeh; Rivero, Haidy G.; Kraft, Robert; Williams, Felicia N; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Klein, Matthew B.; Arnoldo, Brett D.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.

    2014-01-01

    associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Subgroup analysis revealed that patients with mild obesity have the best survival, whereas morbidly obese patients have the highest mortality. PMID:23877367

  6. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, C.Y.; Merriam, N.W.; Jha, M.C.; Breault, R.W.

    1988-06-01

    Research on mild gasification is discussed. The report is divided into three sections: literature survey of mild gasification processes; literature survey of char, condensibles, and gas upgrading and utilization methods; and industrial market assessment of products of mild gasification. Recommendations are included in each section. (CBS) 248 refs., 58 figs., 62 tabs.

  7. 40 CFR 180.1276 - Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus (TMGMV); temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1276 Tobacco mild green mosaic... requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus in or on...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1276 - Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus (TMGMV); temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1276 Tobacco mild green mosaic... requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus in or on...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1276 - Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus (TMGMV); temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1276 Tobacco mild green mosaic... requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus in or on...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1276 - Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus (TMGMV); temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1276 Tobacco mild green mosaic... requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of tobacco mild green mosaic tobamovirus in or on...

  11. The case for more aggressive screening and treatment of mild thyroid failure.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Alejandro R; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2002-04-01

    "Subclinical" (mild) thyroid failure is not benign: it tends to progress to overt thyroid failure and it has adverse clinical effects. We believe it should be screened for more aggressively in the general population, and treated with levothyroxine.

  12. Effectiveness of Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty for Rheumatic Mitral Stenosis with Mild to Severe Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, LinXiang; Hong, Lang; Fang, Jun; Chen, LiangLong

    2016-01-01

    This study is designed to test whether percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty (PBMV) is effective for rheumatic mitral stenosis in Chinese patients with moderate to severe mitral regurgitation. Fifty-six patients with rheumatic mitral valve stenosis were divided into the mild, moderate, and severe regurgitation groups. Cardiac ultrasonography was measured before and 1 to 2 days after PBMV. Following PBMV, the mitral orifice was enlarged, and the left atrial diameter was reduced in the 3 patient groups. The enlargement of the mitral orifice in the mild regurgitation group was greater than that observed in the moderate and severe regurgitation groups. The size of the regurgitation area increased in the mild regurgitation group and decreased in the moderate and severe regurgitation groups, with the decrease in the severe regurgitation group being greater than that in the moderate regurgitation group. Therefore, PBMV is effective for treating rheumatic mitral stenosis in Chinese patients with mild to severe mitral regurgitation. PMID:27034933

  13. The CALS Test Network MIL-D-28000 Class II reference drawing packet: Revision C

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-27

    This CALS Test Network MIL-D-28000 Class II Reference Drawing Packet contains the information needed to conduct tests of the engineering drawing subset, Class II, of the military specification MIL-D-28000 using IGES processors. The material is intended to demonstrate industry's and government's use of MIL-D-28000 in accordance with the CALS initiative. The CALS Test Network (CTN) is the organization tasked with demonstrating this digital data interchange among industry and government and will use this packet during CTN structured testing. The results derived from this testing will allow the CTN to suggest modifications to drafting techniques, CAD vendors' IGES processors, the IGES specification, and most importantly, the MIL-D-28000 military specification.

  14. Kinetics of atmospheric corrosion of mild steel in marine and rural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palraj, S.; Selvaraj, M.; Maruthan, K.; Natesan, M.

    2015-03-01

    In continuation of the extensive studies carried out to update the corrosion map of India, in this study, the degradation of mild steel by air pollutants was studied at 16 different locations from Nagore to Ammanichatram along the east coast of Tamilnadu, India over a period of two years. The weight loss study showed that the mild steel corrosion was more at Nagapattinam site, when compared to Ammanichatram and Maravakadu sites. A linear regression analysis of the experimental data was attempted to predict the mechanism of the corrosion. The composition of the corrosion products formed on the mild steel surfaces was identified by XRD technique. The corrosion rate values obtained are discussed in the light of the weathering parameters, atmospheric pollutants such as salt content & SO2 levels in the atmosphere, corrosion products formed on the mild steel surfaces.

  15. Existence of anti-periodic (differentiable) mild solutions to semilinear differential equations with nondense domain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinghuai; Zhang, Litao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the existence of anti-periodic (or anti-periodic differentiable) mild solutions to the semilinear differential equation [Formula: see text] with nondense domain. Furthermore, an example is given to illustrate our results. PMID:27350933

  16. Neurocognitive outcomes of children secondary to mild iodine deficiency in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Iodine deficiency is the most important preventable cause of brain damage worldwide. During pregnancy, severe iodine deficiency causes endemic cretinism, whereas mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency impairs neurocognitive function of the offspring. Numerous reports demonstrate the impact of iodine supplementation on prevention of cretinism, and recent studies evaluate the effects of iodine prophylaxis on neurocognitive development in children of women with mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency. Iodine prophylaxis is generally well tolerated without side effects for the pregnant women and the offspring. In France, the iodine status was recently considered as satisfactory in children and adult population, but regional studies conducted during the last two decades have shown that healthy women are mild-to-moderately iodine deficient during pregnancy. According to recent World Heath Organization guidelines, systematic iodine prophylaxis is recommended in women planning a pregnancy, during gestation and lactation in order to prevent maternal, neonatal and infantile consequences of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency. PMID:25934357

  17. Mild cognitive dysfunction: an epidemiological perspective with an emphasis on African Americans.

    PubMed

    Unverzagt, Frederick W; Sujuan Gao; Lane, Kathleen A; Callahan, Christopher; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Baiyewu, Olusegun; Gureje, Oye; Hall, Kathleen S; Hendrie, Hugh C

    2007-12-01

    This review begins with a historical accounting of the evolution of the concept of mild cognitive dysfunction, including nomenclature and criteria from Kral to Petersen. A critical analysis of the main elements relating to assessment and diagnosis of mild cognitive dysfunction is provided. Methodological limitations in design, measurement, and characterization, especially as they relate to older African Americans, are identified. Data from a 15-year longitudinal study of community-dwelling African Americans in Indianapolis, Indiana, indicate a 23% prevalence of all-cause mild cognitive dysfunction, with approximately 25% progressing to dementia in 2 years and another 25% reverting to normal cognition in the same interval. Factors contributing to this longitudinal variability in outcomes are reviewed, including the role of medical health factors. The review closes with suggestions for next steps in the epidemiological research of mild cognitive impairment.

  18. Tannin bark Melalauca cajuputi powell (gelam) as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Nur Atiqah Abu; Zakaria, Sarani; Hua, Chia Chin; Othman, Norinsan Kamil

    2014-09-01

    Tannin was extracted from gelam bark and used to produce corrosion inhibitor for mild steel. Tannin was extracted from gelam bark using 70% aqueous acetone for 6 hour. Tannin powder was characterization using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to analyse chemical component in tannin and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) for tannin physical structure. The tannin effect on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel has been investigated in 1Mol HCl solution for 6 hour followed ASTM. The weight loss method were applied to study the mild steel corrosion behavior in the present and absend of different concentration of tannin (250, 300, 350)ppm. Tannin act good inhibitor as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in acid medium. Surface morphology of carbon steel with and without inhibitor was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Neurocognitive outcomes of children secondary to mild iodine deficiency in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Iodine deficiency is the most important preventable cause of brain damage worldwide. During pregnancy, severe iodine deficiency causes endemic cretinism, whereas mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency impairs neurocognitive function of the offspring. Numerous reports demonstrate the impact of iodine supplementation on prevention of cretinism, and recent studies evaluate the effects of iodine prophylaxis on neurocognitive development in children of women with mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency. Iodine prophylaxis is generally well tolerated without side effects for the pregnant women and the offspring. In France, the iodine status was recently considered as satisfactory in children and adult population, but regional studies conducted during the last two decades have shown that healthy women are mild-to-moderately iodine deficient during pregnancy. According to recent World Heath Organization guidelines, systematic iodine prophylaxis is recommended in women planning a pregnancy, during gestation and lactation in order to prevent maternal, neonatal and infantile consequences of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency.

  20. Tannin bark Melalauca cajuputi powell (gelam) as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Talib, Nur Atiqah Abu; Zakaria, Sarani; Hua, Chia Chin; Othman, Norinsan Kamil

    2014-09-03

    Tannin was extracted from gelam bark and used to produce corrosion inhibitor for mild steel. Tannin was extracted from gelam bark using 70% aqueous acetone for 6 hour. Tannin powder was characterization using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to analyse chemical component in tannin and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) for tannin physical structure. The tannin effect on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel has been investigated in 1Mol HCl solution for 6 hour followed ASTM. The weight loss method were applied to study the mild steel corrosion behavior in the present and absend of different concentration of tannin (250, 300, 350)ppm. Tannin act good inhibitor as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in acid medium. Surface morphology of carbon steel with and without inhibitor was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Recurrent bleeding following traumatic hyphema due to mild hemophilia B (Christmas disease).

    PubMed

    Wilker, Shawn C; Singh, Annapurna; Ellis, Forrest J

    2007-12-01

    Traumatic hyphemas generally resolve spontaneously. When recurrent bleeding occurs, a coagulopathy should be suspected. We present a unique case of a traumatic hyphema with recurrent bleeding in association with mild hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency).

  2. Partial trisomy 1(q42-->qter): a new case with a mild phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Concolino, D; Cinti, R; Ferraro, L; Moricca, M T; Strisciuglio, P

    1998-01-01

    We report a female patient with a 46,XX,der(8)t(1;8)(q42.1;p23.3) karyotype who had a mild phenotype characterised by a few subtle dysmorphic features and mild developmental retardation, probably resulting from trisomy 1q42-->qter. The deletion on the short arm of the chromosome 8 appeared to be confined to the distal chromosomal segment. Images PMID:9475102

  3. Regional Neurodegeneration and Gliosis Are Amplified by Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Repeated at 24-Hour Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Amanda Nicholle; Saatman, Kathryn Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Most traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) that occur every year are classified as ‘mild’. Individuals involved in high-risk activities may sustain multiple mild TBIs. We evaluated the acute physiological and histopathological consequences of mild TBI in a mouse model, comparing sham injury, single impact, or 5 impacts at a 24- or 48-hour inter-injury interval. A single closed skull impact resulted in bilateral gliosis in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex that was proportional to impact depth. Midline impact, at a depth just above the threshold to induce transient unconsciousness, produced occasional axonal injury and degenerating neurons accompanied by astrogliosis in the entorhinal cortex and cerebellum. Mild TBI repeated every 24 hours resulted in bilateral hemorrhagic lesions in the entorhinal cortex along with significantly increased neurodegeneration and microglial activation despite diminished durations of apnea and unconsciousness with subsequent impacts. Astrogliosis and diffusely distributed axonal injury were also observed bilaterally in the cerebellum and the brainstem. When the interval between mild TBIs was increased to 48 hours, the pathological consequences were comparable to a single TBI. Together, these data suggest that in mice the brain remains at increased risk for damage for 24 hours after mild TBI despite reduced acute physiological responses to subsequent mild impacts. PMID:25232942

  4. Approach to the Patient with Mild Crohn's Disease: a 2016 Update.

    PubMed

    Scott, Frank I; Lichtenstein, Gary R

    2016-09-01

    Mild Crohn's disease (CD) is classified as those patients who are ambulatory, with <10 % weight loss, are eating and drinking without abdominal mass, tenderness, obstructive symptoms, or fever, and endoscopically they have non-progressive mild findings. Initial evaluation of mild CD should focus on assessment for high-risk features requiring more aggressive therapy. In contrast to moderate-to-severe disease, where therapy is focused on mucosal healing, the management of mild CD is focused on symptom management, while exposing the individual to minimal therapeutic risks. Budesonide is the most commonly used medication for mild CD given its safety profile. Assessment of inflammatory markers, in concert with computed-tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) enterographies and endoscopic studies, should be considered in clinical remission to ensure that mucosal inflammation is not present. Endoscopic inflammation can precede clinical recurrence. Individuals with mild CD require routine vaccination, monitoring for iron-deficiency anemia and vitamin D deficiency, and colorectal cancer screening when appropriate. PMID:27448619

  5. Adolescents with Mild Stunting Show Alterations in Glucose and Insulin Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    da Luz Santos, Carla Danusa; Clemente, Ana Paula Grotti; Martins, Vinicius José Baccin; Albuquerque, Maria Paula; Sawaya, Ana Lydia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate glucose and insulin profiles in adolescents with mild stunting and overweight in order to assess the possibility of increased predisposition to diabetes. Subjects and Methods. The study population consisted of 66 pubertal adolescents classified as mildly stunted (height-for-age z scores ≥−2 and <−1) or of normal stature, as well as overweight (body mass index ≥85th percentile) or normal weight. Beta-cell function and insulin resistance were evaluated according to the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Results. In the group with mild stunting, glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR levels were significantly higher in overweight adolescents compared with those of normal weight, whereas HOMA-B levels were significantly lower. Adolescents with mild stunting showed significantly higher accumulations of body and abdominal fat than their normal stature counterparts. Conclusions. The presence of mild stunting was associated with higher levels of glucose and insulin, diminished function of beta cells, and increased insulin resistance. These results reinforce the need for intervention in adolescents with mild stunting. PMID:21318152

  6. Very mild Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by increased sensitivity to mnemonic interference

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Jim M.; Balota, David A.; Warren, David E.; Cohen, Neal J.

    2014-01-01

    Early pathology and tissue loss in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) occurs in the hippocampus, a brain region that has recently been implicated in relational processing irrespective of delay. Thus, tasks that involve relational processing will especially tax the hippocampal memory system, and should be sensitive to even mild dysfunction typical of early AD. Here we used a short-lag, short-delay memory task previously shown to be sensitive to hippocampal integrity in an effort to discriminate cognitive changes due to healthy aging from those associated with very mild AD. Young adults, healthy older adults, and individuals with very mild AD (N = 30 for each group) participated in our investigation, which entailed attempting to find an exact match to a previously presented target among a series of stimuli that varied in perceptual similarity to the target stimulus. Older adults with very mild AD were less accurate than healthy older adults, who, in turn, were impaired relative to young adults. Older adults with very mild AD were also particularly susceptible to interference from intervening lure stimuli. A measure based on this finding was able to explain additional variance in differentiating those in the very mild stage of AD from healthy older adults after accounting for episodic memory and global cognition composite scores in logistic regression models. Our findings suggest that cognitive changes in early stage AD reflect aging along with an additional factor potentially centered on sensitivity to interference, thereby supporting multifactorial models of aging. PMID:24747209

  7. Very mild Alzheimer׳s disease is characterized by increased sensitivity to mnemonic interference.

    PubMed

    Monti, Jim M; Balota, David A; Warren, David E; Cohen, Neal J

    2014-07-01

    Early pathology and tissue loss in Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) occurs in the hippocampus, a brain region that has recently been implicated in relational processing irrespective of delay. Thus, tasks that involve relational processing will especially tax the hippocampal memory system, and should be sensitive to even mild dysfunction typical of early AD. Here we used a short-lag, short-delay memory task previously shown to be sensitive to hippocampal integrity in an effort to discriminate cognitive changes due to healthy aging from those associated with very mild AD. Young adults, healthy older adults, and individuals with very mild AD (N=30 for each group) participated in our investigation, which entailed attempting to find an exact match to a previously presented target among a series of stimuli that varied in perceptual similarity to the target stimulus. Older adults with very mild AD were less accurate than healthy older adults, who, in turn, were impaired relative to young adults. Older adults with very mild AD were also particularly susceptible to interference from intervening lure stimuli. A measure based on this finding was able to explain additional variance in differentiating those in the very mild stage of AD from healthy older adults after accounting for episodic memory and global cognition composite scores in logistic regression models. Our findings suggest that cognitive changes in early stage AD reflect aging along with an additional factor potentially centered on sensitivity to interference, thereby supporting multifactorial models of aging.

