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Sample records for military medicine conference

  1. 15TH Conference on Military Medicine, "A Challenge to Readiness: Maintaining Currency in Military Education"

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Panel 3: Emerging Technologies Panel 4: Societal Expectations and Ethics SECTION III – SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS REFERENCES EXECUTIVE...their “best guess” predictions in four principal topic areas: (1) new technologies , both medical and non-medical, that are likely to significantly...new weapon technologies ; (4) changes in ethics, mores, and societal expectations that will affect the future practice of military medicine. The

  2. Military Energy Alternatives Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-08

    Power Generation and Alternative Energy Branch US Army RDECOM CERDEC CP&ID Power Division Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD...RDER-CCA-PG PG A E - C R – 1 2– 0 1 M ili ta ry E ne rg y A lte rn at iv es C on fe re nc e Military Energy ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Energy Alternatives Conference 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jonathan

  3. Immunization and military medicine.

    PubMed

    Benenson, A S

    1984-01-01

    This lecture, a memorial to Joseph E. Smadel, reviews the involvement of the military in the development and use of immunizing materials. Smallpox and smallpox immunization in the military and the development and present status of immunization against typhoid, cholera, yellow fever, typhus, tetanus, diphtheria, plague, influenza, adenovirus, meningitis, rubella, and malaria are reviewed. Dr. Smadel's personal contributions to the significant achievements of the military program to civilian practice are emphasized.

  4. [Military medicine and medicine of accidents].

    PubMed

    Chizh, I M

    2010-09-01

    The article presents an observe of such parts of military medicine as intensive aid and operative treatment on the place of case, contestation against infectious diseases, preservation of psychic health, medical and social rehabilitation. Were lighted successful activity of military physicians during liquidation of Chernobyl accident (1986), earthquakes in Armenia (1988), railway accident in Bashkiria (1989) and other accidents. Experience of military medicine (particularly using medical units of special purposes) was used in proving of conception of medicine of accidents, and in organization of medical supply of troops in armed conflicts of restricted scale--in effectuating of antiterrorist operations in Northern Caucasus (1994-1996, 1999-2002), in effectuating of peacemaking operation in Kosovo (1999-2003), natural disasters.

  5. Morning report in military family medicine residencies.

    PubMed

    Drifmeyer, Erin; Oh, Robert

    2008-08-01

    Morning report is a standard component of residency training; however, little is written about this conference in family medicine. We emailed a survey to all 17 military family medicine residency directors. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate means and SDs. Twelve of 17 programs responded. All conducted morning report and all agreed that the main purpose of morning report is education. Its educational value ranked highly (mean, 4.2; SD = 0.78; with 1 = minimal educational value and 5 = very important educational value). Programs reported morning report being held four to five times a week (66%) for 30 minutes (92%) and using preprepared cases (75%) half the time or more. Most (75%) reported having no written goals and objectives; 77% did not track educational outcomes. Although military residencies appear to regard morning report as an important educational venue, most do not have goals or objectives nor formally evaluate effectiveness.

  6. [The cradle of military medicine].

    PubMed

    Tsygan, V N

    2013-12-01

    The Kirov Military Medical Academy, included into the State Code of Particularly Valuable Objects of Cultural Heritage of the Peoples of the Russian Federation, plays an important role in national military-medical science and education during XVIII and XIX centuries. Today the Kirov Military Medical Academy consists of 7 faculties, 63 departments (52 military departments and 11 civil departments), 31 clinics (17 surgical clinics and 14 therapeutic clinics), center of extracorporeal detoxification, 3 departments, taking part in treatment and diagnostic process, 11 clinical subdivisions, research center consisting of 4 research subdivisions and 2 laboratories, and also 14 research laboratories, 32 supply subdivisions and publications department. Glorious staff and graduates of the Academy took part in all russian wars. All famous medical schools were founded in the Academy in XIX-XX centuries. At the present time the Kirov Military Medical Academy is the main military medical university, leading research center and treatment facility of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

  7. Military sports and rehabilitation medicine.

    PubMed

    Dharm-Datta, S; Nicol, E

    2007-06-01

    This article summarises the presentations at the Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Study Day held by the Haywood Club at The Medical Society of London on 21 September 2006. The event was attended by over 100 serving and retired DMS personnel and included talks on a diverse range of subjects from the newly established speciality of Sports and Exercise medicine, the role of physiotherapy, exercise therapy and podiatry, core stability, tendon disorders, anterior knee pain, and the management of chronic pain.

  8. Stem cell applications in military medicine.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, Gregory T; Nesti, Leon J

    2011-10-19

    There are many similarities between health issues affecting military and civilian patient populations, with the exception of the relatively small but vital segment of active soldiers who experience high-energy blast injuries during combat. A rising incidence of major injuries from explosive devices in recent campaigns has further complicated treatment and recovery, highlighting the need for tissue regenerative options and intensifying interest in the possible role of stem cells for military medicine. In this review we outline the array of tissue-specific injuries typically seen in modern combat - as well as address a few complications unique to soldiers--and discuss the state of current stem cell research in addressing each area. Embryonic, induced-pluripotent and adult stem cell sources are defined, along with advantages and disadvantages unique to each cell type. More detailed stem cell sources are described in the context of each tissue of interest, including neural, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal and sensory tissues, with brief discussion of their potential role in regenerative medicine moving forward. Additional commentary is given to military stem cell applications aside from regenerative medicine, such as blood pharming, immunomodulation and drug screening, with an overview of stem cell banking and the unique opportunity provided by the military and civilian overlap of stem cell research.

  9. Stem cell applications in military medicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There are many similarities between health issues affecting military and civilian patient populations, with the exception of the relatively small but vital segment of active soldiers who experience high-energy blast injuries during combat. A rising incidence of major injuries from explosive devices in recent campaigns has further complicated treatment and recovery, highlighting the need for tissue regenerative options and intensifying interest in the possible role of stem cells for military medicine. In this review we outline the array of tissue-specific injuries typically seen in modern combat - as well as address a few complications unique to soldiers - and discuss the state of current stem cell research in addressing each area. Embryonic, induced-pluripotent and adult stem cell sources are defined, along with advantages and disadvantages unique to each cell type. More detailed stem cell sources are described in the context of each tissue of interest, including neural, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal and sensory tissues, with brief discussion of their potential role in regenerative medicine moving forward. Additional commentary is given to military stem cell applications aside from regenerative medicine, such as blood pharming, immunomodulation and drug screening, with an overview of stem cell banking and the unique opportunity provided by the military and civilian overlap of stem cell research. PMID:22011454

  10. Occupational Medicine Model and Asthma Military Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Stuart M

    2015-11-01

    Medical evidence hints that asymptomatic recruits with a history of childhood asthma, quiescent since their 13th birthday, are still at risk for adverse changes in their clinical status following unfavorable environmental exposures during military deployment or combat. Asthmatic persons, claiming none or few symptoms, may still manifest airflow obstruction and display biomarkers of airway inflammation even when they are relatively asymptomatic and experience few if any respiratory complaints. The occupational medicine model offers a credible foundation for acknowledging the importance of personal susceptibility in the pathogenesis of military-associated asthma. It is appropriate to re-explore the current military standard for recruits with asymptomatic childhood asthma (≥12 months) not prescribed antiasthma medications. Raising the acceptance age for these recruits may be a consideration. Unfortunately, there is no effectual screening test that recognizes such susceptible soldiers at risk for future asthma attacks. Nevertheless, there is general support for evidence-based, scientifically valid medical screening that judges fitness for military service. Screening tests comprising asthma biomarkers and genetic indices may better verify vulnerable soldiers destined to suffer future asthma reactivation.

  11. Military Medicine Focused for Joint Warfighting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    AD-A264 612 I I w vi m 6 P nU w i ps i Sw a mB of Un wI do ot memmly muset tib views of ld Dwaxrnit of Dede or MWy Of it qgmim Thr damumt my not be...military medicine fifty years ago. The new culture has not placed appropriate importance on medical readiness, or on training and organizing during...future, to continue the focus on peacetime care for those who have little influence on the outcome of future conflicts, or to "go outside the box" to

  12. Molecular Medicine - CHI's 17th International Tri-Conference: Mastering Medicinal Chemistry - CHI's Seventh Annual Conference.

    PubMed

    Semple, Graeme

    2010-04-01

    CHI's 17th International Tri-Conference on Molecular Medicine, held in San Francisco, included topics covering the drug discovery process, with an emphasis on lead optimization. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the development of several launched and investigational drugs, including Plerixafor, Trox-1 (CombinatoRX Inc), lorcaserin (Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc), vorapaxar (Merck & Co Inc) and ulimorelin (Tranzyme Pharma Inc).

  13. Molecular Medicine - CHI's 17th International Tri-Conference: Mastering Medicinal Chemistry - CHI's Seventh Annual Conference.

    PubMed

    Terrett, Nick

    2010-04-01

    CHI's 17th International Tri-Conference on Molecular Medicine, held in San Francisco, included topics covering new developments in the field of medicinal chemistry. This conference report highlights selected presentations on fragment-based drug discovery, quantum mechanical energy decomposition for the analysis of SARs, medicinal chemistry strategies and the role of imaging in drug discovery. Investigational drugs discussed include MLN-4924 (Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc), GDC-0449 (Chugai Pharmaceutical Co Ltd/Curis Inc/F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd/Genentech Inc/NCI), RDEA-119 (Ardea Biosciences Inc/Bayer HealthCare AG) and tafamidis (Fx-1006A; FoldRx Pharmaceuticals Inc).

  14. How we teach military medicine to medical cadets at Phramongkutklao College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Panichkul, Suthee; Rangsin, Ram; Aimpun, Pote; Mungthin, Mathirut; Pradubpongsa, Panitan; Heebthamai, Danai; Areekul, Wirote

    2009-02-01

    Phramongkutklao College of Medicine has a unique curriculum for "Military Medicine." Military Medicine involves prevention, threat assessment, evacuations and clinical management of diseases and injuries resulting from military occupational exposures. The Military Medicine curriculum covers all the entities of knowledge of Military Sciences, Combat Medical Skills, Military Preventive Medicine, Military Applied Physiology and Military Contingency Medicine. The highlight of the curriculum is "Operation Petcharavut" that represents simulated battlefield operations, involving multidisciplinary clinical integration and military regulation. In this course, medical cadets review all the knowledge that they have learnt and in addition, Medical Platoon leader strategies, Advanced Cardiac Life support and Phramongkutklao Traumatic Life support, crucial medical practices. Medical cadets would experience simulated patients with minimal injuries to critical wounds and complications including combat stress syndromes in various situations, from advancing to retreating units and from Battalion Aid Station to Division Medical Operations Center, whether during day or night. Since the medical cadets experience all Military Medicine courses from the second to the sixth year class and pass all medical knowledge-based examinations, Phramongkutklao College of Medicine expects all graduates to be excellent in not only all standard requirements of the medical professional set forth by the Medical Council of Thailand but also ready to serve the nation effectively in the Royal Thai Armed Forces.

  15. Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conferences

    SciTech Connect

    Nadeau, Joseph H.

    2013-11-25

    The 6th Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conference was held at the Minoa Palace Conference Center, Chania, Crete, Greece (16-21 June 2008). The Organizing Committee was composed of Joe Nadeau (CWRU, Cleveland), Rudi Balling (German Research Centre, Brauschweig), David Galas (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Lee Hood (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Diane Isonaka (Seattle), Fotis Kafatos (Imperial College, London), John Lambris (Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia),Harris Lewin (Univ. of Indiana, Urbana-Champaign), Edison Liu (Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore), and Shankar Subramaniam (Univ. California, San Diego). A total of 101 individuals from 21 countries participated in the conference: USA (48), Canada (5), France (5), Austria (4), Germany (3), Italy (3), UK (3), Greece (2), New Zealand (2), Singapore (2), Argentina (1), Australia (1), Cuba (1), Denmark (1), Japan (1), Mexico (1), Netherlands (1), Spain (1), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1). With respect to speakers, 29 were established faculty members and 13 were graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. With respect to gender representation, among speakers, 13 were female and 28 were male, and among all participants 43 were female and 58 were male. Program these included the following topics: Cancer Pathways and Networks (Day 1), Metabolic Disease Networks (Day 2), Day 3 ? Organs, Pathways and Stem Cells (Day 3), and Day 4 ? Inflammation, Immunity, Microbes and the Environment (Day 4). Proceedings of the Conference were not published.

  16. Virtual reality and telepresence for military medicine.

    PubMed

    Satava, R M

    1997-01-01

    For decades, warfighters have been putting in place a sophisticated "digital battlefield", an electronic communication and information system to support advanced technology. Medicine is now in a position to leverage these technologies to produce a fundamental revolution, and the keystone is the digital physician. Today nearly all information about a patient can be acquired electronically, and with the new technologies of teleoperation and telesurgery we can provide remote treatment and even surgery through telemedicine. The following framework for military medicine will leverage upon the current electronic battlefield. A personnel status monitor (PSM) will have a global positioning locator to tell the position of each soldier and a suite of vital signs sensors. When a soldier is wounded, the medic will instantly know the location of the soldier, and how serious is the casualty. This will permit the medic to locate the most critically wounded soldier. Once stabilised, he will be placed in a critical care pod, a fully automated intensive care unit in a stretcher, which will monitor his vital signs, administer fluids and medications and provide environmental protection. If immediate surgery is needed, a remote telepresence surgery vehicle will come to the wounded soldier, the medic will place him in the vehicle, and a surgeon will operate remotely using telepresence surgery from a distant Mobile Advance Surgical Hospital (MASH) to the combat zone. Also, the expertise from any specialist will be available from the rear echelons as far back as the home country. For education and training in combat casualty care, virtual reality simulators are being implemented. This same scenario can be utilised in civilian health care, especially in providing care to patients in remote areas who do not currently have access to simple, let alone sophisticated, health care.

  17. Depression in military medicine cadets: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Nasioudis, Dimitrios; Palaiodimos, Leonidas; Dagiasis, Matthaios; Katsarou, Angeliki; Ntouros, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Military medicine cadets undergo strenuous military training alongside demanding medical studies. This stressful and complex educational environment can lead to the emergence of depressive symptoms. We investigated the prevalence of depressive symptoms in a cohort of military medicine cadets. We conducted a descriptive questionnaire-based cross-sectional study among Greek military medicine cadets in the undergraduate program of the Hellenic Military School of Combat Support Officers. The Greek translation of the Zung self-rating depression scale questionnaire was used to screen for the presence of depressive symptoms. In addition, demographic, academic and dietary information was collected. The Shapiro-Wilk test of normality, Pearson correlation test, Chi-square test, t-test and Mann Whitney U test were employed for statistical analysis. We enrolled 55 female and 91 male military medicine cadets with a mean age of 19.84 years (SD = 0.99). The mean Zung crude score was 43.32 (SD = 4.55): 42.8 (SD = 4.43) for female cadets and 43.64 (SD = 4.6) for male cadets. Cadets were further subdivided into low and high risk groups for the presence of depressive symptoms. We identified 57 (39 %) cadets with a total Zung crude score of 45 or above: 21 females and 36 males. Statistical analysis did not reveal any significant differences between the two groups based on gender, year of training, academic performance, alcohol consumption, smoking status, vitamin supplementation, dietary habits or BMI. We report a high prevalence of depressive symptoms in a cohort of military medicine cadets that underscores the need for effective screening and appropriate and timely interventions. We did not identify any related risk factors. Military medicine cadets are exposed to a challenging military and medical training environment, and thus represent a group at risk for development of depression.

  18. Military Medicine Interest Groups in U.S. Medical Schools.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Timothy M; Coker, Timothy J; Chen, Steve I; Carlson, Mark A

    2016-11-01

    Medical student interest groups are organizations that help expose students to different medical specialties and fields of medicine while in medical school. Military medicine interest groups (MMIGs) are a particular type of interest group that spreads information about military medicine, fosters mentorship, and camaraderie between students and military faculty, and increases the opportunities for leadership while in medical school. Surveys were sent to all U.S. medical schools to determine how many schools had an MMIG. If a medical school had a group, a second survey was sent to the student leader to determine more information about how their group operated (such as type of participants, funding sources, activities, faculty involvement, military health care provider involvement, etc.). Fifty-six percent of U.S. medical schools who responded were found to have an MMIG and most participants were students in the Health Professions Scholarship Program. Information about military medicine was found to be the biggest impact of having a group at a medical school and student leaders expressed they wished to have more military health care provider involvement. The results of this study could help start MMIGs at other medical schools, as well as give ideas to current MMIGs on how other groups operate.

  19. 2004 Defense Economics Conference: Informing the Debate on Military Compensation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Document D-3075 2004 Defense Economics Conference: Informing the Debate on Military...Compensation Speakers/Panel Members: Richard P. Burke William J. Carr David S . C. Chu Vern Clark Michael L. Dominguez Gordon R. England Glenn A. Gotz...Szemborski can’t be here because I think this room would remind him of his days on submarines. We’ll send him a note by Blackberry to say we’re all feeling

  20. Reaching a better management model for military medicine.

    PubMed

    Schafer, John J

    2008-01-01

    Despite the attempt by some to condemn it because of the unfortunate experience of some service members at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, military medicine has long provided healthcare coverage to legions of soldiers during both war and peace. Since 1884, the U.S. Congress has also required that military medicine provide healthcare treatment free of charge to the families of officers and soldiers. The unforeseen consequence of this Congressional action is that today, military medicine provides medical care to a population of families and retirees that is 4 times larger than the active duty force that it supports. Unable to do so on its own, the Department of Defense hired managed-care support contractors to help create the TRICARE health plan to improve access to healthcare for these families and retirees and to take advantage of capabilities of the managed-care industry. By most accounts, TRICARE has been successful. It is, however, anchored by the military treatment facilities, Walter Reed among them, which need a revolution in management. This article explores these aspects of military medicine.

  1. Military Medicine: One Profession Not Two

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-13

    CPG Clinical practice guideline FMR Fully medically ready FORSCOM United States Army Forces Command GMO General medical officer IAD Institutional...physicians served as general medical officers ( GMOs ) with a military unit after completing medical school and internship, but before residency...I gathered a negative perception of GMOs from senior medical physicians and mentors.6 The Army medical community placed different values on

  2. The 2016 Frontiers in Medicinal Chemistry Conference in Bonn.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christa E; Thimm, Dominik; Baringhaus, Karl-Heinz

    2017-01-05

    Pushing the frontiers of medicinal chemistry: Christa Müller, Dominik Thimm, and Karl-Heinz Baringhaus look back at the events of the 2016 Frontiers in Medicinal Chemistry (FiMC) Conference held in Bonn, Germany. The report highlights the themes & talks in the annual conference hosted by the Joint Division of Medicinal Chemistry of the German Pharmaceutical Society (DPhG) and German Chemical Society (GDCh). It is also an invitation to the 2017 conference in Bern, Switzerland this February 12-15.

  3. [Military pharmacology education outside the imperial school of medicine].

    PubMed

    Yildirim, N

    1998-01-01

    In 1870, just after starting medical education in Turkish at the Imperial School of Medicine (Mekeb-i Tibbiye-i Sahani) favor in the pharmacology and surgery courses decreased; and even pharmacology graduates continued their education to be physicians. This change gave rise to the shortage of pharmacists and surgeons in the army, and consquently in 1873 the branch of surgery and in 1876 pharmacology were inaugurated at the Haydarpasa Military Hospital. Those who had studied at this Hospital for three years were given a diploma for pharmacy practice (ameliyat eczaciligi sehadetnamesi) and were appointed to the army and to military hospitals. The years of education was raised to four years in 1888, and it was reduced to three years again in 1891. According to Charles Bonkowski, the chemist of Sultan Abdulhamid II, the instruction of military pharmacology was independent from the School of Medicine; he suggested the foundation of a higher school of pharmacy in Istanbul on the standards of the Paris Higher School of Pharmacology (Ecole Superieur de Pharmacie de Paris) where he had studied and graduated in 1865. Unfortunately this advice was not realised; but a department of pharmacology was opened within the Military High School for Veterinarians (Baytar Rustiye-i Askeriyesi) in Eyup in order to educate the students properly. This institution, renamed as the Military High School for Veterinarians and Pharmacists (Baytar ve Eczact Mekteb-i Rustiye-i Askeriyesi), had sent its graduates to the Imperial School of Medicine for many years. Since this process had proved to be useful, the Pharmacology Branch at the Haydarpasa Military Hospital was closed in 1892. In 1895, another military school which was called Eczaci ve Timarci Sibyan Mektebi started instruction on the Naval Hospital. Graduates of this school were appointed to the naval offices for minor operations.

  4. Coordinating an interdisciplinary disease management conference on a military installation: collaboration between military and civilian communities, lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fleming, Glenda; Knapp, Casey A

    2009-08-01

    The needs of individuals with chronic diseases or disabilities are similar whether within military or civilian communities. With finite resources and the continuing global war on terrorism, military treatment facilities (MTFs) may find collaborative, multidisciplinary, continuing education efforts with community agencies invaluable. Collaborative efforts that bring military and civilian communities together can result in innovative programs that offer cost-effective high-quality information to enhance the knowledge and skill level of military families, providers, and other professionals who provide services and care for military eligible beneficiaries. This article addresses the development and implementation of two major multidisciplinary disease management conferences at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP), Virginia. It provides an overview of lessons learned in the areas of preplanning, team building, program development, implementation, and evaluation. Despite challenges, tremendous benefits may be reaped from efforts to include diverse target populations from military and civilian communities.

  5. Second International Electronic Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (ECMC-2)

    PubMed Central

    Mayence, Annie; Vanden Eynde, Jean Jacques

    2017-01-01

    The second International Electronic Conference on Medicinal Chemistry, organized and sponsored by the publisher MDPI AG and the Journal Pharmaceuticals, took place in November 2016 on the SciForum website (www.sciforum.net/conference/ecmc-12). More than 150 authors from 22 countries participated in the event. Selected works presented during the scientific meeting are disclosed in this report. PMID:28146112

  6. Conference report: formulating better medicines for children: 4th European Paediatric Formulation Initiative conference.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jennifer; Mills, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The fourth annual European Paediatric Formulation Initiative (EuPFI) conference on Formulating Better Medicines for Children was held on 19-20 September 2012 at the Institute of Molecular Genetics Congress Centre, Prague, Czech Republic. The 2-day conference concentrated on the latest advances, challenges and opportunities for developing medicinal products and administration devices for pediatric use, both from European and US perspectives. It was aimed specifically at providing exposure to emerging practical applications, and for illustrating remedies utilized by pediatric drug-development teams to overcome hurdles faced in developing medicines for pediatric patients. The conference format included plenary talks, focus sessions on each of the EuPFI work streams (extemporaneous preparations, excipients, pediatric administration devices, taste masking and taste assessment, age-appropriate formulations), case studies, soapbox sessions and a parallel poster display. This conference report summarizes the keynote lectures and also gives a flavor of other presentations and posters from the conference.

  7. Preventive medicine oversight of splash pads on military installations.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Lisa Raysby; Perry, Matthew; Browne, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, an increasing number of military installations have installed splash pads that provide fun, recreational water entertainment for Soldiers and their families. The addition of splash pads brings added responsibilities for medical treatment facility preventive medicine oversight and installation facilities maintenance to ensure a safe and healthy environment. Currently, there are no consistent standards or detailed guidance for military installations to follow when installing and maintaining splash pads. The central issues associated with splash pads on military installations are water quality and risk for waterborne illnesses, responsibility for safety and health oversight, and federal energy and water sustainability mandates. This article examines the importance of implementing a standard for design and oversight to ensure the health and safety of Soldiers and their families.

  8. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Military Testing Association (16th).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1974

    The military utilizes tests extensively and should be aware of current testing problems. A conference composed of members from the business, educational, and military communities, both foreign and domestic, was held and these major issues addressed: (1) The Development of Training Requirements; (2) Personnel Assignment Using Interest Inventories;…

  9. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Military Testing Association (16th).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1974

    The military utilizes tests extensively and should be aware of current testing problems. A conference composed of members from the business, educational, and military communities, both foreign and domestic, was held and these major issues addressed: (1) The Development of Training Requirements; (2) Personnel Assignment Using Interest Inventories;…

  10. The Defence Medical Library Service and military medicine.

    PubMed

    Walker, S B

    2005-01-01

    The Defence Medical Library Service (DMLS) supports the clinical practice and career development of military health professionals across the world. Clinical governance and the need for medical knowledge to be evidence-based means the DMLS has a central role to play in support of defence medicine. The DMLS is important for enabling health professionals to make sense of the evidence-based pyramid and the hierarchy of medical knowledge. The Royal Centre for Defence Medicine (RCDM) in Birmingham is recognised as an international centre of excellence. The information, knowledge and research requirements of the RCDM will provide opportunities for the DMLS to support and engage with the academic community.

  11. Military preventive medicine support: the Balkan experience.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, J J; Tannen, K J; Debboun, M

    1999-12-01

    Preventive medicine (PVNTMED) support to deployed forces is as varied as the circumstances for force deployment. The Bosnia-Herzegovina deployment of the 1st Armored Division as part of the Dayton Peace Accords Implementation Forces proved to be no exception to this premise. PVNTMED units, both in the field and at the U.S. Army-Europe support base, were challenged to provide mission support under significant mobility restrictions and in arenas of public health practice not previously thought to be of tactical significance, specifically environmental pollution. New to this operation was the deployment of a Theater Army Medical Laboratory with a mission to assist deployed PVNTMED units with the capability to rapidly diagnose infectious disease agents and provide an expanded array of environmental monitoring support. Vector-borne diseases were also a threat to health, and an innovative base camp sanitation assessment and reporting system was created to alert leaders to the risk of disease transmission to soldiers.

  12. MILCOM '88 - IEEE Military Communications Conference, San Diego, CA, Oct. 23-26, 1988, Conference Record. Volumes 1, 2, & 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-12-01

    The present conference on emerging military communication technologies and their 21st-century applications discusses topics in fiber-optic techniques, data/voice/video processing, advanced modulation and coding methods, C3 operability, fading and multipath channels, novel coding techniques, military communications networks, adaptive antennas, communication network vulnerability and survivability, advanced receiver techniques, meteor-burst communications, spread-spectrum performance, trellis-coded modulation, and lasercom techniques. Also discussed are nertwork protocols, Satcom terminals, mobile communications, AI for military communications, recent advances in networks, and simulation and modeling techniques,

  13. The application status of Chinese herbal medicine in military health service in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ge-Liang; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Hui-Qing; Zhai, Xiao-Feng; Li, Xiao-Qian; Ling, Chang-Quan

    2016-07-01

    Military medicine has had a long history in China since the emergence of the war. Chinese medicine, especially Chinese herbs, was widely used in China as well as other Asian countries for the prevention and treatment of diseases in the military for hundreds of years. However, the use of Chinese medicine in military health service has never been well studied. In this article, we briefly summarize the application status of Chinese herbal medicine in military health service in China, putting particular emphasis on special military environment, in an attempt to build a bridge between Chinese medicine and military health service and promote the quality of health service for the military and maintain world peace.

  14. The 13(th) Winter Conference on Medicinal and Bioorganic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Williams, Scott D

    2017-04-06

    The Medicinal and Bioorganic Chemistry Foundation (MBCF) hosted its 13(th) biannual Winter Conference on Medicinal and Bioorganic Chemistry (WCMBC) this past January 22(nd) -26(th) in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (USA). The gathering this year kept true to the tradition of this conference series, with an impressive lineup of presenters from both academia and industry. With about 125 delegates, the conference took all the advantages of a mid-sized gathering: a sufficiently wide spectrum of scientists in attendance, yet an intimate atmosphere conducive to solid networking and frank, open discussions. This conference report summarizes the presentations that were given this year. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Military Report More Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use than Civilians

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Bernadette P.; Finch, Michael D.; Bray, Robert M.; Williams, Thomas V.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Hadden, Louise S.; Colleran, Heather L.; Jonas, Wayne B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The study objective was to estimate complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among active duty military and compare data with civilian use. Design A global survey on CAM use in the 12 previous months was conducted. Final participants (16,146) were stratified by gender, service, region, and pay grade. Analysis included prevalence of CAM use, demographic and lifestyle characteristics. Results Approximately 45% of respondents reported using at least one type of CAM therapy. Most commonly used therapies were as follows: prayer for one's own health (24.4%), massage therapy (14.1%), and relaxation techniques (10.8%). After exclusion of prayer for one's own health, adjusting to the 2000 U.S. census, overall CAM use in the military (44.5%) was higher than that in comparable civilian surveys (36.0% and 38.3%). Conclusions Military personnel reported using three CAM stress-reduction therapies at 2.5–7 times the rate of civilians. Among the military, high utilization of CAM practices that reduce stress may serve as markers for practitioners assessing an individual's health and well-being. PMID:23323682

  16. Recharging Family Medicine: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Rosemary A

    2016-01-01

    A historic perspective of family medicine's development, the work of Gayle Stephens, and prior Keystone conferences constitute an important backdrop for the fourth Keystone Conference. Decisions made in the past constrain what can be done now, but they may also offer opportunities for family medicine. A major challenge for Keystone IV was to discern what is a constraint and what is an opportunity-in particular when it comes to the role of the personal physician. This article provides reflections based on decades of observation and study and confirms that knowing something and doing something are not the same.

  17. European Generic Medicines Association (EGA)--16th Annual Conference.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Bob

    2010-08-01

    The 16th Annual Conference of the European Generic Medicines Association (EGA), held in Rome, included topics covering new developments and challenges in the generic medicines industry in Europe. This conference report highlights selected presentations on developments for generics in the Italian healthcare system, a summary of the EGA pharmaceutical sector inquiry on the delayed market entry of generics, developments and trends in the European generics market, the evolution and growth of the global generics industry, and a CEO perspective on the challenges facing the industry.

  18. Complementary and Alternative Medicine practices in military personnel and families presenting to a military emergency department.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elliot M; Darracq, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Limited published literature is available on Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use and attitudes toward CAM in the military community. We sought to evaluate past experiences with CAM, common conditions for which CAM is used, and willingness to use acupuncture for acute conditions in an Emergency Department (ED) setting by patients and family members presenting to a tertiary military treatment facility (MTF). After institutional review board approval, an 18-item questionnaire was distributed to a convenience sample of ED patients presenting to a Navy MTF. A response was obtained from 1,005 respondents with 45% describing previous or current CAM use. Massage, chiropractic, herbal, and acupuncture were most frequently employed. The most common reasons for use of CAM therapies are described. The majority (88%) of surveyed participants reported that CAM therapies should be offered by the MTF and 80% reported a willingness to use acupuncture in the ED setting. CAM therapies are used by the military community for a wide variety of conditions. The use of acupuncture in the ED for treatment of presenting complaints was met with interest by respondents. Further studies are necessary to determine indications, efficacy, and patient satisfaction with such therapy in an emergent setting. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  19. [Suppositions for development of preventive military air medicine].

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, V A; Vorona, A A

    2014-10-01

    It is shown that on the basis of scientific concepts for regenerative medicine and organizational principles of prevention as a result of the research were revealed fundamental laws of life of the organism in an unusual environment. It is concluded that the need to integrate the methodology of research and testing aircraft and medical equipment on a single scientific basis. This will enable more productive use of research results in the field of ergonomics, ecology, and computer science in order to preserve the life and health of military personnel and maintain their combat capability.

