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Sample records for military medical academy

  1. [The contribution of the Military Medical Academy to space exploration].

    PubMed

    Belevitin, A B; Tsygan, V N; Blaginin, A A; Kaltygin, M V

    2011-04-01

    The article examines the contribution of the Military Medical Academy as an educational, research and medical institutions in the establishment and development of the national Russian manned spaceflight. Lists the names of the Academy's scientists, working in laboratories and in the Cosmonaut Training Center. In 1958 the academy was formed Department of Aviation Medicine from the research laboratories of aviation medicine, psychophysiology, and encephalography, a division of pressure chambers and furnaces. Direct contribution to the preparation of the first manned space flight made by graduates of the academy, E.A. Karpov (the first chief of Cosmonauts Training Center. Yuri Gagarin) and I.A. Kolosov. Over the half century history of the Russian Space Military Medical Academy, prepared and sent to the CPC Gagarin more than 110 of its graduates.

  2. [The Military Medical Academy during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Elizarev, S V; Lemeshkin, R N; Klyuchnkov, P B

    2015-05-01

    The article is devoted to the 70th anniversary of Victory in the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945. Presented the contribution of the"Military Medical Academy. Examined the activities of the academy and the fulfillment of its employees on the eve of the war, the conditions under which employees had to work in the first months of the war in Leningrad. Described the evacuation of the Academy to the rear of the' country and especially educational, scientific and practical activities of employees Academy in Samarkand; activities clinics Academy remaining in the besieged Leningrad; radical reorganization of the Academy during the war. Presented briefly the history of creation of command and the Medical Faculty. Paying tribute to the faculty of the Academy in the field of research, teaching activities and practical work in the army.

  3. [Military postgraduate courses at the Military Medical Academy: history, current state and prospects].

    PubMed

    Kotiv, B N; Ivchenko, E V; Zubenko, A I; Ovchinnikov, D V

    2013-12-01

    Training of scientific and scientific-pedagogical staff is one of the most important tasks of any high school. The problem of staff training arose in the Kirov Military Medical (Medical Surgical) Academy before its official foundation. In 1741 first scholars were sent abroad for the preparation of theses. The scholars were supposed to return to the hospital schools for teaching activity. Since 1802 scholars have defended their theses in the Academy. In 1858 special medical institute, the prototype of the Institute for postgraduate military studies was established. Many outstanding scientists studied in the Academy and brought name of the Academy into repute. At the present time, the Institute of postgraduate military studies (postgraduate) of the Kirov Military Medical Academy continues to train scientific staff. The Institute of postgraduate military studies remains one of the most successful institutes in Russia.

  4. [The reform of military medical education and the tasks of the Military Medical Academy in improving personnel training].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Iu L

    1994-08-01

    The Military Medical Academy is a military educational institution which carries out the primary profile training of physicians for the Armed Services and all types of post-graduation training and advanced training of the scientific-pedagogical and medical specialists. Internship as a first stage of the post-graduation training is intended to improve practical medical training of the graduates of the Russian Military Medical Academy and other medico-military educational institutions by means of their primary specialization in one of the clinical or profile branches of medicine. The reforming of the post-graduation training rest system in the Military Medical Academy aims at its further development and putting specialists' training system into accordance with the Armed Forces reorganizations. This will make it possible to ensure high professional qualification of military doctors at the level of national and international standards.

  5. [Capabilities of military medical academy in the implementation of advanced scientific research].

    PubMed

    Bel'skikh, A N

    2013-06-01

    The paper describes the main areas of current and future studies of scientific schools, scientific potential and the structure of scientific complex of Military Medical Academy. Improvement and equipping of laboratory bench and test facilities of the Academy are required to perform advanced research and further development of innovative medical technologies. It is necessary to develop and increase the scientific school of the Academy in order to prepare highly qualified scientific and pedagogical staff in the interests of military medicine in the future.

  6. [The past and future of surgical clinics of the Mikhailovsky clinical hospital ("Willie Hospital") of the Kirov Military medical academy].

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, I M; Badalov, V I; Tynyankin, N A; Karev, E A

    2015-07-01

    A brief 140-years history of the Mikhailovsky clinical hospital ("Willie Hospital") of the Kirov Military Medical Academy is presented. Today the department of military surgery, integrated into the system of emergency medical care, locates in historical building of the Kirov Military Medical Academy, and considered as part of multi-field regional center for the treatment of severe combined injuries, and is the only one injury care center of the first level in the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. The hospital admits on treatment more that one million of severe injured patients annually; many patients with severe injuries are transferred from other regional hospitals. Every year more than two thousands of surgical interventions are performed in the hospital. Next renovation of the building is planned in the near future; it should provide further development of new medical technologies in the Kirov Military Medical Academy.

  7. Blood donors’ positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections: the Serbian Military Medical Academy experience

    PubMed Central

    Vučetić, Dušan; Kecman, Gorica; Ilić, Vesna; Balint, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Background Members of armed forces worldwide are considered to be very susceptible to sexually transmitted infections, thus falling into a high-risk group of blood donors regarding transfusion-transmissible infections. In the Serbian Military Medical Academy a significant number (44% for the period 2005–2013) of blood donations were from members of the Serbian Army. The aim of this study was to determine the significance of military blood donors for the safety of blood transfusion. Material and methods Between January 2005 and December 2013, a total of 155,479 blood donations were tested for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis using serological assays (enzyme immunoassays, chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay and western blot) and molecular testing (polymerase chain reaction analysis). Results The percentage of blood donations positive for transfusion-transmissible infections in the estimated period was 0.38%, and the percentage of HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis positive blood donations was 0.20%, 0.12%, 0.005% and 0.06%, respectively. During that period, the percentage of all transfusion-transmissible infections, and in particular of HBV and HCV, declined significantly. In contrast, the percentage of HIV and syphilis positive blood donations remained unchanged. Higher rates of positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections in blood donations from members of the Serbian Army were not found, especially after mandatory military service was abolished in 2009. Discussion The reported rate of positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections in blood donations from the Military Medical Academy was considered low. This information is of great significance for further implementation of public health measures. PMID:26057495

  8. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military Academy. 575.1 Section 575.1 National... MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.1 Military Academy. (a) Organization and administration. (1) The United States Military Academy is under the general direction and supervision of the Department of the Army....

  9. Some sociodemographic and diagnostic characteristics of military patients treated in the Department of Medical Oncology, Gülhane Military Medical Academy.

    PubMed

    Acikel, Cengiz Han; Kir, Tayfun; Komurcu, Seref; Kilic, Selim; Ozett, Ahmet; Rzayev, Maharet; Arpaci, Fikret; Ozturk, Bekir; Ogur, Recai; Ataergin, Selmin; Kuzhan, Okan; Hasde, Metin

    2006-05-01

    Today, chronic diseases have increased importance. Cancer, for which 10 million new cases are diagnosed around the world each year, is in the lead of such diseases. This study included military personnel with cancer who applied to the Department of Medical Oncology, Gülhane Military Medical Academy, in the period between 1998 and 2003, and it aims to describe some sociodemographic and diagnostic characteristics of the patients. The total number of cases was 938, which included both active duty and retired military personnel with diagnoses of cancer who were given medical care between 1998 and 2003 in the Department of Medical Oncology. For the study group, the five most common diagnoses were lung cancer, colorectal cancer, testicular cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Hodgkin's disease. Although the first three diagnoses among officers were lung cancer, testicular cancer, and Hodgkin's disease, those among retired officers were colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Among noncommissioned officers, the first three diagnoses were colorectal cancer, testicular cancer, and Hodgkin's disease for active duty patients and lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and gastric cancer for retired patients. In the group of privates, testicular cancer, Hodgkin's disease, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were the first three diagnoses. When we consider the characteristics of cancers, such as high costs of treatment, loss of manpower, and high mortality rates, prevention of cancers and early diagnosis are very important. Because the frequent types of cancers differed for groups according to age and occupation, those characteristics should be considered when cancer screening programs are being developed for the Armed Forces.

  10. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.1 Military Academy. (a) Organization and administration. (1) The United States.... (b) Mission. The mission of the United States Military Academy is to educate, train, and motivate...

  11. [Graduate of the S.M.Kirov Military-medical academy Fedor Levin: on the way to discovery of DNA].

    PubMed

    Karpuschenko, E G; Deev, R V; Ovchinnikov, D V; Plaska, I L

    2015-10-01

    Biochemist Fedor Aronovich LeviN (1869-1940) graduated with honours from the S.M.Kirov Military Medical Academy in St. Petersburg in 1891 where he had received a fundamental knowledge from A.P.Dianin and I.P.Pavlov, and then he immigrated to the US. More than three and a half decades of his successful research at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research contributed to the foundation of the doctrine of nucleic acids. Scientists, who continued to research nucleic acids, were awarded the Nobel Prize, but Levin and his contribution were forgotten. The authors of the given article didn't found any source in Russian about this prominent biochemist of the 20th century and member of the Russian scientific school. The purpose of the article is to acquaint the reader with a scientific biography of the scientist. who became, without exaggeration, one of the founders of modern genetics.

  12. Military Science and Academies,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-06

    the Higher Education Institutions" note that the higher school, which has a highly qualified-staff of scientific workers at its disposal, is not taking...deemed it necessary to significantly raise the role of higher education establish- ments in the solution of the most important scientific problems. This...requirement is totally applicable also to the higher military education institutions, it obliges the professorial teaching staffs to re-examine their

  13. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the administration and training of the Corps of Cadets and is also head of the Department of Tactics. (b) Mission. The mission of the United States Military Academy is to educate, train, and motivate the... military training. In accomplishing its mission, the Military Academy strives to develop in each cadet...

  14. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  15. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  16. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  17. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional information...

  18. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional information...

  19. Can Academic Freedom Work in Military Academies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niday, Jackson A., II; Harrington, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the thorny question of military discipline vs. academic freedom, demonstrating that the military academy is the perfect proving ground if you want to test the value of academic freedom. The authors, who are also Air Force officers, embarked on a two-year quest to determine what place academic freedom has at a military…

  20. Can Academic Freedom Work in Military Academies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niday, Jackson A., II; Harrington, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the thorny question of military discipline vs. academic freedom, demonstrating that the military academy is the perfect proving ground if you want to test the value of academic freedom. The authors, who are also Air Force officers, embarked on a two-year quest to determine what place academic freedom has at a military…

  1. The Racial History of the U.S. Military Academies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Susan D.

    1999-01-01

    Presents the history of the entry of African American students and faculty into the nation's prestigious military institutions: the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, and the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs. Notes that the military's effort to diversify its troops and officer corps is a recent…

  2. [The contribution of the department of childhood diseases of the S.M.Kirov Military-medical academy to the medical support of students of educational organizations of general education of the Ministry of Defence].

    PubMed

    Shabalov, N P; Arsentev, V G; Mikheev, A V; Tsiteladze, A A

    2015-10-01

    The article is devoted to the 150th anniversary of the department of childhood diseases of the S.M.Kirov Military Medical Academy and reflects on important activity of the department - creation of the system of medical support for students of general education institutions of the Ministry of Defense. The authors emphasize the role of professor M.S.Maslov, as well as other members of the department, in the development of manuals for health maintenance organization of first Suvorov military schools (1944, 1947). The authors also summarize results of the methodological and scientific work, training and improvement of professional skills of medical staff for educational institutions, including the heads of medical service of schools. The role of the department in improving the medical support for educational institutions of secondary education institutions f'the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation at the present stage of development of the Armed Forces is described in the given article.

  3. [A feat of military medical attendant S. A. Bogomolov].

    PubMed

    Goncharova, S G

    2015-05-01

    Sergey Bogomolov (1925-1999) is one of a few military paramedics awarded the title of Hero of the Soviet Union for his heroism in the fight against the Nazis during the Great Patriotic War. After graduating from the Kirov Military Medical Academy he worked as a surgeon and anaesthesiologist in the Burdenko Main Military Clinical Hospital.

  4. The Place of the Humanities at a Military Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammang, Lucretia A.

    2007-01-01

    The author, a captain in the U.S. Coast Guard and professor of English at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut, argues in this article that, contrary to images perpetuated in popular culture, military officers do not eschew the arts as exemplified in such films as "Platoon" and "Full Metal Jacket" where the…

  5. The Place of the Humanities at a Military Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammang, Lucretia A.

    2007-01-01

    The author, a captain in the U.S. Coast Guard and professor of English at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut, argues in this article that, contrary to images perpetuated in popular culture, military officers do not eschew the arts as exemplified in such films as "Platoon" and "Full Metal Jacket" where the…

  6. 20 CFR 1002.60 - Does USERRA cover an individual attending a military service academy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... military service academy? 1002.60 Section 1002.60 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR... Uniformed Services § 1002.60 Does USERRA cover an individual attending a military service academy? Yes. Attending a military service academy is considered uniformed service for purposes of USERRA. There are four...

  7. 78 FR 65977 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will not take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board... of appropriations, the Department of Defense cancelled the meeting of the U.S. Military Academy Board...

  8. 76 FR 5143 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2011 Organizational Meeting of the USMA Board of... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Wednesday, February 16, 2011. ] 3. Time: 12 p.m.-3:30...

  9. How Effective Are Military Academy Admission Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-22

    candidates and determine admissions. This selection formula has been in place for decades and is designed to yield a class of students highly... failure to graduate for academic reasons, failure to graduate because of a desire for a career change, military performance average (MPA), and...significant predictors of failure to graduate for academic reasons, failure to graduate because of choosing a career change, GPA, MPA, and OPA. High

  10. [The analysis of patients with body traumas treated in the Military Medical Academy's Second Clinical Hospital of the Medical University of Lodz].

    PubMed

    Sikorski, Tomasz; Piotrowski, Dariusz; Gaszyński, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    According to recent WHO reports, body traumas are ranked third with respect of frequency of occurrence right after cardiovascular diseases and tumours, and are considered one of the major medical problems. Trauma is a kind of energy (mechanical, thermal or chemical) affecting the human body. After crossing the threshold of tissue endurance, an injury or damage occurs. A common problem of all the centres that treat traumas is a reliable and comparable assessment of injury severity. Constant improvement of the trauma scores, contributes to increased objectivity of the assessment of injury severity and makes trauma research easier. To a large extent, commonness of the scores enables the exchange of experiences with respect to treating patients after trauma. An ideal scale should be reliable, easy to use, and most of all commonly used, thus enabling the employment of a common "traumatologic" language. In the following research, the test group was comprised of 137 adult patients including 113 men (82%) and 24 women (18%). Most patients were aged from 20 to 60 years, that is, in the productive age. Appropriate trauma treatment results in the reduction of the costs of hospitalisation time of those patients and their recovery. An accident or worse still death of a young person is not only a personal tragedy for the family. It is also a big economic loss for the society which results from "lost years of life" and thus "lost years of work". Quick and appropriate treatment, done in a proper centre with appropriately trained staff and highest quality equipment will allow not only to reduce the victim's suffering and return to their daily life, but also minimise the social costs connected with disability pensions, benefits and compensations. Most injuries happened at work--61% were probably due to haste but most of all not complying with occupational health and safety regulations, which all employees should know and comply with. It involves doctors writing a sick note for the

  11. Military Education. Information on Service Academies and Schools. Briefing Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. National Security and International Affairs Div.

    An examination was made of the feasibility of relocating professional military education institutions to the various military academies. Officer professional military education was reviewed to determine the following: (1) how the services define professional military education; (2) where professional military education courses are conducted; (3)…

  12. 75 FR 34989 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Agency: Department of... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2010 Summer Meeting of the USMA Board of Visitors... following Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military...

  13. 77 FR 31339 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... provide the Board updates on the following: Physical, Moral/Ethical and Military Programs, to include...

  14. 75 FR 65006 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2010 Annual Meeting of the USMA Board of Visitors... following Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military...

  15. 78 FR 60266 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... Focus Areas; Academic, Military, and Physical Program Updates; Budget, MILCON, Sustainment Restoration...

  16. Comparing Sexual Assult Survey Prevalence Rates at Military Service Academies and U.S. Colleges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-15

    December 15, 2015 SURVEY NOTE Note No. 2015-17 1 Comparing Sexual Assault Survey Prevalence Rates at Military Service Academies and U.S...Relations Survey (2014 SAGR) was designed to assess the prevalence of sexual assault and misconduct at Department of Defense Military Service Academies...rewards; or failure to obtain affirmative consent. 3 Table 3-21, AAU Report Comparing Sexual Assault Prevalence Rates at Military Service Academies

  17. Preferences at the Service Academies. Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Preferences in Admissions to the U.S. Military Academy and the U.S. Naval Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Robert; Nagai, Althea K.

    This study used statistical analysis to determine the extent to which racial, ethnic, and gender preferences are affect admissions policies of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point (New York) and the U.S. Naval academy at Annapolis (Maryland). The study used data for all applicants for the fall 1995 freshman class that included racial or ethnic…

  18. 76 FR 31308 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of.... Written statements should be sent to the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States...

  19. 77 FR 14006 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of.... Written statements should be sent to the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States...

  20. Catalog of the Orientalia Collection of the U.S. Military Academy Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Pingkun; Kao, Angela H.H.

    This bibliography of the holdings of the United States Military Academy Library's Orientalia Collection as of January 1977 lists books and periodicals written mostly in Chinese, with a few words in Japanese and English. The major subjects include general and military history, history of military art and science, biography, culture, geography,…

  1. Catalog of the Orientalia Collection of the U.S. Military Academy Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Pingkun; Kao, Angela H.H.

    This bibliography of the holdings of the United States Military Academy Library's Orientalia Collection as of January 1977 lists books and periodicals written mostly in Chinese, with a few words in Japanese and English. The major subjects include general and military history, history of military art and science, biography, culture, geography,…

  2. 75 FR 65460 - Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; United States Military Academy Board...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... of the Secretary Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; United States Military... Department of Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the United States Military Academy... advice and recommendation to the President of the United States on matters relating to the U.S. Military...

  3. [I.P. Pavlov and L.A. Orbeli: new materials in stocks of the military medical museum].

    PubMed

    Budko, A A; Nazartsev, B I

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the previously unpublished letter of I.P. Pavlov to L.A. Orbeli being kept in stocks of the Military medical museum of military medical museum of the S.M. Kirov military medical academy. The needed commentaries are given.

  4. Strengthening Environmental Engineering Education in Afghanistan through Cooperating Military Academies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, J. A.; Mahbob, M.; Seely, G. E.; Ressler, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    Many developing countries suffer from substandard employment of environmental engineering and science principles, which leads to poor management of natural and cultural resources, increased public health concerns, and limitations on economic investment and growth. Thus, prior to the implementation of well-intentioned programs designed to promote development, methods for sustaining basic needs, which are the focus of most environmental engineering disciplines, must be designed into the social fabric of the developing culture. Education is a promising method for fostering this development across cultures. Recently, the US Air Force Academy (USAFA) partnered with the US Military Academy (USMA) to implement a Civil Engineering Program at the National Military Academy of Afghanistan (NMAA), Kabul, Afghanistan. This work will outline the process followed during course development, deployment, and implementation, paying particular attention to challenges and benefits at each stage in the process. This cooperation may serve as a model for future implementation of science, technology, engineering and mathematics education programs in developing countries. Consistent with US Civil Engineering programs, the NMAA Civil Engineering program introduces students to a broad range of introductory-level civil engineering subjects--environmental, hydraulic, geotechnical, structural, construction, and transportation engineering. Basic environmental engineering and science principles are addressed through the implementation of an introductory environmental engineering course. Course development followed a three-stage process: (1) course development by US faculty at their home institution, (2) imbedding of US Faculty at the NMAA, and (3) implementation of the course within the NMAA Civil Engineering curriculum using adjunct Afghan faculty hired from Kabul University. An existing environmental engineering course taught at USAFA was used as a model for course development. Although this

  5. Unsafe in the Camouflage Tower: Sexual Victimization and Perceptions of Military Academy Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Jamie A.; Fisher, Bonnie S.; Scherer, Heidi L.; Daigle, Leah E.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined sexual victimization among cadets and midshipmen at the three U.S. Military Academies. Self-report data from the 2005 Service Academy Sexual Assault Survey of Cadets and Midshipmen (n = 5,220) were used to examine the extent of unwanted sexual attention, sexual harassment, unwanted sexual contact, sexual coercion, and…

  6. Epidemiology of ankle sprain at the United States Military Academy.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Brian R; Belmont, Philip J; Cameron, Kenneth L; Deberardino, Thomas M; Owens, Brett D

    2010-04-01

    Ankle sprain is a common injury in athletic populations that results in significant time lost to injury. The incidence rates (IRs) of ankle ligament sprains are influenced by gender, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), physical conditioning, level of competition, type of sport, and athlete exposure to sport. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A longitudinal cohort study was performed to determine the effect of risk factors for ankle sprain at the United States Military Academy between 2005 and 2007. A total 614 cadets sustained new ankle sprains during 10 511 person-years at risk, resulting in an overall IR of 58.4 per 1000 person-years. Women (96.4), compared with men (52.7), had a significantly increased rate ratio (IRR) for ankle sprain of 1.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52-2.20). Men with ankle sprains had higher mean height, weight, and BMI than uninjured men (P <.001). Men with ankle sprains had higher average scores in push-ups, sit-ups, and run time than uninjured men (P <.001). Ankle sprain occurred most commonly during athletics (64.1%). Ankle sprain IR did not significantly differ between intercollegiate and intramural athletic competition after controlling for athlete-exposure (IRR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.81-1.37). The ankle sprain IRR of female compared with male intercollegiate athletes was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.67-1.32) per 1000 person-years and 1.04 (95% CI, 0.74-1.47) per 1000 athlete-exposures. The intercollegiate sports of men's rugby, women's cheerleading, and men's/women's basketball, soccer, and lacrosse had the highest ankle sprain IR. Higher mean height and weight in men, increased BMI in men, greater physical conditioning in men, and athlete exposure to selected sports were all risk factors for ankle sprain.

  7. Military medical graduates' perceptions of organizational culture in Turkish military medical school.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Mustafa; Bakir, Bilal; Teke, Abdulkadir; Ucar, Muharrem; Bas, Turker; Atac, Adnan

    2008-08-01

    Organizational culture is the term used to describe the shared beliefs, perceptions, and expectations of individuals in organizations. In the healthcare environment, organizational culture has been associated with several elements of organizational experience that contribute to quality, such as nursing care, job satisfaction, and patient safety. A range of tools have been designed to measure organizational culture and applied in industrial, educational, and health care settings. This study has been conducted to investigate the perceptions of military medical graduates on organizational culture at Gülhane Military Medical School. A measurement of organizational culture, which was developed by the researchers from Akdeniz University, was applied to all military medical graduates in 2004. This was a Likert type scale that included 31 items. Designers of the measurement grouped all these items into five main dimensions in their previous study. The items were scored on a five-point scale anchored by 1: strongly agree and 5: strongly disagree. Study participants included all military physicians who were in clerkship training period at Gulhane Military Medical Academy in 2004. A total of 106 graduates were accepted to response the questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 25.2 +/- 1.1. At the time of study only 8 (7.5%) graduates were married. The study results have showed that the measurement tool with 31 items had a sufficient reliability with a Cronbach's alpha value of 0.91. Factor analysis has resulted a final measurement tool of 24 items with five factors. Total score and the scores of five subdimensions have been estimated and compared between groups based on living city and marital status. The study has shown the dimension of symbol received positive perceptions while the dimension of organizational structure and efficiency received the most negative perceptions. GMMS has a unique organizational culture with its weak and strong aspects. Conducting this kind

  8. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-20

    Order Code RL33537 Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers Updated May 20, 2008 Richard A. Best Jr. Specialist in National Defense Foreign...control number. 1. REPORT DATE 20 MAY 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Medical Care : Questions and...8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers Summary The primary mission of the military health system, which

  9. Restructuring Military Medical Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-01

    indicates that Tricare stops short of making most of the changes needed to remedy the inefficiencies that have plagued DoD’s management and delivery of health...In short , those findings show that peacetime medical care provides some training for wartime, but most of the care provided during peacetime is not...officers the opportunity to take several other short courses throughout their careers to prepare them for their wartime roles. One such course offered by

  10. Curricular Assessment and Revision at a Military Service Academy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-21

    knowledge and modeling/simulation. The quantitative literacy core competency is also an important Academy-wide outcome. Applying the core concepts...departmental learning goals. The new goals follow closely the V&C recommenda- tions, and they include "Core Concep ts for Biological Literacy ," "Core...Competencies and Disciplinary Practices," and "Core Attitudes and Values ." Moreover, these goals remain consistent with the Academy’s outcomes. The

  11. Campus-based college health services before the Amherst program (1860): military academies lead the way.

    PubMed

    Christmas, William A

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 70 years a legend has evolved that the first college health program in the United States was established at Amherst College in 1861. Although the program at Amherst was innovative in its day and served as a model for the field of college health, several other institutions prior to 1860 appropriated funds, hired staff, and established on-campus programs to improve the health of their students. The military academies led the way, and the first of these early programs to become operational was located at the US Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1830.

  12. Who Speaks for Our Profession? Military and Strategic Studies at the USAF Academy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Lewis Mumford claimed, “the Army has usually been the refuge of third-rate minds.”6 Clearly, the Academy preferred Clausewitz to Mumford , but...Princeton University Press, 1976), 88. 6 Lewis Mumford , Technics and Civilization (New York: Harcourt, Brace, and World, Inc., 1934), 95. Mumford ...credibility of Military Studies. Mumford was winning. In the seventies, Military Studies organized within a new CW organiza- tion, the Deputy

  13. Military Education: Additional DOD Guidance Is Needed to Enhance Oversight of the Service Academies and Their Preparatory Schools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-27

    Military Personnel: The DOD and Coast Guard Academies Have Taken Steps to Address Incidents of Sexual Harassment and Assault , but Greater Federal Oversight...military training activities and mandatory athletic activities. In return for their free education, the graduates must serve on active duty for 5...Academies: Academic Review Processes. GAO/NSIAD-95-57. Washington, D.C.: April 5, 1995. DOD Service Academies: Update on Extent of Sexual Harassment

  14. 75 FR 7571 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... Government in the Sunshine Act of 1976 (5 U.S.C. 552b, as amended), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department...

  15. The Sociology Program in a Professional School Setting: The United States Military Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Mady Wechsler; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Contends that new sociology programs are more likely to be established in professional schools than in liberal arts curricula. Argues that the experience of the United States Military Academy, where a full sociology major was established in the context of a professional curriculum, provides lessons in how such development might take place.…

  16. Developing Leaders of Character at the United States Military Academy: A Relational Developmental Systems Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callina, Kristina Schmid; Ryan, Diane; Murray, Elise D.; Colby, Anne; Damon, William; Matthews, Michael; Lerner, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on the processes of character development within diverse contexts. In this article, the authors use the United States Military Academy at West Point (USMA) as a sample case for understanding character development processes within an institution of higher education. The authors present a discussion of relational…

  17. The College Choice Process of the Women Who Gender Integrated America's Military Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Stacy A.

    2011-01-01

    In 1976 and again in 1995, several brave women chose to enroll at--and thereby to "gender integrate"--America's military colleges. In 1976, women were admitted to the Department of Defense (DOD) service academies after an Act of Congress changed a law so as to allow for their matriculation. Beginning in 1995, women were admitted to state-supported…

  18. Extraordinary Stability and Ordinary Predictability of Academic Success at the United States Military Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Richard P.; McCauley, Clark

    1987-01-01

    Compared with data from civilian institutions, data from two graduating classes at the United States Military Academy showed extrordinary stability of independently calculated grade point averages from freshman to senior years and no decline in the validity of Scholastic Aptitude Tests and high school class rank as predictors of these GPAs over…

  19. The College Choice Process of the Women Who Gender Integrated America's Military Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Stacy A.

    2011-01-01

    In 1976 and again in 1995, several brave women chose to enroll at--and thereby to "gender integrate"--America's military colleges. In 1976, women were admitted to the Department of Defense (DOD) service academies after an Act of Congress changed a law so as to allow for their matriculation. Beginning in 1995, women were admitted to state-supported…

  20. 76 FR 60816 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: Ms. Joy A. Pasquazi, (845) 938-5078, Joy.Pasquazi@us.army.mil . ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  1. 78 FR 13030 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Designated Federal Officer or Point of Contact: Ms. Deadra Ghostlaw, (845) 938-4200,...

  2. An Examination of Factors Relating to Retention of United States Military Academy Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Maurice O.

    Graduates of the United States Military Academy, who received concentrated professional and motivational training, have served traditionally as the backbone of the United States Officer Corps. The fact that numbers of these graduates resign after completing their service obligation deserves special attention. Factors influencing graduates to…

  3. Why They Leave: Resignations from the United States Military Academy Class of 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leider, Robert

    The study explores the reasons for the resignation from the United States Army among graduates of the United States Military Class of 1966. It seeks to determine reasons for resignations, quality of resignees compared with nonresignees, and what can be done to reduce resignations of Academy graduates. Through questionnaires and personal…

  4. Developing Leaders of Character at the United States Military Academy: A Relational Developmental Systems Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callina, Kristina Schmid; Ryan, Diane; Murray, Elise D.; Colby, Anne; Damon, William; Matthews, Michael; Lerner, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on the processes of character development within diverse contexts. In this article, the authors use the United States Military Academy at West Point (USMA) as a sample case for understanding character development processes within an institution of higher education. The authors present a discussion of relational…

  5. An Examination of Factors Relating to Retention of United States Military Academy Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Maurice O.

    Graduates of the United States Military Academy, who received concentrated professional and motivational training, have served traditionally as the backbone of the United States Officer Corps. The fact that numbers of these graduates resign after completing their service obligation deserves special attention. Factors influencing graduates to…

  6. 78 FR 32241 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... Committee: United States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Wednesday, June 19, 2013. 3. Time: 2 p... CFR 102-3.140 through 102-3.165 and the availability of space, this meeting is open to the public... than five working days prior to the next meeting in order to provide time for member consideration. By...

  7. Military and Civilian L2 Instructors: Decoding Perceptions of U.S. Service Academy Cadets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Zachary F.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether cadets at a U.S. service academy perceived attitudinal differences toward their military and civilian L2 instructors along three variables: foreign language expertise, communicative anxiety, and relatability. Cadets' proficiency levels (divided by beginning and intermediate classes) and current instructor (civilian or…

  8. Military and Civilian L2 Instructors: Decoding Perceptions of U.S. Service Academy Cadets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Zachary F.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether cadets at a U.S. service academy perceived attitudinal differences toward their military and civilian L2 instructors along three variables: foreign language expertise, communicative anxiety, and relatability. Cadets' proficiency levels (divided by beginning and intermediate classes) and current instructor (civilian or…

  9. Authentic Science in Education: Studies in Course-Based Research at the United States Military Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation consists of two studies at the United States Military Academy. Both studies involve the use of Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs). These experiences give students the ability to engage in undergraduate research at an early point in their academic career by replacing traditional laboratory activities with…

  10. [Association of the Berlin German Academy of Science and the German Leopoldina Academy of Natural Scientists with the Nazi medical crimes of its members after 1945].

    PubMed

    Hinz-Wessels, Annette

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines how two renowned academies based in East Germany handled the Nazi medical crimes of its members after 1945. It should be noted that both institutions were differently affected by these crimes. This applies both in terms of number of incriminated members, which is a consequence of the different membership structure of the two academies, as well as the extent of their involvement. Despite being apparently the less affected of the two, the former Prussian Academy of Sciences responded more radically to the Nazi past of its members and removed those accounted guilty from the academy before it was reopened by the Soviet military administration on 1 July 1946. The reasons for this are to be found mainly in the exposed situation of the academy, which was in the center of the Soviet occupying power. The Leopoldina did not make such adjustments of the membership lists. The reasons for the moderate dealing with the Nazi crimes of its members are primarily in the attitude of the leading representatives of the Leopoldina in Halle after 1945, in the continuity of the members, and thus the thought structures--regardless of the ruling political systems--and in the particular status of the Leopoldina as an all-German academy tolerated by the SED.

  11. Storying the (Military) Academy: Transforming Soldiers into Writing Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudley, Janice Edgerson

    Through the examination of case studies, this paper discusses a method in which the English Department at West Point can improve their junior military instructors' preparation to teach composition. Twelve departing and incoming instructors were surveyed on the quality of the preparation for teaching they received. Most were generally supportive of…

  12. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-29

    COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...deliver health care during wartime. The military health system also provides health care services through either Department of Defense (DOD...medical facilities, known as “military treatment facilities” or “MTFs” as space is available, or, through private health care providers. Known as “Tricare

  13. Compendium of Military Allied Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL. Council on Medical Education.

    To improve the effectiveness of allied health education in both civilian and military programs, the U. S. Department of Defense and the AMA Council on Medical Education's Advisory Committee on Education for the Allied Professions and Services sponsor a Subcommittee on Military Allied Medical Education. One objective of this Subcommittee is AMA…

  14. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-24

    implementing a shared services model within the military health system. A “ shared services model” means that the DHA will assume responsibility for... shared services , functions, and activities in the military health system, including the TRICARE program, pharmacy programs, medical education and

  15. Report of the Admission of Women to the U.S. Military Academy (Project Athena IV),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    the same factors in their choice of branch specialties, a field study was conducted using members of the Class of 1980 (Dalton and Calhoon , 1980). In...chosen by the Class of 1980. In their discussion of the results of the study, Dalton and Calhoon found that role models (e.g., tacital officer...for the United States Military Academy" West Point, NY: AG Printing Office February 1979. Dalton, B. and Calhoon , J. "Male and Female Differences *in

  16. Longitudinal Study of Sleep Patterns of United States Military Academy Cadets

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nita Lewis; Shattuck, Lawrence G.; Matsangas, Panagiotis

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: The study provided an opportunity to observe sleep patterns in a college-age population attending the United States Military Academy. Design: This 4-year longitudinal study investigated sleep patterns of cadets. A stratified sample of 80 cadets had sleep patterns monitored using actigraphy for 8 months: one month in both fall and spring academic semesters over a 4-year period. Setting: Data were collected at the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY. Participants: Participants were members of the class of 2007 (n˜1300) ranging in age from 17 to 22 when entering USMA. Measurements and Results: A sample of the class (n = 80) wore wrist activity monitors and completed activity logs for one month in fall and spring academic semesters for the 4-year period. On average over the 4 years, cadets slept < 5.5 h on school nights. Cadets napped extensively, perhaps in an attempt to compensate for chronic sleep debt. Cadets slept more during fall than spring semesters. Male and female cadet sleep patterns varied dramatically, with males consistently receiving less sleep than females (˜21 m for nighttime sleep and ˜23 m for daily sleep). Conclusions: Cadet sleep at USMA is related to academic year, semester, season, sex, school day or weekend, and day of the week. These students suffer from chronic sleep debt. Restrictions imposed by the military academy limit the generalizability of the findings to other college age populations. Citation: Miller NL; Shattuck LG; Matsangas P. Longitudinal study of sleep patterns of United States Military Academy cadets. SLEEP 2010;33(12):1623-1631. PMID:21120124

  17. Military Medical Revolution: Military Trauma System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Representative impact of CPGs has been manifested in several analyses to in- clude burn resuscitation-associated abdominal compartment syndrome mortality in which...resuscitative care at Role 2 or 3 facilities, aeromedical evacuation, definitive surgical care/ reconstruction and rehabilitation, and operational...management of the injury pattern for care providers from combat medics to flight paramedics to urologic surgeons with reconstructive expertise in the Role

  18. Nutritional Assessment of U.S. Military Academy Cadets at West Point: Part 2. Assessment of Nutritional Intake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-06

    intake of the group, the greater the intake of other nutrients. However, while the mean nutritional intake of most groups was nutritionally adequate...A/)--A270 580 REPORT NO T94-1 V NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT OF CADETS AT THE U.S. MILITARY ACADEMY: _ PART 2. ASSESSMENT OF NUTRITIONAL INTAKE SU S ARMY...Distribution Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Technical Report No. T94-1 NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT OF CADETS AT THE U.S. MILITARY ACADEMY

  19. Military Education: Student and Faculty Perceptions of Student Life at the Military Academies. Report to the Subcommittee on Defense, Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Derek B.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) surveyed students and faculty at the academies operated by the Army, Navy, and Air Force to educate and train young men and women to become leaders and effective junior officers in the military services. A web-based survey of 12,264 students and 2,065 faculty members at the 3 service academies on questions…

  20. Military Education: DOD Needs To Enhance Performance Goals and Measures To Improve Oversight of Military Academies. Report to the Subcommittee on Defense, Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart; Derek B.

    Graduates of the service academies operated by the Army, Navy, and Air Force currently make up approximately 18 percent of the officer corps for the nation's armed services. The academies represent the military's most expensive source of new officers. The Department of Defense (DOD) pays the full cost of a student's 4-year education at the…

  1. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-14

    providers, subject to regulations. Certain types of care , such as most dentistry and chiropractic services, are excluded. In addition to Tricare...COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...deliver health care during wartime. The military health system also provides health care services through either Department of Defense (DOD) medical

  2. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-04

    providers, subject to regulations. Certain types of care , such as most dentistry and chiropractic services, are excluded. In addition to Tricare Standard...Order Code RL33537 Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers Updated August 4, 2008 Richard A. Best Jr. Specialist in National Defense Foreign...control number. 1. REPORT DATE 04 AUG 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Medical Care : Questions and

  3. Shaping the Environmental Attitude of Military Geography Students at the South African Military Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smit, Hennie A. P.

    2009-01-01

    Globally there is a growing environmental awareness among all segments of society, but research on the effect of environmental education in shaping the attitude of military students is lacking. Tertiary environmental education to officers of the South African Department of Defence is seated in the Department of Military Geography at the South…

  4. Shaping the Environmental Attitude of Military Geography Students at the South African Military Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smit, Hennie A. P.

    2009-01-01

    Globally there is a growing environmental awareness among all segments of society, but research on the effect of environmental education in shaping the attitude of military students is lacking. Tertiary environmental education to officers of the South African Department of Defence is seated in the Department of Military Geography at the South…

  5. [Use of functional packages of medical stuff by military level of medical service of the Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, Iu V; Kononov, V N; Miliaev, A V; Stupnikov, A V; Slobodeniuk, A V

    2013-11-01

    Authors submitted results of recent developments made by The Kirov Military-Medical Academy and OOO "Special medical equipment" in accordance with State defence order in the area of modernization of the system of organizational equipment of military level of medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. Along with other samples of organizational equipment, new functional equipment of medical stuff was developed and approved as supply. New equipment of medical stuff meets modern requirements and is highly valuated by medical services of foreign countries. Authors came to conclusion that functional equipment which is approved as supply and included into the Supply rate provides operational flexibility of set-up/tear-down stages of medical evacuation under the conditions of battlefield, allows to deliver medical aid on the basis of innovative medical technologies.

  6. [The cradle of military medicine].

    PubMed

    Tsygan, V N

    2013-12-01

    The Kirov Military Medical Academy, included into the State Code of Particularly Valuable Objects of Cultural Heritage of the Peoples of the Russian Federation, plays an important role in national military-medical science and education during XVIII and XIX centuries. Today the Kirov Military Medical Academy consists of 7 faculties, 63 departments (52 military departments and 11 civil departments), 31 clinics (17 surgical clinics and 14 therapeutic clinics), center of extracorporeal detoxification, 3 departments, taking part in treatment and diagnostic process, 11 clinical subdivisions, research center consisting of 4 research subdivisions and 2 laboratories, and also 14 research laboratories, 32 supply subdivisions and publications department. Glorious staff and graduates of the Academy took part in all russian wars. All famous medical schools were founded in the Academy in XIX-XX centuries. At the present time the Kirov Military Medical Academy is the main military medical university, leading research center and treatment facility of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

  7. Military Medical Revolution: Prehospital Combat Casualty Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Military medical revolution: Prehospital combat casualty care Lorne H. Blackbourne, MD, David G. Baer, PhD, Brian J. Eastridge, MD, Bijan Kheirabadi...sur- vival for patients with combat-related traumatic injuries. J Trauma. 2009;66(suppl 4):S69 S76. 33. Eastridge BJ, Hardin M, Cantrell J, Oetjen

  8. Military Professional Ethics, Code of Conduct, and Military Academies’ Honor Codes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    Air University Review 24:63-67, November-December 1972. Futernick, Allan J. Avoiding an ethical Armageddon. Military Review 59: 17-23, February 1979...to the new OER: a crisis alert! Air University Review 29:68-72, May-June 1978; comment Air Force Times 39:2, 31 July 1978. Poe , Bryce. Integrity. TIG...Naval War College, 1974. (Microfiche AD A120 494) Schein, Edgar H. Roles - not rules - for the POW. Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Social Science Research

  9. [Surgery in the Academy: history, achievements and prospects].

    PubMed

    Maĭstrenko, N A; Samokhvalov, I M

    2013-12-01

    The 215th anniversary of the Imperial Medical and Surgical Academy (now Military Medical) is a reason not only for celebration, but also is the moment of truth, connecting the great history of surgical development in Russian and its prospects in 21st century. The Kirov Military Medical Academy is the center of professional education for military surgeons. There is not only military medical research and practice, but also clinical. The main goal of the Academy is development of different schools of the Academy. These schools are the fundamental basis for researches and military-medical staff training able for any service during the peace and wartime. Nowadays the Academy is not only the leading institute on battlefield surgery and treatment of severe multisystem injuries, but also the training center for emergency medicine.

  10. The prevalence and practice of academies of medical educators: a survey of U.S. medical schools.

    PubMed

    Searle, Nancy S; Thompson, Britta M; Friedland, Joan A; Lomax, James W; Drutz, Jan E; Coburn, Michael; Nelson, Elizabeth A

    2010-01-01

    Academies of medical educators can be defined as formal organizations of academic teaching faculty recognized for excellence in their contributions to their school's education mission and who, as a group, serve specific needs of the institution. The authors studied the characteristics of academies, including the processes for admission, selection, and retention of academy members; the types of faculty who are academy members; program goals; benefits offered by academies to the individual and to the institution; funding sources and amounts; and the rapid increase in academies since 2003. In 2008, the authors sent an online questionnaire to 127 U.S. medical schools. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. To determine differences between groups, multivariate analysis of variance was performed. Correlation analysis (Pearson r) was used to identify association between variables. Effect size was determined using eta squared (eta2). Thirty-six of the 122 responding schools (96% response rate) reported having academies; 21 schools had initiated academies since 2003, and 33 schools were planning or considering academies. There was a statistically significant difference between academies established before 2004 and in 2004 regarding benefits offered to individuals, membership terms and maintenance requirements, and goals. Rogers' theory of the diffusion of innovation may explain the recent spread of academies. When beginning or reexamining existing academy programs, institutions should consider goals, application process, benefits offered to members as well as the institution, expendable resources, and means of support, because the final product depends on the choices made at the beginning.

  11. [Personal e-cards for military personnel and military-medical information system].

    PubMed

    Kalachev, O V; Stolyar, V P; Kuandykov, M G; Papkov, A Yu

    2015-08-01

    The article presents main directions of activities of the medical service, dealing with implementation of personal electronic cards for military personnel, organizing the process of automation of medical service management, military and medical organizations and health care departments. The given article, reveals the on-going activity, concerning creation of the military-medical information system, which will unite all medical units, organizations, and governments into one information space.

  12. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-07

    control number. 1. REPORT DATE 07 MAR 2007 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Medical Care: Questions and... controls and treatment protocols. In civilian practice, HMOs have been credited with some success in reducing costs, although opponents of these systems...most dentistry and chiropractic services, are excluded. In addition to Tricare Standard and Tricare Prime there is a preferred-provider option, Tricare

  13. Cognitive Apprenticeship in Military Teacher Induction: Facilitating the Transition from War Fighter to Educator at the United States Air Force Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaim, Thomas T.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative research study examined teacher induction in the military undergraduate education context. The U.S. Air Force Academy relies on approximately 520 military and civilian instructors to educate nearly 4000 future military officers each year. It is imperative to our nation's security that these educators be highly skilled and…

  14. Cognitive Apprenticeship in Military Teacher Induction: Facilitating the Transition from War Fighter to Educator at the United States Air Force Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaim, Thomas T.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative research study examined teacher induction in the military undergraduate education context. The U.S. Air Force Academy relies on approximately 520 military and civilian instructors to educate nearly 4000 future military officers each year. It is imperative to our nation's security that these educators be highly skilled and…

  15. Transitioning from military medics to registered nurses

    PubMed Central

    Keita, Mohamed D; Diaz, Valerie J; Miller, Audrey P; Olenick, Maria; Simon, Sharon R

    2015-01-01

    The nursing shortage in the USA is expected to reach 260,000 registered nurses (RNs) by 2025. The most profound shortages are expected in California and Florida, translating into 109,779 and 128,364 RN jobs, respectively. Despite a foreseen growth in nursing career opportunities nationwide, the supply of nurses will be insufficient to meet the corresponding demand. Capitalizing on prior education, experience, and skills of military clinical personnel to fill these jobs could significantly reduce the projected nursing shortage. Florida International University’s Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences is circumventing barriers to recruit, retain, and graduate transitioning veteran medics and corpsmen as Bachelor of Science in Nursing prepared RNs who reintegrate into the civilian workforce. The Veteran Bachelor of Science in Nursing (VBSN) program is in the form of a cooperative agreement between Florida International University and the US Health Resources and Services Administration. The VBSN program’s main objective is to build upon the unique leadership skills, clinical education, and training of military medics and corpsmen to ensure successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing curriculum. VBSN students, as veterans themselves, have unique knowledge and exposure to the specific health issues and needs of the veteran population overall. They are poised and best prepared to effectively care for the US population, particularly the current 22 million US veterans and 1.6 million Florida veterans. Additionally, the VBSN program will alleviate the challenges, such as the lack of recognition of military skills, unemployment, the substandard income, and homelessness that many former service members face after separation from the military. PMID:26648733

  16. The military physician and contested medical humanitarianism: a dueling identity?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Stuart

    2014-11-01

    A critical issue in the study of humanitarianism is who counts as a medical humanitarian. Military physicians are often characterized as caught between the potentially incompatible roles of physician and military professional. Medical NGOs, such as Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), have also vociferously rejected military medical humanitarianism: questioning the mandate, skills, and appropriateness of military involvement in humanitarian medicine as well as the potential impact on 'humanitarian space'. Yet many military doctors contest this. Consequently this study examines the ways in which primarily British military physicians identify and manage their identities as both medical humanitarians and soldiers. The research utilized a mixed method, grounded theory approach involving systematic document searches/expert identification of a core literature of 300 policy and peer reviewed documents, plus grey literature and 53 formal medical post operational reports from units serving in Iraq and Afghanistan between 2004 and 2012. Semi structured interviews involved purposive sampling (34 respondents) ranging from a former Surgeon General to more junior staff. Methods also included an analysis of the original data and literature from the 2003 Medical Services Delphi study (involving an additional 40 experts and an extensive literature review) on military medical identity/future roles as well as direct observation of military doctors in Iraq and Afghanistan (two, 2 month research trips). The research concluded that military physicians conceived of themselves as autonomous medical humanitarians with an individual morality rooted in civilian medical ethics that facilitated resistance to the potentially hegemonic military identity. Nevertheless military physicians were part of a medical organization with fundamentally different priorities from those of civilian humanitarian physicians. Furthermore, the perceived emergence of multiple civilian 'humanitarianisms' has

  17. [Military medical and health care system in the Song Dynasty].