  8. Injury of the Arcuate Fasciculus in the Dominant Hemisphere in Patients With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Ah Young; Shin, So Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about injury of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). We investigated injury of the AF in the dominant hemisphere in patients with mild TBI, using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). We recruited 25 patients with injury of the left AF among 64 right-handed consecutive patients with mild TBI and 20 normal control subjects. DTTs of the left AF were reconstructed, and fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fiber number of the AF were measured. Among 64 consecutive patients, 25 (39%) patients showed injury of the left AF. The patient group showed lower FA value and fiber number with higher ADC value than the control group (P < 0.05). On K-WAB evaluation, aphasia quotient and language quotient were 95.9 ± 4.1 (range 85–100) and 95.0 ± 5.4 (range 80–100), respectively. However, 23 (92.0%) of 25 patients complained of language-related symptoms after TBI; paraphasia in 12 (48.0%) patients, deficits of comprehension in 4 (16.0%) patients, deficits of speech production in 1 (4.0%) patient, and >2 language symptoms in 6 (24.0%) patients. We found that a significant number (39%) of patients with mild TBI had injury of the AF in the dominant hemisphere and these patients had mild language deficit. These results suggest that DTT could provide useful information in detecting injury of the AF and evaluation of the AF using DTT would be necessary even in the case of a patient with mild TBI who complains of mild language deficit. PMID:26945425

  9. Effect of Harsh or Mild Extraction of Soil on Pesticide Leaching to Groundwater.

    PubMed

    Boesten, Jos J T I

    2016-07-01

    Assessment of leaching to groundwater is an important aspect of pesticide risk assessment. The first leaching tier usually consists of simulations with leaching scenarios based on pesticide-soil properties derived from laboratory studies. Because the extractability of pesticide residues in such studies decreases with time, the harshness of the extraction method influences these pesticide-soil properties. This study investigates the effect of using a mild or harsh extraction method on simulated leaching to groundwater with consideration of substances with a range of half-lives and organic matter sorption coefficient values for selected leaching scenarios. The model for linking the concentrations of the mild and the harsh systems was based on laboratory studies with two pesticides and a Dutch sandy soil and was tested against Canadian field studies with atrazine (6-chloro-2-ethyl-4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine). The degradation rate and the aged-sorption parameters of each "mild" soil-substance system were derived from a hypothetical laboratory incubation study using prescribed parameter values for the corresponding "harsh" soil-substance system. Simulations were performed for three European leaching scenarios (United Kingdom, France, Portugal). For the best-guess parameter set, the leaching concentrations of the harsh system were approximately equal to those of the mild system at leaching concentrations greater than 1 μg L and were at most approximately a factor of two higher than those of the mild systems at mild leaching concentrations between 0.01 and 0.1 μg L. However, an extreme parameter set led to harsh leaching concentrations that were at most approximately 10 times higher than the mild leaching concentrations at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 μg L. PMID:27380081

  10. Comparison of SNOMED CT versus Medcin Terminology Concept Coverage for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Montella, Diane; Brown, Steven H.; Elkin, Peter L.; Jackson, James C.; Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind; Welsh, Gail; Cotton, Bryan; Guillamondegui, Oscar D.; Lew, Henry; Taber, Katherine H.; Tupler, Larry A.; Vanderploeg, Rodney; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-01-01

    Background: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a “signature” injury of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Structured electronic data regarding TBI findings is important for research, population health and other secondary uses but requires appropriate underlying standard terminologies to ensure interoperability and reuse. Currently the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) uses the terminology SNOMED CT and the Department of Defense (DOD) uses Medcin. Methods: We developed a comprehensive case definition of mild TBI composed of 68 clinical terms. Using automated and manual techniques, we evaluated how well the mild TBI case definition terms could be represented by SNOMED CT and Medcin, and compared the results. We performed additional analysis stratified by whether the concepts were rated by a TBI expert panel as having High, Medium, or Low importance to the definition of mild TBI. Results: SNOMED CT sensitivity (recall) was 90% overall for coverage of mild TBI concepts, and Medcin sensitivity was 49%, p < 0.001 (using McNemar’s chi square). Positive predictive value (precision) for each was 100%. SNOMED CT outperformed Medcin for concept coverage independent of import rating by our TBI experts. Discussion: SNOMED CT was significantly better able to represent mild TBI concepts than Medcin. This finding may inform data gathering, management and sharing, and data exchange strategies between the VA and DOD for active duty soldiers and veterans with mild TBI. Since mild TBI is an important condition in the civilian population as well, the current study results may be useful also for the general medical setting. PMID:22195156

  11. Cooperative learning and social acceptance of children with mild intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Jacques, N; Wilton, K; Townsend, M

    1998-02-01

    The effects of the participation of non-disabled children in a cooperative learning programme on their social acceptance of classmates with mild intellectual disability was examined. A sample of 24 children with mild intellectual disability in the 9-11-year-old age-range was identified from educational psychologists' case records. All of the children were receiving mainstreaming special education programmes at the time of the study. Twelve of the children had previously attended special education classes, while the remainder had always attended regular classes. Half of the children's regular classes were randomly assigned to either receive an experimental cooperative learning programme or to serve as control classrooms. The non-disabled children in the experimental classes showed significant increases in their social acceptance (sociometric ratings) of the children with mild intellectual disability, both immediately following the programme and 5 weeks later, but no such increases were evident in the children in the control classrooms. This pattern held for both the former special class pupils and the children with mild intellectual disability who had never attended special classes. The results confirm the usefulness of cooperative learning strategies for enhancing the social acceptance of children with mild intellectual disability in mainstreaming special educational programmes, regardless of the nature of their previous special educational provisions. PMID:9534112

  12. Resilience and Other Possible Outcomes After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Karen A; Kempe, Chloe B; Edmed, Shannon L; Bonanno, George A

    2016-06-01

    The relation between resilience and mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) outcome has been theorized but empirical studies have been scarce. This systematic review aimed to describe the research in this area. Electronic databases (Medline, CINAHL, PsychINFO, SPORTdiscus, and PILOTS) were searched from inception to August 2015 for studies in which resilience was measured following TBI. The search terms included 'TBI' 'concussion' 'postconcussion' 'resilience' and 'hardiness'. Inclusion criteria were peer reviewed original research reports published in English, human participants aged 18 years and over with brain injury, and an accepted definition of mild TBI. Hand searching of identified articles was also undertaken. Of the 71 studies identified, five studies were accepted for review. These studies were formally assessed for risk of bias by two independent reviewers. Each study carried a risk of bias, most commonly a detection bias, but none were excluded on this basis. A narrative interpretation of the findings was used because the studies reflected fundamental differences in the conceptualization of resilience. No studies employed a trajectory based approach to measure a resilient outcome. In most cases, the eligible studies assessed trait resilience with a scale and used it as a predictor of outcome (postconcussion symptoms). Three of these studies showed that greater trait resilience was associated with better mild TBI outcomes (fewer symptoms). Future research of the adult mild TBI response that predicts a resilient outcome is encouraged. These studies could yield empirical evidence for a resilient, and other possible mild TBI outcomes.

  13. Microbiologically mediated reduction in the pitting of mild steel overlaid with plywood

    SciTech Connect

    Soracco, R J; Berger, L R; Berger, J A; Mayack, L A; Pope, D H; Wilde, E W

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the role of microorganisms in the pitting of mild steel flooring, which had been overlaid with plywood. The experimental setups consisted of 4.8 mm (3/16 in.) mild steel plates covered with 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) thick pieces of plywood which were exposed to several different aqueous media supplemented with various combinations of a soil suspension and selected inorganic and organic compounds. Half of the replicate metal-wood-water setups were sterilized and aseptically maintained during incubation after which they were checked for the presence of viable microorganisms and pitting of the mild steel. Results of the first set of experiments showed that pitting of the mild steel specimens in many of these setups occurred after a reasonably short incubation period (3 to 6 months). However, the method used to exclude microorganisms by sterilizing the components separately was unsuccessful. In a second set of experiments, setups were sterilized by exposure to gamma irradiation after they had been assembled. The sterilized setups remained sterile after incubation while those which were not originally sterile still contained viable microorganisms. Pitting of the mild steel specimens was more severe when they were exposed to sterile conditions than when viable microorganisms were present. These experiments showed that while microorganisms are known to enhance corrosion processes in some circumstances, their presence can reduce corrosion in others.

  14. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption among Special School Students with Mild Intellectual Disability in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Mok, W. K.; Ling, T. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to predict the fruit and vegetable consumption intention of students with mild intellectual disability in Hong Kong by the application of Ajzen’s Theory of Planned Behaviour. Methods: 50 students with mild intellectual disability (30 male and 20 female), ranging in age from 15 to 38 years, were participated in this study. By means of face-to-face interviews, demographic data, Food Preference and variables of Theory of Planned Behaviour, such as Attitude, Subjective Norm and Perceived Behavioural Control were measured. Results: 20%, 28% and 10% students with mild intellectual disability were rated to be overweight, obese and severely obese respectively. The rest of 10% were classified to be underweight. Regarding the daily intake of fruit and vegetable, 96% students with mild intellectual disability failed to consume sufficient amount. The variables of Theory of Planned Behaviour explained 47.7% of fruit and vegetable consumption intention with significant factors of Attitude, Subjective Norm and Perceived Behavioural Control. Food Preference was found to be a useful construct and further improve the prediction by about 7% after incorporating into the model. Conclusions: Results of this study indicated that Theory of Planned Behaviour is a useful model to predict dietary intention of students with mild intellectual disability in Hong Kong. Food Preference was a significant predictor to model the intention of fruit and vegetable consumption among students other than Attitude, Subjective Norm and Perceived Behavioural Control. PMID:27045396

  15. Time Course of Mild Arm Lymphedema After Breast Conservation Treatment for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Cheville, Andrea; Solin, Lawrence J.; Dutta, Pinaki; Both, Stefan; Harris, Eleanor

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Arm lymphedema is a potential consequence of the treatment for breast carcinoma. The objective of this retrospective study was to characterize the progression of mild arm lymphedema after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The study cohort was drawn from 1,713 consecutive Stage I or II breast cancer patients who underwent breast conservation therapy, including axillary staging followed by radiation. Arm lymphedema was documented in 266 (16%) of 1,713 patients. One hundred nine patients, 6% of the overall group and 40% of the patients with arm lymphedema, presented with mild arm lymphedema, defined as a difference of 2 cm or less between the measured circumferences of the affected and unaffected arms. Results: Among the 109 patients with mild arm lymphedema at the time of arm lymphedema diagnosis, the rate of freedom from progression to more severe lymphedema was 79% at 1 year, 66% at 3 years, and 52% at 5 years. The patients who were morbidly obese, had positive axillary lymph nodes, or received supraclavicular irradiation at the time of breast cancer treatment were at higher risk of progression from mild arm lymphedema to more severe edema. Conclusions: Mild arm lymphedema, generally considered to be a minor complication after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer, was associated with a risk of progression to a more severe grade of arm lymphedema in a substantial fraction of patients.

  16. Resilience and Other Possible Outcomes After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Karen A; Kempe, Chloe B; Edmed, Shannon L; Bonanno, George A

    2016-06-01

    The relation between resilience and mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) outcome has been theorized but empirical studies have been scarce. This systematic review aimed to describe the research in this area. Electronic databases (Medline, CINAHL, PsychINFO, SPORTdiscus, and PILOTS) were searched from inception to August 2015 for studies in which resilience was measured following TBI. The search terms included 'TBI' 'concussion' 'postconcussion' 'resilience' and 'hardiness'. Inclusion criteria were peer reviewed original research reports published in English, human participants aged 18 years and over with brain injury, and an accepted definition of mild TBI. Hand searching of identified articles was also undertaken. Of the 71 studies identified, five studies were accepted for review. These studies were formally assessed for risk of bias by two independent reviewers. Each study carried a risk of bias, most commonly a detection bias, but none were excluded on this basis. A narrative interpretation of the findings was used because the studies reflected fundamental differences in the conceptualization of resilience. No studies employed a trajectory based approach to measure a resilient outcome. In most cases, the eligible studies assessed trait resilience with a scale and used it as a predictor of outcome (postconcussion symptoms). Three of these studies showed that greater trait resilience was associated with better mild TBI outcomes (fewer symptoms). Future research of the adult mild TBI response that predicts a resilient outcome is encouraged. These studies could yield empirical evidence for a resilient, and other possible mild TBI outcomes. PMID:27154289

  17. Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency impairs hippocampal myelinated growth in lactational rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Min, Hui; Song, Binbin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xi, Qi; Chen, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency causes neurological deficits and impairments of brain function in offspring. Hypothyroxinemia is prevalent in developing and developed countries alike. However, the mechanism underlying these deficits remains less well known. Given that the myelin plays an important role in learning and memory function, we hypothesize that hippocampal myelinated growth may be impaired in rat offspring exposed to hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency. To test this hypothesis, the female Wistar rats were used and four experimental groups were prepared: (1) control; (2) maternal mild iodine deficiency diet inducing hypothyroxinemia; (3) hypothyroidism induced by maternal severe iodine deficiency diet; (4) hypothyroidism induced by maternal methimazole water. The rats were fed the diet from 3 months before pregnancy to the end of lactation. Our results showed that the physiological changes occuring in the hippocampal myelin were altered in the mild iodine deficiency group as indicated by the results of immunofluorescence of myelin basic proteins on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Moreover, hypothyroxinemia reduced the expressions of oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 and myelin-related proteins in the treatments on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Our data suggested that hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency may impair myelinated growth of the offspring.

  18. Should men with mild erectile dysfunction be closely evaluated for cardiovascular diseases in the Korean population?

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Yong; Son, Hwancheol; Kim, Soo Woong; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2014-06-01

    This study compared demographic characteristics and prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities between men with mild erectile dysfunction (ED) and men with more severe ED. Men with 6-month history of ED and in monogamous heterosexual relationships were included. Non-responders to type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibitors or patients receiving regular treatment with nitrate, anticoagulants, androgens, and anti-androgens were excluded. ED was defined according to the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire score: no ED (≥26), mild ED (22-25), and others (<22). The review identified 70 patients with mild ED (6.0%, group A) and 1098 patients with more severe ED (94.0%, group B) were included. Of the patients in group B, 365 had mild-to-moderate ED (30.5%), 505 had moderate ED (43.2%), and 233 had severe ED (20.0%). Mean ages and body mass indices showed no differences between groups A and B. Group A had shorter mean duration of ED (p = 0.025). Although patients in group A had milder ED with shorter duration than group B patients, cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension and lipid disorder were still common for group A. The most common comorbidity was diabetes, which was twice as likely for patients in group B. Except for diabetes the prevalence of all diseases was comparable between the two groups. In conclusion, patients with mild ED should be closely evaluated for cardiovascular comorbidities.

  19. Milder is better? advantages and disadvantages of "mild" ovarian stimulation for human in vitro fertilization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, several steps have been made aiming at rendering human IVF more successful on one side, more tolerable on the other side. The "mild" ovarian stimulation approach, in which a lower-than-average dose of exogenous gonadotropins is given and gonadotropin treatment is started from day 2 to 7 of the cycle, represents a significant step toward a more patient's friendly IVF. However, a clear view of its virtues and defects is still lacking, because only a few prospective randomized trials comparing "mild" vs. conventional stimulation exist, and they do not consider some important aspects, such as, e.g., thawing cycles. This review gives a complete panorama of the "mild" stimulation philosophy, showing its advantages vs. conventional ovarian stimulation, but also discussing its disadvantages. Both patients with a normal ovarian responsiveness to exogenous gonadotropins and women with a poor ovarian reserve are considered. Overall, we conclude that the level of evidence supporting the use of "mild" stimulation protocols is still rather poor, and further, properly powered prospective studies about "mild" treatment regimens are required. PMID:21324155

  20. Altered Cerebellar White Matter Integrity in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in the Acute Stage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongqiu; Wu, Wenzhong; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Tianyao; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Guoxing; Chen, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Imaging studies of traumatic brain injury demonstrate that the cerebellum is often affected. We aim to examine fractional anisotropy alteration in acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients in cerebellum-related white matter tracts. Materials and Methods This prospective study included 47 mild traumatic brain injury patients in the acute stage and 37 controls. MR imaging and neurocognitive tests were performed in patients within 7 days of injury. White matter integrity was examined by using diffusion tensor imaging. We used three approaches, tract-based spatial statistics, graphical-model-based multivariate analysis, and region-of-interest analysis, to detect altered cerebellar white matter integrity in mild traumatic brain injury patients. Results Results from three analysis methods were in accordance with each other, and suggested fractional anisotropy in the middle cerebellar peduncle and the pontine crossing tract was changed in the acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients, relative to controls (adjusted p-value < 0.05). Higher fractional anisotropy in the middle cerebellar peduncle was associated with worse performance in the fluid cognition composite (r = -0.289, p-value = 0.037). Conclusion Altered cerebellar fractional anisotropy in acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients is localized in specific regions and statistically associated with cognitive deficits detectable on neurocognitive testing. PMID:26967320

  1. Performance of Terminalia catappa on mild steel corrosion in HCl medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Loto, Cleophas Akintoye; Popoola, Abimbola Patricia Idowu; Obi, Chukwunonso Ezekiel; Sonoiki, Oluwatobi Oluwasegun Oluwagbenga; Oni, Adeoluwa Barnabas; Alabi, Ayomide Samuel; Olarewaju, Abisola Ebunoluwa

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates Terminalia catappa leaf-extract performance on mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl). Electrochemical linear-sweep-voltametry (LSV) and gravimetric techniques were employed for assessing the mild steel corrosion in the HCl test-environment of immersion having different concentrations of the leaf-extract. Results showed that all the concentrations of the Terminalia catappa leaf-extract employed inhibited mild steel corrosion from the electrochemical (potentiodynamic) and the gravimetric considerations. Also, corrosion rate from LSV exhibited excellent correlation (R = 95.77%, Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) = 91.72% and p-value = 0.02383) with linear function of the corrosion rate from gravimetric method, for the leaf-extract concentrations employed. From the experimental model, 6 g/L Terminalia catappa exhibited optimal inhibition efficiency, η = 78.07%, while 8 g/L Terminalia catappa was predicted as optimally effective, η = 75.41%, by the correlation fitting model, at inhibiting mild steel corrosion in the medium. However, adsorption isotherm modelling showed that the experimental gravimetric, experimental potentiodynamic and predicted potentiodynamic data exhibited agreements in following the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. All the three data models indicated favourable adsorption and identified physisorption as the prevalent adsorption mechanism of Terminalia catappa leaf-extract on mild steel immersed in the 0.5 M HCl medium.