  20. Twitter use at a family medicine conference: analyzing #STFM13.

    PubMed

    Mishori, Ranit; Levy, Brendan; Donvan, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    The use of social media is expanding in medicine. A few articles sought to describe participant behavior using Twitter at scientific conferences. Family physicians are known as active participants in social media, but their behavior and practices at conferences have not been methodically described. We recorded all public tweets at the 2013 Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) Annual Spring Conference bearing the hashtag #STFM13, using commercially available services. We created a transcript of all tweets for the 5 days of the conference and 3 days before and after. We looked at the total number of tweets, number of original tweets and re-tweets, active users, most prolific users, and impressions. We categorized the content based on (1) Session related, (2) Social, (3) Logistics, (4) Ads, and (5) Other. We compared major metrics (but not content) to the 2012 STFM Annual Spring Conference. There were a total of 1,818 tweets from 181 user accounts: 13% of the conference registrants. The top tweeter accounted for over 15% of the total tweets, and the top 10 accounted for over 50% of the total volume. Most original tweets (69.7%) were related to session content. Social content came in second (14.2%), followed by other, logistics, and advertisement (7.6%, 6.9%, 1.6%). This preliminary analysis provides an initial snapshot of twitter activity at a family medicine conference. It may suggest avenues for further inquiry: trend identification, "influencer" identification, and qualitative analysis. Interdisciplinary research should focus on evaluation methods that can assess the quality, value, and impact of tweeting.

  1. Are there too few women presenting at emergency medicine conferences?

    PubMed

    Carley, Simon; Carden, Richard; Riley, Rebecca; May, Natalie; Hruska, Katrin; Beardsell, Iain; Johnston, Michelle; Body, Richard

    2016-10-01

    There is a perception that women are under-represented as speakers at emergency medicine (EM) conferences. We aimed to evaluate the ratio of male to female speakers and the proportion of presenting time by gender at major international EM conferences. Conference programmes of the major English-speaking EM conferences occurring from 2014 to 2015 were obtained. The number of presentations, the gender of the speaker and the duration of each presentation were recorded. We analysed eight major EM conferences. These included 2382 presentations, of which 29.9% (range 22.5%-40.9%) were given by women. In total, 56 104 min of presentations were analysed, of which 27.6% (range 21%-36.7%) were delivered by women. On average, presentations by women were 95 s shorter than presentations by men (23 vs 21 min 25 s). Male speakers exceed female speakers at major EM conferences. The reasons for this imbalance are likely complex and multifactorial and may reflect the gender imbalance within the specialty. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. First International Electronic Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (ECMC-1)

    PubMed Central

    Mayence, Annie; Vanden Eynde, Jean Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The first International Electronic Conference on Medicinal Chemistry, organized and sponsored by MDPI AG, publisher, and the Journal Pharmaceuticals, took place in November 2015 on the SciForum website. More than 200 authors from 18 countries participated in the event and was attended by 25,000 visitors who had the opportunity to browse among 55 presentations, keynotes, and videos. A short description of some works presented during that scientific meeting is disclosed in this report.

  3. International Telemedicine/Disaster Medicine Conference: Papers and Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The first International Telemedicine/Disaster Medicine Conference was held in Dec. 1991. The overall purpose was to convene an international, multidisciplinary gathering of experts to discuss the emerging field of telemedicine and assess its future directions; principally the application of space technology to disaster response and management, but also to clinical medicine, remote health care, public health, and other needs. This collection is intended to acquaint the reader with recent landmark efforts in telemedicine as applied to disaster management and remote health care, the technical requirements of telemedicine systems, the application of telemedicine and telehealth in the U.S. space program, and the social and humanitarian dimensions of this area of medicine.

  4. Transfusion Medicine in Sub-Saharan Africa: Conference Summary.

    PubMed

    Dzik, Walter Sunny; Kyeyune, Dorothy; Otekat, Grace; Natukunda, Bernard; Hume, Heather; Kasirye, Phillip G; Ddungu, Henry; Kajja, Isaac; Dhabangi, Aggrey; Mugyenyi, Godfrey R; Seguin, Claire; Barnes, Linda; Delaney, Meghan

    2015-07-01

    In November 2014, a 3-day conference devoted to transfusion medicine in sub-Saharan Africa was held in Kampala, Uganda. Faculty from academic institutions in Uganda provided a broad overview of issues pertinent to transfusion medicine in Africa. The conference consisted of lectures, demonstrations, and discussions followed by 5 small group workshops held at the Uganda Blood Transfusion Service Laboratories, the Ugandan Cancer Institute, and the Mulago National Referral Hospital. Highlighted topics included the challenges posed by increasing clinical demands for blood, the need for better patient identification at the time of transfusion, inadequate application of the antiglobulin reagent during pretransfusion testing, concern regarding proper recognition and evaluation of transfusion reactions, the expanded role for nurse leadership as a means to improve patient outcomes, and the need for an epidemiologic map of blood usage in Africa. Specialty areas of focus included the potential for broader application of transcranial Doppler and hydroxyurea therapy in sickle cell disease, African-specific guidelines for transfusion support of cancer patients, the challenges of transfusion support in trauma, and the importance of African-centered clinical research in pediatric and obstetric transfusion medicine. The course concluded by summarizing the benefits derived from an organized quality program that extended from the donor to the recipient. As an educational tool, the slide-audio presentation of the lectures will be made freely available at the International Society of Blood Transfusion Academy Web site: http://www.isbtweb.org/academy/.

  5. Militares medici in nummis repraesentati: the heritage of military medicine in coins and medals.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John

    2002-01-01

    Coins and commemorative medals constitute one special repository of the history of military medicine. The numismatic record has proven to be the most enduring, albeit one of the most selective, records of the progress of history. Matters of health, and especially of military medicine, have been central to the endeavors and indeed the survival of many cultures and societies. Many such themes in the national and international history of military medicine are preserved in the medallic record. Coins and medallions thus constitute one record of the chronology of this profession, one parallel to that of the more traditional history to be found in oral and written records. This account presents a four-part classification of medical coins and medals of military interest. These examples include (1) medals that portray military surgeons and physicians; (2) medals that commemorate special events of military medicine: (3) coins that portray the themes of the discipline of military medicine and health; and (4) a miscellaneous group that includes such examples as disease "touch pieces" and the militarily worn medals of such bodies as the International Red Cross and the Order of St. John, the latter of which are awarded inter alia for contributions to prehospital care in the field. A representative photo archive of such exemplars is included in this account.

  6. Paddling permanent white water: managing within the paradigm shifts in military medicine.

    PubMed

    Brown, F W

    1994-09-01

    The challenges of managing military medicine over the last three decades have been complicated by rapidly changing priorities and redirections. Inspired by Kuhn's theory of "paradigm shifts," we can identify five distinct paradigms and four paradigm shifts that have dominated military medicine over the last 25 years. These shifts began in the early 1970s when military medicine was forced to make a transition from a focus on combat casualty care to the problems of becoming an all-volunteer force. These paradigm shifts continue in the form of the current challenges of simultaneously embracing new cost-conscious forms of health care delivery while downsizing the force. Each of the shifts has been characterized by a lack of anticipation and the onset of crisis. The present challenges faced by military medical leadership are not necessarily unprecedented; prescience in regard to inevitable future shifts could reduce turmoil and enhance adaptation.

  7. Influence of a Medicine Clerkship Conference Series on Students' Acquisition of Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magarian, Gregory J.

    1993-01-01

    A study investigated the effect of participation in an intensive internal medicine conference series during a third-year medicine clerkship (n=173 students) on medical licensing examination scores and compared this with scores in surgery and pediatrics and scores of 466 students not participating in the conference. Better test performance on the…

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine among veterans and military personnel: a synthesis of population surveys.

    PubMed

    Davis, Margot T; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Larson, Mary Jo; Hoover, Ronald; Mauch, Danna

    2014-12-01

    Recent reports reinforce the widespread interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), not only among military personnel with combat-related disorders, but also among providers who are pressed to respond to patient demand for these therapies. However, an understanding of utilization of CAM therapies in this population is lacking. The goals of this study are to synthesize the content of self-report population surveys with information on use of CAM in military and veteran populations, assess gaps in knowledge, and suggest ways to address current limitations. The research team conducted a literature review of population surveys to identify CAM definitions, whether military status was queried, the medical and psychological conditions queried, and each specific CAM question. Utilization estimates specific to military/veterans were summarized and limitations to knowledge was classified. Seven surveys of CAM utilization were conducted with military/veteran groups. In addition, 7 household surveys queried military status, although there was no military/veteran subgroup analysis. Definition of CAM varied widely limiting cross-survey analysis. Among active duty and Reserve military, CAM use ranged between 37% and 46%. Survey estimates do not specify CAM use that is associated with a medical or behavioral health condition. Comparisons between surveys are hampered due to variation in methodologies. Too little is known about reasons for using CAM and conditions for which it is used. Additional information could be drawn from current surveys with additional subgroup analysis, and future surveys of CAM should include military status variable.

  9. Improving combat casualty care and field medicine: focus on the military medic.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, R A

    1997-04-01

    As military medicine in general copes with a rapidly changing world environment, so too must the backbone of the medical force, the enlisted medic. To meet these challenges, the training and utilization of military medics must match new and different missions. This paper will explore innovative approaches to training and preparing for combat casualty care and field medicine. The focus will fall on the education, evaluation, operations, patient-care skills, equipment, and telemedicine potential of the military medic. Future directions for study and development will be suggested. Exploration of the following may improve the capability of the military medic: (1) improved training to include advanced-level skills and interventions for combat casualty care and broader exposure to the casualties expected in operations other than war; (2) annual educational and periodic proficiency evaluation requirements; (3) strengthened medical control at all echelons; and (4) carefully selected additional equipment and technologies to enhance medical capabilities.

  10. GTCBio's Precision Medicine Conference (July 7-8, 2016 - Boston, Massachusetts, USA).

    PubMed

    Cole, P

    2016-09-01

    GTCBio's Precision Medicine Conference met this year to outline the many steps forward that precision medicine and individualized genomics has made and the challenges it still faces in technological, modeling, and standards development, interoperability and compatibility advancements, and methods of economic and societal adoption. The conference was split into four sections, 'Overcoming Challenges in the Commercialization of Precision Medicine', 'Implementation of Precision Medicine: Strategies & Technologies', 'Integrating & Interpreting Personal Genomics, Big Data, & Bioinformatics' and 'Incentivizing Precision Medicine: Regulation & Reimbursement', with this report focusing on the final two subjects. Copyright 2016 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  11. National Health Service and Military Medicine in Great Britain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-07

    medicine. These guidelines, along with creation of a two-year Masters degree (Master of Science in Social Medicine ) were designed to train physicians for...MSc Social Medicine and pass appropriate examinations. It is difficult for one unaccustomed to the system to determine what is really different about a

  12. A Study on Capabilities Required In Military Medicine to Develop Modular Training Courses: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    DANA, ALI; MOHAMMADIMEHR, MOJGAN

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The main mission of military medicine in the world is to support the health and treatment of the military in relation to issues, risks, injuries and diseases that arise due to the specific occupational conditions. The current study was carried out with the aim of determining the required skills of military physicians to define and determine the required training modules. Methods: The study was a qualitative research. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect the data and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. The study population included all the professors and experts in the field of military medicine and medical sciences at the medical universities of Tehran. Snowball sampling technique was used to sample the study participants. Results: Based on the results, the required skills of military physicians in 5 categories and 29 sub- categories were identified; then based on the identified skills, 60 training modules at two introductory and advanced levels were determined including 39 introductory levels and 21 advanced levels. Conclusion: We can conclude that some of the important skills that military physicians need and can achieved through training have not been provided in any educational program and to achieve such skills and capabilities, other programs should be developed and modular training can be one of them. PMID:28761887

  13. A Study on Capabilities Required In Military Medicine to Develop Modular Training Courses: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Dana, Ali; Mohammadimehr, Mojgan

    2017-07-01

    The main mission of military medicine in the world is to support the health and treatment of the military in relation to issues, risks, injuries and diseases that arise due to the specific occupational conditions. The current study was carried out with the aim of determining the required skills of military physicians to define and determine the required training modules. The study was a qualitative research. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect the data and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. The study population included all the professors and experts in the field of military medicine and medical sciences at the medical universities of Tehran. Snowball sampling technique was used to sample the study participants. Based on the results, the required skills of military physicians in 5 categories and 29 sub- categories were identified; then based on the identified skills, 60 training modules at two introductory and advanced levels were determined including 39 introductory levels and 21 advanced levels. We can conclude that some of the important skills that military physicians need and can achieved through training have not been provided in any educational program and to achieve such skills and capabilities, other programs should be developed and modular training can be one of them.

  14. National Council on Family Relations. Pre-Conference Workshop: "Quality of Family Life in the Military." Proceedings Report (Greensboro, North Carolina, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orthner, Dennis K., Ed.; Chandler, Barbara A., Ed.

    These proceedings of a pre-conference workshop on the quality of family life in the military begin with an overview and the texts of the introduction to the workshop. Three presentations providing an orientation to military family programs and policies are included. Enrichment and support needs of military families and research needs of military…

  15. Physician and Dentist Survey: Desert Storm and Military Medicine. Executive Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    have been documented (Baker, 1969; Cooke, Hymes , and Mixson, 1967; Hughes, 1974; Mangelsdorff and Hubbart, 1976). In general, Army physicians are...Medical officer recruiting and retention. Military Medicine, 157, 149-153. Cooke, E.T., Hymes , J.P., & Mixson, R.J. (1967). Attitudes of physicians entering

  16. Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationships in Biology, Toxicology and Medicine - An International Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J.; Kostecki, Paul T.

    2002-05-28

    Conference abstract book contains seven sections: Plenary-4 abstracts; Chemical-9 abstracts; Radiation-7 abstracts; Ultra Low Doses and Medicine-6 abstracts; Biomedical-11 abstracts; Risk Assessment-5 abstracts and Poster Sessions-25 abstracts. Each abstract was provided by the author/presenter participating in the conference.

  17. Perceptions of current and recent military internal medicine residents on operational medicine, managed care, graduate medical education, and continued military service.

    PubMed

    Salerno, S; Cash, B; Cranston, M; Schoomaker, E

    1998-06-01

    Current and recent internal medicine residents were surveyed on their level of confidence in practicing operational medicine, satisfaction with graduate medical education, the impact of TRICARE, the military managed care plan, on their patients and education, and intentions on remaining in uniformed service. Their sentiments were recorded on a five-point Likert scale (1 = strongly agree, 3 = neutral, 5 = strongly disagree). Two hundred twenty-one of the 294 surveys were returned (75.2%). Most physicians felt unprepared to perform duties in a nuclear, biological, or chemical warfare environment, or handle administrative aspects of operational medicine (mean scores, 3.2-3.7). A majority of respondents felt satisfied with the quality of their residency experience (mean score, 1.9). Although more than half of those surveyed (53.6%) listed the opportunity to teach residents as a top factor influencing their retention decision, most felt skeptical that graduate medical education would remain important in the future (mean score, 3.6). Most physicians agreed that restriction of TRICARE to patients less than 65 years old may degrade the quality of military internal medicine residencies (mean score, 1.6). Previous service, Reserve Officer Training Corps experience, and graduation from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences were factors associated with increased physician intention to remain beyond their obligated service. The most common factors inducing physicians to leave the military included frequent deployments, relocations, and financial compensation. Factors cited most frequently as influencing physicians to stay on active duty included high-quality colleagues, opportunities for teaching residents, and freedom from malpractice and office management details.

  18. Quantifying Federal Funding and Scholarly Output Related to the Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conferences

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Daniel K.; Dinh, Tu; May, Larissa; Yadav, Kabir; Gaddis, Gary M.; Cone, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Since 2000, Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM), the journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, has presented a one-day consensus conference to generate a research agenda for advancement of a scientific topic. One of the 12 annual issues of AEM is reserved for the proceedings of these conferences. The purpose of this study was to measure academic productivity of these conferences by evaluating subsequent federal research funding received by authors of conference manuscripts and calculating citation counts of conference papers. Method This was a cross-sectional study conducted during August and September 2012. NIH RePORTER was searched to identify subsequent federal funding obtained by authors of the consensus conference issues from 2000 to 2010. Funded projects were coded as related or unrelated to conference topic. Citation counts for all conference manuscripts were quantified using Scopus and Google Scholar. Simple descriptive statistics were reported. Results 852 individual authors contributed to 280 papers published in the 11 consensus conference issues. 137 authors (16%) obtained funding for 318 projects. A median of 22 topic-related projects per conference (range 10–97 projects) accounted for a median of $20,488,331 per conference (range $7,779,512–122,918,205). The average (±SD) number of citations per paper was 15.7 ±20.5 in Scopus and 23.7 ±32.6 in Google Scholar. Conclusions The authors of consensus conference manuscripts obtained significant federal grant support for follow-up research related to conference themes. In addition, the manuscripts generated by these conferences were frequently cited. Conferences devoted to research agenda development appear to be an academically worthwhile endeavor. PMID:24280853

  19. Fataluku medicinal ethnobotany and the East Timorese military resistance

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sean WM; Martins, Xisto; Mitchell, Andrew; Teshome, Awegechew; Arnason, John T

    2007-01-01

    Background An ethnobotanical study of medicinal and poisonous plants used by the East Timor resistance was undertaken in the Lautem District of East Timor to study medicinal plant use in the region. Interviews were conducted with a single key consultant from the resistance army who belonged to the Fataluku culture. This study is of importance as a historical document and because no previous medicinal ethnobotanical studies on this region exist. Methods A rapid ethnobotanical survey of medicinal and poisonous plants was conducted through the proposed Conis Santana National Park in the Lautem district of East Timor. Medicinal and poisonous plants were identified by a Consultant and data was collected by the authors using classical descriptive ethnobotanical techniques (i.e. no quantitative measures) through an unstructured open ended interview. Results During the survey 40 medicinal and poisonous plants were identified by the Consultant and collected by the authors. Defining characteristics of the Consultant's knowledge include a high frequency use of trees, heavily forested habitats, leaves, decoctions and drinks for a range of conditions relevant to a resistance army. Conclusion Despite limitations of the study, important contributions of this study include preservation of a part of the cultural history of the resistance movement and traditional botanical knowledge of the Fataluku. Furthermore, initial findings may indicate that traditional botanical knowledge is unique amongst different East Timorese cultures in terms of plant selection. PMID:17241473

  20. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Military Testing Association (10th, San Antonio, Texas, September 16-20, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Human Resources Lab., Lackland AFB, TX.

    Events of this conference on military testing centered on (1) an open panel meeting and discussion on the testing of Project 100,000 personnel (potential rejectees accepted under new standards); and (2) over two dozen papers dealing with specific aptitude and proficiency tests, a comparison of marginal and control Naval personnel on biographical…

  1. [The contribution of military aviation and space medicine to the biomedical support of the first flight into space].

    PubMed

    Belevitin, A B; Bukhtiiarov, I V; Zhdan'ko, I M; Bednenko, V S; Khomenko, M N

    2011-04-01

    April 12, 2011 Humanity celebrated 50 years of one of the greatest achievements of the twentieth century--the legendary flight of Y. Gagarin into space. In this study are highlighted the role and importance of military aviation and space medicine, and in particular, the State Scientific Research Testing Institute of Aviation and Space Medicine, Ministry of Defence of the USSR (now--the State Scientific Research Testing Institute of Military Medicine, Military Medical Academy named after S.M. Kirov) in the preparation and conduct of flight of Yu.A.Gagarin.

  2. The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3rd IGMC, 2015): overall activities and outcome highlights.

    PubMed

    Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Assidi, Mourad; Dallol, Ashraf; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Kalamegam, Gauthaman; Al-Hamzi, Emad; Shay, Jerry W; Scherer, Stephen W; Agarwal, Ashok; Budowle, Bruce; Gari, Mamdooh; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed

    2016-10-17

    The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3(rd) IGMC) was organised by the Centre of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR) at the King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). This conference is a continuation of a series of meetings, which began with the first International Genomic Medicine Conference (1(st) IGMC, 2011) followed by the second International Genomic Medicine Conference (2(nd) IGMC, 2013). The 3(rd) IGMC meeting presented as a timely opportunity to bring scientists from across the world to gather, discuss, and exchange recent advances in the field of genomics and genetics in general as well as practical information on using these new technologies in different basic and clinical applications. The meeting undoubtedly inspired young male and female Saudi researchers, who attended the conference in large numbers, as evidenced by the oversubscribed oral and poster presentations. The conference also witnessed the launch of the first content for npj Genomic Medicine, a high quality new journal was established in partnership by CEGMR with Springer Nature and published as part of the Nature Partner Journal series. Here, we present a brief summary report of the 2-day meeting including highlights from the oral presentations, poster presentations, workshops, poster prize-winners and comments from the distinguished scientists.

  3. [Research Scientific Centre of Military Medicine, Military-medical Techniques and Pharmacy of State Research Scientific Institute of Military Medicine of Ministry of Defence of RF celebrates 80 years].

    PubMed

    Bukhtiiarov, I V; Varlachev, A V; Medvedev, V R

    2010-11-01

    The history of the 80-year activity of the Institute of Military Medicine, established in the Workers and Peasants, Red Army, Soviet Union. The Institute was founded in 1930 in Moscow and was originally called the Military Sanitary Institute. In a subsequent Institute repeatedly reformed, had different names, with the first years of its existence, has made and continues to contribute significantly to the development of means of medical services and other medical devices. The concrete results of operations and information about the staff are established.

  4. [The 75th anniversary of science research and development testing centre of air medicine and military ergonomics SSRDTI of military medicine of Ministry of Defense of the RF].

    PubMed

    Bukhtiiarov, I V; Khomenko, M N; Zhdan'ko, I M

    2010-01-01

    The article presents main stages of forming Science research and development testing centre of air medicine and military ergonomics, results of researches of three main directions: medical-technical (ergonomic) supply of creation, testing and exploitation of air techniques and armament; participating in organization of combat training activity for the purposes of saving professional health, securing of combativity and professional reliability of aircraft pilots; scientific grounding of improvement of medical supply of aviation (improvement of medical control for dynamics of state of health, physiological and psychological resources of organism in course of combat training, creation of automatized diagnostic complexes and etc.).

  5. Strategic National Stockpile program: implications for military medicine.

    PubMed

    Need, James T; Mothershead, Jerry L

    2006-08-01

    The Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) program, managed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Health and Human Services, is designed to deliver critical medical resources to the site of a national emergency. A recent interagency agreement between the Department of Defense and the Department of Health and Human Services indicates that military medical treatment facility commanders should be actively engaged in cooperative planning with local and state public health officials, so that reception, storage, distribution, and dispensing of SNS materials as a consequence of an actual event could occur without disruption or delay. This article describes the SNS program and discusses issues of relevance to medical treatment facility commanders and Department of Defense medical planners and logisticians.

  6. Report on the pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine 2011 conference: part 1.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    The joint Wellcome Trust/Cold Spring Harbor Conference on pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine, held in the UK and USA in alternate years, focuses on the opportunities presented by the growing contribution of genomic information and technologies to interdisciplinary approaches in the study of variable human responses to therapeutic agents. This year's meeting provided in depth discussions on diverse fields that are driving forward the new era of personalized medicine including the use of next-generation sequencing technologies to identify common and rare variants determining response to drugs; the interface of pharmacogenomics and complex disease, including cancer; understanding and managing serious adverse drug reactions and public health pharmacogenetics. This year's meeting followed the UK Pharmacogenetics and Stratified Medicine Network 2011 meeting (Cambridge, UK), and marked the Conference's tenth anniversary. In the first of this two-part conference report, sessions on personalized medicines, public health pharmacogenetics and next-generation sequencing will be discussed.

  7. Conference Report: ESF-COST High-Level Research Conference Natural Products Chemistry, Biology and Medicine III.

    PubMed

    Catino, Arthur

    2010-12-01

    Natural Products Chemistry, Biology and Medicine III was the third conference in a series of events sponsored by the European Science Foundation (ESF) and the European Cooperation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research (COST). Scientists came together from within and outside the EU to present cutting-edge developments in chemical synthesis. Research areas included the synthesis of natural products, methods development, isolation/structural elucidation and chemical biology. As our capacity to produce new chemotherapeutic agents relies on chemical synthesis, this year's conference has never been so timely. This report highlights several of the scientific contributions presented during the meeting.

  8. Medicinal uses of the mushroom Cordyceps militaris: current state and prospects.

    PubMed

    Das, Shonkor Kumar; Masuda, Mina; Sakurai, Akihiko; Sakakibara, Mikio

    2010-12-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a potential harbour of bio-metabolites for herbal drugs and evidences are available about its applications for revitalization of various systems of the body from ancient times. Amongst all the species, C. militaris is considered as the oldest source of some useful chemical constituents. Besides their popular applications for tonic medicine by the all stairs of the community, the constituents of C. militaris are now used extensively in modern systems of medicine. The current survey records the mysterious potentials of C. militaris are boosting up the present herbal treatments, as well as gearing up the green pharmacy revolution, in order to create a friendly environment with reasonable safety. Evidence showed that the active principles of C. militaris are beneficial to act as pro-sexual, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant/anti-aging, anti-tumour/anti-cancer/anti-leukemic, anti-proliferative, anti-metastatic, immunomodulatory, anti-microbial, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-fungal, anti-protozoal, insecticidal, larvicidal, anti-fibrotic, steroidogenic, hypoglacaemic, hypolipidaemic, anti-angiogenetic, anti-diabetic, anti-HIV, anti-malarial, anti-fatigue, neuroprotective, liver-protective, reno-protective as well as pneumo-protective, let alone their other synergistic activities, which let it be marketable in the western countries as over-the-counter medicine. A number of culture techniques for this mushroom have been noticed, for example, storage/stock culture, pre-culture, popular/indigenous culture (spawn culture, husked rice culture and saw dust culture) and, special/laboratory culture (shaking culture, submerged culture, surface liquid culture and continuous/repeated batch culture). The prospects for herbal biotechnology regarding drug discovery using C. militaris delivering what it has promised are high, as the technology is now extremely more powerful than before. This study chiefly highlights the medicinal uses of the mushroom C. militaris

  9. [Study on Li Ting'an's contribution to military medicine during 1932-1943].

    PubMed

    Li, Y C

    2017-01-28

    From 1920, Li Ting'an started to pay attention to military medicine. At the beginning of the Anti-Japanese War, Li Ting'an compiled books of military medicine, restored the health office, participated in the compilation of first aid measures, rehabilitation outlines, and methods of protection practice, and preparing the establishment of hospitals for wounded soldiers in order to support the Anti-Japanese War. At that time, he was appointed as the anti-epidemic commissioner of South China to organize and conduct the epidemic prevention works in the War. During the stalemate period, he kept an eye on the long-term War and devoted himself to the research of national diet and soldier's nutrition. At the same time, Li also recognized the public health at an advanced level so as to save the country.

  10. A Novel Technique for Rejuvenation of Degenerated Caterpillar Medicinal Mushroom, Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes), a Valued Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Anhui; Wang, Yulong; Shao, Ying; Huang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for many years, but its frequent degeneration during continuous maintenance in culture can lead to substantial commercial losses. In this study, a degenerated strain of C. militaris was obtained by subculturing a wild-type strain through 10 successive subcultures. The relative abundance of the 2 mating types seems to be out of balance in the degenerated strain. By cross-mating 4 single-ascospore isolates (2 for MAT 1-1 and 2 for MAT 1-2) from the degenerated strain, we were able to restore fruiting body production to wild-type levels. The rejuvenated strain not only produced well-developed fruiting bodies but also accumulated more cordycepin and adenosine than either the original wild-type strain or the degenerated strain. These new characteristics remained stable after 4 successive transfers, which indicates that the method used to rejuvenate the degenerated strain in this study is an effective approach.

  11. Are Belgian military students in medical sciences better educated in disaster medicine than their civilian colleagues?

    PubMed Central

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Lievers, J; Dieltiens, G; Sabbe, M B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Historically, medical students have been deployed to care for disaster victims but may not have been properly educated to do so. A previous evaluation of senior civilian medical students in Belgium revealed that they are woefully unprepared. Based on the nature of their military training, we hypothesised that military medical students were better educated and prepared than their civilian counterparts for disasters. We evaluated the impact of military training on disaster education in medical science students. Methods Students completed an online survey on disaster medicine, training, and knowledge, tested using a mixed set of 10 theoretical and practical questions. The results were compared with those of a similar evaluation of senior civilian medical students. Results The response rate was 77.5%, mean age 23 years and 59% were males. Overall, 95% of military medical students received some chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear training and 22% took part in other disaster management training; 44% perceived it is absolutely necessary that disaster management should be incorporated into the regular curriculum. Self-estimated knowledge ranged from 3.75 on biological incidents to 4.55 on influenza pandemics, based on a 10-point scale. Intention to respond in case of an incident ranged from 7 in biological incidents to 7.25 in chemical incidents. The mean test score was 5.52; scores improved with educational level attained. A comparison of survey data from civilian senior medical master students revealed that, except for influenza pandemic, military students scored higher on knowledge and capability, even though only 27% of them were senior master students. Data on willingness to work are comparable between the two groups. Results of the question/case set were significantly better for the military students. Conclusions The military background and training of these students makes them better prepared for disaster situations than their civilian

  12. From palace to hut: the architecture of military and naval medicine.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The walls separating medicine from society break down in this examination of early-British hospital architecture, which stresses the similarities and continuities between the civilian and the military. The hospitals examined include those for sick and wounded in the Empire, and later at home and those built for long-term chronic cases. Stevenson considers how matters of state, as well as medical theory and its changes, affected architecture.

  13. Colonel B.K. Ashford, A Brief Military Medicine Historical Review.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jose E; Stack, Kathleen M

    2015-09-01

    Colonel (Col.) Bailey K. Ashford was a turn of the 19th century Army medical corps officer who made great contributions to military medicine in the areas of infectious disease, public health, and education. His service period spans from the Spanish American War to the early 1920s. Although not as well-known as some of his contemporaries, he is an important figure, contributing to the diagnosis and treatment of "new world hookworm" in the tropics, training medical units in World War I, and the creation of the Institute of Tropical Medicine.