    PubMed

    DU, J

    2016-05-01

    The military medical and health care system in the Song Dynasty manifested as two aspects, namely disease prevention and medical treatment. Disease prevention included ensuring food and drink safety, avoiding dangerous stations and enjoying regular vacations, etc. Medical treatment included sending medical officials to patrol, stationing military physicians to follow up, applying emergency programs, establishing military medical and pharmacy centers, dispensing required medicines, and accommodating and nursing sick and injured personnel, etc. Meanwhile, the imperial court also supervised the implementation of military medical mechanism, in order to check the soldiers' foods, check and restrict the military physicians' responsibilities, etc., which did play a positive role in protecting soldier's health, guaranteeing the military combat effectiveness, and maintaining national security.

  18. Authentic science in education: Studies in course-based research at the United States Military Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Anthony M.

    This dissertation consists of two studies at the United States Military Academy. Both studies involve the use of Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs). These experiences give students the ability to engage in undergraduate research at an early point in their academic career by replacing traditional laboratory activities with semester-long research projects. Both studies show an implementation of this type of instruction from the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE). Study 1 shows the specific method of implementation at the military academy and explores learning-based outcomes. Primarily the outcome of critical thinking is demonstrated. Critical thinking is a construct that many curriculum developers and instructors want to foster within their students but often lack clear definitions or evaluation plans. This study gives a definition of critical thinking and an outcome of a critical thinking test. Significant gains in critical thinking are observed by students participating in the CURE as well as significant gains in three affective factors (Interest in Science/Chemistry, Authenticity, Perceived Learning). The gains in critical thinking are then further statistically linked to students’ perceptions of how authentically they saw the research in the course. If they felt that the course was demonstrating more authentic science practices, they gained significantly more in their critical thinking scores. The second study in this dissertation adds an additional transfer focus to the instructional materials that the CURE was meant to support. The treatment group in this study received instruction that was framed expansively. The expansively framed instruction showed students ways that the material was applicable outside of the course. The assessments and instructional materials of this study were transfer assessments with contrasting cases. Instances of negative or “overzealous transfer” were also reported. Findings suggest

  19. Determinants of stress fracture risk in United States Military Academy cadets.

    PubMed

    Cosman, Felicia; Ruffing, Jamie; Zion, Marsha; Uhorchak, John; Ralston, Stuart; Tendy, Susan; McGuigan, Fiona E A; Lindsay, Robert; Nieves, Jeri

    2013-08-01

    Prior studies have identified some risk factors for stress fracture in athletes and military recruits. To determine whether historical factors, physical measures, biochemical variables of skeletal metabolism, genetic factors, bone density (BMD) and bone size could predict risk of stress fracture over 4 years in physically fit cadets at the US Military Academy (USMA). Baseline surveys, assessments of height, weight, scores on the Army Physical Fitness Test, and peripheral BMD were obtained in all cadets (755 men, 136 women), and central BMD in a subset. Blood samples were analyzed for variables of calcium homeostasis, bone turnover, and selected hormones and genetic factors. Stress fractures were adjudicated by review of orthopedic notes and imaging reports. 5.7% of male and 19.1% of female cadets had at least 1 stress fracture (58% metatarsal and 29% tibial), most within 3 months of entry to USMA. In males, risk of stress fracture was higher in those who exercised <7 h per week during the prior year (RR 2.31; CI 1.29,4.12), and in those with smaller tibial cortical area (RR 1.12; CI 1.03,1.23), lower tibial bone mineral content (RR 1.11; CI 1.03,1.20) and smaller femoral neck diameter (RR 1.35, CI 1.01, 1.81). In women, higher stress fracture risk was seen in those with shorter time since menarche (RR 1.44 per year; CI 1.19, 1.73) and smaller femoral neck diameter (RR 1.16; CI 1.01, 1.33.). Although prior physical training in men, length of prior estrogen exposure in women and leg bone dimensions in both genders played a role, the maximum variance explained by all of these factors was below 10%. We conclude these factors play a minor role in the development of stress fractures in physically fit USMA cadets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. NCI and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Sign Statement of Intent

    Cancer.gov

    Today the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Cancer Institute/Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS) signed a statement of intent to share an interest in fostering collaborative biomedical research in oncology and a common goal

  1. Nutrient Intake Evaluation of Male and Female Cadets at the United States Military Academy, West Point, New York.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    AD-RIE 126 NUTRIENT INTRKE EVALUATION OF HALE RND FENRL! CADETS RT THE UNITED STRTES..(U) LETTERMRN ARMY INST OF RESERRCH PRESIDIO OF SRN FRRNCISCO...TEsfi C H A R T Ii Ill -- INSTITUTE REPORT NO. 218 00 NUTRIENT INTAKE EVALUATION OF MALE AND FEMALE CADETS ’AT THE SUNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY...ARMY INSTITUTE OF RESEARCH PRESIDIO OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94129 Nutrient Intake Evaluation of Male and Female Cadets at the United States

  2. Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Harassment and Violence at the Military Service Academies, Academic Program Year 2015-2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-18

    Athletic Department, and the Cadet Wing (CW) established the Colorado Springs Sexual Assault/ Domestic Violence prevention network. USAFA hosted the...Annual Report on Sexual Harassment and Violence at the Military Service Academies Academic Program Year 2015-2016 The Department of Defense...SAPRO | ODMEO 1 DoD SAPRO | ODMEO Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Harassment and Violence at the Military Service Academies

  3. Effective monitoring and evaluation of military humanitarian medical operations.

    PubMed

    Waller, Stephen G; Powell, Clydette; Ward, Jane B; Riley, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Non-military government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have made great strides in the evaluation of humanitarian medical work, and have learned valuable lessons regarding monitoring and evaluation (M&E) that may be equally as valuable to military medical personnel. We reviewed the recent literature by the worldwide humanitarian community regarding the art and science of M&E, with focus toward military applications. The successes and failures of past humanitarian efforts have resulted in prolific analyses. Alliances of NGOs set the standard for humanitarian quality and M&E standards. Military medical personnel can apply some of these standards to military humanitarian M&E in complex and stability operations. The authors believe that the NGO community?s M&E standards should be applied to improve evaluation of U.S. military medical humanitarian operations.

  4. An innovative medical civil-military operation training program.

    PubMed

    Lougee, Douglas; Kemmer, Teresa M; Lynch, Julia

    2007-02-01

    The San Antonio Military Pediatric Center has developed an innovative humanitarian civic assistance (HCA) program. Many medical HCA programs focus on short-term medical interventions and provide transient benefit. To have a more lasting impact, this program focuses on public health surveillance. U.S. military medics conduct random household nutritional surveys and train in austere settings and on rounds in Honduran hospitals. Since 2001, >200 military medics have been trained in population assessment, primary medical care in developing nations, and other skills critical for medical civil-military operations. All activities are coordinated with the host nation. Public health data are collected and reported to Honduran public health leaders, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and nongovernmental organizations, to assist with program and policy development. This innovative project is a potential model to improve both military training and host nation benefit from HCA programs.

  5. Academic and Military Programs of the Five Service Academies. Report to the Congress by the Comptroller General of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staats, Elmer B.

    The academic and military programs of the five service academies are reviewed and found generally to produce qualified officers, but several aspects of their program could be improved. It is noted that only the Naval and Merchant Marine Academies require a comprehensive examination to evaluate students' professional competence before graduation…

  6. America's Service Academies, Your Service Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Born, Dana H.; Phillips, Andrew T.; Trainor, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    The United States Air Force Academy, United States Naval Academy, and United States Military Academy are America's three largest service academies. They are "the" primary undergraduate institutions and commissioning sources that educate and develop the officers who are expected to lead this nation's armed forces. They are special places that have…

  7. America's Service Academies, Your Service Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Born, Dana H.; Phillips, Andrew T.; Trainor, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    The United States Air Force Academy, United States Naval Academy, and United States Military Academy are America's three largest service academies. They are "the" primary undergraduate institutions and commissioning sources that educate and develop the officers who are expected to lead this nation's armed forces. They are special places that have…

  8. [Pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 Outbreak in a Military Academy: start of community circulation in Spain].

    PubMed

    Mayo Montero, Elga; Ballester Orcal, Elena; Piñeyroa Sierra, Antonio Joaquín; Fé Marques, Antonio; Santa-Olalla Peralta, Patricia; Sierra Moros, Maria José

    2010-01-01

    On May 19, 2009, 21 cases of influenza-like illness were reported among soldiers from an Engineering Military Academy (ACING) in Hoyo de Manzanares, Spain. In the context of an influenza A (H1N1)2009 global alert, it was decided to investigate a possible pandemic influenza outbreak. To describe a possible outbreak of influenza A (H1N1)2009 in a Military Training Centre and to describe the measures adopted for transmission control of this new infection. A specific questionnaire was administered and biological samples were collected from all cases under investigation. Isolation and quarantine were recommended for cases and contacts, respectively. Eighty-one cases were confirmed. Among 52 samples tested, 31 were positive for influenza virus A/California/7/2009. The average age of the cases was 22.0 years (range 18-31 years) and 84% were men. Most common reported symptoms were cough and fever. All cases were isolated and treated with oseltamivir, with full recovery. The total attack rate was 12.42%. None of the cases had history of travel to risk areas or contact with previously diagnosed cases outside the academy. Thirty-one confirmed cases related to this outbreak were identified outside the academy, 24 cases were family contacts and friends. This outbreak was the first evidence of community transmission of pandemic influenza H1N1 in Spain. The rapid detection of this outbreak enhanced an early implementation of measures aiming at the containment of its transmission.

  9. Military Medicine Interest Groups in U.S. Medical Schools.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Timothy M; Coker, Timothy J; Chen, Steve I; Carlson, Mark A

    2016-11-01

    Medical student interest groups are organizations that help expose students to different medical specialties and fields of medicine while in medical school. Military medicine interest groups (MMIGs) are a particular type of interest group that spreads information about military medicine, fosters mentorship, and camaraderie between students and military faculty, and increases the opportunities for leadership while in medical school. Surveys were sent to all U.S. medical schools to determine how many schools had an MMIG. If a medical school had a group, a second survey was sent to the student leader to determine more information about how their group operated (such as type of participants, funding sources, activities, faculty involvement, military health care provider involvement, etc.). Fifty-six percent of U.S. medical schools who responded were found to have an MMIG and most participants were students in the Health Professions Scholarship Program. Information about military medicine was found to be the biggest impact of having a group at a medical school and student leaders expressed they wished to have more military health care provider involvement. The results of this study could help start MMIGs at other medical schools, as well as give ideas to current MMIGs on how other groups operate.

  10. [First medical museum of Russia (150-anniversary of the Surgical museum of the Imperial Medical-Surgery Academy)].

    PubMed

    Budko, A A; Gribovskaia, G A; Zhuravlev, D A

    2013-03-01

    The opening in 1863 of the Surgical museum of the Imperial Medical-Surgical Academy was the sign of a new age in the development of medical science. It became the first medical museum in our country. It was the period when similar museums appeared in Europe and America. Thus all over the world were formed the first museums that amassed their collections, the later basis of modem medical museums.

  11. Nominations to the Academy of Medical Sciences USSR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Sanitary Service and Committee of the Tashkent Rail- road Workers’ Trade- Union. 3. BEREZIN, Ivan Filitnyuvich (Surgery) li. GLAZUNOV, Ivan ...Doctor’of Medical Sci- ences; Professor; Heads Chair of Faculty Surgery, Leningrad Medical Institute I imeni I. P.’ Pavlov . Scientific council, Turkmen... Pavlov ; Society of Surgeons imeni Pirogov; Member of the AMS USSR, P. A. Kupriyanov. -&- 7. KOLOMIYCHENKO, Doctor of Medical Sci- Aleksey

  12. Military Medics--Will We Use Their Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Patricia

    1974-01-01

    The greates obstacles medics face in negotiating the passage between military and civilian health jobs are created by civilian hiring standards. Civilian employers rely on licensure by a State agency or accreditation by a professional organization. (Author/AJ)

  13. Infection Prevention and Control in Deployed Military Medical Treatment Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    REVIEW ARTICLE Infection Prevention and Control in Deployed Military Medical Treatment Facilities Duane R. Hospenthal, MD, PhD, FACP, FIDSA, Andrew D...Heather C. Yun, MD, FACP, Clinton K. Murray, MD, FACP, FIDSA, and the Prevention of Combat-Related Infections Guidelines Panel Abstract: Infections have...survived to reach medical care were expected to develop and possibly succumb to infections during their care in military hospitals. Initial care of

  14. Report of the Defense Task Force on Sexual Harassment and Violence at the Military Service Academies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    the ability to obtain support and care ; and assists in making informed decisions. Based on the guide - lines provided in this report, the Academies...an active duty female officer responsible for managing the SAVI Advocates and SAVI GUIDEs . SAVI Advocates are officers and senior enlisted personnel...and one female active duty chaplains with offices located in the Battalion living space. Psychotherapists — The Naval Academy has two mental health

  15. Military medical informatics: accessing information in the deployed environment.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mark B; Von Thun, Annette M

    2009-03-01

    Physicians use multiple sources of information to search for answers to clinical questions. These sources include textbooks, journals, colleagues, and electronic resources, including the Internet. To explore what sources are most commonly used by staff military physicians, we distributed a survey asking them to describe sources of medical information they used most frequently while in garrison and while on deployment. Most military physicians use the Internet to access medical information every day while in garrison. The frequency and pattern of use of medical resources differs while on deployment. The most common sources of electronic medical information are general Internet search engines (Google). Open-domain sites (PubMed and MEDLINE) are more commonly used by military surgeons, while filtered secondary information sources (UptoDate, MD Consult) appear to be more commonly used by military primary care physicians. Younger physicians use electronic resources more commonly than do older physicians. Knowing what sources of medical information military physicians use to search for answers to their clinical questions can help guide allocation of medical informatics resources, particularly to deployed military physicians providing in-theater care.

  16. Surgeons reconsidered: military medical men of the American revolution.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Tabitha

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the reputation of British military medical staff in the 18th century, focusing on the character and professionalism of regimental surgeons and mates who served at the time of the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). Examining the careers and contributions of men such as Thomas Dickson Reide, Robert Jackson, and Robert Hamilton reveals that--in contrast to charges of ineptitude, laziness and dishonesty among military surgeons--the British army could count on a cadre of military medical men who were devoted both to their patients and to the advancement of their profession.

  17. [Scientific activities of Occupational Medicine Department with St Petersburg Medical Academy for Postgraduate Education].

    PubMed

    Retnev, V M; Shliakhetskiĭ, N S; Ivanova, F A; Petruk, Iu A; Dedkova, L E; Boĭko, I V; Milutka, E V; Karulina, O A; Shimanskaia, T G

    2004-01-01

    The article deals with materials devoted to 80th anniversary of scientific activities of Occupational Medicine Department with St Petersburg Medical Academy for Postgraduate Education. Theoretic, scientifical and practical data on achievements on various stages of longstanding history are presented. The authors prove the research carried by the Department to be important and promising for occupational hygiene and industrial medicine.

  18. Family practice career attrition, 1969 to 1993: a comparison of 336 civilian and military graduates of one medical school.

    PubMed

    Jacques, L B; Gray, G R

    2000-08-01

    Instability of specialty choice and career after initial residency entry will affect health personnel projections. Military physicians may differ from civilian physicians in their specialty choice behaviors during their careers. A cohort of 336 graduates who chose family medicine residency training was identified from the graduating classes of 1969 through 1993 at a large private medical school. Current specialty identification was determined, and attrition from family medicine was computed. As of 1997, 275 graduates (82%) were still in family medicine careers, defined by American Academy of Family Physicians membership or current American Board of Family Practice certification. Of graduates who entered military programs, 22 of 77 (28%) had left family medicine careers; 39 of 259 (15%) of the graduates who entered civilian programs had left. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.007). Family medicine career retention is lower for males in military programs compared with males in civilian programs or females in military programs.

  19. "Learning Shock" and Student Veterans: Bridging the Learning Environments of the Military and the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaauw-Hara, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I provide an overview of student veterans' experiences learning in the military, from the ways the armed forces operate as a community of practice to how they build the competence of their service-members through application of andragogical principles. I then contrast the learning environment of the military to that of college,…

  20. [Approaches to development and implementation of the medical information system for military-medical commission of the multidisciplinary military-medical organisation].

    PubMed

    Kuvshinov, K E; Klipak, V M; Chaplyuk, A L; Moskovko, V M; Belyshev, D V; Zherebko, O A

    2015-06-01

    The current task of the implementation of medical information systems in the military and medical organizations is an automation of the military-medical expertise as one of the most important activities. In this regard, noteworthy experience of the 9th Medical Diagnostic Centre (9th MDC), where on the basis of medical information system "Interi PROMIS" for the first time was implemented the automation of the work of military medical commission. The given paper presents an algorithm for constructing of the information system for the military-medical examination; detailed description of its elements is given. According to military servicemen the implementation of the Military Medical Commission (MMC) subsystem of the medical information system implemented into the 9th MDC has reduced the time required for the MMC and paperwork, greatly facilitate the work of physicians and medical specialists on military servicemen examination. This software can be widely applied in ambulatory and hospital practice, especially in case of mass military-medical examinations.

  1. [Academy of medical sciences during the Great Patriotic War and first years after war].

    PubMed

    Knopov, M Sh; Taranukha, V K

    2014-06-01

    In the article presented the history of foundation of the Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR and its activities during the World War Two and the early postwar years. According to the authors, the scientific development of many fundamental problems from domestic medicine experience during the war has retained its relevance in solving of the contemporary issues in health and medical science in modern Russia.

  2. [Ophthalmic reasons in unfitness for military service in medical evidence of the Area Military Medical Commission in Lodz].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Michał S; Goś, Roman; Smigielski, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    To assess ocular causes for rejection from the military service. A retrospective review of medical examinations for entry to the military service from The Area Military Medical Commission in Lodz. Ophthalmic examinations were performed according to meet eligibility criteria. We used statistic analysis to review the results. Statistic analysis revealed that during period 1993-2004 ocular diseases were causes of 4.68% rejections from the army. The major ocular causes were high refractive errors. 1. Ocular diseases are important causes for rejection from the army (4.68% in total). 2. Major ocular causes for rejection are: high refractive errors, glaucoma and chronic diseases of the choroid, retina and optic nerve.

  3. [The prevalence of overweight and obesity vs. the level of physical activity of aviation military academy students].

    PubMed

    Gaździńska, Agata; Baran, Paulina; Skibniewski, Franciszek; Truszczyński, Olaf; Gaździński, Stefan; Wyleżoł, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate overweight, obesity and the level of physical activity in the study group of 100 cadets of the Air Force Military Academy in Dęblin (WSOSP). Evaluation of overweight and obesity was based on body mass index (BMI) and body fat content. An accelerometer AiperMotion 500TM was used to measure the level of physical activity. There were marked such parameters as the average daily energy consumption, the average distance covered during the day and the whole week and the indicator of physical activity level (PAL). Based on BMI indicators, 71.3% of the cadets had normal body weight, 25.3% were overweight and 3.4% were obese. Assessment of nutritional status showed significant differences between the 1st and 2nd vs. the 4th and 5th years of study. Normal BMI values showed 88% of the 1st and 2nd year students, while of the 4th and 5th years - only 48.6% (p < 0.05). Based on the body fat content, obesity was found only in a group of older students (16.2%) and overweight was 10 times higher in the 4th and 5th years (21.6%) in comparison to younger students (2%). The average distance covered during the day or during the whole week was significantly higher in the 1st and 2nd year students. It is necessary to implement appropriate measures in the field of nutrition and physical activity to prevent the development of excessive body weight during studies among the military cadets of the Air Force Military Academy in Dęblin. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  4. [Marketing in the system of military-medical facilities].

    PubMed

    Kostiuchenko, O M; Sviridova, T B

    2014-02-01

    Military medical facilities of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian, have received the right to provide additional services and have been involved in the sphere of market relations. The strong influence of market relations - an objective reality that must be used for the development of military medical institutions and improving quality of care.Effective commercial activity can improve capabilities of the military medical institutions. This requires constant study of market mechanisms to implement and develop their competitive advantage. The paper substantiates the need for the participation of military medical institutions in the provision of health services to the public on the terms of compensation incurred by financial institutions costs (paid medical services, medical assistance program of compulsory and voluntary health insurance). Taking into account the specifics of military medical institutions set out basic principles and recommendations have been implementing marketing approach in their management, the practical application of which will not only increase efficiency, but also create conditions to improve the financial and economic indicators. This knowledge will help the mechanism of functioning health care market and the rules of interaction of market counterparties.

  5. [Brief history of the main institutions in the China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences].

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingwei

    2015-11-01

    On 19 October, 1955, the Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine affiliated with the Ministry of Health of the People's Republic of China was established formally. On 8 October, 1985, its name was changed to "China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine", which was renamed as "China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences (CACMS)" on 15 November, 2005. During its six decades of history, the construction of the institutions in the CACMS were improved constantly. Nowadays, there are altogether 17 academic institutions, 6 clinical institutions, 1 educational institution and 6 industrial institutions in the CACMS, which has become a comprehensive research institution of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), embodying scientific research, clinical service, education and industry as a whole, under the direct control of the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine of the People's Republic of China.

  6. [Participation of the Mexican National Academy of Medicine in the accreditation of medical specialties and the certification of medical specialists].

    PubMed

    Espinosa de Los Reyes Sánchez, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    We present a brief biography of the prominent Mexican doctor Miguel Francisco Jiménez. Because of his great academic contributions and medical achievements, the Mexican National Academy of Medicine named its annual lecture to welcome its new members after him. We also provide insights on the inception of Medical Boards for certification and medical specialties, emphasizing the Mexican situation. The Mexican National Academy of Medicine has had an important role in the organization, development, and recognition of these boards by official health authorities. Finally, we explain how the Advisory Committee of The National Board for Medical Specialties (CONACEM) functions, and how it has become a relevant auxiliary body within the Federal Government.

  7. The military medical school of Mexico: a tradition of excellence.

    PubMed

    Villavicencio, J Leonel; Merrill, Daniel M; Rich, Norman M

    2005-01-01

    It is a historical fact that warfare and surgery have been linked together as far back as military history has been recorded. In the 18th century, the tendency of most armies to dismiss their medical services at the end of every major conflict resulted in higher mortality at the beginning of the next war. This became evident in the French and British Armies during the Battle of Waterloo. These countries went to great efforts to mobilize their civilian reserve physicians, only to discover that more than half of the medical personnel declined to serve. The scarcity of physicians and the inexperience of those caring for the wounded resulted in a high casualty rate. The current armed conflicts throughout the world with their high number of victims are living evidence of the need for preparedness of the military medical personnel. In this article, we review the systems of military medical education in several countries, and offer the example of the Escuela Medico Militar (Military Medical School) of Mexico, a prestigious source of military medical physicians for the Mexican armed forces.

  8. Coordinating medical civil military operations in Multinational Division-North.

    PubMed

    Smyrski, John A; Rainey, McKinley; Roach, Shane; Stevens, Mark; Hernandez, Gloria; Vargo, Ruth

    2010-11-01

    Medical civil military operations (MCMO) are part of military civil capacity-building efforts within the full spectrum of military operations, from war to military operations other than war. In 2008-2009 during Operation Iraqi Freedom, the Division Surgeon's Section (DSS) of the 25th Infantry Division (25ID) and Multinational Division-North developed an innovative MCMO program in northern Iraq. The program centered on understanding and mapping key relationships, empowering brigade-level programs, and leveraging technology to identify and share best practices. The DSS mapped the critical relationships within and between the three entities affecting MCMO: the government of Iraq (GOI), Department of State (DOS), and the Department of Defense (DOD). A division MCMO working group was then created along with processes to facilitate MCMO project execution and program management. The structure and organization of the 25ID MCMO program lend themselves to other operational environments requiring synchronization of medical capacity-building efforts.

  9. Report of the Defense Task Force on Sexual Harassment and Violence at the Military Service Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Defense, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In creating this report the Task Force gathered information by conducting site visits; communicating with numerous individuals, including victims; reviewing the Department of Defense survey data; reviewing Academy and Service policies, reports, and data; consulting with subject matter experts; and communicating with related committees and task…

  10. First Public Report on the Military Academy Chinese People’s Liberation Army Military Pictures Collection (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-10

    dedicated. They know the stored material like the palms of their hands. Whether day or night, there is no error in the receiving or issuing processes. 12...dynasties. S capitalist military line. u~-.5 -a w Full prmotig aademc dmocrcy, Attentively studying the enem % Fuly romtin acaemi deocrcy, truly...Control, English, General Chemistry , General Knowledge on Ship Technology, etc., such that scientific knowledge and special- drdtkind.id o s r rized

  11. SEX DIFFERENCES IN DIGIT RATIO (2D:4D) AMONG MILITARY AND CIVIL COHORTS AT A MILITARY ACADEMY IN WROCŁAW, POLAND.

    PubMed

    Kociuba, Marek; Kozieł, Slawomir; Chakraborty, Raja

    2016-09-01

    The ratio of second-to-fourth digit length (2D:4D), which is generally higher in women compared with men, is a putative marker of prenatal testosterone (PT) exposure. Lower 2D:4D is linked with greater physical ability and strength, better sporting performance and a propensity towards jobs demanding greater physical ability. The objectives of this paper were to examine the sexual dimorphism in 2D:4D in both hands 1and compare this dimorphism in the students of military and civil courses at the General Kuściuszko Military Academy of Land Forces in Wrocław. The cross-sectional study compared 59 female and 118 male students from the military courses and 53 females and 64 male students from the civil courses. Besides calculating 2D:4D (2D/4D) for each hand, height and weight were also recorded. Physical fitness and endurance were assessed using Eurofit tests. Handgrip strength was measured using a standardized isometric dynamometer. In almost all physical tests, students in the military cohort showed highly significant greater physical ability and strength (e.g. handgrip strength) when compared with the civil cohort. Male participants had a significantly lower 2D:4D than females for each hand, as well as for the average value for both hands. The sexual dimorphism was, however, a little more pronounced in the right hand than in the left. Both sex and course type were significant predictors of 2D:4D. There were significant interactions between sex and the student type. Among females, but not in males, the military cohort had a significantly lower, i.e. more 'masculine', 2D:4D for the left hand and right hand and average for both hands (t=3.290, p<0.001) than the civil cohort. This was not the case in males. However, the sex difference in 2D:4D was only significant among the civil students, and not among the military cadets. In conclusion, higher PT exposure, as represented by a lower 2D:4D, among the Polish females might be an indicator of relatively increased physical

  12. Use of the MBTI as a Predictor of Successful Academic and Military Performance at the United States Coast Guard Academy. Report 10-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John C., III

    This study provides an analysis of a random sample of 100 cadets from the United States Coast Guard Academy class of 1993. Emphasis is placed on the cadets' academic achievements, their military performance, and their resignation status to determine whether the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) preferences can be used to predict success in these…

  13. Bibliography of Women: A Survey of Women Past and Present as Reflected by the Holdings of the United States Military Academy Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earl, Martha M., Comp.

    The publication of this bibliography on "Women" is an appropriate event in that it closely follows the passage of the law which for the first time permits women to enter the United States Military Academy in its 173 year history. Over 500 titles are presently extant in the USMA Library collection on the subject of women, representing woman's role…

  14. The Effect of Distributed Practice Homework on Precalculus Achievement at a Military Academy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-08

    This study investigated the main effect of distributive practice homework on achievement in Precalculus . This study also investigated the aptitude...achievement in Precalculus . The sample consisted of 351 United States Air Force Academy cadets (experimental n = 161, control n = 190), all in their first...achievement. A subset of the Math Anxiety Rating Scale developed by Alexander and Martray (1989) was used as the measure of mathematics anxiety. Precalculus

  15. Informed consent and ethical issues in military medical research.

    PubMed

    McManus, John; Mehta, Sumeru G; McClinton, Annette R; De Lorenzo, Robert A; Baskin, Toney W

    2005-11-01

    Informed consent in military research shares many of the same fundamental principles and regulations that govern civilian biomedical research. In fact, much of modern research ethics is grounded in events that occurred in the context of war or government-sponsored research. Despite these similarities and common origins, research in the military has additional requirements designed to preserve service members' informed consent rights. The special nature of the superior-subordinate relationship in the military necessitates careful protections to avoid perceptions of coercion or undue influence on a military subject. Additionally, current legal and regulatory requirements for advanced informed consent significantly restrict the flexibility of the military to conduct research using waiver of consent. This has implications on the ability of the nation to develop effective medical treatments for the global war on terrorism. Nevertheless, work is under way to realign defense research policy with the norms of civilian biomedical practice. Future directions include the adoption of waivers for military emergency research, and the cautious introduction of human subject studies on the battlefield. This paper discusses historical background, regulatory differences, and concerns and challenges of some of these regulatory differences for research personnel that apply to informed consent and waiver of said informed consent for emergency research conducted by the U.S. military.

  16. All Male State-Funded Military Academies: Anachronism or Necessary Anomaly?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Charles J.; Scollay, Susan J.

    1993-01-01

    The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth District, although stopping short of ordering the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) to admit women, ordered VMI to implement a program which comports with the requirements of equal protection. Offers an analysis of the Fourth Circuit's ruling, a discussion of important educational questions, and a…

  17. Tri-Service Medical Transformation - Time for a Unified Military Medical Command (USMEDCOM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and Military Traffic Management Command ( MTMC ) into one functional combatant command with global reach. USTRANSCOM aptly fit the definition of a...Sealift Command MTMC Military Traffic Management Command NCA National Capital Area SASC Senate Armed Services Committee SIMLM Single Integrated Medical

  18. Military Personnel: Enhanced Collaboration and Process Improvements Needed for Determining Military Treatment Facility Medical Personnel Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    dentists, medical service corps, and veterinarians , to name a few, at the work center level across Army fixed military treatment facilities. The model uses...1072 - 896 903 Hematology /Oncology 41 40 43 - 12 17 - 18 14 Infectious Disease 63 59 62 - 29 34 - 16 17 Internal Medicine 315 e 254 e 277 e

  19. Medical supply on contingency military operations: experience from Operation GRITROCK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J P; Reeves, P

    2015-01-01

    Medical supply during military operations has the ability to affect the efficacy of the operation being undertaken, either negatively or positively. An appropriately-managed maritime platform with a robust medical supply chain during transit and on arrival in theatre is the main aim. A secure supply chain will reduce any implications that logistics may have with regard to capability, and negate the effects of deficiencies of short shelf life items occurring over time and during use in high tempo operations.

  20. 38 CFR 17.94 - Outpatient medical services for military retirees and other beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... services for military retirees and other beneficiaries. 17.94 Section 17.94 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.94 Outpatient medical services for military retirees and other beneficiaries. Outpatient medical services for military retirees...

  1. Enhancing Military-Civilian Medical Synergies: The Role of Army Medical Practice in Civilian Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    132206p.pdf ———, Medical Quality Assurance (MQA) and Clinical Quality Management in the Military Health System (MHS), Washington, D.C., Department of...including regional medical commands and military treatment facilities, and, more broadly, to health leaders throughout the U.S. Department of Defense...U.S. Army and conducted within the RAND Arroyo Center’s Personnel, Training, and Health Program. RAND Arroyo Center, part of the RAND Corporation

  2. Abortion Services and Military Medical Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-08

    payments prohibited for drugs or devices to prevent implantation of the fertilized ovum , or for medical procedures necessary for the termination of an...fertilized ovum , or for medical procedures necessary for the termination of an ectopic pregnancy: Provided, however, That the several States are and

  3. Abortion Services and Military Medical Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-16

    are payments prohibited for drugs or devices to prevent implantation of the fertilized ovum , or for medical procedures necessary for the termination...the fertilized ovum , or for medical procedures necessary for the termination of an ectopic pregnancy: Provided, however, That the several States are

  4. [The Russian Armed Forces Military Medical Service: condition and ways of improvement].

    PubMed

    Fisun, A Ia

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 the main efforts of the Medical Service were aimed at the following tasks: optimization of management system of military medical service, improvement of medical evacuation system, medical service security for military contingents, assigned according to territory principle to military-medical facilities of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation, implementation of innovations at all stages of medical evacuation in peace- and wartime, security of combat and mobilization readiness of regulatory bodies of the Medical Service, medical military units and military medical facilities, medical service of troops battle training, improvement of material and technical resources, security of regular pharmacy and equipment supply, activation of research work in the Medical Service interests. Lines of military medicine development in 2014 are: transfer of treatment facilities that are not used by the Ministry of Defence into the Federal Biomedical Agency till the end of 2014, prevention of pneumonia and meningitis in military personnel, improvement of early diagnosis system, medical service for military contingents according to territory principle, improvement of diagnostic and treatment work in military-medical units and subunits and military-medical facilities by means of development of material and technical resources, monitor the implementation of innovative diagnostic and treatment technologies, completion of construction projects of central military hospitals and etc.

  5. Infectious mononucleosis at the United States Military Academy. A prospective study of a single class over four years.

    PubMed

    Hallee, T J; Evans, A S; Niederman, J C; Brooks, C M; Voegtly, j H

    1974-09-01

    A prospective study of EB virus infections was initiated in July, 1969 in the entering class of 1401 cadets, at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. and continued over 4 yr. On entry 63.5% possessed EBV antibody and 36.5 lacked EBV antibody. The rate of antibody prevalence varied with the geographic area from which the cadet originated.Except in two cadets already ill on first bleeding no evidence of clinical infectious mononucleosis (I.M.) occurred over the 4 yr period in the 890 cadets entering the Academy with EBV antibody. Among 437 cadets without antibody on entry, 54 or 12.4% were infected (seroconverted) in the freshman year; 15 of these had clinical I.M., 12 had suggestive I.M., and 39 had no known mono-like illness. The annual infection rates in susceptible cadets in the second, third, and fourth years were 24.4, 15.1, and 30.8 per 100, respectively. Of 201 cadets infected with EBV over 4 yr only 26.4% were manifested by heterophile positive clinical infectious mononucleosis. Overall, 46% of the 437 cadets entering without EBV antibody became infected over 40 mo of serologic observation; definite clinical infectious mononucleosis developed in 53 cadets, a clinical attack rate of 12.1 per 100 for 4 yr. The EBV infection rate among exposed and susceptible roommates of known cases was no higher than in roommates not so exposed.Elevations of EBV-specific and total IgM occurred during acute illness and disappeared in late convalescence. Total IgG and IgA levels were less commonly elevated. EBV-specific-IgM antibody was demonstrable during the acute illness but was absent 12 mo later. Analysis of EBV infection rates revealed no difference among persons of different ABO blood groups.

  6. Infectious Mononucleosis at the United States Military Academy. A Prospective Study of a Single Class Over Four Years 1

    PubMed Central

    Hallee, T. James; Evans, Alfred S.; Niederman, James C.; Brooks, Charles M.; Voegtly, John H.

    1974-01-01

    A prospective study of EB virus infections was initiated in July, 1969 in the entering class of 1401 cadets, at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. and continued over 4 yr. On entry 63.5% possessed EBV antibody and 36.5 lacked EBV antibody. The rate of antibody prevalence varied with the geographic area from which the cadet originated. Except in two cadets already ill on first bleeding no evidence of clinical infectious mononucleosis (I.M.) occurred over the 4 yr period in the 890 cadets entering the Academy with EBV antibody. Among 437 cadets without antibody on entry, 54 or 12.4% were infected (seroconverted) in the freshman year; 15 of these had clinical I.M., 12 had suggestive I.M., and 39 had no known mono-like illness. The annual infection rates in susceptible cadets in the second, third, and fourth years were 24.4, 15.1, and 30.8 per 100, respectively. Of 201 cadets infected with EBV over 4 yr only 26.4% were manifested by heterophile positive clinical infectious mononucleosis. Overall, 46% of the 437 cadets entering without EBV antibody became infected over 40 mo of serologic observation; definite clinical infectious mononucleosis developed in 53 cadets, a clinical attack rate of 12.1 per 100 for 4 yr. The EBV infection rate among exposed and susceptible roommates of known cases was no higher than in roommates not so exposed. Elevations of EBV-specific and total IgM occurred during acute illness and disappeared in late convalescence. Total IgG and IgA levels were less commonly elevated. EBV-specific-IgM antibody was demonstrable during the acute illness but was absent 12 mo later. Analysis of EBV infection rates revealed no difference among persons of different ABO blood groups. PMID:4374836

  7. The Football Association medical research programme: an audit of injuries in academy youth football

    PubMed Central

    Price, R; Hawkins, R; Hulse, M; Hodson, A

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To undertake a prospective epidemiological study of the injuries sustained in English youth academy football over two competitive seasons. Methods: Player injuries were annotated by medical staff at 38 English football club youth academies. A specific injury audit questionnaire was used together with a weekly return form that documented each club's current injury status. Results: A total of 3805 injuries were reported over two complete seasons (June to May) with an average injury rate of 0.40 per player per season. The mean (SD) number of days absent for each injury was 21.9 (33.63), with an average of 2.31 (3.66) games missed per injury. The total amount of time absent through injury equated to about 6% of the player's development time. Players in the higher age groups (17–19 years) were more likely to receive an injury than those in the younger age groups (9–16 years). Injury incidence varied throughout the season, with training injuries peaking in January (p<0.05) and competition injuries peaking in October (p<0.05). Competition injuries accounted for 50.4% of the total, with 36% of these occurring in the last third of each half. Strains (31%) and sprains (20%) were the main injury types, predominantly affecting the lower limb, with a similar proportion of injuries affecting the thigh (19%), ankle (19%), and knee (18%). Growth related conditions, including Sever's disease and Osgood-Schlatter's disease, accounted for 5% of total injuries, peaking in the under 13 age group for Osgood-Schlatter's disease and the under 11 age group for Sever's disease. The rate of re-injury of exactly the same anatomical structure was 3%. Conclusions: Footballers are at high risk of injury and there is a need to investigate ways of reducing this risk. Injury incidence at academy level is approximately half that of the professional game. Academy players probably have much less exposure to injury than their full time counterparts. Areas that warrant further attention

  8. The Defence Medical Library Service and military medicine.

    PubMed

    Walker, S B

    2005-01-01

    The Defence Medical Library Service (DMLS) supports the clinical practice and career development of military health professionals across the world. Clinical governance and the need for medical knowledge to be evidence-based means the DMLS has a central role to play in support of defence medicine. The DMLS is important for enabling health professionals to make sense of the evidence-based pyramid and the hierarchy of medical knowledge. The Royal Centre for Defence Medicine (RCDM) in Birmingham is recognised as an international centre of excellence. The information, knowledge and research requirements of the RCDM will provide opportunities for the DMLS to support and engage with the academic community.

  9. Sleep Patterns of Young Men and Women Enrolled at the United States Military Academy: Results from Year 1 of a 4-Year Longitudinal Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    REQUIREMENTS OF ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS ARE DISTINCTLY DIFFERENT FROM THOSE of other age groups. I·’ When compared 10 adulls, the cir· cadian...Sleep Patterns of Young Men and Women Enrolled at the United States Military Academy: Results from Year 1 of a 4-Year Longitudinal Study Nita leWIs...Sleep patterns of young adults Bre different from those of other age groups .. This study eKamined sleep patterns of cadets during their first year

  10. Medical civil-military operations: the deployed medical brigade's role in counterinsurgency operations.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Jeffrey; Miyamoto, Danelle; Holman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Medical civil-military operations are a critical combat multiplier directly supporting the counterinsurgency fight. Army Medical Department Soldiers support medical civil affairs activities at all levels from platoon to the United States Mission-Iraq (Department of State) initiatives enhancing the legitimacy of medical services in the Iraq Ministry of Health, Ministry of Defense, Ministry of the Interior, and Ministry of Justice. The civil-military operations mission of the deployed Task Force 62 Medical Brigade has also evolved into a broad mission encompassing over 120 contractors including Iraqi-American, Bilingual Bicultural Advisors-Subject Matter Experts serving as case management liaison officers and medical trainers, as well as Iraqi Advisor Task Force members providing medical atmospherics, assessments, training, and the overall management of Iraqi linguists supporting all level III medical facilities.

  11. The Future of Military Graduate Medical Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-08

    young physician will either become a general medical officer( GMO ) or be selected to directly enter further training. Each of the services handles this in...factors being equal, preference is given to those who have completed a GMO tour. 4 The next level of training is the fellowship. This is accomplished...work force and is not appreciably different from the percentage in 1980.4 21 TABLE 5 Number of Trainees Total Training Proaram Air Fr A NAy Allergy 5

  12. [Suggestions of reshaping medical education (The Hungarian medical elite at universities and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences) 1947-1948].

    PubMed

    N Szabó, József

    2017-03-01

    This study is part of the monograph entitled Scientific Elites and Politics (1945-1948) to be published soon. The relationships of political parties with several elite groups, such as groups of agronomic, human, economic, legal, technical and natural sciences, as well as the roles of these elites in scientific life, have been looked into and published in renowned periodicals. Using new sources, different specialist groups' and political powers' suggestions of reshaping medical education in 1947 and 1948, are presented. The medical elite's situation at universities and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences is also outlined. The study renders an account of the entire post-war medical elite. It will be stated who and based on what scientific achievement became member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, who was appointed to professor and who became a habilitated doctor. This study, which is a desideratum of research, may not only interest researchers but is aimed at a broader readership, including physicians. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(11), 432-437.

  13. Comradery, community, and care in military medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael L

    2011-10-01

    Medical ethics prohibits caregivers from discriminating and providing preferential care to their compatriots and comrades. In military medicine, particularly during war and when resources may be scarce, ethical principles may dictate priority care for compatriot soldiers. The principle of nondiscrimination is central to utilitarian and deontological theories of justice, but communitarianism and the ethics of care and friendship stipulate a different set of duties for community members, friends, and family. Similar duties exist among the small cohesive groups that typify many military units. When members of these groups require medical care, there are sometimes moral grounds to treat compatriot soldiers ahead of enemy or allied soldiers regardless of the severity of their respective wounds.

  14. [Military medical doctrine--the scientific basis for medical support of the Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Chizh, I M; Zhiliaev, E G; Galin, L L; Belozerov, V V

    1995-12-01

    Basing upon the experience of soviet medicine during the Great Patriotic War, organization of medical security of the Troops and Navy personnel in the post-war period, especially during the war in Afghanistan and local military conflicts and analysis of modern tendencies in military medicine development in the armies of foreign countries the authors formulate the principles of military-medical doctrine of the Armed Forces. The authors consider the following organizing principles of military-medical doctrine to be the main ones: the use of medical service mobile forces relying on the territorial system of troops medical security; focusing of the main medical service efforts at crucial moment in the necessary direction; maximal approximation of its forces and means to the regions of sanitary loss occurrence; wide use of the automatic managing systems; optimization of the Mobile Forces medical security as a type of the Armed Forces; similar approaches to the treatment of wounds caused by the weapons of modern types; maximal reduction of the medical evacuation stages; early and active detection of visceral complications in the wounded; selection of the infectious patients into separate stream, their treatment and rehabilitation in the specialized hospitals.

  15. Military dependent medical care during World War II.

    PubMed

    Potter, M

    1990-02-01

    Dependent medical care at Army expense or at Army facilities during World War II was offered only on an emergency basis and at the discretion of the facility commanding officer. This had been the practice since 1884 when such care was specifically authorized by Congressional appropriation. Mobilization in 1898 and 1917 had brought a large number of state militiamen or inductees into the army--men who could leave their families behind. When mobilization began again in 1940, it was thought that a similar procedure would be followed. Events, however, overwhelmed the system as commanders of Army bases faced large numbers of young, pregnant wives who had followed their husbands. This had happened, in part, because of the dislocations of the Great Depression and, in part, because the wives of military inductees hoped to find work close to where their husbands were stationed. Although dependent medical care was not increased in proportion to the numbers of new dependents brought in by the war mobilization, medical care was provided for the four lower grades under the Emergency Maternity and Infant Care section of the Social Security Act of 1935. Subsequent to World War II and the experience of the Korean War, Congress saw it fit to specifically authorize medical care for dependents of military personnel as part of the soldiers' terms of employment, as a device to stimulate retention in service of both soldiers and doctors. In 1956 the United States Congress established the right at law of military dependents to medical care as specified in the Dependents' Medical Care Act.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Beyond the medical home: Special Care Family Academy for children and youth.

    PubMed

    Thrall, Roger S; Blumberg, Jody H; Beck, Stephanie; Bourgoin, Magdalena D; Votto, John J; Barton, Randall W

    2012-01-01

    Children and youth with special health care needs require more health care and related services and consequently incur more costs than other individuals. Implementation of the "medical home" concept has benefitted children with special needs, resulting in fewer unmet medical needs and more consistent health care delivery. As advances in health care have enabled an increasingly higher percentage of children with special needs to live far into adulthood, the transition from adolescence to adulthood poses new challenges in obtaining medical care, education, job training, and employment opportunities. A more comprehensive medical home paradigm for children with special needs is composed of three fundamental components: 1) home/community, 2) education, and 3) medical/dental care. These components should be developed equally and in parallel, emphasizing consumer advocacy, care coordination, education, life skills, and career development, to attain independent or minimally dependent living. This new model has been initiated at Hospital for Special Care in New Britain, Connecticut, in its Special Care Family Academy.

  17. [Prophylactic medical examination of military personnel with ENT-diseases].

    PubMed

    Belevitin, A B; Govorun, M I; Syroezhkin, F A

    2010-11-01

    One of the most important goals in military otolaryngology is a prevention ENT-diseases of armed forces personnel. Prophylactic medical examination of their staff is the major instrument in it. The article presents detailed project of its realization in accordance with present-day classification of ENT-diseases (International Classification of Diseases by World Health Organization), new structure of medical service and its resources and conditions. The diseases of the nose, ear and throat were considered. Algorithm of patients' observation and volume of diagnostic examinations were given.