  2. Mild coarctation of the aorta: to touch or not to touch the patient?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Randles, Amanda; Rikhtegar Nezami, Farhad; Partida, Ramon; Nakamura, Kenta; Staziaki, Pedro V.; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Bhatt, Ami; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2015-11-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (COA) is an aortic obstruction. A peak-to-peak trans-coarctation pressure gradient (PKdP) of greater than 20 mmHg warns severe COA and the need for interventional/surgical repair. The optimal method and timing of intervention remain uncertain especially for mild COA (PKdP <20 mmHg); even it is unclear if mild COA should be treated at all. Although it was recently suggested that treatment strategies for mild COA may need to be redefined as transcatheter interventions emerge, benefits of such interventions are unclear. We investigated the effects of transcatheter interventions on the aorta and left ventricle (LV) hemodynamics in 11 patients with mild COA using a developed computational fluid dynamics and lumped parameter modeling framework along with particle image velocimetry and clinical measurements. Such interventions can improve aortic hemodynamics to some extent (e.g., time-averaged wall shear stress and kinetic energy were reduced by about 20%). However there is no concomitant effect on the LV hemodynamics (e.g., stroke work and LV pressure were reduced by only less than 4%). Our computational approach can effectively predict clinical conditions. Herein one must question intervention for mild COA, as it has limited utility in reducing myocardial strain.

  3. Differences and the relationship in default mode network intrinsic activity and functional connectivity in mild Alzheimer's disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Marina; Teixeira, Camila Vieira Ligo; Nogueira, Mateus Henrique; de Campos, Brunno Machado; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; Cendes, Fernando; Balthazar, Marcio Luiz Figueredo

    2014-10-01

    There is evidence that the default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and few studies also reported a decrease in DMN intrinsic activity, measured by the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFFs). In this study, we analyzed the relationship between DMN intrinsic activity and functional connectivity, as well as their possible implications on cognition in patients with mild AD and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and healthy controls. In addition, we evaluated the differences both in connectivity and ALFF values between these groups. We recruited 29 controls, 20 aMCI, and 32 mild AD patients. To identify the DMN, functional connectivity was calculated by placing a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Within the DMN mask obtained, we calculated regional average ALFFs. Compared with controls, aMCI patients showed decreased ALFFs in the temporal region; compared with AD, aMCI showed higher values in the PCC but lower in the temporal area. The mild AD group had lower ALFFs in the PCC compared with controls. There was no difference between the connectivity in the aMCI group compared with the other groups, but AD patients showed decreased connectivity in the frontal, parietal, and PCC. Also, PCC ALFFs correlated to functional connectivity in nearly all subregions. Cognitive tests correlated to connectivity values but not to ALFFs. In conclusion, we found that DMN connectivity and ALFFs are correlated in these groups. Decreased PCC ALFFs disrupt the DMN functional organization, leading to cognitive problems in the AD spectrum.

  4. Differences and the Relationship in Default Mode Network Intrinsic Activity and Functional Connectivity in Mild Alzheimer's Disease and Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Marina; Teixeira, Camila Vieira Ligo; Nogueira, Mateus Henrique; de Campos, Brunno Machado; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; Cendes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There is evidence that the default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and few studies also reported a decrease in DMN intrinsic activity, measured by the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFFs). In this study, we analyzed the relationship between DMN intrinsic activity and functional connectivity, as well as their possible implications on cognition in patients with mild AD and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and healthy controls. In addition, we evaluated the differences both in connectivity and ALFF values between these groups. We recruited 29 controls, 20 aMCI, and 32 mild AD patients. To identify the DMN, functional connectivity was calculated by placing a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Within the DMN mask obtained, we calculated regional average ALFFs. Compared with controls, aMCI patients showed decreased ALFFs in the temporal region; compared with AD, aMCI showed higher values in the PCC but lower in the temporal area. The mild AD group had lower ALFFs in the PCC compared with controls. There was no difference between the connectivity in the aMCI group compared with the other groups, but AD patients showed decreased connectivity in the frontal, parietal, and PCC. Also, PCC ALFFs correlated to functional connectivity in nearly all subregions. Cognitive tests correlated to connectivity values but not to ALFFs. In conclusion, we found that DMN connectivity and ALFFs are correlated in these groups. Decreased PCC ALFFs disrupt the DMN functional organization, leading to cognitive problems in the AD spectrum. PMID:25026537

  5. Nano-TiO(2) improve the photosynthesis of tomato leaves under mild heat stress.

    PubMed

    Qi, Mingfang; Liu, Yufeng; Li, Tianlai

    2013-12-01

    Nano-TiO(2) has been reported to promote photosynthesis in some crops; however, the mechanism behind this action remains unknown. In this research, the effects of nano-TiO(2) on leaf photosynthesis under mild heat stress were investigated. Results showed that the net photosynthetic rate, conductance to H2O, and transpiration rate of tomato leaves increased after application of an appropriate concentration of nano-TiO(2). Nano-TiO(2) also significantly decreased the minimum chlorophyll fluorescence and relative electron transport in leaves. Under mild heat stress, Nano-TiO(2) increased regulated photosystem II (PS II) energy dissipation and decreased non-regulated PS II energy dissipation. These results indicate that nano-TiO(2) plays a positive role in promoting photosynthesis in tomato leaves under mild heat stress. PMID:24214855

  6. The serial position effect in mild and moderately severe vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Paul, Robert H; Cohen, Ronald A; Moser, David J; Zawacki, Tricia M; Gordon, Norman

    2002-05-01

    The present study examined the serial position effect in 2 subgroups of individuals with vascular dementia (VaD). Nineteen individuals with mild VaD and 17 individuals with moderate VaD were administered the California Verbal Learning Test. Both groups were impaired on a general memory measure, and the moderately impaired group demonstrated significantly poorer recall than the mildly impaired group on the first learning trial and on total learning across trials. In addition, individuals with mild dementia demonstrated an intact primacy and recency effect, whereas individuals with moderate dementia demonstrated neither primacy nor recency effects. The latter findings are consistent with studies examining the serial position effect in other dementia populations, and suggests that the absence of primacy and recency effects in more advanced dementia may occur regardless of dementia type.

  7. Development of an advanced continuous mild gasification process for the production of coproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.W.; Cha, C.Y.; Kang, T.W.; Vaillancourt, M.B.

    1990-12-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) teamed with the AMAX Research and Development Center and Riley Stoker Corporation on Development of an Advanced, Continuous Mild-Gasification Process for the Production of Coproducts under contract DE-AC21-87MC24268 with the Morgantown Energy Technology of the US Department of Energy. The strategy for this project is to produce electrode binder pitch and diesel fuel blending stock by mild gasification of Wyodak coal. The char is upgraded to produce anode-grade carbon, carbon black, and activated carbon. This report describes results of mild-gasification tests conducted by WRI. Char upgrading tests conducted by AMAX will be described in a separate report.

  8. Retrograde enhancement of memory by mild flurothyl treatment in the chick.

    PubMed

    Cherkin, A; Meinecke, R O; Garman, M W

    1975-02-01

    Strong flurothyl treatment (1.7% v/v for 8 min) produces retrograde amnesia in chicks when administered as long as 24 hr after one-trial avoidance training with a strongly aversive stimulus. Mild flurothyl treatment (0.2% v/v for 8 min) produced retrograde enhancement when administered as long as 16 min after similar training with a moderately aversive stimulus. The moderate training followed by mild flurothyl treatment enhanced 24-hr retention to the level found after strong training alone. Enhanced retention persisted for at least 72 hr; nonspecific performance effects faded within 48 hr. The predominant dose-dependent and time-dependent enhancement effect of mild flurothyl treatment is interpreted as improved memory consolidation.

  9. Distinctive sleep problems in children with perinatal moderate or mild hypoxic-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xin; Cheng, Zhi; Sun, Bin; Huang, Jian; Wang, Liang; Han, Xing; Yang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wen; Cao, Xujun; Miao, Po; Wang, Ying; Guo, Wanliang; Gu, Qin; Feng, Xing

    2016-02-12

    Extensive studies focus on the cognitive and motor impairments after perinatal hypoxic-ischemia (HI). Sleep problems, although reported to be associated with cerebral palsy (CP), are often overlooked in non-severe HI patients. Here, by investigating the sleep qualities of children with different degrees of HI, we discovered that sleep initiation and maintenance, sleep-related breathing problems, or circadian rhythmic issues were highly associated with children of moderate or mild HI, respectively. Follow-up MRI studies in 2-year old patients showed that periventricular white matter lesions including periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) were prevalent in moderate, but not mild, HI children. In contrast, the occurrence of pineal cysts had a high risk in children with mild HI. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms of distinctive sleep problems associated with children of different degrees of HI, and therefore sheds light on the studies of targeted therapeutic treatments for sleep disorders in children who suffer from HI. PMID:26762786

  10. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.A.; Wright, R.E.; Im, C.J.; Henkelman, M.R.; O`Neal, G.W.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a continuous mild gasification process to convert highly caking coals to coal liquids, char and coke for near term commercial application. Task 3, Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study, has been underway since September 1989. In char upgrading studies, ``green`` uncured char briquettes have been prepared and calcined in 20-pound batches to evaluate the effects of char, binders, and heating conditions on final coke properties. A total of 150. formulations have been tested thus far in this work. Work on Task 4, Process Development Unit (PDU) Mild Gasification Study, has been in progress since February 1991, with the completion of a Continuous Mild Gasification Unit (CMGU) with a design rate of 1000 lb./hr. Since start-up of the CMGU, there have been 72 runs with a variety of operating conditions and coal types.

  11. Causation of Permanent Unilateral and Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss in Children

    PubMed Central

    Tharpe, Anne Marie; Sladen, Douglas P.

    2008-01-01

    Children with permanent unilateral or mild bilateral hearing loss have been a focus of concern by audiologists, educators, and physicians for at least 2 decades. These children are known to be at risk for psychoeducational difficulties. However, despite this concern, little has been learned about the causative factors of these hearing losses and how those factors might be contributing to child development. This review of known causes of permanent unilateral and mild bilateral hearing loss in children is meant to draw attention to the importance of the search for etiologic factors. That is, the identification of the hearing loss should not signal the end of the diagnostic process but, rather, the beginning of a search for causation. With the combined efforts of audiologists, otolaryngologists, pediatricians, geneticists, and other medical professionals, we may enhance our understanding of the primary causes of unilateral and mild bilateral hearing loss and, perhaps, create links between causative factors and psychosocial and psychoeducational outcomes. PMID:18270175

  12. Distinctive sleep problems in children with perinatal moderate or mild hypoxic-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xin; Cheng, Zhi; Sun, Bin; Huang, Jian; Wang, Liang; Han, Xing; Yang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wen; Cao, Xujun; Miao, Po; Wang, Ying; Guo, Wanliang; Gu, Qin; Feng, Xing

    2016-02-12

    Extensive studies focus on the cognitive and motor impairments after perinatal hypoxic-ischemia (HI). Sleep problems, although reported to be associated with cerebral palsy (CP), are often overlooked in non-severe HI patients. Here, by investigating the sleep qualities of children with different degrees of HI, we discovered that sleep initiation and maintenance, sleep-related breathing problems, or circadian rhythmic issues were highly associated with children of moderate or mild HI, respectively. Follow-up MRI studies in 2-year old patients showed that periventricular white matter lesions including periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) were prevalent in moderate, but not mild, HI children. In contrast, the occurrence of pineal cysts had a high risk in children with mild HI. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms of distinctive sleep problems associated with children of different degrees of HI, and therefore sheds light on the studies of targeted therapeutic treatments for sleep disorders in children who suffer from HI.

  13. Medical-School Partnership in Guiding Return to School Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Youth.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Gerard A

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury is recognized as a prevalent and significant risk concern for youth. Appropriate school return is particularly challenging. The medical and school systems must be prepared partners to support the school return of the student with mild traumatic brain injury. Medical providers must be trained in assessment and management skills with a focused understanding of school demands. Schools must develop policies and procedures to prepare staff to support a gradual return process with the necessary academic accommodations. Ongoing communication between the family, student, school, and medical provider is essential to supporting recovery. A systematic gradual return to school process is proposed including levels of recommended activity and criteria for advancement. Targets for intervention are described with associated strategies for supporting recovery. A 10-element Progressive Activities of Controlled Exertion (PACE) model for activity-exertion management is introduced to manage symptom exacerbation. A strong medical-school partnership will maximize outcomes for students with mild traumatic brain injury.

  14. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars suggests that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. If early Mars surface geochemical conditions were neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then large carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would preclude the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of the proposed work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions.

  15. A model to guide the rehabilitation of high-functioning employees after mild brain injury.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Matthew B

    2010-01-01

    Impairment in executive functioning can occur after mild stroke, mild Traumatic Brain Injury, and neurodegenerative disease, and this can have deleterious effects on employment outcomes, occupational functioning, and general quality of life. What is not as well identified is the symbiotic relationship between executive functioning and other important psychosocial constructs inherent in successful employees ("Employee Performance Enablers"), and how various aspects of the employment environment can enable or inhibit the success of the employee with executive functioning deficits in meeting their essential job functions ("Workplace Ecology"). From an extensive review of the literature and the author's practice experience, a clinical model was developed to elucidate these two critical variables, as well as to provide guidance for organizing, planning, and implementing interventions that will address both employee enablers and workplace ecology to affect positive return to work outcomes for individuals with mild brain injury. PMID:20714101

  16. Human capabilities, mild autism, deafness and the morality of embryo selection.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Pier; Welin, Stellan

    2013-11-01

    A preimplantation genetic test to discriminate between severe and mild autism spectrum disorder might be developed in the foreseeable future. Recently, the philosophers Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane claimed that there are strong reasons for prospective parents to make use of such a test to prevent the birth of children who are disposed to autism or Asperger's disorder. In this paper we will criticize this claim. We will discuss the morality of selection for mild autism in embryo selection in a hypothetical in vitro fertilization (IVF) situation where preimplantation genetic diagnosis is performed and compare this with a similar selection for congenital deafness. To do this we first discuss relevant human differences. We then introduce the principle of human capabilities (PC) and compare this principle with the principle of procreative beneficence (PB) introduced by Savulescu and Kahane. We apply the two principles to selection for mild autism and selection for congenital deafness. We argue that PC allows for the selection for mild autism but rules out selection for congenital deafness. PB will not give clear answers; the ruling of PB depends to a large extent on expected social, cultural and political developments. We will argue that PC is preferable to PB. We will discuss arguments for the value of mild autism for individuals who have this condition and argue that they are able to lead a life with human dignity provided autism-friendly social circumstances are present. Neither PC nor PB yields strong reasons for prospective parents to seek to prevent the birth of children who are disposed to mild autism spectrum disorder.

  17. Human capabilities, mild autism, deafness and the morality of embryo selection.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Pier; Welin, Stellan

    2013-11-01

    A preimplantation genetic test to discriminate between severe and mild autism spectrum disorder might be developed in the foreseeable future. Recently, the philosophers Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane claimed that there are strong reasons for prospective parents to make use of such a test to prevent the birth of children who are disposed to autism or Asperger's disorder. In this paper we will criticize this claim. We will discuss the morality of selection for mild autism in embryo selection in a hypothetical in vitro fertilization (IVF) situation where preimplantation genetic diagnosis is performed and compare this with a similar selection for congenital deafness. To do this we first discuss relevant human differences. We then introduce the principle of human capabilities (PC) and compare this principle with the principle of procreative beneficence (PB) introduced by Savulescu and Kahane. We apply the two principles to selection for mild autism and selection for congenital deafness. We argue that PC allows for the selection for mild autism but rules out selection for congenital deafness. PB will not give clear answers; the ruling of PB depends to a large extent on expected social, cultural and political developments. We will argue that PC is preferable to PB. We will discuss arguments for the value of mild autism for individuals who have this condition and argue that they are able to lead a life with human dignity provided autism-friendly social circumstances are present. Neither PC nor PB yields strong reasons for prospective parents to seek to prevent the birth of children who are disposed to mild autism spectrum disorder. PMID:23334404

  18. Mild cold effects on hunger, food intake, satiety and skin temperature in humans

    PubMed Central

    Langeveld, M; Tan, C Y; Virtue, S; Ambler, G K; Watson, L P E; Murgatroyd, P R; Chatterjee, V K; Vidal-Puig, A

    2016-01-01

    Background Mild cold exposure increases energy expenditure and can influence energy balance, but at the same time it does not increase appetite and energy intake. Objective To quantify dermal insulative cold response, we assessed thermal comfort and skin temperatures changes by infrared thermography. Methods We exposed healthy volunteers to either a single episode of environmental mild cold or thermoneutrality. We measured hunger sensation and actual free food intake. After a thermoneutral overnight stay, five males and five females were exposed to either 18°C (mild cold) or 24°C (thermoneutrality) for 2.5 h. Metabolic rate, vital signs, skin temperature, blood biochemistry, cold and hunger scores were measured at baseline and for every 30 min during the temperature intervention. This was followed by an ad libitum meal to obtain the actual desired energy intake after cold exposure. Results We could replicate the cold-induced increase in REE. But no differences were detected in hunger, food intake, or satiety after mild cold exposure compared with thermoneutrality. After long-term cold exposure, high cold sensation scores were reported, which were negatively correlated with thermogenesis. Skin temperature in the sternal area was tightly correlated with the increase in energy expenditure. Conclusions It is concluded that short-term mild cold exposure increases energy expenditure without changes in food intake. Mild cold exposure resulted in significant thermal discomfort, which was negatively correlated with the increase in energy expenditure. Moreover, there is a great between-subject variability in cold response. These data provide further insights on cold exposure as an anti-obesity measure. PMID:26864459

  19. Effect of mild hypothermia on focal cerebral ischemia. Review of experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Takahito; Tamura, Akira; Fukui, Shinji; Hossmann, Konstantin-Alexander

    2003-07-01

    The purposes of this review are to clarify the effect of hypothermia therapy on focal cerebral ischemia in rats, and to consider the relevancy of its application to human focal cerebral ischemia. Since 1990, 26 reports confirming the brain-protecting effect of hypothermia in rat focal cerebral ischemia models have been published. Seventy-four experimental groups in these 26 reports were classified as having transient middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAO) with mild hypothermia (group A; 43 groups), permanent MCAO with mild hypothermia (group B; 14 groups), permanent MCAO with deep hypothermia (group C; 8 groups) and transient or permanent MCAO with mild hyperthermia (group D; 9 groups). The results were evaluated as the % infarct volume change caused by hypothermia or hyperthermia compared with the infarct volume in normothermic animals. The effectiveness was confirmed in 36 (83%) of the 43 groups in group A, 10 (71%) of the 14 in group B, and six (75%) of the eight in group C. The infarct volume of eight of the nine groups in group D was markedly aggravated. The percent infarct volume change was 55.3% +/- 27.1% in group A, 57.6% +/- 24.7% in group B, 60.8% +/- 45.5% in group C, and 189.7% +/- 89.4% in group D. For effective reduction of the infarct volume, hypothermia should be started during ischemia or within 1 h, at latest, after the beginning of reperfusion in the rat transient MCAO model. However, it is not clear whether this neuroprotective effect of hypothermia can also be observed in the chronic stage, such as several months later. Keeping the body temperature normothermic in order to avoid mild hyperthermia seems to be rather important for not aggravating cerebral infarction. Clinical randomized studies on the efficacy of mild hypothermia for focal cerebral ischemia and sophisticated mild hypothermia therapy techniques are mandatory.