  14. Genome sequence of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps militaris, a valued traditional chinese medicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Species in the ascomycete fungal genus Cordyceps have been proposed to be the teleomorphs of Metarhizium species. The latter have been widely used as insect biocontrol agents. Cordyceps species are highly prized for use in traditional Chinese medicines, but the genes responsible for biosynthesis of bioactive components, insect pathogenicity and the control of sexuality and fruiting have not been determined. Results Here, we report the genome sequence of the type species Cordyceps militaris. Phylogenomic analysis suggests that different species in the Cordyceps/Metarhizium genera have evolved into insect pathogens independently of each other, and that their similar large secretomes and gene family expansions are due to convergent evolution. However, relative to other fungi, including Metarhizium spp., many protein families are reduced in C. militaris, which suggests a more restricted ecology. Consistent with its long track record of safe usage as a medicine, the Cordyceps genome does not contain genes for known human mycotoxins. We establish that C. militaris is sexually heterothallic but, very unusually, fruiting can occur without an opposite mating-type partner. Transcriptional profiling indicates that fruiting involves induction of the Zn2Cys6-type transcription factors and MAPK pathway; unlike other fungi, however, the PKA pathway is not activated. Conclusions The data offer a better understanding of Cordyceps biology and will facilitate the exploitation of medicinal compounds produced by the fungus. PMID:22112802

  15. Genome sequence of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps militaris, a valued traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peng; Xia, Yongliang; Xiao, Guohua; Xiong, Chenghui; Hu, Xiao; Zhang, Siwei; Zheng, Huajun; Huang, Yin; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Liu, Xingzhong; St Leger, Raymond J; Wang, Chengshu

    2011-11-23

    Species in the ascomycete fungal genus Cordyceps have been proposed to be the teleomorphs of Metarhizium species. The latter have been widely used as insect biocontrol agents. Cordyceps species are highly prized for use in traditional Chinese medicines, but the genes responsible for biosynthesis of bioactive components, insect pathogenicity and the control of sexuality and fruiting have not been determined. Here, we report the genome sequence of the type species Cordyceps militaris. Phylogenomic analysis suggests that different species in the Cordyceps/Metarhizium genera have evolved into insect pathogens independently of each other, and that their similar large secretomes and gene family expansions are due to convergent evolution. However, relative to other fungi, including Metarhizium spp., many protein families are reduced in C. militaris, which suggests a more restricted ecology. Consistent with its long track record of safe usage as a medicine, the Cordyceps genome does not contain genes for known human mycotoxins. We establish that C. militaris is sexually heterothallic but, very unusually, fruiting can occur without an opposite mating-type partner. Transcriptional profiling indicates that fruiting involves induction of the Zn2Cys6-type transcription factors and MAPK pathway; unlike other fungi, however, the PKA pathway is not activated. The data offer a better understanding of Cordyceps biology and will facilitate the exploitation of medicinal compounds produced by the fungus.

  16. Sports medicine training room clinic model for the military.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Stephen; Fairbanks, Keith; Nguyen, William; Blivin, Steve; Frantz, Earl

    2012-02-01

    A transition from traditional problem-based clinics to the Sports Medicine and Reconditioning Team (SMART) clinic model was completed by January 2009 at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. The SMART clinic model allows for more patients to be seen and enhances coordinated care between providers. The objective of this research is to show the advantages of implementing a training room team approach for the care of musculoskeletal injuries in active duty members by comparing the number of patients seen, the number of limited duty (LIMDU) periods, the number of physical evaluation boards (PEBs), and the percentage of orthopedic referrals. Electronic medical records for patients seen at sports medicine clinics between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 were reviewed. Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune provided a database of patients placed on LIMDU and PEB from 2007 through 2010. Fifty-eight and twenty-four percent more encounters occurred in 2009 and 2010, respectively, than that in 2007. The percentage of LIMDU referred for PEB in 2010 was reduced to 9% compared to that in 2007. In conclusion, the SMART clinic model allows for more patients to be seen and a reduction in the percentage of patients recommended for PEB from LIMDU.

  17. Military Medicine Publications: What has Happened in the Past Two Decades?

    PubMed

    Yavnai, Nirit; Huerta-Hartal, Michael; Mimouni, Francis; Pinkert, Moshe; Dagan, David; Kreiss, Yitshak

    2014-05-28

    Military medical personnel, like all other physician specialists, face the challenge of keeping updated with developments in their field of expertise, in view of the great amount of new medical information published in the literature. The availability of the Internet has triggered tremendous changes in publication characteristics, and in some fields, the number of publications has increased substantially. The emergence of electronic open access journals and the improvement in Web search engines has triggered a significant change in the publication processes and in accessibility of information. The objective of this study was to characterize the temporal trends in the number and types of publications in military medicine in the medical literature. We searched all PubMed-registered publications from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2010 using the keywords "military" or "army". We used the publication tag in PubMed to identify and examine major publication types. The trends were tested using the Mann-Kendall test for trend. Our search yielded 44,443 publications in military medicine during the evaluation period. Overall, the number of publications showed two distinct phases over time: (1) a moderate increase from 1990 to 2001 with a mean annual increase of 2.78% (r(2)=.79, P<.002), and (2) a steeper mean annual increase of 11.20% (r(2)=.96, P<.002) from 2002 to 2010. Most of the examined publication types showed a similar pattern. The proportion of high-quality-of-evidence publication types (randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses) increased from 2.91% to 8.43% of the overall military medicine publications with a mean annual incremental increase of 14.20%. These publication types demonstrated a similar dual phase pattern of increase (10.01%, r(2)=.80, P<.002 for 1990-2001 and 20.66%, r(2)=.88, P<.002 for 2002-2010). We conclude that over the past twenty years, scholarly work in the field of military medicine has shown a significant increase

  18. Three types of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases from the medicinal caterpillar fungus, Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes).

    PubMed

    Lian, Tiantian; Dong, Cai-Hong; Yang, Tao; Sun, Junde

    2014-01-01

    Geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) is a key enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, catalyzing the synthesis of its C20 precursor. In the present study, three types of ggpps genes were cloned and analyzed from the Caterpillar Medicinal Fungus Cordyceps militaris, a valued carotenoid-producing species. The sequences were named as ggpps727, ggpps191, and ggpps595. The open reading frame codes for predicted polypeptides of 464, 550, and 431 aa. Three predicted GGPPSs had a high similarity to that from Beauveria bassiana ARSEF 2860 with identity of 73%, 71%, and 56%, respectively. Homology comparison of the deduced peptide sequences of the various GGPPSs revealed highly conserved domains. Both GGPPS727 and GGPPS191 from C. militaris contained all five domains highly conserved among prenyltransferases as well as two aspartate-rich DDXX(XX)D motifs in domains II and V, which have been proven essential for prenyltransferase activity. By constructing the phylogenetic tree of fungal GGPPSs, it was found that fungi-derived GGPPSs could be divided into three clusters, suggesting there were three types of GGPPSs in fungi. Each type may be responsible for a different metabolism. Three types of GGPPSs from C. militaris belonged to the different clusters separately. Expression analysis of three ggpps genes during the fruit body cultivation of C. militaris by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) suggested the ggpps 191 gene may be involved in the synthesis of carotenoids and ggpps 727 may be responsible for primary metabolism. This is the first report of the GGPPS from C. militaris, a valued edible and medicinal fungus.

  19. Trends in National Emergency Medicine Conference Didactic Lectures Over a 6-Year Period.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Michael; Riddell, Jeff; Njie, Abdoulie

    2017-01-01

    National conference didactic lectures have traditionally featured hour-long lecture-based presentations. However, there is evidence that longer lectures can lead to both decreased attention and retention of information. The authors sought to identify trends in lecture duration, lecture types, and number of speakers at four national emergency medicine (EM) conferences over a 6-year period. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of the length, number of speakers, and format of didactic lectures at four different national EM conferences over 6 years. The authors abstracted data from the national academic assemblies for the four largest not-for-profit EM organizations in the United States: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American College of Emergency Physicians, Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. There was a significant yearly decrease in the mean lecture lengths for three of the four conferences. There was an increase in the percentage of rapid fire sessions over the preceding 2 years with a corresponding decrease in the percentage of general educational sessions. There was no significant difference in the mean number of speakers per lecture. An analysis of 4210 didactic lecture sessions from the annual meetings of four national EM organizations over a 6-year period showed significant decreases in mean lecture length. These findings can help to guide EM continuing medical education conference planning and research.

  20. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Military Testing Association (17th, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, September 15-19, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1975

    The 62 papers presented at the 1975 conference of the Military Testing Association cover almost all areas of military and occupational assessment and evaluation, and are arranged in 19 "common subject-matter groupings": Symposium (on Aptitude Testing), Training Extension Courses, Computerized Testing, Task Validation and Qualification…

  1. Military microwaves '84; Proceedings of the Conference, London, England, October 24-26, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The present conference on microwave frequency electronic warfare and military sensor equipment developments consider radar warning receivers, optical frequency spread spectrum systems, mobile digital communications troposcatter effects, wideband bulk encryption, long range air defense radars (such as the AR320, W-2000 and Martello), multistatic radars, and multimode airborne and interceptor radars. IR system and subsystem component topics encompass thermal imaging and active IR countermeasures, class 1 modules, and diamond coatings, while additional radar-related topics include radar clutter in airborne maritime reconnaissance systems, microstrip antennas with dual polarization capability, the synthesis of shaped beam antenna patterns, planar phased arrays, radar signal processing, radar cross section measurement techniques, and radar imaging and pattern analysis. Attention is also given to optical control and signal processing, mm-wave control technology and EW systems, W-band operations, planar mm-wave arrays, mm-wave monolithic solid state components, mm-wave sensor technology, GaAs monolithic ICs, and dielectric resonator and wideband tunable oscillators.

  2. The impact of social media on a major international emergency medicine conference.

    PubMed

    Neill, Andrew; Cronin, John J; Brannigan, Domhnall; O'Sullivan, Ronan; Cadogan, Mike

    2014-05-01

    To report on the presence and use of social media by speakers and attendees at the International Conference on Emergency Medicine (ICEM) 2012, and describe the increasing use of online technologies such as Twitter and podcasts in publicising conferences and sharing research findings, and for clinical teaching. Speakers were identified through the organising committee and a database constructed using the internet to determine the presence and activity of speakers on social media platforms. We also examined the use of Twitter by attendees and non-attendees using an online archiving system. Researchers tracked and reviewed every tweet produced with the hashtag #ICEM2012. Tweets were then reviewed and classified by three separate authors into different categories. Of the 212 speakers at ICEM 2012, 41.5% had a LinkedIn account and 15.6% were on Twitter. Less than 1% were active on Google+ and less than 10% had an active website or blog. There were over 4500 tweets about ICEM 2012. Over 400 people produced tweets about the conference, yet only 34% were physically present at the conference. Of the original tweets produced, 74.4% were directly related to the clinical and research material of the conference. ICEM 2012 was the most tweeted emergency medicine conference on record. Tweeting by participants was common; a large number of original tweets regarding clinical material at the conference were produced. There was also a large virtual participation in the conference as multiple people not attending the conference discussed the material on Twitter. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Report from the Second International Conference of Traditional and Complementary Medicine on Health 2015.

    PubMed

    Isidoro, Ciro; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The Second International Conference of Traditional and Complementary Medicine on Health was held from October 24th through 27th at the GIS National Taiwan University Convention Center in Taipei. Twenty-seven invited speakers, representative of fourteen Countries, delivered their lecture in front of an audience of more than two hundreds of attendees. In addition, a poster exhibition with seventy-two presenters completed the scientific sessions. The leitmotif of the Conference was to promote a common platform in which all medical knowledge is integrated to improve the health care system. Traditional medicine and complementary medicine are characterized by a holistic approach to prevent and cure diseases, making use of natural products and/or physical manipulations. In this context, the Conference emphasized the importance of the Quality Control and of standardized methods for the authentication, preparation and characterization of the herbal products and nutrient supplements, as well as the need for controlled clinical trials and for experimental studies to demonstrate the efficacy and to understand the underlying mechanisms of the preventive and curative treatments. In this report, we highlight the novel findings and the perspectives in Traditional and Complementary Medicine (TCM; chuán tǒng jì hù bǔ yī xué) that emerged during the conference.

  4. Report from the Second International Conference of Traditional and Complementary Medicine on Health 2015

    PubMed Central

    Isidoro, Ciro; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The Second International Conference of Traditional and Complementary Medicine on Health was held from October 24th through 27th at the GIS National Taiwan University Convention Center in Taipei. Twenty-seven invited speakers, representative of fourteen Countries, delivered their lecture in front of an audience of more than two hundreds of attendees. In addition, a poster exhibition with seventy-two presenters completed the scientific sessions. The leitmotif of the Conference was to promote a common platform in which all medical knowledge is integrated to improve the health care system. Traditional medicine and complementary medicine are characterized by a holistic approach to prevent and cure diseases, making use of natural products and/or physical manipulations. In this context, the Conference emphasized the importance of the Quality Control and of standardized methods for the authentication, preparation and characterization of the herbal products and nutrient supplements, as well as the need for controlled clinical trials and for experimental studies to demonstrate the efficacy and to understand the underlying mechanisms of the preventive and curative treatments. In this report, we highlight the novel findings and the perspectives in Traditional and Complementary Medicine (TCM; 傳統暨互補醫學 chuán tǒng jì hù bǔ yī xué) that emerged during the conference. PMID:26870692

  5. Proceedings for the 5th Asia-Pacific Conference on Disaster Medicine: creating an agenda for action.

    PubMed

    De Grace, M; Ericson, D; Folz, H; Greene, W; Ho, K; Pearce, L

    2001-01-01

    Disaster medicine has come to the forefront and has become the focus of interest not only in the medical community, but also in the eyes of the public. The 5th APCDM was convened in Vancouver, Canada, 27-30 September 2000. It brought together over 300 delegates from 32 countries to share their experiences and thoughts regarding disaster events and how to effectively manage them. The conference was devoted to the task of establishing priorities and creating an Agenda for Action. From the discussions, key actions required were defined: COMMUNICATIONS: (1) Identify existing regional telehealth groups and gather lessons to be learned from them; (2) Form a telehealth advisory group to work with regional groups to compile telehealth initiatives, identify international protocols in telehealth already in existence, and solicit feedback before setting international standards; and (3) Increase corporate partnerships in the fields of telehealth and telecommunications, and invite corporations to send delegates to future APCDM meetings. This should be an initiative of the APCDM, the World Association of Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM), or the European Society of Emergency Medicine. EDUCATION AND RESEARCH: (1) Formalize education in disaster medicine and management. The World Health Organization and WADEM should take a leadership role; (2) WADEM is requested to hold a conference with a focus on qualitative research; (3) WHO is requested to continue the provision of international research teams, but to advocate for the development of national disaster research infrastructure; (4) Make research findings and reports available on web sites of such organizations as WHO and PAHO; (5) Develop the translation of research for community utilization. The WHO and PAHO are organizations that are requested to consider this action; and (6) WADEM/APCDM are requested to focus future conferences on applied research. INFORMATION AND DATA: (1) Create an "Information and Data Clearinghouse

  6. Are Belgian military students in medical sciences better educated in disaster medicine than their civilian colleagues?

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Lievers, J; Dieltiens, G; Sabbe, M B

    2016-10-01

    Historically, medical students have been deployed to care for disaster victims but may not have been properly educated to do so. A previous evaluation of senior civilian medical students in Belgium revealed that they are woefully unprepared. Based on the nature of their military training, we hypothesised that military medical students were better educated and prepared than their civilian counterparts for disasters. We evaluated the impact of military training on disaster education in medical science students. Students completed an online survey on disaster medicine, training, and knowledge, tested using a mixed set of 10 theoretical and practical questions. The results were compared with those of a similar evaluation of senior civilian medical students. The response rate was 77.5%, mean age 23 years and 59% were males. Overall, 95% of military medical students received some chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear training and 22% took part in other disaster management training; 44% perceived it is absolutely necessary that disaster management should be incorporated into the regular curriculum. Self-estimated knowledge ranged from 3.75 on biological incidents to 4.55 on influenza pandemics, based on a 10-point scale. Intention to respond in case of an incident ranged from 7 in biological incidents to 7.25 in chemical incidents. The mean test score was 5.52; scores improved with educational level attained. A comparison of survey data from civilian senior medical master students revealed that, except for influenza pandemic, military students scored higher on knowledge and capability, even though only 27% of them were senior master students. Data on willingness to work are comparable between the two groups. Results of the question/case set were significantly better for the military students. The military background and training of these students makes them better prepared for disaster situations than their civilian counterparts. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  7. PREFACE: International Conference on Image Optimisation in Nuclear Medicine (OptiNM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christofides, Stelios; Parpottas, Yiannis

    2011-09-01

    Conference logo The International Conference on Image Optimisation in Nuclear Medicine was held at the Atlantica Aeneas Resort in Ayia Napa, Cyprus between 23-26 March 2011. It was organised in the framework of the research project "Optimising Diagnostic Value in SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging" (YΓΕΙΑ/ΔYΓΕΙΑ/0308/11), funded by the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation and the European Regional Development Fund, to present the highlights of the project, discuss the progress and results, and define future related goals. The aim of this International Conference was to concentrate on image optimization approaches in Nuclear Medicine. Experts in the field of nuclear medicine presented their latest research results, exchanged experiences and set future goals for image optimisation while balancing patient dose and diagnostic value. The conference was jointly organized by the Frederick Research Centre in Cyprus, the Department of Medical and Public Health Services of the Cyprus Ministry of Health, the Biomedical Research Foundation in Cyprus and the AGH University of Science and Technology in Poland. It was supported by the Cyprus Association of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, and the Cyprus Society of Nuclear Medicine. The conference was held under the auspices of the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. The conference scientific programme covered several important topics such as functional imaging; image optimization; quantification for diagnosis; justification; simulations; patient dosimetry, staff exposures and radiation risks; quality assurance and clinical audit; education, training and radiation protection culture; hybrid systems and image registration; and new and competing technologies. The programme consisted of 13 invited and keynote presentations as well as workshops, round table discussions and a number of scientific sessions. A total of 51 speakers presented their

  8. Evidence-based medicine in military orthopaedics: are we doing our part?

    PubMed

    Tennent, David J; Bailey, James R; Ficke, James R; Stinner, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The clinical application of evidence-based medicine is influenced by the quality of the published literature. Journals assign objective levels of evidence to articles to describe the quality and reliability of individual articles. Studies assigned levels I to III are considered higher quality studies. This study reviewed 60 continuous years of the American edition of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery to analyze trends in the quality of research published by U.S. military orthopaedic surgeons. Three hundred and six of 371 identified articles were assigned a level of evidence from I to V. These were then analyzed to determine if military orthopaedic surgeons were producing higher quality studies over time. Over time, the total number of articles published decreased. However, the number of higher quality studies and average level of evidence per decade improved over time. This trend toward publishing higher quality studies is consistent with the general orthopaedic community and highlights the need for continued work by the military orthopaedic community to conduct higher quality studies.

  9. Medicine and the Egyptian campaign: the development of the military medical officer during the Napoleonic Wars c. 1798-1801.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates how French and British army medical officers in Egypt at the turn of the 19th century were affected by campaign experiences. Their encounters with ophthalmia, plague, and other diseases influenced the practice of medicine in later campaigns and fostered the development of the idea amongst military practitioners that military diseases required specialised knowledge. Practitioners' campaign writings are used to demonstrate how British army doctors approached the investigation of the "new" diseases they encountered. In particular, the article focuses on how Dr. James McGrigor used the military system to control, direct, and disseminate the development of medical knowledge.

  10. MILCOM '89 - IEEE Military Communications Conference, Boston, MA, Oct. 15-18, 1989, Conference Record. Volumes 1, 2, & 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Various papers on the interoperability, survivability, and security of military communications are presented. The general topics addressed include: performance of frequency-hopping systems, tactical networks, HF communications, emerging communications technologies, spread-spectrum multiple access, forward error correction coding, network routing and analysis, optical communications, digital signal processing for military communications, advanced antenna techniques, detectability of communication signals, network protocols, meteor burst communications, SATCOM systems and performance, tutorial communications system performance design, interference suppression, error control coding, VLF/LF communications, residue number system applications, trellis-coded modulation, advanced topics in communications, survivable communication networks, fading multipath channels and compensation techniques, RF and HEMT technology, update on tutorial public key cryptography, network architecture, advanced topics in modulation and coding, HF channel measurements and modeling, acquisition and synchronization in spread spectrum systems, military system applications and performance.

  11. Selected papers from the 7th International Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology (MMB 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Ellis; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-03-01

    In this special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering are a collection of the best microengineering papers presented at the 7th International Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology (MMB 2013) which took place in the seaside town of Marina del Rey, California, USA on 10-12 April, 2013. During the 3-day conference, participants enjoyed talks from 6 invited keynote speakers and 125 flash oral/poster presentations. The MMB conference is a biennial meeting with the primary purpose of fostering interactions between biologists and medical researchers, clinicians, chemists, physicists and engineers to enhance and strengthen the potential microtechnologies that will revolutionize the fields of medicine and biological sciences. The conference possesses a unique format where all poster presenters provide a brief 60 s oral presentation highlighting their research. This format was devised to provide training and exposure for young researchers, especially PhD students and postdocs, in the field and stimulate interdisciplinary exchanges. Therefore, MMB provides an intimate intellectual venue the facilitate discussions and collaborations to advance new research tools and technologies for medicine and biological sciences. The MMB conference series was co-founded by Professor David Beebe (University of Wisconsin—Madison) and Professor André Dittmar (University of Lyon) and was the first international meeting to provide a forum focusing on emerging applications of microtechnologies to unmet needs in medicine and biology. The series was held for the first time in 2000, in Lyon, France and followed by Madison, USA (2002), Oahu Island in Hawaii, USA (2005), Okinawa, Japan (2006), Québec City, Canada (2009), Lucerne, Switzerland (2011), and Marina del Rey, USA (2013). The next conference will be held in Seoul, Korea in 2015. This collection of articles highlights recent progress in microtechnologies with medical and biological applications. We are

  12. [AVIATION MEDICINE: THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AND FOCAL FUNDAMENTAL AND PRACTICAL ISSUES (for the 80th anniversary of the Research Test Center of Aerospace Medicine and Military Ergonomics)].

    PubMed

    Zhdanko, I M; Pisarev, A A; Vorona, A A; Lapa, V V; Khomenko, M N

    2015-01-01

    The article discloses postulates of theoretical concepts that make the methodological basis for addressing the real-world aviation medicine challenges of humanizing aviator's environment, labor content and means, and health and performance maintenance. Under consideration are focal fundamental and practical issues arising with the technological progress in aviation and dealt with at the AF CRI Research Test Center of Aerospace Medicine and Military Ergonomics.

  13. Holistic Care in the US Military I—The Epidaurus Project: An Initiative in Holistic Medicine for the Military Health System, 2001–2012

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Roger J.; Frampton, Susan B.; Pellegrino, Edmund D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the history and findings of the Epidaurus Project, a Uniformed Services University–affiliated project to bring holistic care and evidence-based design into the Military Health System (MHS). A distinguished group of civilian thought leaders contributed. The 2005 Base Realignment and Closure process offered a chance to implement the Epidaurus agenda. A new integrated healthcare delivery system, centered around the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center at Bethesda, Maryland, was the result. These facilities will be templates for a new generation of MHS “healing environments” and a model for innovative systems of healthcare nationwide. The Epidaurus Project represents a significant collaboration between civilian medicine and the military in times of war. PMID:24278818

  14. Holistic Care in the US Military I-The Epidaurus Project: An Initiative in Holistic Medicine for the Military Health System, 2001-2012.

    PubMed

    Foote, Frederick O; Bulger, Roger J; Frampton, Susan B; Pellegrino, Edmund D

    2012-05-01

    This article describes the history and findings of the Epidaurus Project, a Uniformed Services University-affiliated project to bring holistic care and evidence-based design into the Military Health System (MHS). A distinguished group of civilian thought leaders contributed. The 2005 Base Realignment and Closure process offered a chance to implement the Epidaurus agenda. A new integrated healthcare delivery system, centered around the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center at Bethesda, Maryland, was the result. These facilities will be templates for a new generation of MHS "healing environments" and a model for innovative systems of healthcare nationwide. The Epidaurus Project represents a significant collaboration between civilian medicine and the military in times of war.

  15. Health care utilization among complementary and alternative medicine users in a large military cohort

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Complementary and Alternative Medicine use and how it impacts health care utilization in the United States Military is not well documented. Using data from the Millennium Cohort Study we describe the characteristics of CAM users in a large military population and document their health care needs over a 12-month period. The aim of this study was to determine if CAM users are requiring more physician-based medical services than users of conventional medicine. Methods Inpatient and outpatient medical services were documented over a 12-month period for 44,287 participants from the Millennium Cohort Study. Equal access to medical services was available to anyone needing medical care during this study period. The number and types of medical visits were compared between CAM and non-CAM users. Chi square test and multivariable logistic regression was applied for the analysis. Results Of the 44,287 participants, 39% reported using at least one CAM therapy, and 61% reported not using any CAM therapies. Those individuals reporting CAM use accounted for 45.1% of outpatient care and 44.8% of inpatient care. Individuals reporting one or more health conditions were 15% more likely to report CAM use than non-CAM users and 19% more likely to report CAM use if reporting one or more health symptoms compared to non-CAM users. The unadjusted odds ratio for hospitalizations in CAM users compared to non-CAM users was 1.29 (95% CI: 1.16-1.43). The mean number of days receiving outpatient care for CAM users was 7.0 days and 5.9 days for non-CAM users (p < 0.001). Conclusions Our study found those who report CAM use were requiring more physician-based medical services than users of conventional medicine. This appears to be primarily the result of an increase in the number of health conditions and symptoms reported by CAM users. PMID:21481260

  16. Framework negotiations: diagnostic insights among alternative medical practitioners participating in integrative medicine case conferences.

    PubMed

    Salkeld, Ellen J

    2014-03-01

    Medical anthropology concerns itself with cultural interpretations of health and illness in complex pluralistic societies whose members incorporate multiple strategies to address health issues. This research explored the variety of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) topics introduced into biomedically structured clinical evaluation. A field study of routine case conferences held within a clinical fellowship program in integrative medicine (IM) provided the ideal setting to explore contrasting conceptualizations of disease. Study results yielded five core sources of information sought by CAM practitioners, typically not addressed in biomedicine: social relations history within family of origin, emotional health, energetic health, spiritual health, and in-depth nutritional evaluation. © 2014 by the American Anthropological Association.

  17. Increasing Faculty Attendance at Emergency Medicine Resident Conferences: Does CME Credit Make a Difference?

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Cedric W; Hiestand, Brian; Bond, Michael C; Fox, Sean M; Char, Doug; Weber, Drew S; Glenn, David; Patterson, Leigh A; Manthey, David E

    2013-03-01

    Faculty involvement in resident teaching events is beneficial to resident education, yet evidence about the factors that promote faculty attendance at resident didactic conferences is limited. To determine whether offering continuing medical education (CME) credits would result in an increase in faculty attendance at weekly emergency medicine conferences and whether faculty would report the availability of CME credit as a motivating factor. Our prospective, multi-site, observational study of 5 emergency medicine residency programs collected information on the number of faculty members present at CME and non-CME lectures for 9 months and collected information from faculty on factors influencing decisions to attend resident educational events and from residents on factors influencing their learning experience. Lectures offering CME credit on average were attended by 5 additional faculty members per hour, compared with conferences that did not offer CME credit (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.9-6.1; P < .001). Faculty reported their desire to "participate in resident education" was the most influential factor prompting them to attend lectures, followed by "explore current trends in emergency medicine" and the lecture's "specific topic." Faculty also reported that "clinical/administrative duties" and "family responsibilities" negatively affected their ability to attend. Residents reported that the most important positive factor influencing their conference experience was "lectures given by faculty." Although faculty reported that CME credit was not an important factor in their decision to attend resident conferences, offering CME credit resulted in significant increases in faculty attendance. Residents reported that "lectures given by faculty" and "faculty attendance" positively affected their learning experience.

  18. 1st Joint European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry (TTMC 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Le Borgne, Marc; Haidar, Samer; Duval, Olivier; Wünsch, Bernhard; Jose, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry is a new two-day meeting on drug discovery that is focused on therapeutic targets and the use of tools to explore all fields of drug discovery and drug design such as molecular modelling, bioorganic chemistry, NMR studies, fragment screening, in vitro assays, in vivo assays, structure activity relationships, autodisplay. Abstracts of keynote lectures, plenary lectures, junior lectures, flash presentations, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:26712767

  19. 1st Joint European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry (TTMC 2015).

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, Marc; Haidar, Samer; Duval, Olivier; Wünsch, Bernhard; Jose, Joachim

    2015-12-26

    The European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry is a new two-day meeting on drug discovery that is focused on therapeutic targets and the use of tools to explore all fields of drug discovery and drug design such as molecular modelling, bioorganic chemistry, NMR studies, fragment screening, in vitro assays, in vivo assays, structure activity relationships, autodisplay. Abstracts of keynote lectures, plenary lectures, junior lectures, flash presentations, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report.

  20. Thirty years of artificial intelligence in medicine (AIME) conferences: A review of research themes.

    PubMed

    Peek, Niels; Combi, Carlo; Marin, Roque; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-09-01

    Over the past 30 years, the international conference on Artificial Intelligence in MEdicine (AIME) has been organized at different venues across Europe every 2 years, establishing a forum for scientific exchange and creating an active research community. The Artificial Intelligence in Medicine journal has published theme issues with extended versions of selected AIME papers since 1998. To review the history of AIME conferences, investigate its impact on the wider research field, and identify challenges for its future. We analyzed a total of 122 session titles to create a taxonomy of research themes and topics. We classified all 734 AIME conference papers published between 1985 and 2013 with this taxonomy. We also analyzed the citations to these conference papers and to 55 special issue papers. We identified 30 research topics across 12 themes. AIME was dominated by knowledge engineering research in its first decade, while machine learning and data mining prevailed thereafter. Together these two themes have contributed about 51% of all papers. There have been eight AIME papers that were cited at least 10 times per year since their publication. There has been a major shift from knowledge-based to data-driven methods while the interest for other research themes such as uncertainty management, image and signal processing, and natural language processing has been stable since the early 1990s. AIME papers relating to guidelines and protocols are among the most highly cited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding Resident Learning Preferences Within an Internal Medicine Noon Conference Lecture Series: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsky, Adam P.; Zickmund, Susan L.; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2014-01-01

    Background The lecture remains the most common approach for didactic offerings in residency programs despite conflicting evidence about the effectiveness of this format. Objective The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of internal medicine residents toward conferences held in the lecture format. Methods The investigators invited internal medicine residents (N  =  144) to participate in focus groups discussing their perspectives about noon conference lectures. The investigators used a semistructured guide to ask about motivations for attendance and effectiveness of noon conferences, transcribed the recordings, coded the discussions, and analyzed the results. Results Seven focus groups with a total of 41 residents were held. This identified 4 major domains: (1) motivations for attendance; (2) appropriate content; (3) effective teaching methods; and (4) perspectives on active participation. Residents' motivations were categorized into external factors, including desire for a break and balance to their workload, and intrinsic attributes, including the learning opportunity, topic, and speaker. Appropriate content was described as clinically relevant, practical, and presenting a balance of evidence. Identified effective teaching methods included shorter teaching sessions focused on high-yield learning points structured around cases and questions. While active participation increases residents' perceived level of stress, the benefits of this format include increased attention and learning. Conclusions This study furthers our knowledge of the learning preferences of internal medicine residents within the changing environment of residency education and can be used in conjunction with principles of adult learning to reform how we deliver core medical knowledge. PMID:24701307

  2. Understanding resident learning preferences within an internal medicine noon conference lecture series: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Zickmund, Susan L; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2014-03-01

    The lecture remains the most common approach for didactic offerings in residency programs despite conflicting evidence about the effectiveness of this format. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of internal medicine residents toward conferences held in the lecture format. The investigators invited internal medicine residents (N  =  144) to participate in focus groups discussing their perspectives about noon conference lectures. The investigators used a semistructured guide to ask about motivations for attendance and effectiveness of noon conferences, transcribed the recordings, coded the discussions, and analyzed the results. Seven focus groups with a total of 41 residents were held. This identified 4 major domains: (1) motivations for attendance; (2) appropriate content; (3) effective teaching methods; and (4) perspectives on active participation. Residents' motivations were categorized into external factors, including desire for a break and balance to their workload, and intrinsic attributes, including the learning opportunity, topic, and speaker. Appropriate content was described as clinically relevant, practical, and presenting a balance of evidence. Identified effective teaching methods included shorter teaching sessions focused on high-yield learning points structured around cases and questions. While active participation increases residents' perceived level of stress, the benefits of this format include increased attention and learning. This study furthers our knowledge of the learning preferences of internal medicine residents within the changing environment of residency education and can be used in conjunction with principles of adult learning to reform how we deliver core medical knowledge.