  18. [Organisation of medical care delivery to citizens, enjoying a right to get medical care at military-medical organisations of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Fisun, A Ya; Kuvshinov, K Ye; Pastukhov, A G; Zemlyakov, S V

    2015-09-01

    One of the main priorities of the medical service of the armed forces of the Russian federation is a realization of rights for military retirees and members of their families to free medical care. For this purpose was founded a system of organization of medical care delivery at military-medical subdivisions, units and organizations of the ministry of defence of the Russian federation, based on territorial principle of medical support. In order to improve availability and quality of medical care was determined the order of free medical care delivery to military servicemen and military retirees in medical organizations of state and municipal systems of the health care.

  19. Global health diplomacy training for military medical researchers.

    PubMed

    Katz, Rebecca; Blazes, David; Bae, Jennifer; Puntambekar, Nisha; Perdue, Christopher L; Fischer, Julie

    2014-04-01

    Given the unprecedented growth of global health initiatives in the past decade, informal diplomacy between technical partners plays an increasingly important role in shaping opportunities and outcomes. This article describes a course developed and executed specifically to equip U.S. military health professionals with core skills in practical diplomacy critical to help them successfully plan and implement public health surveillance, research, and capacity building programs with partner nation governments and organizations. We identified core competencies in practical diplomacy for laboratory and public health researchers, catalogued and evaluated existing training programs, and then developed a pilot course in global health diplomacy for military medical researchers. The pilot course was held in June 2012, and focused on analyzing contemporary issues related to global health diplomacy through the framework of actors, drivers, and policies that affect public health research and capacity-building, beginning at the level of global health governance and cooperation and moving progressively to regional (supranational), national, and institutional perspective. This course represents an approach geared toward meeting the needs specific to U.S. military public health personnel and researchers working in international settings. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. U.S. medical students' knowledge about the military draft, the Geneva Conventions, and military medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Boyd, J Wesley; Himmelstein, David U; Lasser, Karen; McCormick, Danny; Bor, David H; Cutrona, Sarah L; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain how much U.S. medical students are taught about and know about military medical ethics, the Geneva Conventions, and the laws governing conscription of medical personnel. The authors developed an Internet-based questionnaire on these matters, and e-mail invitations to participate were sent to approximately 5,000 medical students at eight U.S. medical schools. Thirty-five percent of e-mail recipients participated in the survey. Of those, 94 percent had received less than one hour of instruction about military medical ethics and only 3.5 percent were aware of legislation already passed making a "doctor's draft" possible; 37 percent knew the conditions under which the Geneva Conventions apply; 33.8 percent did not know that the Geneva Conventions state that physicians should "treat the sickest first, regardless of nationality;" 37 percent did not know that the Geneva Conventions prohibit ever threatening or demeaning prisoners or depriving them of food or water; and 33.9 percent could not state when they would be required to disobey an unethical order.

  1. How we teach military medicine to medical cadets at Phramongkutklao College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Panichkul, Suthee; Rangsin, Ram; Aimpun, Pote; Mungthin, Mathirut; Pradubpongsa, Panitan; Heebthamai, Danai; Areekul, Wirote

    2009-02-01

    Phramongkutklao College of Medicine has a unique curriculum for "Military Medicine." Military Medicine involves prevention, threat assessment, evacuations and clinical management of diseases and injuries resulting from military occupational exposures. The Military Medicine curriculum covers all the entities of knowledge of Military Sciences, Combat Medical Skills, Military Preventive Medicine, Military Applied Physiology and Military Contingency Medicine. The highlight of the curriculum is "Operation Petcharavut" that represents simulated battlefield operations, involving multidisciplinary clinical integration and military regulation. In this course, medical cadets review all the knowledge that they have learnt and in addition, Medical Platoon leader strategies, Advanced Cardiac Life support and Phramongkutklao Traumatic Life support, crucial medical practices. Medical cadets would experience simulated patients with minimal injuries to critical wounds and complications including combat stress syndromes in various situations, from advancing to retreating units and from Battalion Aid Station to Division Medical Operations Center, whether during day or night. Since the medical cadets experience all Military Medicine courses from the second to the sixth year class and pass all medical knowledge-based examinations, Phramongkutklao College of Medicine expects all graduates to be excellent in not only all standard requirements of the medical professional set forth by the Medical Council of Thailand but also ready to serve the nation effectively in the Royal Thai Armed Forces.

  2. An Assessment of National EMT Certification Among Enlisted Military Medics.

    PubMed

    Harper, Stephen; Crowe, Remle; Bentley, Melissa; Kharod, Chetan; Walrath, Benjamin

    2017-03-01

    Navy Hospital Corpsmen (HMs) are the Navy equivalent to Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) both in-garrison and on the battlefield. In 2000, the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Education Agenda for the Future highlighted the need for a single certification agency to provide consistent evaluation of entry level competence for each nationally recognized EMS provider level. Administered by the National Registry of EMTs (NREMT), National EMT Certification is currently utilized by 46 states, the District of Columbia, four territories, and six federal organizations as part of their processes for granting licensure. Unlike the Air Force (USAF) and Army (USA), the Navy (USN) does not require National EMT Certification to perform the duties equivalent to a civilian EMT. Our objective is to describe the number of USN HMs, USAF medics, and USA combat medics who have obtained National EMT Certification from 2007 through 2014. Results from all USN HMs, USAF medics, and USA combat medics who tested between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2014 were queried from the NREMT database. Descriptive statistics were calculated based on a retrospective review of prospectively collected testing data. During the study period, 89,136 Military Service Members received their EMT certification from the NREMT. The breakdown of the total and percent of total is; USA Combat Medics (n = 69,761; 78.3%), USAF Medics (n = 16,195; 18.1%), and USN HMs (n = 3,180; 3.6%). Approximately 4,000 HMs graduate yearly from the Department of Defense Medical Education and Training Campus at Fort Sam Houston, Texas and 253 HMs obtained certification in 2014. About 6.3% (253/4,000) HMs obtained National EMT Certification in 2014, which is a nationally recognized standard for entry-level competence utilized by civilian EMTs and other branches of the military. More information about those HMs that obtain certification may help Commanders maximize the number of HMs obtaining certification. Mandating National EMT

  3. The Houston Academy of Medicine--Texas Medical Center Library management information system.

    PubMed Central

    Camille, D; Chadha, S; Lyders, R A

    1993-01-01

    A management information system (MIS) provides a means for collecting, reporting, and analyzing data from all segments of an organization. Such systems are common in business but rare in libraries. The Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library developed an MIS that operates on a system of networked IBM PCs and Paradox, a commercial database software package. The data collected in the system include monthly reports, client profile information, and data collected at the time of service requests. The MIS assists with enforcement of library policies, ensures that correct information is recorded, and provides reports for library managers. It also can be used to help answer a variety of ad hoc questions. Future plans call for the development of an MIS that could be adapted to other libraries' needs, and a decision-support interface that would facilitate access to the data contained in the MIS databases. PMID:8251972

  4. Implementing the CASPiE course-based research experience at the United States Military Academy: Affective responses and effects on critical thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Anthony Michael

    The Center for Authentic Science Practices in Education (CASPiE) pioneered a course-based research experience approach to teaching chemistry laboratory courses. The method had previously been studied in a variety of institutional settings. Recently, the United States Military Academy at West Point decided to develop CASPiE-style modules for the introductory honors chemistry course. This research setting presents clean experimental-control comparisons and a group of faculty who were completely new to the method. Equipping students with authentic research experiences early in their education is important regardless of the institution. However, cadets at a military academy must make decisions relatively early (the outset of their second year) as to what their career trajectory will be as eventual officers. In the new CASPiE-based experience, cadets are given the opportunity to select from one of three different modules (analytical chemistry, toxicology, and chemical engineering) in which to participate during the course. These three modules represent subsections of an overall Army waste-to-energy research project. Cadets generate unique hypotheses, real data, and research posters towards the advancement of the project. Posters are then presented in a session. that includes an audience of project stakeholders, course instructors, and other academy faculty and staff. Here, I will present my research methods, evaluative procedures, and findings in the affective domain, critical thinking, and laboratory content comprehension.

  5. Dispatcher Recognition of Stroke Using the National Academy Medical Priority Dispatch System

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Brian H; Starkman, Sidney; Eckstein, Marc; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Haines, Jill; Huang, Rainy; Colby, Daniel; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2009-01-01

    Background Emergency Medical Dispatchers (EMDs) play an important role in optimizing stroke care if they are able to accurately identify calls regarding acute cerebrovascular disease. This study was undertaken to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the current national protocol guiding dispatcher questioning of 911 callers to identify stroke, QA Guide v 11.1 of the National Academy Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS). Methods We identified all Los Angeles Fire Department paramedic transports of patients to UCLA Medical Center during the 12 month period from January to December 2005 in a prospectively maintained database. Dispatcher-assigned MPDS codes for each of these patient transports were abstracted from the paramedic run sheets and compared to final hospital discharge diagnosis. Results Among 3474 transported patients, 96 (2.8%) had a final diagnosis of stroke or transient ischemic attack. Dispatchers assigned a code of potential stroke to 44.8% of patients with a final discharge diagnosis of stroke or TIA. Dispatcher identification of stroke showed a sensitivity of 0.41, specificity of 0.96, positive predictive value of 0.45, and negative predictive value of 0.95. Conclusions Dispatcher recognition of stroke calls using the widely employed MPDS algorithm is suboptimal, with failure to identify more than half of stroke patients as likely stroke. Revisions to the current national dispatcher structured interview and complaint identification algorithm for stroke may facilitate more accurate recognition of stroke by EMDs. PMID:19390065

  6. Scientometric Analysis of the Journals of the Academy of Medical Sciences in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin; Zunic, Lejla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Currently in Bosnia and Herzegovina there are 25 journals in the field of biomedicine, 6 of them are indexed in Medline/PubMed base (Medical Archives, Materia Socio-Medica, Acta Informatica Medica, Acta Medica Academica, Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences (BJBMS) and Medical Glasnik), and one (BJBMS) is indexed in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE)/Web of Science base. Aim: The aim of this study was to show the scope of work of the journals that were published by Academy of Medical Sciences of Bosnia and Herzegovina - Medical Archives, Materia Socio-Medica and Acta Informatica Medica. Material and Methods: The research presents a meta-analysis of three journals, or their issues, during the calendar year 2015 (retrospective and descriptive character). Results: During 2015 calendar year a total of 286 articles were published (in Medical Archives 104 (36.3%), in Materia Socio-Medica 99 (34.6%), and in Acta Informatica Medica 83 (29%)). Original articles are present in the highest number in all three journals (in Medical Archives 80.7%, in Materia Socio Medica 77.7%, and in Acta Informatica Medica 68.6%). In Medical Archives, 90.3% of the articles were related to the field of clinical medicine. In Materia Socio-Medica, the domain of clinical medicine and public health was the most represented. Preclinical areas are most frequent in Acta Informatica Medica. The period of 50-60 days for a decision on the admission of article is most common in all three journals, with trend of shortening of that period. Articles came from 19 countries, mostly from Bosnia and Herzegovina, then from Iran, Kosovo, Saudi Arabia and Greece. Conclusion: In Medical Archives original articles in the field of clinical medicine (usually internal and surgical disciplines) are most often present, and that is the case in last four years. The number of articles in Materia Socio-Medica and Acta Informatica Medica is growing from year to year. In Materia Socio-Medica there is a

  7. Scientometric Analysis of the Journals of the Academy of Medical Sciences in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin; Zunic, Lejla

    2016-02-01

    Currently in Bosnia and Herzegovina there are 25 journals in the field of biomedicine, 6 of them are indexed in Medline/PubMed base (Medical Archives, Materia Socio-Medica, Acta Informatica Medica, Acta Medica Academica, Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences (BJBMS) and Medical Glasnik), and one (BJBMS) is indexed in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE)/Web of Science base. The aim of this study was to show the scope of work of the journals that were published by Academy of Medical Sciences of Bosnia and Herzegovina - Medical Archives, Materia Socio-Medica and Acta Informatica Medica. The research presents a meta-analysis of three journals, or their issues, during the calendar year 2015 (retrospective and descriptive character). During 2015 calendar year a total of 286 articles were published (in Medical Archives 104 (36.3%), in Materia Socio-Medica 99 (34.6%), and in Acta Informatica Medica 83 (29%)). Original articles are present in the highest number in all three journals (in Medical Archives 80.7%, in Materia Socio Medica 77.7%, and in Acta Informatica Medica 68.6%). In Medical Archives, 90.3% of the articles were related to the field of clinical medicine. In Materia Socio-Medica, the domain of clinical medicine and public health was the most represented. Preclinical areas are most frequent in Acta Informatica Medica. The period of 50-60 days for a decision on the admission of article is most common in all three journals, with trend of shortening of that period. Articles came from 19 countries, mostly from Bosnia and Herzegovina, then from Iran, Kosovo, Saudi Arabia and Greece. In Medical Archives original articles in the field of clinical medicine (usually internal and surgical disciplines) are most often present, and that is the case in last four years. The number of articles in Materia Socio-Medica and Acta Informatica Medica is growing from year to year. In Materia Socio-Medica there is a trend of growth of articles in the field of public health

  8. [The General Military Medical Department during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Kryuchkov, O A; Kulnev, S V; Taranov, S P

    2015-08-01

    The article is devoted to the contribution of the General Military Medical Department of the Red Army (GMMD) to organisation of health care support during the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945. In the summary you may follow the main ways of activity of the central governing body of medical (health) services of the Red. Army. The main focus of the article is made on conditions under which GMMD had to organize medical support of the Red. Army at the beginning of the war, the most difficult period of the Great Patriotic War. The authors payed attention to the forms and methods of the work of the head of GMMD and its subordinate departments under the conditions of rapidly changing environment of combat and rear situation, as well as interaction with GMMD People Commissariat of Health. The authors tried to highlight not well known but not less important moments in the activities of the Red Army GMMD.

  9. The Voroshilov Lectures. Materials from the Soviet General Staff Academy, Volume 2: Issues of Soviet Military Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    established "as the highest politico -military organ of the country," although this was not publicly disclosed until later (1976). The lectures dis...possible dangers in politico -military and mili- tary situations, and to determine accordingly the most appropri- ate (rational) form of action for the...forecast, rationally and elaborately, the possible changes in politico -military and military situations, and to determine accord- ingly the most

  10. Infection prevention and control in deployed military medical treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Hospenthal, Duane R; Green, Andrew D; Crouch, Helen K; English, Judith F; Pool, Jane; Yun, Heather C; Murray, Clinton K

    2011-08-01

    Infections have complicated the care of combat casualties throughout history and were at one time considered part of the natural history of combat trauma. Personnel who survived to reach medical care were expected to develop and possibly succumb to infections during their care in military hospitals. Initial care of war wounds continues to focus on rapid surgical care with debridement and irrigation, aimed at preventing local infection and sepsis with bacteria from the environment (e.g., clostridial gangrene) or the casualty's own flora. Over the past 150 years, with the revelation that pathogens can be spread from patient to patient and from healthcare providers to patients (including via unwashed hands of healthcare workers, the hospital environment and fomites), a focus on infection prevention and control aimed at decreasing transmission of pathogens and prevention of these infections has developed. Infections associated with combat-related injuries in the recent operations in Iraq and Afghanistan have predominantly been secondary to multidrug-resistant pathogens, likely acquired within the military healthcare system. These healthcare-associated infections seem to originate throughout the system, from deployed medical treatment facilities through the chain of care outside of the combat zone. Emphasis on infection prevention and control, including hand hygiene, isolation, cohorting, and antibiotic control measures, in deployed medical treatment facilities is essential to reducing these healthcare-associated infections. This review was produced to support the Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update contained in this supplement of Journal of Trauma.

  11. Coast Guard. Cost for the Naval Academy Preparatory School and Profile of Military Enrollment. Report to the Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Resources, Community, and Economic Development Div.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) conducted a study for two purposes: (1) to verify how much it costs the Coast Guard to send a student to the Naval Academy Preparatory School in preparation for the Coast Guard Academy and explain what is included in the cost; and (2) to determine to what extent the school is helping the minority profile at the…

  12. The prevalence of medical symptoms in military aircrew.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Barak; Erlich, Yifat; Carmon, Erez

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of medical symptoms in aviators has not been described in the medical literature. An anonymous questionnaire was handed to all Israeli Air Force aviators who went through the routine yearly examination. Because only two women filled the questionnaire, we excluded them. The questionnaire contained a list of 49 symptoms and the aviators were asked to mark symptoms that were present in the last month before the examination as well as age, estimated weekly flying hours, military service status (reserve or career) and type of aircraft (jet-fighter, helicopter or transport). A general linear model was used to determine the association between age, weekly flying hours, type of aircraft and type of service with the number of symptoms. Binary logistic regression analyses was used to assess the association of these factors with lack of symptoms, and the top five ranking symptoms. Data was available for 323 male aviators. 62.5% of the aviators reported at least one symptom in the previous month. 26.9% reported three or more symptoms. 25.1% reported spinal symptoms, 22% respiratory symptoms, 21.4% fatigue, 11.5% headache and 6.5% general weakness. Career service was associated with the number of symptoms, fatigue and general weakness. Age was associated with fatigue and general weakness. Aircraft type and weekly flying hours were not associated with any symptom. Medical symptoms are prevalent in military aviators. Career personnel report on medical symptoms, especially fatigue, more often than reserve personnel. Further study is warranted to examine this association.

  13. Admitting Deserving Medical Students from Rural and Disadvantaged: Patan Academy of Health Sciences' Approach.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, S K; Bhandary, S; Bhandari, D B; Dulal, R K; Baral, K P; Gongal, R N; Acharya, P K; Shrestha, S; Shah, J N; Karki, A

    2017-01-01

    Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS) aims to produce physicians who would be able and willing to serve in the rural areas. Recognizing the critical importance of student selection strategy, among others, in achieving the program goals, it has adopted an innovative scheme for selecting medical students. This paper describes PAHS medical student selection scheme that favors enrollment of deserving applicants from rural and disadvantaged groups so as to help improve distribution of physicians in rural Nepal. A student admission committee comprising a group of medical educators finalized a three-step student selection scheme linked with scholarships after reviewing relevant literatures and consultative meetings with experts within and outside Nepal. The committee did local validation of Personal Quality Assessment (PQA) that tested cognitive ability and personality traits, Admission OSPE (Objective Structured Performance Examination) that assessed non-cognitive attributes of applicants. It also provided preferential credits to applicants' socio-economic characteristics to favor the enrollment of deserving applicants from rural and disadvantaged groups through Social Inclusion Matrix (SIM). Three different categories of scholarship schemes namely Partial, Collaborative and Full were devised with Partial providing 50% and other two categories each providing 100% coverage of tuition fee. PAHS student selection scheme succeeded in enrolling more than half of its students from rural areas of Nepal, including about 10% of the students from that of the most backward region of the country. About one third of students were female and about the same were from public and community school. Sixty percent of students receive different categories of scholarships. Limited findings indicate the success of the selection scheme in enrolling high proportion of applicants from rural and disadvantageous groups and enable them to pursue study by providing scholarships.

  14. [Textbook of surgery by W. Schultze, used at the Tokyo Medical Academy in the early Meiji era].

    PubMed

    Koseki, T

    1993-06-01

    Wilhelm Schultze, Professor of Surgery of the Tokyo Medical Academy, wrote "Vortraege der Allgemeine Chirurgie" for the benefit of his students in about 1880. The author examined this book and concluded that it was based upon "Lehrbuch der Chirurgie und Operationslehre" by Prof. Adolf Bardeleben, his teacher at the Charité in Berlin. Schultze's textbook was translated into Japanese and published by G. Yamazaki and U. Ishiguro, his students at the Tokyo Medical Academy, in 1884. This version was widely used as a textbook in many medical schools at that time, as well as S. Sato's translation of "Die Allgemeine Chirurgische Pathologie und Therapie" written by Prof. Theodor Billroth. The author found and introduced two different Japanese versions of Schultze's textbook printed without permission.

  15. The Ecology of Medical Care Among Israeli Military Aviators.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Barak; Levy, Yuval; Yemini, Tal; Carmon, Erez; Erlich, Yifat; Hermoni, Doron

    2016-12-01

    The ecology of medical care model has been used in various populations with varying results. We aimed to apply this model in the population of Israeli Air Force (IAF) aviators. An anonymous questionnaire was presented to all Israeli Air Force aviators during their mandatory yearly check-up over 1 yr starting on November 26th, 2012. The questionnaire contained items on demographic, personal, and military details, as well as items on the presence of clinical symptoms, and various health care contacts in the previous month. We assessed the differences between career and reserve personnel using a X2 test. There were 325 aviators who completed the questionnaire (2 women, 132 reserves). Clinical symptoms were reported by 62.5% of the responders. Over half (52.6%) had any health care encounter: 23.7% with a dentist, 17.9% with non-MD therapists, 12.6% with a specialist, and 11.7% with a primary physician. A significant difference between reserve and career personnel was found only in primary care visits. Out of the aviators who reported having clinical symptoms, 70.9% did not visit a physician. Of those who did not seek medical care, 42.4% reported that the symptoms were viewed as unimportant, 41% thought they would disappear by themselves, 40.3% could not find time for treatment. Aviators in the IAF have similar rate of clinical symptoms as in other unselected populations. Those who report symptoms usually do not visit a physician for treatment. When they do seek advice it is mostly from non-MD practitioners.Gordon B, Levy Y, Yemini T, Carmon E, Erlich Y, Hermoni D. The ecology of medical care among Israeli military aviators. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(12):1036-1040.

  16. [Iconography of N.I.Pirogov in "Military-medical magazine"].

    PubMed

    Poddubnyĭ, M V

    2010-11-01

    The portraits of Pirogov on the covers of the "Military medical magazine" for the period 1944-2010 were analyzed. During this period, we can count at least 11 different covers of "Military medical magazine" and 10 variants of Pirogov's portrait on it. We have no documents about the causes of changing scenes. Obviously, the initiative emanated from the publisher.

  17. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Interprofessional Education in Nutrition as an Essential Component of Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Hark, Lisa A; Deen, Darwin

    2017-07-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) should play a significant role in educating medical students, residents, fellows, and physicians in practice. The more physicians learn about the effectiveness of nutrition for the prevention and treatment of noncommunicable diseases, the more likely they are to consult with RDNs and refer patients for medical nutrition therapy. The more interprofessional education that occurs between medical students, other health professional students, and RDNs, the more likely all health care professionals will understand and value the role of the RDN in improving the quality of care provided to patients. The training and experience of RDNs make them uniquely qualified for the role of educating medical students about nutrition as it relates to health and disease. This position paper provides RDNs with the tools and language to emphasize to medical educators, course directors, curriculum committees, medical school deans, residency and fellowship directors, physicians, and other health professionals in training and practice how ongoing nutrition counseling and management, conducted by an RDN, can benefit their patients. Specific teaching settings and examples for RDNs to take a leadership role (paid and unpaid positions) in ensuring that future physicians discuss nutrition, healthy lifestyle, and physical activity with their patients, consult with RDNs, and refer patients for medical nutrition therapy are presented. This position paper supports interprofessional education in nutrition as an essential component of medical education. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Definitive treatment of combat casualties at military medical centers.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Romney C; Frisch, H Michael; Farber, Gerald L; Hayda, Roman A

    2006-01-01

    More than 9,000 casualties have been evacuated during the current conflict, and more than 40,000 orthopaedic surgical procedures have been performed. The most severely injured patients are treated in the United States at military medical centers. Individualized reconstructive plans are developed, and patients are treated with state-of-the-art techniques. Rehabilitation includes the assistance of the physical medicine and rehabilitation, physical therapy, and occupational therapy services, as well as, when necessary, psychiatric or other services. The extreme challenges of treating war-related soft-tissue defects include neurovascular injuries, burns, heterotopic ossification, infection, prolonged recovery, and persistent pain. Such injuries do not allow full restoration of function. Because of such devastating injuries, and despite use of up-to-date methods, outcomes can be less than optimal.

  19. Developing a pharmaceutical formulary for joint military medical operations.

    PubMed

    Caouette, Marc L

    2005-02-01

    This article describes the development of a standardized formulary for medical contingency operations for any theater of operations. The article compares peacetime health care systems within the Department of Defense and the formulary systems developed and used within the fixed facility environment with Department of Defense contingency health care operations systems and the complications encountered while attempting formulary development for the deployed environment. Despite great difficulties, the Joint Readiness Clinical Advisory Board developed, published, and marketed a jointly approved, standardized, modernized formulary to assist forces deploying for Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. The process used by the Joint Readiness Clinical Advisory Board during formulary development is described in detail, giving readers an understanding of the foundations of the Joint Deployment Formulary. The military departments will experience the benefits of enhanced supply chain predictability and responsiveness, increased clinician satisfaction, and improved patient safety and health care quality by implementing the Joint Deployment Formulary for their forces engaged in contingency operations.

  20. Improving combat casualty care and field medicine: focus on the military medic.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, R A

    1997-04-01

    As military medicine in general copes with a rapidly changing world environment, so too must the backbone of the medical force, the enlisted medic. To meet these challenges, the training and utilization of military medics must match new and different missions. This paper will explore innovative approaches to training and preparing for combat casualty care and field medicine. The focus will fall on the education, evaluation, operations, patient-care skills, equipment, and telemedicine potential of the military medic. Future directions for study and development will be suggested. Exploration of the following may improve the capability of the military medic: (1) improved training to include advanced-level skills and interventions for combat casualty care and broader exposure to the casualties expected in operations other than war; (2) annual educational and periodic proficiency evaluation requirements; (3) strengthened medical control at all echelons; and (4) carefully selected additional equipment and technologies to enhance medical capabilities.

  1. Quality assurance in military medical research and medical radiation accident management.

    PubMed

    Hotz, Mark E; Meineke, Viktor

    2012-08-01

    The provision of quality radiation-related medical diagnostic and therapeutic treatments cannot occur without the presence of robust quality assurance and standardization programs. Medical laboratory services are essential in patient treatment and must be able to meet the needs of all patients and the clinical personnel responsible for the medical care of these patients. Clinical personnel involved in patient care must embody the quality assurance process in daily work to ensure program sustainability. In conformance with the German Federal Government's concept for modern departmental research, the international standard ISO 9001, one of the relevant standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), is applied in quality assurance in military medical research. By its holistic approach, this internationally accepted standard provides an excellent basis for establishing a modern quality management system in line with international standards. Furthermore, this standard can serve as a sound basis for the further development of an already established quality management system when additional standards shall apply, as for instance in reference laboratories or medical laboratories. Besides quality assurance, a military medical facility must manage additional risk events in the context of early recognition/detection of health risks of military personnel on deployment in order to be able to take appropriate preventive and protective measures; for instance, with medical radiation accident management. The international standard ISO 31000:2009 can serve as a guideline for establishing risk management. Clear organizational structures and defined work processes are required when individual laboratory units seek accreditation according to specific laboratory standards. Furthermore, international efforts to develop health laboratory standards must be reinforced that support sustainable quality assurance, as in the exchange and comparison of test results within

  2. Medication dispensing errors in a French military hospital pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Bohand, Xavier; Aupée, Olivier; Le Garlantezec, Patrick; Mullot, Hélène; Lefeuvre, Leslie; Simon, Laurent

    2009-08-01

    To determine the rate and the primary types of medication dispensing errors detected by pharmacists during implementation of a unit dose drug dispensing system. The central pharmacy at the Percy French military hospital (France). The check of the unit dose medication cassettes was performed by pharmacists to identify dispensing errors before delivering to the care units. From April 2006 to December 2006, detected errors were corrected and recorded into seven categories: unauthorized drug, wrong dosage-form, improper dose, omission, wrong time, deteriorated drug, and wrong patient errors. Dispensing error rate, calculated by dividing the total of detected errors by the total of filled and omitted doses; classification of recorded dispensing errors. During the study, 9,719 unit dose medication cassettes were filled by pharmacy technicians. Pharmacists detected 706 errors for a total of 88,609 filled and omitted unit doses. An overall error rate of 0.80% was found. There were approximately 0.07 detected dispensing errors per medication cassette. The most common error types were improper dose errors (n = 265, 37.5%) and omission errors (n = 186, 26.3%). Many causes may probably explain the occurrence of dispensing errors, including communication failures, problems related to drug labeling or packaging, distractions, interruptions, heavy workload, and difficulties in reading handwriting prescriptions. The results showed that a wide range of errors occurred during the dispensing process. A check performed after the initial medication selection is also necessary to detect and correct dispensing errors. In order to decrease the occurrence of dispensing errors, some practical measures have been implemented in the central pharmacy. But because some dispensing errors may remain undetected, there is a requirement to develop other strategies that reduce or eliminate these errors. The pharmacy staff is widely involved in this duty.

  3. "Make Sure You're Not Getting Yourself in Trouble:" Building Sexual Relationships and Preventing Sexual Violence at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

    PubMed

    Arbeit, Miriam R

    2016-08-05

    Sexual violence continues to present a problem on college campuses nationwide and among members of the U.S. military. This study attended to patterns of response in how students (cadets) at the U.S. Military Academy (West Point) discussed sexual and romantic relationships, both potential and actual, in order to examine how, if at all, they enact their sexuality-related values. Constructivist grounded theory was used to analyze semistructured interviews with three male and three female cadets from each of the 4 years of the undergraduate program, in which they are intended to become "leaders of character" who will serve as Army officers. Findings indicated limitations in cadets' access to developing and implementing sexuality-related skills within this context. Cadets' fear and distrust erected barriers to their pursuing their desires; the ways in which cadets avoided getting in trouble for sexual harassment or sexual assault shifted responsibility from a potential perpetrator onto a potential victim; and cadets were caught in dilemmas regarding romantic relationships as sources of both emotional support and social stigma. These findings have implications for promoting gender equity and for preventing sexual violence at this institution and at others like it, including both university campuses and other military settings.

  4. A Model Midshipman: Factors Related to Academic and Military Success of Prior Enlisted Midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    40 1. Plebe Year Academic Performance..................................................40 2. First Class Year Academic Performance...43 3. Plebe Military Performance..............................................................44 4. First...41 Table 5. Plebe Year CAQPR Regression Output

  5. How medical students use the computer and Internet at a Turkish military medical school.

    PubMed

    Kir, Tayfun; Ogur, Recai; Kilic, Selim; Tekbas, Omer Faruk; Hasde, Metin

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how medical students use the computer and World Wide Web at a Turkish military medical school and to discuss characteristics related to this computer use. The study was conducted in 2003 in the Department of Public Health at the Gulhane Military Medical School in Ankara, Turkey. A survey developed by the authors was distributed to 508 students, after pretest. Responses were analyzed statistically by using a computer. Most of the students (86.4%) could access a computer and the Internet and all of the computers that were used by students had Internet connections, and a small group (8.9%) had owned their own computers. One-half of the students use notes provided by attending stuff and textbooks as assistant resources for their studies. The most common usage of computers was connecting to the Internet (91.9%), and the most common use of the Internet was e-mail communication (81.6%). The most preferred site category for daily visit was newspaper sites (62.8%). Approximately 44.1% of students visited medical sites when they were surfing. Also, there was a negative correlation between school performance and the time spent for computer and Internet use (-0.056 and -0.034, respectively). It was observed that medical students used the computer and Internet essentially for nonmedical purposes. To encourage students to use the computer and Internet for medical purposes, tutors should use the computer and Internet during their teaching activities, and software companies should produce assistant applications for medical students. Also, medical schools should build interactive World Wide Web sites, e-mail groups, discussion boards, and study areas for medical students.

  6. Using Educational Psychology Courses at a Military Academy to Help Foster Mentoring Relationships between Officers and Cadets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Jordan, Mark H.; Guerrero, Camilo

    2008-01-01

    In the "hands on" mentoring program describing in this paper, cadets enrolled in a traditional undergraduate Educational Psychology course at the U.S. Air Force Academy) were mentored by Air Officer Commanders (AOCs) enrolled in a graduate level Educational Psychology course. This mentoring program was ideal for both groups of students, as the…

  7. The Soviet Military Education System for Commissioning and Training Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    Organization; Instructor Complement; Curriculum; Manpower Levels; Military Academies; Other Advanced Officer Training; The Military Academy of the General Staff; Post Graduate Programs ; Central Hierarchy; Overall Manpower Estimates.

  8. [From the history of military-medical examination in the Far East (to the 60th anniversary of the 4th Branch of the Main center of military-medical examination of the Ministry of Defense of RF)].

    PubMed

    Pashkovskiĭ, R D

    2013-09-01

    Military-medical examination is a part of medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation and plays a significant role in recruiting military troops with healthy, physically vigorous soldiers, in saving and improving of health of military personnel, in undertaking prophylaxis and therapeutic measures, in solving social problems of servicemen and their families. Military-medical examination board of Eastern Command plays a significant role in the system of military-medical examination of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. The article is devoted to the history of formation and development of military-medical examination in the Far East depending on aims and goals of military-medical service at different stages of military formation. Eastern Command dated back to the Civil War, has changed its organization, boundaries, structure and name many times. According these changes many new military-medical departments, including military-medical examination board, were reorganized, disbanded and created. Various military-medical commissions alternating or working simultaneously at different military units were created in the Far East.

  9. A PERSPECTIVE ON MILITARY MEDICAL SERVICE ROLE IN STABILIZATION OPERATIONS: EXPANSION OF AIR FORCE MEDICAL SERVICE CAPABILITIES INMEDICAL DIPLOMACY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-06

    iv Abstract This research paper advocates that the US military health workers will be more effective in medical diplomacy than their NGO...environments, civilian aid workers are restricted in conducting their missions creating a critical “gap” in rebuilding health care infrastructure in...in stabilizing the area. The military health workers through medical diplomacy with early intervention during the transition phase can assist the JTF

  10. Military medical surge capacity in times of war and natural disaster.

    PubMed

    Eiseman, Ben; Chandler, James G

    2006-01-01

    The military medical services need demand-based strategies to ensure the best possible care of the injured in combat and natural disasters without compromising peacetime health care commitments at home and abroad. A review of steps that have already been taken suggests that they are being used to their fullest extent commensurate with the public will. In fact, the situation has driven preliminary exploration of a special health care personnel draft. We believe the answer lies not in expanding the full-time, active duty US medical and nursing corps, but rather in tapping identifiable reservoirs of trained trauma care physicians, nurses, and allied health care workers in the United States and elsewhere. A rudimentary analysis suggests the most promising novel considerations are: developing special, trauma-trained reserve units within the US civilian trauma care community; seeking temporary attachments of an allied country's military medical officers, or a complete medical battalion; and contracting with US and foreign trauma surgeons, nurses and allied health personnel through a medical private military firm, analogous to those that have provided food, housing, transportation, and special combat units in support of our major military campaigns and peacekeeping operations. These considerations have important pros and cons that deserve in-depth evaluation by the best military and civilian trauma/critical care and organizational minds within a structured organization committed to the needs of military medicine. We believe that a Military Medical Think Tank within the Uniformed Services University's postgraduate division should be that organization.

  11. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons/Orthopaedic Trauma Associations/Pediatric Orthopaedic Association Disaster Response and Preparedness Course.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anthony E; Gerlinger, Tad L; Born, Christopher T

    2015-10-01

    A disaster is a catastrophic event that disrupts normal infrastructure to such a degree that normal response mechanisms and capabilities cannot manage what is required to respond appropriately to the event. Launched after the largest urban disaster in modern history--the 2010 Haiti Earthquake--the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons/Orthopaedic Trauma Association/Pediatric Orthopaedic Association of North America (AAOS/SOMOS/OTA/POSNA) Disaster Response Course (DRC) is designed to prepare orthopaedic surgeons for service in disaster response and humanitarian assistance efforts in both the acute phases as well as in the recovery and reconstructions phases. To date, 395 orthopaedic surgeons have completed the DRC and 286 (72.4%) have opted to become registered disaster responders.

  12. Health Services Management Education On-Site at a Military Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stephen J.; Poss, W. Bradley; Cupp, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A cooperative educational program with the U.S. military is described to illustrate a unique opportunity that confronted a graduate healthcare management program. The resulting degree program supported the military's operational medical mission but also presented interesting and unexpected challenges resulting from the wars in Iraq and…

  13. Health Services Management Education On-Site at a Military Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stephen J.; Poss, W. Bradley; Cupp, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A cooperative educational program with the U.S. military is described to illustrate a unique opportunity that confronted a graduate healthcare management program. The resulting degree program supported the military's operational medical mission but also presented interesting and unexpected challenges resulting from the wars in Iraq and…

  14. The Military and Society. Proceedings of the Military History Symposium (5th), United States Air Force Academy, 5-6 October 1972,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-01-01

    that disparate nature o from the project a comprehended, ev The papers 1968, together wi participated in t Academy in 196 The success of thiHistory, in...nature of the discussions leading potential publishers to shy away from the project and the significance of the event not having yet been fully...Monte D. Wright and Lawrence J. Paszek. Washington. USOPO. 1973. (For sale by the Superintendent of Documents. USGPO. Washington. DC 20402 0l.60, stock

  15. Prevalence of use of erectile dysfunction medication by Dutch military personnel between 2003 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Janssen, D G A; Vermetten, E; Egberts, T C G; Heerdink, E R

    2017-03-01

    Use of ED medication can be seen as a marker for ED. ED is associated with increasing age, exposure to traumatic events and physical injuries in military veterans. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of use of ED medication in Dutch military personnel in the period 2003-2012 and to assess its association with age and psychotropic medication use. Data on dispensing of ED medication, age and co-medication with psychotropic medication of all Dutch military personnel between 2003 and 2012 were collected. The prevalence of ED medication use in each year was estimated, stratified for age and use of psychotropic medication. The number of ED medication users increased a hundredfold from 0.09 to 9.29 per 1000 per year between 2003 and 2012. ED medication was more often used by men over 40 than under 40 (prevalence in 2012: 2.4% vs 0.2%, OR (2003-2012, adjusted for calendar year) 15.6, 95% CI 13.5-17.9) and by men using psychotropic medication (prevalence in 2012: 3.8% vs 0.9%, OR (2003-2012, adjusted for calendar year) 3.13, 95% CI 2.66-3.67). This study shows a strong increase between 2003 and 2012 in a number of ED medication users in male Dutch military personnel. ED medication use increases with age and with psychotropic medication use.

  16. A study of prehospital medical documentation by military medical providers during precombat training.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Adam B; Mott, Jeffrey C; Kotwal, Russ S

    2015-01-01

    Documentation of medical care provided is paramount for improving performance and ultimately reducing morbidity and mortality. However, documentation of prehospital trauma care on the battlefield has historically been suboptimal. Modernization of prehospital documentation tools have aligned data and information to be gathered with up-to-date treatment being rendered through Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) protocols and practices. Our study was conducted to evaluate TCCC Card completion, and accuracy of card completion, by military medical providers conducting precombat training through the Tactical Combat Medical Care Course. Study results do not show a deficiency in TCCC documentation training as provided by this course which should translate to adequate ability to accurately document prehospital trauma care on the battlefield. Leadership emphasis and community acceptance is required to increase compliance with prehospital documentation.

  17. Criticism of American, British, European and Classical Authors: A Selective Bibliography of Books in the United States Military Academy Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Margaret, Comp.

    The purpose of this bibliography is to provide critical, literary commentaries on the works of American, British, and classical authors, found in general literature books. Selection of authors was accomplished on the basis of West Point military cadets' choices of topics for their annual English papers; alphabetical listings of citations (from…

  18. [The history of military training at the First Moscow State Medical University n.a. I.M.Sechenov].

    PubMed

    Chizh, I M; Putilo, V M; Tregubov, V N; Timakov, V V

    2011-11-01

    In 2011, the oldest medical educational institution of Russia--the First Moscow State Medical University n. a. I.M.Sechenov celebrates 85 years of military training. Passing not easy, but at the same time, glorious path of military training in First MGMU n. a. I.M.Sechenov today occupies a key place in the training of military physicians.

  19. Graduate Medical Education and Military Medicine: Report of a Study by a Committee of the Institute of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    Graduate medical education (GME) in the military services was investigated with respect to the following concerns: the maximum capacity of each military medical department to conduct GME programs in its own hospital; how these programs affect the recruitment and retention of military physicians; and the optimal sizes of such programs. It is…

  20. [Improvement of the system of medical equipmet rationing for military units during the wartime].

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, Iu V; Goriachev, A B; Popov, A A; Morgunov, V A; Ryzhikov, M V; Merkulov, A V

    2013-07-01

    The authors analyze new legal regulatory document--Medical equipment and reserves supply rate for military units and organisations of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation, developed in the process of modernization of the system of medical equipment rationing for military units. New legal regulatory document was developed with the aim to replace the similar document d.d 1996-1997. The authors came to conclusion that costs of new medical equipment and reserves supply rates are similar to previous rates. At the same time costs new medical equipment supply rates for medical service increased more than 25%. It is related to change of the role of medical service in the system of medical supply of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. Modernization of the system of medical equipment supply rates for military unit of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation, performed for the purpose of medical supplement for military unit in accordance with new state of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation, allowed to actualize the regulatory framework of medical supply by means of development and adoption of new Supply and reserves rates be the Ministry of defence. Use if these rates will increase effectiveness and quality of medical supply during the wartime, provide a commonality of reserves of medical equipment and maintenance of established level of combat readiness of medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

  1. [Prophylactic medical examination of state frontier military personnel of Ukraine: state and perspective of the development].

    PubMed

    Mehed', V P

    2008-01-01

    The article presents main indices obtained from prophylactic medical examination of state frontier military personnel of Ukraine for the period from 2005 till 2007 years, shortcomings found and ways of their correction.

  2. An examination of the role of military medical chief information officer.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Mark; Thatcher, Jason; Roberts, Nicholas; Carter, Michelle

    2012-07-01

    Although research has described the roles, responsibilities, and skills of effective chief information officers (CIOs) in for-profit organizations, little is known regarding the traits and skills that characterize effective military medical CIOs. This study identifies skills a military medical CIO needs to act as a technology strategist who can successfully identify information technology (IT) innovations and convert those innovations into organizational health IT solutions. We assessed the level of necessary informational, decisional, and interpersonal skills in a cross-sectional survey of 48 military medical CIOs. We also compared military medical CIO characteristics to general CIO characteristics. Our results show that both decisional and interpersonal skills are strongly related to informational skills necessary to convert innovations into organizational IT solutions. Further, decisional skills are strongly related to a CIO's ability to act as a technology strategist. Our study provides implications for research and practice.

  3. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates at the Military Medical Academy in Ankara, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kisa, Ozgul; Albay, Ali; Baylan, Orhan; Tozkoparan, Ergun; Acikel, Cengiz Han; Doganci, Levent

    2007-05-01

    Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from infected individuals can play an important role in tracking the source of infection and unraveling the epidemiology of a tuberculosis pandemic. A total of 114 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by spoligotyping and results were compared with an international spoligotype database (SpoIDB4). Twenty-one spoligotyping-defined clusters including 97 patients were established, and an additional 17 unique patterns were found. Ninety-eight (85.9%) isolates belonged to previously defined shared types (STs). The ST53 (ill-defined T1 superfamily, n=31), ST41 (LAM7-TUR family, n=9), ST118 (T undefined, n=8) and ST50 (Haarlem 3, n=6) were four major clusters of our isolates. After comparison with the international SpoIDB4 database, two new intrafile clusters, ST2136 and ST2139, were created and two new interfile clusters, ST2135 and ST2140, were defined. Eight (7%) of the 17 isolates with unique patterns were found to be orphans, whereas the STs of 9 isolates had previously been deposited in the international SpoIDB4 database. In addition, two isolates with an ST pattern characteristic of the Beijing family of M. tuberculosis were found. This study shows that, although ubiquitous spoligotypes are common, several spoligotypes specific to Turkey also exist. Thus, our study may help us to better understand the spread of M. tuberculosis genotypes to Turkey.

  4. The effectiveness of technology-enhanced relaxation techniques for military medical warriors.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Melba C; Kaloi-Chen, Janalle Y; Turner, David D; Bouchard, Stéphane; Riva, Giuseppe; Wiederhold, Brenda K

    2011-09-01

    Combat zones can be very stressful for those in the area. Even in the battlefield, military medical personnel are expected to save others, while also staying alive. In this study, half of a sample of deployed military medical warriors (total n = 60) participated in technology-assisted relaxation training. Learning relaxation skills with a video clip of virtual reality relaxing scenes showed a statistically significant impact on the anxiety levels of the Experimental Group.

  5. Humanitarian military medical mission in a postconflict environment: lessons from Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Hubner, M E; Ditzler, Thomas F

    2004-09-01

    In the aftermath of a genocidal civil war, the Government of Cambodia is left with major deficiencies in its healthcare system. This article recounts a military medical mission to Cambodia; the authors describe the objectives of the mission and provide a summary of the lessons learned. Specific areas of concern include healthcare infrastructure, logistics, standards of care, social traditions, organizational issues and potential problems in civil-military collaboration. This report is offered as a heuristic device to illuminate some of the issues that can mediate the success of military medical missions in postconflict environments.