  20. Abnormal verbal event related potentials in mild cognitive impairment and incipient Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Olichney, J; Morris, S; Ochoa, C; Salmon, D; Thal, L; Kutas, M; Iragui, V

    2002-01-01

    Background: It has been reported that patients with amnesia have a reduced effect of word repetition upon the late positive component of the event related potential (ERP), which peaks at around 600 ms after word onset. Objective: To study a word repetition ERP paradigm in subjects with mild cognitive impairment. Subjects: 14 patients with mild cognitive impairment (mean mini-mental state examination score = 27); 14 normal elderly controls. Methods: Auditory category statements were each followed by a single visual target word (50% "congruous" category exemplars, 50% "incongruous") while ERPs were recorded. N400 (an ERP component elicited by semantically "incongruous" words) and LPC amplitude data were submitted to analysis of variance. Results: The latency of the N400 was slower in mild cognitive impairment. In normal controls, the ERPs to "congruous" targets showed a late positive component to new words, which was greatly diminished with repetition. This repetition effect in normal subjects started before 300 ms at right frontal sites, and peaked at ∼600 ms post-stimulus over posterior sites. In contrast, the group with mild cognitive impairment had a reduced repetition effect (p < 0.02), which started around 500 ms, with a more central distribution. Further comparisons within the cognitive impairment group showed no appreciable congruous word repetition effect among seven individuals who subsequently converted to probable Alzheimer's disease. The congruous word repetition effect in the group with mild cognitive impairment was almost entirely accounted for by the non-converters. The amplitude of the congruous late positive component word repetition effect was significantly correlated (0.38 ≤ r ≤ 0.73) with several verbal memory measures. Conclusions: The congruous word repetition ERP effect appears sensitive to the memory impairment in mild cognitive impairment and could have value in predicting incipient Alzheimer's disease. PMID:12235303

  1. Molecular Evidence for Differences in Endometrium in Severe Versus Mild Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Aghajanova, Lusine; Giudice, Linda C.

    2011-01-01

    Women with stage III/IV versus stage I/II endometriosis have lower implantation and pregnancy rates in natural and assisted reproduction cycles. To elucidate potential molecular mechanisms underlying these clinical observations, herein we investigated the transcriptome of eutopic endometrium across the menstrual cycle in the setting of severe versus mild endometriosis. Proliferative (PE), early secretory (ESE), and mid-secretory (MSE) endometrial tissues were obtained from 63 participants with endometriosis (19 mild and 44 severe). Purified RNA was subjected to microarray analysis using the Gene 1.0 ST Affymetrix platform. Data were analyzed with GeneSpring and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and subsequently validated. Comparison of differentially regulated genes, analyzed by cycle phase, revealed dysregulation of progesterone and/or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-regulated genes and genes related to thyroid hormone action and metabolism. Also, members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway were observed, with the greatest upregulation of EGFR in severe versus mild disease during the early secretory phase. The extracellular matrix proteoglycan versican (VCAN), which regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis, was the most highly expressed gene in severe versus mild disease. Upregulation of microRNA 21 (MIR21) and DICER1 transcripts suggests roles for microRNAs (miRNAs) in the pathogenesis of severe versus mild endometriosis, potentially through regulation of gene silencing and epigenetic mechanisms. These observed differences in transcriptomic signatures and signaling pathways may result in poorly programmed endometrium during the cycle, contributing to lower implantation and pregnancy rates in women with severe versus mild endometriosis. PMID:21063030

  2. Tau Reduction Diminishes Spatial Learning and Memory Deficits after Mild Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jason S.; Craft, Ryan; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Ho, Kaitlyn; Wang, Xin; Mohan, Geetha; Mangnitsky, Sergey; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Mucke, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Objective Because reduction of the microtubule-associated protein Tau has beneficial effects in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy, we wanted to determine whether this strategy can also improve the outcome of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods We adapted a mild frontal impact model of TBI for wildtype C57Bl/6J mice and characterized the behavioral deficits it causes in these animals. The Barnes maze, Y maze, contextual and cued fear conditioning, elevated plus maze, open field, balance beam, and forced swim test were used to assess different behavioral functions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 7 Tesla) and histological analysis of brain sections were used to look for neuropathological alterations. We also compared the functional effects of this TBI model and of controlled cortical impact in mice with two, one or no Tau alleles. Results Repeated (2-hit), but not single (1-hit), mild frontal impact impaired spatial learning and memory in wildtype mice as determined by testing of mice in the Barnes maze one month after the injury. Locomotor activity, anxiety, depression and fear related behaviors did not differ between injured and sham-injured mice. MRI imaging did not reveal focal injury or mass lesions shortly after the injury. Complete ablation or partial reduction of tau prevented deficits in spatial learning and memory after repeated mild frontal impact. Complete tau ablation also showed a trend towards protection after a single controlled cortical impact. Complete or partial reduction of tau also reduced the level of axonopathy in the corpus callosum after repeated mild frontal impact. Interpretation Tau promotes or enables the development of learning and memory deficits and of axonopathy after mild TBI, and tau reduction counteracts these adverse effects. PMID:25551452

  3. Levothyroxine treatment of mild subclinical hypothyroidism: a review of potential risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Zeeshan; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with normal levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4). SCH is further classified into a milder condition with TSH levels between 4.0 and 10.0 milli-international units (mIU)/l (mild-SCH) and a severe form with TSH >10.0 mIU/l (severe-SCH). SCH is a common problem (prevalence is greater in women than men), which increases further with increasing age and TSH levels. Even though the risk of progression to overt hypothyroidism is higher in patients with severe-SCH, the risk is also significant in patients having mild-SCH; it has been suggested that every twofold rise in serum TSH would increase the risk from 1 to 4%, which further increases to 38% if thyroid antibodies are positive. Current data have shown increased cardiovascular risk in patients with mild-SCH and have demonstrated some benefits of levothyroxine treatment in reducing these events. However, evidence on the association of mild-SCH and musculoskeletal system, cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and goitre is conflicting. Similarly, the discussion regarding the exact upper limit of normal for serum TSH remains controversial. The data have also shown increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in patient with mild-SCH, with some benefits of thyroxine treatment. The recent available guidelines related to management of patients with serum TSH <10 mIU/l have suggested decisions should be made taking into account the age of the patient, associated risk factors and comorbid conditions. This chronicle review assesses current evidence regarding the risks associated and the recommendations related to benefits of levothyroxine treatment in patients having mild-SCH. PMID:26885359

  4. A Modified Controlled Cortical Impact Technique to Model Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Mechanics in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, YungChia; Mao, Haojie; Yang, King H.; Abel, Ted; Meaney, David F.

    2014-01-01

    For the past 25 years, controlled cortical impact (CCI) has been a useful tool in traumatic brain injury (TBI) research, creating injury patterns that includes primary contusion, neuronal loss, and traumatic axonal damage. However, when CCI was first developed, very little was known on the underlying biomechanics of mild TBI. This paper uses information generated from recent computational models of mild TBI in humans to alter CCI and better reflect the biomechanical conditions of mild TBI. Using a finite element model of CCI in the mouse, we adjusted three primary features of CCI: the speed of the impact to achieve strain rates within the range associated with mild TBI, the shape, and material of the impounder to minimize strain concentrations in the brain, and the impact depth to control the peak deformation that occurred in the cortex and hippocampus. For these modified cortical impact conditions, we observed peak strains and strain rates throughout the brain were significantly reduced and consistent with estimated strains and strain rates observed in human mild TBI. We saw breakdown of the blood–brain barrier but no primary hemorrhage. Moreover, neuronal degeneration, axonal injury, and both astrocytic and microglia reactivity were observed up to 8 days after injury. Significant deficits in rotarod performance appeared early after injury, but we observed no impairment in spatial object recognition or contextual fear conditioning response 5 and 8 days after injury, respectively. Together, these data show that simulating the biomechanical conditions of mild TBI with a modified cortical impact technique produces regions of cellular reactivity and neuronal loss that coincide with only a transient behavioral impairment. PMID:24994996

  5. Lack of Impact of Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleepiness, Mood and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Budhiraja, Rohit; Batool-Anwar, Salma; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Eichling, Phillip; Patel, Sanjay; Shen, Wei; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with sleepiness, depression and reduced quality of life. However, it is unclear whether mild OSA has these negative impacts. Using data from the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), this study determined whether participants with mild OSA had greater sleepiness, more depressive symptoms and poorer quality of life in comparison to those without OSA. Methods 239 individuals evaluated for participation in APPLES with a baseline apnea hypopnea index (AHI) < 15 /hour were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: No OSA (N=40, AHI < 5 /hour) or Mild OSA (N=199, 5 to <15 /hour) based on their screening polysomnogram. Scores on their Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI) were compared between groups. Results There were no significant differences between the No OSA and Mild OSA groups on any of the 5 measures: ESS (No OSA, 9.8 ± 3.5 vs Mild OSA, 10.6 ± 4.3, p=0.26), SSS,(2.8 ± 0.9 vs. 2.9 ± 1.0, p=0.52), HAM-D (4.6 ± 3.0 vs. 4.9 ± 4.7, p=0.27), POMS (33.5 ± 22.3 vs. 28.7 ± 22.0, p=0.70), SAQLI (4.5 ± 0.8 vs. 4.7 ± 0.7, p=0.39). Conclusion Individuals with mild OSA in this cohort do not have worse sleepiness, mood or quality of life in comparison to those without OSA. PMID:25232509

  6. Mild traumatic brain injury results in depressed cerebral glucose uptake: An (18)FDG PET study.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Reed; Hockenbury, Nicole; Jaiswal, Shalini; Mathur, Sanjeev; Armstrong, Regina C; Byrnes, Kimberly R

    2013-12-01

    Moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans and rats induces measurable metabolic changes, including a sustained depression in cerebral glucose uptake. However, the effect of a mild TBI on brain glucose uptake is unclear, particularly in rodent models. This study aimed to determine the glucose uptake pattern in the brain after a mild lateral fluid percussion (LFP) TBI. Briefly, adult male rats were subjected to a mild LFP and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)FDG), which was performed prior to injury and at 3 and 24 h and 5, 9, and 16 days post-injury. Locomotor function was assessed prior to injury and at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after injury using modified beam walk tasks to confirm injury severity. Histology was performed at either 10 or 21 days post-injury. Analysis of function revealed a transient impairment in locomotor ability, which corresponds to a mild TBI. Using reference region normalization, PET imaging revealed that mild LFP-induced TBI depresses glucose uptake in both the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres in comparison with sham-injured and naïve controls from 3 h to 5 days post-injury. Further, areas of depressed glucose uptake were associated with regions of glial activation and axonal damage, but no measurable change in neuronal loss or gross tissue damage was observed. In conclusion, we show that mild TBI, which is characterized by transient impairments in function, axonal damage, and glial activation, results in an observable depression in overall brain glucose uptake using (18)FDG-PET. PMID:23829400

  7. Mild Hypothermia Protects Pigs’ Gastric Mucosa After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation via Inhibiting Interleukin 6 (IL-6) Production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Song, Jian; Liu, Yuhong; Li, Yaqiang; Liu, Zhengxin

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of mild hypothermia therapy on gastric mucosa after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the underlying mechanism. Material/Methods Ventricular fibrillation was induced in pigs. After CPR, the surviving pigs were divided into mild hypothermia-treated and control groups. The changes in vital signs and hemodynamic parameters were monitored before cardiac arrest and at intervals of 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after restoration of spontaneous circulation. Serum IL-6 was determined at the same time, and gastroscopy was performed. The pathologic changes were noted, and the expression of IL-6 was determined by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and immunohistochemistry under light. Results The heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, and cardiac output in both groups did not differ significantly. The gastric mucosa ulcer index evaluated by gastroscopy 2 h and 24 h after restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in the mild hypothermic group was lower than that the control group (P<0.05). The inflammatory pathologic score of gastric mucosa in the mild hypothermic group 6–24 h after ROSC was lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). Serum and gastric mucosa IL-6 expression 0.5–4 h and 6, 12, and 24 h after ROSC was lower in the mild hypothermic group than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions Mild hypothermia treatment protects gastric mucosa after ROSC via inhibiting IL-6 production and relieving the inflammatory reaction. PMID:27694796

  8. Health-Related Quality of Life in Chinese Patients with Mild and Moderately Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Kai; Zhang, Shengsheng; Wang, Chuijie; Zhao, Wenxia; Shen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Ulcerative colitis (UC) impairs the health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The difference in HRQOL between patients with mild and moderately active UC is not well-defined. Few studies have been conducted to explore the factors that influence HRQOL in Chinese patients. Our study aims were to (1) compare HRQOL of mildly active UC patients with moderate patients; (2) explore the factors that influence HRQOL in Chinese patients with UC; and (3) analyze demographic and disease characteristics of UC in China. Methods A total of 110 mild and 114 moderate patients with UC were enrolled. The demographic and disease characteristics were recorded. HRQOL was measured by the Chinese version of the inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) between mild and moderate patients, male and female patients, and different disease distributions. Stepwise regression analysis was used to assess factors influencing the IBDQ score. Results Patients with moderate UC had significantly lower IBDQ total scores compared to patients with mild UC (P=0.001). The IBDQ total score had a negative correlation with the Mayo score (r=–0.263, P<0.001). Stepwise regression analysis showed that the disease activity index and gender had an influence on the IBDQ total score (P<0.05). The female patients had a lower score than the male patients (P<0.05), especially in the emotional function domain (P=0.002). Different disease distributions were not statistically significant in the IBDQ total score (P=0.183). Conclusions UC has a negative influence on HRQOL. HRQOL in patients with moderate UC was lower than HRQOL in patients with mild UC, as measured by the IBDQ. UC disease activity has a negative correlation with HRQOL. Gender and the disease activity index are important factors involved in the impairment of HRQOL in Chinese patients with UC. Chinese females may benefit from increased psychological care as part of UC therapy. PMID:25915777

  9. MANAGEMENT OF PEDIATRIC MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: A NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL REVIEW FROM INJURY THROUGH RECOVERY

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, Michael W.; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H. Gerry; Randolph, Christopher; McCrea, Michael; Anderson, Vicki A.

    2010-01-01

    Little scientific attention has been aimed at the non-acute clinical care of pediatric mild TBI. We propose a clinical management model focused on both evaluation and intervention from the time of injury through recovery. Intervention strategies are outlined using a framework encompassing four relevant domains: the individual youth, family, school, and athletics. Clinical management has primary value in its potential to speed recovery, minimize distress during the recovery process, and reduce the number of individuals who subjectively experience longer lasting postconcussive problems. With proper management, most children and adolescents sustaining an uncomplicated mild TBI can be expected to recover fully. PMID:17896204

  10. Diminished supraspinal pain modulation in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shivshil; Yang, Eric; Canlas, Bryan; Kadokana, Mawj; Heald, Jason; Davani, Ariea; Song, David; Lin, Lisa; Polston, Greg; Tsai, Alice; Lee, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic pain conditions are highly prevalent in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Supraspinal diffuse axonal injury is known to dissociate brain functional connectivity in these patients. The effect of this dissociated state on supraspinal pain network is largely unknown. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study was conducted to compare the supraspinal pain network in patients with mild traumatic brain injury to the gender and age-matched healthy controls with the hypothesis that the functional connectivities of the medial prefrontal cortices, a supraspinal pain modulatory region to other pain-related sensory discriminatory and affective regions in the mild traumatic brain injury subjects are significantly reduced in comparison to healthy controls. Results The mild traumatic brain injury group (N = 15) demonstrated significantly (P < 0.01, cluster threshold > 150 voxels) less activities in the thalamus, pons, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortices than the healthy control group (N = 15). Granger Causality Analyses (GCA) indicated while the left medial prefrontal cortices of the healthy control group cast a noticeable degree of outward (to affect) causality inference to multiple pain processing related regions, this outward inference pattern was not observed in the mild traumatic brain injury group. On the other hand, only patients’ bilateral anterior cingulate cortex received multiple inward (to be affected) causality inferences from regions including the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices and the inferior parietal lobe. Resting state functional connectivity analyses indicated that the medial prefrontal cortices of the mild traumatic brain injury group demonstrated a significantly (P < 0.01, F = 3.6, cluster size > 150 voxels) higher degree of functional connectivity to the inferior parietal lobe, premotor and secondary somatosensory cortex

  11. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of coproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; McCormick, R.L.; Hogsett, R.F.; Rowe, R.M.