  3. Optimization of Liquid Fermentation Conditions and Protein Nutrition Evaluation of Mycelium from the Caterpillar Medicinal Mushroom, Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes).

    PubMed

    Gang, Jie; Liu, Han; Liu, Yanhong

    2016-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal mushroom. In this study, the mycelium of C. militaris was cultured using liquid fermentation technology and the culture medium components were optimized by the orthogonal test method. Our results showed that the optimal medium combination for the mycelium growth is 3% glucose, 3% peptone, 0.1% MgSO4, and 0.2% KH2PO4 The international general nutritional assessment method was applied to the overall evaluation of the protein nutrition value of submerged cultivated mycelium and fruit body of C. militaris. The protein contents in C. militaris mycelium and fruit body are 21.10% and 18.47%, respectively. The first limiting amino acids of C. militaris mycelium and fruit bodies are the sulfur-containing amino acids (methionine and cysteine), and the second limiting amino acid is isoleucine. The quality of amino acids from submerged cultivated mycelium and fruit body from C. militaris was also evaluated by amino acid score (AAS), chemical score (CS), essential amino acid index (EAAI), biological value (BV), nutritional index (NI), and score of ratio coefficient of amino acid (SRCAA). Our data demonstrate that AAS, CS, EAAI, BV, NI, and SRCAA scores of the submerged cultivated mycelium proteins are 62.41, 38.74, 88.37, 84.63, 18.61, and 25.57, respectively, whereas the fruit body proteins are 37.11, 34.59, 61.92, 55.79, 11.44, and 68.51, respectively. The protein content of C. militaris mycelium has higher nutrition value than that of fruit body protein, which holds the promise for future further development. Our study provides the optimal culture conditions and the essential nutritional information of medicinal species, C. militaris.

  4. Graduate Medical Education and Military Medicine: Report of a Study by a Committee of the Institute of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    Graduate medical education (GME) in the military services was investigated with respect to the following concerns: the maximum capacity of each military medical department to conduct GME programs in its own hospital; how these programs affect the recruitment and retention of military physicians; and the optimal sizes of such programs. It is…

  5. Overview of 'Omics Technologies for Military Occupational Health Surveillance and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Bradburne, Christopher; Graham, David; Kingston, H M; Brenner, Ruth; Pamuku, Matt; Carruth, Lucy

    2015-10-01

    Systems biology ('omics) technologies are emerging as tools for the comprehensive analysis and monitoring of human health. In order for these tools to be used in military medicine, clinical sampling and biobanking will need to be optimized to be compatible with downstream processing and analysis for each class of molecule measured. This article provides an overview of 'omics technologies, including instrumentation, tools, and methods, and their potential application for warfighter exposure monitoring. We discuss the current state and the potential utility of personalized data from a variety of 'omics sources including genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, lipidomics, and efforts to combine their use. Issues in the "sample-to-answer" workflow, including collection and biobanking are discussed, as well as national efforts for standardization and clinical interpretation. Establishment of these emerging capabilities, along with accurate xenobiotic monitoring, for the Department of Defense could provide new and effective tools for environmental health monitoring at all duty stations, including deployed locations.

  6. Increasing Faculty Attendance at Emergency Medicine Resident Conferences: Does CME Credit Make a Difference?

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Cedric W.; Hiestand, Brian; Bond, Michael C.; Fox, Sean M.; Char, Doug; Weber, Drew S.; Glenn, David; Patterson, Leigh A.; Manthey, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Faculty involvement in resident teaching events is beneficial to resident education, yet evidence about the factors that promote faculty attendance at resident didactic conferences is limited. Objective To determine whether offering continuing medical education (CME) credits would result in an increase in faculty attendance at weekly emergency medicine conferences and whether faculty would report the availability of CME credit as a motivating factor. Methods Our prospective, multi-site, observational study of 5 emergency medicine residency programs collected information on the number of faculty members present at CME and non-CME lectures for 9 months and collected information from faculty on factors influencing decisions to attend resident educational events and from residents on factors influencing their learning experience. Results Lectures offering CME credit on average were attended by 5 additional faculty members per hour, compared with conferences that did not offer CME credit (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.9–6.1; P < .001). Faculty reported their desire to “participate in resident education” was the most influential factor prompting them to attend lectures, followed by “explore current trends in emergency medicine” and the lecture's “specific topic.” Faculty also reported that “clinical/administrative duties” and “family responsibilities” negatively affected their ability to attend. Residents reported that the most important positive factor influencing their conference experience was “lectures given by faculty.” Conclusions Although faculty reported that CME credit was not an important factor in their decision to attend resident conferences, offering CME credit resulted in significant increases in faculty attendance. Residents reported that “lectures given by faculty” and “faculty attendance” positively affected their learning experience. PMID:24404225

  7. Evaluation of different agricultural wastes for the production of fruiting bodies and bioactive compounds by medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qunying; Long, Liangkun; Wu, Liangliang; Zhang, Fenglun; Wu, Shuling; Zhang, Weiming; Sun, Xiaoming

    2017-08-01

    In commercial production of Cordyceps militaris (a famous Chinese medicine), cereal grains are usually utilized as cultivation substrates. This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of agricultural wastes as substitute materials in the low-cost production of C. militaris. Cottonseed shells (CS), corn cob particles (CCP), Italian poplar sawdusts (IPS) and substrates spent by Flammulina velutipes (SS) were employed to cultivate C. militaris, using rice medium as control. CS and CCP were suitable for fruit body formation of C. militaris, with yields of 22 and 20 g per bottle respectively. Fruit bodies grown on CCP showed the highest levels of cordycepin and adenosine, up to 9.45 and 5.86 mg g(-1) respectively. The content of d-mannitol in fruit bodies obtained on CS was 120 mg g(-1) (80% of the control group), followed by that on CCP, 100 mg g(-1) . Fruit bodies cultivated on CCP displayed a high crude polysaccharide level of 26.9 mg g(-1) , which was the closest to that of the control group (34.5 mg g(-1) ). CS and CCP are effective substrates for the production of fruit bodies and bioactive compounds by C. militaris. This study provides a new approach to decreasing the cost of C. militaris cultivation and dealing with these agricultural wastes. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Quality information for quality use of medicines; 2nd International Conference, Kazan, 15-16 October 2010.

    PubMed

    Ziganshina, Lilia E; Menkes, David B; Herxheimer, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Kazan hosted Russia's first international conference on medicines that was entirely independent of the pharmaceutical industry, attracting 414 participants from 9 countries and 20 regions of the Russian Federation. The meeting was greeted and endorsed by world leaders in pharmaceutical information, policy and regulation. Delegates discussed the professional and social problems arising from unethical drug promotion, including compromised evidence from clinical trials and consequent impairments in health service delivery. The Conference adopted a resolution prioritizing policy development and health system needs, notably including the development of clinical pharmacology. A website documents conference materials and provides an interface for future collaboration: http://evidenceupdate-tatarstan.ru/confer.

  9. Military medicine and the ethics of war: British colonial warfare during the Seven Years War (1756-63).

    PubMed

    Charters, Erica

    2010-01-01

    This article examines 18th-century European warfare, tracing the first formal codifications of conventions of war, frequently introduced by military physicians and initially regarding the treatment of the sick and wounded. It outlines to what extent these conventions were followed in practice, particularly in the challenging environment of American irregular warfare, with a focus on the most well-known incident of "biological warfare" in the period: the deliberate spread of smallpox by British officers among Amerindians in 1763. More broadly, it demonstrates that the history of military medicine provides a fruitful method with which to uncover assumptions about the ethics of war.

  10. Military Testing Association (Proceedings of the Annual Conference (27th, San Diego, California, October 21-25, 1985). Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navy Personnel Research and Development Center, San Diego, CA.

    The 169 paper and symposium presentations given during 57 sessions of the conference are provided in these two volumes. The first volume contains the keynote speech, which addressed military entrance processing command and its acquired immune deficiency snydrome testing program. Symposia topics in this volume include: (1) computerized diagnostic…

  11. Military Testing Association (Proceedings of the Annual Conference (27th, San Diego, California, October 21-25, 1985). Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navy Personnel Research and Development Center, San Diego, CA.

    The 169 paper and symposium presentations given during 57 sessions of the conference are provided in these two volumes. The first volume contains the keynote speech, which addressed military entrance processing command and its acquired immune deficiency snydrome testing program. Symposia topics in this volume include: (1) computerized diagnostic…

  12. Advancing Systems Biology in the International Conference on Intelligent Biology and Medicine (ICIBM) 2015.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongming; Liu, Yunlong; Huang, Yufei; Huang, Kun; Ruan, Jianhua

    2016-08-26

    The 2015 International Conference on Intelligent Biology and Medicine (ICIBM 2015) was held on November 13-15, 2015 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. ICIBM 2015 included eight scientific sessions, three tutorial sessions, one poster session, and four keynote presentations that covered the frontier research in broad areas related to bioinformatics, systems biology, big data science, biomedical informatics, pharmacogenomics, and intelligent computing. Here, we present a summary of the 10 research articles that were selected from ICIBM 2015 and included in the supplement to BMC Systems Biology.

  13. Social Justice as the Moral Core of Family Medicine: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    A recurring conference theme was the essential place of social justice within family medicine, especially the need to focus on denominator populations, exalt the personal and caring qualities of doctoring, and address social determinants of health. Many expressed solidarity with "community," but it is not always easy to define community in our large and diverse nation. Exhortations for health advocacy were frequently voiced, but putting these into meaningful action agendas is a challenge. There was general agreement that medicine is in flux and that the many expressions of "commodity-centered consumerism" have altered organization and financing. The increasing demands by "consumers", who want low cost, instant availability, and shared decision-making, and yet change doctors when health plans alter coverage also differentially impact high-volume, low-margin specialties such as family medicine. Additional challenges were the electronic health record and calibrating an appropriate work/life balance. Five action steps are recommended: 1) speak out on the important social and moral issues; 2) be the experts on personal care; 3) make common cause with potential allies; 4) help institutions perceive the value of generalism; and 5) help find ways to enrich generalist disciplines to increase the joy of medicine and decrease the threat of burn out.

  14. A novel protein with anti-metastasis activity on 4T1 carcinoma from medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Yin, Yalin; Yu, Guojun; Jin, Yanxia; Ye, Xiangdong; Shrestha, Alok; Liu, Wei; Yu, Wenhui; Sun, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a famous fungus used in traditional Chinese medicine for nearly one thousand years. And its fruiting body is known to possess anticancer and immunomodulatory activities. This study describes the isolation, characterization, and test of antitumor activity of a C. militaris protein, called here as "C. militaris immunoregulatory protein" (CMIP). CMIP was purified through a three-step chromatographic procedure. The MS analyses showed that CMIP corresponded to an uncharacterized protein (CCM_01955) in the C. militaris transcriptional database. Circular dichroism of CMIP revealed the composition of 35.5% β-sheet, 18.5% α-helix, 17.0% turn and 29.0% random coil. No significant cytotoxicity of CMIP was observed on HeLa, HepG2 and 4T1 tumor cells. However, CMIP demonstrated anti-metastasis activity on a mouse model of 4T1 breast cancer lung metastasis. It reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung of tumor-bearing mice and prolonged their survival time. Furthermore, proliferation of the 4T1 cells was inhibited by macrophage-CMIP conditioned media. And the mRNA levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were increased significantly in peritoneal macrophages treated by CMIP. These results reveal the antitumor potential of CMIP, thus reinforcing the importance of biochemical prospecting of C. militaris.

  15. [The greatest organizer of military medicine and health service E.I.Smirnov about N.I.Pirogov].

    PubMed

    Belevitin, A B; Shelepov, A M; Kriuchkov, O A

    2010-10-01

    E.I.Smirnov's views of the role and place of organizational aspects of the greatest Russian surgeon N.I.Pirogov in development of modern medical supply system are covered on the basis of vast historiographical data. From the perspectives of historism and objectivism a degree of realization Pirogov's ideas during creation of the consistent military-medicine doctrine and organization of medical-evacuational measures during the Great Patriotic War 1941-1945 is analyzed.

  16. The international effort: building the bridge for Translational Medicine: Report of the 1st International Conference of Translational Medicine (ICTM)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Supported by the International Society for Translational Medicine (ISTM), Wenzhou Medical College and the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, the International Conference on Translational Medicine (ICTM) was held on October 22–23, 2011 in Wenzhou, China. Nearly 800 registrants attended the meeting, primarily representing institutes and hospitals in Europe, The United States of America, And Asia, and China. The meeting was chaired and organized by Dr. Xiangdong Wang, Xiaoming Chen, Richard Coico, Jeffrey M. Drazen, Richard Horton, Francesco M. Marincola, Laurentiu M. Popescu, Jia Qu and Aamir Shahzad. Findings The meeting focused on the communication of the need to foster translational medicine (TM) by building and broadening bridges between basic research and clinical studies at the international level. The meeting included distinguished TM experts from academia, the pharmaceutical and diagnostics industries, government agencies, regulators, and clinicians and provided the opportunity to identify shared interests and efforts for collaborative approaches utilizing cutting edge technologies, innovative approaches and novel therapeutic interventions. The meeting defined the concept of TM in its two-way operational scheme and emphasized the need for bed to bench efforts based directly on clinical observation. Conclusions It was the meeting participants’ realization that the shared main goals of TM include breaking the separation between clinic practice and basic research, establishing positive feedback by understanding the basis of expected and unexpected clinical outcomes and accelerating basic research relevant to human suffering. The primary objectives of the meeting were two-fold: to accelerate the two-way translation by informing the participants representing the different disciplines about the state of art activities around TM approaches; and to identify areas that need to be supported by redirecting limited resources as well as

  17. Military medicine: establishing a more comprehensive strategy for improved worker health.

    PubMed

    Smith, Harry F

    2002-08-01

    In an era of decreased resources, optimizing worker safety and health has become increasingly challenging. Data obtained from the Army and Navy Safety Centers suggest that current strategies for managing worker safety and health can be improved. In the past, work safety management practices placed sole responsibility for safety upon the worker. More recently, safety and health practices have recognized that organizational climate and structure influence worker safety and health. Furthermore, although worker safety and health, work site health promotion, and risk management efforts have been managed autonomously, all three components are interrelated and dependent on one another to achieve greater worker safety and health. The intent of this article is to increase awareness and marketing among military medicine staff members of the crucial components of an improved health and safety program. This article explains common organizational barriers to achieving worker safety and health, provides an understanding of the interconnectedness of occupational safety and health, health promotion, and risk management, and suggests strategies for optimizing worker safety and health.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome: innovative medical approaches in military medicine.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Erik B; Varney, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    After a radiological or nuclear event, acute radiation syndrome (ARS) will present complex medical challenges that could involve the treatment of hundreds to thousands of patients. Current medical doctrine is based on limited clinical data and remains inadequate. Efforts to develop medical innovations that address ARS complications are unlikely to be generated by industry because of market uncertainties specific to this type of injury. A prospective strategy could be the integration of cellular therapy to meet the medical demands of ARS. The most clinically advanced cellular therapy to date is the administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Results of currently published investigations describing MSC safety and efficacy in a variety of injury and disease models demonstrate the unique qualities of this reparative cell population in adapting to the specific requirements of the damaged tissue in which the cells integrate. This report puts forward a rationale for the further evaluation of MSC therapy to address the current unmet medical needs of ARS. We propose that the exploration of this novel therapy for the treatment of the multivariate complications of ARS could be of invaluable benefit to military medicine.

  19. Outcomes From U.S. Military-Supported Overseas Training Rotations in Tropical Medicine and Global Health, 2006-2015.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, James D; Garges, Eric C; Hickey, Patrick W; Coldren, Rodney L; Korman, Amy K; Keep, Lisa W; DeFraites, Robert F; Sanchez, Jose L

    2017-09-01

    Since 2006, the Division of Tropical Public Health at the Uniformed Services University (USU) has sponsored the Tropical Medicine Training Program (TMTP). Despite practice guidelines stating that global health education should include the collection and evaluation of data on the impact of the training experiences, no quantitative evaluation of program outcomes had previously occurred. The objective of this report was to evaluate TMTP outcomes to guide program improvement. We developed an anonymous, web-based survey to assess program outcomes as part of routine program evaluation. The survey addressed four main areas of potential TMTP impact: (1) career engagement, (2) military service contributions, (3) scholarly activity, and (4) acquisition of knowledge and skills. In February 2016, we sent the survey electronically to 222 program participants between Fiscal Years 2006 and 2015 who had e-mails available in DoD administrative systems. Ninety-eight (44%) of these responded to the survey. TMTP demonstrated impact in several areas. Increased knowledge and skills were reported by 81% of trainees, and 70% reported increased interest in serving at military overseas medical research laboratories. Subsequent career engagement by trainees included seven assignments to overseas research laboratories, 71 military deployments, and 193 short-term military missions. The ability to achieve many of the desired outcomes was associated with time elapsed since completion of formal medical education, including 24% who were still enrolled in graduate medical education. The TMTP has improved the U.S. military's ability to perform surveillance for emerging tropical and infectious diseases and has contributed to force health protection and readiness. Although many of the outcomes, such as service in the overseas research laboratories and military deployments, are dependent on military service requirements, these results remain perhaps the most relevant ways that the TMTP meets global

  20. International perspectives on quality assurance and new techniques in radiation medicine: outcomes of an IAEA conference.

    PubMed

    Shortt, Ken; Davidsson, Lena; Hendry, Jolyon; Dondi, Maurizio; Andreo, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organized an international conference called, "Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine" (QANTRM). It dealt with quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of radiation medicine (diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy) at the international level. Participants discussed QA issues pertaining to the implementation of new technologies and the need for education and staff training. The advantage of developing a comprehensive and harmonized approach to QA covering both the technical and the managerial issues was emphasized to ensure the optimization of benefits to patient safety and effectiveness. The necessary coupling between medical radiation imaging and radiotherapy was stressed, particularly for advanced technologies. However, the need for a more systematic approach to the adoption of advanced technologies was underscored by a report on failures in intensity-modulated radiotherapy dosimetry auditing tests in the United States, which could imply inadequate implementation of QA for these new technologies. A plenary session addressed the socioeconomic impact of introducing advanced technologies in resource-limited settings. How shall the dual gaps, one in access to basic medical services and the other in access to high-quality modern technology, be addressed?

  1. The rise of Chinese military medicine: opportunity for mercy ship, not gunboat, diplomacy.

    PubMed

    Chambers, James A

    2011-09-01

    Recent exchanges between the United States and China at the presidential and cabinet level have emphasized the need for an enhanced military-to-military relationship to further mutual understanding and promote cooperation. This article explores the historic context of military medical relations between the two nations as well as the rationale and opportunities for increased interaction through medical diplomacy. Specific areas for potential collaboration are discussed with recommendations for future action.

  2. Training Australian Defence Force Medical Officers to civilian general practice training standards--reflections on military medicine and its links to general practice education and training.

    PubMed

    Kitchener, Scott J; Rushbrook, Elizabeth; Brennan, Leonard; Davis, Stephen

    2011-06-06

    This article examines military medicine and its links to civilian general practice education and training, drawing attention to the variations and difficulties in, and successful approaches for, training Australian Defence Force (ADF) Medical Officers. Military medicine has been an area of change over the 10 years of the Australian General Practice Training (AGPT) program. Crisis situations like those in Timor Leste and Afghanistan have focused attention and recognition on the importance of primary health care in the work of the ADF. To train doctors in military medicine, there are several different models at different locations around Australia, as well as large variations in military course and experience recognition and approvals between AGPT regional training providers. At times, the lack of standardisation in training delays the progress of ADF registrars moving through the AGPT program and becoming independently deployable Medical Officers.

  3. Conference scene: nanotechnology and medicine: the next big thing is really small.

    PubMed

    Tasciotti, Ennio; Sakamoto, Jason; Ferrari, Mauro

    2009-08-01

    Emerging trends from nanotechnology on a globalized scale have created the need for a platform to discuss advances and share developments in this fast growing field. A conference was held to attract a vast number of scientists, representatives from nanotechnology vendor companies, and a diverse array of investors, businessmen and industry participants. The scope of the meeting was to discuss and share developments, innovations and research in the growing, but still emerging science of nanotechnology. The thrust of nanotechnology towards the development of personalized medicine, along with the enforced partnership between the Alliance for NanoHealth (ANH) and the US FDA to solve the issues of safety and approval of nanotechnology-based products were principally recognized.

  4. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Military Testing Association (22nd) Held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 27-31 October 1980. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    8217 ° "........ e . .Ai.nis.r . 1aa.. ... .... .ii that the purpose of the survey was to test the "fifth crewman" concept and not to evaluate their...PROCEEDINGS _2._A_ NNUAL CONFERENCE .- of th e MILITARY TESTING ASSOCIATION (’’-, co-ordinated by CANADIAN FORCES PERSONNEL APPLIED RESEARCH UNIT...science researchers will play a large part in that evaluation . A more global use of our behavioural specialists is in our employment-of-women studies

  5. Biotechnological production and applications of Cordyceps militaris, a valued traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian Dong

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a potential harborer of biometabolites for herbal drugs. For a long time, C. militaris has gained considerable significance in several clinical and biotechnological applications. Much knowledge has been gathered with regard to the C. militaris's importance in the genetic resources, nutritional and environmental requirements, mating behavior and biochemical pharmacological properties. The complete genome of C. militaris has recently been sequenced. This fungus has been the subject of many reviews, but few have focused on its biotechnological production of bioactive constituents. This mini-review focuses on the recent advances in the biotechnological production of bioactive compositions of C. militaris and the latest advances on novel applications from this laboratory and many others.

  6. Military microwaves '80; Proceedings of the Second Conference, London, England, October 22-24, 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topics related to communications are discussed, taking into account recent developments in military telemetry, a tactical radio relay for the 80s, selectivity predictions for troposcatter links, microwave communications to remotely piloted vehicles, design aspects for ESM systems, improved angular discrimination for digital ESM systems, suspended substrate stripline filters and multiplexers, and wide-open and scanning ESM systems. Active electronic counter measures are considered along with instrumentation and radar, mm-wave circuit technology, air defense radars, solid state transmitters, radar test equipment, radar, satellite systems and technology, transmit-receive devices for radars, polarization control, and guided weapons. Attention is also given to microwave tubes, radomes, aspects of receiver technology, special antennas, and mm-wave targets, clutter and propagation.

  7. Proceedings of the seventh annual conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Vol. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.C.; Feinberg, B.N.

    1985-01-01

    These papers were given at a conference on the uses of electrical engineering in biomedicine. Topics covered include natural language processing in medicine, advances in the design of nuclear magnetic resonance imagers, CAT scanners, and microwave radiation monitors, as well as experiment planning on the effects of low frequency electromagnetic fields.

  8. Flying and dying in WWI: British aircrew losses and the origins of U.S. military aviation medicine.

    PubMed

    Jones, David R

    2008-02-01

    In 1918, 1920, and 1935, William H. Wilmer wrote that of every 100 British military pilot deaths during the first year of World War I, 90 resulted from individual deficiencies (60 of these from physical defects), 8 from aircraft defects, and 2 from enemy action. "As a result of these appalling findings, the British established a special service for the 'Care of the Flier,'" thus reducing deaths from physical defects to "20% during the second year and 12% during the third." Wilmer never specified the source of his statistics. American aeromedical texts have long cited his '90-8-2' numbers as the basis for establishing the U.S. military flight surgeon system in 1918, but these statistics never appeared in British aeromedical literature. Given the frail aircraft and sketchy mishap investigations of that era, it seems unlikely that pilot deficiencies (today, "human factors") were proven to have caused 90% of British aviation-related deaths in 1914-15, or that their military aviation medicine program reduced human factor losses to just 12% of total pilot fatalities by 1917. Recent analyses from academic British sources demonstrate that of 153 British military fliers who died while flying between August 1914 and December 1915, 89 (58%) were killed in action or died of their wounds soon after being shot down, and 64 (42%) perished from injuries suffered in training or operational mishaps. This article reviews the history of early British and American military aeromedical services, and proposes replacement of the 90-8-2 statistic with a ratio of 58:42.

  9. Strategic disaster preparedness and response: implications for military medicine under joint command.

    PubMed

    Burkle, F M; Frost, D S; Greco, S B; Petersen, H V; Lillibridge, S R

    1996-08-01

    With the end of the Cold War, renewed emphasis has been placed on humanitarian assistance such as disaster relief, refugee management, and humanitarian intervention during conflicts by the military forces of all nations. The role of the military in humanitarian assistance has been the subject of much recent debate, as the ability of the United States to mount an effective emergency response is linked to our nation's strategic policy and planning. This article describes and broadens the understanding of the evolving concepts of strategic disaster management and the role of Joint Military Commands in providing disaster relief. Examples of strategic humanitarian relief operations are discussed.

  10. Healing Without Waging War: Beyond Military Metaphors in Medicine and HIV Cure Research

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Gilbertson, Adam Lloyd; de Roubaix, Malcolm; Staunton, Ciara; van Niekerk, Anton; Tucker, Joseph D.; Rennie, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Military metaphors are pervasive in biomedicine, including HIV research. Rooted in the mindset that regards pathogens as enemies to be defeated, terms such as “shock and kill” have become widely accepted idioms within HIV cure research. Such language and symbolism must be critically examined as they may be especially problematic when used to express scientific ideas within emerging health-related fields. In this paper, philosophical analysis and an interdisciplinary literature review utilizing key texts from sociology, anthropology, history, and Chinese and African studies were conducted to investigate the current proliferation of military metaphors. We found the use of these metaphors to be ironic, unfortunate, and unnecessary. To overcome military metaphors we propose to: 1) give them less aggressive meanings, and/or 2) replace them with more peaceful metaphors. Building on previous authors’ work, we argue for the increased use of “journey” (and related) metaphors as meaningful, cross-culturally appropriate alternatives to military metaphors. PMID:27653388

  11. Healing Without Waging War: Beyond Military Metaphors in Medicine and HIV Cure Research.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Gilbertson, Adam; de Roubaix, Malcolm; Staunton, Ciara; van Niekerk, Anton; Tucker, Joseph D; Rennie, Stuart

    2016-10-01

    Military metaphors are pervasive in biomedicine, including HIV research. Rooted in the mind set that regards pathogens as enemies to be defeated, terms such as "shock and kill" have become widely accepted idioms within HIV cure research. Such language and symbolism must be critically examined as they may be especially problematic when used to express scientific ideas within emerging health-related fields. In this article, philosophical analysis and an interdisciplinary literature review utilizing key texts from sociology, anthropology, history, and Chinese and African studies were conducted to investigate the current proliferation of military metaphors. We found the use of these metaphors to be ironic, unfortunate, and unnecessary. To overcome military metaphors we propose to (1) give them less aggressive meanings, and/or (2) replace them with more peaceful metaphors. Building on previous authors' work, we argue for the increased use of "journey" (and related) metaphors as meaningful, cross-culturally appropriate alternatives to military metaphors.

  12. The 52(nd) International Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (RICT 2016) of the French Medicinal Chemistry Society (SCT) Held in Caen (Normandy).

    PubMed

    Sapi, Janos; Van Hijfte, Luc; Dallemagne, Patrick

    2017-06-21

    Outstanding Medchem in France: Guest editors Janos Sapi, Luc Van Hjfte, and Patrick Dallemagne look back at the 52(nd) International Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (RICT 2016) held in Caen, France. They discuss the history of the French Medicinal Chemistry Society (Société de Chimie Thérapeutique, SCT) and provide highlights of last year's events, including some key presentations now collected in this Special Issue. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The 2017 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference: Catalyzing System Change through Healthcare Simulation: Systems, Competency, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bond, William; Hui, Joshua; Fernandez, Rosemarie

    2017-08-29

    Over the past decade, emergency medicine took a lead role in healthcare simulation in part due to its demands for successful interprofessional and multidisciplinary collaboration, along with educational needs in a diverse array of cognitive and procedural skills. Simulation-based methodologies have the capacity to support training and research platforms that model micro-, meso- and macro- systems of healthcare. To fully capitalize on the potential of simulation-based research to improve emergency healthcare delivery will require the application of rigorous methods from engineering, social science, and basic science disciplines. The Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) Consensus Conference, "Catalyzing System Change Through Healthcare Simulation: Systems, Competency, and Outcome" was conceived to foster discussion among experts in emergency medicine, engineering, and social sciences, focusing on key barriers and opportunities in simulation-based research. This executive summary describes the overall rationale for the conference, conference planning, consensus-building approaches, and outlines the focus of the eight breakout sessions. The consensus outcomes from each breakout session are summarized in Proceedings papers published in this issue of Academic Emergency Medicine. Each paper provides an overview of methodological and knowledge gaps in simulation research and identifies future research targets aimed at improving the safety and quality of healthcare. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Publication bias in animal research presented at the 2008 Society of Critical Care Medicine Conference.

    PubMed

    Conradi, Una; Joffe, Ari R

    2017-07-07

    To determine a direct measure of publication bias by determining subsequent full-paper publication (P) of studies reported in animal research abstracts presented at an international conference (A). We selected 100 random (using a random-number generator) A from the 2008 Society of Critical Care Medicine Conference. Using a data collection form and study manual, we recorded methodology and result variables from A. We searched PubMed and EMBASE to June 2015, and DOAJ and Google Scholar to May 2017 to screen for subsequent P. Methodology and result variables were recorded from P to determine changes in reporting from A. Predictors of P were examined using Fisher's Exact Test. 62% (95% CI 52-71%) of studies described in A were subsequently P after a median 19 [IQR 9-33.3] months from conference presentation. Reporting of studies in A was of low quality: randomized 27% (the method of randomization and allocation concealment not described), blinded 0%, sample-size calculation stated 0%, specifying the primary outcome 26%, numbers given with denominators 6%, and stating number of animals used 47%. Only being an orally presented (vs. poster presented) A (14/16 vs. 48/84, p = 0.025) predicted P. Reporting of studies in P was of poor quality: randomized 39% (the method of randomization and allocation concealment not described), likely blinded 6%, primary outcome specified 5%, sample size calculation stated 0%, numbers given with denominators 34%, and number of animals used stated 56%. Changes in reporting from A to P occurred: from non-randomized to randomized 19%, from non-blinded to blinded 6%, from negative to positive outcomes 8%, from having to not having a stated primary outcome 16%, and from non-statistically to statistically significant findings 37%. Post-hoc, using publication data, P was predicted by having positive outcomes (published 62/62, unpublished 33/38; p = 0.003), or statistically significant results (published 58/62, unpublished 20/38; p < 0

  15. Engineering Foundation Conference: Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine, and surgery, Kona Surf Resort and Conference Center, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, August 1-6, 1999. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yodh, Arjun; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Benaron, David

    2001-09-01

    The intent of the conference was to gather a group of cross-disciplinary investigators from universities, medical schools, national laboratories, industry, and government in order to highlight future applications and technology of the optical sciences in biotechnology, medicine, and surgery. The session chairs brought new participants and speakers to the conference who were not regular attendees of the OSA and SPIE conferences. Attendees included a good number of graduate and post-doctoral students who tended to join the more senior members in organized and spontaneous afternoon activities. A critique of the conference is given which discusses things that worked well and things that could have been better, focusing on costs, funding, and speaker cancellations. Sessions were held on the following topics: Photodynamic therapy: fundamental and clinical studies; Frontiers in spectroscopy; Photon migration; Advances in tissue microscopy, dyes and reporters; Advances in cell microscopy: spectroscopy and micromanipulation; Laser-tissue interactions: therapeutic interventions; and Optics for biotechnology. Along with the program and participant lists, nearly 50 poster presentations are included.