  6. Why military personnel fail to keep medical appointments.

    PubMed

    Thornton, R; Ballard, K

    2008-03-01

    Failure to keep medical appointments, commonly referred to as 'Did Not Attend' (DNA), is a frequent problem in both primary and secondary health care and leads to a waste of valuable resources. Although the reasons for DNA within the general population are well documented, little is known about this behaviour amongst people serving in the armed forces. In this paper we report the findings of a questionnaire-based study investigating the reasons why military personnel fail to keep hospital appointments. A postal questionnaire asking questions about the reasons for not attending the appointment and how they perceived the condition for which treatment had been sought, were sent to 167 military patients known to have missed appointments in either a hospital outpatient department or regional rehabilitation unit. 162 controls, who attended appointments, were also sent a questionnaire asking them about factors leading to their appointment and how they perceived the condition that they attended the appointment for. Illness perception was measured using a previously validated Illness perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R). The controls were matched by rank, gender and corps. The overall response rate was 51.5%, with 46% response in the DNA group and 55% in the controls. A previous history of hospital DNA (though not DNA in primary care) and attempting to change the appointment date were associated with DNA (p = 0.01). Those who received a reminder about the appointment were less likely to DNA (p < or = 0.001). Although patients who perceived their condition to be less important were more likely to fail to attend their appointment (p = 0.01), illness perception as measured on the IPQ-R, was not associated with appointment attendance. The most frequent reasons cited for missed appointments were due to administrative problems, with many (38%) respondents being simply unaware that they had an appointment at all or believing that they had cancelled it (14%). Forgetting the appointment

  7. Are Military and Medical Ethics Necessarily Incompatible? A Canadian Case Study.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Christiane; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2016-12-01

    Military physicians are often perceived to be in a position of 'dual loyalty' because they have responsibilities towards their patients but also towards their employer, the military institution. Further, they have to ascribe to and are bound by two distinct codes of ethics (i.e., medical and military), each with its own set of values and duties, that could at first glance be considered to be very different or even incompatible. How, then, can military physicians reconcile these two codes of ethics and their distinct professional/institutional values, and assume their responsibilities towards both their patients and the military institution? To clarify this situation, and to show how such a reconciliation might be possible, we compared the history and content of two national professional codes of ethics: the Defence Ethics of the Canadian Armed Forces and the Code of Ethics of the Canadian Medical Association. Interestingly, even if the medical code is more focused on duties and responsibility while the military code is more focused on core values and is supported by a comprehensive ethical training program, they also have many elements in common. Further, both are based on the same core values of loyalty and integrity, and they are broad in scope but are relatively flexible in application. While there are still important sources of tension between and limits within these two codes of ethics, there are fewer differences than may appear at first glance because the core values and principles of military and medical ethics are not so different.

  8. Endocrine and Metabolic Changes during Exhaustive Multifactorial Military Stress. Results from Studies during the Ranger Training Course of the Norwegian Military Academy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    from wrist actigraphy (Vitalog) and from our own and officers’ observation, the cadets’ sleep during the course has been estimated to 1-3 hours totally...infantry activities around the clock corresponding to 35 % of their maximal oxygen uptake (Waldum and Huser 1974, Aakvaag et al 1978a) as measured by...and granulocytes during a 5-day military training course with heavy physical activities , sleep and energy deficiency. The experiments were performed

  9. The Voroshilov Lectures. Materials from the Soviet General Staff Academy. Volume 1. Issues of Soviet Military Strategy,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    responsibility . He was imprisoned again twice (and tortured) and finally allowed to retire by order of the Minister of Defense. During this period, he...Programs Soviet Research Team. Lieutenant Colonel (Ret.) John G. Hines: Senior Research Analyst, Rand Corporation , Washington, D.C. Colonel Ali Amad...dialectical response from other senior military personnel in subsequent articles, the Gastilovich article posited radical changes for the Soviet Armed

  10. Training and Educating Army Officers for the 21st Century: Implications for the United States Military Academy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-11

    accept nontraditional roles.1,2 A WHOLE NEW PLAYING FIELD I contend that many issues in this new Information era will have extreme relevancy to the...comfort and stability of a middle-class life is utterly unknown, find war and a barracks existence a step up.൘ It is obvious that the Information ... era offers tremendous implications for our future military leaders. They will need to be flexible enough to adapt to these new challenges

  11. [Human microecology studies at Department of Microbiology with Virology and Immunology, I.M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy].

    PubMed

    Vorob'ev, A A; Bykov, A S; Boĭchenko, M N; Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Pashkov, E P; Mironov, A Iu; Budanova, E V; Seleznev, A S; Khoroshko, N V; Zudenkov, A E; Solntseva, V K

    2001-01-01

    Studies of human microflora in health and disease and during exposure to professional and ecological factors is a traditional problem solved for many years by staff members of Department of Microbiology with Virology and Immunology, I. M. Setchenov Moscow Medical Academy. The purpose of research is to develop methods and means for diagnosis and prevention of human microbiocenosis disorders. Fundamental and applied research in cooperation with prophylactic and clinical institutions and departments yielded data contributing to solution of many pressing problems in prevention and diagnosis of infectious diseases.

  12. Non-medical aspects of civilian-military collaboration in management of major incidents.

    PubMed

    Khorram-Manesh, A; Lönroth, H; Rotter, P; Wilhelmsson, M; Aremyr, J; Berner, A; Andersson, A Nero; Carlström, E

    2017-03-02

    Disasters and major incidents demand a multidisciplinary management. Recent experiences from terrorist attacks worldwide have resulted in a search for better assessment of the needs, resources, and knowledge in the medical and non-medical management of these incidents and also actualized the need for collaboration between civilian and military healthcare. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the civilian-military collaboration in a Swedish context with the main focus on its non-medical management. An exercise, simulating a foreign military attack centrally on Swedish soil, was designed, initiated, and conducted by a team consisting of civilian and military staff. Data were collected prospectively and evaluated by an expert team. Specific practical and technical issues were presented in collaboration between civilian and military staffs. In addition, shortcomings in decision-making, follow-up, communication, and collaboration due to prominent lack of training and exercising the tasks and positions in all managerial levels of the hospital were identified. Current social and political unrests and terror attacks worldwide necessitate civilian-military collaboration. Such collaboration, however, needs to be synchronized and adjusted to avoid preventable medical and non-medical consequences. Simulation exercises might be one important source to improve such collaboration.

  13. Military Interaction With Nongovernmental Organizations: A Comparison of Medical Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    viewpoints or frames of reference ( Leininger , 1985, 5). This study has two primary stakeholders: military commanders seeking concise military goals...possible the totality of whatever is being studied in the context of respondents’ viewpoints or frames of reference ( Leininger , 1985, p. 5). This...www.smartmoney.com/mag/ index.cfm?story=dec01-charities. Internet. Accessed on 24 April 2003. Leininger , Madeleine, ed. 1985. Qualitative Research Methods in

  14. Medical Aspects of Sickle Hemoglobin in Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Brodine, C. E.; Uddin, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD) will soon issue a directive to test all incoming military personnel for the presence of hemoglobin S. The military testing program for hemoglobin S is an occupational medicine program. This report includes a discussion of armed services physical standards, a description of the Navy effort to evaluate an automated system for detection of hemoglobin S, and the proposed DOD directive. PMID:833894

  15. Medical aspects of sickle hemoglobin in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Brodine, C E; Uddin, D E

    1977-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD) will soon issue a directive to test all incoming military personnel for the presence of hemoglobin S. The military testing program for hemoglobin S is an occupational medicine program. This report includes a discussion of armed services physical standards, a description of the Navy effort to evaluate an automated system for detection of hemoglobin S, and the proposed DOD directive.

  16. Accreditation status of U.S. military graduate medical education programs.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2008-07-01

    Military graduate medical education (GME) comprises a substantial fraction of U.S. physician training capacity. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have placed substantial stress on military medicine, and lay and professional press accounts have raised awareness of the effects on military GME. To date, however, objective data on military GME quality remains sparse. Determine the accreditation status of U.S. military GME programs. Additionally, military GME program data will be compared to national (U.S.) accreditation lengths. Retrospective review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) data. All military-sponsored core programs in specialties with at least three residencies were included. Military-affiliated but civilian-sponsored programs were excluded. The current and past cycle data were used for the study. For each specialty, the current mean accreditation length and the net change in cycle was calculated. National mean accreditation lengths by specialty for 2005 to 2006 were obtained from the ACGME. Comparison between the overall mean national and military accreditation lengths was performed with a z test. All other comparisons employed descriptive statistics. Ninety-nine military programs in 15 specialties were included in the analysis. During the study period, 1 program was newly accredited, and 6 programs had accreditation withdrawn or were closed. The mean accreditation length of the military programs was 4.0 years. The overall national mean for the same specialties is 3.5 years (p < 0.01). In previous cycles, 68% of programs had accreditation of 4 years or longer, compared to 70% in the current cycle, while 13% had accreditation of 2 years or less in the previous cycle compared to 14% in the current cycle. Ten (68%) of the military specialties had mean accreditation lengths greater than the national average, while 5 (33%) were below it. Ten (68%) specialties had stable or improving cycle lengths when compared to previous cycles

  17. [Medical anthropology in academies: on the criticism of natural science medicine exemplified by Viktor von Weizsäcker].

    PubMed

    Schott, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Viktor von Weizsäcker (1886-1957) founded his concept of medical anthropology as a clinician educated in internal medicine and neurology. He tried to broaden natural scientific medicine psychosomatically focussing on the "sick human". The natural scientific approach would exclude subjectivity, and therefore he propagated the "introduction of the subject' (Einführung des Subjekts) into the life sciences. His own sensory physiological experiments and Sigmund Freud's psychoanalysis inspired him essentially since the 1920s. In his main work Der Gestaltkreis (gestalt circle) published in 1940 he stressed the "entity of perceiving and moving" (Einheit von Wahrnehmen und Bewegen) in regard to relevant aspects of medicine. In 1932, Weizsäcker became a member of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences, whose president he was from 1947 till 1949; 1942 he became a member of the Leopoldina. Primarily his merits as a neurologist were highly appreciated. His medical anthropology was not relevant for his election by the two academies. Nevertheless, there was a certain repudiation against the objectivistic and materialistic Weltanschauung within the scientific community. So, Paracelsus and Goethe were highly estimated as natural philosophical guides for own conceptions. This was especially evident for the circle around Wilhelm Troll and Karl Lothar Wolf in Halle, both members of the Leopoldina, who were fascinated by Goethe's concept of "Gestalt". Weizsäcker's lecture on "Gestalt und Zeit" in Halle in 1942 fitted in the concept of those natural scientists.

  18. Are Belgian military students in medical sciences better educated in disaster medicine than their civilian colleagues?

    PubMed Central

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Lievers, J; Dieltiens, G; Sabbe, M B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Historically, medical students have been deployed to care for disaster victims but may not have been properly educated to do so. A previous evaluation of senior civilian medical students in Belgium revealed that they are woefully unprepared. Based on the nature of their military training, we hypothesised that military medical students were better educated and prepared than their civilian counterparts for disasters. We evaluated the impact of military training on disaster education in medical science students. Methods Students completed an online survey on disaster medicine, training, and knowledge, tested using a mixed set of 10 theoretical and practical questions. The results were compared with those of a similar evaluation of senior civilian medical students. Results The response rate was 77.5%, mean age 23 years and 59% were males. Overall, 95% of military medical students received some chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear training and 22% took part in other disaster management training; 44% perceived it is absolutely necessary that disaster management should be incorporated into the regular curriculum. Self-estimated knowledge ranged from 3.75 on biological incidents to 4.55 on influenza pandemics, based on a 10-point scale. Intention to respond in case of an incident ranged from 7 in biological incidents to 7.25 in chemical incidents. The mean test score was 5.52; scores improved with educational level attained. A comparison of survey data from civilian senior medical master students revealed that, except for influenza pandemic, military students scored higher on knowledge and capability, even though only 27% of them were senior master students. Data on willingness to work are comparable between the two groups. Results of the question/case set were significantly better for the military students. Conclusions The military background and training of these students makes them better prepared for disaster situations than their civilian

  19. Experiences of Swedish military medical personnel in combat zones: adapting to competing loyalties.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Kristina; Kjellström, Sofia; Jonsson, Anders; Sandman, Lars

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the Swedish military personnel's experience of what it means to perform a caring role in a combat zone. This study assesses the challenges faced by military medical personnel in the context of a combat zone. The design was descriptive with a qualitative inductive approach. Twenty military medical personnel (physicians, nurses, and combat lifesavers) were interviewed individually. They had been involved in international military operations between 2009 and 2012. This study was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis produced four categories: being in a primarily noncaring organization, caring in emotionally charged relationships, lacking an open dialog about expectations of killing and having to prioritize scarce resources. This study shows that medical personnel easily adapt to a military setting. They care but also perform other tasks when they are in a combat zone. The medical personnel want to give care to host nation but use drugs they can spare. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology membership experience with allergen immunotherapy safety in patients with specific medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée E S; Hauswirth, David W; Calabria, Christopher W; Sher, Lawrence D; Rank, Matthew A

    2016-09-01

    Little data in the literature exist concerning patients with certain underlying medical conditions who receive allergen subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). To survey allergists' experience with SCIT in patients with medical conditions considered to impose an elevated risk for untoward outcomes. A Web-based survey was conducted among members of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology to query about their experience with SCIT in patients with certain medical conditions. There were 1085 replies (21% response), of whom, 86% were U.S. based, 51% were suburban, 31% were academic, 42% were medium-sized practices, and 54% had >15 years' experience. In responders' opinion, SCIT was "contraindicated" in patients with the following: acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (48%), cancer (and still receiving active treatment) (33%), severe asthma (32%), and a history of transplantation (30%). Even so, survey responders collectively gave SCIT to >2400 patients for each of these conditions: severe asthma, coronary artery disease, cancer in remission, and autoimmune disorders; and to ≥5400 patients with hypertension and ≥4100 women who became pregnant. The experience of colleagues with these patients rarely resulted in major problems (i.e., activation of underlying disease, systemic reactions to SCIT, or SCIT discontinuation), with the exception of severe asthma (12.5%), initiation of SCIT during pregnancy (5.4%), and AIDS (4.2%). For most other conditions, it was ≤1.5% (e.g., continue during pregnancy, cancer in remission, history of transplantation, positive human immunodeficiency virus and no AIDS). According to the experience of a large group of practicing allergists, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology members, few medical conditions seemed to pose an elevated risk for untoward outcomes from SCIT. Because these are survey results, prospective research might yield even more solid data.

  1. Association between cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms among military medical students in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Güleç, Mahir; Bakir, Bilal; Ozer, Mustafa; Uçar, Muharrem; Kiliç, Selim; Hasde, Metin

    2005-04-30

    An association has been documented between two important health concerns, smoking and depression. A cross-sectional study was carried out to explore whether this relationship exists in a sample of Turkish military medical undergraduates. Of a total of 779 military medical undergraduates, 690 agreed to participate in the study. The students completed a self-administered questionnaire including the Turkish adaptation of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and gave a smoking history. It was determined that the smokers among medical students were 2.2 times more likely to have depressive symptoms than nonsmokers. This result extends the significant association between smoking and depressive symptoms in the literature to a sample of Turkish military medical undergraduates.

  2. The new military medical ethics: legacies of the Gulf Wars and the War on Terror.

    PubMed

    Miles, Steven H

    2013-03-01

    United States military medical ethics evolved during its involvement in two recent wars, Gulf War I (1990-1991) and the War on Terror (2001-). Norms of conduct for military clinicians with regard to the treatment of prisoners of war and the administration of non-therapeutic bioactive agents to soldiers were set aside because of the sense of being in a 'new kind of war'. Concurrently, the use of radioactive metal in weaponry and the ability to measure the health consequences of trade embargos on vulnerable civilians occasioned new concerns about the health effects of war on soldiers, their offspring, and civilians living on battlefields. Civilian medical societies and medical ethicists fitfully engaged the evolving nature of the medical ethics issues and policy changes during these wars. Medical codes of professionalism have not been substantively updated and procedures for accountability for new kinds of abuses of medical ethics are not established. Looking to the future, medicine and medical ethics have not articulated a vision for an ongoing military-civilian dialogue to ensure that standards of medical ethics do not evolve simply in accord with military exigency. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Testing of Junctional Tourniquets by Military Medics to Control Simulated Groin Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    periumbilical and groin , for the inguinal indication in question for the AAJT, appear to have substantially different pain levels as the groin ...were preferred by the participants. Keywords: tourniquets, hemorrhage, resuscitation, groin , inguinal, medical device, injuries and wounds Introduction...Army and were mid-grade enlisted noncommissioned Testing of Junctional Tourniquets by Military Medics to Control Simulated Groin Hemorrhage John

  4. Technology complementing military psychology programs and services in the Pacific Regional Medical Command.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Melba C; Folen, Raymond A; Van Horn, Sandra; Ruseborn, Daniel; Samuel, Kevin M

    2013-08-01

    The Tripler Army Medical Center is the only federal tertiary care hospital serving the Pacific Regional Medical Command. Due to Tripler's large area of responsibility, many behavioral health professionals are starting to employ more technology during their sessions. As explained in this article, virtual reality and telepsychology efforts are proving to benefit military service members and their families in the Pacific Rim.

  5. Factor Analysis of Teacher Professional Development in Chinese Military Medical Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Juan-Juan; Chen, Gang; Wang, Zhen-Wei; Liu, Wei-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Teacher professional development potentially enhances teachers' professional morale, knowledge, skills and autonomy, which helps improve the quality of education. The military medical university is an important medical education institution in China; however, studies of teacher professional development within military…

  6. Factor Analysis of Teacher Professional Development in Chinese Military Medical Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Juan-Juan; Chen, Gang; Wang, Zhen-Wei; Liu, Wei-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Teacher professional development potentially enhances teachers' professional morale, knowledge, skills and autonomy, which helps improve the quality of education. The military medical university is an important medical education institution in China; however, studies of teacher professional development within military…

  7. Educating medical students about military health: Perspectives from a multidisciplinary lecture initiative.

    PubMed

    Theophanous, Christos; Kalashnikova, Mariya; Sadler, Claire; Barreras, Elizabeth; Fung, Cha-Chi; Bruning, Madeleine

    2016-01-01

    Medical student education on military health topics is critical in ensuring optimal future care for military service members and their families. Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (Keck SOM) students were invited to participate in an anonymous, voluntary, online survey ("Pre") rating their level of interest, awareness, exposure and comfort with military health issues on a 5-point Likert scale. A student-organized program of four voluntary lectures discussing military health-related topics was then implemented. Students were invited to re-take the survey ("Post") and also indicate which, if any, lectures they had attended. 230 students completed the "Pre" survey. A statistically significant deviation in responses was observed in all four questions, showing high interest (mean: 3.19 ± 1.20, P = 0.002), low awareness (mean: 2.52 ± 1.15, P < 0.001), low comfort (mean: 2.66 ± 1.11, P < 0.001), and low exposure (mean: 1.80 ± 0.95, P < 0.001) to military health issues. 132 students completed the "Post" survey, including 37 lecture attendees and 95 non-attendees. A statistically significant difference in the level of interest (P < 0.05) and exposure (P < 0.05) was observed between these groups. Medical schools that lack military health curricula may underprepare students to care for military-affiliated patients. Student-led programs can help introduce this topic before formalized curricula are instituted.

  8. Progress in the Development of the 1992 DoD Survey of Military Medical Care Beneficiaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    as well as the attitudes and knowledge of military medical care beneficiaries regarding various aspects of3 their health care benefits. This document...services. (2) determine their attitudes and the extent of their knowledge regarding (A) the quality and availability of health and dental care under...Access to and use of inpatient and outpatient health care I services. 2. Attitudes and knowledge regarding military health care benefits and services

  9. Natural History of Multi-Drug Resistant Organisms in a New Military Medical Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    and Clostridium difficile de-novo on an ‘epidemiologic clean slate’ before the opening of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC...and Clostridium difficile de-novo on an ‘epidemiologic clean slate’ before the opening of Walter Reed National Military M edical Center (WRNMMC...MRSA. We generated prim ers from genes large enough to have species specific regions (eg, ompA or gyrA) or were species specific themselves (eg, algD

  10. Development of Community Based Learning and Education system within Undergraduate Medical Curriculum of Patan Academy of Health Sciences.

    PubMed

    Baral, K P; Upadhyay, S K; Bhandary, S; Gongal, R N; Karki, A

    2016-01-01

    In response to continuing health disparities between rural and urban population, Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS) was established in 2008. It aimed to produce physicians who would be able and willing to serve in the rural areas. In order to empower them with understanding and tools to address health issues of rural population, an innovative curriculum was developed. This paper aims to describe the community based learning and education (CBLE) system within the overall framework of PAHS undergraduate medical curriculum. A Medical School Steering Committee (MSSC) comprising of a group of committed medical educators led the curriculum development process. The committee reviewed different medical curricula, relevant literatures, and held a series of consultative meetings with the stakeholders and experts within and outside Nepal. This process resulted in defining the desirable attributes, terminal competencies of the graduates, and then the actual development of the entire curriculum including CBLE. Given the critical importance of population health, 25% of the curricular weightage was allocated to the Community Health Sciences (CHS). CBLE system was developed as the primary means of delivering CHS curriculum. The details of CBLE system was finalized for implementation with the first cohort of medical students commencing their studies from June 2010. The CBLE, a key educational strategy of PAHS curriculum, is envisaged to improve retention and performance of PAHS graduates and, thereby, health status of rural population. However, whether or not that goal will be achieved needs to be verified after the graduates join the health system.

  11. Self-medication among Finnish young men in the beginning of common military service.

    PubMed

    Linden, Kari; Jormanainen, Vesa; Swigonski, Nancy L; Pietilä, Kirsi

    2005-03-01

    Little is known about self-medication in adolescent and young adult males, particularly in ones exposed to increased stress. The objective of this article is to analyze self-medication and its predictors in young Finnish men at entry into common military service. The responding men (n = 857) from nine brigades anonymously completed a self-administered questionnaire during the first conscription days before active military training in July 1999. The effect of pre-disposing, need and health behavior variables on self-medication was assessed using Andersen et al. theoretical health care utilization model. In the 2 weeks preceding the survey, 65% of the men reported self-medication. Self-medication for pain or common cold symptoms was reported by 54% while 8% had taken caffeine tablets or other stimulants. Multivariate analysis on overall self-medication showed an association with brigade and using health services before the conscription. Along with pre-disposing variables, need variables were associated with self-medication for pain or common cold symptoms and self-medication with stimulants. Stimulant use was also associated with health behaviors such as trial with illegal drugs during lifetime. Young men frequently self-medicate at the initial stage of conscription that may pose them at an increased risk for adverse effects of medicines or other medical problems. The military and civilian primary health care providers should discuss the proper use of self-medication with young men. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Collaborative Systems Biology Projects for the Military Medical Community.

    PubMed

    Zalatoris, Jeffrey J; Scheerer, Julia B; Lebeda, Frank J

    2017-09-01

    This pilot study was conducted to examine, for the first time, the ongoing systems biology research and development projects within the laboratories and centers of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC). The analysis has provided an understanding of the breadth of systems biology activities, resources, and collaborations across all USAMRMC subordinate laboratories. The Systems Biology Collaboration Center at USAMRMC issued a survey regarding systems biology research projects to the eight U.S.-based USAMRMC laboratories and centers in August 2016. This survey included a data call worksheet to gather self-identified project and programmatic information. The general topics focused on the investigators and their projects, on the project's research areas, on omics and other large data types being collected and stored, on the analytical or computational tools being used, and on identifying intramural (i.e., USAMRMC) and extramural collaborations. Among seven of the eight laboratories, 62 unique systems biology studies were funded and active during the final quarter of fiscal year 2016. Of 29 preselected medical Research Task Areas, 20 were associated with these studies, some of which were applicable to two or more Research Task Areas. Overall, studies were categorized among six general types of objectives: biological mechanisms of disease, risk of/susceptibility to injury or disease, innate mechanisms of healing, diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, and host/patient responses to vaccines, and therapeutic strategies including host responses to therapies. We identified eight types of omics studies and four types of study subjects. Studies were categorized on a scale of increasing complexity from single study subject/single omics technology studies (23/62) to studies integrating results across two study subject types and two or more omics technologies (13/62). Investigators at seven USAMRMC laboratories had collaborations with systems biology experts

  13. Challenges of self-reported medical conditions and electronic medical records among members of a large military cohort

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Besa; Chu, Laura K; Smith, Tyler C; Amoroso, Paul J; Boyko, Edward J; Hooper, Tomoko I; Gackstetter, Gary D; Ryan, Margaret AK

    2008-01-01

    Background Self-reported medical history data are frequently used in epidemiological studies. Self-reported diagnoses may differ from medical record diagnoses due to poor patient-clinician communication, self-diagnosis in the absence of a satisfactory explanation for symptoms, or the "health literacy" of the patient. Methods The US Department of Defense military health system offers a unique opportunity to evaluate electronic medical records with near complete ascertainment while on active duty. This study compared 38 self-reported medical conditions to electronic medical record data in a large population-based US military cohort. The objective of this study was to better understand challenges and strengths in self-reporting of medical conditions. Results Using positive and negative agreement statistics for less-prevalent conditions, near-perfect negative agreement and moderate positive agreement were found for the 38 diagnoses. Conclusion This report highlights the challenges of using self-reported medical data and electronic medical records data, but illustrates that agreement between the two data sources increases with increased surveillance period of medical records. Self-reported medical data may be sufficient for ruling out history of a particular condition whereas prevalence studies may be best served by using an objective measure of medical conditions found in electronic healthcare records. Defining medical conditions from multiple sources in large, long-term prospective cohorts will reinforce the value of the study, particularly during the initial years when prevalence for many conditions may still be low. PMID:18644098

  14. American Academy of Ophthalmology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses ...

  15. Causation, incidence, and costs of traumatic brain injury in the U.S. military medical system.

    PubMed

    Ommaya, A K; Ommaya, A K; Dannenberg, A L; Salazar, A M

    1996-02-01

    Hospital discharge records from military facilities and private facilities reimbursed by Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services for fiscal year 1992 were reviewed to identify head injury admissions. Incidence rates, case fatality rates, causes of head injuries, and direct cost for hospital admissions were computed in this well-defined population. For fiscal year 1992, there were 5,568 hospitalized cases of noncombat head injury in the military medical system. The age-adjusted head injury rates for ages 15-44 years are higher in active-duty individuals compared with other beneficiaries (1.6 times greater for men and 2.5 times greater for women). The total cost for hospitalization in this population was $43 million. Private facility rehabilitation accounted for 26% of all private facility costs but only 6% of head injury cases. Firearms and motor vehicle crashes caused the most severe injuries for cases admitted to military facilities. Motor vehicle crashes, falls, and fighting accounted for 80% of the total military facility cost for head injuries. Military active-duty individuals are at increased risk for noncombat head injury. Prevention of head injury in military settings should focus on motor vehicle crashes, fist fights (assault), and falls.

  16. The Evolution of Medical Training Simulation in the U.S. Military.

    PubMed

    Linde, Amber S; Kunkler, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The United States has been at war since 2003. During that time, training using Medical Simulation technology has been developed and integrated into military medical training for combat medics, nurses and surgeons. Efforts stemming from the Joint Programmatic Committee-1 (JPC-1) Medical Simulation and Training Portfolio has allowed for the improvement and advancement in military medical training by focusing on research in simulation training technology in order to achieve this. Based upon lessons learned capability gaps have been identified concerning the necessity to validate and enhance combat medial training simulators. These capability gaps include 1) Open Source/Open Architecture; 2) Modularity and Interoperability; and 3) Material and Virtual Reality (VR) Models. Using the capability gaps, JPC-1 has identified important research endeavors that need to be explored.

  17. Evaluation and implementation of quality standards to ensure relevant medical care in the system of military medical services of Armenia.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, R

    2014-10-01

    It was the goal of this review to determine if the MHS of Armenia meets benchmarks for health care quality; to provide military medical officials with relevant information to create an adequate environment for all the quality improvement initiatives being undertaken at the medical care level; to design and implement effective interventions to make informed strategic choices and promote quality and a culture of safety in. Documents addressing the quality of care in the MHS of Armenia were reviewed.

  18. Military Personnel: Status of Accession, Retention, and End Strength for Military Medical Officers and Preliminary Observations Regarding Accession and Retention Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-16

    consistently below its authorizations in 4 nursing specialties, including: Critical Care Nurse , Operating Room Nurse , and Nurse Anesthetist . • The active...Military medical professionals are in demand, and the Department of Defense (DOD) is experiencing shortfalls in physician, dental, nurse , and other...their occupations for health professional officers2 into the following categories: Medical Corps, Dental Corps, Nurse Corps, Medical Service Corps

  19. Military Medics' Insight Into Providing Women's Health Care in Deployed Settings.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Candy; Corrigan, Robert; Reese, Sharon; Almonte, Angelica; Simpson, Danielle; Wilson, Amber

    2016-11-01

    To gain better understanding of the military medics' (Navy Independent Duty Corpsman, Air Force Independent Duty Medical Technician, and Army Health Care Specialist, experiences providing health care for women in the deployed or ship setting. The researchers used an exploratory, descriptive design informed by ethnography. A total of 86 individuals participated in the focus group and individual interviews. Three themes were identified: Training Fidelity, Advocate Leader, and The Challenges of Providing Patient Care. Experience in austere settings has convinced a number of medics they need additional women's health care topics in every facet of their training. They further suggested such training should be provided in stepwise fashion, beginning with initial, technical training courses and continuing through medical skills sustainment platforms. They were especially interested in basic women's health concerns. Topics suggested included vaginal infections, urinary tract infections, and birth control management. Although the advancement of women in the military continues to make strides-it is clear the availability of quality women's health care that women feel comfortable accessing may be its defining limitation. Medics are an excellent conduit for reinforcing these healthy messages and providing first-line treatment to deployed military women. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Dual Enrollment Academy Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Nicolas; Chavez, Guadalupe

    2009-01-01

    Dual Enrollment Engineering (DEEA) and Medical Science (DEMSA) Academies are two-year dual enrollment programs for high school students. Students explore engineering and medical careers through college coursework. Students prepare for higher education in engineering and medical fields while completing associate degrees in biology or engineering…

  1. Dual Enrollment Academy Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Nicolas; Chavez, Guadalupe

    2009-01-01

    Dual Enrollment Engineering (DEEA) and Medical Science (DEMSA) Academies are two-year dual enrollment programs for high school students. Students explore engineering and medical careers through college coursework. Students prepare for higher education in engineering and medical fields while completing associate degrees in biology or engineering…

  2. The NAS-NRC Twin Registry of WWII military veteran twins. National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council.

    PubMed

    Page, William F

    2002-10-01

    The NAS-NRC Twin Registry is one of the oldest, national population based-twin registries in the United States. It consists of 15,924 white male twin pairs born in the years 1917-1927 (inclusive) both of whom served in the armed forces. The registry, which has been in operation more than 30 years, has collected data from a variety of sources. Records-based, computerized data have come largely from the Department of Veterans Affairs, and there have been three major epidemiologic questionnaires, undertaken roughly every 15 years. Classic twin studies on a variety of medical conditions were the early focus of the registry, which now has a strong focus on chronic disease epidemiology. Work on a DNA specimen bank has been proceeding slowly, but is now a top priority, due to the increasing force of mortality in this twin cohort.

  3. The medical department in military operations other than war. Part I. Planning for deployment.

    PubMed

    Baker, M S; Ryals, P A

    1999-08-01

    Many military deployments are "military operations other than war" (MOOTW), a spectrum of assignments less than all-out combat. The corresponding medical support requirement differs from conventional military medical combat support and also from customary civilian medical practice. Hence, medical planners will use different doctrine and planning tools than are used in civilian facilities or on field training exercises when tasked for MOOTW activities. The deployment team must be self-sufficient, plan for very large numbers of affected individuals, and arrange for food, water, shelter, sanitation, power, light, security, transportation, communications, and team health care in advance of arrival. Careful and well-thought-out advance liaison with numerous interested parties is required to ensure mission success. The medical department on these missions may represent the lead element, and other warfare specialists and line and staff officers may support the medical mission by providing security, communications, transportation, and logistics. The medical team may find that it represents the foreign policy "point of the spear" during MOOTW deployments.

  4. Military Emergency Medical Service System Assessment: Application of the National Park Service Needs Assessment and Program Audit to Objectively Evaluate the Military EMS System of Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elliot M; Harper, Stephen A; Cunningham, Cord; Walrath, Benjamin D; DeMers, Gerard; Kharod, Chetan U

    2017-03-01

    As part of a Military Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system process improvement initiative, the authors sought to objectively evaluate the U.S. military EMS system for the island of Okinawa. They applied a program evaluation tool currently utilized by the U.S. National Park Service (NPS). A comprehensive needs assessment was conducted to evaluate the current Military EMS system in Okinawa, Japan. The NPS EMS Program Audit Worksheet was used to get an overall "score" of our assessment. After all the data had been collected, a joint committee of Military EMS physicians reviewed the findings and made formal recommendations. From 2011 to 2014, U.S. military EMS on Okinawa averaged 1,345 ± 137 patient transports annually. An advanced life support (ALS) provider would have been dispatched on 558 EMS runs (38%) based on chief complaint in 2014 had they been available. Over 36,000 man-hours were expended during this period to provide National Registry Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-accredited instruction to certify 141 Navy Corpsman as EMT Basics. The NPS EMS Program Audit Worksheet was used and the program scored a total of 31, suggesting the program is well planned and operating within standards. This evaluation of the Military EMS system on Okinawa using the NPS program assessment and audit worksheet demonstrates the NPS evaluation instruments may offer a useful assessment tool for the evaluation of Military EMS systems. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  5. From the National Academies: Medical School Admissions Requirements and Undergraduate Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labov, Jay B.

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on a series of issues that may be of interest to college and university science faculty who educate undergraduates: requirements and policies for admission to medical school and their possible influences on undergraduate science education. The Center for Education of the National Research Council (NRC) and the Institute of…

  6. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Medical Laboratory Specialist (Basic) Part II, 10-15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    These instructor plans of instruction and lesson plans and student text and review materials for a secondary-postsecondary-level course for medical laboratory specialist are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. It is the second…

  7. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Medical Laboratory Specialist (Basic) Part I, 10-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    These instructor plans of instruction, lesson plans, and student text and review materials for a secondary-postsecondary-level course for medical laboratory specialist are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. It is the first of…

  8. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Medical Laboratory Specialist (Basic) Part II, 10-15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    These instructor plans of instruction and lesson plans and student text and review materials for a secondary-postsecondary-level course for medical laboratory specialist are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. It is the second…

  9. Medical Laboratory Technician--Microbiology, 10-3. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the second of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  10. Psychological Type and Undergraduate Student Achievement in Pharmacy Course in Military Medical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Ru; Shan, Shou-qin; Tian, Jian-quan

    2007-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was given to 264 students in an undergraduate Pharmacy course at a military medical university. Selected MBTI personality types were compared for achievement in the course using a t-test to compare total points earned. High grades were earned by students stronger in the traits of introversion (I) and judgment…

  11. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Medical Laboratory Specialist (Basic) Part I, 10-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    These instructor plans of instruction, lesson plans, and student text and review materials for a secondary-postsecondary-level course for medical laboratory specialist are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. It is the first of…

  12. [Scientific heritage of N.I.Pirogov in "Military-Medical Magazine"].

    PubMed

    Galin, L L

    2010-12-01

    The article is concerned with 8 publications of N. I. Pirogov, printed in "Military-Medical magazine", including the publication about the first usage of ether anesthesia on the battlefield. The articles hold timeliness not only as works which are rich in matter, but also as examples of scientific statement.

  13. Are Belgian military students in medical sciences better educated in disaster medicine than their civilian colleagues?

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Lievers, J; Dieltiens, G; Sabbe, M B

    2016-10-01

    Historically, medical students have been deployed to care for disaster victims but may not have been properly educated to do so. A previous evaluation of senior civilian medical students in Belgium revealed that they are woefully unprepared. Based on the nature of their military training, we hypothesised that military medical students were better educated and prepared than their civilian counterparts for disasters. We evaluated the impact of military training on disaster education in medical science students. Students completed an online survey on disaster medicine, training, and knowledge, tested using a mixed set of 10 theoretical and practical questions. The results were compared with those of a similar evaluation of senior civilian medical students. The response rate was 77.5%, mean age 23 years and 59% were males. Overall, 95% of military medical students received some chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear training and 22% took part in other disaster management training; 44% perceived it is absolutely necessary that disaster management should be incorporated into the regular curriculum. Self-estimated knowledge ranged from 3.75 on biological incidents to 4.55 on influenza pandemics, based on a 10-point scale. Intention to respond in case of an incident ranged from 7 in biological incidents to 7.25 in chemical incidents. The mean test score was 5.52; scores improved with educational level attained. A comparison of survey data from civilian senior medical master students revealed that, except for influenza pandemic, military students scored higher on knowledge and capability, even though only 27% of them were senior master students. Data on willingness to work are comparable between the two groups. Results of the question/case set were significantly better for the military students. The military background and training of these students makes them better prepared for disaster situations than their civilian counterparts. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  14. Military Medics Insight into Providing Womens Health Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-22

    sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), pregnancy, and routine pelvic examination. This list of diagnoses the medics described is not unlike what the...medics were bacterial vaginosis, dysmenorrhea, urinary tract infection, urinary incontinence, dehydration, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and...C05 9 etc.), and sexual health. The medics believed that the time spent teaching women was an opportunity for their population to see them as a

  15. Enhancing Interoperability Among Enlisted Medical Personnel. A Case Study of Military Surgical Technologists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    defense Intelligence Community under Contract W74V8H-06-C-0002. iii Preface As medical staff are becoming more integrated in forward-deployed medical...the Navy, the Marine Corps, the defense agencies, and the defense Intelligence Community . The principal investigators are Sheila Nataraj Kirby and...students and become aware of potentially immediate job opportunities within the military. However, greater exposure to the civilian labor market might

  16. [Current knowledge among students of the Silesian Medical Academy about the importance and role of medical care funds].

    PubMed

    Tyrpień, Mirosław; Jaskólecki, Henryk; Steplewski, Zygmunt; Miarczyńska-Jończyk, Halina; Woźniak, Joanna; Malara, Beata

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research was verification and comparison of the present state of knowledge among the students of different departments and years of study. The questions concerned the role of Medical Care Funds in the up-to-now healthcare system and the patient's rights as far as the students' future professions as doctors, dentists, healthcare managers and medical rescuers is concerned. The questionnaire included 15 questions referring to the problem of functioning of the medical care institutions after the reform of healthcare services introduced in 1999. Distinct from most of the published works of this kind, the authors adopted a uniform "assessment" method following the principles of didactic measurement. The researchers calculated: Range, Modal, Mediana, Arithmetic Average, Variance, Standard Deviation, Easiness of the Task, Difficulty of the Task, Skip Fraction, the Task's Differentiating Power, Reliability Coefficient of the Test. The calculation was conducted with the use of the Excel programme modified by the researchers to suit the needs of didactic measurement. The survey included 104 students of the 3rd year of Dental Department, 116 of the students 4th year of Dental Department, 31 students of Bachelor's Medical Rescue Studies by the Medical Department in Zabrze, 18 students of Post-Graduate Management and Administration in Healthcare by the Medical Department in Zabrze and Silesian Technical University, 151 4th year students of the Medical Department in Zabrze and 121 6th year students of the Medical Department in Zabrze. It has been proved that between the particular groups there are significant differences as far as the students' knowledge is concerned ("the healthcare managers" demonstrated quite a high knowledge ratio). And that the questions were at different difficulty levels depending on the branch and year of study represented by the respondents.

  17. [Further development of prophylactic medical examination of military personnel in Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Bibik, T A; Moroz, H Z

    2007-01-01

    The article presents new principles of carrying out prophylactic medical examination of military personnel: criteria of definition of health groups were proposed, pivotal role of general practitioner in performing of prophylactic medical examination, treatment-and heaIth-improving measures were highlighted. Positive results of introduction of this system of prophylactic medical examination in Kiev garrison enables to recommend it in a wide use to enhance the efficiency of regular medical check-ups in armed forces of Ukraine and other power authorities.

  18. Effect of military conflicts on the formation of emergency medical services systems worldwide.

    PubMed

    Goniewicz, Mariusz

    2013-05-01

    This article briefly reviews the evolution of medical support during wars and conflicts from ancient to modern times and discusses the effect warfare has had on the development of civilian health care and emergency medical services (EMS). Medical breakthroughs and discoveries made of necessity during military conflicts have developed into new paradigms of medical care, including novel programs of triage and health assessment, emergency battlefield treatment and stabilization, anesthesia, and other surgical and emergency procedures. The critical role of organizations that provide proper emergency care to help the sick and injured both on the battlefield and in the civilian world is also highlighted. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. [Chemistry and Pharmacy in the Journal of the Academy of Medical Medicine (1836-1843)].

    PubMed

    Morales-Cosme, Dolores; Viesca-Treviño, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes the articles published on chemicals and pharmaceuticals in the Periódico de la Academia de Medicina de Mégico. Through these publications it is possible to illustrate the transformation in the study of medical material of the era. At the same time, it shows discussions held by doctors and pharmacists about scientific news and analysis of local therapeutic resources.

  20. A key player in biomedical sciences and clinical service in China, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC).

    PubMed

    Zhan, Qimin; Liu, Depei

    2007-08-01

    The Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) is the largest medical institution in China and has a leading high-level multidisciplinary medical research and medial service. Under the CAMS and PUMC infrastructure, there are 17 biomedical institutes and 6 large hospitals, which cover most fields of the human disease-related research. CAMS and PUMC has always attached great emphasis on the control and cure of severe diseases, as well as a series of innovative drug researches, and has made significant progress in those fields. The long-term goals for CAMS and PUMC in the future development are: reaching the international advanced level in the areas of severe disease prediction, prevention, control, diagnosis, and research on drug innovation; establishing theoretical and technological system for explanation of the mechanism of severe diseases, which possesses Chinese style and represents the frontier level in the world, and at the same time, providing scientific support for the prevention and treatment of severe disease and making contribution to the establishment and development of a harmonious society in China.

  1. Advising and assisting an Iraqi Army medical clinic: observations of a U.S. military support mission.

    PubMed

    Lynn, David C; De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2011-09-01

    Medical civil-military operations are important for deployed military medical units engaged in counter-insurgency missions. There are few reports on military support for a host nation's military medical infrastructure, and we describe an initiative of the 21st Combat Support Hospital in 2010 during the postsurge phase of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn. The goal was to incrementally improve the quality of care provided by Iraqi 7th Army medical personnel using existing clinic infrastructure and a low budget. Direct bedside teaching to include screening and treatment of ambulatory patients (sick call), focused pharmacy and medical supply system support, medical records documentation, and basic infection control compliance were the objectives. Lessons learned include the requirement to implement culturally relevant changes, maintain focus on system processes, and maximize education and mentorship through multiple modalities. In summary, a combat hospital can successfully implement an advise and assist mission with minimal external resources.

  2. An Analysis of Medical Imaging Costs in Military Treatment Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    authority to completely control the medical systems of each service, the DHA 7 was given management responsibility for specific shared services , functions...efficient health operations through enhanced enterprise-wide shared services . • Deliver more comprehensive primary care and integrated health...of shared services that will fall under central control: • facility planning • medical logistics • health information technology • Tricare health

  3. The Impact of an Academy of Medical Educators on the Culture of an American Health Sciences Campus.

    PubMed

    Corral, Janet; Guiton, Gretchen; Aagaard, Eva

    2017-08-01

    During the last two decades in the United States, academies of medical educators (AMEs) have proliferated as formal organizations within faculties of health professions education to recognize teaching excellence, support faculty development, and encourage scholarly activity. AMEs have been effective at rewarding faculty for educational excellence and providing faculty development. However, the impact of an AME on campus culture remains unclear. A qualitative case study asked, How has an AME shaped organizational culture? The authors investigated the University of Colorado health sciences campus AME given its clear mandate to impact organizational culture. The authors interviewed a purposeful sample of 26 AME members and non-AME campus faculty and educational leaders during the 2014-2015 academic year. Two reviewers employed content analysis to code the transcripts. The AME has positively impacted organizational culture by being a symbol of institutional commitment to the educational mission, and by asserting education as an evidence-based practice. At the faculty member level, the AME's impact includes creating a home and community for educators to network. Individual faculty influence departments and programs across campus through teaching and interpersonal connections. However, the AME has not impacted all of campus, due to only reaching self-identified educators, and the siloed nature of departments on campus. Although limited to a single campus and an early established AME, this study contributes significant insight by describing how an AME as a structural unit impacts individual faculty members, who in turn impact organizational campus culture regarding the educational mission.

  4. [Surgery for respiratory tuberculosis at the Research Institute of Phthisiopulmonology, I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy: history and current trends].

    PubMed

    Sinitsyn, M V; Semenov, G I; Latyshev, A N; Agkatsev, T V; Kessel', M M

    2009-01-01

    The authors present concise data on the history of surgical treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis at the Research Institute of Phthisiopulmonology, I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy (1918-2008). They analyze the results of surgical treatment in 1007 patients with different forms of pulmonary tuberculosis in the past 10 years. The most common indications for surgical treatment are tuberculoma (44.2%), fibrocavernous and cirrhotic tuberculosis (37.8%), chronic pleuritis and pleural empyema (7.3%). There are prevalent resection-type operations (77.7%), with fatal cases after pneumonectomy (3.9%), lobectomy (0.6), and minor resections (0%). The proportion of thorocoplastic operations was 4.1% without fatal cases. Mini-invasive surgery using video-assisted technologies have received wide recognition in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. The results of treatment depend on the extent and presence of complications of a tuberculous process, comorbidity, suppressed immunity, and the scope of a surgical intervention. Overall, the efficiency of surgical treatment of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis is 90% or more.

  5. Voyenno-Meditsinskiy Zhurnal (Military Medical Journal), 8, 1959.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    gathering jth^em up and evacuating them to stages of medical evaptiät ion« This problem; despite the great attention given it on the part of small and...War, which had an effect on the time that the wounded arrived at the stages of medical evacuation« Thus, according to the data of "Experience of... stages . In the first stage a study was made of the working conditions and the possibilities of the sanitation detachments of companies, litter bearers

  6. Zakho Military Academy. Zakho, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-12

    to an 80 millimeter non-structural concrete base . The design also required a 100 mm sand sub- base underneath the concrete . In addition, the design...parade field. The design cross section consisted of 10 centimeters of non-reinforced concrete panels over a 10 centimeter gravel base . Beneath the...the facility (preconstruction) was based on information obtained from the contract and the USACE project file. The project site is located at the

  7. Gaining experience with military medical situational awareness and geographic information systems in a simulated influenza epidemic.

    PubMed

    DeFraites, Robert F; Chambers, William C

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of medical situational awareness is to provide useful and actionable information for preparing and employing medical assets in support of a wide variety of operational missions around the world, and monitoring and protecting the health of the force in the face of rapidly changing health threats. Since 2005, the Medical Situational Awareness in the Theater Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration has exploited advances in information technology, geographic information systems, and open systems architecture to produce a functioning prototype of a medical situational enhancement capability. In May 2006, this prototype supported the medical staff of a combined/joint task force in a realistic command postexercise featuring a simulated outbreak of influenza during Exercise COBRA GOLD in Thailand. The proliferation and maturation of geographic information systems present many opportunities for the military medical community to improve the health of the populations for which it is responsible.

  8. [Achievements and prospects in the development of the St. Petersburg Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology of the Northwestern Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences].