    1990-10-23

    Research continued on the production of coproducts from continuous mild gasification. During the third quarter of 1990, work focused on start-up and operation of the 50 pound/hour char-to-carbon (CTC) process research unit (PRU). Start-up procedures have been finalized for the methane production reactor, and the design temperature has been achieved. Flows and pressures for the overall process have been balanced and optimized. We have achieved temperatures above 1500{degree}F in the carbon formation reactor. Upgrading experiments on mild gasification pitch have also continued on a pitch produced in run MG-122. Results of heat treating and catalytic treating tests are reported.

  12. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, R.O. Jr.; Aulich, T.R.

    1990-10-01

    The primary objective of the EERC/AMAX Mild Gasification project is to commercialize a process that will produce several value-added products from a high-sulfur midwestern bituminous or a low-sulfur subbituminous coal. Indiana No. 3 and Wyodak coals are being tested in a 100-lb/hr process development unit (PDU) that has undergone shakedown testing and is undergoing parametric testing. This unit will provide the engineering data for use in determining the technical and economic data required for the design of a commercial-scale mild gasification plant. This report discusses results of carbonizer tests, char upgrading and char separations. 12 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Yellow tailflower mild mottle virus: a new tobamovirus described from Anthocercis littorea (Solanaceae) in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Stephen J; Li, Hua; Jones, Michael G K

    2014-04-01

    The complete genome sequence of a tobamovirus was determined from a wild plant of yellow tailflower (Anthocercis littorea, family Solanaceae) that exhibited mild mottling and chlorosis on the leaves. The virus induced severe symptoms including systemic necrosis when inoculated to plants of three other solanaceous species. The viral genome was resequenced after passage in Nicotiana benthamiana. The two genomes were 6379 nucleotides in length, and they differed by three nucleotides. Phylogenetic analysis and the deduced architecture of the genome place the virus, provisionally named yellow tailflower mild mottle virus, with other tobamoviruses that infect solanaceous hosts.

  14. Update on the Epidemiology of Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Voss, Jameson D; Connolly, Joseph; Schwab, Karen A; Scher, Ann I

    2015-07-01

    Mild traumatic injuries to the brain (e.g., concussion) are common and have been recognized since antiquity, although definitions have varied historically. Nonetheless, studying the epidemiology of concussion helps clarify the overall importance, risk factors, and at-risk populations for this injury. The present review will focus on recent findings related to the epidemiology of concussion including definition controversies, incidence, and patterns in the population overall and in the military and athlete populations specifically. Finally, as this is an area of active research, we will discuss how future epidemiologic observations hold promise for gaining greater clarity about concussion and mild traumatic brain injury. PMID:26049775

  15. Teaching Tai Chi to elders with osteoarthritis pain and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason Y; Tsai, Pao-Feng; Woods, Sheery; Beck, Cornelia; Roberson, Paula K; Rosengren, Karl

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the authors' experience and strategies in teaching Tai Chi, a gentle exercise derived from an ancient Chinese martial art, to mildly cognitively impaired elders to relieve osteoarthritic knee pain. The 12-form Sun-style Tai Chi, a set of Tai Chi forms endorsed by the American Arthritis Foundation, was used in the program. Teaching Tai Chi to elders with mild cognitive impairment requires particular strategies tailored to their physical and cognitive frailty. When effectively taught, Tai Chi can be a unique and cost-effective intervention for elders with knee pain caused by osteoarthritis.

  16. Update on the Epidemiology of Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Voss, Jameson D; Connolly, Joseph; Schwab, Karen A; Scher, Ann I

    2015-07-01

    Mild traumatic injuries to the brain (e.g., concussion) are common and have been recognized since antiquity, although definitions have varied historically. Nonetheless, studying the epidemiology of concussion helps clarify the overall importance, risk factors, and at-risk populations for this injury. The present review will focus on recent findings related to the epidemiology of concussion including definition controversies, incidence, and patterns in the population overall and in the military and athlete populations specifically. Finally, as this is an area of active research, we will discuss how future epidemiologic observations hold promise for gaining greater clarity about concussion and mild traumatic brain injury.

  17. Use of Coaxil (tianeptine) in elderly patients with combined mild cognitive and depressive-anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Karpukhin, I B

    2009-01-01

    The studies reported here addressed 20 patients aged 60-69 years whose clinical picture combined the manifestations of mild dementia with those of mild depression and anxiety. Patients were treated with Coaxil (tianeptine) for 60 days at a dose of 37.5 mg/day. Patients were assessed by clinical-psychological investigations with addition of the Hamilton scales and neuropsychological testing by the Luriya method. Coaxil was found to be highly effective in relation to all psychopathological components. Recommendations for the use of Coaxil in elderly patients with cognitive and depressive-anxiety disorders are formulated.

  18. Mild Palladium-Catalyzed Cyanation of (Hetero)aryl Halides and Triflates in Aqueous Media

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A mild, efficient, and low-temperature palladium-catalyzed cyanation of (hetero)aryl halides and triflates is reported. Previous palladium-catalyzed cyanations of (hetero)aryl halides have required higher temperatures to achieve good catalytic activity. This current reaction allows the cyanation of a general scope of (hetero)aryl halides and triflates at 2–5 mol % catalyst loadings with temperatures ranging from rt to 40 °C. This mild method was applied to the synthesis of lersivirine, a reverse transcriptase inhibitor. PMID:25555140

  19. Metal-Free Markovnikov-Type Alkyne Hydration under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbo; Wang, Haining; Li, Chao-Jun

    2016-05-01

    A Markovnikov-type alkyne hydration protocol is presented using 20% CF3SO3H (TfOH) as the catalyst under unprecedented mild conditions applicable to various alkynes, including terminal arylalkynes, terminal nonfunctionalized aliphatic alkynes, and internal alkynes with excellent regioselectivity in good to excellent yields (average yields >85%). The reaction procedure operates under mild conditions (25-70 °C), with broad functional group compatibility, and uses only slightly more than a stoichiometric amount of water in the absence of any transition metal. The success of this protocol hinges upon the utilization of trifluoroethanol as the solvent. PMID:27082159

  20. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Brad; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars has been used to suggest that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. However, if early Mars was neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then large carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. The critical question is: Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? We suggest that Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would inhibit the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of this work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions. The stability of smectites under mildly acidic conditions is attributed to elevated Fe/Mg activities that inhibit smectite dissolution. Beidelite and saponite have been shown to form from hydrothermal alteration of basaltic glass at pH 3.5-4.0 in seawater solutions. Nontronite is also known to be stable in mildly acidic systems associated with mafic and ultramafic rock. Nontronite was shown to form in acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain, Thailand due to oxidation of Fe-sulfides that transformed saponite to nontronite. Smectite is known to transform to kaolinite in naturally acid soils due to selective leaching of Mg. However, if Mg removal is limited, then based on equilibrium relationships, the dissolution of smectite should be minimized. If Fe and Mg solution activities are sufficiently high, such as might be found in a low water/rock ratio system that is poorly drained, smectite could form and remain stable under mildly acidic conditions on Mars. The sources of mild acidity on early Mars includes elevated atmospheric CO2 levels, Fe-hydrolysis reactions, and the presence of volcanic SO2 aerosols. Equilibrium calculations dictate that water equilibrated with an early Mars CO2 atmosphere at 1 to 4 bar yields a pH of 3.6 to 3

  1. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars has been used to suggest that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. However, if early Mars was neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then "large" carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. The critical question is: Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? We suggest that Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would inhibit the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of this work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions. The stability of smectites under mildly acidic conditions is attributed to elevated Fe/Mg activities that inhibit smectite dissolution. Beidelite and saponite have been shown to form from hydrothermal alteration of basaltic glass at pH 3.5-4.0 in seawater solutions. Nontronite is also known to be stable in mildly acidic systems associated with mafic and ultramafic rock. Nontronite was shown to form in acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain, Thailand due to oxidation of Fe-sulfides that transformed saponite to nontronite. Smectite is known to transform to kaolinite in naturally acid soils due to selective leaching of Mg. However, if Mg removal is limited, then based on equilibrium relationships, the dissolution of smectite should be minimized. If Fe and Mg solution activities are sufficiently high, such as might be found in a low water/rock ratio system that is poorly drained, smectite could form and remain stable under mildly acidic conditions on Mars. The sources of mild acidity on early Mars includes elevated atmospheric CO2 levels, Fe-hydrolysis reactions, and the presence of volcanic SO2 aerosols. Equilibrium calculations dictate that water equilibrated with an early Mars CO2 atmosphere at 1 to 4 bar yields a pH of 3.6 to 3

  2. A Pyrosequencing Investigation of Differences in the Feline Subgingival Microbiota in Health, Gingivitis and Mild Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stephen; Croft, Julie; O'Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Allsopp, Judi; Milella, Lisa; Davis, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in cats yet little is known about the bacterial species important for the disease. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis (<25% attachment loss) in feline plaque. Knowledge of these species is a first step in understanding the potential for improving oral health of cats via dietary interventions that alter the proportions of influential species. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from 92 cats with healthy gingiva, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA from these plaque samples generated more than one million reads and identified a total of 267 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all gingival health categories, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Fusobacteria. The Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant family in gingivitis and mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from various genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. The species identified were very similar to those observed in canine plaque in the corresponding health and disease states. Such similarities were not observed between cat and human at the bacterial species level but with disease progression similarities did emerge at the phylum level. This suggests that interventions targeted at human pathogenic species will not be effective for use in cats but there is more potential for commonalities in interventions for cats and dogs.

  3. A mildly relativistic radio jet from the otherwise normal type Ic supernova 2007gr.

    PubMed

    Paragi, Z; Taylor, G B; Kouveliotou, C; Granot, J; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Bietenholz, M; van der Horst, A J; Pidopryhora, Y; van Langevelde, H J; Garrett, M A; Szomoru, A; Argo, M K; Bourke, S; Paczyński, B

    2010-01-28

    The class of type Ic supernovae have drawn increasing attention since 1998 owing to their sparse association (only four so far) with long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although both phenomena originate from the core collapse of a massive star, supernovae emit mostly at optical wavelengths, whereas GRBs emit mostly in soft gamma-rays or hard X-rays. Though the GRB central engine generates ultra-relativistic jets, which beam the early emission into a narrow cone, no relativistic outflows have hitherto been found in type Ib/c supernovae explosions, despite theoretical expectations and searches. Here we report radio (interferometric) observations that reveal a mildly relativistic expansion in a nearby type Ic supernova, SN 2007gr. Using two observational epochs 60 days apart, we detect expansion of the source and establish a conservative lower limit for the average apparent expansion velocity of 0.6c. Independently, a second mildly relativistic supernova has been reported. Contrary to the radio data, optical observations of SN 2007gr indicate a typical type Ic supernova with ejecta velocities approximately 6,000 km s(-1), much lower than in GRB-associated supernovae. We conclude that in SN 2007gr a small fraction of the ejecta produced a low-energy mildly relativistic bipolar radio jet, while the bulk of the ejecta were slower and, as shown by optical spectropolarimetry, mildly aspherical.

  4. Impact of Mild Stroke on the Quality of Life of Spouses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellier, Myriam; Rochette, Annie; Lefebvre, Helene

    2011-01-01

    Clients with mild stroke may present subtle deficits that have an impact on complex activities and roles. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceived quality of life of spouses, 3 months after the client with stroke was discharged to go home from acute care. A qualitative design based on a constructivist paradigm was used. Interviews…

  5. The Emergent Charter School Model for Ninth Grade Mildly Disabled United States Students: Extending to Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Emmanuel Teah

    2009-01-01

    An ethnographic, descriptive research methodology was used to explore the service delivery of three U.S. charter schools (one independent and two dependent secondary public charter schools) in Southern New England, United States as they relate to grade nine mildly disabled special needs students. Field research was also conducted in Costa Rica and…

  6. The Sexual Knowledge, Experience, Feelings and Needs of People with Mild Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Marita P.; Cummins, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    Thirty adults with mild mental retardation and 50 first-year psychology students were surveyed regarding their sexual knowledge, experience, feelings, and needs. Subjects with mental retardation had less knowledge, more negative attitudes toward sexual issues, and less experience in intimacy and sexual intercourse, but more experience in…

  7. De novo ring chromosome 3: a new case with a mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    McKinley, M; Colley, A; Sinclair, P; Donnai, D; Andrews, T

    1991-08-01

    We report an 18 year old female with a de novo ring chromosome 3 found after investigation for short stature. Her karyotype was interpreted as 46,XX, r(3)(p26.2q29). Her phenotype is milder than previously reported cases and illustrates the mild end of the spectrum of the ring chromosome 3 phenotype.

  8. Transition and Students with Mild Intellectual Disability: Findings From the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Joshi, Gauri S.

    2016-01-01

    Students with intellectual disability historically struggle with post-school outcomes. However, much of the research on students with intellectual disability relative to post-school outcomes and transition services is aggregated for students with mild, moderate, and severe intellectual disability. This secondary analysis of the National…

  9. Uses of Integrated Media Instruction in a Self-Contained Class for Children with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narita, Shigeru

    This conference paper describes the use of integrated media-oriented instruction in a self-contained class at Yokohama Municipal Elementary School in Japan. Three students with mild disabilities, in grades 5 and 6, participated in the project. Integrated media (IM) is defined as the linkage of text, sound, video, graphics, and the computer in such…

  10. Using Text-to-Speech Reading Support for an Adult with Mild Aphasia and Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Judy; Hux, Karen; Snell, Jeffry

    2013-01-01

    This single case study served to examine text-to-speech (TTS) effects on reading rate and comprehension in an individual with mild aphasia and cognitive impairment. Findings showed faster reading, given TTS presented at a normal speaking rate, but no significant comprehension changes. TTS may support reading in people with aphasia when time…

  11. Effect of Acidified Feronia elephantum Leaf Extract on the Corrosion Behavior of Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, Pitchaipillai; Prakash, Periakaruppan; Ilayaraja, Murugan; Jeyaprabha, Balasubramanian; Shankar, Karikalan

    2015-03-01

    Mild steel is used as a structural material for pipes, tank, reaction vessels, etc. which are known to corrode invariably in contact with various solvents. From the view point of a nation's economy and financial implications of corrosion hazard, it is necessary to adopt appropriate means and ways to reduce the losses due to corrosion. The use of eco-friendly corrosion inhibitors are increasing day by day. Feronia elephantum leaf extract (FELE) has been tested as eco-friendly corrosion inhibitor for A262 mild steel in 1 M H2SO4 and 1 M HCl solutions using non-electrochemical (Gravimetric, X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and electrochemical techniques (open circuit potential, potentiostatic polarization, and electrochemical impedance measurements). The protection efficiency is found to increase with increase in FELE concentration but decrease with temperature, which is suggestive of physical adsorption mechanism. The adsorption of FELE on mild steel surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. SEM results confirm the formation of a protective layer by FELE over mild steel surface.

  12. Anticorrosive Activity of Kigelia pinnata Leaves Extract on Mild Steel in Acidic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, P.; Saravana Kumar, K.; Jeyaprabha, B.; Prakash, P.

    2014-09-01

    The corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 1 M H2SO4 and 1 M HCl solution with different concentrations of Kigelia pinnata leaves extract (KPLE) was investigated using mass loss, Tafel polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Inhibition efficiency of KPLE is found to increase with increasing concentration but to decrease with temperature. Polarization measurements reveal that KPLE acts as a mixed type inhibitor in both acids. Impedance curves show that increasing KPLE concentration increases charge transfer resistance and decreases double layer capacitance. The adsorption of KPLE on the mild steel surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The experimental results reveal that KPLE inhibits the corrosion reaction in both acid environments, and inhibition efficiency follows the order H2SO4 > HCl. The kinetic and adsorption parameters for mild steel in acid in the presence and absence of KPLE were evaluated and discussed. The negative value of the standard free energy of adsorption in the presence of inhibitor suggests spontaneous adsorption of inhibitor on the mild steel surface. Protective film formation against corrosion was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible), X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy techniques.

  13. Mild Intellectual Disability at the Postsecondary Level: Results of a Survey of Disability Service Offices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Allyson G.; Holmes, Alana

    2014-01-01

    Disability Service Staff at colleges and universities in Ontario, Canada were surveyed regarding the number of students arriving at their offices with the label of mild intellectual disability. Information was obtained regarding criteria used in association with this label, documentation required to support the classification, and accommodations…

  14. Brassica plant responses to mild herbivore stress elicited by two specialist insects from different feeding guilds.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, P; Pérez, E; Najar-Rodriguez, A; Walter, A; Dorn, S

    2014-02-01

    Compensation growth and chemical defense are two components of plant defense strategy against herbivores. In this study, compensation growth and the response of primary and secondary metabolites were investigated in Brassica rapa plants subjected to infestation by two herbivores from contrasting feeding guilds, the phloem-feeding aphid Brevicoryne brassicae and the leaf-feeding caterpillar Pieris brassicae. These specialist herbivores were used at two different densities and allowed to feed for seven days on a young caged leaf. Changes in growth rates were assessed for total leaf area and bulb mass, whereas changes in primary and secondary metabolites were evaluated in young and mature leaves, roots, and bulbs. Mild stress by caterpillars on young plants enhanced mean bulb mass and elicited a contrasting regulation of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates in the leaves. In contrast, mild stress by aphids enhanced leaf growth and increased glucosinolate concentrations in the bulb, the most important storage organ of B. rapa. A similar mild stress by either herbivore to older plants did not alter plant growth parameters or concentrations of the metabolites analyzed. In conclusion, Brassica plant growth was either maintained or enhanced under mild herbivore stress, and defense patterns differed strongly in response to herbivore type and plant development stage. These results have implications for the understanding of plasticity in plant defenses against herbivores and for the management of Brassica rapa in agroecosystems.