  16. Knowledge mapping visualization analysis of the military health and medicine papers published in the web of science over the past 10 years.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan-Ming; Zhang, Xuan; Luo, Xu; Guo, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Li-Qun; Guo, Ji-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Military medicine is a research field that seeks to solve the medical problems that occur in modern war conditions based on public medicine theory. We explore the main research topics of military health and medical research in the web of science™ core collection (WoSCC) from 2007 to 2016, and the goal of this work is to serve as a reference for orientation and development in military health and medicine. Based on CiteSpace III, a reference co-citation analysis is performed for 7921 papers published in the WoSCC from 2007 to 2016. In addition, a cluster analysis of research topics is performed with a comprehensive analysis of high-yield authors, outstanding research institutions and their cooperative networks. Currently, the research topics in military health and medicine mainly focus on the following seven aspects: mental health diagnoses and interventions, an army study to assess risk and resilience in service members (STARRS), large-scale military action, brain science, veterans, soldier parents and children of wartime, and wound infection. We also observed that the annual publication rate increased with time. Wessely S, Greenberg N, Fear NT, Smith TC, Smith B, Jones N, Ryan MAK, Boyko EJ, Hull L, and Rona RJ were the top 10 authors in military health and medicine research. The top 10 institutes were the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, the United States Army, the United States Navy, Kings College London, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Boston University, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Naval Health Research Center, and the VA Boston Healthcare System. We are able to perform a comprehensive analysis of studies in military health and medicine research and summarize the current research climate and the developmental trends in the WoSCC. However, further studies and collaborations are needed worldwide. Overall, our findings provide valuable information and new perspectives and shape

  17. Research in Biological and Medical Sciences Including Biochemistry, Communicable Disease and Immunology, Internal Medicine, Nuclear Medicine, Physiology, Psychiatry, Surgery, and Veterinary Medicine. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    preventive medicine; Military medical research program S. E. Asia; Combat surgery; Military internal medicine ; Military psychiatry; Ionizing radiation injury, prevention and treatment; Malaria prophyaxis; Biosensor systems.

  18. Integrative Medicine Interventions for Military Personnel (Interventions medicales integrantes a destination du personnel militaire)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-01

    research in complementary and alternative medicine I: History . Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2005;2(4):453-458. [3] Eliade, M. General...F.F. History of Medicine in China When Medicine Took an Alternative Path. MJM 2004;8:79-84. [15] Hufford, D.J., Fritts, M.J. and Rhodes, J.E...World. Arch Dermatol. 1998;134(11):1373-1386. [26] Prioreschi, P. Alternative medicine in ancient and medieval history . Med Hypotheses. 2000;55(4):319

  19. Novel methods in pulmonary hypertension phenotyping in the age of precision medicine (2015 Grover Conference series)

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Adriano R.; Heresi, Gustavo A.; Newman, Jennie E.; Mellor, Noël E.; Grove, David E.; Dweik, Raed A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Among pulmonary vascular diseases, pulmonary hypertension (PH) is the best studied and has been the focus of our work. The current classification of PH is based on a relatively simple combination of patient characteristics and hemodynamics. This leads to inherent limitations, including the inability to customize treatment and the lack of clarity from a more granular identification based on individual patient phenotypes. Accurate phenotyping of PH can be used in the clinic to select therapies and determine prognosis and in research to increase the homogeneity of study cohorts. Rapid advances in the mechanistic understanding of the disease, improved imaging methods, and innovative biomarkers now provide an opportunity to define novel PH phenotypes. We have recently shown that altered metabolism may affect nitric oxide levels and protein glycosylation, the peripheral circulation (which may provide insights into the response to therapy), and exhaled-breath analysis (which may be useful in disease evaluation). This review is based on a talk presented during the 2015 Grover Conference and highlights the relevant literature describing novel methods to phenotype pulmonary arterial hypertension patients by using approaches that involve the pulmonary and systemic (peripheral) vasculature. In particular, abnormalities in metabolism, the pulmonary and peripheral circulation, and exhaled breath in PH may help identify phenotypes that can be the basis for a precision-medicine approach to PH management. These approaches may also have a broader scope and may contribute to a better understanding of other diseases, such as asthma, diabetes, and cancer. PMID:28090286

  20. Research in Biological and Medical Sciences, Including Biochemistry, Communicable Disease and Immunology, Internal Medicine, Nuclear Medicine, Physiology, Psychiatry, Surgery, and Veterinary Medicine. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Military preventive medicine; Military medical research program S. E. Asia; Military medical materiel; Combat surgery; Military internal ... medicine ; Military psychiatry; Ionizing radiation injury, prevention, and treatment; Malaria prophylaxis; and Biosensor systems.

  1. Alienating evidence based medicine vs. innovative medical device marketing: a report on the evidence debate at a Wounds conference.

    PubMed

    Madden, Mary

    2012-06-01

    Wound care management is one of the largest segments of the UK medical technology sector with a turnover exceeding £1bn in 2009 (BIS, 2010). Using data derived from participant observation, this article examines the antagonistic relationship expressed by wound care clinicians towards evidence based medicine in the context of the 2010 United Kingdom (UK) Wounds UK conference/trade show, where evidence based medicine is positioned in opposition to clinical knowledge, as an obstacle to innovation and as a remover of solutions rather than a provider of them. The article is written in the context of the trend towards increasing marketization and privatization in the UK National Health Service (NHS).

  2. Cognitive rehabilitation for military personnel with mild traumatic brain injury and chronic post-concussional disorder: Results of April 2009 consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Helmick, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    A consensus conference on cognitive rehabilitation for mild traumatic brain injury was conducted by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury and the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center. Fifty military and civilian subject matter experts from a broad range of clinical and scientific disciplines developed clinical guidance for the care of Service Members with persistent post-concussion cognitive symptoms three or more months post injury. "Cognitive rehabilitation" was identified to be a broad group of diverse services. Specific services within this rubric were identified as effective or not, and were evaluated both as single-services and as combined integrated cognitive rehabilitation programs. Co-morbidities were acknowledged and addressed, but the conference and ensuing guidance focused primarily upon treatment of cognitive impairment. Guidance regarding effective services addressed the areas of assessment, intervention, outcome measurement, and treatment program implementation.

  3. Comparative mitochondrial genomics toward exploring molecular markers in the medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Hao, Ai-Jing; Zhao, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Jie

    2017-01-10

    Cordyceps militaris is a fungus used for developing health food, but knowledge about its intraspecific differentiation is limited due to lack of efficient markers. Herein, we assembled the mitochondrial genomes of eight C. militaris strains and performed a comparative mitochondrial genomic analysis together with three previously reported mitochondrial genomes of the fungus. Sizes of the 11 mitochondrial genomes varied from 26.5 to 33.9 kb mainly due to variable intron contents (from two to eight introns per strain). Nucleotide variability varied according to different regions with non-coding regions showing higher variation frequency than coding regions. Recombination events were identified between some locus pairs but seemed not to contribute greatly to genetic variations of the fungus. Based on nucleotide diversity fluctuations across the alignment of all mitochondrial genomes, molecular markers with the potential to be used for future typing studies were determined.

  4. [Use of modern technologies and designing means for development of automated information systems for military medicine].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Dubynin, I V; Retunskiĭ, V V

    2002-03-01

    At present time, the intensive activity implementation of automated information systems (AIS) to the military medical establishment are observed. From design quality the successful functioning of the AIS depend on. The effective functioning and the interaction of the automated information technologies by specialists, which computers and telecommunications use for performance of the their purpose, are a goal of the design. Today, there are two classes" technologies for designing of the automated information systems of military medical application: conventional technology and integrated instrumental means technologies. In this article, the conventional technology and integrated instrumental means technologies are considered more detail. CASE-technologies (the functional-oriented and object-oriented approaches) and RAD (Rapid Application Development) are viewed.

  5. Comparative mitochondrial genomics toward exploring molecular markers in the medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Hao, Ai-Jing; Zhao, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a fungus used for developing health food, but knowledge about its intraspecific differentiation is limited due to lack of efficient markers. Herein, we assembled the mitochondrial genomes of eight C. militaris strains and performed a comparative mitochondrial genomic analysis together with three previously reported mitochondrial genomes of the fungus. Sizes of the 11 mitochondrial genomes varied from 26.5 to 33.9 kb mainly due to variable intron contents (from two to eight introns per strain). Nucleotide variability varied according to different regions with non-coding regions showing higher variation frequency than coding regions. Recombination events were identified between some locus pairs but seemed not to contribute greatly to genetic variations of the fungus. Based on nucleotide diversity fluctuations across the alignment of all mitochondrial genomes, molecular markers with the potential to be used for future typing studies were determined. PMID:28071691

  6. Conference report: Undergraduate family medicine and primary care training in Sub-Saharan Africa: Reflections of the PRIMAFAMED network

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Robert; Essuman, Akye; Flinkenflögel, Maaike

    2017-01-01

    Internationally, there is a move towards strengthening primary healthcare systems and encouraging community-based and socially responsible education. The development of doctors with an interest in primary healthcare and family medicine in the African region should begin during undergraduate training. Over the last few years, attention has been given to the development of postgraduate training in family medicine in the African region, but little attention has been given to undergraduate training. This article reports on the 8th PRIMAFAMED (Primary Care and Family Medicine Education) network meeting held in Nairobi from 21 to 24 May 2016. At this meeting the delegates spent time presenting and discussing the current state of undergraduate training at 18 universities in the region and shared lessons on how to successfully implement undergraduate training. This article reports on the rationale for, information presented, process followed and conclusions reached at the conference. PMID:28155289

  7. [Illustration of military medicine on the pages of mass printed media during the First World War].

    PubMed

    Poddubnyĭ, M V

    2014-12-01

    The article analyses some of illustrations dedicated to the military medical topics on the pages of some Russian magazines and newspapers (magazine "Ogonek" newspaper "Petrograd's paper" and its annexes), its place among the images of the war, formed in the mass consciousness by periodical subjects. It is concluded that with the beginning of the First World War medical illustrations were finally approved as a recognizable symbol of the war. Mass printed media played a significant role in its entrenchment.

  8. Identification of Bioethical Dilemmas, Ethical Reasoning, and Decision-Making in Military Emergency Medicine Departments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    own values better or to deal more openly with moral dilemmas with patients and fellow professionals (Pellegrino, Hart, Henderson, Loeb, & Edwards...U.S. ARMY-BAYLOR UNIVERSITY GRADUATE PROGRAM IN HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION IDENTIFICATION OF BIOETHICAL DILEMMAS , ETHICAL REASONING, AND DECISION...of service members and their families. ABSTRACT ii Background. Little is known about (1) the range and frequency of bioethical dilemmas that military

  9. DRGs and Military Medicine: A Look at DRGs and Length of Stay.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    accomplished by evaluating the impact and significance of mean LOS, ancillary procedures, surgical procedures, nosocomial rates and incident reports...information, providers carrying Iw SQ. 39 unusually high or low work loads can be identified and evaluated to determine if management intervention is...Discharge Survey, 1981). In addition, ten DRGs with the highest incidence in the military data set have been selected to examine what, if any, particular

  10. Utility of a sports medicine model in military combat concussion and musculoskeletal restoration care.

    PubMed

    Spooner, Shawn P; Tyner, Stuart D; Sowers, Christopher; Tsao, Jack; Stuessi, Keith

    2014-11-01

    Combat-related concussions are significant sources of injury and morbidity among deployed military service members. Musculoskeletal injury also is one of the most prevalent battle and nonbattle-related deployed injury types. Both injuries threaten the service member's physical condition as well as unit and mission readiness due to reduced duty status or evacuation from military theater of operations. In August 2010, the Concussion Restoration Care Center (CRCC) was established at Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan, to address the need for consistent and specialized evaluation and care of concussion and musculoskeletal injury. This performance improvement effort examined evaluation and treatment of concussion and musculoskeletal injury at the CRCC. Among 4,947 military personnel evaluated at the CRCC between August 2010 and May 2013, 97.9% were returned to duty and retained in theater. Members averaged 10 to 12 days of limited duty status to achieve complete recovery. Concussion injury was secondary to blast injury in 90% of cases. Sport/recreation, occupational, and other accidental injuries each represented 30% of the musculoskeletal injuries with only 10% reported as result of combat. The utilization patterns and outcome measures demonstrate the success and utility of a multidisciplinary clinical model of care for these two types of injuries in the far-forward deployed setting.

  11. Shaping the military wound: issues surrounding the reconstruction of injured servicemen at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine.

    PubMed

    Evriviades, Demetrius; Jeffery, Steven; Cubison, Tania; Lawton, Graham; Gill, Martin; Mortiboy, Deborah

    2011-01-27

    The conflict in Afghanistan has produced injuries similar to those produced from military conflicts for generations. What distinguishes the modern casualty of the conflict in Afghanistan from those of other conflicts is the effectiveness of modern field medical care that has led to individuals surviving with injuries, which would have been immediately fatal even a few years ago. These patients present several challenges to the reconstructive surgeon. These injured individuals present early challenges of massive soft-tissue trauma, unstable physiology, complex bony and soft-tissue defects, unusual infections, limited reconstructive donor sites, peripheral nerve injuries and traumatic amputations. Late challenges to rehabilitation include the development of heterotopic ossification in amputation stumps. This paper outlines the approach taken by the reconstructive team at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine in managing these most difficult of reconstructive challenges.

  12. Shaping the military wound: issues surrounding the reconstruction of injured servicemen at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Evriviades, Demetrius; Jeffery, Steven; Cubison, Tania; Lawton, Graham; Gill, Martin; Mortiboy, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    The conflict in Afghanistan has produced injuries similar to those produced from military conflicts for generations. What distinguishes the modern casualty of the conflict in Afghanistan from those of other conflicts is the effectiveness of modern field medical care that has led to individuals surviving with injuries, which would have been immediately fatal even a few years ago. These patients present several challenges to the reconstructive surgeon. These injured individuals present early challenges of massive soft-tissue trauma, unstable physiology, complex bony and soft-tissue defects, unusual infections, limited reconstructive donor sites, peripheral nerve injuries and traumatic amputations. Late challenges to rehabilitation include the development of heterotopic ossification in amputation stumps. This paper outlines the approach taken by the reconstructive team at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine in managing these most difficult of reconstructive challenges. PMID:21149357

  13. MILCOM '91 - IEEE Military Communications Conference, McLean, VA, Nov. 4-7, 1991, Conference Record. Vols. 1-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Various papers on military communications are presented. Some of the general topics addressed are: network protocols and routing, circuit technology, VLF/LF systems, C3 modeling, digital signal processing in modulation/demodulation, spread spectrum networks, civil communications in Europe, propagation, antennas, communication systems performance, link level modeling, standards, modulation in satellite communications, modulation and spread spectrum, interference suppression in spread spectrum systems, key military technical problems, broadband networks, network control and management, satellite communication systems, meteor burst communications, trends in tactical communications. Also discussed are: LPI techniques, modulation techniques, spread spectrum communications, commercial and military communications systems and technology, network performance modeling, meteor burst applications, communications for distributed C3 systems, information security and computer security, sequencing and acquisition, LPI systems laser communications applications, technological opportunities.

  14. Race, Genetics and Medicine: New Information, Enduring Questions: Final Report on Conference held on April 9, 2005 and its Sequelae

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, Jonathan R.

    2008-08-20

    The Conference, “Race, Genetics and Medicine: New Information, Enduring Questions,” was held on Saturday, April 9, 2005 in the Science Center, Lecture Hall D at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. Approximately 150 people attended. The audience was composed mainly of college and graduate school science students and postdoctoral fellows, some science and medical school faculty, science teachers at various levels, journalists and interested members of the public. The keynote speaker and the panelists reflected different academic disciplines (genetics, medicine, anthropology, sociology) and a CEO of a biotechnology company with background in medicine and law. They also presented different perspectives on the utility of race concepts in medicine and even on the use of the word “race.” While the talks often involved descriptions of genetic approaches that were not simple to explain, the speakers did an effective job of getting across the gist of studies that have been carried out on these issues. Although no consensus was reached, the conference gave the audience the opportunity to understand the issues and to have the tools to follow the debates in the future. Our strongest feedback was from attendees who had heard of the race and genetics issues through various media, but did not have a sense of what they were really about. They reported to us that they now felt they understood the basis of these discussions. Our post-conference activities have been successfully completed. While we had proposed to make available transcripts of the talks to the public through a Website, some of the speakers would not agree to have their presentations available in this way. Therefore, we asked permission from the DOE to use the funds to prepare classroom lesson plans for high school students to discuss the issues. These were prepared over a year-long period by the Genetic Screening Study Group Members with an educator, Ms. Ronnee Yashon, who teaches at Tufts University and who

  15. The Evolution of Military Trauma and Critical Care Medicine: Applications for Civilian Medical Care Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    is named after the Persian physician, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah Ibn Sina , who lived between 900 and 1037 A.D. He is credited with writing one of...treatment, and over 760 medications. This text remained the med- ical guide to Western medicine through the 18th century. Ibn Sina , considered one of the...leaders in medicine such as Ibn Sina , war and conflict have also been credited with advances in medical and surgical therapy throughout the centu

  16. [Military medical doctrine and the development of the concept of disaster medicine].

    PubMed

    Nechaev, E A; Nazarenko, G I; Zhizin, V N

    1993-04-01

    On the basis of their own experience and literature concerning liquidation of the disaster consequences the authors analyse limitations in the disaster health care system. The article shows the trends towards the improvement of medical aid during catastrophes of peaceful period, taking into account various aspects of military doctrine and, especially, the casualty care staging system. It is stressed that the disaster health care procedures will depend on the structure of sanitary losses, characteristic features of the scene of an accident and the dynamics of medical environment.

  17. PREFACE AND CONFERENCE SUMMARY: Advanced Metrology for Ultrasound in Medicine, 27 28 April 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Adam

    2004-01-01

    AMUM 2004 proved to be a great success and provided a fantastic opportunity for the world's ultrasound experts from medicine, industry and academia to explore the measurement challenges presented by new and emerging clinical ultrasound equipment. There were a total of 88 attendees. Of these 39 were from the UK, 22 from the rest of Europe, and 27 from outside Europe. 31 of the delegates were from industry, 22 were university-based, 18 from hospitals, 10 from other National Metrology Institutes and regulatory bodies, and 7 from NPL. Test your knowledge of the ultrasound community by trying to name all the faces in the group photograph! It was especially gratifying to see so many major medical equipment manufacturers represented—including Siemens, Philips, Esaote, Kontron, Pie Medical, G.E., Hitachi, Aloka and Imasonic—since it is essential that there is a good dialogue between industry and the measurement community. The presentations were split into 8 oral sessions—Hydrophones, Hydrophone measurements, Safety and thermal hazard, Measurement challenges for diagnostic ultrasound, Measurement of therapy fields, Tissue interaction, Novel measurement methods, and Measurement challenges for therapeutic ultrasound; and 3 poster sessions—Performance of diagnostic equipment, Measurement and safety, and Field modelling. It was always my hope that this conference would provide a framework for the development of measurement methods to meet the metrological challenges we face over the next decade. To this end, I have asked the Chairs of each oral and poster session to give their views of their own session and of the more general requirements in that topic area. The feedback I received both during and subsequent to the meeting was almost uniformly good; this was borne out by the returned questionnaires, with most categories being scored excellent or good. I was delighted at the high standard of the presentations and to see delegates of such reputation and experience in the

  18. Accelerating Momentum Toward Improved Health for Patients and Populations: Family Medicine as a Disruptive Innovation-A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Stream, Glen; DeVoe, Jennifer E; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    This paper was prepared in follow up to the G. Gayle Stephens Keystone IV Conference by authors who attended the conference and are also members of the Family Medicine for America's Health board of directors (FMAHealth.org). It connects the aspirations of the current strategic and communications efforts of FMAHealth with the ideas developed at the conference. The FMAHealth project is sponsored by 8 national family medicine organizations and seeks to build on the work of the original Future of Family Medicine project. Among its objectives are a robust family physician workforce practicing in a continually improving medical home model, supported by a comprehensive payment model sufficient to sustain the medical home and enable the personal physician relationship with patients. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. Introduction: the International Conference on Intelligent Biology and Medicine (ICIBM) 2016: special focus on medical informatics and big data.

    PubMed

    Tao, Cui; Gong, Yang; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Zhongming

    2017-07-05

    In this editorial, we first summarize the 2016 International Conference on Intelligent Biology and Medicine (ICIBM 2016) held on December 8-10, 2016 in Houston, Texas, USA, and then briefly introduce the ten research articles included in this supplement issue. At ICIBM 2016, a special theme, "Medical Informatics and Big Data," was dedicated to the recent advances of data science in the medical domain. After peer review, ten articles were selected for this special issue, covering topics such as Knowledge and Data Personalization, Social Media Applications to Healthcare, Clinical Natural Language Processing, Patient Safety Analyses, and Data Mining Using Electronic Health Records.

  20. Funding mechanisms for gender-specific research: proceedings from a panel discussion at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna R; Anise, Ayodola; Brown, Jeremy; Conwit, Robin; Filart, Rosemarie; Scott, Jane; Choo, Esther K

    2014-12-01

    As part of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," we assembled a diverse panel of representatives from federal and nonfederal funding agencies to discuss future opportunities for sex- and gender-specific research. The discussion revolved around the mission and priorities of each organization, as well as its interest in promoting sex- and gender-specific research. The panelists were asked to provide specific examples of funding lines generated or planned for as pertinent to emergency care. Training opportunities for future researchers in this area were also discussed.

  1. Health Care Utilization Among Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users in a Large Military Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Sources In addition to our longitudinal survey instrument , other data sources include the Standard Inpatient Data Record (SIDR), which is an...therapy, high-dose megavita- min therapy, homeopathic remedies, hypnosis , massage therapy, relaxation, and spiritual healing. For the pur- poses of these...analyses, acupuncture, biofeedback, chiro- practic care, energy healing, folk medicine, hypnosis , and massage therapy were grouped together as practi

  2. Health Care Utilization Among Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users in a Large Military Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-11

    the Naval Health Research Center (protocol NHRC.2000.0007). Data Sources In addition to our longitudinal survey instrument , other data sources...megavitamin therapy, homeopathic remedies, hypnosis , massage therapy, relaxation, and spiritual healing. For the purposes of these analyses...acupuncture, biofeedback, chiropractic care, energy healing, folk medicine, hypnosis , and massage therapy were grouped together as practitioner-assisted

  3. [Legal regulation of the personnel issues of military medicine during the reign of Paul I].

    PubMed

    Iskhakov, E R

    2015-08-01

    The article describes laws and regulations concerning the Russian army and navy, and accordingly its medical services accepted during the reign of Paul I. During this period different decrees aimed to improve medical personnel training in order to admit students to medical and surgical schools, reorganization of educational medical institutions, improving of professional skills of medical workers. Other decrees, aimed to improvement of recruitment of medical personnel of troops: the best students of had to be sent to troops instead physician assistant, medical staff increase and additional funding, countering the reduce of physicians' social welfare due to the inhumane attitude of the authorities, to regulate of the military medical service rotation order as well as assessment of their professional, moral, and psychological qualities.

  4. The future of military medicine has not arrived yet, but we can see it from here.

    PubMed

    Romano, James A; Lam, David M; Moses, Gerald R; Gilbert, Gary R; Marchessault, Ronald

    2006-08-01

    Throughout history, military medical personnel have provided care for their comrades in arms, often at the expense of their own lives. For many centuries, these medical personnel have applied the highest available level of knowledge and technology to the care of their patients. This paper discusses the current state of the technological art for the care of combat casualties, and discusses some of the newest technology solutions currently being developed for the provision of field medical care. The ongoing efforts of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (MRMC), and the U.S. Army Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) are highlighted.

  5. Lower body negative pressure as a tool for research in aerospace physiology and military medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    2001-01-01

    Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) has been extensively used for decades in aerospace physiological research as a tool to investigate cardiovascular mechanisms that are associated with or underlie performance in aerospace and military environments. In comparison with clinical stand and tilt tests, LBNP represents a relatively safe methodology for inducing highly reproducible hemodynamic responses during exposure to footward fluid shifts similar to those experienced under orthostatic challenge. By maintaining an orthostatic challenge in a supine posture, removal of leg support (muscle pump) and head motion (vestibular stimuli) during LBNP provides the capability to isolate cardiovascular mechanisms that regulate blood pressure. LBNP can be used for physiological measurements, clinical diagnoses and investigational research comparisons of subject populations and alterations in physiological status. The applications of LBNP to the study of blood pressure regulation in spaceflight, groundbased simulations of low gravity, and hemorrhage have provided unique insights and understanding for development of countermeasures based on physiological mechanisms underlying the operational problems.

  6. Lower body negative pressure as a tool for research in aerospace physiology and military medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    2001-01-01

    Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) has been extensively used for decades in aerospace physiological research as a tool to investigate cardiovascular mechanisms that are associated with or underlie performance in aerospace and military environments. In comparison with clinical stand and tilt tests, LBNP represents a relatively safe methodology for inducing highly reproducible hemodynamic responses during exposure to footward fluid shifts similar to those experienced under orthostatic challenge. By maintaining an orthostatic challenge in a supine posture, removal of leg support (muscle pump) and head motion (vestibular stimuli) during LBNP provides the capability to isolate cardiovascular mechanisms that regulate blood pressure. LBNP can be used for physiological measurements, clinical diagnoses and investigational research comparisons of subject populations and alterations in physiological status. The applications of LBNP to the study of blood pressure regulation in spaceflight, groundbased simulations of low gravity, and hemorrhage have provided unique insights and understanding for development of countermeasures based on physiological mechanisms underlying the operational problems.

  7. Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Global Conference (SCRGC) 2016 (August 23-24, 2016 - Gyeonggi-do, Korea).

    PubMed

    Vertès, A

    2016-10-01

    In its third edition, the Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Global Conference (SCRGC) organized by the Global Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine Acceleration Center (GSRAC) was focused on breaking barriers to accelerate the pace of innovation and development of the regenerative medicine industry. GSRAC is both a think tank and a global network of key opinion leaders from the public and the private sectors. GSRAC was commissioned in 2011 by the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW) of Korea. GSRAC's primary mission is to enable and accelerate the delivery of innovative technologies to patients who are affected by currently untreatable diseases. This goal is notably achieved by resolving hurdles in the field of regenerative medicine. With a total of 30 speakers and panelists from 8 different countries and more than 400 attendees from an array of institutions including hospitals, clinics, biotechnology companies, pharmaceutical companies, scientists, as well as policy makers, the 2-day SCRGC highlighted critical challenges and paths to resolving them in policy and regulatory, and industrial-scale manufacturing of gene-based and cell-based therapies, comprising plenary lectures and sessions covering strategic policy, regulatory, reimbursement and business development, and business of manufacturing, and production technologies. Several of these presentations are summarized in this report.

  8. Conference reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongpei, Chen; Yulong, Ma

    1994-12-01

    The Ultrasonic Electronics Branch Society of the China Acoustics Society, and the Electronics Countermeasure Branch Society of the China Electronics Society held and All-China Applications Conference of Ultrasonic Electronics Devices in Electronic Countermeasures, Radar and Military Communication Technology. A total of 66 papers was received by the conference with contents relating to surface acoustic wave devices, high-frequency acoustic wave devices, acousto-optical devices, applications of devices in radar, applications of devices in electronic countermeasures, and applications of devices in military communication systems.

  9. International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemle, Ludovic Dan; Jiang, Yiwen

    2014-03-01

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013) took place in Wuhan, P R China from 26-27 October 2013 at the Military Economics Academy. The conference is regularly organized, alternately in Romania and in P R China, by ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P R China, with the aim to serve as a platform for the exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences, and to promote the communication between the scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The conference has been organized for the first time in 15-16 June 2012 at the Engineering Faculty of Hunedoara, Romania. The topics of the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues: Economical sciences Engineering sciences Fundamental sciences Medical sciences The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has applicability potential in economics, defense, medicine, etc. The number of registered participants was nearly 90 from 5 countries. During the two days of the conference 4 invited and 36 oral talks were delivered. A few of the speakers deserve a special mention: Mircea Octavian Popoviciu, Academy of Romanian Scientist — Timişoara Branch, Correlations between mechanical properties and cavitation erosion resistance for stainless steels with 12% chromium and variable contents of nickel; Carmen Eleonora Hărău, ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, SWOT analysis of Romania's integration in EU; Ding Hui, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, Design and engineering analysis of material procurement mobile operation platform; Serban Rosu, University of Medicine and Pharmacy ''Victor Babeş'' Timişoara, Cervical and facial infections — a real life threat, among others. Based on the work presented at the conference, 14 selected papers are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. These papers

  10. Realizing Major William Borden's dream: military medicine, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and its wounded warriors, 1909-2009: an essay review.

    PubMed

    Connor, J T H

    2011-07-01

    This essay review examines three books dealing with the founding and subsequent activities of Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) and the evolution of military medicine from 1909 to 2009 recently published by the US Army's Borden Institute. Established by fellow army doctor William Borden to honor Walter Reed himself, WRAMC, located in Washington, DC, soon became the public and professional face of medical care for American soldiers. The discussion highlights the ongoing issue of the care and treatment of combat amputees; aspects of gender within military medicine; and WRAMC's function as an educational and research facility. Also discussed are the archival and documentary bases for these books and their utility for historians. Complimentary analysis of two of the books which are, in particular, explicitly about the history of WRAMC is contextualized within the celebration of the centennial of this army post contemporaneously with its closure, amalgamation, and relocation primarily to Maryland.

  11. The progress of Chinese burn medicine from the Third Military Medical University-in memory of its pioneer, Professor Li Ao.