    PubMed

    Morozov, V G; Khavinson, V Kh

    2002-01-01

    The article presents the results of the 10-years' long activity of the St. Petersburg Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology of the North-Western Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences founded to fulfill the basic and applied aims in the sphere of bioregulation and gerontology and to integrate with medical practice new methods of preventing premature ageing and age-related pathology by means of pharmaceuticals based upon peptide bioregulators. Among the Institute main achievements are the theoretical developments in the field of peptide regulation of ageing, creation of a new medical domain--bioregulation therapy, and foundation of the Russian school of biogerontology.

  9. Use of a hemorrhage simulator to train military medics.

    PubMed

    Mabry, Robert L

    2005-11-01

    The leading cause of preventable battlefield death is extremity hemorrhage. This study examines how current first aid training for the management of severe extremity hemorrhage can be improved by using a patient simulator. This was a prospective trial involving two cohorts of U.S. Army combat medic trainees. The control group received the standard first aid training for bleeding, including lectures and practical exercises. The study group received the same lectures but was exposed to a hemorrhage simulator during the practical exercises. Both groups were then evaluated during a field exercise 7 weeks later. The study group showed a statistically significant improvement in the time it took to stop severe extremity hemorrhage in a simulated patient. Simple innovations in training may play a significant role in preparing medics (and combatants) to care for injuries they will encounter on the battlefield.

  10. [Main types of activity of specialists of medical and preventive profile in military hospitals].

    PubMed

    Akimkin, V G; Azarov, I I; Volynkov, I O; Bobylev, V A

    2015-09-01

    Infection prevention in medical organizations is an essential task to ensure quality of medical care and create a safe environment for patients and medical staff. The main task of a specialist of medical and preventive profile in the hospital is to maintain sanitary and epidemiological safety and control fulfillment of a complex of preventive measures. To achieve these goals specialists monitor epidemiological and microbiological fulfilment of the implementation and effectiveness of preventive measures, which allow to except infection entry to the hospital and possible carrying out beyond the hospital, occurrence and spread of disease. An obligatory activity of the specialist of medical and preventive profile in the hospital is a scientific and methodical work. The authors propose adoption of preventive structural subdivisions to the state largest diversified military hospitals.

  11. Sleep Disorders and Associated Medical Comorbidities in Active Duty Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Mysliwiec, Vincent; McGraw, Leigh; Pierce, Roslyn; Smith, Patrick; Trapp, Brandon; Roth, Bernard J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Describe the prevalence of sleep disorders in military personnel referred for polysomnography and identify relationships between demographic characteristics, comorbid diagnoses, and specific sleep disorders. Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Setting: Military medical treatment facility. Participants: Active duty military personnel with diagnostic polysomnogram in 2010. Measurements: Primary sleep disorder rendered by review of polysomnogram and medical record by a board certified sleep medicine physician. Demographic characteristics and conditions of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), anxiety, depression, and pain syndromes determined by medical record review. Results: Primary sleep diagnoses (n = 725) included: mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 207 (27.2%); insomnia, 188 (24.7%); moderate-to-severe OSA, 183 (24.0 %); and paradoxical insomnia,39 (5.1%); behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome, 68 (8.9%) and snoring, 40 (5.3%) comprised our control group. Short sleep duration (< 5 h) was reported by 41.8%. Overall 85.2% had deployed, with 58.1% having one or more comorbid diagnoses. Characteristics associated with moderate-to-severe OSA were age (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.03 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.0–1.05], sex (male) (adjusted OR, 19.97 [95% CI, 2.66–150.05], anxiety (adjusted OR, 0.58 [95% CI, 0.34–0.99]), and body mass index, BMI (adjusted OR 1.19 [95% CI, 1.13–1.25]; for insomnia, characteristics included PTSD (adjusted OR, 2.12 [95% CI, 1.31–3.44]), pain syndromes (adjusted OR, 1.48 [95%CI, 1.01–2.12]), sex (female) (adjusted OR, 0.22 [95% CI, 0.12–0.41]) and lower BMI (adjusted OR, 0.91 [95% CI, 0.87, 0.95]). Conclusions: Service-related illnesses are prevalent in military personnel who undergo polysomnography with significant associations between PTSD, pain syndromes, and insomnia. Despite having sleep disorders, almost half reported short sleep duration

  12. Sleep disorders and associated medical comorbidities in active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Mysliwiec, Vincent; McGraw, Leigh; Pierce, Roslyn; Smith, Patrick; Trapp, Brandon; Roth, Bernard J

    2013-02-01

    Describe the prevalence of sleep disorders in military personnel referred for polysomnography and identify relationships between demographic characteristics, comorbid diagnoses, and specific sleep disorders. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Military medical treatment facility. Active duty military personnel with diagnostic polysomnogram in 2010. Primary sleep disorder rendered by review of polysomnogram and medical record by a board certified sleep medicine physician. Demographic characteristics and conditions of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), anxiety, depression, and pain syndromes determined by medical record review. Primary sleep diagnoses (n = 725) included: mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 207 (27.2%); insomnia, 188 (24.7%); moderate-to-severe OSA, 183 (24.0 %); and paradoxical insomnia,39 (5.1%); behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome, 68 (8.9%) and snoring, 40 (5.3%) comprised our control group. Short sleep duration (< 5 h) was reported by 41.8%. Overall 85.2% had deployed, with 58.1% having one or more comorbid diagnoses. Characteristics associated with moderate-to-severe OSA were age (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.03 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.0-1.05], sex (male) (adjusted OR, 19.97 [95% CI, 2.66-150.05], anxiety (adjusted OR, 0.58 [95% CI, 0.34-0.99]), and body mass index, BMI (adjusted OR 1.19 [95% CI, 1.13-1.25]; for insomnia, characteristics included PTSD (adjusted OR, 2.12 [95% CI, 1.31-3.44]), pain syndromes (adjusted OR, 1.48 [95%CI, 1.01-2.12]), sex (female) (adjusted OR, 0.22 [95% CI, 0.12-0.41]) and lower BMI (adjusted OR, 0.91 [95% CI, 0.87, 0.95]). Service-related illnesses are prevalent in military personnel who undergo polysomnography with significant associations between PTSD, pain syndromes, and insomnia. Despite having sleep disorders, almost half reported short sleep duration. Multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of military personnel with sleep disorders and service

  13. [Experience of medical backup of military parade on Red Square. Authors showed data about medical backup of military personnel taking part in the parade on Red Square dedicating to anniversary of victory in the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Malykh, A B; Iakovlev, S V; Valevskiĭ, V V

    2014-03-01

    Authors showed data about medical backup of military personnel taking part in the parade on Red Square dedicating to anniversary of Victory in the Great Patriotic War. Experience of running such events allowed to work out an algorithm for medical service: preparatory stage, training stage, running of parade, stage of move out to permanent base. During the parade on Red Square for medical care asked 18 people (participants of parade and civilians). Authors came to conclusion that as a result of medical backup of military personnel taking part in the parade no infectious and group diseases were registered.

  14. Medicine and the Egyptian campaign: the development of the military medical officer during the Napoleonic Wars c. 1798-1801.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates how French and British army medical officers in Egypt at the turn of the 19th century were affected by campaign experiences. Their encounters with ophthalmia, plague, and other diseases influenced the practice of medicine in later campaigns and fostered the development of the idea amongst military practitioners that military diseases required specialised knowledge. Practitioners' campaign writings are used to demonstrate how British army doctors approached the investigation of the "new" diseases they encountered. In particular, the article focuses on how Dr. James McGrigor used the military system to control, direct, and disseminate the development of medical knowledge.

  15. [Military medical doctrine and the development of the concept of disaster medicine].

    PubMed

    Nechaev, E A; Nazarenko, G I; Zhizin, V N

    1993-04-01

    On the basis of their own experience and literature concerning liquidation of the disaster consequences the authors analyse limitations in the disaster health care system. The article shows the trends towards the improvement of medical aid during catastrophes of peaceful period, taking into account various aspects of military doctrine and, especially, the casualty care staging system. It is stressed that the disaster health care procedures will depend on the structure of sanitary losses, characteristic features of the scene of an accident and the dynamics of medical environment.

  16. Select clinical recommendations for military medical practitioners conducting humanitarian and civic assistance activities.

    PubMed

    Hollon, Justin R; Hickey, Patrick W

    2010-09-01

    Training and planning for stability, security, transition, and reconstruction, to include humanitarian and civic assistance activities, has taken on new importance for today's military forces. Deployed medical forces providing medical care to local populations are presented with the challenge of limited resources, complex public health needs, and complex cultural and linguistic barriers to care. In this article, we review some of the clinical situations commonly encountered during these operations and provide an evidence-based rationale for proposed courses of action. This report is timely given expanding operations in Afghanistan and the stand-up of the U.S. African Command (AFRICOM).

  17. Peninsula Academies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raby, Marilyn E.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the Peninsula Academies program developed by the Sequoia (California) Union High School District and 27 local high technology companies to help educationally disadvantaged students break the pattern of low academic achievement, lack of skills, and chronic unemployment. (FL)

  18. Prevalence of Psychotropic Medication Use Among Dutch Military Personnel Between 2003 and 2012 and Its Comparison to the Dutch General Population.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Debbie G A; Vermetten, Eric; Egberts, Toine C G; Heerdink, Eibert R

    2017-01-01

    The armed forces work under high pressure and in stressful environments and it is well known that being in the military is a risk factor for psychiatric problems. However, it remains unknown how prevalent psychotropic medication use is in military personnel. To assess prevalence of psychotropic medication use in Dutch military personnel and compare to the Dutch general population. Data were obtained from the military pharmacy. From 2003 to 2012, the year-prevalence of psychotropic medication use was calculated from the number of distributed psychotropic medications and the number of Dutch military personnel. For the year 2011, the year-prevalence of psychotropic medication use in the military was compared to that of the Dutch general population. The year-prevalence of psychotropic medication use increased by 55%, from 1.64% in 2003 to 2.54% in 2012 in Dutch military personnel. An increase is seen in the number of users of psychotropic medication. Also the use of antidepressants and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medication increased. Over the last decade, there has been a 1.5-fold increase in psychotropic medication dispensed to Dutch military personnel. However, Dutch military personnel were significantly less likely to use psychotropic medications compared to the Dutch general population. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  19. The development of military medical care for peripheral nerve injuries during World War I.

    PubMed

    Hanigan, William

    2010-05-01

    Although the clinical and electrical diagnoses and treatments of peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) had been described prior to World War I, many reports were fragmented and incomplete. Individual physicians' experiences were not extensive, and in 1914 the patient with a PNI remained a subject of medical curiosity, and was hardly a focus of comprehensive care. World War I altered these conditions; casualties with septic wounds and PNIs swamped the general hospitals. By 1915, specialized hospitals or wards were developed to care for neurological injuries. In the United Kingdom, Sir Robert Jones developed the concept of Military Orthopedic Centres, with coordinated specialized care and rehabilitation. Military appointments of neurologists and electrotherapists sharpened clinical diagnoses and examinations. Surgical techniques were introduced, then discarded or accepted as surgeons developed skills to meet the new conditions. The US Surgeon General, William Gorgas, and his consultant in neurosurgery, Charles Frazier, went a step further, with the organization of a research laboratory as well as the establishment of a Peripheral Nerve Commission and Registry. Despite these developments and good intentions, postwar follow-up for PNIs remained incomplete at best. Records were lost, personnel transferred, and patients discharged from the system. The lack of a standardized grading system seriously impaired the ability to record clinical changes and compare outcomes. Nevertheless, specialized treatment of a large number of PNIs during World War I established a foundation for comprehensive care that influenced military medical services in the next world war.

  20. [The contribution of the Archive of the Military Medical Museum in summarizing the experience of the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Budko, A A; Gribovskaya, G A

    2015-06-01

    During 70 years of existence of the Military Medical Museum one of its main goals was to create an archive of military medical documents, the formation of his ideology and collecting funds, saving and promotion of unique materials related to the history of Russia, feat of arms Defenders of the Fatherland in the wars of the XX century. Creating a military medical museum archive was conceived in the beginning of the Great Patriotic War by leading figures of the military medicine--E.I.Smirnov, S.M.Bagdasaryan, V.N.Shevkunenko, A.N.Maksimenkov, who offered to collect all materials about the work of physicians at the front and in the rear, to consider the archive as a base for scientific works on the history of the military health care. Today the archive was removed from the Army Medical Museum and now it is a branch of the Central Archive of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation (military medical records). His staff keeps the traditions established by predecessors and use in their activities a wealth of experience and background research.

  1. The strange career of managed competition: from military failure to medical success?

    PubMed Central

    Waitzkin, H

    1994-01-01

    Managed competition remains untested as the basis of a national health program. However, key principles of managed competition first emerged in the military. For this study, published works on systems analysis and the planning-programming-budgeting system (PPBS), developed by Alain Enthoven and colleagues at the US Department of Defense during the 1960s, were compared with published presentations of managed competition. The influence of PPBS waned after it generated controversy and opposition. PPBS and managed competition represent similar managerial strategies of policy reform. Although the origin of managed competition in failed military policy does not ensure failure in the medical arena, this history also does not augur success. Images p483-a p484-a PMID:8129073

  2. Modafinil, sleep deprivation, and cognitive function in military and medical settings.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Kelli J

    2005-04-01

    Military personnel of many professions, including health care workers, are routinely challenged with performing their duties during hours when the circadian rhythm is at its trough, namely, late night and early morning. Studies have shown that cognitive performance declines significantly during these hours. Although many pharmacologic agents have been studied in an attempt to find a safe medication to enhance alertness and cognitive function, no safe nonaddictive options have been identified. Modafinil is a novel wakefulness-promoting agent that has been shown to improve cognitive performance and promote wakefulness among shift workers. This article reviews the studies on modafinil administration and cognitive performance as they relate to military operations and the provision of health care by sleep-deprived individuals.

  3. The use of animals in live-tissue trauma training and military medical research.

    PubMed

    Martinic, Gary

    2011-09-21

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage is the most common preventable cause of death for soldiers wounded in combat. In live-tissue trauma training (LTTT), animals (mostly goats and pigs) are used to train physicians and paramedical personnel in how to treat severe traumatic injuries, including severe blood loss. Military personnel insist that such realistic training is necessary and has to date saved countless lives of soldiers. Animal rights groups, however, argue that the practice is inhumane and should be replaced with alternative methods. In this essay, the author explains how and why animals are used for LTTT and in military medical research (MMR), as well as why he feels that the continued use of animals for LTTT and MMR is justified. The author hopes to encourage wider discussion of this topic within the scientific, defense and animal welfare circles, leading to further refinements in the welfare and protection of animals used for these important, though often controversial, purposes.

  4. Improving the quality of discharge summaries: implementing updated Academy of Medical Royal Colleges standards at a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    May-Miller, Hannah; Hayter, Joanne; Loewenthal, Lola; Hall, Louis; Hilbert, Rebecca; Quinn, Michael; Pearson, Nicola; Patel, Alisha; Law, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Quality of documentation is harder to quantify and incentivise, but it has a significant impact on patient care. Good discharge summaries facilitate continuity between secondary and primary care. The junior doctors’ forum led this project to improve the quality of electronic discharge summaries (eDS). Baseline measurement revealed significant room for improvement. We measured the quality of 10 summaries per month (across all inpatient specialties), against 23 indicators from the revised Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AoMRC) standards (2013) that were prioritised by GPs as a “minimum dataset”. Junior doctors felt that the Trust's dual eDS systems were responsible for great variation in quality. This was confirmed by the results of a comparison audit of the systems in April 2014: one system greatly outperformed the other (57% mean compliance with iSoft clinical management (iCM) based system vs. 77% with InfoPath-based system). We recommended that the Trust move to a single eDS system, decommissioning the iCM-based system, and this proposal was approved by several Trust committees. We worked with information services, junior doctors, general practitioners and hospital physicians to develop and implement a generic template to further improve compliance with AoMRC standards. In August 2014, the iCM-based system was withdrawn, the new template went live, and training was delivered, coinciding with the changeover of junior doctors to minimise disruption. Median compliance increased from 66.7% to 77.8%. Quality of discharge summaries had improved across the specialties. There was a reduction in the number of complaints and positive qualitative feedback from general practitioners and junior doctors. Completion of discharge summaries within 24 hours was not affected by this change. There is still more to be done to improve quality; average compliance with the full AoMRC standards (39 indicators) is 59.5%. With the approval of the Trust executive committee further

  5. Improving the quality of discharge summaries: implementing updated Academy of Medical Royal Colleges standards at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    May-Miller, Hannah; Hayter, Joanne; Loewenthal, Lola; Hall, Louis; Hilbert, Rebecca; Quinn, Michael; Pearson, Nicola; Patel, Alisha; Law, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Quality of documentation is harder to quantify and incentivise, but it has a significant impact on patient care. Good discharge summaries facilitate continuity between secondary and primary care. The junior doctors' forum led this project to improve the quality of electronic discharge summaries (eDS). Baseline measurement revealed significant room for improvement. We measured the quality of 10 summaries per month (across all inpatient specialties), against 23 indicators from the revised Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AoMRC) standards (2013) that were prioritised by GPs as a "minimum dataset". Junior doctors felt that the Trust's dual eDS systems were responsible for great variation in quality. This was confirmed by the results of a comparison audit of the systems in April 2014: one system greatly outperformed the other (57% mean compliance with iSoft clinical management (iCM) based system vs. 77% with InfoPath-based system). We recommended that the Trust move to a single eDS system, decommissioning the iCM-based system, and this proposal was approved by several Trust committees. We worked with information services, junior doctors, general practitioners and hospital physicians to develop and implement a generic template to further improve compliance with AoMRC standards. In August 2014, the iCM-based system was withdrawn, the new template went live, and training was delivered, coinciding with the changeover of junior doctors to minimise disruption. Median compliance increased from 66.7% to 77.8%. Quality of discharge summaries had improved across the specialties. There was a reduction in the number of complaints and positive qualitative feedback from general practitioners and junior doctors. Completion of discharge summaries within 24 hours was not affected by this change. There is still more to be done to improve quality; average compliance with the full AoMRC standards (39 indicators) is 59.5%. With the approval of the Trust executive committee further plan

  6. [Experience and prospective activities of the Department of Occupational Medicine at the St. Petersburg Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education].

    PubMed

    Retnev, V M

    1997-01-01

    Occupational Medicine Department in St. Petersburg Academy for Postgraduate Education has carried out considerable educational and scientific work during seventy years. Occupational medicine is a prospective scientific discipline, as it has a legal reason-the state's preservation of workers' health.

  7. [Research Scientific Centre of Military Medicine, Military-medical Techniques and Pharmacy of State Research Scientific Institute of Military Medicine of Ministry of Defence of RF celebrates 80 years].

    PubMed

    Bukhtiiarov, I V; Varlachev, A V; Medvedev, V R

    2010-11-01

    The history of the 80-year activity of the Institute of Military Medicine, established in the Workers and Peasants, Red Army, Soviet Union. The Institute was founded in 1930 in Moscow and was originally called the Military Sanitary Institute. In a subsequent Institute repeatedly reformed, had different names, with the first years of its existence, has made and continues to contribute significantly to the development of means of medical services and other medical devices. The concrete results of operations and information about the staff are established.

  8. Military Personnel. The DOD and Coast Guard Academies Have Taken Steps to Address Incidents of Sexual Harassment and Assault, but Greater Federal Oversight is Needed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Sexual Assault Awareness Month Assists the senior commander to meet annual SAPR training requirements, including orientation for newly assigned...by providing sexual harassment and assault orientation briefings for new students and personnel. Each of the DOD academies employs different...Address Incidents of Sexual Harassment and Assault, but Greater Federal Oversight Is Needed January 2008 GAO-08-296 Report Documentation

  9. The Joint Military Medical Executive Skills initiative: an impressive response to changing human resource management rules of engagement.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Bernard J

    2007-01-01

    Confronted with a sudden and substantial change in the rules regarding who could command a military medical treatment facility (MTF), the Military Health System (MHS) responded to the challenge with an impressive human resource management solution-the Joint Medical Executive Skills Program. The history, emergence, and continuing role of this initiative exemplifies the MHS's capacity to fulfill the spirit and intent of an arduous Congressional mandate while enhancing professional development and sustaining the career opportunities of medical officers. The MHS response to the Congressional requirement that candidates for MTF command demonstrate professional administrative skills was decisive, creative, and consistent with the basic principles of human resource management. The Joint Medical Executive Skills Program is a management success story that demonstrates how strategic planning, well-defined skills requirements, and structured training can assure a ready supply of qualified commanders for the military's MTFs.

  10. Female military medical school graduates entering surgical internships: are we keeping up with national trends?

    PubMed

    Vertrees, Amy; Laferriere, Nicole; Elster, Eric; Shriver, Craig D; Rich, Norman M

    2014-10-01

    Ratios of women graduating from the only US military medical school and entering surgical internships were reviewed and compared with national trends. Data were obtained from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences graduation announcements from 2002 to 2012. There were 1,771 graduates from 2002 to 2012, with 508 female (29%) and 1,263 male (71%) graduates. Female graduates increased over time (21% to 39%; P = .014). Female general surgery interns increased from 3.9% to 39% (P = .025). Female overall surgical subspecialty interns increased from 20% in 2002 to 36% in 2012 (P = .046). Women were represented well in obstetrics (57%), urology (44%), and otolaryngology (31%), but not in neurosurgery, orthopedics, and ophthalmology (0% to 20%). The sex disparity between military and civilian medical students occurs before entry. Once in medical school, women are just as likely to enter general surgery or surgical subspecialty as their male counterparts. Increased ratio of women in the class is unlikely to lead to a shortfall except in specific subspecialties. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A retrospective cohort study of military deployment and postdeployment medical encounters for respiratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Joseph H; Eick-Cost, Angie; Clark, Leslie L; Hu, Zheng; Baird, Coleen P; DeFraites, Robert; Tobler, Steven K; Richards, Erin E; Sharkey, Jessica M; Lipnick, Robert J; Ludwig, Sharon L

    2014-05-01

    Deployed military personnel are exposed to inhalational hazards that may increase their risk of chronic lung conditions. This evaluation assessed associations between Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) deployment and postdeployment medical encounters for respiratory symptoms and medical conditions. This retrospective cohort study was conducted among military personnel who, between January 2005 and June 2007, were deployed to either of two locations with burn pits in Iraq, or to either of two locations without burn pits in Kuwait. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated using two nondeployed reference groups. Rates among personnel deployed to burn pit locations were also compared directly to those among personnel deployed to locations without burn pits. Significantly elevated rates of encounters for respiratory symptoms (IRR = 1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.20-1.30) and asthma (IRR = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.33-1.78) were observed among the formerly deployed personnel relative to U.S.-stationed personnel. Personnel deployed to burn pit locations did not have significantly elevated rates for any of the outcomes relative to personnel deployed to locations without burn pits. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that OIF deployment is associated with subsequent risk of respiratory conditions. Elevated medical encounter rates were not uniquely associated with burn pits.

  12. Military inpatient residential treatment of substance abuse disorders: the Eisenhower Army Medical Center experience.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Scott R; Horton, Philip A; Trakowski, John H; Lenard, Janet H; Barron, Mark R; Nave, Peggy V; Gautreaux, Melissa S; Lott, Heather D

    2014-06-01

    Opened in 2009, the Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center Inpatient Residential Treatment Facility (RTF) is the largest and most well-established inpatient substance use disorder treatment facility in the Department of Defense. The RTF is a 28-day inpatient treatment program that employs evidence-based practices and is based on Alcoholics/Narcotics Anonymous principles that are incorporated with a hybrid of military daily structure regime including early morning physical training. Family involvement is encouraged. The RTF is staffed by a multidisciplinary team specializing in addictions and admits Active/Activated Service Members (SMs) from all Service branches, typically those who have failed other military/civilian substance use disorder programs. Eighty-seven percent of SMs referred to the program successfully commenced, with continuous sobriety observed in over half of SMs 6 months later, and 1 year relapse rates comparable to other alcohol treatment programs. Limitations of our program evaluation efforts, lessons learned, and recommendations for the way ahead are shared. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Patient-centered medical home: an emerging primary care model and the military health system.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Robert C; Doperak, Martin; Milner, Michelle; Motsinger, Charles; Newton, Terry; Padden, Maureen; Pastoor, Sara; Hughes, Cortney L; LeFurgy, Jennifer; Mun, Seong K

    2011-11-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a primary care model that aims to provide quality care that is coordinated, comprehensive, and cost-effective. PCMH is hinged upon building a strong patient-provider relationship and using a team-based approach to care to increase continuity and access. It is anticipated that PCMH can curb the growth of health care costs through better preventative medicine and lower utilization of services. The Navy, Air Force, and Army are implementing versions of PCMH, which includes the use of technologies for improved documentation, better disease management, improved communication between the care teams and patients, and increased access to care. This article examines PCMH in the Military Health System by providing examples of the transition from each of the branches. The authors argue that the military must overcome unique challenges to implement and sustain PCMH that civilian providers may not face because of the deployment of patients and staff, the military's mission of readiness, and the use of both on-base and off-base care by beneficiaries. Our objective is to lay out these considerations and to provide ways that they have been or can be addressed within the transition from traditional primary care to PCMH.

  14. Urologic Diseases in Korean Military Population: a 6-year Epidemiological Review of Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We sought to describe the incidence rate of the urologic disease in the Korean military by reviewing diagnoses made in active duty soldiers from 2008 to 2013. A total of 72,248 first visits were generated in the Defense Medical Statistics Information System (DMSIS) with its gradually increasing trend over 6 years. A sharp increase of first visit was observed after implementation of the regular health check-up for all conscripted soldiers since 2013. Urolithiasis, prostatitis, epididymoorchitis, urethritis, and varicocele were prevalent. Prostatitis was the highest diagnosis made in the outpatient service, while varicocele was ranked the highest in the inpatient service. The incidence rates of urologic disease varied from 12.3 to 34.2 cases per 1,000 person-years. The urologic disease in conscripted men showed different distribution when we separated the population into conscripted and professional soldiers. Epididymoorchitis was the highest disease followed by urolithiasis, dysuresia, and balanoposthitis in 2013. This study underscores that the urologic disease has spent significant amount of health care resources in the Korean military. This calls for further study to find any significant difference and contributing factors of the urologic disease in the military and the civilian population. PMID:27914143

  15. Medical stability operations--one approach to transforming the Department of Defense Military Health System.

    PubMed

    Licina, Derek

    2012-10-01

    The Department of Defense Instruction (DoDI) 6000.16 entitled Military Health Support for Stability Operations was published in 2010 and established policy that Medical Stability Operations (MSOs) would be a core military mission. The instruction set out to institutionalize how the Military Health Support (MHS) would effectively support MSOs and assist in bridging the gap with other actors operating in the same space. What is less clear is the current status of the MHS in accomplishing the responsibilities outlined in the DoDI. Even more concerning is how these efforts will support the "new" strategic guidance for the DoD published in January 2012 that states U.S. forces will no longer be sized to conduct large-scale, prolonged stability operations. In the absence of a publicly available DoDI 6000.16 implementation strategy, this article proposes the use of an organizational transformation process developed by internationally acclaimed leadership and organizational change expert Dr. John Kotter. The eight-step process is used as a framework to explore ways to effectively transform the DoD in meeting the intent of the MSOs DoDI. The past decade has transformed how service members think about MSOs. Now is the time to transform the MHS with urgency to institutionalize these thoughts.

  16. Urologic Diseases in Korean Military Population: a 6-year Epidemiological Review of Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Choi, Se Young; Yoon, Chang Gyo

    2017-01-01

    We sought to describe the incidence rate of the urologic disease in the Korean military by reviewing diagnoses made in active duty soldiers from 2008 to 2013. A total of 72,248 first visits were generated in the Defense Medical Statistics Information System (DMSIS) with its gradually increasing trend over 6 years. A sharp increase of first visit was observed after implementation of the regular health check-up for all conscripted soldiers since 2013. Urolithiasis, prostatitis, epididymoorchitis, urethritis, and varicocele were prevalent. Prostatitis was the highest diagnosis made in the outpatient service, while varicocele was ranked the highest in the inpatient service. The incidence rates of urologic disease varied from 12.3 to 34.2 cases per 1,000 person-years. The urologic disease in conscripted men showed different distribution when we separated the population into conscripted and professional soldiers. Epididymoorchitis was the highest disease followed by urolithiasis, dysuresia, and balanoposthitis in 2013. This study underscores that the urologic disease has spent significant amount of health care resources in the Korean military. This calls for further study to find any significant difference and contributing factors of the urologic disease in the military and the civilian population.

  17. Evaluating the Military Medical Evacuation Chain: Need for Expeditious Evacuation Out of Theater?

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Thijs T C F; de Graaf, Johan; Plat, Marie-Christine J; Huizinga, Eelco P; Janse, Jacobine; van der Krans, Arie C; Leenen, Luke P H; Hoencamp, Rigo

    2017-09-01

    An important factor within the military medical logistical chain is the capability of expeditious evacuation from point of injury, through a Medical Treatment Facility, to the country of residence where highest level of care can be provided. Although many factors can relate to patient outcome, the evaluation of the medical evacuation chain related to long-term patient outcome can be important for investigating possibilities for performance improvement in this domain. This article aims to provide a means to evaluate the quality of care of the medical evacuation chain. Repatriated service members from the Afghan theater between 2004 and 2014 were invited to participate in a survey concerning functional outcome and quality of life using Lower Extremity Functional Scale, Short Form health survey 36, and EuroQol-6D questionnaires. Possible associations between these outcomes were analyzed in respect to duration of medical evacuation from point of injury to arrival in the Dutch military hospital. The duration was dichotomized into within and after 72 hours. Ordinal regression was used to analyze a possible association with duration as a continuous variable. Sixty percent (28/47) of battle casualties arrived in The Netherlands within 72 hours. For the nonbattle injury cohort this was 30% (7/23). Of those who became ill, 18% (5/28) was evacuated in 72 hours. No significant independent associations between interval duration and measured outcomes were found. Repatriated battle casualties had lower outcome scores compared to the disease nonbattle injured service members. Significant differences in functional outcome and quality of life with respect to evacuation duration were not found. Specialized tactical evacuation and en route care capability during strategic evacuation contributed to relative high standards of care. Combined with our results, this could implicate that delivery of the right care to the right patient at the right time is a justifiable paradigm. The main

  18. Gilda's Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duplessis, Gilda

    2008-01-01

    Immediately after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, the author and her partner made a decision to rebuild their child care center as two apartments. However, the city of New Orleans would only approve the location for one dwelling with a child care center. This article describes the author's experiences in rebuilding Gilda's Academy, her child…

  19. Adaptive Virtual Reality Training to Optimize Military Medical Skills Acquisition and Retention.

    PubMed

    Siu, Ka-Chun; Best, Bradley J; Kim, Jong Wook; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Ritter, Frank E

    2016-05-01

    The Department of Defense has pursued the integration of virtual reality simulation into medical training and applications to fulfill the need to train 100,000 military health care personnel annually. Medical personnel transitions, both when entering an operational area and returning to the civilian theater, are characterized by the need to rapidly reacquire skills that are essential but have decayed through disuse or infrequent use. Improved efficiency in reacquiring such skills is critical to avoid the likelihood of mistakes that may result in mortality and morbidity. We focus here on a study testing a theory of how the skills required for minimally invasive surgery for military surgeons are learned and retained. Our adaptive virtual reality surgical training system will incorporate an intelligent mechanism for tracking performance that will recognize skill deficiencies and generate an optimal adaptive training schedule. Our design is modeling skill acquisition based on a skill retention theory. The complexity of appropriate training tasks is adjusted according to the level of retention and/or surgical experience. Based on preliminary work, our system will improve the capability to interactively assess the level of skills learning and decay, optimizes skill relearning across levels of surgical experience, and positively impact skill maintenance. Our system could eventually reduce mortality and morbidity by providing trainees with the reexperience they need to help make a transition between operating theaters. This article reports some data that will support adaptive tutoring of minimally invasive surgery and similar surgical skills.

  20. Chinese military medical teams in the Ebola outbreak of Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinying; Rong, G; Yu, S P; Sun, Z; Duan, X; Dong, Z; Xia, H; Zhan, N; Jin, C; Ji, J; Duan, H

    2016-06-01

    The 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa was the largest in history. The three most affected countries, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, have faced enormous challenges in controlling transmission and providing clinical care for patients with EVD. The Chinese government, in response to the requests of the WHO and the governments of the affected countries, responded rapidly by deploying Chinese military medical teams (CMMTs) to the areas struck by the deadly epidemic. A total of three CMMTs, comprising 115 military medical professionals, were rotationally deployed to Freetown, Sierra Leone to assist with infection prevention and control, clinical care and health promotion and training. Between 1 October 2014 and 22 March 2015, the CMMTs in Sierra Leone admitted and treated a total of 773 suspected and 285 confirmed EVD cases. Among the 285 confirmed cases, 146 (51.2%) patients survived after treatment. In addition, the CMMTs maintained the record of zero infections among healthcare workers and zero cross-infections between quarantined patients. In this manuscript, we aim to give an overview of the mission, and share our best practices experience on predeployment preparedness, EVD holding and treatment centre building and EVD case management. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Chinese military medical teams in the Ebola outbreak of Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yinying; Rong, G; Yu, S P; Sun, Z; Duan, X; Dong, Z; Xia, H; Zhan, N; Jin, C; Ji, J; Duan, H

    2016-01-01

    The 2014–2015 Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa was the largest in history. The three most affected countries, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, have faced enormous challenges in controlling transmission and providing clinical care for patients with EVD. The Chinese government, in response to the requests of the WHO and the governments of the affected countries, responded rapidly by deploying Chinese military medical teams (CMMTs) to the areas struck by the deadly epidemic. A total of three CMMTs, comprising 115 military medical professionals, were rotationally deployed to Freetown, Sierra Leone to assist with infection prevention and control, clinical care and health promotion and training. Between 1 October 2014 and 22 March 2015, the CMMTs in Sierra Leone admitted and treated a total of 773 suspected and 285 confirmed EVD cases. Among the 285 confirmed cases, 146 (51.2%) patients survived after treatment. In addition, the CMMTs maintained the record of zero infections among healthcare workers and zero cross-infections between quarantined patients. In this manuscript, we aim to give an overview of the mission, and share our best practices experience on predeployment preparedness, EVD holding and treatment centre building and EVD case management. PMID:26744190

  2. [The outcomes and the lessons of medical provision of the military forces during the great patriotic war].

    PubMed

    Knopov, M Sh; Taranukha, V K

    2010-01-01

    The progressive type of the system of of the military forces during the Great Patriotic War was ensured by the following features: the availability and maintenance of the principles of integrated field military medical doctrine, the theoretical validity of the propositions of the mentioned doctrine and the implementation of advanced achievements of medicine in developing the principles of organization of medical care and methods of treatment of wounded and ill patients; the dynamic development of content and organization of curative evacuative measures and their permanent development during the War; the systematic and close interrelationships of civil and military health care which ensured the ultimately possible implementation of national health care resources and scientific technical and industrial potentials of medical and closely-related industries in the interests of development of necessary material technical foundation of curative evacuative system during all stages of war.

  3. Development of a portable therapeutic and high intensity ultrasound system for military, medical, and research use.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Olbricht, William L

    2008-11-01

    We have developed a portable high power ultrasound system with a very low output impedance amplifier circuit (less than 0.3 Omega) that can transfer more than 90% of the energy from a battery supply to the ultrasound transducer. The system can deliver therapeutic acoustical energy waves at lower voltages than those in conventional ultrasound systems because energy losses owing to a mismatched impedance are eliminated. The system can produce acoustic power outputs over the therapeutic range (greater then 50 W) from a PZT-4, 1.54 MHz, and 0.75 in diameter piezoelectric ceramic. It is lightweight, portable, and powered by a rechargeable battery. The portable therapeutic ultrasound unit has the potential to replace "plug-in" medical systems and rf amplifiers used in research. The system is capable of field service on its internal battery, making it especially useful for military, ambulatory, and remote medical applications.

  4. Development of a portable therapeutic and high intensity ultrasound system for military, medical, and research use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, George K.; Olbricht, William L.

    2008-11-01

    We have developed a portable high power ultrasound system with a very low output impedance amplifier circuit (less than 0.3 Ω) that can transfer more than 90% of the energy from a battery supply to the ultrasound transducer. The system can deliver therapeutic acoustical energy waves at lower voltages than those in conventional ultrasound systems because energy losses owing to a mismatched impedance are eliminated. The system can produce acoustic power outputs over the therapeutic range (greater then 50 W) from a PZT-4, 1.54 MHz, and 0.75 in diameter piezoelectric ceramic. It is lightweight, portable, and powered by a rechargeable battery. The portable therapeutic ultrasound unit has the potential to replace "plug-in" medical systems and rf amplifiers used in research. The system is capable of field service on its internal battery, making it especially useful for military, ambulatory, and remote medical applications.

  5. Diversity and the Success of Entering Classes at the U.S. Service Academies. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Sheila Nataraj

    2010-01-01

    The United States Military Academy (USMA) at West Point, the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) at Colorado Springs, and the United States Naval Academy (USNA) at Annapolis provide tuition-free, four-year undergraduate education and prepare entrants to be officers of the U.S. military services. Graduates are commissioned as officers for a…

  6. Diversity and the Success of Entering Classes at the U.S. Service Academies. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Sheila Nataraj

    2010-01-01

    The United States Military Academy (USMA) at West Point, the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) at Colorado Springs, and the United States Naval Academy (USNA) at Annapolis provide tuition-free, four-year undergraduate education and prepare entrants to be officers of the U.S. military services. Graduates are commissioned as officers for a…

  7. USSR Report, Military Affairs, No. 1782

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Star Academy imeni 60-Let Velikogo Oktyabrya (197061, Leningrad, P-61). Pushkin Higher Order of the Red Star Academy of Air Defense Electronics...188620, Leningrad, Pushkin , 1). Stavropol Higher Military Aviation Academy of Air Defense Pilots and Naviga- tors (355021, Stavropol, 21, kray). The...period of instruction at the engineers’ academies and at the engineers* faculty of the Pushkin Academy is 5 years, at other academies and also at the

  8. Perspectives from Ethiopia regarding U.S. military humanitarian assistance: how to build a better medical civil action project (MEDCAP).

    PubMed

    Miles, Shana; Malone, Joseph L

    2013-12-01

    Assuming that budgetary constraints continue over the next several years, the U.S. military's overseas medical activities including medical civic action projects (MEDCAPs) and humanitarian assistance projects could comprise an increasing proportion of the contributions of U.S. government (USG) to improving global health. We have identified several issues with MEDCAPs in Ethiopia since 2009 that resulted in delays or project cancellations. These were mostly related to lack of a plan to develop sustainable capacities. Although there are many obvious medical needs for civilian populations in Ethiopia, the provision of sustainable development assistance involving these Ethiopian populations on behalf of the USG is a complex undertaking involving coordination with many partners and coordination with several other USG agencies. Military medical professionals planning MEDCAPs and other cooperative global health projects would benefit from consultation and close coordination with U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and U.S. Agency of International Development (USAID) experts who are involved in supporting medium- and long-term health projects in Ethiopia. The establishment of durable military medical academic relationships and involvement of overseas military medical research units could also help promote sustainable projects and build robust professional relationships in global health.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome: innovative medical approaches in military medicine.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Erik B; Varney, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    After a radiological or nuclear event, acute radiation syndrome (ARS) will present complex medical challenges that could involve the treatment of hundreds to thousands of patients. Current medical doctrine is based on limited clinical data and remains inadequate. Efforts to develop medical innovations that address ARS complications are unlikely to be generated by industry because of market uncertainties specific to this type of injury. A prospective strategy could be the integration of cellular therapy to meet the medical demands of ARS. The most clinically advanced cellular therapy to date is the administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Results of currently published investigations describing MSC safety and efficacy in a variety of injury and disease models demonstrate the unique qualities of this reparative cell population in adapting to the specific requirements of the damaged tissue in which the cells integrate. This report puts forward a rationale for the further evaluation of MSC therapy to address the current unmet medical needs of ARS. We propose that the exploration of this novel therapy for the treatment of the multivariate complications of ARS could be of invaluable benefit to military medicine.

  10. Philippine Academy of Rehabilitation Medicine emergency basic relief and medical aid mission project (November 2013-February 2014): the role of physiatrists in Super Typhoon Haiyan.

    PubMed

    Ganchoon, Filipinas; Bugho, Rommel; Calina, Liezel; Dy, Rochelle; Gosney, James

    2017-06-09

    Physiatrists have provided humanitarian assistance in recent large-scale global natural disasters. Super Typhoon Haiyan, the deadliest and most costly typhoon in modern Philippine history, made landfall on 8 November 2013 resulting in significant humanitarian needs. Philippine Academy of Rehabilitation Medicine physiatrists conducted a project of 23 emergency basic relief and medical aid missions in response to Super Typhoon Haiyan from November 2013 to February 2014. The final mission was a medical aid mission to the inland rural community of Burauen, Leyte. Summary data were collected, collated, and tabulated; project and mission evaluation was performed. During the humanitarian assistance project, 31,254 basic relief kits containing a variety of food and non-food items were distributed and medical services including consultation, treatment, and medicines were provided to 7255 patients. Of the 344 conditions evaluated in the medical aid mission to Burauen, Leyte 85 (59%) were physical and rehabilitation medicine conditions comprised of musculoskeletal (62 [73%]), neurological (17 [20%]), and dermatological (6 [7%]) diagnoses. Post-mission and project analysis resulted in recommendations and programmatic changes to strengthen response in future disasters. Physiatrists functioned as medical providers, mission team leaders, community advocates, and in other roles. This physiatrist-led humanitarian assistance project met critical basic relief and medical aid needs of persons impacted by Super Typhoon Haiyan, demonstrating significant roles performed by physiatrists in response to a large-scale natural disaster. Resulting disaster programing changes and recommendations may inform a more effective response by PARM mission teams in the Philippines as well as by other South-Eastern Asia teams comprising rehabilitation professionals to large-scale, regional natural disasters. Implications for rehabilitation Large-scale natural disasters including tropical cyclones can

  11. Determining the dimensions of essential medical coverage required by military body armour plates utilising Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Breeze, J; Lewis, E A; Fryer, R

    2016-09-01

    Military body armour is designed to prevent the penetration of ballistic projectiles into the most vulnerable structures within the thorax and abdomen. Currently the OSPREY and VIRTUS body armour systems issued to United Kingdom (UK) Armed Forces personnel are provided with a single size front and rear ceramic plate regardless of the individual's body dimensions. Currently limited information exists to determine whether these plates overprotect some members of the military population, and no method exists to accurately size plates to an individual. Computed Tomography (CT) scans of 120 male Caucasian UK Armed Forces personnel were analysed to measure the dimensions of internal thoraco-abdominal anatomical structures that had been defined as requiring essential medical coverage. The boundaries of these structures were related to three potential anthropometric landmarks on the skin surface and statistical analysis was undertaken to validate the results. The range of heights of each individual used in this study was comparable to previous anthropometric surveys, confirming that a representative sample had been used. The vertical dimension of essential medical coverage demonstrated good correlation to torso height (suprasternal notch to iliac crest) but not to stature (r(2)=0.53 versus 0.04). Horizontal coverage did not correlate to either measure of height. Surface landmarks utilised in this study were proven to be reliable surrogate markers for the boundaries of the underlying anatomical structures potentially requiring essential protection by a plate. Providing a range of plate sizes, particularly multiple heights, should optimise the medical coverage and thus effectiveness of body armour for UK Armed Forces personnel. The results of this work provide evidence that a single width of plate if chosen correctly will provide the essential medical coverage for the entire military population, whilst recognising that it still could overprotect the smallest individuals

  12. Financial Operations of the Five Service Academies: Department of Defense, Department of Transportation, Department of Commerce. Report to the Congress by the Comptroller General of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This is the first report of the review of operations of five service academies operated by the government: U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York; Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland; Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado; Coast Guard Academy, New London, Connecticut; and Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point, New York. This report…

  13. A Historical Analysis of the Geneva And Hague Conventions and Their Protection of Military Medical Personnel, Facilities, and Transport During World War I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-05

    1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Historical Analysis of the Geneva And Hague Conventions and Their Protection of Military Medical Personnel, Facilities...personnel, facilities, and transport during World War I. The analysis focuses on violations against American, British, and French protected medical...and transport. Based upon the analysis , the investigator concluded that the German military frequently and intentionally violated the provisions of

  14. High intensity scenario training of military medical students to increase learning capacity and management of stress response.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Genevieve R; Moloff, Alan L; Wedmore, Ian S; Schoeff, Jonathan E; Laporta, Anthony J

    2012-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between a beneficial stress response that enhances memory and recall performance and a detrimental high stress response that impairs memory and learning. Repetitive training in stressful situations enables people to lower their stress levels from the detrimental range to a more beneficial one.1 This is particularly true for physicians in training as they seek to achieve advanced skills and knowledge in the fields of triage, emergency medicine, and surgery prior to graduation. This need is significant for medical students entering military service after graduation. We theorize that military medical students can advance their proficiencies through an Intensive Skills Week (ISW) prior to entering their third and forth year rotations. To test this theory, Rocky Vista University will hold a week long high-intensity first-responder, emergency medicine and surgical training course, facilitated by military medical physicians, to further students? skills and maximize training using the Human Worn Partial Surgical Task Simulator (Cut Suit). We also see the possible benefit to physician and non-physician military personnel, especially Special Operations Forces (SOF) medical personnel, from developing and implementing similar training programs when live tissue or cadaver models are unavailable or not feasible. Stress, cortisol, medical student, enhanced learning, scenario, high intensity. 2012.

  15. Self-reported health status of students in-processing into military medical advanced individual training.

    PubMed

    Rice, Valerie J Berg; Mays, Mary Z; Gable, Clayton

    2009-01-01

    It is important to be aware of the health and injury status of students in military training settings in order to adequately plan for their progression through required physical training and provision of health care to meet their needs. This paper describes the self-reported health status of students arriving in two medical training Battalions at Ft. Sam Houston. The results revealed that 43% of arriving soldiers had musculoskeletal symptoms and 35% had symptoms that interfered with their ability to accomplish the normal daily activities required as students. The most common sites of symptoms were knee (17 and 18%), foot/toe (16 and 13%), ankle (9 and 10%), and lower leg (9 and 12%) for the 232nd and 187th Medical Battalions respectively. Risk factors for those with musculoskeletal injury (MSI) symptoms that interfere with their abilities to do their jobs include gender, past history of injury, and self-reported stress and fitness levels. Other risk factors for medical specialties other than combat medic include being older (over 24 yrs of age), active duty status, being overweight, and use of smokeless tobacco. This information can help identify soldiers considered at risk of incurring a MSI during AIT. With this knowledge, physical training can be designed to help soldiers achieve fitness without additional injury and health care facilities can be designed to provide appropriate staffing of the health care professionals needed for evaluation and treatment.