  15. Markers for Aggression in Inpatient Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, Nienke H.; Didden, Robert; Stolker, Joost Jan; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    In high care settings for persons with intellectual disability (ID) aggressive incidents often occur. Still little is known about factors that are associated with an increased risk for aggressive behavior in clients who are admitted to an inpatient treatment facility. In four inpatient facilities, 108 adults with mild and borderline ID and…

  16. Motor Performance of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability and Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuijk, P. J.; Hartman, E.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is a relatively small body of research on the motor performance of children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Adequate levels of motor skills may contribute to lifelong enjoyment of physical activity, participation in sports and healthy lifestyles. The present study compares…

  17. The Social-Sexual Voice of Adults with Mild Intellectual Disabilities: A Qualitative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, George W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how adults with mild intellectual disabilities live out their social-sexual lives. Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) are often assumed to be asexual or incapable of having sexual lives, resulting in a paucity of research-based knowledge. Research and educational efforts with this…

  18. Self-Reported versus Informant-Reported Depressive Symptoms in Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mileviciute, I.; Hartley, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Virtually nothing is known about potential differences in the types of depression symptoms reported by adults with mild intellectual disability (ID) on self-reported questionnaires as compared with the types of symptoms reported by caregivers on informant questionnaires. Moreover, little is known about how the presentation of…

  19. Structuring Word Problems for Diagnostic Teaching: Helping Teachers Meet the Needs of Children with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmar, Rene S.; Cawley, John F.

    1994-01-01

    Matrix organization can be used to construct math word problems for children with mild disabilities. Matrix organization specifies the characteristics of problems, such as problem theme or setting, operations, level of computation complexity, reading vocabulary level, and need for classification. A sample scope and sequence and 16 sample word…

  20. Facile synthesis of nano-sized hollow single crystal zeolites under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Daniel; Pacosová, Lucie; Krumeich, Frank; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2014-01-01

    We report a method to synthesize hollow ZSM-5 single crystals of a size below 100 nm that could function as nanoreactors with access through the zeolite micropores only. In the first step, ZSM-5 is synthesized with the respective crystal size. In the second, the zeolite is base leached and acid washed under mild conditions.

  1. Early Detection of Depression and Associated Risk Factors in Adults with Mild/Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGillivray, Jane A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presentation and risk factors for depression in adults with mild/moderate intellectual disability (ID). A sample of 151 adults (83 males and 68 females) participated in a semi-structured interview. According to results on the Beck Depression Inventory II, 39.1% of participants evinced symptoms of…

  2. Mild Memory Impairment in Healthy Older Adults Is Distinct from Normal Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargin, J. Weaver; Maruff, P.; Collie, A.; Masters, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mild memory impairment was detected in 28% of a sample of healthy community-dwelling older adults using the delayed recall trial of a word list learning task. Statistical analysis revealed that individuals with memory impairment also demonstrated relative deficits on other measures of memory, and tests of executive function, processing speed and…

  3. Treating Attention in Mild Aphasia: Evaluation of Attention Process Training-II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Laura L.; Keeton, R. Jessica; Karcher, Laura

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether attention processing training-II [Sohlberg, M. M., Johnson, L., Paule, L., Raskin, S. A., & Mateer, C. A. (2001). "Attention Process Training-II: A program to address attentional deficits for persons with mild cognitive dysfunction" (2nd ed.). Wake Forest, NC: Lash & Associates.; APT-II], when applied in the context of…

  4. The Establishment of Learned Reinforcers in Mildly Retarded Children. IMRID Behavioral Science Monograph No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worley, John C., Jr.

    Research regarding the establishment of learned reinforcement with mildly retarded children is reviewed. Noted are findings which indicate that educable retarded students, possibly due to cultural differences, are less responsive to social rewards than either nonretarded or more severely retarded children. Characteristics of primary and secondary…

  5. NLRP3 Inflammasome Mediates Chronic Mild Stress-Induced Depression in Mice via Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Lei; Liu, Yun-Zi; Shen, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Teng-Yun; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yun-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence from both clinical and experimental research indicates that the immune-brain interaction plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of depression. A multi-protein complex of the innate immune system, the NLRP3 inflammasome regulates cleavage and secretion of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β. The inflammasome detects various pathogen-associated molecule patterns and damage-associated molecule patterns, which then leads to a series of immune-inflammatory reactions. Methods: To explore the role of inflammasome activation in the underlying biological mechanisms of depression, we established a mouse model of depression with unpredictable chronic mild stress. Results: Mice subjected to chronic mild stress for 4 weeks had significantly higher serum corticosterone levels, serum interleukin-1β levels, and hippocampal active interleukin-1β protein levels. They also displayed depressive-like symptoms, including decreased sucrose preference and increased immobility time. Moreover, the hippocampi of chronic mild stress-exposed mice had significantly higher activity of caspase-1, which accompanied by higher protein levels of NLRP3 and the apoptotic speck-containing protein with a card. Pretreatment with the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor VX-765 decreased serum and hippocampal levels of interleukin-1β protein and significantly moderated the depressive-like behaviors induced by chronic mild stress. Conclusions: These data suggest the NLRP3 inflammasome mediates stress-induced depression via immune activation. Future procedures targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome may have promising effects in the prevention and treatment of depression. PMID:25603858

  6. Catalase activity as a biomarker for mild-stress-induced robustness in Bacillus weihenstephanensis.

    PubMed

    den Besten, Heidy M W; Effraimidou, Styliani; Abee, Tjakko

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to survive and grow in changing environments by activating stress adaptation mechanisms which may enhance bacterial robustness. Stress-induced enhanced robustness complicates the predictability of microbial inactivation. Using psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis strain KBAB4 as a model, we investigated the impact of the culturing temperature on mild-oxidative-stress-induced (cross-)protection toward multiple stresses, including severe oxidative, heat, and acid stresses. Culturing at a refrigeration temperature (7°C) compared to the optimal growth temperature (30°C) affected both the robustness level of B. weihenstephanensis and the oxidative stress adaptive response. Scavengers of reactive oxygen species have a crucial role in adaptation to oxidative stresses, and this points to a possible predictive role in mild-oxidative-stress-induced robustness. Therefore, the catalase activity was determined upon mild oxidative stress treatment and was demonstrated to be significantly correlated with the robustness level of mild-stress-treated cells toward severe oxidative and heat stresses but not toward severe acid stress for cells grown at both refrigeration and optimal temperatures. The quantified correlations supported the predictive quality of catalase activity as a biomarker and also underlined that the predictive quality is stress specific. Biomarkers that are able to predict stress-induced enhanced robustness can be used to better understand stress adaptation mechanisms and might allow the design of effective combinations of hurdles to control microbial behavior.

  7. Assistive Technology as an Accommodation for a Student with Mild Disabilities: The Case of Alex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackenreed, Darlene

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigated the impact of selected types of adaptive and assistive technology (AT) on the learning gains and academic achievement levels of a female student with mild disabilities in her sixth and seventh grades in a Catholic school board in northeastern Ontario. Interviews were conducted with the parent, student, and pre-service…

  8. Predictors of Helping Profession Choice and Volunteerism among Siblings of Adults with Mild Intellectual Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Julie Lounds; Shivers, Carolyn M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined aspects of the sibling relationship that predicted helping profession choice and volunteerism in siblings of individuals with mild intellectual deficits at 3 points in adulthood: their mid-30s, early 50s, and mid-60s. The 393 respondents were from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a prospective, longitudinal study following…

  9. Adapting a Problem-Solving Approach to Teaching Mathematics to Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer J.; Hofstetter, Elaine

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for implementing a problem-solving approach to teaching mathematics concepts and skills to students with mild disabilities include: establish connections to daily life; use visual presentations; use manipulatives; use peer-mediated instruction; provide models, cues, and prompts; teach self-management techniques and learning strategies;…

  10. The lightest market in the world: light and mild cigarettes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Assunta, Mary; Chapman, Simon

    2008-05-01

    This article reviews the history of the introduction and use of light and mild labeled cigarettes in Japan, the "lightest" market in the world. Systematic keyword and opportunistic Web site searches were conducted on tobacco industry internal documents relevant to Japan, supplemented with relevant material from the tobacco trade and sociological literatures. Certain "market quirks" of the Japanese society benefited the tobacco industry in promoting its light and mild cigarettes. Japan's is a trend-conscious society with a penchant for new fashion and products. The Japanese are innovative, with the propensity to transform concepts into something characteristically their own marked by a distinct cultural style, such as the concept of keihaku tansho ("light-thin-short-small"). With big-budget sophisticated advertising, tobacco companies developed a lucrative market for mild, light, and ultra-low-tar cigarettes. Smokers had a preference for charcoal filters, which they believed protected them. Tar numbers meant little to smokers. The transnational tobacco companies capitalized on consumer concerns about the health hazards of smoking to promote low-tar cigarettes as a safer alternative. This may be one factor that explains why smoking prevalence in Japan remains high. Light and mild cigarettes are popular in Japan because Japanese smokers believe low tar/nicotine cigarette with charcoal filters protect them and help mollify their health concerns about smoking.

  11. Educating Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities in Regular Schools in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khatib, Jamal M.; Al Khatib, Fareed

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a description of current practices in educating students with mild intellectual disabilities in regular schools in Jordan. The data were obtained using several methods, including interviews with special education staff at the Ministry of Education, summaries of documents and published research related to resource rooms and…

  12. [Toxicity studies of mild gasification products]. [Quarterly report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Mild gasification of coal is a technology being developed by the United States Department of Energy and private industry with the hope that a cleaner method of coal use can help meet future energy needs. As the technology develops and its commercial use becomes a more viable possibility, efforts are being made to study the safety or possible toxicity of the mild gasification products. DOE and the National Institute for occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) are cooperating through an interagency agreement to examine some of these products for their genotoxic potential. NIOSH has studied the mutagenicity of several mild gasification product samples using the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay. As reported earlier PSIS{number_sign}830331 failed to demonstrate genotoxic activity in the Ames assay under all conditions tested. Since the mild gasification products are complex mixtures, interactions between various components are likely to occur. Such interactions between various components of complex mixtures may increase or decrease genotoxic activity in short-term assays like the Ames test. Although all synergistic interactions may not be detailed, the separate analysis of those components in several classes provides a more accurate view of the genotoxicity of each component and better allows for chemical characterization of the possible mutagens in the mixture. NIOSH has performed mutagenicity studies on the subfractions of PSIS{number_sign}830331. The results of those studies are detailed in this report.

  13. The Association between Mild Traumatic Brain Injury History and Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontifex, Matthew B.; O'Connor, Phillip M.; Broglio, Steven P.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of multiple mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) on neuroelectric and task performance indices of the cognitive control of action monitoring was assessed in individuals with and without a history of concussion. Participants completed a standard clinical neurocognitive assessment and the error-related negativity of the…

  14. Cognitive Biases in Individuals with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability and Alcohol Use-Related Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Duijvenbode, Neomi; Didden, Robert; Voogd, Hubert; Korzilius, Hubert P. L. M.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of the present pilot study was to examine cognitive biases in individuals with mild to borderline ID and alcohol use-related problems. Participants (N = 57) performed the approach avoidance task, picture rating task and visual dot probe task, which was combined with eye-tracking methodology. They were admitted to a forensic setting…

  15. Benefits of treating highly disabled migraine patients with zolmitriptan while pain is mild.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J; Lucas, C; Røsjø, Ø; Charlesworth, B

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials of migraine therapy often require treatment when migraine pain intensity is moderate or severe, but many physicians find this practice artificial and patients often prefer to treat while pain is mild. This randomized, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy of zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in treating migraine while pain is mild, in patients who typically experience migraine attacks that are initially mild, but progress to moderate or severe. The intent-to-treat population comprised 280 patients (138 zolmitriptan; 148 placebo), with mean MIDAS grades of 29.6 (zolmitriptan) and 27.6 (placebo). Zolmitriptan 2.5 mg provided a significantly higher pain-free rate at 2 h (43.4% vs. 18.4% placebo; P < 0.0001). Significantly fewer zolmitriptan patients reported progression of headache pain to moderate or severe intensity 2 h postdose (53.7% vs. 70.4% placebo; P < 0.01), or required further medication within 24 h (46.4% vs. 71.1% placebo; P < 0.0001). The efficacy of zolmitriptan was more pronounced in patients treating during the first 15 min following pain onset. Adverse events were reported in 31.2% of patients treated with zolmitriptan (vs. 11.3% for placebo), and the incidence was lower in patients who treated early after attack onset. Zolmitriptan provides high efficacy when treating migraine while pain is mild, with the clinical benefits being more pronounced when treating early after migraine onset.

  16. Processing of Mass/Count Information in Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taler, Vanessa; Jarema, Gonia

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the processing of a specific linguistic distinction, the mass/count distinction, in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Fourteen AD and 10 MCI subjects were tested using a sentence grammaticality judgement task where grammaticality violations were caused by determiner--noun…

  17. Cognitive control in mild traumatic brain injury: conflict monitoring and conflict adaptation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Michael J; Farrer, Thomas J; Clayson, Peter E

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that individuals who have experienced a concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) show deficits in cognitive control. We tested the hypothesis that behavioral (response time [RT] and error rate) and electrophysiological (N450 and conflict SP components of the event-related potential [ERP]) reflections of conflict monitoring and conflict adaptation would be attenuated in 29 individuals with mild TBI compared to 36 control participants. Groups did not differ in age, sex, years of education, or neuropsychological test performance. Conflict monitoring and conflict adaptation can be seen when behavioral and ERP indices are reduced following high-conflict trials relative to low-conflict trials. Participants completed a Stroop task with 50% congruent and 50% incongruent trials. Behaviorally, both groups showed statistically significant conflict adaptation effects for RTs and error rates; these effects did not differ as a function of group. For ERPs, both groups showed more negative N450 and more positive conflict SP amplitudes on incongruent trials relative to congruent trials. Groups significantly differed in level of conflict adaptation for the conflict SP; controls showed significant conflict adaptation, whereas individuals with mild TBI did not. ERP amplitudes did not correlate with indices of injury severity or time since injury. Findings replicate and extend previous work that suggests the conflict SP is sensitive to conflict adaptation in healthy individuals, but is decreased in individuals across the range of TBI severity. Findings also suggest that mild TBI is associated with intact conflict monitoring, but altered conflict adaptation and adjustment processes.

  18. Ultrasound findings of mild neonatal periventricular-intraventricular hemorrhage after different treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sida; Liao, Chunyan; Liang, Shuyuan; Zhong, Danni; Liu, Junjie; Li, Zhixian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the ultrasound findings of mild neonatal periventricular-intraventricular hemorrhage (PIVH) after different treatments, and to evaluate the neurological outcomes of mild PIVH with Gesell Development Diagnosis Scale (GDDS). Methods: A total of 194 newborns with grade I-II PIVH were recruited, and findings of cranial ultrasound examination before and 1 month after birth were included for analysis. The echo intensity and size of the lesions were recorded. Results: There was no significant difference in the echo intensity among three groups of grade I PIVH patients (P>0.05). There was significant difference in the echo intensity among three groups of grade II PIVH patients, and the ganglioside had the best therapeutic efficacy (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed in the area change among three groups of grade I PIVH patients (P>0.05). However, significant difference was observed in the area change among three groups of grade II PIVH patients, and ganglioside had a better efficacy than cerebrolysin and control agent (P<0.05), but there was no significant difference between cerebrolysin and control groups (P>0.05). GDDS evaluation showed no significant difference among three groups (P>0.05), and all the patients recovered completely. Conclusion: The efficacy of different treatments for mild PIVH can be reflected in the ultrasound findings. Mild PIVH children generally have a good neurological prognosis. PMID:26131081

  19. Meeting Transition Needs of the Mildly Handicapped in Rural Areas: Personnel and Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Donald

    The Rural Transition Teacher Preparation Project was designed to train rural special educators to be clinical instructors for the University of Utah's Department of Special Education. These trained educators then serve as delivery agents of courses designed to improve transition services to mildly and moderately handicapped students in rural…

  20. Clock Drawing Performance and Brain Morphology in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomann, Philipp A.; Toro, Pablo; Santos, Vasco Dos; Essig, Marco; Schroder, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a widely used instrument in the neuropsychological assessment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As CDT performance necessitates several cognitive functions (e.g., visuospatial and constructional abilities, executive functioning), an interaction of multiple brain regions is likely. Fifty-one subjects with mild cognitive…

  1. Selecting Instructional Interventions for Students with Mild Disabilities in Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keel, Marie C.; Dangel, Harry L.; Owens, Sherie H.