    PubMed

    Li, Haisheng; Zhou, Junyi; Peng, Yizhi; Zhang, Jiaping; Peng, Xi; Luo, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhiqiang; Yan, Hong; Peng, Daizhi; He, Weifeng; Wang, Fengjun; Liang, Guangping; Huang, Yuesheng; Wu, Jun; Luo, Gaoxing

    2017-01-01

    Professor Li Ao was one of the founders of Chinese burn medicine and one of the most renowned doctors and researchers of burns in China. He established one of the Chinese earliest special departments for burns at Third Military Medical University (TMMU) in 1958. To memorialize Professor Li Ao on his 100th birthday in 2017 and introduce our extensive experience, it is our honor to briefly review the development and achievement of the Chinese burn medicine from TMMU. The epidemiology and outcomes of admitted burn patients since 1958 were reviewed. Furthermore, main achievements of basic and clinical research for the past roughly 60 years were presented. These achievements mainly included the Chinese Rule of Nine, fluid resuscitation protocol, experience in inhalation injury, wound treatment strategies, prevention and treatment of burn infections, nutrition therapy, organ support therapies, and rehabilitation. The progress shaped and enriched modern Chinese burn medicine and promoted the development of world burn medicine.

  12. [Cell engineering in nephrology: The current state and prospectives from the point of view of military medicine].

    PubMed

    Bel'skih, A N; Golota, A S; Krassii, A B; Nagibovich, O A

    2015-09-01

    This article is dedicated to the current state and prospectives of cell engineering in nephrology from the point of view of military medicine. The review is based on publications from January 1, 2014, to June 1, 2015, and consists of two parts. In the first part the main directions of the cell engineering development are mentioned. The only two clinical trials existed in the field are discussed in more detail. The second part deals with prospectives of cell engineering in nephrology. It is shown that currently this field is in the stage of preclinical experimentation. Of the two known clinical trials the first has failed to demonstrate any effectiveness of cell engineering, the second--will be completed only at the end of 2016. Also, the review notes an extraordinary cost of cell engineering experiments in nephrology. The analysis of publications allows to come to a conclusion that the future progress in prevention and treatment of acute kidney injury could go not in the direction of cell engineering but rather non-cell technologies. One of. the practical consequence of such a conclusion is a necessity to continue the improvement of already existing methods of machine renal replacement therapy.

  13. Beyond war and military medicine: social factors in the development of prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Reznick, Jeffrey S

    2008-01-01

    Polytrauma is an immediate outcome of current warfare, and the need to investigate this condition is equally immediate. The value of historical analysis in this endeavor should not be underestimated. It is among the best tools we have to help ensure that current research and practice involve engagement with the social contexts of polytrauma as well as with the medical science of its treatment. This special communication provides historical perspective on certain aspects of the polytraumatic condition--namely, limb loss, prosthetic rehabilitation, and community reintegration after receiving a prosthesis. It discusses the influential role of societal factors in these areas to encourage greater understanding that the care of persons with polytrauma must involve critical thinking about their relationships to and participation in society as well as their treatment by medical science. This special communication also provides historical perspective to enrich appreciation of the value of history for the field of physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R), the PM&R clinician, and the PM&R clinical researcher. Readers will learn that historical knowledge puts PM&R research and practice into perspective, reminding us that rehabilitation should involve critical thinking not only about medicine, but also about social roles and the participation of people in society despite physical and psychologic challenges.

  14. ePatient Conference Explores Future of Personalized Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... D. FNLM Chairman How are computer networks and digital technologies changing the future of health care? Will ... and your healthcare provider communicate better in the digital future? What is personalized medicine? Some of the ...

  15. Personal, Electronic, Secure National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records Conference

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR Personal, Electronic, Secure: National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records ... One suggestion for saving money is to implement electronic personal health records. With this in mind, the ...

  16. Physical medicine and rehabilitation in the military: the Bosnian mass casualty experience.

    PubMed

    Marin, R

    2001-04-01

    On February 5, 1994, a 120-mm mortar shell crashed into the main Market Square of Sarajevo, Bosnia. The explosion killed 66 and injured 206. The United States evacuated 71 of the injured to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, where the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service evaluated 28 victims. This mass casualty evacuation underscores the role of Army physiatrists in humanitarian assistance and wartime casualty management. The author collected data regarding demographic factors, injury types, complications, and functional limitations. Seventeen of the 28 patients evaluated were injured during the market bombing, with the rest being injured before the bombing. Of 132 diagnoses in these 28 patients, 31 were fractures, 14 were amputations, 8 were peripheral neuropathies, 3 were spinal cord injuries, and 1 was a traumatic brain injury. Contractures and decubitus ulcers, both complications of immobility, accounted for 18 of the diagnoses. Ambulatory impairments were present in all of the patients, and 4 patients had major impairments in activities of daily living.

  17. Consortium for Health and Military Performance and American College of Sports Medicine consensus paper on extreme conditioning programs in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Michael F; Nindl, Bradley C; Deuster, Patricia A; Baumgartner, Neal; Kane, Shawn F; Kraemer, William J; Sexauer, Lisa R; Thompson, Walter R; O'Connor, Francis G

    2011-01-01

    A potential emerging problem associated with increasingly popularized extreme conditioning programs (ECPs) has been identified by the military and civilian communities. That is, there is an apparent disproportionate musculoskeletal injury risk from these demanding programs, particularly for novice participants, resulting in lost duty time, medical treatment, and extensive rehabilitation. This is a significant and costly concern for the military with regard to effectively maintaining operational readiness of the Force. While there are certain recognized positive aspects of ECPs that address a perceived and/or actual unfulfilled conditioning need for many individuals and military units, these programs have limitations and should be considered carefully. Moreover, certain distinctive characteristics of ECPs appear to violate recognized accepted standards for safely and appropriately developing muscular fitness and are not uniformly aligned with established and accepted training doctrine. Accordingly, practical solutions to improve ECP prescription and implementation and reduce injury risk are of paramount importance.

  18. Sequence thyself: personalized medicine and therapies for the future: 2012 Yale Healthcare Conference.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ashley Erin

    2012-09-01

    Now in its 8th year, the Yale Healthcare Conference has arguably come upon its most exciting and dramatic time within the U.S. health care system. Dynamic speakers from all over the country came together in April 2012 at Yale University to question, debate, creatively think, and examine challenges within health care organizations and institutions. One of the most prominent issues concerned the aftermath of sequencing the human genome and the explosion of information concerning gene polymorphisms and biomarkers in health and disease. Clinicians, scientists, and pharmaceuticals are looking to innovative individually tailored treatments for patients. During the conference breakout session, speakers Thomas Lynch, MD, director of the Yale Cancer Center and physician-in-chief of the Smilow Cancer Hospital, and Zen Chu, MBA, co-founder of Accelerated Medical Ventures and entrepreneur-in-residence at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, provided enriching discussion on the delivery of science and genetic care of the individual.

  19. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Military Testing Association (18th, Gulf Shores, Alabama, October 18-22, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Military Testing Association.

    The 75 papers included in these conference proceedings discuss testing conducted by the different brances of the armed forces. The importance of relating necessary job skills to the skills measured by the tests administered to the job applicants is emphasized. Various evaluation methods--including peer rating, aptitude testing, adaptive testing,…

  20. [Medicine and health in the year 2000. The works from the Stuttgart Conference 1965-1990].

    PubMed

    Montiel, L

    1993-01-01

    In this study we shall describe the works carried out over a period of twenty five years by a group of experts from the old Federal Republic of Germany. These studies, whose purpose was to identify the trends in medicine for the near future--the every symbolic year 2000--were coordinated by the medical historian Heinrich Schipperges, who played a decisive role in the foundation, and even in the historical orientation of this prospective work. As history illustrates, the limitations and risks of the present models of health and medicine are very pronounced. The concept of utopian medicine, whose historical reality is highlighted by bibliographical and field research, constitutes the hub around which the symptoms of the disease from which the welfare society is suffering, revolve.

  1. Third Annual Open Meeting of the UK Pharmacogenomics and Stratified Medicine Network Conference.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth H

    2015-07-01

    Third Annual Open Meeting of the UK Pharmacogenetics and Stratified Medicine Network 14 January 2015, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK The third Annual Open Meeting of the UK Pharmacogenetics and Stratified Medicine Network was held on 14 January 2015 in association with the Wellcome Trust on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus at Hinxton, Cambridge, UK. In the morning, speakers from Cancer Research UK, the Medical Research Council, Genomics England, Innovate UK (formerly TSB) and the Department of Health described the current major projects they are funding. In the afternoon, speakers from various universities around the United Kingdom presented data on pharmacogenetics and stratified medicine research covering diverse disease areas including cancers, warfarin dosing, Gaucher disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Quantifying the variability of financial disclosure information reported by authors presenting research at multiple sports medicine conferences.

    PubMed

    Jegede, Kolawole A; Ju, Brian; Miller, Christopher P; Whang, Peter; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2011-11-01

    In the study reported here, we compared self-reported industry relationships of authors who attended 3 major orthopedic sports medicine conferences during a single calendar year. Our goal was to calculate the variability between disclosure information over time. A significant percentage of authors who attended these meetings were inconsistent in submitting their disclosure information. In addition, most authors with irregularities had more than 1 discrepancy. We believe that the vast majority of the observed discrepancies did not result from intentional deception on the part of the authors but instead from ongoing confusion regarding which industry relationships should be acknowledged for particular meetings (some specialty societies require that all relationships be divulged, whereas others require only those affiliations directly applicable to research being presented). In the absence of a uniform disclosure policy that is widely adopted by many specialty societies, these findings suggest that the disclosure process will continue to be plagued by inconsistent reporting of financial conflicts of interest.

  3. Leveraging time and learning style, iPod vs. realtime attendance at a series of medicine residents conferences: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tempelhof, Michael W; Garman, Katherine S; Langman, Matthew K; Adams, Martha B

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether participation in educational conferences utilising iPod technology enhances both medical knowledge and accessibility to educational content among medical residents in training. In May 2007, the authors led a randomised controlled study involving 30 internal medicine residents who volunteered either to attend five midday educational conferences or to use an iPod audio/video recording of the same conferences, each followed by a five-question competency quiz. Primary outcomes included quantitative assessment of knowledge acquisition and qualitative assessment of resident perception of ease of use. Secondary outcomes included resident perception of self-directed learning. At baseline, residents reported attendance at 50% of educational conferences. Of iPod participants, 46.7% previously used an iPod. During the study, 46-60% of conference attendees were paged out of each conference, of whom between 6 and 33% missed more than half of the conference. The quiz completion rate was 93%. Key findings were: 1) similar quiz scores were achieved by conference attendees, mean 60.7% (95% CI; 53.0-68.3%), compared to the iPod user group, mean 67.6% (95% CI; 61%-74.1%), and 2) the majority (10/15, 66.6%) of conference attendees stated they would probably benefit from the option to refer back to conferences for content review and educational purposes. Residency training programmes can optimise time management strategies with the integration of innovative learning resources into educational curricula. This study suggests that iPod capture of conferences is a reasonable resource to help meet the educational goals of residents and residency programs.

  4. Promoting Business and Entrepreneurial Awareness in Health Care Professionals: Lessons From Venture Capital Panels at Medicine 2.0 Conferences

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jigar; Eysenbach, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    There are few mechanisms that bring the academic and business worlds together in a way that would maximize the success of health technology (health tech) start-ups by increasing researchers’ knowledge about how to operate in the business world. Existing solutions (eg, technology transfer offices and dual degree MD/MBA programs) are often unavailable to researchers from outside the institution or to those who have already completed their primary education, such as practicing physicians. This paper explores current solutions and offers a partial solution: include venture capital (VC) panels in medical conferences. These VC panels educate academics on 2 important and interconnected issues: how to “pitch” their ideas in the business world and what to consider when creating a company. In these sessions, academia-based start-up companies present their ideas before a VC panel composed of professional investors and receive feedback on their idea, business plan, and presentation techniques. Recent panel recommendations from Medicine 2.0 conferences fell into 7 categories: (1) the product, service, or idea you are developing into a company, (2) determine market forces and identify the target audience, (3) describe your competitive advantage, (4) the business plan, (5) current and future resources and capabilities, (6) legal aspects, and (7) general advice on the art of pitching. The academic and business literature validates many of these recommendations suggesting that VC panels may be a viable and cost-effective introduction to business and entrepreneurial education for physicians and other health care professionals. Panels benefit not only the presenting companies, but also the physicians, psychologists, and other health care professionals attending the session. Incorporating VC panels into academic conferences might also illuminate the need for incorporating relevant business training within academia. PMID:25100579

  5. Promoting business and entrepreneurial awareness in health care professionals: lessons from venture capital panels at medicine 2.0 conferences.

    PubMed

    Miron-Shatz, Talya; Shatz, Itamar; Becker, Stefan; Patel, Jigar; Eysenbach, Gunther

    2014-08-06

    There are few mechanisms that bring the academic and business worlds together in a way that would maximize the success of health technology (health tech) start-ups by increasing researchers' knowledge about how to operate in the business world. Existing solutions (eg, technology transfer offices and dual degree MD/MBA programs) are often unavailable to researchers from outside the institution or to those who have already completed their primary education, such as practicing physicians. This paper explores current solutions and offers a partial solution: include venture capital (VC) panels in medical conferences. These VC panels educate academics on 2 important and interconnected issues: how to "pitch" their ideas in the business world and what to consider when creating a company. In these sessions, academia-based start-up companies present their ideas before a VC panel composed of professional investors and receive feedback on their idea, business plan, and presentation techniques. Recent panel recommendations from Medicine 2.0 conferences fell into 7 categories: (1) the product, service, or idea you are developing into a company, (2) determine market forces and identify the target audience, (3) describe your competitive advantage, (4) the business plan, (5) current and future resources and capabilities, (6) legal aspects, and (7) general advice on the art of pitching. The academic and business literature validates many of these recommendations suggesting that VC panels may be a viable and cost-effective introduction to business and entrepreneurial education for physicians and other health care professionals. Panels benefit not only the presenting companies, but also the physicians, psychologists, and other health care professionals attending the session. Incorporating VC panels into academic conferences might also illuminate the need for incorporating relevant business training within academia.

  6. Developing a Research Agenda to Optimize Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: An Executive Summary of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization" was held on May 12, 2015, with the goal of developing a high-priority research agenda on which to base future research. The specific aims of the conference were to (1) understand the current state of evidence regarding emergency department (ED) diagnostic imaging use and identify key opportunities, limitations, and gaps in knowledge; (2) develop a consensus-driven research agenda emphasizing priorities and opportunities for research in ED diagnostic imaging; and (3) explore specific funding mechanisms available to facilitate research in ED diagnostic imaging. Over a 2-year period, the executive committee and other experts in the field convened regularly to identify specific areas in need of future research. Six content areas within emergency diagnostic imaging were identified before the conference and served as the breakout groups on which consensus was achieved: clinical decision rules; use of administrative data; patient-centered outcomes research; training, education, and competency; knowledge translation and barriers to imaging optimization; and comparative effectiveness research in alternatives to traditional computed tomography use. The executive committee invited key stakeholders to assist with the planning and to participate in the consensus conference to generate a multidisciplinary agenda. There were a total of 164 individuals involved in the conference and spanned various specialties, including general emergency medicine, pediatric emergency medicine, radiology, surgery, medical physics, and the decision sciences.

  7. Proceedings of the 8th annual conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society

    SciTech Connect

    Kondraske, G.V.; Robinson, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains over 200 selections. Some of the titles are: Clinical Engineering in Nuclear Medicine in a Rapidly Developing Country; Microscopic NMR Imaging; Computer Graphics Imaging of T1 and T2 mappings for NMR Data: High Detail Magnetic Resonance Images using SIFFT; Waveform Analysis of EMG Evoked During Muscle Relaxation; and Sinus Arrhythmia and REM/NREM Sleep.

  8. Hyperproduction of cordycepin by two-stage dissolved oxygen control in submerged cultivation of medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xian-Bing; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2004-01-01

    Effect of oxygen supply on cordycepin production was investigated in submerged cultivation of Cordyceps militaris, a famous traditional Chinese medicinal mushroom, in a 5-L turbine-agitated bioreactor (TAB). Initial volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa) within the range of 11.5-113.8 h(-1) had significant influence on cordycepin production. The highest cordycepin concentration of 167.5 mg/L was obtained at an initial kLa value of 54.5 h(-1), where a moderate dissolved oxygen (DO) pattern was observed throughout cultivation. The possible correlation between cordycepin production and DO level was explored by DO control experiments, and the results showed that DO within the range of 10-80% of air saturation greatly affected the cultivation process. To obtain a high specific cordycepin formation rate (rho) throughout cultivation, a two-stage DO control strategy was developed based on the analysis of the relationship of rho and DO. That is, DO was controlled at 60% from the beginning of cultivation and then shifted to a lower control level of 30% when rho started to decrease. As a result, a high cordycepin production of 201.1 mg/L and a high productivity of 15.5 mg/(L.d) were achieved, which was enhanced by about 15% and 30% compared to the highest titers obtained in conventional DO control experiments, respectively. The proposed DO control strategy was also applied to a recently developed 5-L centrifugal impeller bioreactor (CIB) with cordycepin production and productivity titers of 188.3 mg/L and 14.5 mg/(L.d). Furthermore, the scale-up of the two-stage DO control process from 5-L CIB to 30-L CIB was successfully demonstrated. The work is useful for the efficient large-scale production of bioactive metabolites by mushroom cultures.

  9. Mitochondria in health and disease - 3rd annual conference of society for mitochondrial research and medicine - 19-20 December 2013 - Bengaluru, India.

    PubMed

    Durhuus, Jon Ambæk; Desler, Claus; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of mitochondria was long considered to be production of cellular energy. However, as the understanding of mitochondria in disease is ever expanding, so is their additional function for a healthy organism. Mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to a range of pathologies, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, premature aging, diabetes and muscular diseases. Mitochondrial diseases can be hard to diagnose and treat and, therefore, interdisciplinary research and communication are important. The Third Annual Conference of Society for Mitochondrial Research and Medicine - India (SMRM) was titled "Mitochondria in Health and Disease". The conference was organized by Gayathri N, K Thangaraj, and KK Singh and was held at the National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences (NIMHANS) in Bangalore, India, from the 19th to 20th of December 2013. The meeting featured internationally renowned speakers within the field of mitochondrial research and medicine with the goal of bridging the gap between basic and clinical researchers. This review summarizes key outcomes of the conference.

  10. Suicide totals for MDs sad reminder of stresses facing medicine, conference told.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, C

    1996-01-01

    A recent conference on physician health cosponsored by the CMA and American Medical Association provided some sobering news. One physician reported on the suicides of physicians practising in the US. Another reported that inroads being made by managed health care is affecting physician morale. "Physicians' lifetime calling of caring for the sick is being called into question," said Dr. Patricia Tighe. "They have become like factory workers who can't take pride in their work and are denied a sense of belonging. They are part of a corporate enterprise, to be dispensed with when they are not profitable, and subjected to penalties if their work doesn't measure up". PMID:8673972

  11. Cultivation of medicinal caterpillar fungus, Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes), and production of cordycepin using the spent medium from levan fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang-Chen; Chen, Yi-Lin; Chang, Shu-Ming; Shih, Ing-Lung

    2013-01-01

    A process of tandem cultivation for the production of green and invaluable bioproducts (levan and Cordycepes militaris) useful for medical applications has been successfully developed. The process involves first cultivating Bacillus subtilis strain natto in sucrose medium to produce levan, followed by the subsequent cultivation of C. militaris in liquid- and solid-state cultures using the spent medium from levan fermentation as substrates. The factors affecting the cell growth and production of metabolites of C. militaris were investigated, and the various metabolites produced in the culture filtrate, mycelia, and fruiting body were analyzed. In addition, cordycepin was prepared from the solid waste medium of C. militaris. This is an excellent example in the development of cost effective biorefineries that maximize useful product formation from the available biomass. The preparation of cordycepin from solid waste medium of C. militaris using a method with high extraction efficiency and minimum solvent usage is also environmentally friendly.

  12. [Defense, attack, and street fighting. The role of medicine and military illustrated the example of the cholera epidemics in Prussia].

    PubMed

    Briese, O

    1997-01-01

    This article intends to illustrate the introduction of military rhetoric into medical discourse during the cholera epidemic of 1831/32 in Europe. Even before the era of bacteriology, illness and epidemics were considered to be the military enemies of mankind. Beginning with the rise of the military in early modern times, the language of medical discourses oriented itself on the influential military institutions. Sickness appeared as a warring aggressor. Since the time of the plague at the very latest, military connotations were commonplace in Europe, and this tendency became stronger during the conflicts of the 19th century. In this vein, during the inner crises of Germany at the end of this century, cholera was, at least in the descriptive rhetoric, understood as an inner, destructive, and anarchic enemy.

  13. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Military Testing Association (19th), 17-21 October 1977, San Antonio, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    administered by computer, the essential difference between this method and paper-and-pencil tests is that each examinee will answer a special set of test...conferences io the field and essentially received support Irom rators foT a system of this sort. The whole process sitill mazes m! We sttarted out with...safety Secure Employment Living Essentials Rctirernent, Medical, and Local Environmi t other Fringe Benefits SAFETY AND Convenience Work Environment

  14. Research in Biological and Medical Sciences, Including Biochemistry, Communicable Disease and Immunology, Internal Medicine, Nuclear Medicine, Physiology, Psychiatry, Surgery, and Veterinary Medicine. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: In-house laboratory independent research; Communicable diseases and immunology; Surgery, internal medicine , psychiatry, Biochemistry...surgery, military internal medicine , military psychiatry; Malaria prophylaxis; and Biosensor systems.

  15. Association of a training psychotherapy, experience with deployment stress in military physicians.

    PubMed

    Haney, Aaron W; Gray, Sheila Hafter

    2007-01-01

    This study examines whether an elective Training Psychotherapy Experience (TPE) confers any specific benefit for those who must engage in military operations. A questionnaire and an Impact of Event Scale--Revised (IES-R) were sent to military physicians who had graduated from the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) after 1980 and completed residencies in psychiatry, internal medicine, or a combination of the two. Those who participated in TPE and those who did not were compared in respect of demographics and whether they chose to remain in or leave the military after obligation. There was no difference in retention between the two groups. We suggest that this may be due to their medical education having taken place in a military-oriented environment. The IES-R scores confirm earlier findings that deployed medical personnel have fewer psychiatric sequellae than deployed combat troops (Kolkow, Grieger, Morse, & Spira, 2005).

  16. Cloning of mating-type gene MAT1-1 from the caterpillar medicinal mushroom, Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes) using TAIL-PCR technology.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wei-Ran; Gong, Zhen-Hua; Shi, Dan-Dan; Guo, Hui; Zhou, Xuanwei

    2014-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris and Ophiocordyceps sinensis (syn. Cordyceps sinensis), 2 well-known traditional Chinese medicines, contain the same bioactive components and share a similar developmental process. In this study, one C. militaris strain preserved in our laboratory was proven to be a MAT1 mating-type strain using a polymerase chain reaction-based mating-type assay. A 5000-bp nucleotide sequence of the mating-type MAT1-1 from C. militaris was amplified by thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction, but genes within the mating-type MAT1-2 remain undetectable. Sequence analysis shows that the mating-type gene MAT1-1 idiomorph contains 2 genes, MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-1-2. The MAT1-1-1 gene consists of 1480-bp nucleotides that encode 456 amino acids and contain the conserved a-box domain interrupted by 2 introns; the MAT1-1-2 gene consists of 1066 nucleotides that encode 377 amino acids interrupted by one intron. The intervening distance between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-1-2 is 778 bp. The C. militaris MAT1-1 idiomorph organization is the same as that of Cordyceps takaomontana. The MAT1-1 mating-type idiomorph of both Cordyceps species lacks the MAT1-1-3 gene, which is typically present in Pyrenomycetes. These studies provide some insights for further study of the morphological development of C. militaris and will eventually benefit the domestication of O. sinensis.

  17. The twin children of Auschwitz-Birkenau: conference on Nazi medicine.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2013-06-01

    The twin children who survived the Holocaust and the horrific medical experiments conducted by Nazi doctors are sometimes overlooked in the relevant literature. This topic and more were discussed as part of an annual conference hosted by students from Yeshiva University's Medical Ethics Society in October 2012. A selective summary of this meeting is followed by summaries of recent twin studies concerning genetic influences on twinning, in vitro fertilization versus spontaneous twin pregnancies, gender identity disorder, and royal support for twin registries. Several human interest stories are also worth noting. They include identical twin school principals, twin loss at Sandy Hook Elementary School, timely twin documentaries, new twin and twin-like reunions, and the passing of two prominent twins.

  18. A report on the Academic Emergency Medicine 2015 consensus conference "Diagnostic imaging in the emergency department: a research agenda to optimize utilization".

    PubMed

    Gunn, Martin L; Marin, Jennifer R; Mills, Angela M; Chong, Suzanne T; Froemming, Adam T; Johnson, Jamlik O; Kumaravel, Manickam; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2016-08-01

    In May 2015, the Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic imaging in the emergency department: a research agenda to optimize utilization" was held. The goal of the conference was to develop a high-priority research agenda regarding emergency diagnostic imaging on which to base future research. In addition to representatives from the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine, the multidisciplinary conference included members of several radiology organizations: American Society for Emergency Radiology, Radiological Society of North America, the American College of Radiology, and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. The specific aims of the conference were to (1) understand the current state of evidence regarding emergency department (ED) diagnostic imaging utilization and identify key opportunities, limitations, and gaps in knowledge; (2) develop a consensus-driven research agenda emphasizing priorities and opportunities for research in ED diagnostic imaging; and (3) explore specific funding mechanisms available to facilitate research in ED diagnostic imaging. Through a multistep consensus process, participants developed targeted research questions for future research in six content areas within emergency diagnostic imaging: clinical decision rules; use of administrative data; patient-centered outcomes research; training, education, and competency; knowledge translation and barriers to imaging optimization; and comparative effectiveness research in alternatives to traditional computed tomography use.

  19. Surgery and Medicine Residents' Perspectives of Morbidity and Mortality Conference: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Improve ACGME Core Competency Compliance.

    PubMed

    Flynn-O'Brien, Katherine T; Mandell, Samuel P; Eaton, Erik Van; Schleyer, Anneliese M; McIntyre, Lisa K

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality conferences (MMCs) are often used to fulfill the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) competency, but there is variation among institutions and disciplines in their approach to MMCs. The objective of this study is to examine the trainees' perspective and experience with MMCs and adverse patient event (APE) reporting across disciplines to help guide the future implementation of an institution-wide, workflow-embedded, quality improvement (QI) program for PBLI. Between April 1, 2013, and May 8, 2013, surgical and medical residents were given a confidential survey about APE reporting practices and experience with and attitudes toward MMCs and other QI/patient safety initiatives. Descriptive statistics and univariate analyses using the chi-square test for independence were calculated for all variables. Logistic regression and ordered logistic regression were used for nominal and ordinal categorical dependent variables, respectively, to calculate odds of reporting APEs. Qualitative content analysis was used to code free-text responses. A large, multihospital, tertiary academic training program in the Pacific Northwest. Residents in all years of training from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited programs in surgery and internal medicine. Survey response rate was 46.2% (126/273). Although most respondents agreed or strongly agreed that knowledge of and involvement in QI/patient safety activities was important to their training (88.1%) and future career (91.3%), only 10.3% regularly or frequently reported APEs to the institution's established electronic incident reporting system. Senior-level residents in both surgery and medicine were more likely to report APEs than more junior-level residents were (odds ratio = 4.8, 95% CI: 3.1-7.5). Surgery residents had a 4.9 (95% CI: 2.3-10.5) times higher odds than medicine residents had to have reported an APE to

  20. Acupuncture in Military Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    for phantom limb pain and it is used in the Specialized Care Program (SCP) at the Deployment Health Clinical Center. The SCP is a three-week, multidis...Ramstien Air Base, Germany to Joint Andrews Base and another pilot study examining acupuncture for phantom limb pain that yielded promising preliminary data...describe persistent, multi-system symptoms of varying degrees and severities. This is reminiscent of “Gulf War Syndrome ” or “Chronic Multi-symptom

  1. Acupuncture in Military Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Germany to Joint Andrews Base and another pilot study examining acupuncture for phantom limb pain that yielded promising preliminary data. In 2006 a...persistent, multi-system symptoms of varying degrees and severities. This is reminiscent of “Gulf War Syndrome ” or “Chronic Multi-symptom Illness” defined...illness syndrome . Acupuncture is more than the act of needle insertion. It is embedded in a ritual that includes a narrative interaction and trusting

  2. Organizational characteristics of the austere intensive care unit: the evolution of military trauma and critical care medicine; applications for civilian medical care systems.

    PubMed

    Grathwohl, Kurt W; Venticinque, Steven G

    2008-07-01

    Critical care in the U.S. military has significantly evolved in the last decade. More recently, the U.S. military has implemented organizational changes, including the use of multidisciplinary teams in austere environments to improve outcomes in severely injured polytrauma combat patients. Specifically, organizational changes in combat support hospitals located in combat zones during Operation Iraqi Freedom have led to decreased intensive care unit mortality and length of stay as well as resource use. These changes were implemented without increases in logistic support or the addition of highly technologic equipment. The mechanism for improvement in mortality is likely attributable to the adherence of basic critical care medicine fundamentals. This intensivist-directed team model provides sophisticated critical care even in the most austere environments. To optimize critically injured patients' outcomes, intensive care organizational models similar to the U.S. military, described in this article, can possibly be adapted to those of civilian care during disaster management to meet the challenges of emergency mass critical care.

  3. What Makes a Great Resident Teacher? A Multicenter Survey of Medical Students Attending an Internal Medicine Conference

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Lindsay; Kassam, Zain; Burke, Andrew; Wasi, Parveen; Neary, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Residents have a critical role in the education of medical students and have a unique teaching relationship because of their close proximity in professional development and opportunities for direct supervision. Although there is emerging literature on ways to prepare residents to be effective teachers, there is a paucity of data on what medical students believe are the attributes of successful resident teachers. Objective We sought to define the qualities and teaching techniques that learners interested in internal medicine value in resident teachers. Methods We created and administered a resident-as-teacher traits survey to senior medical students from 6 medical schools attending a resident-facilitated clinical conference at McMaster University. The survey collected data on student preferences of techniques employed by resident teachers and qualities of a successful resident teacher. Results Of 90 student participants, 80 (89%) responded. Respondents found the use of clinical examples (78%, 62 of 80) and repetition of core concepts (71%, 58 of 80) highly useful. In contrast, most respondents did not perceive giving feedback to residents, or receiving feedback from residents, was useful to their learning. With respect to resident qualities, respondents felt that a strong knowledge base (80%, 64 of 80) and tailoring teaching to the learner's level (83%, 66 of 80) was highly important. In contrast, high expectations on the part of resident supervisors were not valued. Conclusions This multicenter survey provides insight into the perceptions of medical students interested in internal medicine on the techniques and qualities that characterize successful resident teachers. The findings may be useful in the future development of resident-as-teacher curricula. PMID:26140120

  4. Military Officers, Tropical Medicine, and Racial Thought in the Formation of the West India Regiments, 1793-1802.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael

    2016-10-28

    The article examines the establishment and growth between 1793 and 1802 of the West India Regiments, British army corps manned by slaves of African descent and commanded by European officers. Focusing on the medical history of British military operations in the West Indies, the article demonstrates that the rationale behind the regiments was medical, but that the impetus for them came from senior military commanders rather than from the medical practitioners whose writings are usually privileged in the historiography. The senior officers who commanded the West Indian expeditions in the French Revolutionary Wars mobilized their own particular brand of medical theory, based explicitly on their experience of the region's epidemiological environment, in support of the policy. This willingness to adopt and adapt medical ideas heavily influenced both military policy regarding the regiments, and commanders' relationships with their medical men.