  16. The Proceedings of the War and Morality Symposium held at United States Military Academy, West Point, New York on 1-2 May 1980,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    RESPONSIBILITIES IN WAR.....................29 by LTG William R. Peers (USA, Reired) THE MORALITY OF MILITARY INTERVENTION THE MORALITY OF...University from 1973-74. Two of Profes- sor Brandt’s books are Ethical Th (1959) andA Theory of the Good anT "h" Kt (19). .Professo Thomas Nagel -Thomas... Nagel is Professor of Philosophy atPilnceton University. He was edu- cated at Cornell, Oxford, and Harvard and taught for three years at Berkeley

  17. Proceedings of the (20th) Annual Military Librarians’ Workshop on Public Relations, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, 20-22 October 1976

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-22

    of their overall collection. Paul Klinefelter has remarked that DDC intends someday to provide the kind of snared cataloging for technical reports that...Military History Research Collection Naval Observatory Library Carlisle Uarracks, Pennsylvania 17013 34th and Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. - Autovon: 242-3600...Maryland 20910 Columbus, Georgia 31905 Autovon: 290-2545 Autovon: 835-4053 I PAUL KLINEFELTER UNA HUGGINS Deputy Dircctor of Technical Services Army

  18. Israeli Military Medical Experience: Ideas for the U.S. Air Force’s Medical Service?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    To contravene this policy would cause serious problems for triage, where it would be logistically difficult and medically dangerous to attempt to...1976. Danon , Y. and T. Halel (Huler), "Hospital Disaster Planning and Exercises," Harefuah, 83:377-380, 1972. ,-CUDUG PAGN SLUM-O TILAW - 32 - The

  19. A markov decision process model for the optimal dispatch of military medical evacuation assets.

    PubMed

    Keneally, Sean K; Robbins, Matthew J; Lunday, Brian J

    2016-06-01

    We develop a Markov decision process (MDP) model to examine aerial military medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) dispatch policies in a combat environment. The problem of deciding which aeromedical asset to dispatch to each service request is complicated by the threat conditions at the service locations and the priority class of each casualty event. We assume requests for MEDEVAC support arrive sequentially, with the location and the priority of each casualty known upon initiation of the request. The United States military uses a 9-line MEDEVAC request system to classify casualties as being one of three priority levels: urgent, priority, and routine. Multiple casualties can be present at a single casualty event, with the highest priority casualty determining the priority level for the casualty event. Moreover, an armed escort may be required depending on the threat level indicated by the 9-line MEDEVAC request. The proposed MDP model indicates how to optimally dispatch MEDEVAC helicopters to casualty events in order to maximize steady-state system utility. The utility gained from servicing a specific request depends on the number of casualties, the priority class for each of the casualties, and the locations of both the servicing ambulatory helicopter and casualty event. Instances of the dispatching problem are solved using a relative value iteration dynamic programming algorithm. Computational examples are used to investigate optimal dispatch policies under different threat situations and armed escort delays; the examples are based on combat scenarios in which United States Army MEDEVAC units support ground operations in Afghanistan.

  20. Honor Codes at the Service Academies. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Manpower and Personnel of the Committee on Armed Services. United States Senate. Ninety-fourth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Armed Services.

    Transcripts of the hearings on honor codes at the federal military academies in June and August of 1976 include the statements of the Secretary of the Army, Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy, Commandant of Cadets at the Military Academy, Superintendent of the Naval Academy, the Officer Representative to the Brigade Honor Committee (Naval…

  1. DOD Service Academies. More Actions Needed To Eliminate Sexual Harassment. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of National Security and International Affairs.

    The General Accounting Office reviewed sexual harassment of students at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland; the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado; and the Military Academy in West Point, New York. At the core of the review were surveys of academy students, faculty, and staff conducted in late 1990 and early 1991 and focus…

  2. Effect of a simulated patient-based educational program on the quality of medical encounters at military recruitment centers.

    PubMed

    Farfel, Alon; Hardoff, Daniel; Afek, Arnon; Ziv, Amitai

    2010-08-01

    Simulation-based medical education has become a powerful tool in improving the quality of care provided by health professionals. To evaluate the effect of a simulated patient-based educational program for military recruitment center physicians on the quality of medical encounters with adolescent candidates for military service. Twelve physicians participated in an educational intervention that included a one day SP-based workshop, where simulations of eight typical candidates for military service were conducted. Assessment of the physicians' performance before and after the intervention was based on questionnaires filled by 697 and 508 military candidates respectively upon completion of their medical examination by these physicians. The questionnaire explored health topics raised by the examining physician as well as the atmosphere during the encounter. The candidates were also asked whether they had omitted important medical information during the medical encounter. Pre- and post-intervention comparison revealed significant changes in the percentages of candidates who reported that they had been asked questions related to psychosocial topics: school problems--59.7% and 68.9% (P = 0.01), protected sex--29.6% and 36.4% (P = 0.01), mood changes--46.9% and 52.2% (P = 0.05) respectively. Physicians were perceived as being interested in the candidates by 68.2% of the candidates before the intervention and 77.5% after (P < 0.01). The percentage of candidates who reported omitting medical information decreased from 6.6% before the intervention to 2.4% after (P < 0.01). A simulated patient-based educational program for military physicians improved the quality of physician-candidate encounters. Such programs may serve as an effective instrument for training physicians to communicate with adolescents.

  3. The challenges of military medical education and training for physicians and nurses in the Nordic countries - an interview study.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Linda; Boffard, Kenneth; Lundberg, Lars; Rydmark, Martin; Karlgren, Klas

    2017-04-11

    Development and use of e-learning has not taken place to the same extent in military medicine in the Nordic countries. The aim was to explore the similarities and differences in education and training in military medicine for health professionals in the Nordic countries, and more specifically to identify the specific challenges regarding education and training of military medicine, and how e-learning is used at present and the opportunities for the future. Key educators within military medicine in the Nordic countries, as approved by the respective Surgeons General, were interviewed and the interviews were analyzed using content analysis. The data showed that all Nordic countries cooperate in the field of military medical training to some extent. The models of recruitment and employment of health professionals differed as well as the degree of political support. These differences affected the ability for health professionals to gain actual experience from the military environment. To improve the quality of medical education and training, attempts were made to recruit physicians. The recruitment of physicians was considered a challenge which had resulted in disruptions of courses, training programs and maintenance of accreditation. The Nordic countries were described as having commonalities in the military medical systems and common needs for international collaboration within training, but differing in the range of education and training. Gaps were identified in methods for transferring outcomes from education into practice, as well as regarding evaluation and feedback of outcomes to military medicine. The educational tradition was described as oriented towards practical skills training without requirements on pedagogical education of educators. The results confirmed previous studies showing that e-learning was underutilized. Contextual understanding and experience of healthcare were seen as crucial factors for successful e-learning development. Extended Nordic

  4. Medical Laboratory Technician--Hematology, Serology, Blood Banking & Immunohematology, 10-4. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the third of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  5. 75 FR 24754 - Cost of Hospital and Medical Care Treatment Furnished by the Department of Defense Military...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... BUDGET Cost of Hospital and Medical Care Treatment Furnished by the Department of Defense Military... of Management and Budget, Executive Office of the President. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: By virtue of...), and delegated to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget by the President through...

  6. [Organisational peculiarities and principles of medical-psychological rehabilitation of military personnel of special units of the Ministry of Defence].

    PubMed

    Trishkin, D V; Titov, I G; Nechiporuk, S A

    2015-06-01

    The authors presented information about current state of organization of medical and psychological rehabilitation at sanatorium stage of military servicemen of special units of the Russian Defense Ministry, information about rehabilitation treatment techniques, and physical and psychological rehabilitation, natural and premature medicinal factors.

  7. Medical Service Specialist, Blocks I & II, 10-10. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This first course of a two-course, postsecondary-level series for medical service specialists is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. The purpose stated for the 50-hour course is to provide training in the basic theory and…

  8. Medical Laboratory Technician--Chemical Chemistry & Urinalysis, 10-2. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This publication, the last of three course materials in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from the Military Curriculum Materials for Use in Technical and Vocational Education series, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It can be used by advanced students or beginning students participating in a…

  9. Medical Service Specialist, Blocks III, V, VI, 10-11. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This second course of a two-course, postsecondary-level series for medical service specialist is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. The purpose stated for the 89-hour course is to provide training in the basic theory and…

  10. Edward D. Churchill as a combat consultant: lessons for the senior visiting surgeons and today's military medical corps.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jeremy W; Fischer, Josef E

    2010-03-01

    In World War II, Edward D. Churchill volunteered as a combat consultant. In this role, he mentored many junior surgeons and challenged the Army leadership to treat hemorrhagic shock with blood rather than plasma. These lessons have continued relevance for today's Senior Visiting Surgeons and our military medical corps.

  11. Medical Service Specialist, Blocks I & II, 10-10. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This first course of a two-course, postsecondary-level series for medical service specialists is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. The purpose stated for the 50-hour course is to provide training in the basic theory and…

  12. Incidence of Norovirus-Associated Medical Encounters among Active Duty United States Military Personnel and Their Dependents.

    PubMed

    Rha, Brian; Lopman, Benjamin A; Alcala, Ashley N; Riddle, Mark S; Porter, Chad K

    2016-01-01

    Norovirus is a leading cause of gastroenteritis episodes and outbreaks in US military deployments, but estimates of endemic disease burden among military personnel in garrison are lacking. Diagnostic codes from gastroenteritis-associated medical encounters of active duty military personnel and their beneficiaries from July 1998-June 2011 were obtained from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. Using time-series regression models, cause-unspecified encounters were modeled as a function of encounters for specific enteropathogens. Model residuals (representing unexplained encounters) were used to estimate norovirus-attributable medical encounters. Incidence rates were calculated using population data for both active duty and beneficiary populations. The estimated annual mean rate of norovirus-associated medically-attended visits among active duty personnel and their beneficiaries was 292 (95% CI: 258 to 326) and 93 (95% CI: 80 to 105) encounters per 10,000 persons, respectively. Rates were highest among beneficiaries <5 years of age with a median annual rate of 435 (range: 318 to 646) encounters per 10,000 children. Norovirus was estimated to cause 31% and 27% of all-cause gastroenteritis encounters in the active duty and beneficiary populations, respectively, with over 60% occurring between November and April. There was no evidence of any lag effect where norovirus disease occurred in one population before the other, or in one beneficiary age group before the others. Norovirus is a major cause of medically-attended gastroenteritis among non-deployed US military active duty members as well as in their beneficiaries.

  13. [The Literary Friendly Assembly (Jorge Juan, Cádiz, 1755): a Spanish scientific academy with a high medical content].

    PubMed

    González de Posada, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    In commemoration of the 250th Anniversary of the creation of the Asamblea Amistosa Literaria in Cádiz by Jorge Juan, we are making a historical review in which the distinguishing notes, of an intrinsic nature, are emphasised and other ideas are established, of a social and historical extrinsic nature, in contradiction with a current trajectory of a progressively legendary nature. As regards Medicine and Surgery, we note: 1) the numerous presence and outstanding participation of doctors and surgeons: 50% of the delegates and 30% of the speakers; 2) that the written contributions of doctors and surgeons may be considered truly exceptional; 3) that in Cadiz, in 1755, the mathematicians and physicists of European stature, Jorge Juan and Luis Godin, met at the Academy of Sciences not only with doctors (University) but also surgeons (non-University) and considered them to be not only ",academics", but also "scientists".

  14. [Women members of the Mexican National Academy of Medicine. An analysis of their membership and place in the medical elite].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-de Romo, Ana Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    This article analyzes women's admission to Mexico's National Academy of Medicine (NAM) originally an all-male institution. We describe the demographic characteristics of female members of the NAM. By the year 2006, the NAM had 536 academic members, 62 of them were women. Data gathered included date of entry to the NAM, members' age at time of admission, current age, whether they had children and the field and or area to which they were assigned. We also analyzed membership to the "National System of Researchers" (Sistema Nacional de Investigadores, SNI). Women admitted to the NAM were all competitive scholars who planned their career choices, sought and achieved positions of power yet gender issues still determined their professional careers.

  15. Complementary and alternative medical therapies in multiple sclerosis--the American Academy of Neurology guidelines: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vijayshree; Narayanaswami, Pushpa

    2014-12-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) is common, but its use has been limited by a lack of evidence-based guidance. In March 2014, the American Academy of Neurology published the most comprehensive literature review and evidence-based practice guidelines for CAM use in MS. The guideline author panel reviewed and classified articles according to the American Academy of Neurology therapeutic scheme, and recommendations were linked to the evidence strength. Level A recommendations were found for oral cannabis extract effectiveness in the short term for spasticity-related symptoms and pain and ineffectiveness of ginkgo biloba for cognitive function improvement in MS. Key level B recommendations included: Oral cannabis extract or a synthetic cannabis constituent, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is probably ineffective for objective spasticity improvement in the short term; Nabiximols oromucosal cannabinoid spray is probably effective for spasticity symptoms, pain, and urinary frequency, but probably ineffective for objective spasticity outcomes and bladder incontinence; Magnetic therapy is probably effective for fatigue reduction in MS; A low-fat diet with fish oil supplementation is probably ineffective for MS-related relapses, disability, fatigue, magnetic resonance imaging lesions, and quality of life. Several Level C recommendations were made. These included possible effectiveness of gingko biloba for fatigue; possible effectiveness of reflexology for MS-related paresthesias; possible ineffectiveness of the Cari Loder regimen for MS-related disability, symptoms, depression, and fatigue; and bee sting therapy for MS relapses, disability, fatigue, magnetic resonance imaging outcomes, and health-related quality of life. Despite the availability of studies evaluating the effects of oral cannabis in MS, the use of these formulations in United States may be limited due to a lack of standardized, commercial US Food and Drug

  16. [The path from science to the practicing surgeon. Engagement of documentation of the Swiss Academy of Medical Sciences for providing evidence-based medicine].

    PubMed

    Bleuer, J P

    1999-01-01

    The flood of information that comes along with the rise of electronic media has changed the expectations towards the Documentation Service of the Swiss Academy of Medical Sciences (DOKDI): Evidence Based Medicine (EMB) in particular not only demands procurement of information, but also a selection regarding quality and relevance: The question arising out of the clinical situation requires an answer correct in its content and helpful in the specific situation. Getting an idea of what evidence exists about the correctness of a certain procedure through critical lecture is an ideal often obstructed by lack of time and methodical problems in the practice; therefore, one often has to rely on evidence acquired through others and consult e.g. the Cochrane Library. DOKDI commits itself to the development of systematic reviews as well as to the dissemination of evidence found by using its experience in the documentation with electronic media and by providing the corresponding infrastructure. In addition to these activities, the Academy has spoken a grant for the training of EBM-Tutors. During a weekly workshop held in Oxford, clinicians will be trained as EBM-Tutors. This will allow an increasing number of EBM-Workshops held in Switzerland in the future.

  17. [Capabilities of stress echocardiography in diagnosis of cardiovascular pathology and estimation for military service].

    PubMed

    Shulenin, S N; Kulikov, A N; Kuchmin, A N; Bobrov, A L; Nagornyĭ, M B; Litvinenko, R I

    2014-03-01

    Annually about 6,5 thousands of military servicemen retire due to cardiovascular diseases, every second serviceman retires before superannuation. Stress echocardiography in comparison with other imaging studies is cheaper, safer and matches in sensibility and specificity. The prevalence of stress echocardiography and stress systems can make it available in district, central and main hospitals, and clinics of the Kirov Military Medical Academy. It is proposed to expand indications for stress echocardiography for certain contingent soldiers: those senior commanders, aircrew, and divers soldiers at high risk of cardiovascular complications. For training of specialists in the filed of stress echocardiography in the Kirov Military Medical Academy themed cycles for medical ultrasound and functional diagnostics are orginised.

  18. [Methodical approaches to rate setting of the quantity of medical personal in medical-therapeutic institutes of Military of Defense of Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Shpanka, A V; Tregubov, V N; Kostiuchenko, A I

    2007-10-01

    Rational use of forces and facilities of military--medical service of the Defense Ministry of the Russian Federation (DM of the RF) in now-day's conditions is considered as a priority direction of reforming of the state public health services. On this background for stationary treatment-and-prophylactic institutes (DM of the RF) rate setting of work of the medical personnel has a special value. Rate setting includes designing and creation in medical institutions of such conditions at which medical aid will be rendered the most qualitatively and effectively.

  19. Systematic review: efficacy and safety of medical marijuana in selected neurologic disorders: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Barbara S; Brust, John C M; Fife, Terry; Bronstein, Jeff; Youssof, Sarah; Gronseth, Gary; Gloss, David

    2014-04-29

    To determine the efficacy of medical marijuana in several neurologic conditions. We performed a systematic review of medical marijuana (1948-November 2013) to address treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), epilepsy, and movement disorders. We graded the studies according to the American Academy of Neurology classification scheme for therapeutic articles. Thirty-four studies met inclusion criteria; 8 were rated as Class I. The following were studied in patients with MS: (1) Spasticity: oral cannabis extract (OCE) is effective, and nabiximols and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are probably effective, for reducing patient-centered measures; it is possible both OCE and THC are effective for reducing both patient-centered and objective measures at 1 year. (2) Central pain or painful spasms (including spasticity-related pain, excluding neuropathic pain): OCE is effective; THC and nabiximols are probably effective. (3) Urinary dysfunction: nabiximols is probably effective for reducing bladder voids/day; THC and OCE are probably ineffective for reducing bladder complaints. (4) Tremor: THC and OCE are probably ineffective; nabiximols is possibly ineffective. (5) Other neurologic conditions: OCE is probably ineffective for treating levodopa-induced dyskinesias in patients with Parkinson disease. Oral cannabinoids are of unknown efficacy in non-chorea-related symptoms of Huntington disease, Tourette syndrome, cervical dystonia, and epilepsy. The risks and benefits of medical marijuana should be weighed carefully. Risk of serious adverse psychopathologic effects was nearly 1%. Comparative effectiveness of medical marijuana vs other therapies is unknown for these indications.

  20. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-99-1-9478 TITLE: COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION ...COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 99 – 31 Dec 06 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION RESEARCH 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...report presents the activities of the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Military Nutrition Research (CMNR) for the

  1. Testing of junctional tourniquets by military medics to control simulated groin hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kragh, John F; Parsons, Donald L; Kotwal, Russ S; Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Aden, James K; Gerhardt, Robert T; Baer, David G; Dubick, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Junctional hemorrhage is a common cause of death on the battlefield, but there is no documented direct comparison for the use of junctional tourniquet models by US medics. The purpose of this testing is to assess military medic experience with the use of junctional tourniquets in simulated out-of-hospital trauma care. Nine medics (seven men and two women) used four different junctional tourniquets: Combat Ready Clamp™ (CRoC™; http://www.combatmedicalsystems .com), Abdominal Aortic and Junctional Tourniquet™ (AAJT™; http://www.compressionworks.net), Junctional Emergency Treatment Tool (JETT™; http://www.narescue .com), and SAM Junctional Tourniquet® (SJT®; http://www.sammedical.com/products). These medics also acted as simulated casualties. Effectiveness percentages, as measured by stopped distal pulse by Doppler auscultation, and time to effectiveness were recorded in two tests per tourniquet (72 total tests). Tourniquet users ranked their preference of model by answering the question: "If you had to go to war today and you could only choose one, which tourniquet would you choose to bring?" All tourniquets used were safe under the conditions of this study. Both the SJT and the CRoC had high effectiveness percentages; their rate difference was not statistically significant. The SJT and the CRoC had fast times to effectiveness; their time difference was not statistically significant. Users preferred the SJT and the CRoC; their ranked difference was not statistically significant. The SJT and the CRoC were equally effective and fast and were preferred by the participants. 2014.

  2. How to turn a team of experts into an expert medical team: guidance from the aviation and military communities

    PubMed Central

    Burke, C; Salas, E; Wilson-Donnelly, K; Priest, H

    2004-01-01

    There is no question that interdisciplinary teams are becoming ubiquitous in healthcare. It is also true that experts do not necessarily combine to make an expert team. However when teams work well they can serve as adaptive systems that allow organisations to mitigate errors within complex domains, thereby increasing safety. The medical community has begun to recognise the importance of teams and as such has begun to implement team training interventions. Over the past 20 years the military and aviation communities have made a large investment in understanding teams and their requisite training requirements. There are many lessons that can be learned from these communities to accelerate the impact of team training within the medical community. Therefore, the purpose of the current paper is to begin to translate some of the lessons learned from the military and aviation communities into practical guidance that can be used by the medical community. PMID:15465963

  3. Seroprevalence of Antibodies against Noroviruses among Students in a Chinese Military Medical University

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ying-chun; Nie, Jun; Zhang, Xu-fu; Li, Zhi-feng; Bai, Yang; Zeng, Zhi-rong; Yu, Shou-yi; Farkas, Tibor; Jiang, Xi

    2004-01-01

    Noroviruses (NVs) are important causes of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in humans, but the role of NVs as a cause of diseases in the Chinese people, particularly in Chinese military personnel, remains unclear. This study investigated antibody prevalence and factors that associate with the prevalence of antibody to NVs among students attending a military medical university. Serum specimens were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for immunoglobulin G antibody to recombinant capsid antigens of three NVs (rNorwalk, rMxV, and rVA387). Of 588 serum samples tested, the antibody prevalence was 88.9, 54.1, or 90.0% for the three antigens, respectively. There were significant differences in the prevalence of antibody to rMxV between blood types (P < 0.05); the prevalence for type O was the highest (62.5%), and the prevalence for type B was the lowest (49.1%). The average optical density values for antibody to rNorwalk and rMxV were lowest among students with type B. The number of students who did not have antibody to any of the three antigens was the highest for blood type B (6.9%) compared to other blood types (0.8 to 3.4% [P < 0.006]). The antibody prevalence also varied with the hometown residencies of the students before joining the military, with the highest rates for students from rural areas, lower rates for students from small towns or villages, and the lowest rates for students from large cities. The numbers of students who did not have antibody to any of the three antigens were highest for students from the large cities, lower for students from small towns or villages, and lowest for students from rural areas. The distribution of ABO blood types did not differ among the three groups. These data suggest that NVs are prevalent in China and that both genetic and environmental factors play a role in NV infection. PMID:15472318

  4. Seroprevalence of antibodies against noroviruses among students in a Chinese military medical university.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ying-chun; Nie, Jun; Zhang, Xu-fu; Li, Zhi-feng; Bai, Yang; Zeng, Zhi-rong; Yu, Shou-yi; Farkas, Tibor; Jiang, Xi

    2004-10-01

    Noroviruses (NVs) are important causes of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in humans, but the role of NVs as a cause of diseases in the Chinese people, particularly in Chinese military personnel, remains unclear. This study investigated antibody prevalence and factors that associate with the prevalence of antibody to NVs among students attending a military medical university. Serum specimens were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for immunoglobulin G antibody to recombinant capsid antigens of three NVs (rNorwalk, rMxV, and rVA387). Of 588 serum samples tested, the antibody prevalence was 88.9, 54.1, or 90.0% for the three antigens, respectively. There were significant differences in the prevalence of antibody to rMxV between blood types (P < 0.05); the prevalence for type O was the highest (62.5%), and the prevalence for type B was the lowest (49.1%). The average optical density values for antibody to rNorwalk and rMxV were lowest among students with type B. The number of students who did not have antibody to any of the three antigens was the highest for blood type B (6.9%) compared to other blood types (0.8 to 3.4% [P < 0.006]). The antibody prevalence also varied with the hometown residencies of the students before joining the military, with the highest rates for students from rural areas, lower rates for students from small towns or villages, and the lowest rates for students from large cities. The numbers of students who did not have antibody to any of the three antigens were highest for students from the large cities, lower for students from small towns or villages, and lowest for students from rural areas. The distribution of ABO blood types did not differ among the three groups. These data suggest that NVs are prevalent in China and that both genetic and environmental factors play a role in NV infection.

  5. Clonal distribution and associated characteristics of Escherichia coli clinical and surveillance isolates from a military medical center.

    PubMed

    Manges, Amee R; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton K; Johnston, Brian D; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Johnson, James R

    2017-04-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli are a concern for military health services. We studied 100 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-producing E. coli clinical and surveillance isolates from military personnel and civilians at Brooke Army Medical Center (2007-2011). Major E. coli lineages, most prominently ST10 (24%), ST131 (16%), and ST648 (8%), were distributed much as reported for other North American populations. ST131, represented mainly by its resistance-associated ST131-H30 clonal subset, was uniquely associated with a clinical origin, regardless of ESBL status. Thus, clonal background predicted resistance phenotype and clinical versus surveillance origin, and these findings could assist military clinicians and epidemiologists.

  6. USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emerging as a cause of bloodstream infections at military medical centers.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Jeffrey; Park, Matthew; Robben, Paul; Whitman, Timothy; Ellis, Michael W

    2013-04-01

    USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of skin and soft-tissue infection (SSTI) in military personnel. USA300 MRSA has emerged as an important cause of healthcare-associated bloodstream infection (BSI) in metropolitan centers. To determine the prevalence, risk factors, and patient outcomes associated with USA300 MRSA BSI in military tertiary medical centers. Retrospective case-control study. Patients admitted during the period 2001-2009 with MRSA BSI. Walter Reed Army Medical Center (Washington, DC) and National Naval Medical Center (Bethesda, MD) tertiary medical centers with 500 inpatient beds combined, which provide care to active duty service members and military beneficiaries. After identifying patients with MRSA BSI, we collected epidemiological data from electronic medical records and characterized bacterial isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A total of 245 MRSA BSI cases were identified, and 151 isolates were available for analysis. Epidemiological characteristics for the 151 patients with available isolates included the following: mean age, 61 years; male sex, 70%; white race, 62%; and combat-wounded service members, 11%. The crude in-hospital mortality rate was 17%. PFGE demonstrated that 30 (20%) of 151 MRSA BSI cases with isolates available for analysis were due to USA300, and 27 (87%) of these 30 cases were healthcare-associated infection. USA300 was associated with a significantly increasing proportion of MRSA BSI when examined over sequential time periods: 2 (4%) of 51 isolates during 2001-2003, 9 (19%) of 47 isolates during 2004-2006, and 19 (36%) of 53 isolates during 2007-2009 ([Formula: see text]). USA300 MRSA is emerging as a cause of healthcare-associated BSI in tertiary military medical centers.

  7. [State-of-the-art and prospects of high-tech medical aid to patients with cardiac arrhythmia based at military medical facilities].

    PubMed

    Steklov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of provision of high-tech medical aid to patients with cardiac arrhythmia based at military medical facilities showed that the available means and workforce are sufficient for the purpose. In order to facilitate access to high-tech medical aid it is necessary to equip arrhythmologic departments with up-to-date-instruments and set up cabinets of electrocardiostimulation in regional (naval) hospitals for implantation of temporary and permanent pacemakers. A program is pending for education (primary specialization) and advanced training of specialists in clinical cardiac electrophysiology, interventional and surgical arrhythmology.

  8. Relationship between anxiety and medical disorders among compulsory military service candidates between the years 1998-2013.

    PubMed

    Shelef, Leah; Dotan, Shron; Kaminsky, Dan; Kedem, Ron; Margulis, Alexander; Hassidim, Ayal

    2016-10-30

    One of the most common psychiatric diagnoses among adolescents is anxiety disorder. Many of the anxiety symptoms are expressed physiologically, and therefore can mimic other medical conditions. The aim of this study was to examine the association between anxiety disorders and other medical conditions sharing common symptoms with anxiety (MDSCSA: Irritable Bowel Syndrome, asthma, migraine and hyperhidrosis). The study was based on the national database of the candidates for military service in Israel. Data for the years 1998-2013 was retrieved to create the study dataset. The final cohort population was comprised of 1,229,461 military service candidates. Anxiety prevalence and its association with other medical conditions sharing the same symptoms was examined in the cohort. The results showed significant statistical association between anxiety and IBS, asthma, migraine and hyperhidrosis. These findings support the fact that there is a clear association between anxiety disorder and the examined medical conditions. Moreover, in the military setting, the primary care physician has an important role in giving a correct diagnosis for soldiers presenting with symptoms that can be regarded both to anxiety and to other physical illnesses.

  9. Perceptions of current and recent military internal medicine residents on operational medicine, managed care, graduate medical education, and continued military service.

    PubMed

    Salerno, S; Cash, B; Cranston, M; Schoomaker, E

    1998-06-01

    Current and recent internal medicine residents were surveyed on their level of confidence in practicing operational medicine, satisfaction with graduate medical education, the impact of TRICARE, the military managed care plan, on their patients and education, and intentions on remaining in uniformed service. Their sentiments were recorded on a five-point Likert scale (1 = strongly agree, 3 = neutral, 5 = strongly disagree). Two hundred twenty-one of the 294 surveys were returned (75.2%). Most physicians felt unprepared to perform duties in a nuclear, biological, or chemical warfare environment, or handle administrative aspects of operational medicine (mean scores, 3.2-3.7). A majority of respondents felt satisfied with the quality of their residency experience (mean score, 1.9). Although more than half of those surveyed (53.6%) listed the opportunity to teach residents as a top factor influencing their retention decision, most felt skeptical that graduate medical education would remain important in the future (mean score, 3.6). Most physicians agreed that restriction of TRICARE to patients less than 65 years old may degrade the quality of military internal medicine residencies (mean score, 1.6). Previous service, Reserve Officer Training Corps experience, and graduation from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences were factors associated with increased physician intention to remain beyond their obligated service. The most common factors inducing physicians to leave the military included frequent deployments, relocations, and financial compensation. Factors cited most frequently as influencing physicians to stay on active duty included high-quality colleagues, opportunities for teaching residents, and freedom from malpractice and office management details.

  10. A NATO guide for assessing deployability for military personnel with chronic medical conditions: medical fitness for expeditionary missions, Task Group 174, Human Factors, and Medicine Panel.

    PubMed

    Russell, Randy; Reid, Alastair; Borgers, Guy; Wassink, Henry; Grove, Andreas; Niebuhr, David W

    2014-12-01

    Each time a deployed military member has an exacerbation of a pre-existing chronic disease there is a potential risk to mission success, individual health, and the safety of the unit. Currently, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) member nations employ different approaches to assessing an individual's medical fitness for deployment. To set the minimum medical standards for NATO deployments. A seven nation task group met periodically from 2008 to 2012 to develop guidelines for frontline military physicians to assess medical fitness for deployment. A medical deployment guide for 31 specific diseases/conditions using a rational, standardized and algorithmic approach based on a red-yellow-green risk stratification. If adopted as a NATO policy, this guide could then be kept up-to-date through a process that allows nations to track individuals with known chronic disease who were deployed into a theater of operations, allowing the guide to become increasingly evidence-based, and also more accurate in quantifying the risk of exacerbation based on individual and disease characteristics, as well as the nature and length of the deployment. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Global strategies targeting the recruitment crisis in psychiatry: the Doctors Academy Future Excellence International Medical Summer School.

    PubMed

    Hankir, Ahmed; Zaman, Rashid

    2015-09-01

    The World Health Organization has identified a chronic shortage of psychiatrists worldwide whereas the demand for mental health services is on the rise. Indeed mental health problems are projected to be a leading cause of morbidity by 2020 according to the Global Burden of Disease study. Bhugra et al, under the auspices of the Royal College of Psychiatrists and the World Psychiatry Association, spearheaded an international study across 22 countries and identified myriad factors that can influence career choices at pre-medical school, medical school and postgraduate levels. The enthusiasm and passion of mental health educators and the quality of psychiatry placements were identified as factors that can attract medical and students and graduates to a career in psychiatry. The Future Excellence International Medical Summer School (FEIMSS) is a 5-day event for medical students held yearly in Manchester, UK. FEIMSS is the largest event of its kind in the world; the 2013 cohort was comprised of 244 students from 40 countries representing 80 universities. To improve the image of psychiatrists and the perception of psychiatry in general with 2 brief contact-based lectures from a consultant and an early-career psychiatrist. The lectures incorporated references to the humanities (literature, poetry, history, film, drama and art). A mixed-methods study was conducted. Paper evaluation forms were hand-distributed to participants who attended the psychiatry talks. Items to constructs relevant to the talks were on a Likert-type scale. Participants were given the choice of anonymity. There was space for free-text comments which were subjected to thematic analyses. 25/25 of the participants responded (response rate 100%). The heterogeneous sample was comprised of participants representing 11 countries from Japan to Kosovo. The written feedback was exceptionally positive. For the, 'The psychiatry talks were interesting' and, 'Attending FEIMMS improved my understanding and respect

  12. Core Content for Undergraduate Medical Education in Spain: Recommendations of the Instructors' Group of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV).

    PubMed

    Casanova, J M; Pujol, R M; Ferrándiz, C; Betlloch, I; Bosch, R J; Fernández, V; Martí, R M; Requena, L; Moreno, J C; Alegre, V; Vilata, J J; Vilar, N; Jaén, P; Bielsa, I; Querol, I; Azón, T; Borrego, L; Mascaró, J M; Alsina, M; Díaz, R M; Suarez, R; García-Bustinduy, M; García-Patos, V; Estrach, T

    2016-03-01

    Skin problems are among the most frequent reasons for seeking medical attention in primary care. In recent years, as a result of the process of adapting medical curricula to the requirements of the European Higher Education Area, the amount of time students spend learning the concepts of dermatology has been reduced in many universities. In order to reach a consensus on core content for undergraduate education in dermatology, we sent a survey to the 57 members of the instructors' group of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV), asking their opinions on what objectives should be set for a dermatology course in Spain. A total of 131 previously selected objectives were listed. We then applied the Delphi method to achieve consensus on which ones the respondents considered important or very important (score≥4 on a Likert scale). Nineteen responses (33%) were received. On the second round of the Delphi process, 68 objectives achieved average scores of at least 4. The respondents emphasized that graduates should understand the structure and functions of the skin and know about bacterial, viral, and fungal skin infections, the most common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and the 4 main inflammatory dermatoses. Students should also learn about common complaints, such as itching and bald patches; the management of dermatologic emergencies; purpura and erythema nodosum as signs of internal disease; and the prevention of STDs and skin cancer. During clinical clerkships students should acquire the communication skills they will need to interview patients, write up a patient's medical history, and refer the patient to a specialist. The AEDV's group of instructors have defined their recommendations on the core content that medical faculties should adopt for the undergraduate subject of dermatology in Spain. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  13. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    MILITARY RESEARCH, * NUTRITION , MILITARY PERSONNEL, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), METABOLISM, NUTRIENTS, HIGH ENERGY, MEDICAL RESEARCH, FOOD, DIET, MENTAL ABILITY, WORKSHOPS, BIOMEDICINE, CAFFEINE, SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.

  14. Children of Military Families: A Part and Yet Apart

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    peoples and with broader world issues. The world view that these military dependents and the children of British- Asian couples in England share is...received a B.A. in English and Political Science . He received an M.D. from Northwestern University Medical School. Dr. Privitera completed a Psychiatry...Family in India. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 368: 132-45. 1972. "Third Culiure Factors in Educational Change.’ In

  15. Education Status of Oral Genetics at the Fourth Military Medical University and other Chinese Dental Schools.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan Li; Wang, Chang Ning; Fan, Zhi Peng; Jiao, Yang; Duan, Xiao Hong

    To investigate the current state of genetics education at the Fourth Military Medical University (FMMU) and compare it with other dental schools of China. Detailed information about the history and current education status of Oral Genetics in the FMMU were collected and questionnaires were completed to acquire the feedback of twenty-seven students on the course. In the other thirty-five dental schools including the capitals of twenty-five provinces and four municipalities in China, information about the oral genetic course were collected by a telephone survey. The contents of survey included whether or not the Oral Genetic course is offered and some basic information about the curriculum (such as the content, hours, teachers' background and teaching methods). Among a total of thirty-six dental schools investigated, six of them (16.7%) offered the Oral Genetic course or related lectures/seminars. The length and contents of the curriculum vary among these schools. The FMMU offered the oral genetic curriculum both to undergraduates and graduated students. Their teachers had a broad range of backgrounds, such as dentistry, biology, genetics, and biochemistry. The students considered the Oral Genetics course to be helpful for their future professional careers. Genetic education in dentistry in China is still at a preliminary stage. More effort must be paid to spread the knowledge of Oral Genetics in China. In addition, domestic and international communications and networks for Oral Genetics should be set up in the near future.

  16. DOD Service Academies. Academy Preparatory Schools Need a Clearer Mission and Better Oversight. Report to the Chairmen, Senate and House Committees on Armed Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. National Security and International Affairs Div.

    The three service academy prep schools were assessed to determine how well the schools accomplished their missions and whether they were cost effective. A review was performed at seven sites, the: Department of Defense (DOD) and service headquarters, Washington, District of Columbia; Military Academy, West Point, New York; Air Force Academy,…

  17. Incidence of Norovirus-Associated Medical Encounters among Active Duty United States Military Personnel and Their Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Rha, Brian; Lopman, Benjamin A.; Alcala, Ashley N.; Riddle, Mark S.; Porter, Chad K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Norovirus is a leading cause of gastroenteritis episodes and outbreaks in US military deployments, but estimates of endemic disease burden among military personnel in garrison are lacking. Methods Diagnostic codes from gastroenteritis-associated medical encounters of active duty military personnel and their beneficiaries from July 1998–June 2011 were obtained from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. Using time-series regression models, cause-unspecified encounters were modeled as a function of encounters for specific enteropathogens. Model residuals (representing unexplained encounters) were used to estimate norovirus-attributable medical encounters. Incidence rates were calculated using population data for both active duty and beneficiary populations. Results The estimated annual mean rate of norovirus-associated medically-attended visits among active duty personnel and their beneficiaries was 292 (95% CI: 258 to 326) and 93 (95% CI: 80 to 105) encounters per 10,000 persons, respectively. Rates were highest among beneficiaries <5 years of age with a median annual rate of 435 (range: 318 to 646) encounters per 10,000 children. Norovirus was estimated to cause 31% and 27% of all-cause gastroenteritis encounters in the active duty and beneficiary populations, respectively, with over 60% occurring between November and April. There was no evidence of any lag effect where norovirus disease occurred in one population before the other, or in one beneficiary age group before the others. Conclusions Norovirus is a major cause of medically-attended gastroenteritis among non-deployed US military active duty members as well as in their beneficiaries. PMID:27115602

  18. Putting the Puzzle Together: A Proposal for a Comprehensive Study of the Military Medical Management of Nuclear Casualties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    et al., “Scarce Resources for Nuclear Detonation: Project Overview and Challenges,” Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness 5 (2011): S15...NAIRA). TC 3-15. Fort Leavenworth, KS: U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, December 1988. “ Nuclear Preparedness.” Disaster Medicine and Public Health...a Comprehensive Study of the Military Medical Management of Nuclear Casualties Carl A. Curling Julia K. Burr Lucas A. LaViolet Preston J. Lee

  19. Intensive skills week for military medical students increases technical proficiency, confidence, and skills to minimize negative stress.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Genevieve; Hunt, Bonnie; Wall, Van; Rush, Robert; Molof, Alan; Schoeff, Jonathan; Wedmore, Ian; Schmid, James; Laporta, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The effects of stress induced cortisol on learning and memory is well documented in the literature.1-3 Memory and learning are enhanced at low levels while high levels are detrimental. Repetitive training in stressful situations enables management of the stress response4 as demonstrated by the high intensity training military members undergo to prepare for tactical situations. Appropriate management of one?s stress response is critical in the medical field, as the negative effects of stress can potentially hinder life-saving procedures and treatments. This also applies to physicians-in-training as they learn and practice triage, emergency medicine, and surgical skills prior to graduation. Rocky Vista University?s Military Medicine Honor?s Track (MMHT) held a week long high-intensity emergency medicine and surgical Intensive Skills Week (ISW), facilitated by military and university physicians, to advance students? skills and maximize training using the Human Worn Partial Surgical Task Simulator (Cut Suit). The short-term goal of the ISW was to overcome negative stress responses to increase confidence, technical and non-technical knowledge, and skill in surgery and emergency medicine in an effort to improve performance as third-year medical students. The long-term goal was to enhance performance and proficiency in residency and future medical practice. The metrics for the short-term goals were the focus of this pilot study. Results show an increase in confidence and decrease in perceived stress as well as statistically significant improvements in technical and non-technical skills and surgical instrumentation knowledge throughout the week. There is a correlative benefit to physician and non-physician military personnel, especially Special Operations Forces (SOF) medical personnel, from developing and implementing similar training programs when live tissue or cadaver models are unavailable or unfeasible.

  20. Diversity of Service Academy Entrants and Graduates. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Sheila Nataraj; Thie, Harry J.; Naftel, Scott; Adelson, Marisa

    2010-01-01

    In the wake of concern about the diversity of cadets/midshipmen selected by the service academies, Congress requested that the Secretary of Defense conduct a comprehensive assessment of the recruiting efforts, admissions policies, graduation rates, and career success rates of entrants and graduates at the United States Military Academy (USMA), the…

  1. Diversity of Service Academy Entrants and Graduates. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Sheila Nataraj; Thie, Harry J.; Naftel, Scott; Adelson, Marisa

    2010-01-01

    In the wake of concern about the diversity of cadets/midshipmen selected by the service academies, Congress requested that the Secretary of Defense conduct a comprehensive assessment of the recruiting efforts, admissions policies, graduation rates, and career success rates of entrants and graduates at the United States Military Academy (USMA), the…

  2. New York Chapter History of Military Medicine Award. U.S. Army medical helicopters in the Korean War.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, R S

    2001-04-01

    Medical evacuation helicopters are taken for granted in today's military. However, the first use of helicopters for this purpose in the Korean War was not done intentionally but as a result of the necessity of moving patients rapidly over difficult Korean terrain and of the early ebbing of the main battle line. The objective of this essay is to increase the historical awareness of military medical evacuation helicopters in the Korean War during this 50th anniversary year. By describing the many challenges and experiences encountered in implementing the use of helicopters for evacuation, the reader will appreciate how a technology developed for another use helped in the success of evacuating nearly 22,000 patients while contributing to establishing a mortality rate of wounded of 2.4%. The preparation to write this essay included archival research of historical reports, records, and oral histories from the archives of the U.S. Army Center for Military History. Additionally, a search of journal articles written during and after the Korean War was conducted. The result is a comprehensive description of the use of medical evacuation helicopters in the Korean War.

  3. Impact of Transcendental Meditation on Psychotropic Medication Use Among Active Duty Military Service Members With Anxiety and PTSD.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Vernon A; Monto, Andrea; Williams, Jennifer J; Rigg, John L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether the regular practice of Transcendental Meditation (TM) decreased the need for psychotropic medications required for anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) management and increased psychological wellbeing. The sample included 74 military Service Members with documented PTSD or anxiety disorder not otherwise specified (ADNOS), 37 that practiced TM and 37 that did not. At 1 month, 83.7% of the TM group stabilized, decreased, or ceased medications and 10.8% increased medication dosage; compared with 59.4% of controls that showed stabilizations, decreases, or cessations; and 40.5% that increased medications (p < 0.03). A similar pattern was observed after 2 (p < 0.27), 3 (p < 0.002), and 6 months (p < 0.34). Notably, there was a 20.5% difference between groups in severity of psychological symptoms after 6 months, that is, the control group experienced an increase in symptom severity compared with the group practicing TM. These findings provide insight into the benefits of TM as a viable treatment modality in military treatment facilities for reducing PTSD and ADNOS psychological symptoms and associated medication use.

  4. Role of Human Health Care Providers and Medical Treatment Facilities in Military Working Dog Care and Accessibility Difficulties with Military Working Dog Blood Products.

    PubMed

    Giles Iii, James T

    2016-01-01

    The use of military working dogs (MWDs) in support of military operations has increased dramatically over recent years, as they have proven to be our most reliable deterrent to improvised explosive devices. Healthcare delivery for MWDs in combat presents unique challenges and requires extensive collaboration between veterinarians and human health care providers (HCPs). A successful example is the incorporation of MWD emergency care for nonveterinary HCPs into the Joint Trauma System Clinical Practice Guidelines, which has proven to be a helpful product. Additional challenges that need further solutions include MWDs as patients in human medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and the procurement of appropriate canine blood components in an operational environment. It is often necessary for MWDs to be treated as patients in human MTFs, however, there is no Department of Defense guidance to support this activity. Access to MWD blood products is limited to collection of fresh whole blood in the operational setting. Similar to humans, specific blood component therapy, such as fresh frozen plasma, is often indicated for sick or injured MWDs. Currently there is no formal system in place to deliver any blood products for MWDs or to facilitate collection in theater.