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses factors involved in selecting appropriate inclusion intervention strategies for students with mild disabilities. Teacher-directed and student-directed interventions include direct instruction, precision teaching, time delay, story maps, advance organizers, student-directed task engagement, student-directed instruction,…

  2. Not All Created Equally: Exploring Calculator Use by Students with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakubova, Gulnoza; Bouck, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Calculators are widely used in mathematics education, yet limited research examines the effects of calculators for students with mild intellectual disability. An alternating treatments design was used to study the effects of calculator types (i.e., scientific and graphing) on the mathematical performance (i.e., computation and word problems) of…

  3. Is There Really a Difference? Distinguishing Mild Intellectual Disability from "Similar" Disability Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Satsangi, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Students with mild intellectual disability generally garner less individual attention in research, as they are often aggregated with students with moderate and severe intellectual disability or students with other high incidence disabilities. This study used the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) to look at the personal…

  4. Response to Intervention for Young Children with Mild, Moderate/Severe Cognitive Disabilities: Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almalki, Nabil; Abaoud, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    This study has discussed in-depth information about understanding the Response to Intervention (RTI) linking with children from pre-school to kindergarten (three to eight years old) who have Cognitive Disabilities (CD), including different levels from mild to moderate and/or severe. The study consists of five main sections--RTI, CD, RTI Linking…

  5. Enhancing the Note-Taking Skills of Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Joseph R.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the difficulties students with mild disabilities can have with note taking. It begins with a vignette and then describes how teachers can modify their lectures and how they can teach note-taking techniques to students. The two note-taking techniques described are strategic note taking and guided notes. (Contains references.)…

  6. Grading-Credit-Diploma: Accommodation Practices for Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Roger; And Others

    This volume contains two papers concerning appropriate accommodations that can be made in the areas of grading and granting credits and diplomas for mildly handicapped high school students. The first paper discusses grades for students with disabilities who are mainstreamed in general education classes. It presents seven guiding principles that…

  7. Amplification Considerations for Children With Minimal or Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss and Unilateral Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Sarah; Gravel, Judith S.; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2008-01-01

    Children with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss and unilateral hearing loss are at higher risk for academic, speech-language, and social-emotional difficulties than their normal hearing peers. The choice to fit infants with moderate or greater degrees of bilateral hearing loss has been standard practice for most clinicians, but for those with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss or unilateral hearing loss, the fitting of hearing technology must be based on limited data. Evidence does not yet exist to support all the management decisions that an audiologist must make upon identifying an infant with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss or unilateral hearing loss. It is not yet known which children are at the greatest risk for educational problems nor is it known if the provision of early amplification in this population will help a child avoid later difficulties. Some of these considerations and current hearing technology options for children with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss or unilateral hearing loss are reviewed in this article. PMID:18270178

  8. The Croydon Assessment of Learning Study: Prevalence and Educational Identification of Mild Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonoff, Emily; Pickles, Andrew; Chadwick, Oliver; Gringras, Paul; Wood, Nicky; Higgins, Siobhan; Maney, Julie-Ann; Karia, Nisha; Iqbal, Huma; Moore, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Background: Mild mental retardation is an enduring and impairing condition. Its prevalence has varied widely across different studies from 0.5 to over 8%, with higher rates in completely ascertained samples. The current study estimates the prevalence of low IQ in the mental retardation range (intellectual disability) in a population sample and…

  9. Social Problem-Solving and Mild Intellectual Disabilities: Relations with Externalizing Behavior and Therapeutic Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, Maroesjka; de Castro, Bram Orobio; Wijnroks, Lex; Vermeer, Adri; Matthys, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Relations among externalizing behavior, therapeutic context (community care vs. residential care), and social problem-solving by children with mild intellectual disabilities or borderline intelligence were examined. Participants were 186 children (12 to 14 years of age) who responded to a video-based social problem-solving task. Of these, 130…

  10. Co-Teaching Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities Using Literature-Based Reading Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swicegood, Philip; Miller, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Literacy instruction for students with mild to moderate special needs should include authentic literature. Literature-based reading instruction provides time for students to develop new knowledge and strategies in a supportive context. When reading instruction occurs in an inclusion classroom, it also allows time for general education and special…

  11. A single subcutaneous dose of tramadol for mild to moderate musculoskeletal trauma in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Alejandro; Silva, Carlos; Dominguez, Luis; Botero, Beatriz; Zambrano, Paulo; Bareno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mild to moderate musculoskeletal trauma is a common cause for an emergency room visit, and frequent pain is one of the cardinal symptoms of consultation. The objective of this study is to assess the perception of a single subcutaneous dose of 50 mg tramadol for pain management in patients with mild to moderate musculoskeletal trauma, likewise to appraise the perception of pain by subcutaneous injection. METHODS: A total of 77 patients, who met inclusion criteria, received a single subcutaneous dose of tramadol. Pain control was evaluated based on the verbal numerical pain scale (0–10) at baseline, 20 and 60 minutes; similarly, pain perception was evaluated secondary to subcutaneous injection of the analgesic. RESULTS: On admission, the average pain perceived by patients was 8; twenty minutes later, 89% of the patients reported five or less, and after sixty minutes, 94% had three or less on the verbal numerical pain scale. Of the patients, 88% reported pain perception by verbal numeric scale of 3 or less by injection of the drug, and 6.5% required a second analgesic for pain control. Two events with drug administration (soft tissue infection and mild abdominal rectus injection) were reported. CONCLUSION: We conclude that a single subcutaneous dose of tramadol is a safe and effective option for the management of patients with mild to moderate pain and musculoskeletal disease in the emergency department. PMID:25548601

  12. Preclinical Cerebral Network Connectivity Evidence of Deficits in Mild White Matter Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ying; Sun, Xuan; Xu, Shijun; Liu, Yaou; Huang, Ruiwang; Jia, Jianjun; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2016-01-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are notable for their high prevalence and have been demonstrated to be a potential neuroimaging biomarker of early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. This study aimed to identify the brain functional and structural mechanisms underlying cognitive decline observed in mild WMLs. Multi-domain cognitive tests, as well as resting-state, diffusion tensor and structural images were obtained on 42 mild WMLs and 42 age/sex-matched healthy controls. For each participant, we examined the functional connectivity (FC) of three resting-state networks (RSNs) related to the changed cognitive domains: the default mode network (DMN) and the bilateral fronto-parietal network (FPN). We also performed voxel-based morphometry analysis to compare whole-brain gray matter (GM) volume, atlas-based quantification of the white matter tracts interconnecting the RSNs, and the relationship between FC and structural connectivity. We observed FC alterations in the DMN and the right FPN combined with related white matter integrity disruption in mild WMLs. However, no significant GM atrophy difference was found. Furthermore, the right precuneus FC in the DMN exhibited a significantly negative correlation with the memory test scores. Our study suggests that in mild WMLs, dysfunction of RSNs might be a consequence of decreased white matter structural connectivity, which further affects cognitive performance. PMID:26924981

  13. Measuring Stress in the Mildly Intellectually Handicapped: The Factorial Structure of the Subjective Stress Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramston, Paul; Fogarty, Gerard J.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the underlying structure of the Subjective Stress Scale (SSS) by analyzing responses of 221 intellectually disabled adults. Results suggest that, although actual stressors vary, persons with mild intellectual disability are affected by the same major stress dimensions as the general population. Results also found the SSS…

  14. People with Mild to Moderate Intellectual Disability Talking about Their Diabetes and How They Manage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardol, M.; Rijken, M.; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of diabetes is relatively high in people with intellectual disability (ID). However, little is known about how people with ID experience having diabetes and how they manage the condition. Method: Seventeen people with mild to moderate ID who have diabetes were interviewed. A framework on illness perceptions having an…

  15. Can Mild Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Affect Developmental Abilities in Younger School-Age Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ðokovic, Sanja; Gligorovic, Milica; Ostojic, Sanja; Dimic, Nadežda; Radic-Šestic, Marina; Slavnic, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    The research study was conducted for the purpose of examining the influence of mild bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (MBSNHL) on developmental abilities of younger school-age children. The sample encompassed 144 children with MBSNHL, aged 7.5-11 (M = 8.85). MBSNHL (20-40 dB HL) was identified by pure tone audiometry. The control group…

  16. Mild Intellectual Disability in Children in Lahore, Pakistan: Aetiology and Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaqoob, M.; Bashir, A.; Zaman, S.; Ferngren, H.; von Dobeln, U.; Gustavson, K.-H.

    2004-01-01

    One of the main objectives of studying intellectual disability (ID) in children is to explore its causes. A specific aetiological diagnosis is important in determining the prognosis, nature and extent of services needed to support affected children. Aetiology and risk factors in mild ID were studied in a cohort of longitudinally followed children…

  17. Structural Dissociation of Attentional Control and Memory in Adults with and without Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niogi, Sumit N.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Ghajar, Jamshid; Johnson, Carl E.; Kolster, Rachel; Lee, Hana; Suh, Minah; Zimmerman, Robert D.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; McCandliss, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Memory and attentional control impairments are the two most common forms of dysfunction following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and lead to significant morbidity in patients, yet these functions are thought to be supported by different brain networks. This 3 T magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study investigates whether…

  18. The Imagination Inflation Effect in Healthy Older Adults and Patients with Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Maureen K.; Deason, Rebecca G.; Reynolds, Erin; Tat, Michael J.; Flannery, Sean; Solomon, Paul R.; Vassey, Elizabeth A.; Budson, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The imagination inflation effect is a type of memory distortion defined as an increased tendency to falsely remember that an item has been seen, or an action has been performed, when it has only been imagined. For patients with very mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD), susceptibility to the imagination inflation effect could have significant functional consequences in daily life. Method We assessed whether patients with very mild AD were more or less susceptible to the imagination inflation effect when compared to healthy older adults. In the first session, participants were read an action statement such as “fill the pillbox” and engaged in one of three activities: listened to the statement being read, performed the action, or imagined performing the action. During the second session, participants imagined action statements from the first session as well as new action statements. During the recognition test, participants were asked to determine whether action statements were or were not performed during the first session. Results We found that imagining performing actions increased the tendency of patients with very mild AD to falsely recall the action as having been performed to an extent similar to that of healthy older adults. Conclusion We concluded that, similar to healthy older adults, patients with very mild AD were susceptible to the imagination inflation effect, which we attributed to difficulties with source monitoring and reliance on familiarity. PMID:25893972

  19. Gender-Specific Development of Nonverbal Behaviours and Mild Depression in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Beek, Yolanda; Van Dolderen, Marlies S. M.; Demon Dubas, Judith J. S.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Individual differences in depressive symptoms have been linked with social skill deficits in adults and children, yet empirical studies on adolescents are lacking. The present research examines age and gender differences in nonverbal behaviour between mildly depressed and nondepressed (pre-) adolescents during conversations with an…

  20. Total synthesis of polyene natural product dihydroxerulin by mild organocatalyzed dehydrogenation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hexin; Zhang, Shilei; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinshuai; Zhao, Sihan; Xu, Zian; Song, Xixi; Yu, Xinhong; Wang, Wei

    2012-02-20

    Polyene synthesis: An efficient approach to the total synthesis of polyene natural product dihydroxrulin (1) is described. A novel, mild, direct organocatalytic IBX-mediated dehydrogenation process of simple alcohols to enals has been developed, which serves as a key step in the synthesis (see scheme).

  1. Detective Questions: A Strategy for Improving Inference-Making in Children With Mild Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiménez-Fernández, Gracia

    2015-01-01

    One of the most frequent problems in reading comprehension is the difficulty in making inferences from the text, especially for students with mild disabilities (i.e., children with learning disabilities or with high-functioning autism). It is essential, therefore, that educators include the teaching of reading strategies to improve their students'…

  2. Insights into early treatment of mild asthma: do inhaled corticosteroids make a difference?

    PubMed

    Tan, Wan C

    2007-01-01

    Approaches to the management of moderate-to-severe persistent asthma in both children and adults are widely accepted but the treatment of mild persistent asthma remains controversial because of the lack of agreement on what constitutes mild asthma and whether regular treatment is required at all. Recent evidence indicates that 'mild asthma' may not be as benign a condition as was widely believed and should be treated to improve asthma control and to prevent the significant burden of exacerbation and progression of disease. This is supported by compelling evidence from histologic and clinical studies that have attributed irreversible pathologic and functional airway changes to consequences of persistent airway inflammation and under-treated asthma. This article focuses on the rationale of early treatment of mild persistent asthma, and discusses the various findings from the largest randomized, early-intervention trial with inhaled corticosteroids as regular treatment in patients with asthma of recent onset--the START (inhaled Steroid Treatment As Regular Therapy in early asthma) study. A brief review of the background of the natural history of asthma, the findings from key longitudinal epidemiologic studies on disease progression in children and adults, and the effect of inhaled corticosteroids on this progression are included, to provide further insight into the impact of early treatment on asthma management guidelines.

  3. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Poor Functioning after Isolated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Children

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, Dennis R.; Koepsell, Thomas D.; Wang, Jin; Temkin, Nancy R.; Dorsch, Andrea M.; Vavilala, Monica S.; Jaffe, Kenneth M.; Rivara, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of poor 3 and 12 month quality of life outcomes in a cohort of pediatric patients with isolated mild TBI. We conducted a prospective cohort study of children and adolescents <18 years of age treated for an isolated mild TBI, defined as “no radiographically apparent intracranial injury” or “an isolated skull fracture, and no other clinically significant non-brain injuries.” The main outcome measure was the change in quality of life from baseline at 3 and 12 months following injury, as measured by the Pediatric Quality of Life index (PedsQL). Poor functioning was defined as a decrease in total PedsQL score of >15 points between baseline and follow-up scores (at 3 and 12 months). Of the 329 patients who met inclusion criteria, 11.3% (95% CI 8.3–15.3%) at 3 months and 12.9% (95% CI 9.6–17.2%) at 12 months following injury had relatively poor functioning. Significant predictors of poor functioning included less parental education, Hispanic ethnicity (at 3 months following injury, but not at 12 months); low household income (at 3 and 12 months), and Medicaid insurance (at 12 months only). Children and adolescents sustaining a mild TBI who are socioeconomically disadvantaged may require additional intervention to mitigate the effects of mild TBI on their functioning. PMID:24294826

  4. The Relation of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury to Chronic Lapses of Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontifex, Matthew B.; Broglio, Steven P.; Drollette, Eric S.; Scudder, Mark R.; Johnson, Chris R.; O'Connor, Phillip M.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the extent to which failures in sustained attention were associated with chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) deficits in cognitive control among college-age young adults with and without a history of sport-related concussion. Participants completed the ImPACT computer-based assessment and a modified flanker task. Results…

  5. Brain Substrates of Learning and Retention in Mild Cognitive Impairment Diagnosis and Progression to Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Ling; Bondi, Mark W.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; McEvoy, Linda K.; Hagler, Donald J., Jr.; Jacobson, Mark W.; Dale, Anders M.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the underlying qualitative features of memory deficits in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can provide critical information for early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study sought to investigate the utility of both learning and retention measures in (a) the diagnosis of MCI, (b) predicting progression to AD, and (c)…

  6. Predictors of Hearing Aid Use Time in Children with Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Spratford, Meredith; Moeller, Mary Pat; Oleson, Jacob; Ou, Hua; Roush, Patricia; Jacobs, Shana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated predictors of hearing aid (HA) use time for children with mild-to-severe hearing loss (HL). Barriers to consistent HA use and reliability of parent report measures were also examined. Method: Participants included parents of 272 children with HL. Parents estimated the amount of time the child used HAs daily.…

  7. Pentop Computers as Tools for Teaching Multiplication to Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Bassette, Laura; Taber-Doughty, Teresa; Flanagan, Sara M.; Szwed, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of a pentop computer when teaching multiplication facts to three middle school students with mild intellectual disabilities was examined. A multiple probe design was used to assess the students learning of one and two digit multiplication facts over a 2-3 week intervention period. During the intervention phase, students used a…

  8. Mild and metal-free oxy- and amino-fluorination for the synthesis of fluorinated heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Dixit; Rueping, Magnus

    2014-11-21

    A mild intramolecular fluoro-cyclisation reaction of benzylic alcohols and amines has been developed. This strategy uses commercially available Selectfluor to trigger electrophilic cyclisations to afford fluorinated heterocycles containing 1,3-disubstitution. The dual role of the reagent as a fluorine source and a base is shown to be crucial for reactivity.

  9. Emission, absorption and polarization of gyrosynchrotron radiation of mildly relativistic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Mctiernan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Approximate analytic expressions are presented for the emissivity and absorption coefficient of synchrotron radiation of mildly relativistic particles with an arbitrary energy spectrum and pitch angle distribution. From these, an expression for the degree of polarization is derived. The analytic results are compared with numerical results for both thermal and non-thermal (power law) distributions of particles.

  10. Cooperative Learning as an Academic Intervention for Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmgren, Kimber W.

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses cooperative learning as a strategy for increasing academic achievement for students with mild disabilities. Factors for successful cooperative learning groups include: heterogeneous grouping, tasks cooperative in nature, the existence of positive interdependence, individual accountability, equal opportunities for success,…

  11. A Systematic Approach for Teaching Notetaking Skills to Students with Mild Learning Handicaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beirne-Smith, Mary

    1989-01-01

    A five-step method for teaching notetaking skills in students with mild learning handicaps includes evaluating current performance, teaching preskills, teaching a notetaking system, providing for distributed practice, and providing for skill generalization. Additional practical suggestions for teachers are provided. (MSE)

  12. Comparison of Black and White Mildly Retarded Students from Marshall v. Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reschly, Daniel J.; Kicklighter, Richard J.