  5. Developing a Research Agenda to Optimize Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: An Executive Summary of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization," was held on May 12, 2015, with the goal of developing a high-priority research agenda on which to base future research. The specific aims of the conference were to: 1) understand the current state of evidence regarding emergency department (ED) diagnostic imaging utilization and identify key opportunities, limitations, and gaps in knowledge; 2) develop a consensus-driven research agenda emphasizing priorities and opportunities for research in ED diagnostic imaging; and 3) explore specific funding mechanisms available to facilitate research in ED diagnostic imaging. Over a 2-year period, the executive committee and other experts in the field convened regularly to identify specific areas in need of future research. Six content areas within emergency diagnostic imaging were identified prior to the conference and served as the breakout groups on which consensus was achieved: clinical decision rules; use of administrative data; patient-centered outcomes research; training, education, and competency; knowledge translation and barriers to imaging optimization; and comparative effectiveness research in alternatives to traditional computed tomography use. The executive committee invited key stakeholders to assist with planning and to participate in the consensus conference to generate a multidisciplinary agenda. There were 164 individuals involved in the conference spanning various specialties, including emergency medicine (EM), radiology, surgery, medical physics, and the decision sciences. This issue of AEM is dedicated to the proceedings of the 16th annual AEM consensus conference as well as original research related to emergency diagnostic imaging.

  6. Various grain substrates for the production of fruiting bodies and bioactive compounds of the medicinal caterpillar mushroom, Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes).

    PubMed

    Liang, Zeng-Chin; Liang, Chih-Hung; Wu, Chiu-Yeh

    2014-01-01

    In this study, several grains such as brown rice (Br), plumule rice (Pr), wheat (W) and pearl barley (Pb) supplemented with 1% (w/w) peptone (P), yeast extract (Ye), ammonia sulfate (As), and monosodium glutamate (Mg) as a nitrogen source, respectively, were used to produce fruiting bodies and bioactive compounds of two strains of Cordyceps militaris. Among these grain substrates, the substrate most suitable to mycelial growth was Pb+Ye for C. militaris H and L. The mushroom strains colonized this substrate in 12.8 and 12.6 days, respectively. For C. militaris L, the fewest days were required for primordial initiation on Br+Ye and Pr+P substrates. The highest yield and biological efficiency was observed with Pb substrate (25.16 g/bottle and 87.36%) and Br+P substrate (21.84 g/bottle and 75.83%) for C. militaris H and L, respectively. In the fruiting bodies of C. militaris H, the highest cordycepin content was cultivated on W+Mg substrate (25.07 mg/g), the highest mannitol content was cultivated with Pr+Mg (153.21 mg/g) and Pr (151.65 mg/g) substrates, and the highest adenosine content was cultivated with Pr+Ye (0.94 mg/g) and Pb+Ye (0.90 mg/g) substrates. In the fruiting bodies of C. militaris L, the highest cordycepin content was cultivated with W+Mg substrate (22.14 mg/g); the highest mannitol content was cultivated with Pb substrate (189.33 mg/g); and the highest adenosine content was cultivated with Pb+Ye substrate (0.71 mg/g).

  7. Reflections on military psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Arthur, R J

    1978-07-01

    The need for psychiatrists in the military was recognized for the first time during World War I, which involved millions of men in unusually protracted warfare. The policy of treating psychiatric casualties close to the from and returning soldiers to their military units as quickly as possible proved of great significance in the U.S. war effort. During World War II, the Korean conflict, and the war in Viet Nam, military psychiatry made great contributions and learned many lessions, both at home and abroad. The lessions learned by military psychiatry have important applications for the rest of medicine, especially in the fields of stress, crisis therapy, and community psychiatry.

  8. Military Psychology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TRANSLATIONS, MILITARY TRAINING, OFFICER PERSONNEL, PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY , COMMUNISM, INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS, EMOTIONS....MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), *MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY , *TEXTBOOKS, USSR, ORGANIZATIONS, COMBAT READINESS, PSYCHOMOTOR FUNCTION, REASONING, SURVEYS

  9. Organization, execution and evaluation of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care - an executive summary.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna R

    2014-12-01

    With the goal of reducing inequalities in patient care, the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," convened a diverse group of researchers, clinicians, health care providers, patients, and representatives of federal agencies and policy-makers in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014. The executive and steering committees identified seven clinical domains as key to gender-specific emergency care: cardiovascular, neurological, trauma/injury, substance abuse, pain, mental health, and diagnostic imaging. The main aims of the conference were to: 1) summarize and consolidate current data related to sex- and gender-specific research for acute care and identify critical gender-related gaps in knowledge to inform an EM research agenda; 2) create a consensus-driven research agenda that advances sex- and gender-specific research in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of acute diseases and identify strategies to investigate them; and 3) build a multinational interdisciplinary consortium to disseminate and study the sex and gender medicine of acute conditions. Over a 2-year period, this collaborative network of stakeholders identified key areas where sex- and gender-specific research is most likely to improve clinical care and ultimately patient outcomes. The iterative consensus process culminated in a daylong conference on May 13, 2014, with a total of 133 registrants, with the majority being between ages 31 and 50 years (57%), females (71%), and whites (79%). Content experts led the consensus-building workshops at the conference and used the nominal group technique to consolidate consensus recommendations for priority research. In addition, panel sessions addressed funding mechanisms for gender-specific research as well as gender-specific regulatory challenges to product development and approval. This special issue of AEM reports the

  10. Personality Correlated of Success in Interviewing at the USUHS School of Medicine,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Personality , *Interviewing, *Admittance, *Universities, Students, Selection, Decision making, Ratings, Performance(Human), Training, Scoring, Military facilities, Military psychology , Military medicine, Symposia

  11. [Even more critical medicine: a retrospective analysis of casualties admitted to the intensive care unit in the Spanish Military Hospital in Herat (Afghanistan)].

    PubMed

    Navarro Suay, R; Bartolomé Cela, E; Jara Zozaya, I; Hernández Abadía de Barbará, A; Gutiérrez Ortega, C; García Labajo, J D; Planas Roca, A; Gilsanz Rodríguez, F

    2011-04-01

    To analyze casualties from firearm and explosives injuries who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit in the Spanish ROLE-2E from December 2005 to December 2008 and to evaluate which damaging agent had produced the highest morbidity-mortality in our series using score indices with anatomical base (ISS and NISS). Observational and retrospective study performed between 2005 and 2008. Polyvalent Intensive Care Unit in the Spanish Military Hospital of those deployed in Afghanistan. The inclusion criteria were all patients who had been wounded by firearm or by explosive devices and who had been admitted in ICU in Spanish Military Hospital in Herat (Afghanistan). The anatomic scores Injury Severity Score and the New Injury Severity Score (NISS) were applied to all the selected patients to estimate the grade of severity of their injuries. Independent: damaging agent, injured anatomical area, protection measures and dependent: mortality, surgical procedure applied, score severity and socio-demographics and control variables. Eighty-six casualties, 30 by firearm and 56 by explosive devices. Applying the NISS, 38% of the casualties had suffered severe injuries. Mean stay in the ICU was 2.8 days and mortality was 10%. Significant differences in admission to the ICU for the damaging agent were not observed (P=.142). No significant differences were observed in the need for admission and stay in the ICU according to the damaging agent. The importance of the strategy, care and logistics of the intensive care military physician in Intensive Medicine in the Operating Room in Afghanistan is stressed. © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of Major Bioactive Compounds of the Caterpillar Medicinal Mushroom, Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes), Fruiting Bodies Cultured on Wheat Substrate and Pupae.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingmin; Guo, Suping; Huaijun, Yang; Bu, Ning; Dong, Cai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the main bioactive compounds of the fruit bodies of Cordyceps militaris-such as adenosine, cordycepin, polysaccharides, mannitol, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and carotenoids-were cultivated on wheat and pupae, as well as sclerotium (the pupae portion) and sclerotium with fruiting bodies. The amounts of adenosine and polysaccharide in all the tested samples (except for the polysaccharides of sclerotium) are higher than the quality standards (adenosine ≥0.055% and polysaccharide ≥2.5%) determined by the Ministry of Health of the People's Republic of China. As the most important bioactive compound in C. militaris, cordycepin is the highest in the fruiting bodies on pupae than in other samples, whereas it is the lowest in the sclerotium. The amounts of cordycepin, carotenoids, and SOD were higher in the fruiting bodies on pupae than that in the fruiting bodies on wheat, whereas the amounts of adenosine, polysaccharides, and mannitol were higher in the fruiting bodies on wheat than in the fruiting bodies on pupae. There was no significant difference in the amounts of cordycepin, carotenoids, and SOD in the sclerotium with fruiting bodies and the fruiting bodies on wheat. The adenosine, polysaccharide, and mannitol contents in the sclerotium with fruiting bodies were significantly lower than those of the fruiting bodies on wheat. Overall, the results of this evaluation could not distinguish which is better: the fruiting bodies on pupae or those on wheat; each has its own merits. The fruiting bodies of C. militaris cultivated on both wheat and pupae are important candidates for medicinal and tonic use for the welfare of humankind.

  13. A systematic scoping review of complementary and alternative medicine mind and body practices to improve the health of veterans and military personnel.

    PubMed

    Elwy, A Rani; Johnston, Jennifer M; Bormann, Jill E; Hull, Amanda; Taylor, Stephanie L

    2014-12-01

    Meditation, imagery, acupuncture, and yoga are the most frequently offered mind and body practices in the Department of Veterans Affairs. Yet, the research on mind and body practices has been critiqued as being too limited in evidence and scope to inform clinical treatment. We conducted a systematic scoping review of mind and body practices used with veterans or active duty military personnel to identify gaps in the literature and make recommendations for future primary research. Following systematic literature review methodology, we searched 5 databases using 27 different National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine-defined mind and body practices as text words, keywords, and MeSH terms through June 30, 2014. We also conducted handsearches of 4 previous reviews. Active duty military members or veterans 18 years or older participating in mind and body practice interventions globally. Data were extracted from studies meeting 5 inclusion criteria. The quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was assessed using an existing checklist. Of 1819 studies identified, 89 interventions (50 RCTs) published between 1976 and 2014, conducted in 9 countries, using 152 different measures to assess 65 health and well-being outcomes met our inclusion criteria. Most interventions took place in the United States (n=78). Meditation practices (n=25), relaxation techniques including imagery (n=20), spinal manipulation including physical therapy (n=16), and acupuncture (n=11) were the most frequently studied practices. Methodological quality of most RCTs was rated poorly. Meditation and acupuncture practices are among the most frequently offered and studied mind and body practices. Future research should include yoga as it is currently understudied among veterans and military personnel. A repository of mind and body intervention outcome measures may further future research efforts, as would conducting pragmatic trials and more robust RCTs.

  14. Photoperiodic Responses and Characterization of the Cmvvd Gene Encoding a Blue Light Photoreceptor from the Medicinal Caterpillar Fungus Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Dong, Xiaoming; Song, Xinhua; Wang, Fen; Dong, Caihong

    2017-01-01

    Light is a necessary environmental factor for production of conidia and pigment, formation of stroma, and development of Cordyceps militaris, a well-known edible and medicinal mushroom. In this study, an obvious rhythm loop was observed in certain strains of C. militaris under conditions of alternating 12-hour intervals of dark and light. A possibly related gene, Cmvvd, the homologue of the blue-light photoreceptor of Neurospora crassa, was cloned from the genome of C. militaris. The protein CmVVD is predicted to be 203 amino acids in length and is characterized by the presence of a light, oxygen, or voltage domain. Analysis of the CmVVD sensor domain (light, oxygen, or voltage) suggested that it is a blue-light receptor. Cysteine 108 is essential for the in vivo function of VIVID (VVD) in N. crassa photoadaptation. However, proline is in this position instead in all of the tested CmVVD proteins, suggesting that CmVVD may have a different function or may function in ways different from VVD in N. crassa. Genetic variation analysis of CmVVD in 6 representative strains indicated that 3 informative sites exist. Cmvvd messenger RNA was able to be induced by light, and the expression level increased over 10 times after irradiation and was maintained at high levels in the nascent fruiting body. The light-induced expression of Cmvvd was abolished in Cmwc-1 mutants, suggesting that the expression of Cmvvd is dependent on the photoreceptor CmWC-1 or on a functional CmWC-1/WC-2 complex. This article will help to open the still-unexplored field of circadian rhythms for this fungus.

  15. Assessment Needs Analysis for Developing Mobile Apps to Encourage Proactive Preventive Medicine Education Among Young Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    De Leo, Gianluca; Bonacina, Stefano; Brivio, Eleonora; Cuper, Taryn

    2012-04-01

    International travel to underdeveloped areas where both hygienic conditions and sufficient medical care are often in short supply can pose severe health risks. Infectious disease is one of the most common health risks for military forces deployed overseas. Careful personal hygiene and early symptom recognition serve as important steps in averting potential illness. With the ubiquitous deployment threat of chemical and biological warfare agents, the benefit of early detection and action can ultimately be critical for survival. Nowadays game-based learning models, made available on mobile devices in the form of apps, can provide relevant medical knowledge, and they can effectively reach a young military population. The aims of this preliminary research project are twofold: (1) We want to investigate whether young U.S. Army personnel would be open to the use of mobile apps while deployed abroad, and (2) we want to share the research design adopted with the intent of providing a baseline methodology that can be used in future larger studies. We recruited and interviewed Reserve Officers' Training Corps cadets at a university in the United States. Focus groups have been adopted as a research tool for collecting data. Open and close-ended questions were used during the focus group. Four domains were investigated: Cell phone usage, game console perceptions, game genre preferences, and gaming habits and perceptions. The analysis of the focus group data reported that young military personnel often play with videogames and that they prefer first person Action/Combat genre. The data also showed that they do not consider playing videogames to be a leisure activity but a part of their lives. The preliminary results of this study suggest that games on cell phones could be considered as a platform for teaching young military personnel medical-related concepts and health safety procedures.

  16. New York Chapter History of Military Medicine Award. U.S. Army medical helicopters in the Korean War.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, R S

    2001-04-01

    Medical evacuation helicopters are taken for granted in today's military. However, the first use of helicopters for this purpose in the Korean War was not done intentionally but as a result of the necessity of moving patients rapidly over difficult Korean terrain and of the early ebbing of the main battle line. The objective of this essay is to increase the historical awareness of military medical evacuation helicopters in the Korean War during this 50th anniversary year. By describing the many challenges and experiences encountered in implementing the use of helicopters for evacuation, the reader will appreciate how a technology developed for another use helped in the success of evacuating nearly 22,000 patients while contributing to establishing a mortality rate of wounded of 2.4%. The preparation to write this essay included archival research of historical reports, records, and oral histories from the archives of the U.S. Army Center for Military History. Additionally, a search of journal articles written during and after the Korean War was conducted. The result is a comprehensive description of the use of medical evacuation helicopters in the Korean War.

  17. Anti-Inflammatory Properties of the Medicinal Mushroom Cordyceps militaris Might Be Related to Its Linear (1→3)-β-D-Glucan

    PubMed Central

    Smiderle, Fhernanda R.; Baggio, Cristiane H.; Borato, Débora G.; Santana-Filho, Arquimedes P.; Sassaki, Guilherme L.; Iacomini, Marcello; Van Griensven, Leo J. L. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Ascomycete Cordyceps militaris, an entomopathogenic fungus, is one of the most important traditional Chinese medicines. Studies related to its pharmacological properties suggest that this mushroom can exert interesting biological activities. Aqueous (CW and HW) and alkaline (K5) extracts containing polysaccharides were prepared from this mushroom, and a β-D-glucan was purified. This polymer was analysed by GC-MS and NMR spectrometry, showing a linear chain composed of β-D-Glcp (1→3)-linked. The six main signals in the 13C-NMR spectrum were assigned by comparison to reported data. The aqueous (CW, HW) extracts stimulated the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2 by THP-1 macrophages, while the alkaline (K5) extract did not show any effect. However, when the extracts were added to the cells in the presence of LPS, K5 showed the highest inhibition of the pro-inflammatory genes expression. This inhibitory effect was also observed for the purified β-(1→3)-D-glucan, that seems to be the most potent anti-inflammatory compound present in the polysaccharide extracts of C. militaris. In vivo, β-(1→3)-D-glucan also inhibited significantly the inflammatory phase of formalin-induced nociceptive response, and, in addition, it reduced the migration of total leukocytes but not the neutrophils induced by LPS. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrates the anti-inflammatory effect of β-(1→3)-D-glucan. PMID:25330371

  18. Developments in Surge Research Priorities: A Systematic Review of the Literature Following the Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, 2007-2015.

    PubMed

    Morton, Melinda J; DeAugustinis, Matthew L; Velasquez, Christina A; Singh, Sonal; Kelen, Gabor D

    2015-11-01

    In 2006, Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) published a special issue summarizing the proceedings of the AEM consensus conference on the "Science of Surge." One major goal of the conference was to establish research priorities in the field of "disasters" surge. For this review, we wished to determine the progress toward the conference's identified research priorities: 1) defining criteria and methods for allocation of scarce resources, 2) identifying effective triage protocols, 3) determining decision-makers and means to evaluate response efficacy, 4) developing communication and information sharing strategies, and 5) identifying methods for evaluating workforce needs. Specific criteria were developed in conjunction with library search experts. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library databases were queried for peer-reviewed articles from 2007 to 2015 addressing scientific advances related to the above five research priorities identified by AEM consensus conference. Abstracts and foreign language articles were excluded. Only articles with quantitative data on predefined outcomes were included; consensus panel recommendations on the above priorities were also included for the purposes of this review. Included study designs were randomized controlled trials, prospective, retrospective, qualitative (consensus panel), observational, cohort, case-control, or controlled before-and-after studies. Quality assessment was performed using a standardized tool for quantitative studies. Of the 2,484 unique articles identified by the search strategy, 313 articles appeared to be related to disaster surge. Following detailed text review, 50 articles with quantitative data and 11 concept papers (consensus conference recommendations) addressed at least one AEM consensus conference surge research priority. Outcomes included validation of the benchmark of 500 beds/million of population for disaster surge capacity, effectiveness of simulation- and Internet

  19. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  20. A Countercultural Heritage: Rediscovering the Relationship-Centered and Social Justice Roots of Family Medicine-A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Waters, Richard C; Stoltenberg, Mark; Hughes, Lauren S

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 G. Gayle Stephens Keystone conference convened a cohort of primary care professionals to discuss what promises personal physicians will make to their patients going forward. New physicians were prompted to rediscover the foundational values of and historic context for family medicine. At the heart of this rediscovery was learning of the writings and teachings of Dr. G. Gayle Stephens, a founder of family medicine who emphasized the essentiality of relationship-centered care and social justice to the new specialty. Dr. Stephens viewed family medicine as being in a countercultural relationship to mainstream medicine, as family medicine fought for justice and equity in an inequitable and fragmented health care system. Here we argue that by reaffirming and renewing this countercultural heritage the new generation of family physicians will have better clarity in approaching the many challenges in health care today. Particularly for trainees and new physicians, the historic lens offered by Dr. Stephens's writing and other foundational documents allows us to better see ourselves in a trajectory of ongoing health care reform.

  1. III Italian Consensus Conference on Malignant Mesothelioma of the Pleura. Epidemiology, Public Health and Occupational Medicine related issues.

    PubMed

    Magnani, C; Bianchi, C; Chellini, E; Consonni, D; Fubini, B; Gennaro, V; Marinaccio, A; Menegozzo, M; Mirabelli, D; Merler, E; Merletti, F; Musti, M; Oddone, E; Romanelli, A; Terracini, B; Zona, A; Zocchetti, C; Alessi, M; Baldassarre, A; Dianzani, I; Maule, M; Mensi, C; Silvestri, S

    2015-09-09

    The III Italian Consensus Conference on Pleural Mesothelioma (MM) convened on January 29th 2015. This report presents the conclusions of the 'Epidemiology, Public Health and Occupational Medicine' section. MM incidence in 2011 in Italy was 3.64 per 100,000 person/years in men and 1.32 in women. Incidence trends are starting to level off. Ten percent of cases are due to non-occupational exposure. Incidence among women is very high in Italy, because of both non-occupational and occupational exposure. The removal of asbestos in place is proceeding slowly, with remaining exposure. Recent literature confirms the causal role of chrysotile. Fibrous fluoro-edenite was classified as carcinogenic by IARC (Group 1) on the basis of MM data. A specific type (MWCNT-7) of Carbon Nanotubes was classified 2B. For pleural MM, after about 45 years since first exposure, the incidence trend slowed down; with more studies needed. Cumulative exposure is a proxy of the relevant exposure, but does not allow to distinguish if duration or intensity may possibly play a prominent role, neither to evaluate the temporal sequence of exposures. Studies showed that duration and intensity are independent determinants of MM. Blood related MM are less than 2.5%. The role of BAP1 germline mutations is limited to the BAP1 cancer syndrome, but negligible for sporadic cases. Correct MM diagnosis is baseline; guidelines agree on the importance of the tumor gross appearance and of the hematoxylin-eosin-based histology. Immunohistochemical markers contribute to diagnostic confirmation: the selection depends on morphology, location, and differential diagnosis. The WG suggested that 1) General Cancer Registries and ReNaM Regional Operational Centres (COR) interact and systematically compare MM cases; 2) ReNaM should report results presenting the diagnostic certainty codes and the diagnostic basis, separately; 3) General Cancer Registries and COR should interact with pathologists to assure the up

  2. [Consequences learned from the use of chemical weapons during the First World War for the modern military medicine].

    PubMed

    Belskikh, A N; Basharin, V A; Chepur, S V; Khalimov, Yu Sh; Markizova, N F

    2015-08-01

    The article describes the way medical service dealed with problems resulted from the use of chemical weapons during the First World War (1914-1918). It was revealed that many of the abovementioned problems remain unsolved up to the present moment. It is stated the existence of the threat of use of chemical weapons in modem military conflicts, which expands the area of responsibility for medical chemical protection. The authors proved necessity and algorithm of the training system, considered as a part of medical protection in case of adverse factors of chemical nature.

  3. Tenth European Consensus Conference on Hyperbaric Medicine: recommendations for accepted and non-accepted clinical indications and practice of hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Daniel; Marroni, Alessandro; Kot, Jacek

    2017-03-01

    The tenth European Consensus Conference on Hyperbaric Medicine took place in April 2016, attended by a large delegation of experts from Europe and elsewhere. The focus of the meeting was the revision of the European Committee on Hyperbaric Medicine (ECHM) list of accepted indications for hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT), based on a thorough review of the best available research and evidence-based medicine (EBM). For this scope, the modified GRADE system for evidence analysis, together with the DELPHI system for consensus evaluation, were adopted. The indications for HBOT, including those promulgated by the ECHM previously, were analysed by selected experts, based on an extensive review of the literature and of the available EBM studies. The indications were divided as follows: Type 1, where HBOT is strongly indicated as a primary treatment method, as it is supported by sufficiently strong evidence; Type 2, where HBOT is suggested as it is supported by acceptable levels of evidence; Type 3, where HBOT can be considered as a possible/optional measure, but it is not yet supported by sufficiently strong evidence. For each type, three levels of evidence were considered: A, when the number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is considered sufficient; B, when there are some RCTs in favour of the indication and there is ample expert consensus; C, when the conditions do not allow for proper RCTs but there is ample and international expert consensus. For the first time, the conference also issued 'negative' recommendations for those conditions where there is Type 1 evidence that HBOT is not indicated. The conference also gave consensus-agreed recommendations for the standard of practice of HBOT.

  4. PREFACE: International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemle, Ludovic Dan; Jiang, Yiwen

    2015-06-01

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2014) took place in Hunedoara, Romania from 2-4 October 2014 at the Engineering Faculty of Hunedoara. The conference takes place alternately in Romania and in P.R. China and is organized by "Politehnica" University of Timisoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P.R. China, with the aim to serve as a platform for exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences and to promote the communication between scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The topics of the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues: 1. Economical Sciences 2. Engineering Sciences 3. Fundamental Sciences 4. Medical Sciences The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has the potential for application in economics, defense, medicine, etc. There were nearly 100 registered participants from six countries, and four invited and 56 oral talks were delivered during the two days of the conference. Based on the work presented at the conference, selected papers are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. These papers present new research in the various fields of Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Computer Engineering, and Mathematical Engineering. It is our great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering to the scientific community to promote further research in these areas. We sincerely hope that the papers published in this volume will contribute to the advancement of knowledge in their respective fields.

  5. Soviet-American Dance Medicine. Proceedings of the Glasnost Dance Medicine Conference and Workshops (Boston, Massachusetts, May 18-19, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micheli, Lyle, Ed.; And Others

    The information shared in this document represents a dialogue between the United States and the Soviet Union on the discipline of dance medicine, which involves the care of injured dancers as well as prevention of injuries. An introduction including a preface, opening remarks, and an overview of dance medicine comprises section 1. The second…

  6. Self-Reported Health Symptoms and Conditions Among Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users in a Large Military Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Millennium Cohort survey instrument to assess CAM use. Although these questions were not intended to encompass the full spectrum of CAM possibilities...response: acupuncture, biofeedback, chiropractic care, energy healing, folk remedies, herbal therapy, high dose/ megavitamin therapy, homeopathy, hypnosis ...National Center for CAM (24). Acupuncture, biofeedback, chiropractic care, energy healing, folk medicine, hypnosis , and massage were grouped together as

  7. Is rest after concussion "the best medicine?": recommendations for activity resumption following concussion in athletes, civilians, and military service members.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Noah D; Iverson, Grant L

    2013-01-01

    Practice guidelines universally recommend an initial period of rest for people who sustain a sports-related concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in daily life or military service. This practice is difficult to reconcile with the compelling evidence that other health conditions can be worsened by inactivity and improved by early mobilization and exercise. We review the scientific basis for the recommendation to rest after MTBI, the challenges and potential unintended negative consequences of implementing it, and how patient management could be improved by refining it. The best available evidence suggests that complete rest exceeding 3 days is probably not helpful, gradual resumption of preinjury activities should begin as soon as tolerated (with the exception of activities that have a high MTBI exposure risk), and supervised exercise may benefit patients with persistent symptoms.

  8. Beyond a curricular design of convenience: replacing the noon conference with an academic half day in three internal medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Batalden, Maren K; Warm, Eric J; Logio, Lia S

    2013-05-01

    Several residency programs have created an academic half day (AHD) for the delivery of core curriculum, and some program Web sites provide narrative descriptions of individual AHD curricula; nonetheless, little published literature on the AHD format exists. This article details three distinctive internal medicine residency programs (Cambridge Health Alliance, University of Cincinnati, and New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical College) whose leaders replaced the traditional noon conference curriculum with an AHD. Although each program's AHD developed independently of the other two, retrospective comparative review reveals instructive similarities and differences that may be useful to other residency directors. In this article, the authors describe the distinct approaches to the AHD at the three institutions through a framework of six core principles: (1) protect time and space to facilitate learning, (2) nurture active learning in residents, (3) choose and sequence curricular content deliberately, (4) develop faculty, (5) encourage resident preparation and accountability for learning, and (6) employ a continuous improvement approach to curriculum development and evaluation. The authors chronicle curricular adaptations at each institution over the first three years of experience. Preliminary outcome data, presented in the article, suggests that the transition from the traditional noon conference to an AHD may increase conference attendance, improve resident and faculty satisfaction with the curriculum, and improve resident performance on the In Training Examination.

  9. Gender differences in acute and chronic pain in the emergency department: results of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference pain section.

    PubMed

    Musey, Paul I; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Miner, James R; Bortsov, Andrey V; Safdar, Basmah; Bijur, Polly; Rosenau, Alex; Tsze, Daniel S; Chang, Andrew K; Dorai, Suprina; Engel, Kirsten G; Feldman, James A; Fusaro, Angela M; Lee, David C; Rosenberg, Mark; Keefe, Francis J; Peak, David A; Nam, Catherine S; Patel, Roma G; Fillingim, Roger B; McLean, Samuel A

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a leading public health problem in the United States, with an annual economic burden of more than $630 billion, and is one of the most common reasons that individuals seek emergency department (ED) care. There is a paucity of data regarding sex differences in the assessment and treatment of acute and chronic pain conditions in the ED. The Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference convened in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014 to develop a research agenda to address this issue among others related to sex differences in the ED. Prior to the conference, experts and stakeholders from emergency medicine and the pain research field reviewed the current literature and identified eight candidate priority areas. At the conference, these eight areas were reviewed and all eight were ratified using a nominal group technique to build consensus. These priority areas were: 1) gender differences in the pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for pain, including differences in opioid tolerance, side effects, or misuse; 2) gender differences in pain severity perceptions, clinically meaningful differences in acute pain, and pain treatment preferences; 3) gender differences in pain outcomes of ED patients across the life span; 4) gender differences in the relationship between acute pain and acute psychological responses; 5) the influence of physician-patient gender differences and characteristics on the assessment and treatment of pain; 6) gender differences in the influence of acute stress and chronic stress on acute pain responses; 7) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating acute pain in ED populations; and 8) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating chronic pain development after trauma, stress, or acute illness exposure. These areas represent priority areas for future scientific inquiry, and gaining understanding in these will be essential to improving our understanding of sex and gender

  10. [Nikolai Illarionovich Kozlov--a scientist, a doctor, an outstanding organizer of Military Medicine (To the 200th anniversary of the birth)].

    PubMed

    Egorysheva, I V

    2014-11-01

    To Kozlov N.I. (1814-1889) belong numerous achievements in the organization of military medical unit during the Crimean (1853-1856) and the Russian-Turkish (1877-1878) wars, the introduction of women's medical education in Russia, establishment of an improvement system for the military doctors, edition for their medical guidelines, the organization of military health care in Russia.

  11. Sex- and gender-specific research priorities in cardiovascular resuscitation: proceedings from the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Cardiovascular Resuscitation Research Workgroup.

    PubMed

    Wigginton, Jane G; Perman, Sarah M; Barr, Gavin C; McGregor, Alyson J; Miller, Andrew C; Napoli, Anthony M; Napoli, Anthony F; Safdar, Basmah; Weaver, Kevin R; Deutsch, Steven; Kayea, Tami; Becker, Lance

    2014-12-01

    Significant sex and gender differences in both physiology and psychology are readily acknowledged between men and women; however, data are lacking regarding differences in their responses to injury and treatment and in their ultimate recovery and survival. These variations remain particularly poorly defined within the field of cardiovascular resuscitation. A better understanding of the interaction between these important factors may soon allow us to dramatically improve outcomes in disease processes that currently carry a dismal prognosis, such as sudden cardiac arrest. As part of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Medicine: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," our group sought to identify key research questions and knowledge gaps pertaining to both sex and gender in cardiac resuscitation that could be answered in the near future to inform our understanding of these important issues. We combined a monthly teleconference meeting of interdisciplinary stakeholders from largely academic institutions with a focused interest in cardiovascular outcomes research, an extensive review of the existing literature, and an open breakout session discussion on the recommendations at the consensus conference to establish a prioritization of the knowledge gaps and relevant research questions in this area. We identified six priority research areas: 1) out-of-hospital cardiac arrest epidemiology and outcome, 2) customized resuscitation drugs, 3) treatment role for sex steroids, 4) targeted temperature management and hypothermia, 5) withdrawal of care after cardiac arrest, and 6) cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and implementation. We believe that exploring these key topics and identifying relevant questions may directly lead to improved understanding of sex- and gender-specific issues seen in cardiac resuscitation and ultimately improved patient outcomes. © 2014 by the Society

  12. "Higher, always higher": technology, the military and aviation medicine during the age of the two world wars.