  5. The role of mentoring in academic career progression: a cross-sectional survey of the Academy of Medical Sciences mentoring scheme.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Amy C; Eady, Nigel Aj; Wessely, Simon C

    2014-08-01

    Summary OBJECTIVES: To describe a successful mentoring scheme designed for mid-career clinician scientists and to examine factors associated with mentee report of positive career impact. Mixed methods study including in-depth interviews and cross-sectional data collection via an online survey. Academy of Medical Sciences mentoring scheme set up in 2002 and evaluated in 2010. One hundred and forty-seven of 227 mentees took part in the study (response rate of 65%). Ten mentees, three mentors and eight stakeholders/scheme staff were selected to participate in in-depth interviews. Qualitative data: Interviews were transcribed, and free text was analysed to identify themes and subthemes in the narrative. Quantitative data: We examined the associations of reported positive career impact of mentoring by performing simple and multiple logistic regression analysis. Mentoring success was determined by a variety of factors including reasons for selection (e.g. presence of a personal recommendation), mentee characteristics (e.g. younger age), experience and skills of the mentor (e.g. 'mentor helped me to find my own solutions') and the quality of the relationship (e.g. 'my mentor and I set out clear expectations early on'). Our evaluation demonstrates that both mentor and mentee value mentoring and that careful planning of a scheme including preparation, training and ongoing support of both mentor and mentee addressing expectations, building rapport and logistics are likely to be helpful in ensuring success and benefit from the intervention. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  6. Acupuncture therapy for fever induced by viral upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in military medical service: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kwon, SeungWon; Shin, KyoungHo; Jung, WooSang; Moon, SangKwan; Cho, KiHo

    2014-12-01

    We report the cases of eight military patients with fever (≥38°C) induced by viral upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) who requested treatment with acupuncture in the military medical service room. All patients were treated immediately after diagnosis with classical acupuncture (GV14, GB20, TE8 points) and a new type of acupuncture, equilibrium acupuncture (Feibing and Ganmao points). After one treatment session (20 min), reduction of body temperature was confirmed in all patients. Accompanying symptoms such as headache, myalgia and nasal obstruction also showed a tendency to decrease. Within 3 days of treatment, six of the eight patients had recovered from the URTI. No adverse effects of acupuncture treatment were reported. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. A Preliminary Analysis of Noise Exposure and Medical Outcomes for Department of Defense Military Musicians.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cindy; Beamer, Sharon; Hall, Shane; Helfer, Thomas; Kluchinsky, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Noise exposure is a known occupational health hazard to those serving in the military. Previous military epidemiology studies have identified military occupations at risk of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL); however, musicians have not been specifically mentioned. The focus of military NIHL studies is usually on those service members of the combat arms occupations. This project was a preliminary examination of Department of Defense (DoD) active duty military musicians in regard to their noise exposure, annual hearing test rates, and hearing injury rates using available data sources. The analysis concluded that DoD military musicians are an underserved population in terms of hearing conservation efforts. Noise surveillance data extracted from the Defense Occupational and Environmental Health Readiness System-Industrial Hygiene showed that every musician similar exposure group (SEG) with noise survey data from 2009 to 2013 exceeded the occupation exposure level adopted by DoD Instruction 6055.12. However, only a small percentage of all DoD active duty military musicians (5.5% in the peak year of 2012) were assigned to a SEG that was actually surveyed. Hearing test data based on Current Procedural Terminology coding extracted from the Military Health System revealed that the percentage of musicians with annual hearing tests increased over the 5 years studied in all services except the Air Force. During 2013, the data showed that the Navy had the highest percentage of musicians with annual hearing tests at 70.9%, and the Air Force had the lowest at 11.4%. The Air Force had the highest percentage of hearing injuries of those musicians with annual hearing tests for all 5 years analyzed. Although noise surveillance and annual hearing tests are being conducted, they occur at a much lower rate than required for a population that is known to be overexposed to noise.

  8. State Institution "National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" - research activities and scientific advance in 2014.

    PubMed

    Bazyka, D; Sushko, V; Chumak, A; Buzunov, V; Talko, V; Yanovich, L

    2015-12-01

    Research activities and scientific advance achieved in 2014 at the State Institution "National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" (NRCRM) concerning medical problems of the Chornobyl disaster, radiation medicine, radiobiology, radiation hygiene and epidemiology in collaboration with the WHO network of medical preparedness and assistance in radiation accidents are outlined in the annual report.Epidemiological cohort studies found increased incidence (1990-2012 gg.) of thyroid cancer in victims of Chernobyl accident (liquidators - in 4.6 times, evacuated - in 4.0 times, residents of contaminated areas - in 1.3 times) and increased incidence of breast cancer in female workers of 1986-1987. (in the 1994-2012 biennium. SIR = 160,0%, 95% CI: 142,4-177,6). Retrospective studies of thyroid cancer ("case control") in cohorts and 152 thousand of liquidators were continued together with the US National Cancer Institute. Radiation risks of multiple myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia were found.Molecular effects of remote period after radiation exposure include changes in gene expression TERF1, TERF2, CCND1, telomere length, the protein expression of cyclin D1, histone gamma H2AX. An association of molecular changes with cognitive deficits were defined. Genetic polymorphisms of rs2981582 gene FGFR2, rs12443621 gene TNRC9, rs3817198 gene LSP1, rs3803662 gene TNRC9, rs889312 gene MAP3K1 and their association with breast can cer were studied; the expression by tumor cells of estrogen and progesterone receptor, antigens of c kit, cytoker atins 5/6, TP53 and ki67, amplification status of the gene Her2 / neu, mutation status of the genes BRCA1 (muta tions 185delAG and 5382insC) and BRCA2 (mutation 6174delT) were studied. The possibility of persistence of radi ation modified hidden chromosomal instability in consecutive generations of human somatic cells was proven.The status of reproductive function and peculiarities

  9. American Academy of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology membership experience with venom immunotherapy in chronic medical conditions and pregnancy, and in young children.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Christopher W; Hauswirth, David W; Rank, Matthew; Sher, Lawrence; Larenas-Linnemann, Desiree

    2017-03-01

    Few data exist regarding the use of venom immunotherapy (VIT) in specific high-risk chronic medical conditions and pregnancy, and in young children. A Web-based survey was sent to American Academy of Asthma Allergy & Immunology members to explore their VIT experience in potential high-risk medical conditions and pregnancy, and in young children. Major problems were defined as "activation of underlying disease and/or VIT not well tolerated (systemic adverse events) and/or VIT discontinued for medical reasons." Results were expressed descriptively. A total of 697 of 5123 surveys (14%) were completed: 87% of the respondents were based in the United States, and 28% worked in an academic setting. Most respondents (71%) believed that pregnancy was a contraindication for starting VIT. Most were comfortable continuing VIT (51%) if the woman became pregnant after starting therapy. Of the allergists who treated children, many would give VIT down to age 5 years (42%) or younger, ages 1-4 years (35%). The following list is of the specific medical condition, the number of allergists who used VIT in patients with this condition, and the percentage who reported major problems: severe asthma, 212 (4.2%); hypertension, 287 (1.1%); coronary artery disease, 222 (3.6%); arrhythmias, 136 (3.4%); cerebrovascular disease, 104 (5.1%); cancer in remission, 166 (0%); cancer stable but still under treatment, 44 (7.2%); a history of bone marrow transplantation, 15 (4.9%); a history of solid organ transplantation, 29 (3.6%); human immunodeficiency virus, 53 (1.4%); acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, 24 (6.2%); stable autoimmune disease, 164 (2.8%); mastocytosis, 66 (18.4%); elevated serum tryptase, 101 (10.8%); immunodeficiency 59 (2.5%). Many allergists were comfortable using VIT in young children and continuing but not starting pregnant women on VIT. VIT was commonly used in patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, arrhythmias, cancer in remission, and stable autoimmune disease

  10. Commitment to Liberal Education at the United States Air Force Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enger, Rolf C.; Jones, Steven K.; Born, Dana H.

    2010-01-01

    Located just north of Colorado Springs, Colorado, the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) is one of the nation's federally funded military service academies. With an enrollment of approximately 4,400 undergraduates, the academy offers an integrated four-year curriculum of academics, athletics, leadership and character development, military…

  11. Commitment to Liberal Education at the United States Air Force Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enger, Rolf C.; Jones, Steven K.; Born, Dana H.

    2010-01-01

    Located just north of Colorado Springs, Colorado, the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) is one of the nation's federally funded military service academies. With an enrollment of approximately 4,400 undergraduates, the academy offers an integrated four-year curriculum of academics, athletics, leadership and character development, military…

  12. [Development of sanitary microbiology researches at the A. N. Marzeyev Institute for Hygiene and Medical Ecology, Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine (Kiev)].

    PubMed

    Serdiuk, A M; Surmasheva, E V; Korchak, G I

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the main stages of development of sanitary bacteriological studies at the leading hygiene research institute of Ukraine--the A. N Marzeyev Institute for Hygiene and Medical Ecology. These researches have made a substantial contribution to the formation and development of hygiene science in the former Soviet Union. The current and promising areas in sanitary microbiology in Ukraine are considered.

  13. Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses ...

  14. [The contribution of military aviation and space medicine to the biomedical support of the first flight into space].

    PubMed

    Belevitin, A B; Bukhtiiarov, I V; Zhdan'ko, I M; Bednenko, V S; Khomenko, M N

    2011-04-01

    April 12, 2011 Humanity celebrated 50 years of one of the greatest achievements of the twentieth century--the legendary flight of Y. Gagarin into space. In this study are highlighted the role and importance of military aviation and space medicine, and in particular, the State Scientific Research Testing Institute of Aviation and Space Medicine, Ministry of Defence of the USSR (now--the State Scientific Research Testing Institute of Military Medicine, Military Medical Academy named after S.M. Kirov) in the preparation and conduct of flight of Yu.A.Gagarin.

  15. [Unique exhibits and collections dedicated to the Great patriotic War in funds of the Military-medical museum].

    PubMed

    Budko, A A; Chigareva, N G

    2015-05-01

    The Military Medical Museum, where concentrated materials reflecting the multifaceted activities of the medical service at the front of the bloodiest war in human history, was established in the midst of the Great Patriotic War. For targeted collection of materials were formed special front brigades, which included artists, photographers, a pathologist, a spokesman for the museum. Thanks to their work, the museum has a collection of unique materials--genuine evidence of war, reflecting all aspects of the health departments of fronts, armies, parts and cities in the form of drawings, products, models, models, photographs, charts, medical supplies, documents, etc. On the basis of materials of the museum was prepared 35-volume work

  16. Breastfeeding rates and factors related to cessation in a military population.

    PubMed

    Bales, Karrn; Washburn, John; Bales, James

    2012-12-01

    Evidence continues to accumulate showing the benefits of breastfeeding to infants, mothers, and society as a whole. However, breastfeeding success rates nationwide have consistently fallen short of recommendations set forth by the American Academy of Pediatrics. There are several potential barriers to successful breastfeeding, and many of these could be magnified in the demanding careers of military members and their families. We surveyed 254 women at a regional military medical facility, both active duty members and dependents of active duty members, regarding their ability to successfully breastfeed their infants. We found that American Academy of Pediatrics target goals in this population as a whole were indeed nearly met at this facility, but also found that active duty members and those who encountered military-related difficulty fell well short of these goals. These findings suggest potential barriers to breastfeeding success that warrant further study from the U.S. Department of Defense.

  17. Hospitalizations among HIV controllers and persons with medically controlled HIV in the U.S. Military HIV Natural History Study

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Trevor A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Berry, Stephen A; Deiss, Robert G; Agan, Brian K; Okulicz, Jason F

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV controllers (HICs) experience relatively low-level viraemia and CD4 preservation without antiretroviral therapy (ART), but also immune activation that may predispose to adverse clinical events such as cardiovascular disease and hospitalization. The objective of this study was to characterize the rates and reasons for hospitalization among HICs and persons with medically controlled HIV. Methods Subjects with consistently well-controlled HIV were identified in the U.S. Military HIV Natural History Study. ART prescription and HIV-1 RNA data were used to categorize subjects as HICs or medically controlled as defined by ≥3 HIV-1 RNA measurements ≤2000 or ≤400 copies/mL, respectively, representing the majority of measurements spanning ≥12 months. Hospitalizations were tallied and assigned diagnostic categories. All-cause hospitalization rates were compared between groups using negative binomial regression. Results and discussion Of 3106 subjects followed from 2000 to 2013, 221 were HICs, including 33 elite (1.1%) and 188 viraemic (6.0%) controllers, who contributed 882 person-years (PY) of observation time. An additional 870 subjects with medically controlled HIV contributed 4217 PY. Mean hospitalization rates were 9.4/100 PY among HICs and 8.8/100 PY among medically controlled subjects. Non-AIDS-defining infections were the most common reason for hospitalization (2.95/100 PY and 2.70/100 PY, respectively) and rates of cardiovascular hospitalization were similar in both groups (0.45/100 PY and 0.76/100 PY). There was no difference in hospitalization rate for HICs compared with subjects with medically controlled HIV (adjusted incidence rate ratio 1.15 [95% confidence interval 0.80 to 1.65]). Conclusions All-cause and cardiovascular hospitalization rates did not differ between HICs and persons with medically controlled HIV. Non-AIDS defining infections were common in this young, healthy, predominantly male cohort of military personnel and

  18. Training Australian Defence Force Medical Officers to civilian general practice training standards--reflections on military medicine and its links to general practice education and training.

    PubMed

    Kitchener, Scott J; Rushbrook, Elizabeth; Brennan, Leonard; Davis, Stephen

    2011-06-06

    This article examines military medicine and its links to civilian general practice education and training, drawing attention to the variations and difficulties in, and successful approaches for, training Australian Defence Force (ADF) Medical Officers. Military medicine has been an area of change over the 10 years of the Australian General Practice Training (AGPT) program. Crisis situations like those in Timor Leste and Afghanistan have focused attention and recognition on the importance of primary health care in the work of the ADF. To train doctors in military medicine, there are several different models at different locations around Australia, as well as large variations in military course and experience recognition and approvals between AGPT regional training providers. At times, the lack of standardisation in training delays the progress of ADF registrars moving through the AGPT program and becoming independently deployable Medical Officers.

  19. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 57 - Procedures for the Provision of Related Services by the Military Medical Departments to DoDDS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN... other medical personnel, shall be supervised by a physician or other qualified healthcare provider. (ii) This medical evaluation shall include a review of general health history, current health assessment...

  20. [Famous scientist in the area of military-medical geography (to the 100th anniversary of the birth of A.A. Shoshin)].

    PubMed

    Shelepov, A M; Soldatov, E A

    2013-06-01

    The articale is dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the birth of famous domestic scientist in the area of military-medical geography, organization of health care and pedagogy, laureate of USSR state prize, Ph.D.Med, professor colonel of medical service Aleksei Alekseevich Shoshin (1913-1978). In 1953 he published his study guide "Short course in military-medical geography" and determined aims and tasks of course, clued peculiarities of the influence of physiographic conditions on health, sanitary status and medical support of the forces; gave military medical-geographic characteristics of the main landscape zones and methodology of territory research for possible unit sites. In 1962 AN USSR Publisher published his monograph "Principle of medical geography". In 1964 was published his book "Military-medical geography". In January 1966 A.A.Shoshin was elected as Head of social hygiene and public health organization Chair of the Leningrad pediatric medical institute. He chaired till the end of his life.

  1. American Academy of Optometry

    MedlinePlus

    ... care through lifelong learning. Login Meetings Academy 2017 Chicago 2017 Call for Courses 2017 Exhibitor Information Scientific ... News Wednesday Eye-Mail® Daily - From Academy 2017 Chicago Wed, 10/11/2017 10 Things to Help ...

  2. National Academy of Sciences

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Americans . Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) PNAS is one of the world’s most- ... Exchange Evolution Resources Biographical Memoirs National Academy of Sciences About The NAS Mission History Organization Leadership and ...

  3. Honey Bee Swarms Aboard the USNS Comfort: Recommendations for Sting Prevention, Swarm Removal, and Medical Readiness on Military Ships.

    PubMed

    Dunford, James C; Kronmann, Karl C; Peet, Luke R; Stancil, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    The article provides observations of multiple honey bee (Apis mellifera) swarms aboard the USNS Comfort (TAH-20) during the Continuing Promise 2015 mission. A brief overview of swarming biology is given along with control/removal recommendations to reduce sting exposures. The observations suggest that preventive medicine personnel should provide adequate risk communications about the potential occurrence of bee swarms aboard military ships, and medical department personnel should be prepared for the possibility of treating of multiple sting exposures, especially in the Southern Command Area of Operations where the Africanized genotype of A mellifera is common.

  4. Foreign Medical Teams in support of the Ebola outbreak: a UK military model of pre-deployment training and assurance.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Christopher; Fletcher, T; Clay, K; Griffiths, A

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the training methodology developed and utilised to prepare UK military medical teams to establish an Ebola Treatment Centre in Sierra Leone. We highlight the process of identifying and mitigating nosocomial risk in the Pre-Deployment Training process, encompassing the challenges of developing, training and assuring a capability at pace, which deployed to deliver high quality clinical care to patients with Ebola Virus Disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. [Academies Institute Andalucia].

    PubMed

    Piédrola Angulo, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Academies Institute of Andalusia is the only corporation in the State grouping twenty seven Spanish Academies and Royal Academies of an autonomous region, with a total of 760 Academicians. This paper sets out as conceived, their roles and relationships with other national corporations, as well as the primary mission to maintain and strengthen fraternal relations, culture, research and collaboration between the Andalusian Academy, showing academic representation whole of them.

  6. [The outstanding figure of domestic military and civil public health services].

    PubMed

    Pavlovskiĭ, L N

    2011-01-01

    The article presents data on the outstanding Soviet theorist and the organizer of Health Care, full member of Academy of Medical Science of the U.S.S.R., the Hero of Socialist Work, the colonel general of a health service E.I. Smirnov who has developed a lot on the theory and practice of civil and military public health services. Its contribution to communication between organizational forms of medical maintenance of armies and principles of military art, and also dependence of quality of medical aid to the population on the organizational structure of a treatment-and-prophylactic network were considered. E.I. Smirnova's personal role in improvement of organizational forms of medical maintenance of armies, theory and practice development of intermediate treatments with evacuation to destination, in the organization of antiepidemic maintenance of armies and development number of actual questions of modern military medicine are shown in the article.

  7. Improving maternal and newborn nursing services in a military medical center.

    PubMed

    Padderatz, A Y

    1999-07-01

    As military treatment facility leaders become more knowledgeable regarding apportionment of resources, decision making involving primary family member support services must be clear and concise. Continuing in its effort to meet the maternal and child health care expectations of its patients, a large military treatment facility command instituted several changes to consolidate its maternal and newborn services. This article presents findings and outcomes of actions taken in support of quality improvement and efficient use of budgetary resources to maximize patient satisfaction and bring about cost savings.

  8. Medical science and the military: the Allies' use of amphetamine during World War II.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Although amphetamine was thoroughly tested by leading scientists for its effects in boosting or maintaining physical and mental performance in fatigued subjects, the results never provided solid grounds for approving the drug's use, and, in any case, came too late to be decisive. The grounds on which amphetamine was actually adopted by both British and American militaries had less to do with the science of fatigue than with the drug's mood-altering effects, as judged by military men. It increased confidence and aggression, and elevated "morale."

  9. Academies and School Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the implications of Academies for the diversity of schooling in England. It seeks to establish the extent to which Academies are distinctive compared to other types of state secondary schools and whether this has been affected by a number of recent reforms. Different types of Academies are also be examined. Previous work in…

  10. Academies and School Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the implications of Academies for the diversity of schooling in England. It seeks to establish the extent to which Academies are distinctive compared to other types of state secondary schools and whether this has been affected by a number of recent reforms. Different types of Academies are also be examined. Previous work in…

  11. Why a Steiner Academy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avison, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the curious position of the Academy model in the English school system and how a potential Hereford Steiner Waldorf Academy might figure in this. It sketches the background to the Steiner movement in the UK and goes on to set out the key aspirations and concerns of Steiner educators regarding an Academy. The article provides…

  12. Career Academy Course Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Thom; Lenz, Robert

    This career academy course sequence guide is designed to give teachers a quick overview of the course sequences of well-known career academy and career pathway programs from across the country. The guide presents a variety of sample course sequences for the following academy themes: (1) arts and communication; (2) business and finance; (3)…

  13. Why a Steiner Academy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avison, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the curious position of the Academy model in the English school system and how a potential Hereford Steiner Waldorf Academy might figure in this. It sketches the background to the Steiner movement in the UK and goes on to set out the key aspirations and concerns of Steiner educators regarding an Academy. The article provides…

  14. [Efim Ivanovich Smirnov--an outstanding founder of the military medicine and civil health care (to the 110th anniversary of birth)].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, I B; Krylov, N L

    2014-10-01

    In October 2014 we celebrate the 110th anniversary of the birth of Chief of the Main Military Medical Administration of the People's Commissariat of Defense, Minister of Health of the USSR, Hero of Socialist Labor, Member of the Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, Colonel-General of the Medical Service Efim Smirnov (1904-1989). The article highlights biographical information about him.

  15. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Deputy Superintendent, if present for duty, shall have such government and command. The Dean of the... judgment to take appropriate action in the absence of instructions or supervision. (7) Physical and moral...

  16. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Deputy Superintendent, if present for duty, shall have such government and command. The Dean of the... judgment to take appropriate action in the absence of instructions or supervision. (7) Physical and moral...

  17. Congressional Nominations to U.S. Service Academies: An Overview and Resources for Outreach and Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-21

    authorized by law to nominate candidates for appointment to four U.S. service academies. These schools are the U.S. Military Academy, the U.S. Naval...five years . The nomination of constituents to one of the service academies can provide Members of Congress with the opportunity to perform community...1 embers of Congress are authorized by law to nominate candidates for appointment to four U.S. service academies. 1 These schools are the U.S

  18. [Medical and psychological prediction of professional readiness of graduates of military school].

    PubMed

    Vorona, A A; Gerasimenko, V D; Kozlovskiĭ, É A; Kukushkin, Iu A; Bogomolov, A V

    2012-01-01

    The authors propose a method for assessing the professional readiness of graduates of military educational institution, taking into account academic performance, the results of sociometric surveys, data on the professional fitness and health. The high efficiency of the developed method for predicting successful adaptation of graduates to serve in the armed forces is showed.

  19. Implementation and Dissemination of a Military Trauma System: Utilizing Medical Lessons Learned from the Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    instituted as standards of care within the theater trauma system, including deep venous thrombosis ( DVT ) prophylaxis, hypothermia prevention , and...for massive transfusion / damage control resuscitation, burn care, hypothermia prevention and management, wound and amputation management have been...advances in numerous components of battlefield injury care. PREVENTION Since the implementation of the military trauma system, the effect of new

  20. The military health system: a community of solutions for medical education, health care delivery, and public health.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Robert P; Saguil, Aaron; Seehusen, Dean A; Reamy, Brian V; Stephens, Mark B

    2013-01-01

    Multiple strategies have been proposed to improve health care in the United States. These include the development of communities of solution (COSs), implementation of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), and lengthening family medicine residency training. There is scant literature on how to build and integrate these ideal models of care, and no literature about how to build a model of care integrating all 3 strategies is available. The Military Health System has adopted the PCMH model and will offer some 4-year family medicine residency positions starting in 2013. Lengthening residency training to 4 years represents an unprecedented opportunity to weave experiential COS instruction throughout a family physician's graduate medical education, providing future family physicians the skills needed to foster a COS in their future practice. This article describes our COS effort to synergize 3 aspects of modern military medicine: self-defined community populations, the transition to the PCMH model, and the initiation of the 4-year length of training pilot program in family medicine residency training. In this way we provide a starting point and general how-to guide that can be used to create a COS integrated with other current concepts in medicine.

  1. Delivering biodefense continuing education to military medical providers by allowing a biodefense educational curriculum to unfold in practice.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Donna M; D'Alessandro, Michael P

    2007-12-01

    A challenge today is how to deliver initial and continuing education on biodefense to military medical providers in a manner that can be integrated into their workflow and lifestyle. A summative evaluation of a prototypical biodefense digital library (BDL) and learning collaboratory was performed. The BDL posted daily links to biodefense news stories from January 2004 to December 2005. Four evaluations were completed, that is, content evaluation, curriculum comparison with a biodefense graduate program, usage evaluation, and impact factor analysis. News stories (N = 678) came from a broad range of authoritative national and international news sources (N = 178). News stories covered all of the categories in the required and elective formal biodefense graduate program courses. The BDL was consistently displayed on the first page of the top three Internet search engines, meaning that it was among the top 10 authoritative Internet sites on biodefense. Presenting biodefense news stories to busy military medical providers in an organized chronological fashion produces an unstructured biodefense educational curriculum that unfolds in practice and becomes an educational resource that is ultimately well regarded and may be efficient to use.

  2. Pulse!!: a model for research and development of virtual-reality learning in military medical education and training.

    PubMed

    Dunne, James R; McDonald, Claudia L

    2010-07-01

    Pulse!! The Virtual Clinical Learning Lab at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, in collaboration with the United States Navy, has developed a model for research and technological development that they believe is an essential element in the future of military and civilian medical education. The Pulse!! project models a strategy for providing cross-disciplinary expertise and resources to educational, governmental, and business entities challenged with meeting looming health care crises. It includes a three-dimensional virtual learning platform that provides unlimited, repeatable, immersive clinical experiences without risk to patients, and is available anywhere there is a computer. Pulse!! utilizes expertise in the fields of medicine, medical education, computer science, software engineering, physics, computer animation, art, and architecture. Lab scientists collaborate with the commercial virtual-reality simulation industry to produce research-based learning platforms based on cutting-edge computer technology.

  3. [Quality of diagnosis and prophylaxis of HIV-infection in military clinical institutions and related problems in training medical personnel].

    PubMed

    Volzhanin, V M; Bulan'kov, Iu I; Bolekhan, V N; Vasil'ev, V V; Orlova, E S

    2009-06-01

    The analysis of results of laboratorial diagnostics of HIV-infection in multiprofile treatment institute of the Ministry of Defense of RF, questioning of medical staff on the questions of diagnostics and treatment of HIV-infection discovered several disadvantages in the system of training of the physicians in this sphere. Insufficient level of knowledge of practical aspects of HIV-infection causes baseless quantity of screening laboratorial tests (up to 70%). It leads to grand material inputs of the Ministry of Defense of RF. The authors propose an elaborated guidance manual for teachers, attending physicians and students of academies on studying questions of HIV-infection, based on the principle of "transparent study", on broad engaging of different departments to the process of teaching, on consideration of profiles of cycles of studying, of levels of adoption, types of lessons, volume of study time.

  4. Design strategy and implementation of the medical diagnostic image support system at two large military medical centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Donald V.; Smith, Stan M.; Sauls, F.; Cawthon, Michael A.; Telepak, Robert J.

    1992-07-01

    The Medical Diagnostic Imaging Support (MDIS) system contract for federal medical treatment facilities was awarded to Loral/Siemens in the Fall of 1991. This contract places ''filmless'' imaging in a variety of situations from small clients to large medical centers. The MDIS system approach is a ''turn-key'', performance based specification driven by clinical requirements.

  5. Military Personnel: DOD Addressing Challenges in Iraq and Afghanistan but Opportunities Exist to Enhance the Planning Process for Army Medical Personnel Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    dental corps, and nurse anesthetists are to be deployed in theater for no longer than 90 days at a time unless the individual volunteers for a longer...dentists, and nurse anesthetists . To determine the extent to which the Army’s reserve component medical units deployed their authorized medical...refer to U.S. military health care officers including physicians, dentists, nurses , and others, as well as enlisted personnel such as medics, hospital

  6. Australian military primary care practitioners do not believe clinical practice guidelines are needed for postdeployment medically unexplained symptoms.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jon; MacKenzie, Alison; McLaughlin, Ruth; Burke, Nicholas; Bennett, Sonya; Mobbs, Robyn; Ellis, Niki

    2009-04-01

    In Australia, little research has been undertaken on the development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to assist with the impact of postdeployment ill-health including medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) and it has been unclear whether such a development is desired by Australian primary care practitioners. In response an empirical investigation into the perceptions and experiences of 24 medical officers from the Australian military with regard to postdeployment ill-health, medically unexplained symptoms, and the potential development of CPGs in this area was undertaken. The analysis suggests that although MUS are accepted as common in general practice they are not perceived by practitioners to be as prevalent in the Australian Defense Forces. Although the medical officers do not perceive clinical practice guidelines as the best tool for managing MUS, there was interest in the development of practical tools to assist in the diagnosis of medically unexplained symptoms. The response by practitioners is of critical importance for the potential implementation of clinical practice guidelines in this area.

  7. Brain fingerprinting classification concealed information test detects US Navy military medical information with P300.

    PubMed

    Farwell, Lawrence A; Richardson, Drew C; Richardson, Graham M; Furedy, John J

    2014-01-01

    A classification concealed information test (CIT) used the "brain fingerprinting" method of applying P300 event-related potential (ERP) in detecting information that is (1) acquired in real life and (2) unique to US Navy experts in military medicine. Military medicine experts and non-experts were asked to push buttons in response to three types of text stimuli. Targets contain known information relevant to military medicine, are identified to subjects as relevant, and require pushing one button. Subjects are told to push another button to all other stimuli. Probes contain concealed information relevant to military medicine, and are not identified to subjects. Irrelevants contain equally plausible, but incorrect/irrelevant information. Error rate was 0%. Median and mean statistical confidences for individual determinations were 99.9% with no indeterminates (results lacking sufficiently high statistical confidence to be classified). We compared error rate and statistical confidence for determinations of both information present and information absent produced by classification CIT (Is a probe ERP more similar to a target or to an irrelevant ERP?) vs. comparison CIT (Does a probe produce a larger ERP than an irrelevant?) using P300 plus the late negative component (LNP; together, P300-MERMER). Comparison CIT produced a significantly higher error rate (20%) and lower statistical confidences: mean 67%; information-absent mean was 28.9%, less than chance (50%). We compared analysis using P300 alone with the P300 + LNP. P300 alone produced the same 0% error rate but significantly lower statistical confidences. These findings add to the evidence that the brain fingerprinting methods as described here provide sufficient conditions to produce less than 1% error rate and greater than 95% median statistical confidence in a CIT on information obtained in the course of real life that is characteristic of individuals with specific training, expertise, or organizational

  8. Brain fingerprinting classification concealed information test detects US Navy military medical information with P300

    PubMed Central

    Farwell, Lawrence A.; Richardson, Drew C.; Richardson, Graham M.; Furedy, John J.

    2014-01-01

    A classification concealed information test (CIT) used the “brain fingerprinting” method of applying P300 event-related potential (ERP) in detecting information that is (1) acquired in real life and (2) unique to US Navy experts in military medicine. Military medicine experts and non-experts were asked to push buttons in response to three types of text stimuli. Targets contain known information relevant to military medicine, are identified to subjects as relevant, and require pushing one button. Subjects are told to push another button to all other stimuli. Probes contain concealed information relevant to military medicine, and are not identified to subjects. Irrelevants contain equally plausible, but incorrect/irrelevant information. Error rate was 0%. Median and mean statistical confidences for individual determinations were 99.9% with no indeterminates (results lacking sufficiently high statistical confidence to be classified). We compared error rate and statistical confidence for determinations of both information present and information absent produced by classification CIT (Is a probe ERP more similar to a target or to an irrelevant ERP?) vs. comparison CIT (Does a probe produce a larger ERP than an irrelevant?) using P300 plus the late negative component (LNP; together, P300-MERMER). Comparison CIT produced a significantly higher error rate (20%) and lower statistical confidences: mean 67%; information-absent mean was 28.9%, less than chance (50%). We compared analysis using P300 alone with the P300 + LNP. P300 alone produced the same 0% error rate but significantly lower statistical confidences. These findings add to the evidence that the brain fingerprinting methods as described here provide sufficient conditions to produce less than 1% error rate and greater than 95% median statistical confidence in a CIT on information obtained in the course of real life that is characteristic of individuals with specific training, expertise, or organizational

  9. Establishment of a Comprehensive Military Medical System during Wartime in El Salvador: A Retrospective View

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    Central American provinces declared their independence from Spain. 2 2 Fearing incorporation of the region under the Emperor of Mexico in 1823, El...communist leader trained in Mexico . * The uprising was brutally quashed by then president, General * Maximiliano Hernandez Martinez, and between...frequent. Likewise, spouse abuse, domestic violence, and an attitude of " machismo " are said to be prevalent.87 THE MILITARY 56 The Armed Forces of El

  10. [The role of the vaccine prophylaxis of cervical cancer among female military personnel].

    PubMed

    Shmidt, A A; Alieva, M T; Ivanova, L V; Molchanov, O V

    2015-06-01

    The authors presented results of the study concerning human papillomavirus infecting of military students of higher military educational institutions of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. In the Center for Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the Kirov Military-Medical Academy was performed a dynamic examination of 478 female cadets aged 17-25. The high level of high-risk HPV viruses was revealed during the examination what proves the necessity of prophylaxis enhancing with the aim to prevent gynecological diseases and reproductive health promotion. The main ways of cervical cancer prophylaxis are health education, in-depth medical examination of women with the aim to reveal and treat gynecological diseases (this medical examination should be carried out twice a year), primary prevention of cervical cancer by vaccination.

  11. An Evaluation of the Significance of Work-Related Influence Factors on Fitness and the Development of Medical and Orthopaedic Conditions in Military Executives

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Michael; Finze, Susanne; Holtherm, Christoph; Hinder, Jens; Lison, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health promotion is an effective tool to improve the state of health of employees. As part of occupational health promotion in the German Bundeswehr, top-ranking military executives are offered a medical examination and training programme. Health-related data is collected as a basis for training and lifestyle counselling. This data was subjected to a retrospective evaluation in order to identify occupational risk factors and their correlation with cardiovascular resilience, trunk strength, and the development of orthopaedic and internal disorders. A total of 122 military executives (all male, age 54.6 ± 4.2 years) answered a questionnaire aimed at evaluating private and occupational stress factors. The medical history was followed by a medical and orthopaedic examination involving a lactate performance test (treadmill or bicycle ergometry) and an isometric trunk strength measurement. The data obtained was then statistically evaluated. For military executives, work-related travelling and commuting involve a high risk of medical and orthopaedic conditions. Regular exercise leads to improved fitness levels. In order to prevent medical problems, military executives working long hours should regularly take part in fitness and weight training under professional instructions. PMID:27774505

  12. Observation on the Joint Service Military Medical Facility What Does the Future Hold

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    base hospitals at Mather and McClellan , Sacramento , CA; March AFB hospital, CA; Fitzsimmons Medical Center, Aurora, CO, among others.20 Unlike...Medical Center, San Diego, CA and David Grant Medical Center, Travis AFB , CA for Army RC units, such as the 921st Field Hospital (FH) from Sacramento ...with Malcolm Grow Medical Center at Andrews AFB , Dewitt Army Community Hospital at Ft. Belvoir, and associated area clinics.14 But the Office of

  13. Development of medical engagement training toolkits to support special operations military assistance programs in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Boedeker, Ben H; Boedeker, David; Tate, Charmaine

    2012-01-01

    The Medical Seminar (MEDSEM) is a medical operation that shares culturally appropriate medical information with a defined indigenous population based upon a "train the trainer" concept. This work describes the development of a hand washing training toolkit designed to support a MEDSEM action in Afghanistan.

  14. Medical examination of Israeli 17-year-olds before military service as a national resource for health information.

    PubMed

    Kark, J D; Kedem, R; Revach, M

    1986-01-01

    At age 17 years Israelis undergo medical examination for the purpose of health classification for military service. The potential use of this extensive data collection system for epidemiologic studies is illustrated for selected conditions. Trends in diagnosed disorders over a 25-year period are exemplified in the changing prevalence of tuberculosis, bronchial asthma, diabetes, epilepsy and heart defects. Within birth cohorts, cross-sectional analyses of height, body mass, blood pressure and disorders--such as bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, diabetes, psychiatric diagnoses and such genetic conditions as familial Mediterranean fever--point to clear ethnic differences. Educational level is strongly associated with measures of health status. Potential uses of this resource include: detecting groups in need of preventive, curative and rehabilitative care, assessing changing needs and priorities of health care, evaluation of intervention programs and health services provided in childhood, a wide spectrum of etiologic studies including assessment of health effects of social change, follow-up studies including the natural history of disorders, and developing data systems such as national registries of rare or important conditions. Issues relating to data reliability and validity, changing disease classification and nonexamination of groups exempted from military service limit interpretation of findings and restrict uses of this resource. Emphasis on standardization of data collection and diagnostic criteria, quality assurance and improved data management will be necessary.

  15. [The system of selection and training of military-medical staff for the 40th army (1979-1989)].

    PubMed

    Ryabinkin, V V

    2015-10-01

    In December 1979 in order to fulfil their internationalist duty troops and units of the 40th Army of the Armed Forces of the USSR was brought into Afghanistan. For complete and qualitative manning of the army with the military doctors it was needed in a short time to create a system capable to carry out candidates selection, their education and specialized training for work in extreme conditions of combat operations. This system was created in a short time. The article presents information about its features, advantages and problems that had to be solved during the entire period of the Soviet-Afghan war. The complex staff arrangements had allowed solving medical support problems of the 40th Army on the high level.

  16. Prevention of combat-related infections: antimicrobial therapy in battlefield and barrier measures in French military medical treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Mérens, Audrey; Rapp, Christophe; Delaune, Deborah; Danis, Julien; Berger, Franck; Michel, Remy

    2014-01-01

    Infection is a major complication associated with combat-related injuries. Beside immobilization, wound irrigation, surgical debridement and delayed coverage, post-injury antimicrobials contribute to reduce combat-related infections, particularly those caused by bacteria of the early contamination flora. In modern warfare, bacteria involved in combat-related infections are mainly Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the late contamination flora. These bacteria are frequently resistant or multiresistant to antibiotics and spread through the deployed chain of care. This article exposes the principles of war wounds antimicrobial prophylaxis recommended in the French Armed Forces and highlights the need for high compliance to hygiene standard precautions, adapted contact precautions and judicious use of antibiotics in French deployed military medical treatment facilities (MTF).

  17. Is point-of-care ultrasound accurate and useful in the hands of military medical technicians? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hile, David C; Morgan, Andrew R; Laselle, Brooks T; Bothwell, Jason D

    2012-08-01

    Over the past decade, point-of-care ultrasound (US) use by nonphysician providers has grown substantially. The purpose of this article is to (1) summarize the literature evaluating military medics' facility at US, (2) more clearly define the potential utility of military prehospital US technology, and (3) lay a pathway for future research of military prehospital US. The authors performed a keyword search using multiple search engines. Each author independently reviewed the search results and evaluated the literature for inclusion. Of 30 studies identified, five studies met inclusion criteria. The applications included evaluation of cardiac activity, pneumothorax evaluation, and fracture evaluation. Additionally, a descriptive study demonstrated distribution of US exam types during practical use by Army Special Forces Medical Sergeants. No studies evaluated retention of skills over prolonged periods. Multiple studies demonstrate the feasibility of training military medics in US. Even under austere conditions, the majority of studies conclude that medic can perform US with a high degree of accuracy. Lessons learned from these studies tend to support continued use of US in out-of-hospital settings and exploration of the optimal curriculum to introduce this skill.

  18. [The contributin of medical supply experts into military health care during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, Yu V; Bunin, S A; Kononov, V N; Perfilev, A G

    2015-05-01

    During the Great Patriotic War edical supply experts to solve complex problems for the "smooth and full achievement of medical supplies of the army, the development of official documents, creation of new samples of complete- standard-issue equipment, ambulance and medical equipment. The experience gained on the battlefield and during the post-war period, allowed progressively improving the functioning of. the medical supply troops (forces), successfully and consistently carried out in the framework of its organizational planning and other activities.

  19. Diagnoses and factors associated with medical evacuation and return to duty among nonmilitary personnel participating in military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Steven P.; Brown, Charlie; Kurihara, Connie; Plunkett, Anthony; Nguyen, Conner; Strassels, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nonmilitary personnel play an increasingly critical role in modern wars. Stark differences exist between the demographic characteristics, training and missions of military and nonmilitary members. We examined the differences in types of injury and rates of returning to duty among nonmilitary and military personnel participating in military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Methods We collected data for nonmilitary personnel medically evacuated from military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan between 2004 and 2007. We compared injury categories and return-to-duty rates in this group with previously published data for military personnel and identified factors associated with return to duty. Results Of the 2155 medically evacuated nonmilitary personnel, 74.7% did not return to duty. War-related injuries in this group accounted for 25.6% of the evacuations, the most common causes being combat-related injuries (55.4%) and musculoskeletal/spinal injuries (22.9%). Among individuals with non–war-related injuries, musculoskeletal injuries accounted for 17.8% of evacuations. Diagnoses associated with the highest return-to-duty rates in the group of nonmilitary personnel were psychiatric diagnoses (15.6%) among those with war-related injuries and noncardiac chest or abdominal pain (44.0%) among those with non–war-related injuries. Compared with military personnel, nonmilitary personnel with war-related injuries were less likely to return to duty (4.4% v. 5.9%, p = 0.001) but more likely to return to duty after non–war-related injuries (32.5% v. 30.7%, p = 0.001). Interpretation Compared with military personnel, nonmilitary personnel were more likely to be evacuated with non–war-related injuries but more likely to return to duty after such injuries. For evacuations because of war-related injuries, this trend was reversed. PMID:21324873

  20. The evolution of military neurosurgery in the Turkish army.

    PubMed

    Izci, Yusuf

    2010-05-01

    The history of neurosurgery in the Turkish army is not long and complex. Neurosurgery was first practiced in the Ottoman army by Cemil Pasha, who was a general surgeon. After the fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Republic of Turkey was established and modern neurosurgical procedures were applied at the Gulhane Military Medical Academy (GMMA). Maj. Zinnur Rollas, M.D., was the founder of the Department of Neurosurgery at GMMA in 1957. A modern neurosurgical program and school was established in 1965 by Col. Hamit Ziya Gokalp, M.D., who completed his residency training in the US. Today, 26 military neurosurgeons are on active duty in 11 military hospitals in Turkey. All of these neurosurgeons work in modern clinics and operating theaters. In this paper, military neurosurgery in the Turkish army is reported in 3 parts: 1) the history of neurosurgery in the Turkish military, 2) the Department of Neurosurgery at the GMMA, and 3) the duties of a military neurosurgeon in the Turkish army.

  1. Acute coronary syndromes in deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Leigh K; Turner, Barbara S; Stotts, Nancy A; Dracup, Kathleen A

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the cardiovascular (CV) risk profile of deployed military men who experience acute coronary syndrome (ACS). A retrospective record review of deployed military men who experienced ACS while deployed and were treated at an overseas military medical center between 2001 and 2007 was conducted to obtain the information for this descriptive study (N= 100). Acute myocardial infarction was diagnosed in 82% of the sample, and 18% experienced unstable angina. Subjects' mean age was 44.7 years (SD± 7.6; range 29-60) and most were enlisted and reservists. Risk factors included a family history of premature coronary artery disease (41%) and smoking (47%) as well as a history of hyperlipidemia (48%), hypertension (28%), and glucose abnormalities (6%). The group was overweight (BMI 27.77 kg/m(2) ± 3.2) and low risk for CV events (Framingham risk score 7.8%[± 4.4]). Young military men are regarded as the epitome of health and fitness; however, findings from this study suggest that this generally low-risk group do indeed have multiple CV risk factors and experience ACS. Early risk factor assessment and modification, including smoking cessation, weight management, and improving dyslipidemia, is essential. ©2011 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Talent Management in Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Brent; Davies, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Academies are semi-autonomous schools set up outside the normal local government structures with sponsors from business and charity groups to create new and innovative ways of creating and sustaining school transformation. The aim of this paper is to assist in a strategic conversation within the academy movement on talent development.…

  3. Talent Management in Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Brent; Davies, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Academies are semi-autonomous schools set up outside the normal local government structures with sponsors from business and charity groups to create new and innovative ways of creating and sustaining school transformation. The aim of this paper is to assist in a strategic conversation within the academy movement on talent development.…

  4. Researching Academies in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Helen; Woods, Philip; Woods, Glenys

    2008-01-01

    In 2002 the New Labour government launched the Academies programme (known initially as City Academies) with the target of 400, of which 200 are to opened by 2010. The espoused aim has been to tackle underachievement and encourage diversity of provision. However, it continues to be a controversial policy that is being driven by the Specialist…

  5. Military and Civilian Undergraduates: Attitudes toward Women, Masculinity, and Authoritarianism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurpius, Sharon E. Robinson; Lucart, A. Leigh

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed students at the U.S. Naval Academy, U.S. Air Force Academy, Reserve Officer Training Corp, and a civilian university about attitudes toward gender roles and authoritarianism. Military students had the most traditional authoritarian beliefs and gender role attitudes, with Naval Academy males holding the most traditional attitudes toward…

  6. [Peculiarities of forensic medical expertise in a situation of massive salmonellosis morbidity in a military unit].

    PubMed

    Shirokova, L V; Pinchuk, P V

    2011-01-01

    The authors propose to consider infectious diseases as mass clinical conditions in both normative-legal and medical contexts. Peculiarities of commission and comprehensive inspections carried out in situations of massive infectious morbidity among servicemen are illustrated by examples of the work of state forensic medical organizations and investigative authorities of the Russian Defense Ministry.

  7. Challenges of Self-Reported Medical Conditions and Electronic Medical Records Among Members of a Large Military Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-05

    29.7 99.6 Manic - depressive disorder 0.9 (0.8, 0.9) 2.1 (2.0, 2.3) 1.9 11.8 98.7 Hepatitis C 0.8 (0.7, 0.9) 0.2 (0.2, 0.3) 0.1 25.4 99.6 Coronary...relatively common acute or transient medical conditions were migraine headaches and depression . Relatively common chronic medical conditions were...recorded data was consistently lower than prevalence based on self- report for most conditions, with the exception of chronic bronchitis, manic

  8. Diversity and clinical impact of Acinetobacter baumannii colonization and infection at a military medical center.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kyle; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; van der Reijden, Tanny J; van Strijen, Beppie; You, David M; Babel, Britta S; Philip, Andrew I; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii emerging in combat casualties is poorly understood. We analyzed 65 (54 nonreplicate) Acinetobacter isolates from 48 patients (46 hospitalized and 2 outpatient trainees entering the military) from October 2004 to October 2005 for genotypic similarities, time-space relatedness, and antibiotic susceptibility. Clinical and surveillance cultures were compared by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genomic fingerprinting to each other and to strains of a reference database. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined, and multiplex PCR was performed for OXA-23-like, -24-like, -51-like, and -58-like carbapenemases. Records were reviewed for overlapping hospital stays of the most frequent genotypes, and risk ratios were calculated for any association of genotype with severity of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score or injury severity score (ISS) and previous antibiotic use. Nineteen genotypes were identified; two predominated, one consistent with an emerging novel international clone and the other unique to our database. Both predominant genotypes were carbapenem resistant, were present at another hospital before patients' admission to our facility, and were associated with higher APACHE II scores, higher ISSs, and previous carbapenem antibiotics in comparison with other genotypes. One predominated in wound and respiratory isolates, and the other predominated in wound and skin surveillance samples. Several other genotypes were identified as European clones I to III. Acinetobacter genotypes from recruits upon entry to the military, unlike those in hospitalized patients, did not include carbapenem-resistant genotypes. Acinetobacter species isolated from battlefield casualties are diverse, including genotypes belonging to European clones I to III. Two carbapenem-resistant genotypes were epidemic, one of which appeared to belong to a novel international clone.