    Random samples of black and white EMR (Educable Mentally Retarded) students (N=69) from defendant districts in Marshall v. Georgia were compared on numerous variables related to preplacement evaluation, classification and placement in special education, and reevaluation. On nearly all variables black and white mildly mentally retarded (MMR)…

  13. Mild Intellectual Disability Associated with a Progeny of Father-Daughter Incest: Genetic and Environmental Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansermet, Francois; Lespinasse, James; Gimelli, Stefania; Bena, Frederique; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old female resulting from a father-daughter sexual abuse and presenting a phenotype of mild intellectual disability with minor dysmorphic features. Karyotyping showed a normal 46, XX constitution. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) revealed a heterozygote 320kb 6p22.3 microdeletion in the…

  14. Computer-Based Working Memory Training in Children with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delavarian, Mona; Bokharaeian, Behrouz; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    We designed a working memory (WM) training programme in game framework for mild intellectually disabled students. Twenty-four students participated as test and control groups. The auditory and visual-spatial WM were assessed by primary test, which included computerised Wechsler numerical forward and backward sub-tests and secondary tests, which…

  15. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Aimee M; Stephenson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) (and concussion) occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the “dark neuron” (DN) as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours) total sleep deprivation (TSD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day) affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons), and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%). Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%), and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%). Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. PMID:26124685

  16. Developmental Differences in the Symptomatology of Psychiatric Inpatients with and without Mild Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Marion; Zigler, Edward

    1995-01-01

    The symptomatology of 93 psychiatric inpatients with mild mental retardation was compared with that of a matched sample of inpatients without mental retardation. Patients with retardation displayed more outwardly directed and less inwardly directed symptoms; more symptoms involving action than thought; and psychotic symptom pictures which more…

  17. Versatile, mild, and selective reduction of various carbonyl groups using an electron-deficient boron catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Katherine M; Kleman, Adam F; Sadergaski, Luke R; Jolly, Caitlyn L; Bollinger, Brady S; Mackesey, Brittany L; McGrath, Nicholas A

    2016-06-15

    A mild and selective new method was discovered to reduce acetanilides and other carbonyl compounds. Unlike sodium borohydride, which is selective in reducing aldehydes and ketones, this new protocol is uniquely selective in reducing acetanilides and nitriles over other carbonyl containing functional groups. Additionally, β-ketoamides were shown to be reduced at the ketone preferentially over the amide.

  18. Mild maternal stress disrupts associative learning and increases aggression in offspring.

    PubMed

    Eaton, L; Edmonds, E J; Henry, T B; Snellgrove, D L; Sloman, K A

    2015-05-01

    Maternal stress has been shown to affect behaviour of offspring in a wide range of animals, but this evidence has come from studies that exposed gestating mothers to acute or severe stressors, such as restraint or exposure to synthetic stress hormones. Here we show that exposure of mothers to even a mild stressor reduces associative learning and increases aggression in offspring. Female guppies were exposed to routine husbandry procedures that produced only a minimal, non-significant, elevation of the stress hormone cortisol. In contrast to controls, offspring from mothers that experienced this mild stress failed to learn to associate a colour cue and food reward, and showed a greater amount of inter-individual variation in behaviour compared with control offspring. This mild stress also resulted in offspring that were more aggressive towards their own mirror image than controls. While it is possible that these results could represent the transmission of beneficial maternal characteristics to offspring born into unpredictable environments, the potential for mild maternal stress to affect offspring performance also has important implications for research into the trans-generational effects of stress.

  19. Berberine as a natural source inhibitor for mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Peng; Liang, Qiang; Hou, Baorong

    2005-12-01

    Berberine was abstracted from coptis chinensis and its inhibition efficiency on corrosion of mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4 was investigated through weight loss experiment, electrochemical techniques and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) with energy disperse spectrometer (EDS). The weight loss results showed that berberine is an excellent corrosion inhibitor for mild steel immersed in 1 M H 2SO 4. Potentiodynamic curves suggested that berberine suppressed both cathodic and anodic processes for its concentrations higher than 1.0 × 10 -4 M and mainly cathodic reaction was suppressed for lower concentrations. The Nyquist diagrams of impedance for mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4 containing berberine with different concentrations showed one capacitive loop, and the polarization resistance increased with the inhibitor concentration rising. A good fit to Flory-Huggins isotherm was obtained between surface coverage degree and inhibitor concentration. The surface morphology and EDS analysis for mild steel specimens in sulfuric acid in the absence and presence of the inhibitor also proved the results obtained by the weight loss and electrochemical experiments. The correlation of inhibition effect and molecular structure of berberine was then discussed by quantum chemistry study.

  20. Mild copper-mediated fluorination of aryl stannanes and aryl trifluoroborates.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yingda; Sanford, Melanie S

    2013-03-27

    This communication describes a mild copper-mediated fluorination of aryl stannanes and aryl trifluoroborates with N-fluoro-2,4,6-trimethylpyridinium triflate. This protocol demonstrates broad substrate scope and functional group tolerance, and does not require the use of any noble metal additives. The reaction is proposed to proceed via an arylcopper(III) fluoride intermediate. PMID:23485148

  1. Patterns of Intellectual, Adaptive and Behavioral Functioning in Individuals with Mild Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soenen, Sarah; Van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina; Scholte, Evert

    2009-01-01

    Many researchers have studied the population of individuals with mild mental retardation (MIMR) as if it is a clear entity. Few researchers have investigated potential subtypes within the MIMR population. The purpose of the present study was to investigate which subtypes can be identified on the basis of intellectual, adaptive and behavioral…

  2. Mild maternal stress disrupts associative learning and increases aggression in offspring.

    PubMed

    Eaton, L; Edmonds, E J; Henry, T B; Snellgrove, D L; Sloman, K A

    2015-05-01

    Maternal stress has been shown to affect behaviour of offspring in a wide range of animals, but this evidence has come from studies that exposed gestating mothers to acute or severe stressors, such as restraint or exposure to synthetic stress hormones. Here we show that exposure of mothers to even a mild stressor reduces associative learning and increases aggression in offspring. Female guppies were exposed to routine husbandry procedures that produced only a minimal, non-significant, elevation of the stress hormone cortisol. In contrast to controls, offspring from mothers that experienced this mild stress failed to learn to associate a colour cue and food reward, and showed a greater amount of inter-individual variation in behaviour compared with control offspring. This mild stress also resulted in offspring that were more aggressive towards their own mirror image than controls. While it is possible that these results could represent the transmission of beneficial maternal characteristics to offspring born into unpredictable environments, the potential for mild maternal stress to affect offspring performance also has important implications for research into the trans-generational effects of stress. PMID:25840012

  3. A mildly relativistic radio jet from the otherwise normal type Ic supernova 2007gr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paragi, Z.; Taylor, G. B.; Kouveliotou, C.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Bietenholz, M.; van der Horst, A. J.; Pidopryhora, Y.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Garrett, M. A.; Szomoru, A.; Argo, M. K.; Bourke, S.; Paczyński, B.

    2010-01-01

    The class of type Ic supernovae have drawn increasing attention since 1998 owing to their sparse association (only four so far) with long duration γ-ray bursts (GRBs). Although both phenomena originate from the core collapse of a massive star, supernovae emit mostly at optical wavelengths, whereas GRBs emit mostly in soft γ-rays or hard X-rays. Though the GRB central engine generates ultra-relativistic jets, which beam the early emission into a narrow cone, no relativistic outflows have hitherto been found in type Ib/c supernovae explosions, despite theoretical expectations and searches. Here we report radio (interferometric) observations that reveal a mildly relativistic expansion in a nearby type Ic supernova, SN 2007gr. Using two observational epochs 60days apart, we detect expansion of the source and establish a conservative lower limit for the average apparent expansion velocity of 0.6c. Independently, a second mildly relativistic supernova has been reported. Contrary to the radio data, optical observations of SN 2007gr indicate a typical type Ic supernova with ejecta velocities ~6,000kms-1, much lower than in GRB-associated supernovae. We conclude that in SN 2007gr a small fraction of the ejecta produced a low-energy mildly relativistic bipolar radio jet, while the bulk of the ejecta were slower and, as shown by optical spectropolarimetry, mildly aspherical.

  4. The Prevalence and Characteristics of Psychiatric Disorders among Adolescent Bedouin with Mild to Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manor-Binyamini, Iris

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and types of psychiatric disorders among Bedouin adolescents with mild to moderate intellectual disability. This is the first study ever conducted on this topic within the Bedouin community in the Negev in Israel. The issue of psychiatric disorders among adolescents with intellectual disability…

  5. Working Memory Development in Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Molen, M. J.; Henry, L. A.; Van Luit, J. E. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the current cross-sectional study was to examine the developmental progression in working memory (WM) between the ages of 9 and 16 years in a large sample of children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities (MBID). Baddeley's influential WM model was used as a theoretical framework. Furthermore, the…

  6. Working Memory Structure in 10- and 15-Year Old Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual, Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Molen, Mariet J.

    2010-01-01

    The validity of Baddeley's working memory model within the typically developing population, was tested. However, it is not clear if this model also holds in children and adolescents with mild to, borderline intellectual disabilities (ID; IQ score 55-85). The main purpose of this study was therefore, to explore the model's validity in this…

  7. [Teaching of Written Language Skills to Mildly Handicapped Students]. PRISE Reporter No. 18, October 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englert, Carol Sue; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This newsletter issue concentrates on the topic of teaching written language skills to mildly handicapped elementary and secondary students, with emphasis on the communicative function of writing. The feature article discusses expository writing instruction, describing essential elements of the expository writing process and characteristics of…

  8. Dimensions of Ambiguous Loss in Couples Coping with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blieszner, Rosemary; Roberto, Karen A.; Wilcox, Karen L.; Barham, Elizabeth J.; Winston, Brianne L.

    2007-01-01

    We applied the theory of ambiguous loss to couples with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), an age-related decline in memory and other cognitive processes assumed not to interfere with daily activities or the maintenance of personal relationships. Face-to-face interviews with 67 older married couples revealed that lack of understanding about the…

  9. Lessons for Inclusion: Classroom Experiences of Students with Mild and Moderate Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Up to 15 % of the student population in integrated classrooms has mild or moderate hearing loss (MMHL) (Niskar et al., 2001), a communication disability that can impact language development, academic performance, and social-emotional quality of life. Due to the mostly intelligible speech of these students, teachers may easily overlook their…

  10. Benefits of treating highly disabled migraine patients with zolmitriptan while pain is mild.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J; Lucas, C; Røsjø, Ø; Charlesworth, B

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials of migraine therapy often require treatment when migraine pain intensity is moderate or severe, but many physicians find this practice artificial and patients often prefer to treat while pain is mild. This randomized, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy of zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in treating migraine while pain is mild, in patients who typically experience migraine attacks that are initially mild, but progress to moderate or severe. The intent-to-treat population comprised 280 patients (138 zolmitriptan; 148 placebo), with mean MIDAS grades of 29.6 (zolmitriptan) and 27.6 (placebo). Zolmitriptan 2.5 mg provided a significantly higher pain-free rate at 2 h (43.4% vs. 18.4% placebo; P < 0.0001). Significantly fewer zolmitriptan patients reported progression of headache pain to moderate or severe intensity 2 h postdose (53.7% vs. 70.4% placebo; P < 0.01), or required further medication within 24 h (46.4% vs. 71.1% placebo; P < 0.0001). The efficacy of zolmitriptan was more pronounced in patients treating during the first 15 min following pain onset. Adverse events were reported in 31.2% of patients treated with zolmitriptan (vs. 11.3% for placebo), and the incidence was lower in patients who treated early after attack onset. Zolmitriptan provides high efficacy when treating migraine while pain is mild, with the clinical benefits being more pronounced when treating early after migraine onset. PMID:15482352

  11. A Model of Phonological Processing, Language, and Reading for Students with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, R. Michael; Sevcik, Rose A.; Morris, Robin D.; Romski, MaryAnn

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the relationships between phonological processing, language, and reading in children with intellectual disability (ID). We examined the structure of phonological processing in 294 school-age children with mild ID and the relationships between its components and expressive and receptive language and reading skills using…

  12. The Challenge of Caring for Mildly Ill Children: A Canadian National Childcare Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polyzoi, E.; Babb, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    This Canadian study of the care of mildly ill children in licensed childcare facilities compares director and parent preferences for eight models of care, exclusionary practices for ill children by directors, and preferred backup care options of parents. It also investigates anticipated usage and willingness of parents to pay for emergency…

  13. Patients With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Check Excessively in Response to Mild Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Toffolo, Marieke B J; van den Hout, Marcel A; Engelhard, Iris M; Hooge, Ignace T C; Cath, Daniëlle C

    2016-07-01

    Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) not only respond to obsessions with perseverative checking, but also engage in more general checking, irrespective of their obsessive concerns. This study investigated whether general checking is specific to OCD and exacerbated when only mild uncertainty is induced. Thirty-one patients with OCD, 26 anxiety- and 31 healthy controls performed a visual search task with eye-tracking and indicated in 50 search displays whether a target was "present" or "absent". Target-present trials were unambiguous, whereas target-absent trials induced mild uncertainty, because participants had to rely on not overlooking the target. Checking behavior was measured by assessing search time and the number of fixations, measured with an eye-tracker. Results showed that in both target-present and target-absent trials patients with OCD searched longer and made more fixations than healthy and anxiety controls. However, the difference in checking behavior between patients with OCD and the control groups was larger in target-absent trials (where mild uncertainty was induced). Anxiety and healthy controls did not differ in checking behavior. Thus, mild uncertainty appears to specifically promote checking in patients with OCD, which has implications for treatment. PMID:27423170

  14. A Pyrosequencing Investigation of Differences in the Feline Subgingival Microbiota in Health, Gingivitis and Mild Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stephen; Croft, Julie; O'Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Allsopp, Judi; Milella, Lisa; Davis, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in cats yet little is known about the bacterial species important for the disease. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis (<25% attachment loss) in feline plaque. Knowledge of these species is a first step in understanding the potential for improving oral health of cats via dietary interventions that alter the proportions of influential species. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from 92 cats with healthy gingiva, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA from these plaque samples generated more than one million reads and identified a total of 267 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all gingival health categories, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Fusobacteria. The Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant family in gingivitis and mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from various genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. The species identified were very similar to those observed in canine plaque in the corresponding health and disease states. Such similarities were not observed between cat and human at the bacterial species level but with disease progression similarities did emerge at the phylum level. This suggests that interventions targeted at human pathogenic species will not be effective for use in cats but there is more potential for commonalities in interventions for cats and dogs. PMID:26605793

  15. (Social) Cognitive Skills and Social Information Processing in Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.; Vriens, A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the unique contributions of (social) cognitive skills such as inhibition, working memory, perspective taking, facial emotion recognition, and interpretation of situations to the variance in social information processing in children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities. Respondents were 79…

  16. Computer-Assisted Instruction for Students at Risk for ADHD, Mild Disabilities, or Academic Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Renet L.; Bender, William N.

    This guide is intended to help teachers integrate computer-assisted instruction into classrooms which include students who are at risk for or students who have mild and moderate disabilities such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. After an introductory chapter, Chapter 2 discusses how computer programs can help students with particular…

  17. Increased Sensitivity to Proactive and Retroactive Interference in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: New Insights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanseeuw, Bernard J.; Seron, Xavier; Ivanoiu, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Increased sensitivity to proactive (PI) and retroactive (RI) interference has been observed in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). PI and RI are often explained as being the result of a response competition mechanism. However, patients with aMCI are supposed to suffer mostly from encoding deficits. We hypothesized that in aMCI…

  18. Early Detection of Cognitive-Linguistic Change Associated with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Valarie B.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may present with subtle declines in linguistic ability that go undetected by tasks not challenging enough to tax a relatively intact cognitive-linguistic system. This study was designed to replicate and extend a previous study of cognitive-linguistic ability in MCI using a complex discourse…

  19. Positive Effects of Computer-Based Cognitive Training in Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, C.; Chambon, C.; Michel, B. F.; Paban, V.; Alescio-Lautier, B.

    2012-01-01

    Considering the high risk for individuals with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (A-MCI) to progress towards Alzheimer's disease (AD), we investigated the efficacy of a non-pharmacological intervention, that is, cognitive training that could reduce cognitive difficulties and delay the cognitive decline. For this, we evaluated the efficacy of a…

  20. The UCLA Longitudinal Study of Neurocognitive Outcomes Following Mild Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Babikian, Talin; Satz, Paul; Zaucha, Ken; Light, Roger; Lewis, Richard S.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive reviews of neurocognitive outcomes following mild, uncomplicated traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children have shown minimal effects on neurocognition, especially in methodologically rigorous studies. In this study, we report longitudinal (1, 6, and 12 months post injury) results in four domains of neurocognitive functioning in a large sample of children with mild TBI (n = 124, ages 8–17 at injury) relative to two demographically matched control groups (other injury: n = 94 and non-injury: n = 106). After accounting for age and parental education, significant main effects of group were observed on 7 of the 10 neurocognitive tests. However, these differences were not unique to the TBI sample but were found between both the TBI and other injury groups relative to the non-injured group, suggesting a general injury effect. Effects were primarily within the domains measuring memory, psychomotor processing speed, and language. This is the largest longitudinal study to date of neurocognitive outcomes at discrete time points in pediatric mild TBI. When controlling for pre-injury factors, there is no evidence of long-term neurocognitive impairment in this group relative to another injury control group. The importance of longitudinal analyses and use of appropriate control groups are discussed in the context of evaluating the effects of mild TBI on cognition. PMID:21813031