  9. Diversity and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter baumannii Colonization and Infection at a Military Medical Center ▿

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Kyle; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; van der Reijden, Tanny J.; van Strijen, Beppie; You, David M.; Babel, Britta S.; Philip, Andrew I.; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii emerging in combat casualties is poorly understood. We analyzed 65 (54 nonreplicate) Acinetobacter isolates from 48 patients (46 hospitalized and 2 outpatient trainees entering the military) from October 2004 to October 2005 for genotypic similarities, time-space relatedness, and antibiotic susceptibility. Clinical and surveillance cultures were compared by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genomic fingerprinting to each other and to strains of a reference database. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined, and multiplex PCR was performed for OXA-23-like, -24-like, -51-like, and -58-like carbapenemases. Records were reviewed for overlapping hospital stays of the most frequent genotypes, and risk ratios were calculated for any association of genotype with severity of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score or injury severity score (ISS) and previous antibiotic use. Nineteen genotypes were identified; two predominated, one consistent with an emerging novel international clone and the other unique to our database. Both predominant genotypes were carbapenem resistant, were present at another hospital before patients' admission to our facility, and were associated with higher APACHE II scores, higher ISSs, and previous carbapenem antibiotics in comparison with other genotypes. One predominated in wound and respiratory isolates, and the other predominated in wound and skin surveillance samples. Several other genotypes were identified as European clones I to III. Acinetobacter genotypes from recruits upon entry to the military, unlike those in hospitalized patients, did not include carbapenem-resistant genotypes. Acinetobacter species isolated from battlefield casualties are diverse, including genotypes belonging to European clones I to III. Two carbapenem-resistant genotypes were epidemic, one of which appeared to belong to a novel international clone. PMID:21084513

  10. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of colonels A. Denisov and V . Materikin, senior instructors at the Military Academy of Armored Troops imeni MSU R. Ya. Malinovskiy. Each of these...Response to Arms Initiatives Criticized [Capt. V . Kuzar; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 17 Jul 88] 6 ARMED FORCES Results of KRASNAYA ZVEZDA’S On-Going Readers...Shkadov; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 26 Apr 88] 18 Maj Gen Dorofeyev on Educational Reform in Military Academies [ Yu . Dorofeyev; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 24 Apr 88] 20

  11. Case report: Military subcultural competency.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric

    2013-07-01

    The military is comprised of numerous subcultures. These subcultures can dramatically impact perceptions of illness and care. Although efforts are currently underway to improve the military cultural competence of all health care providers, efforts to improve the subcultural competence of military providers require attention. Military providers, although part of the military culture, may not appreciate their patients' military subculture or be aware of the impact their own subculture plays on the encounter. To illustrate potential difficulties, a case is described where limited military subcultural competence disrupted care. As the military medical corps continues to integrate across service lines, this case underscores the importance of training military physicians to assess the influence of a service member's specific military subculture. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. [To the history of organisation and development of cardiac anesthesiology in the A. N. Bakulev Research Center of Cardiovascular Surgery of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences: the start of activities (1956-1965)].

    PubMed

    Gliantsev, S P; Gudkova, M V

    2006-01-01

    The authors present data on the development and introduction of anesthetic techniques during cardiac surgery at the Institute of Thoracic Surgery, USSR Academy of Medical Sciences, in 1956-1960 and after its reorganization to the Institute of Cardiovascular Surgery, USSR Academy of Medical Sciences, in 1961-1965. It is shown that in the years of introduction of closed operations on the heart, the methods of one- and many component inhalational anesthesia were mastered, its techniques were developed, anesthesia apparatuses and an anesthesia schedule were designed, cardiac anesthesiological studies were conducted, training of physicians from the country's regions was initiated, and the first guidelines for general anesthesia were published. In these years, the firm foundation was laid for the development of cardiac anesthesia. Later on the Institute developed and introduces all basic types of inhalational anesthesia during operations on the open heart under both extracorporeal circulation and hypothermia. The gained experience allowed the laboratory staff to defend several dissertations, to issue two monographs, and to analyze errors and risks of general anesthesia in patients with cardiovascular diseases at surgery.

  13. Optimization of Simulation and Moulage in Military-Related Medical Training.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Christopher; Rush, Stephen C; Gallo, Isabelle; Dalere, Bryan; Staak, Brian; Moore, Litt; Kerr, Win; Chandler, Matthew; Smith, Will

    2017-01-01

    Preparation of Special Operations Forces (SOF) Medics as first responders for the battle space and austere environments is critical to optimize survival and quality of life for our Operators who may sustain serious and complex wounding patterns and illnesses. In the absence of constant clinical exposure for these medics, it is necessary to maximize all available training opportunities. The incorporation of scenario-based training helps weave together teamwork and the ability to practice treatment protocols in a tactical, controlled training environment to reproduce, to some degree, the environment in and stressors under which care will need to be delivered. We reviewed the evolution of training scenarios within one Pararescue (PJ) team since 2008 and codified various tools used to simulate physical findings and drive medical exercises as part of scenario-based training. We also surveyed other SOF Medic training resources. 2017.

  14. American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering-Military Collaboration: Bioengineering Challenges of Brain Trauma Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Field MRI: Alisa D. Gean, M.D., Professor of Radiology , Neurology and Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco; Chief of...Mun, Ph.D., Director and Professor of Radiology Director of the Imaging Science and Information System (ISIS) Research Center Georgetown...University Medical Center Ron Kikinis, M.D., Director of the Surgical Planning Laboratory, Professor of Radiology , Harvard Medical School Larry

  15. The Evolution of Military Trauma and Critical Care Medicine: Applications for Civilian Medical Care Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    is named after the Persian physician, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah Ibn Sina , who lived between 900 and 1037 A.D. He is credited with writing one of...treatment, and over 760 medications. This text remained the med- ical guide to Western medicine through the 18th century. Ibn Sina , considered one of the...leaders in medicine such as Ibn Sina , war and conflict have also been credited with advances in medical and surgical therapy throughout the centu

  16. Military medical advances resulting from the conflict in Korea, Part I: Systems advances that enhanced patient survival.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael S

    2012-04-01

    The Korean War started several years after the World War II had ended and no recognition of the threat or preparation was made for this possibility. The military and its medical service had been downsized after World War II and had to quickly ramp up to meet the surprise attack. The war provided the laboratory for trials and experimentation with the new technological developments of the era. The Korean conflict led to numerous advances in medical systems and patient care. The Mobile Army Surgical Hospital came of age, and was instrumental in saving many lives. Helicopters saw their first regular use as flying ambulances to take the injured to definitive care in a timely fashion. The national blood banking program was rapidly geared up and new techniques such as plastic bags for collection and delivery resulted. Body armor was developed that would allow mobility while offering protection and was widely used for the first time. Each of these systems improvements saved the lives of soldiers in combat and were soon to be used in the civilian sector to save and improve lives around the world.

  17. [Military physician Colonel Robert Yout. Twenty years as a paratrooper medical officer].

    PubMed

    Yout, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Robert Yout was born on June 15th, 1930. A rugby player and a member of the French Volleyball team, he was already an outstanding sportsman when he began his studies at the Health Services School in Lyons. His career as an army medical officer among the paratroopers was atypical. He spent many years among the most prestigious elite paratroopers of the French army: the 2nd REP, the 1st CHOC and the CINC (The Army Training School for Combat Swimmers) . When he retired, he was Head Doctor of the Paratroopers parent company: The Airborne School of Pau. For the army medical historian, Robert Yout is the perfect example of a man with an outstanding and remarkable career: A crack soldier, a brave army medical officer, a parachuting and diving pioneer and a sportsman of international class.

  18. [Main ways of improvements of the systems of medical rehabilitation of military servicemen after cardiovascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Iudin, V E; Klimko, V V; Shkarupa, O F; Guzenko, I E

    2014-08-01

    For better improvement of medical rehabilitation referred to effective restoration of functional status of servicemen after cardiovascular surgery it is necessary to introduce standards of medical rehabilitation at all stages of rehabilitation, syndrome-pathologic principle of grouping patients, multidisciplinary organisation of medical activity: cardiologist-physician, specialist of functional diagnostics, specialist of physical therapy, psychotherapist, physical therapeutic, surgeon and specialist of professional rehabilitation. Basic ways of improvement of the system of rehabilitation were organisational technologies of interaction during early and late stages of rehabilitation and persistent control of quality and effectiveness of rehabilitation. Optimization of organisation of late stage of hospitalisation allowed to reduce the average time of rehabilitation to 33,3% and at the same time to improve effectiveness of rehabilitation.

  19. [The experience of 183 medical special forces of the Volga-Urals Military District in the elimination of the health effects of the emergency in the Republic of Indonesia].

    PubMed

    Korniushko, I G; Iakovlev, S V; Vladimirov, A V

    2011-08-01

    The article is based on personal experience of the authors with assistance in the aftermath of the tsunami in the Republic of Indonesia, which killed about 120 thousand (December 26, 2004 at 255 km to the west coast of Sumatra). In the disaster area were sent to 183 medical detachments for special purposes of the Volga-Urals Military District, reinforced brigade of specialized medical care of military medical institutions under the central government and the Moscow Military District. As the authors noted, in the aftermath of a disaster like the tsunami, at first put forward preventive measures among displaced persons. The experience gained by the Medical Service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation in the aftermath of natural disaster in the Republic of Indonesia, is used to plan future humanitarian operations abroad with the assistance of military medical specialists from Russia.

  20. American Academy of Audiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... CEU Manager by April 21. Audiology News 27 Mar Suppressors: Hearing Protection or Safety Threat? 22 Mar Is There a Genetic Component to Tinnitus? 03 Mar Celebrate World Hearing Day with the Academy! 23 ...

  1. Defense Dept. May Cut U.S. Service Academies' Affirmative-Action Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The nation's military-service academies could be stripped of one of their chief tools for bringing in black, Hispanic, and American Indian students as a result of regulatory changes being considered by the Department of Defense, officials of the U.S. Air Force Academy said last week. The proposed change in the department's directives to its…

  2. Character Development at the United States Air Force Academy: A Phenomenological Case Study of Graduates' Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. Micheal

    2010-01-01

    The United States Air Force Academy develops commissionable officers of character through an intense 4-year program that includes academic, athletic, and military education and training. The literature was silent on whether the Academy effectively develops character or, if so, how the development takes place. This was a phenomenological case study…

  3. Defense Dept. May Cut U.S. Service Academies' Affirmative-Action Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The nation's military-service academies could be stripped of one of their chief tools for bringing in black, Hispanic, and American Indian students as a result of regulatory changes being considered by the Department of Defense, officials of the U.S. Air Force Academy said last week. The proposed change in the department's directives to its…

  4. Character Development at the United States Air Force Academy: A Phenomenological Case Study of Graduates' Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. Micheal

    2010-01-01

    The United States Air Force Academy develops commissionable officers of character through an intense 4-year program that includes academic, athletic, and military education and training. The literature was silent on whether the Academy effectively develops character or, if so, how the development takes place. This was a phenomenological case study…

  5. Military Psychology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TRANSLATIONS, MILITARY TRAINING, OFFICER PERSONNEL, PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY , COMMUNISM, INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS, EMOTIONS....MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), *MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY , *TEXTBOOKS, USSR, ORGANIZATIONS, COMBAT READINESS, PSYCHOMOTOR FUNCTION, REASONING, SURVEYS

  6. Technology complementing military behavioral health efforts at tripler army medical center.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Melba C; Folen, Raymond A; Yamanuha, Bronson K

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a short narrative on the ways that behavioral health professionals and their patients are currently benefitting from the use of technology. Examples stem from applications of technology to patients/research participants at the Tripler Army Medical Center. The paper also discusses how current use of this technology has made it possible to serve individuals in their own cultural environment, providing a cost-effective means of providing mental health services.

  7. Realizing Major William Borden's dream: military medicine, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and its wounded warriors, 1909-2009: an essay review.

    PubMed

    Connor, J T H

    2011-07-01

    This essay review examines three books dealing with the founding and subsequent activities of Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) and the evolution of military medicine from 1909 to 2009 recently published by the US Army's Borden Institute. Established by fellow army doctor William Borden to honor Walter Reed himself, WRAMC, located in Washington, DC, soon became the public and professional face of medical care for American soldiers. The discussion highlights the ongoing issue of the care and treatment of combat amputees; aspects of gender within military medicine; and WRAMC's function as an educational and research facility. Also discussed are the archival and documentary bases for these books and their utility for historians. Complimentary analysis of two of the books which are, in particular, explicitly about the history of WRAMC is contextualized within the celebration of the centennial of this army post contemporaneously with its closure, amalgamation, and relocation primarily to Maryland.

  8. Characteristics of the Social Status of Students at Military Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlova, E. N.

    2013-01-01

    Research on the motivations of Russian college students in military training centers and military departments, and cadets enrolled in military service academies shows that the first two occupy a marginal position. This is reflected in the ambiguity of their status and the fact that they are at the interface between two cultures, manifested in…

  9. Characteristics of the Social Status of Students at Military Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlova, E. N.

    2013-01-01

    Research on the motivations of Russian college students in military training centers and military departments, and cadets enrolled in military service academies shows that the first two occupy a marginal position. This is reflected in the ambiguity of their status and the fact that they are at the interface between two cultures, manifested in…

  10. Partnership to improve quality care for veterans: the VA Nursing Academy.

    PubMed

    Harper, Doreen C; Selleck, Cynthia S; Eagerton, Gregory; Froelich, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    More than 22 million living veterans reside in the United States. In fact, understanding military culture and the experiences of these veterans is important to their ongoing health care and the unique challenges faced by many. The Veterans Affairs (VA) Nursing Academy began in 2007 to fund pilot partnerships between schools of nursing and local VA health care facilities to better serve our veteran population. Fifteen academic/service partnerships were selected for funding between 2007 and 2009 with the goals of expanding faculty and professional development, increasing nursing student enrollment, providing opportunities for educational and practice innovations, and increasing the recruitment and retention of VA nurses. This article details critical components of the partnership developed between the Birmingham VA Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, a VA Nursing Academy partnership funded in the 2009 cohort. Site-specific goals of the partnership are described along with a discussion of the framework used to develop the Birmingham VA Nursing Academy, which includes relationship building, engagement, governance, evaluation of outcomes, and sustainability. The logic model developed for the partnership is included, and the interim outputs and outcomes of this practice-academic partnership are detailed, a number of which can be replicated by VAs and schools of nursing across the country. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [A brief analysis on the on-duty systems and dispatching systems in the Imperial Academy of Medicine of the Qing Dynasty].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Wenhao; Duan, Xiaohua; Shen, Yi; Zhang, Qicheng

    2014-01-01

    The "on-duty systems" and "dispatching systems" in the Tai yi yuan (Imperial Academy of Medicine) of the Qing Dynasty served as the "prelude" of the medical officials to carry out their diagnoses and treatments. Mainly serving in the royal court, the "on-duty systems" included 3 sorts, viz., "specially selected on-duty", "interior on-duty" and "exterior on-duty". In addition to providing medical services in the royal court, Imperial Academy of Medicine also served other royal members in the Capital, the ministers, the military, the civilians, the metropolitan examinations and the prisons. Thus, the "dispatching systems" was established, also included 3 sorts, viz., "special dispatchments", "dispatchments through reporting to the emperor" and "dispatchments through official communication".

  12. Medical Efforts and Injury Patterns of Military Hospital Patients Following the 2013 Lushan Earthquake in China: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Peng; Tang, Bihan; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Liu, Zhipeng; Lv, Yipeng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate medical efforts and injury profiles of victims of the Lushan earthquake admitted to three military hospitals. This study retrospectively investigated the clinical records of 266 admitted patients evacuated from the Lushan earthquake area. The 2005 version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS-2005) was used to identify the severity of each injury. Patient demographic data, complaints, diagnoses, injury types, prognosis, means of transportation, and cause of injury were all reviewed individually. The statistical analysis of the study was conducted primarily using descriptive statistics. Of the 266 patients, 213 (80.1%) were admitted in the first two days. A total of 521 injury diagnoses were recorded in 266 patients. Earthquake-related injuries were primarily caused by buildings collapsing (38.4%) and victims being struck by objects (33.8%); the most frequently injured anatomic sites were the lower extremities and pelvis (34.2%) and surface area of the body (17.9%). Fracture (41.5%) was the most frequent injury, followed by soft tissue injury (27.5%), but crush syndrome was relatively low (1.2%) due to the special housing structures in the Lushan area. The most commonly used procedure was suture and dressings (33.7%), followed by open reduction and internal fixation (21.9%).The results of this study help formulate recommendations to improve future disaster relief and emergency planning in remote, isolated, and rural regions of developing countries. PMID:26334286

  13. Outpatient evaluation, recognition, and initial management of pediatric overweight and obesity in U.S. military medical treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Wayne; Arday, David R; Kelly, Joseph; Carnahan, Col David

    2017-02-01

    As childhood obesity is a concern in many communities, this study investigated outpatient evaluation and initial management of overweight and obese pediatric patients in U.S. military medical treatment facilities (MTFs). Samples of 579 overweight and 341 obese patients (as determined by body mass index [BMI]) aged 3-17 years were drawn from MTFs. All available FY2011 outpatient records were searched for documentation of BMI assessment, overweight/obesity diagnosis, and counseling. Administrative data for these patients were merged to assess coded diagnostic and counseling rates and receipt of recommended laboratory screenings. Generic BMI documentation was high, but BMI percentile assessments were found among fewer than half the patients. Diagnostic recording or recognition totaled 10.9% of overweight and 32.0% of obese. Counseling rates were higher, with 46.4% and 61.0% of overweight and obese patients, respectively, receiving weight related counseling. Among patients 10 years of age or older, rates of recommended lab screenings for diabetes, liver abnormality, and dyslipidemia were not greater than 33%. BMI percentile recording was strongly associated with diagnostic recording, and diagnostic recording was strongly associated with counseling. Improvements to electronic health records or implementation of local procedures to facilitate better diagnostic recording would likely improve adherence to clinical practice guidelines. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. Military to civilian questionnaire: a measure of postdeployment community reintegration difficulty among veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs medical care.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Nina A; Frazier, Patricia; Orazem, Robert J; Murdoch, Maureen; Gravely, Amy; Carlson, Kathleen F; Hintz, Samuel; Noorbaloochi, Siamak

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe the development, reliability, and construct validity of scores on the Military to Civilian Questionnaire (M2C-Q), a 16-item self-report measure of postdeployment community reintegration difficulty. We surveyed a national, stratified sample of 1,226 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who used U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical care; 745 completed the M2C-Q and validated mental health screening measures. All analyses were based on weighted estimates. The internal consistency of the M2C-Q was .95 in this sample. Factor analyses indicated a single total score was the best-fitting model. Total scores were associated with measures theoretically related to reintegration difficulties including perception of overall difficulty readjusting back into civilian life (R(2) = .49), probable PTSD (d = 1.07), probable problem drug or alcohol use (d = 0.34), and overall mental health (r = -.83). Subgroup analyses revealed a similar pattern of findings in those who screened negative for PTSD. Nonwhite and unemployed veterans reported greater community reintegration difficulty (d = 0.20 and 0.45, respectively). Findings offer preliminary support for the reliability and construct validity of M2C-Q scores.

  15. The Majority of US Combat Casualty Soft-Tissue Wounds are not Infected or Colonized Upon Arrival or during Treatment at a Continental US Military Medical Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    2%, 0.8% ), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (2%, 0.8%), Citrobacter freuntlii (2%, 0.8%), A/loicoccus otitis ( 1%, 0.4% ), and Bacillus cereus (1...multiple operating rooms, blood products surgi- cal teams, and subspccialists. Within this modem US military medical paradigm, the emphasis in the combat...Homogenized tissue spec- imens (1 J.LL and 10 J.CL) were inoculated on sheep’s blood agar and MacConkey plates in triplicate. Plates were incu- bated

  16. Medical Malpractice Claims Against Military and Civilian Personnel of the Armed Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-24

    Civilian Personnel of the Armed Forces References: (a) Public Law 94-464, & l(a), 90 Stat. 1985, Title 10, United States Code, SectionD TI 1089 (f)ELECTE (b...OF AUTHORITY 1. The authority vested in the Secretary of Defense by I, ’I Title 10, U.S. C., section 1089 (f) (reference (a)) to hold harm- /’i...Title 10, U.S. C., section 1089 (f) (reference (a)). D. PROCEDURES 1. In all cases under Title 10, U.S.C., section 1089 , medical per- sonnel shall be

  17. Women's Health Knowledge and Skills Among Transitional Year Internship-Trained Military Medical Officers Serving as Independent Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Ryan J; Hammons, Crystal B; Batig, Alison L

    2017-07-01

    majority of respondents were comfortable discussing self-administered methods (combined contraceptives); fewer were comfortable discussing or had training to place the more efficacious, longer-acting methods. Although screening services specific to female health are offered, the uniform provision of these basic services appears to be inconsistent among our surveyed population of first-line health care providers. Our study identifies potential areas for refinement in transitional year medical training that could translate to enhanced female medical and mission readiness. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. [A priceless contribution to the theory and practice of military public health].

    PubMed

    Chizh, I M

    1994-09-01

    The article is dedicated to the outstanding figure in national medicine--colonel-general MD E.I. Smirnov (1904-1989), the Hero of Socialist Labour, member of the Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, who was the Head of the Main Military Sanitary Department of the Red Army during the Great Patriotic war, and the Minister of Health of the USSR in the post-war period. The main attention of the author is drawn on the contribution of E.I. Smirnov to the development of military medicine. The article makes a detailed analysis of the role of E. Smirnov in the development and practical implementation of military medical doctrine and the antiepidemic support system during the years of the Great Patriotic War, as well as his contribution for organizational arrangement of field therapy as an independent scientific discipline and as a subject of study in the system of medical education; his merits in organization of specialized medical care; formation of an institution of senior medical specialists; reforms in military medical education. The article contains many concrete examples which characterize a celebrated personality of E.I. Smirnov and his leadership qualities.

  19. The educational responsibilities of a National Academy of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Walton, H

    1994-01-01

    Academies of Medicine now should see their educational mission as concern with all stages of medical education in the nation. Traditionally, National Academies have tended to regard Postgraduate Training as their proper educational responsibility. Such limitation is no longer defensible, particularly because medical education is now accepted as a continuum and, moreover, is viewed as lifelong. Discontinuities between basic education, specialist training and continuing education are now considered detrimental, and have to be eliminated. The Medical School Curriculum must be required to equip future doctors with the self-learning skills now essential for specialist training. The longest and most critically important phase of training has unquestionably become continuing medical education. It is argued therefore that basic medical education, specialist training and continuing education have all to be concerns of National Academies. National Academies in Europe, inevitably, have come to have profound international obligations now that free movement of doctors is legally established in the European Community.

  20. [Problems and prospects of infectious diseases and HIV-infected military personnel register organization].

    PubMed

    Bolekhan, V N; Zagorodnikov, G G; Gorichnyĭ, V A; Orlova, E S; Nikolaev, P G

    2014-08-01

    An analysis of regulatory documents of the Ministry of Healthcare and the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation related to HIV/AIDS prevention was carried out. The current system of HIV/AIDS detection and registration among military and civil personnel was assessed. Problems and prospects of scientific-and-research laboratory (the register of infectious disease pathology and HIV-infected military personnel) of Scientific-and-research centre at the Kirov Military medical academy were discussed. It is proposed that the main direction of the laboratory activity will be the restoration of up-to-date records of military personnel with HIV/AIDS. This activity will provide the necessary information to responsible specialists of the Main state sanitary and epidemiological surveillance centre and the Main military medical department of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation for the sanitary and epidemiological surveillance for purposeful and economically feasible management decisions in the field of military personnel infection diseases prevention.

  1. Electrocution fatalities in military personnel in Ankara, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Tugcu, Harun; Ozsoy, Sait; Balandiz, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate various cases of death caused by electrical injuries among Turkish military personnel. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed fatality cases of military personnel between 1994 and 2013 at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey, the only forensic medicine center for the Turkish Armed Forces. Medical records and autopsy reports of cases of electrical fatalities were reviewed and analyzed in terms of age and gender-specific incidence, voltage, contact details, body region distribution, location, and season of incident, site, and severity of injuries sustained, and histopathological and toxicological findings. Results: Sixteen (3.5%) out of the 450 autopsy cases involved electrocution. All deaths were accidental and most frequently occurred outdoors (75%). Eight (50%) died due to high voltage while 6 (37.5%) died due to low voltage. The entry and exit lesions were determined most frequently in cases with high voltage injury. The low voltage deaths commonly occurred at the scene of the event (66.6%), while almost all high voltage deaths occurred in the hospital (87.5%, p=0.03). Electrical burns were most commonly detected in the upper extremities (32.6%, n=14). Conclusion: The present study shows that deaths due to high voltage electrocution are more frequent than low voltage electrocution among military personnel. PMID:25630009

  2. Electrocution fatalities in military personnel in Ankara, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tugcu, Harun; Özsoy, Sait; Balandiz, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate various cases of death caused by electrical injuries among Turkish military personnel. We retrospectively reviewed fatality cases of military personnel between 1994 and 2013 at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey, the only forensic medicine center for the Turkish Armed Forces. Medical records and autopsy reports of cases of electrical fatalities were reviewed and analyzed in terms of age and gender-specific incidence, voltage, contact details, body region distribution, location, and season of incident, site, and severity of injuries sustained, and histopathological and toxicological findings. Sixteen (3.5%) out of the 450 autopsy cases involved electrocution. All deaths were accidental and most frequently occurred outdoors (75%). Eight (50%) died due to high voltage while 6 (37.5%) died due to low voltage. The entry and exit lesions were determined most frequently in cases with high voltage injury. The low voltage deaths commonly occurred at the scene of the event (66.6%), while almost all high voltage deaths occurred in the hospital (87.5%, p=0.03). Electrical burns were most commonly detected in the upper extremities (32.6%, n=14). The present study shows that deaths due to high voltage electrocution are more frequent than low voltage electrocution among military personnel.

  3. [Legal regulation of clinical drug trials for the use in military-medical organisations].

    PubMed

    Ivchenko, E V; Ivanov, V S; Shustov, S B

    2015-06-01

    The authors identified problematic issues of legal regulation of clinical drug trials for medical use, and proposed possible solutions. It has been established that the conduction of clinical trials, of medicinal products is based on the norms of various branches of law embodied in the Constitution of the Russian Federation, the norms of international law, the Civil Code of the Russian Federation and federal laws and subordinate legislations regulating health and pharmaceutical activity. According to the authors, the norms of bioethics can be attributed to the sources of legal doctrine. It is proposed to oblige executives of clinical trials to make a report about effectiveness and safety of drugs and pass the results to the customer, in his/her turn the customer is obliged to accept the results of these trials and pay for them.

  4. Science, Technology, and Warfare. Proceedings of the Military History Symposium (3rd) Held at the United States Air Force Academy (Colorado Springs, Colorado) on 8-9 May 1969

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-09-01

    practice (unless we call the tram-road and truck, as in Agricola , a conveyor) . I believe we will not go far wrong in supposing that pick, shovel, and...it up-+not of course the really dangerous and dirty business but the definable and fascinating problem of the flight of bodies through the air. It...civilians that the military had no business to be dabbling with technological experiments. Writing for the theatergoers of Puritan London, Ben Jonson

  5. Cultural Dimensions of Military Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    advanced language skills, and culture and regional expertise with the goals to promote a rethinking of culture and intercultural competence , and how... Intercultural Competence ” (Center for Languages, Cultures, and Regional Studies, United States Military Academy, West Point, NY), 4. 34Headquarters...motivational components that enable individuals to adapt effectively in intercultural environments.”39 The Cross-cultural Competence model

  6. Medical mentorship in Afghanistan: How are military mentors perceived by Afghan health care providers?

    PubMed

    Beckett, Andrew; Fowler, Robert; Adhikari, Neill K J; Adhikari, Neil; Hawryluck, Laura; Razek, Tarek; Tien, Homer

    2015-06-01

    Previous work has been published on the experiences of high-resource setting physicians mentoring in low-resource environments. However, not much is known about what mentees think about their First World mentors. We had the opportunity to explore this question in an Afghan Army Hospital, and we believe this is the first time this has been studied. We conducted a pilot cross-sectional survey of Afghan health care providers evaluating their Canadian mentors. We created a culturally appropriate 19- question survey with 5-point Likert scores that was then translated into the local Afghan language. The survey questions were based on domains of Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada's CanMEDS criteria. The survey response rate was 90% (36 of 40). The respondents included 13 physicians, 21 nurses and 2 other health care professionals. Overall, most of the Afghan health care workers felt that working with mentors from high-resource settings was a positive experience (median 4.0, interquartile range [IQR] 4-4), according to CanMEDS domains. However, respondents indicated that the mentors were reliant on medical technology for diagnosis (median 5.0, IQR 4-5) and failed to consider the limited resources available in Afghanistan. The overall impression of Afghan health care providers was that mentors are appropriate and helpful. CanMEDS can be used as a framework to evaluate mentors in low-resource conflict environments.

  7. Medical mentorship in Afghanistan: How are military mentors perceived by Afghan health care providers?

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Maj Andrew; Fowler, Robert; Adhikari, Neil; Hawryluck, Laura; Razek, Tarek; Tien, Col Homer

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous work has been published on the experiences of high-resource setting physicians mentoring in low-resource environments. However, not much is known about what mentees think about their First World mentors. We had the opportunity to explore this question in an Afghan Army Hospital, and we believe this is the first time this has been studied. Methods We conducted a pilot cross-sectional survey of Afghan health care providers evaluating their Canadian mentors. We created a culturally appropriate 19-question survey with 5-point Likert scores that was then translated into the local Afghan language. The survey questions were based on domains of Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada’s CanMEDS criteria. Results The survey response rate was 90% (36 of 40). The respondents included 13 physicians, 21 nurses and 2 other health care professionals. Overall, most of the Afghan health care workers felt that working with mentors from high-resource settings was a positive experience (median 4.0, interquartile range [IQR] 4–4), according to CanMEDS domains. However, respondents indicated that the mentors were reliant on medical technology for diagnosis (median 5.0, IQR 4–5) and failed to consider the limited resources available in Afghanistan. Conclusion The overall impression of Afghan health care providers was that mentors are appropriate and helpful. CanMEDS can be used as a framework to evaluate mentors in low-resource conflict environments. PMID:26100785

  8. [Formation and development of flight-surgeon examination in the Branch No. 1 of Main Military Clinical Hospital n. a. N.N.Burdenko].

    PubMed

    Esipov, A V; Tsyganok, V A; Vartbaronov, R A

    2012-10-01

    The history of formation and development of branch No. 1 FSI "Main Military Clinical Hospital n. a. N.N.Burdenko of the Ministry of Defense of the RF" is described in the article. The hospital celebrates in this year the 65-years anniversary of scientific and medical activity in the field of military clinical medicine, aviation clinical medicine and a fight-surgeon's examination. The leading historical role of this establishment in support of flight safety, combat readiness and anti-aircraft rocket troops is shown, and then last 10 years and in Air Forces of Russia, and also the basic achievements of branch in successful scientific and medical activity from 1946 till present time are given. Prospects of the further development of this branch are substantially connected to the increase of intensification of research works together with leading military-medical establishments of an aviation profile: Institute of Military medicine of Military-medical Academy, the Central flight-surgeon commission and 3 branch of FSI "3 Central military Clinical Hospital MD RF" etc.,--in solution of the large state problem of decrease of accident rate and rising of a medical flight safety of the RF State aviation.

  9. The Teen Parent Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptiste, H. Prentice, Jr.; Walker, Diane

    2005-01-01

    Pregnant teenagers and young parents often do not receive the quality of education available to other students. Most schools do not have a separate facility or program that deals with their special needs. Pregnant teens and teen parents should not be left behind. The Teen Parent Academy--a unique program in a predominantly Hispanic Texas border…

  10. Valor Collegiate Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The four guiding principles behind the blended, competency-based, personalized learning model of Valor Collegiate Academies, a charter organization serving grades 5-12 in Nashville, TN: (1) Reflect the diversity of both our country and local community; (2) Personalize a student's experience to meet his/her unique academic and non-academic needs;…

  11. Free Schools and Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eades, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The number and range of problems associated with academies and "free" schools is worrying and can be attributed to the lack of ability of central Government to oversee the increasingly fragmented education provision. In this article, the author looks at just a few of those problems which have been reported since she started to log them…

  12. Peninsula Academies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sequoia Union High School District, Redwood City, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The Peninsula Academies program helps educationally disadvantaged youth overcome the handicaps of low academic achievement, lack of skills, and chronic unemployment. This is accomplished by providing a high school curriculum that is clearly related to work, training in specific job skills, emphasis…

  13. The California Partnership Academies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raby, Marilyn

    The California Partnership Academies Program is a highly successful school/business collaboration that allows students who are at risk of not graduating from high school to see clearly the connection between school and the workplace. The following key components are discussed: (1) an at-risk student population made up largely of the educationally…

  14. Legends of the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Arelis

    2009-01-01

    For this special edition on "Higher Education Careers," "Diverse" caught up with some legends whose careers have made an indelible impact on the academy. "Diverse" found that even in retirement, or semi-retirement, these pioneers never venture far from the passions that made them great educators and diversity advocates. This article features four…

  15. Legends of the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Arelis

    2009-01-01

    For this special edition on "Higher Education Careers," "Diverse" caught up with some legends whose careers have made an indelible impact on the academy. "Diverse" found that even in retirement, or semi-retirement, these pioneers never venture far from the passions that made them great educators and diversity advocates. This article features four…

  16. Benjamin Franklin Street Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohl, Seth F.

    In this evaluation report of the sixth year of operation of the Benjamin Franklin-Urban League Street Academy in New York City, it is recommended that the program be continued for the seventh year despite the poorer than expected student gains in all studied components and the sporadic student attendance pattern and high dropout rate. Students…

  17. Academy Engages Incarcerated Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    It's not easy to keep young people on task for learning in a youth prison, but David Domenici, the principal of the Maya Angelou Academy, a charter-like school serving incarcerated juveniles, is trying to do it while at the same time creating a model program for improving educational services for young offenders. Located at the New Beginnings…

  18. Academy Engages Incarcerated Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    It's not easy to keep young people on task for learning in a youth prison, but David Domenici, the principal of the Maya Angelou Academy, a charter-like school serving incarcerated juveniles, is trying to do it while at the same time creating a model program for improving educational services for young offenders. Located at the New Beginnings…

  19. The Teen Parent Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptiste, H. Prentice, Jr.; Walker, Diane

    2005-01-01

    Pregnant teenagers and young parents often do not receive the quality of education available to other students. Most schools do not have a separate facility or program that deals with their special needs. Pregnant teens and teen parents should not be left behind. The Teen Parent Academy--a unique program in a predominantly Hispanic Texas border…

  20. From the National Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberts, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    The Center for Education at the National Academies was established on the premise that educators urgently need to harness science to improve the education that they provide to all Americans. This includes not only emphasizing an inquiry approach to science education from kindergarten through college, but also promoting an energetic attempt to use…

  1. The Global Youth Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alschuler, Alfred; Myers, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    The Global Youth Academy began as a low-cost, private school that taught global citizenship to its own students and foreign students recruited enroute. The school-on-wings formula is simple: build the curriculum into a tour, integrate academic and personal growth, and stress community service. The program succeeds academically while promoting…

  2. Academy of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of the Academy of Reading program (by AutoSkill International, Inc.), a comprehensive reading remediation tool designed to complement curriculum for grades K-12. It notes the computer-based approach is designed to help underachieving readers get the skills they need to become proficient, and the product includes…

  3. Brightside Academy: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Brightside Academy has been providing quality care to children six weeks to 12 years old. Operating 49 locations in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and New York, the company is committed to strengthening learners and respecting families. Currently, the organization provides early education for 6,700 children on a daily basis. 90%…

  4. Philadelphia High School Academies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubauer, Antonia

    1986-01-01

    Describes Phaladelphia's four semiautonomous high school academies designed to provide disadvantaged students with a carefully aligned academic and vocational program and, ultimately, with relevant, marketable job skills. Discusses administration, academics, integration of academic and vocational courses, career education and counseling, work…

  5. Valor Collegiate Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The four guiding principles behind the blended, competency-based, personalized learning model of Valor Collegiate Academies, a charter organization serving grades 5-12 in Nashville, TN: (1) Reflect the diversity of both our country and local community; (2) Personalize a student's experience to meet his/her unique academic and non-academic needs;…

  6. Epidemiologic aspects of traumatic brain injury in acute combat casualties at a major military medical center: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Xydakis, Michael S; Ling, Geoffrey S F; Mulligan, Lisa P; Olsen, Cara H; Dorlac, Warren C

    2012-11-01

    From the ongoing military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, an understanding of the neuroepidemiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has emerged as requisite for further advancements in neurocombat casualty care. This study reports population-specific incidence data and investigates TBI identification and grading criteria with emphasis on the role of loss of consciousness (LOC) in the diagnostic rubric. This is a cohort study of all consecutive troops acutely injured during combat operations-sustaining body-wide injuries sufficient to require immediate stateside evacuation-and admitted sequentially to our medical center during a 2-year period. A prospective exploration of the TBI identification and grading system was performed in a homogeneous population of blast-injured polytrauma inpatients. TBI incidence was 54.3%. Structural neuroimaging abnormalities were identified in 14.0%. Higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) was associated with abnormal neuroimaging, longer length of stay (LOS), and elevated TBI status-primarily based on autobiographical LOC. Mild TBI patients had normal neuroimaging, higher ISS, and comparable LOS to TBI-negative patients. Patients who reported LOC had a lower incidence of abnormal neuroimaging. This study demonstrates that the methodology used to assign the diagnosis of a mild TBI in troops with complex combat-related injuries is crucial to an accurate accounting. The detection of incipient mild TBI, based on an identification system that utilizes LOC as the principal diagnostic criterion to discern among patients with outcomes of interest, misclassifies patients whose LOC may not reflect actual brain injury. Attempts to identify high-risk battlefield casualties within the current point-of-injury mild TBI case definition, which favors high sensitivity, will be at the expense of specificity. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  7. [Level and dynamics of empathy in I and VI year students at the Medical Academy of Medicine in Gdańsk].

    PubMed

    Kliszcz, J; Hebanowski, M; Rembowski, J

    1996-01-01

    Empathy is and important element in achieving didactic goals in the field of communication skills. It is a valuable feature particularly in the family doctor practice. 353 students (210 female and 143 male) from the first and last year of medical school were survived by using the psychological questionnaire-"Emotional Empathy Scale" by A. Mehrabian and N. Epstein, evaluating emotional aspects of empathy. The findings suggest that the level of empathy is higher among women than among men from the first year. The difference is statistically significant. During six years of medical education there is a significant decrease of empathy skill in women, specially in its emotional aspect. These students represent the lack of willingness in contact with people having problems. According to these findings we decided to continue our research to check the hypothesis concerning reasons of decreasing level of empathy in medical students.

  8. Trench foot--a study in military-medical responsiveness in the Great War, 1914-1918.

    PubMed Central

    Haller, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    Along the nearly 15,000 miles of trenches on the western front in the Great War of 1914-1918, a condition known as "trench foot" caused serious attrition among the fighting troops and resulted in swollen limbs, impaired sensory nerves, inflammation, and even loss of tissue through gangrene. Physicians, sanitarians, and military officers explored numerous theories regarding etiology and treatment before focusing on a combined regimen of common-sense hygiene and strict military discipline. PMID:1972307

  9. [Medical aspect of the winter march of the Fifth Regiment of the Eighth Military Division in the winter of 1902 - particularly concerning the cause of Major Yamaguchi's death].

    PubMed

    Matsuki, A

    1993-09-01

    Two hundred and ten military soldiers of the Fifth Regiment of the Eighth Division of the Japan Imperial Army joined a marching practice in the end of January, 1902, but 193 soldiers out of 210 died due to severe frost-bite during stormy weather and only seventeen, including Major Yamaguchi, were rescued to survive and brought to the Veteran's Administration Hospital at Aomori. This accident was most tragic and world-shaking for the Japanese people as well as for the Japanese Imperial Army. In December of 1991, an admission record of the Veteran's Administration Hospital at Aomori was found in the residence of Dr. Murakami of Aomori City. Judging from its handwriting, this record was written by a military physician Ki-ichi Murakami, Dr. Murakami's uncle. The record describes the details of seventeen patients, most of whom were severely injured and frost-bitten during the winter march. The content of this newly discovered record is similar to the report written by the military physicians of the Fifth Regiment which appeared in the Japan Imperial Military Medical Journal, but a more detailed description about Major Yamaguchi's vital signs, and symptoms of his frost-bite were found in the former. In the journal, Major Yamaguchi was reported to have died because of sudden cardiac arrest but Jiro Nitta described in his novel "Death March on Mount Hakkoda" that he committed suicide using his gun. However, this record strongly tells us that both of his hands, as well as both lower extremities, were severely frost-bitten and swollen and that he could not pull the trigger of his gun with his fingers. Since Jiro Nitta's novel has been published, it is widely accepted that Major Yamaguchi committed suicide with his gun. But we do not have any definite proof to substantiate his suicide. The present detailed survey on the medical references strongly suggests that he could not have pulled his gun's trigger by himself.

  10. Portrait of STS-27 uniformed crewmembers representing US service academies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    One of the 'firsts' that will be logged on STS-27 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, when it launches in November of this year is the representation of the three United States (US) service academies. Wearing their respective military uniforms, left to right are Mission Specialist (MS) Richard M. Mullane (West Point), Pilot Guy S. Gardner (US Air Force (USAF)), and MS William M. Shepherd (US Naval Academy). Crewmember stand in front of photograph of space shuttle orbiter in launch configuration. Crew insignia is displayed in background.

  11. Portrait of STS-27 uniformed crewmembers representing US service academies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    One of the 'firsts' that will be logged on STS-27 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, when it launches in November of this year is the representation of the three United States (US) service academies. Wearing their respective military uniforms, left to right are Mission Specialist (MS) Richard M. Mullane (West Point), Pilot Guy S. Gardner (US Air Force (USAF)), and MS William M. Shepherd (US Naval Academy). Crewmember stand in front of photograph of space shuttle orbiter in launch configuration. Crew insignia is displayed in background.

  12. Let's Look at Academies Systemically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatter, Ron

    2009-01-01

    In this article the author seeks to look at the policy on Academies from a broader perspective, briefly touching on issues of democracy, autonomy, governance and accountability and arguing that the policy must be considered holistically. Individuals should focus not on an Academy or Academies in isolation but on their relationship with the rest of…

  13. What does a military nursing shortage mean to us?

    PubMed

    Finfgeld, D L

    1991-01-01

    The current nursing shortage makes U.S. military medical readiness questionable. Legislative initiatives for attracting nurses to the military and reserves are being employed. In spite of these efforts, plans are underway to draft nurses during a military emergency.

  14. Energy and nutritional value of diets used in patients alimentation and their assessment by patients of selected clinical department in the Military Medical Institute in Warsaw.

    PubMed

    Kłos, Krzysztof; Bertrandt, Jerzy; Jałocha, Lukasz; Matuszewski, Tomasz; Abramowicz, Michał

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the work was laboratory assessment of energy and nutritional value of general and light diets used in patients of selected clinical department in the Military Medical Institute in Warsaw alimentation. Using questionnaire method the assessment of diets was done by patients too. Meals given to patients in hospital not always fulfilled nutritional requirements. Additional consumption of supplementary products did not always meet the requirements of proper nutrition. Half of examined patients appraised nutrition variety as good but at the same time claimed the there was not enough fruits and vegetables.

  15. Development of electronic textiles to support networks, communications, and medical applications in future U.S. military protective clothing systems.

    PubMed

    Winterhalter, Carole A; Teverovsky, Justyna; Wilson, Patricia; Slade, Jeremiah; Horowitz, Wendy; Tierney, Edward; Sharma, Vikram

    2005-09-01

    The focus of this paper is on the development of textile-based wearable electronics that can be integrated into military protective clothing. A materials and manufacturing survey was conducted to determine the best performing and most durable materials to withstand the rigors of textile manufacturing and potential military use. Narrow woven technology was selected as one of the most promising textile manufacturing methods. A working wearable narrow fabric version of the Universal Serial Bus (USB), as well as a radiating conductor, were successfully developed and fabricated. A circular knit T-shirt with an integrated spiral bus was also developed. Military products developed include components of a personal area network providing data and power transport, and a body-borne antenna integrated into a load-bearing vest.

  16. Report of the Panel To Review Sexual Misconduct Allegations at the U.S. Air Force Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This report is the result of the first investigation by an independent body of a problem that has plagued the U.S. Air Force Academy for at least a decade, and possibly since the admission of women in 1976. At the direction of Congress, the Secretary of Defense appointed seven U.S. citizens with expertise in the military academies, behavioral and…

  17. The Importance of Military Cultural Competence.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric G; Writer, Brian W; Brim, William

    2016-03-01

    Military cultural competence has recently gained national attention. Experts have posited that limited outcomes in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression in the military may be related to limited familiarity with the military. National surveys have indicated low military cultural competence among providers and limited educational efforts on military culture or pertinent military pathology in medical schools and residency training programs. Military families, with their own unique military cultural identity, have been identified as a population with increased risks associated with deployment. In response to these findings, several curricula regarding military culture have been established and widely distributed. Assessments of military cultural competence have also been developed. The clinical impact of enhanced cultural competence in general has thus far been limited. The military, however, with its highly prescribed cultural identity, may be a model culture for further study.

  18. DOD Service Academies. Status Report on Reviews of Student Treatment. Statement of Paul L. Jones, Director, Defense Force Management Issues, National Security and International Affairs Division. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Manpower and Personnel, Committee on Armed Services, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. National Security and International Affairs Div.

    Preliminary results of ongoing reviews of student treatment at the U.S. Military Academy, the U.S. Naval Academy, and the U.S. Air Force Academy show the following: (1) hazing has not completely disappeared from the academies, despite prohibitions against it; (2) women and minorities have not reached the same level of achievement as white males in…

  19. The Home Front and War in the Twentieth Century. The American Experience in Comparative Perspective: Proceedings of the Military History Symposium (10th) Held at the United States Air Force Academy on 20-22 October 1982

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    typhoid, cerebro -spinal feve, and new antisep- tics. Permanence was assured with the change of title in April 1920 to Medical Research Council. In...Arthur shook his head, md my loafers, which we made in Argen- tina, just squeezed the hell out of my feet. So, we’ll pan on that one. rstrup: I’ll talk

  20. Military Sexual Assault: Chronology of Activity in Congress and Related Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-30

    or repeated, threatening sexual harassment that occurred while the veteran was in the military.” Both men and women can experience MST during their...from the Academic Program Year (APY) 2011- 2012 Report on Sexual Harassment and Violence at the United States Military Service Academies.3 According to...release.aspx?releaseid=15585 3 “DOD Evaluates Sexual Harassment and Prevention Response Efforts at Military Academies,” DOD News, December 21, 2012, at