    PubMed

    Kehrt, Christian

    2006-12-01

    The history of flight has been strongly influenced by the interplay between physiology and technology. The human body defined the relationship between man and machine--it had to be protected from the cold, bad weather, high altitude, speed and bullets. Technological innovations offered a way to improve on aeroplane safety, and enabled pilots to exceed the limits imposed by physiological constraints. In particular, reconnaissance and bombing missions during World War II, which demanded flight at high altitudes, stimulated intensive scientific research and technological development. This research led to the construction of artificial environments for pilots and ultimately gave rise to space medicine.

  13. Changes in bacterial flora and antibiotic resistance in clinical samples isolated from patients hospitalized in the Military Institute of Medicine in Warsaw, Poland, between 2005-2012

    PubMed

    Guzek, Aneta; Rybicki, Zbigniew; Tomaszewski, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Hospital infections have become an important problem. Knowledge of microbiological situations both helps in ensuring that the optimal choice of antibacterial treatment is made, and in improving the results of the selected therapy. In this paper, both the changes in the bacterial flora of patients hospitalized in the Military Institute of Medicine, and the bacterial resistance to antimicrobials were analyzed. Data were collected between 2005 and 2012. The identification and testing of pathogens, susceptibility tests, and analysis of bacterial resistance mechanisms to antibiotics were performed according to current guidelines. A total number of 28,066 bacterial strains were isolated. The most frequently isolated pathogens were Gram-negative bacteria (n=18,021; 64% of all isolated bacteria), including Enterobacteriaceae (71%) and non-Enterobacteriaceae (29%). The total number of isolated Gram-positive bacteria (n=10,045; 36% of all isolates) included Staphylococcus spp. (65%) and Enterococcus spp. (35%). The highest increase in the number of infections was caused by Enterobacteriaceae. The number of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus resistant to methicillin decreased. Analyzed alert pathogens with resistance phenotypes were highly susceptible to a single type of antibiotic. All multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria (except those naturally resistant to colistin) were susceptible to colistin. All methicillin resistant S. aureus and methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococci were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid. All MSSA strains were susceptible to cloxacillin, all Enterococcus faecium strains to ampicillin, and all VRE strains were susceptible to linezolid and tigecycline.

  14. HIV medicine after Barcelona conference: interview with Howard Grossman, M.D. Interview by John S. James.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Howard

    2002-09-06

    We asked a leading HIV physician to summarize some of the treatment issues that clinicians are now looking at after the Barcelona conference. Topics in this interview include: Tenofovir, including first-line therapy; The shift from protease inhibitors to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors, for many but not all patients; Benefits of once-a-day regimens; Lipodystrophy, and strategies for avoiding or reducing it; Viral resistance testing; T-20; Prevention--including danger of superinfection with a new HIV strain.

  15. Nutrition research in the military.

    PubMed

    Hill, Neil E; Fallowfield, J L; Delves, S K; Wilson, D R

    2014-06-01

    Military research performed in an operational environment involves mission-specific considerations. The Institute of Naval Medicine was tasked in 2008 by the Surgeon General to investigate the nutritional status of deployed British military personnel, and how this might affect body composition, physical fitness and operational capability. This paper briefly describes the logistic and technical issues specific to military research that were encountered by the study team, how these issues were overcome and how this research has influenced military practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Report on the conference on 'Men, Women, and Medicine: A New View of the Biology of Sex/Gender Differences and Aging' held in Berlin, 24–26th February 2006

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Antje

    2006-01-01

    The first world wide symposium on the topic of gender-specific medicine provided the latest research on differences in sex and/or gender in medicine and medical care. The presentations ranged beyond the topic of reproduction to encompass the entire human organism. This report critically reviews three issues that emerged during the Conference: gender mainstreaming, the concept of sex/gender differences and the issue of men's health. It suggests that the interdisciplinary concept of gender-specific medicine has to be mirrored by the integration of social and cultural studies into medical research and practice. PMID:17067380

  17. Report on the conference on 'Men, women, and medicine: a new view of the biology of sex/gender differences and aging' held in Berlin, 24-26th February 2006.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Antje

    2006-10-26

    The first world wide symposium on the topic of gender-specific medicine provided the latest research on differences in sex and/or gender in medicine and medical care. The presentations ranged beyond the topic of reproduction to encompass the entire human organism. This report critically reviews three issues that emerged during the Conference: gender mainstreaming, the concept of sex/gender differences and the issue of men's health. It suggests that the interdisciplinary concept of gender-specific medicine has to be mirrored by the integration of social and cultural studies into medical research and practice.

  18. The 2016 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, Shared Decision Making in the Emergency Department: Development of a Policy-relevant Patient-centered Research Agenda May 10, 2016, New Orleans, LA.

    PubMed

    Grudzen, Corita R; Anderson, Jana R; Carpenter, Christopher R; Hess, Erik P

    2016-12-01

    Shared decision making in emergency medicine has the potential to improve the quality, safety, and outcomes of emergency department (ED) patients. Given that the ED is the gateway to care for patients with a variety of illnesses and injuries and the safety net for patients otherwise unable to access care, shared decision making in the ED is relevant to numerous disciplines and the interests of the United States (U.S.) public. On May 10, 2016 the 16th annual Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Shared Decision Making: Development of a Policy-Relevant Patient-Centered Research Agenda" was held in New Orleans, Louisiana. During this one-day conference clinicians, researchers, policy-makers, patient and caregiver representatives, funding agency representatives, trainees, and content experts across many areas of medicine interacted to define high priority areas for research in 1 of 6 domains: 1) diagnostic testing; 2) policy, 3) dissemination/implementation and education, 4) development and testing of shared decision making approaches and tools in practice, 5) palliative care and geriatrics, and 6) vulnerable populations and limited health literacy. This manuscript describes the current state of shared decision making in the ED context, provides an overview of the conference planning process, the aims of the conference, the focus of each respective breakout session, the roles of patient and caregiver representatives and an overview of the conference agenda. The results of this conference published in this issue of AEM provide an essential summary of the future research priorities for shared decision making to increase quality of care and patient-centered outcomes. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. H2S2014 in Kyoto: the 3rd International Conference on H2S in Biology and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideo

    2015-04-30

    About 20 years ago, a pungent gas was found to be the physiological mediator of cognitive function and vascular tone. Since then, studies on hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have uncovered its numerous physiological roles such as protecting various tissues/organs from ischemia and regulating inflammation, cell growth, oxygen sensing, and senescence. These effects of H2S were extensively studied, and some of the corresponding mechanisms were also studied in detail. Previous studies on the synergistic interaction between H2S and nitric oxide (NO) have led to the discovery of several potential signaling molecules. Polysulfides are considerably potent and are one of the most active forms of H2S. H2S has a significant therapeutic potential, which is evident from the large number of novel H2S-donating compounds and substances developed for manipulating endogenous levels of H2S. The Third International Conference on H2S was held in Kyoto in June 2014. One hundred and sixty participants from 21 countries convened in Kyoto to report new advances, discuss conflicting findings, and make plans for future research. This article summarizes each oral presentation presented at the conference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effectiveness of evidence-based medicine training for undergraduate students at a Chinese Military Medical University: a self-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiangyu; Xu, Bin; Liu, Qingyun; Zhang, Yao; Xiong, Hongyan; Li, Yafei

    2014-07-04

    To evaluate the effect of the integration of evidence-based medicine (EBM) into medical curriculum by measuring undergraduate medical students' EBM knowledge, attitudes, personal application, and anticipated future use. A self-controlled trial was conducted with 251 undergraduate students at a Chinese Military Medical University, using a validated questionnaire regarding the students' evidence-based practice (EBP) about knowledge (EBP-K), attitude (EBP-A), personal application (EBP-P), and future anticipated use (EBP-F). The educational intervention was a 20-hour EBM course formally included in the university's medical curriculum, combining lectures with small group discussion and student-teacher exchange sessions. Data were analyzed using paired t-tests to test the significance of the difference between a before and after comparison. The difference between the pre- and post-training scores were statistically significant for EBP-K, EBP-A, EBP-P, and EBP-F. The scores for EBP-P showed the most pronounced percentage change after EBM training (48.97 ± 8.6%), followed by EBP-A (20.83 ± 2.1%), EBP-K (19.21 ± 3.2%), and EBP-F (17.82 ± 5.7%). Stratified analyses by gender, and program subtypes did not result in any significant changes to the results. The integration of EBM into the medical curriculum improved undergraduate medical students' EBM knowledge, attitudes, personal application, and anticipated future use. A well-designed EBM training course and objective outcome measurements are necessary to ensure the optimum learning opportunity for students.

  1. American College of Sports Medicine Roundtable on Exertional Heat Stroke - Return to Duty/Return to Play: Conference Proceedings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    in physical activity and exposure to heat stress (35). Although current American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommendations suggest EHS...D, Punnett L, et al. The effects of continuous hot weather training on risk of exertional heat illness. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 2005; 37:84Y90. 66... Sports Med. 1986; 3:346Y56. 68. Wilkinson DA, Burholt DR, Shrivastava PN. Hypothermia following whole-body heating of mice: effect of heating time

  2. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    care resources of the military, impact unit morale, and take a large emotional toll on the involved friends, family, and commanders. There is...Psychology, 29(2), 177.,187. Gutierrez, P.M. (1999). Suicidality in parentally bereaved adolescents. Death Studies, 23(4), 359-370. Osman, A., Kopper, B. A...Gutierrez, P. M. VA continuum of care for suicidal Veterans. Panel presentation at the American Association of Suicidology conference, Pmilati.d, OR

  3. Military Hybrid Vehicle Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-03

    Some examples include:  Allison Hybrid EP System™ - Transit buses two-mode parallel hybrid with continuously variable transmission (CVT)  Azure... Transit Buses , Proceeding of the Vehicular Technology Conference, Vol. 5, pp 3310-3315, October 2003. [3] E. Rosenthal, U.S. Military Orders Less...applications such as delivery trucks and transit busses. One of the biggest justifications for hybrids is their fuel efficiency. However, the U.S

  4. Maritime Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, J. Worth

    1996-01-01

    Presents a fascinating look at the practice of medicine aboard commercial and military ships in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Contemporary medical practice believed all diseases were created by one of four "humors." In spite of this, and the constant presence of disease, most seamen led relatively healthy lives. (MJP)

  5. Proceedings of the International Conference on Algorithms for Approximation (2nd) Held in Royal Military College of Science, Shrivenham, England on July 1988. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Untersuchungen iber Fouriersche Reihen, Math. Ann. - 58, 51-69. 36 -3 Fejer, L. (1910), Lebesguesche Konstanten und divergente Fourierreihen, : 4 J...Best Avai~lable copy 4 , 4 ( LALGORITHMS FOR APPROXIMATION II Based on the proceedings of the Second International Conference on Algorithms for...approximation, 3. Interpolation, 4 . Smoothing and constraint methods, 5. Complex approximation, 6. Computer-aided design and geometric modelling, 7

  6. Military Government

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-07-01

    CGSC MG MILITARY GOVERNMENT LIBHARY ARI\\’IY WAR COLLEGE CJ\\RLISLE BARRACKS, PAa This text is approved for resident and extension-course...and functions · of ’ military government . It conforms ·substantially to the subject matter , of Field Manual 27-5, Civil Affairs/ Military Government ...Teaching experience at the Command and General Staff College has ···--·demonstrated the need for a military government text which brings to- gether

  7. Directions and Dilemmas in Massage Therapy Research: A Workshop Report from the 2009 North American Research Conference on Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Christopher A.; Dryden, Trish; Shipwright, Stacey

    2009-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy (MT) is widely used and expanding rapidly, but systematic research on its mechanisms and effects has, in contrast with many other therapeutic fields, a short history. Purpose: To take stock of the current state of MT research and to explore approaches, directions, and strategies with the potential to make the next two decades of MT research optimally productive. Setting: The 2009 North American Research Conference on Complementary and Integrative Medicine held in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Method: Using a modified Delphi method, the study authors led an interactive workshop that aimed to identify established MT research findings, needed MT research, weaknesses and limitations in currently available MT research, and directions to pursue in the next two decades of MT research. Participants: The thirty-seven conference attendees—including MT researchers, educators, and practitioners, and other health care practitioners who already work interprofessionally with MT—actively participated in the workshop and ensured that a diversity of perspectives were represented. Results: The MT field has made rapid and laudable progress in its short history, but at the same time this short history is probably the main reason for most of the current shortcomings in MT research. Drawing on a diversity of backgrounds, workshop participants identified many opportunities and strategies for future research. Conclusion: Though lost time can never be recovered, the field’s late start in research should not be allowed to be a demoralizing handicap to progress. Modern scientific methods and technologies, applied to the range of directions and dilemmas highlighted in this report, can lead to impressive progress in the next twenty years of MT research. PMID:21589729

  8. Gender-specific research for emergency diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease: proceedings from the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Cardiovascular Research Workgroup.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Basmah; Nagurney, John T; Anise, Ayodola; DeVon, Holli A; D'Onofrio, Gail; Hess, Erik P; Hollander, Judd E; Legato, Mariane J; McGregor, Alyson J; Scott, Jane; Tewelde, Semhar; Diercks, Deborah B

    2014-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause of death for both men and women. However, over the years, emergency physicians, cardiologists, and other health care practitioners have observed varying outcomes in men and women with symptomatic CAD. Women in general are 10 to 15 years older than men when they develop CAD, but suffer worse postinfarction outcomes compared to age-matched men. This article was developed by the cardiovascular workgroup at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference to identify sex- and gender-specific gaps in the key themes and research questions related to emergency cardiac ischemia care. The workgroup had diverse stakeholder representation from emergency medicine, cardiology, critical care, nursing, emergency medical services, patients, and major policy-makers in government, academia, and patient care. We implemented the nominal group technique to identify and prioritize themes and research questions using electronic mail, monthly conference calls, in-person meetings, and Web-based surveys between June 2013 and May 2014. Through three rounds of nomination and refinement, followed by an in-person meeting on May 13, 2014, we achieved consensus on five priority themes and 30 research questions. The overarching themes were as follows: 1) the full spectrum of sex-specific risk as well as presentation of cardiac ischemia may not be captured by our standard definition of CAD and needs to incorporate other forms of ischemic heart disease (IHD); 2) diagnosis is further challenged by sex/gender differences in presentation and variable sensitivity of cardiac biomarkers, imaging, and risk scores; 3) sex-specific pathophysiology of cardiac ischemia extends beyond conventional obstructive CAD to include other causes such as microvascular dysfunction, takotsubo, and coronary artery dissection, better recognized as IHD; 4) treatment and prognosis are influenced by sex-specific variations in biology, as well as patient

  9. THE TECHNOLOGY OF MILITARY TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WALLIS, D.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS PART OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF A CONFERENCE ON OPERATIONAL AND PERSONNEL RESEARCH IN THE MANAGEMENT OF MANPOWER SYSTEMS, HELD IN BRUSSELS IN 1965. A MODEL ILLUSTRATES THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED MILITARY INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEM WHICH PROVIDES CONTINUOUS FEEDBACK AND CONTROL OF LEARNING. THE TRAINING COURSE INCLUDES--(1) A CLEAR…

  10. THE TECHNOLOGY OF MILITARY TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WALLIS, D.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS PART OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF A CONFERENCE ON OPERATIONAL AND PERSONNEL RESEARCH IN THE MANAGEMENT OF MANPOWER SYSTEMS, HELD IN BRUSSELS IN 1965. A MODEL ILLUSTRATES THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED MILITARY INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEM WHICH PROVIDES CONTINUOUS FEEDBACK AND CONTROL OF LEARNING. THE TRAINING COURSE INCLUDES--(1) A CLEAR…

  11. Modeling, Simulation, and Gaming: Student Capstone Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Highlights student research and student projects focused on MS&G. Competitive presentations - Volunteer judges from industry, government, military and academic institutions across America. - Evaluate research, presentation expertise, . and ability to answer questions. - Judges also facilitate their assigned conference tracks

  12. Policy Measures and Reimbursement for Emergency Medical Imaging in the Era of Payment Reform: Proceedings From a Panel Discussion of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Berdahl, Carl; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Fisher, Nancy L; Burstin, Helen; Pines, Jesse M

    2015-12-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 is expanding the use of quality measurement and promulgating new payment models that place downward pressure on health care utilization and costs. As emergency department (ED) computed tomography utilization has tripled in the past decade, stakeholders have identified advanced imaging as an area where quality and efficiency measures should expand. On May 12, 2015, Academic Emergency Medicine convened a consensus conference titled "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." As part of the conference, a panel of health care policy leaders and emergency physicians discussed the effect of the ACA and other quality programs on ED diagnostic imaging, specifically the way that quality metrics may affect ED care and how ED diagnostic imaging fits in the broader strategy of the U.S. government. This article discusses the content of the panel's presentations. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. The first ever Cochrane event in Russia and Russian speaking countries - Cochrane Russia Launch - Evidence-based medicine: Achievements and barriers (QiQUM 2015) International Conference, Kazan, December 7-8, 2015.

    PubMed

    Ziganshina, Liliya Eugenevna; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2016-01-01

    Kazan hosted Russia's second International Conference QiQUM 2015 on Cochrane evidence for health policy, which was entirely independent of the pharmaceutical or other health industry, bringing together 259 participants from 11 countries and 13 regions of the Russian Federation. The Conference was greeted and endorsed by world leaders in Evidence-based medicine, health and pharmaceutical information, policy and regulation, and the World Health Organization. Participants discussed the professional and social problems arising from biased health information, unethical pharmaceutical promotion, misleading reporting of clinical trials with consequent flaws in health care delivery and the role of Cochrane evidence for informed decisions and better health. The first in history Cochrane workshop, facilitated jointly by experts from Cochrane and the WHO, with 40 participants from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Russia introduced the concept of Cochrane systematic review and the Use of Cochrane evidence in WHO policy setting. Websites document conference materials and provide interface for future collaboration: http://kpfu.ru/biology-medicine/struktura-instituta/kafedry/kfikf/konferenciya/mezhdunarodnaya-konferenciya-39dokazatelnaya.html and http://russia.cochrane.org/news/international-conference.

  14. Asia Pacific Military Medicine Conference (APMMC) Simulation Symposium (16th) Held in New Delhi, India on March 26-31, 2006. Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    DEPARTMENT AGAINST THE SOUTHERN UNREST Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Crabtree, United States -Hawaii EXTREMITY INJURIES AND LIMB SALVAGE TECHNIQUES IN OPERATION...PAKISTAN EARTHQUAKE DISASTER RELIEF Colonel BNBMPrasad, SM, India A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE EFFICACY OF PLEURAL DRAINAGE BY PIGTAIL CATHETER AND CHEST...medical evacuation, war surgery, mobile medical units, and forward army medical department. EXTREMITY INJURIES AND LIMB SALVAGE TECHNIQUES IN

  15. EDITORIAL: The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008) The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jack Jiqui; Fang, Fengzhou

    2009-05-01

    Nanomanufacturing is an emerging technology in the field of synthesis of nanomaterials, manufacture of nanodevices, nanosystems and the relevant characterization technologies, and will greatly impact our society and environment: speeding up scientific discovery, technological development, improving healthcare and living standards and slowing down the exhaustion of energy resources, to name but few. The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008) was held on the 13-16 July 2008 in Singapore in conjunction with ThinFilm2008 (The 4th International Conference on Technological Advances of Thin Films & Surface Coatings). Approximately 140 delegates from all over the world have participated in the conference and presented their latest discoveries and technological developments. The main focuses of the conference were modern nanomanufacturing by laser machining, focused ion beam fabrication, nano/micro-molding/imprinting, nanomaterial synthesis and characterization, nanometrology and nano/microsystems fabrication and characterization. There was also great interest in applications of nanomanufacturing technologies in traditional areas such as free form machining, polishing and grinding with nano-scale precision and the smoothness of surfaces of objects, and applications in space exploration, military and medicine. This special issue is devoted to NanoMan2008 with a collection of 9 invited talks presented at the conference, covering all the topics of nanomanufacturing technology and development. These papers have been upgraded by the authors with new results and discoveries since the preparation of the conference manuscripts, hence presenting the latest developments. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all the delegates who attended the conference and made the conference successful, and to the authors who contributed papers to this special issue. Thanks also go to the conference committee for their efforts and devotion to the conference. We

  16. Consortium for health and military performance and American College of Sports Medicine Summit: utility of functional movement assessment in identifying musculoskeletal injury risk.

    PubMed

    Teyhen, Deydre; Bergeron, Michael F; Deuster, Patricia; Baumgartner, Neal; Beutler, Anthony I; de la Motte, Sarah J; Jones, Bruce H; Lisman, Peter; Padua, Darin A; Pendergrass, Timothy L; Pyne, Scott W; Schoomaker, Eric; Sell, Timothy C; O'Connor, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of musculoskeletal injuries (MSKI) is critical in both civilian and military populations to enhance physical performance, optimize health, and minimize health care expenses. Developing a more unified approach through addressing identified movement impairments could result in improved dynamic balance, trunk stability, and functional movement quality while potentially minimizing the risk of incurring such injuries. Although the evidence supporting the utility of injury prediction and return-to-activity readiness screening tools is encouraging, considerable additional research is needed regarding improving sensitivity, specificity, and outcomes, and especially the implementation challenges and barriers in a military setting. If selected current functional movement assessments can be administered in an efficient and cost-effective manner, utilization of the existing tools may be a beneficial first step in decreasing the burden of MSKI, with a subsequent focus on secondary and tertiary prevention via further assessments on those with prior injury history.

  17. Isolation and purification of a polysaccharide from the caterpillar medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes) fruit bodies and its immunomodulation of RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lina; Tang, Qingjiu; Zhou, Shuai; Liu, Yanfang; Zhang, Zhong; Gao, Xinhua; Wang, Shiping; Wang, Zhaolong

    2014-01-01

    A novel polysaccharide (CP2-S) was purified from Cordyceps militaris fruit bodies by hot water extraction, ethanol precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose Fast Flow and Sephacryl S-400 high-resolution chromatography. The polysaccharide had a molecular weight of 5.938 × 10(6) g/mol and was mainly composed of glucose. CP2-S had carbohydrate content estimated to be 100% using the phenol-sulfuric acid method. Immunostimulating experiments in vitro indicated that CP2-S could stimulate nitric oxide production, phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and secretion of interleukin-1β and interleukin-2 of macrophages, suggesting that this water-soluble polysaccharide from the fruit body of C. militaris is a natural immunostimulating polysaccharide with potential for further application.

  18. Conference Scene

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J Steven; Lantos, John; Spielberg, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for clinicians, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies is to better understand the relative contributions of ontogeny and genetic variation to observed variability in drug disposition and response across the pediatric age spectrum from preterm and term newborns, to infants, children and adolescents. Extrapolation of adult experience with pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine to pediatric patients of different ages and developmental stages, is fraught with many challenges. Compared with adults, pediatric pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics involves an added measure of complexity as variability owing to developmental processes, or ontogeny, is superimposed upon genetic variation. Furthermore, some pediatric diseases have no adult correlate or are more prevalent in children compared with adults, and several adverse drug reactions are unique to children, or occur at a higher frequency in children. The primary objective of this conference was to initiate an ongoing series of annual meetings on ‘Pediatric Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine’ organized by the Center for Personalized Medicine and Therapeutic Innovation and Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Medical Therapeutics at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City, MO, USA. The primary goals of the inaugural meeting were: to bring together clinicians, basic and translational scientists and allied healthcare practitioners, and engage in a multi- and cross-disciplinary dialog aimed at implementing personalized medicine in pediatric settings; to provide a forum for the presentation and the dissemination of research related to the application of pharmacogenomic strategies to investigations of variability of drug disposition and response in children; to explore the ethical, legal and societal implications of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine that are unique to children; and finally, to create networking opportunities for stimulating discussion

  19. [Efim Ivanovich Smirnov--an outstanding founder of the military medicine and civil health care (to the 110th anniversary of birth)].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, I B; Krylov, N L

    2014-10-01

    In October 2014 we celebrate the 110th anniversary of the birth of Chief of the Main Military Medical Administration of the People's Commissariat of Defense, Minister of Health of the USSR, Hero of Socialist Labor, Member of the Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, Colonel-General of the Medical Service Efim Smirnov (1904-1989). The article highlights biographical information about him.

  20. Which End does the Thermometer go? Application of Military Medicine in Counterinsurgency: Does Direct Patient Care by American Service Members Work?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-12

    also corralled all stray hogs, goats, and dogs.94 Nursing care and training received particular attention in Haiti. Post-partum infections and...U.S., should render all care to the people. This venture included multinational civilian physicians, nurses and medical technicians. These first...multiple programs had American military physicians, nurses , and medics providing care to host nation civilians. These programs, based on ideas of altruism

  1. A NATO guide for assessing deployability for military personnel with chronic medical conditions: medical fitness for expeditionary missions, Task Group 174, Human Factors, and Medicine Panel.

    PubMed

    Russell, Randy; Reid, Alastair; Borgers, Guy; Wassink, Henry; Grove, Andreas; Niebuhr, David W

    2014-12-01

    Each time a deployed military member has an exacerbation of a pre-existing chronic disease there is a potential risk to mission success, individual health, and the safety of the unit. Currently, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) member nations employ different approaches to assessing an individual's medical fitness for deployment. To set the minimum medical standards for NATO deployments. A seven nation task group met periodically from 2008 to 2012 to develop guidelines for frontline military physicians to assess medical fitness for deployment. A medical deployment guide for 31 specific diseases/conditions using a rational, standardized and algorithmic approach based on a red-yellow-green risk stratification. If adopted as a NATO policy, this guide could then be kept up-to-date through a process that allows nations to track individuals with known chronic disease who were deployed into a theater of operations, allowing the guide to become increasingly evidence-based, and also more accurate in quantifying the risk of exacerbation based on individual and disease characteristics, as well as the nature and length of the deployment. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Effects of Illumination Pattern during Cultivation of Fruiting Body and Bioactive Compound Production by the Caterpillar Medicinal Mushroom, Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes).

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiu-Yeh; Liang, Zeng-Chin; Tseng, Chin-Yin; Hu, Shu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of light intensity in the 3 cultivation stages separately-the mycelium colonization stage, the primordial initiation stage, and the fruiting stage (in order)-on fruiting body and bioactive compound production by Cordyceps militaris. In the mycelium colonization stage, rice substrates were incubated in a spawn running room at 23°C. During the primordial initiation stage, C. militaris was grown at 18°C and illuminated 12 hours/day. In the fruiting stage the temperature was 23°C, with illumination provided 12 hours/day. The highest fruiting body yield and biological efficiency were 4.06 g dry weight/bottle and 86.83%, respectively, under 1750 ± 250 lux during the second and third stages. The cordycepin content was highest during the second and third stages under 1250 ± 250 lux. The mannitol and polysaccharide contents were highest under 1250 ± 250 and 1750 ± 250 lux during the primordial initiation stage and the fruiting stage, respectively. Thus, with controlled lighting, C. militaris can be cultivated in rice-water medium to increase fruiting body yield and bioactive compound production.

  3. The use of artificial neural networks methodology in the assessment of "vulnerability" to heroin use among army corps soldiers: a preliminary study of 170 cases inside the Military Hospital of Legal Medicine of Verona.

    PubMed

    Speri, L; Schilirò, G; Bezzetto, A; Cifelli, G; De Battisti, L; Marchi, S; Modenese, M; Varalta, F; Consigliere, F

    1998-02-01

    This article describes a preliminary study of screening/diagnostic instruments for prediction for large-scale application in the military field at the Neuropsychiatric Department of the Military Hospital of Legal Medicine of Verona and for the prevention of self-destructive behaviors, particularly through the use of drugs. 170 subjects divided into three subsamples were examined. The first subsample was characterized by a strong tendency towards normalcy, the second by a strong tendency towards pathology, and the third by a great variety of expressions of psychological and social problems, which were not necessarily related to drug use. These subjects were administered a questionnaire designed according to Squashing Theory principles (Buscema, 1994a). Answers were processed by an Artificial Neural Network created by Semeion in Rome (Buscema, 1996) and were compared with a standard clinical psychiatric assessment report and with the results of psychodiagnostic tests. Results document ANNs' remarkable ability to recognize subjects with declared, in exordium and "at risk" pathological behaviors. Blind results on learning and trial samples show a very high predictive capacity (over 90%). A comparison with the examined subjects' clinical report and the results of the first follow-up also document very high agreements. The broad variation of answers obtained in the third subsample allows further methodological reflections on the contribution of Artificial Neural Networks and Squashing Theory to the study of deviance, for both sociologists and clinicians, and not only for those in the field of drug addiction.

  4. 2001 MAPLD International Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This CD contains the proceedings from the '2001 MAPLD International Conference', held on 11-13 September 2001 at Johns Hopkins University. Sessions included the following: (1) Applications: Military and Aerospace; (2) Design 1: Processors, Logic, and Programmable Devices; (3) Reliability: Devices and The Effects of the Radiation Environment; (4) Design 2: Systems; and (5) Design 3: Fault Tolerance.

  5. Impact of Service Member Death on Military Families: A National Study of Bereavement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Service Member Death on Military Families: A National Study of Bereavement Dr. Stephen Cozza Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of...Military Medicine Rockville, MD 20652 scozza@usuhs.mil The present study will examine various factors that influence the military family bereavement ...recruitment of study participants. military bereavement ; grief; coping; resilience; physical health; psychological health 7 INTRODUCTION: Since 9/11

  6. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    3 National Security in the Nuclear Age [V. Serebryannikov; KOMMUNIST VOORUZHENNYKH SIL No 9, May 88] 5 MILITARY SCIENCE Military Aspect of...words. This is the main order issued by the party conference. 07045 National Security in the Nuclear Age 18010259 Moscow KOMMUNIST VOORUZHENNYKH SIL...Nuclear Age "] [Text] Ensuring national security has always been con- sidered the holy of holies of every state. The armed forces and weapons

  7. Downgrading the Military in Soviet Foreign Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    students for military service." Students at Kiev University at an October 15, 1988, conference were apparently already given assurances that the dress code will...not been missed by military commentators, who have expressed their disapproval. Among the reasons for the student boycott are an overly strict dress ... code ; loss of study time in main career-track courses; abusive, crude instructors; and outdated, inaccurate textbooks. Colonel General A. Demidov, Chief

  8. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Zickmund, Susan L; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    Background In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. Methods The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an 'editing approach' within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Results Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences. Conclusion

  9. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Zickmund, Susan L; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an 'editing approach' within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences. This study highlights several

  10. The International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care: a list of recommendations and additional conclusions: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Bösel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Roberson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    Careful patient monitoring using a variety of techniques including clinical and laboratory evaluation, bedside physiological monitoring with continuous or non-continuous techniques and imaging is fundamental to the care of patients who require neurocritical care. How best to perform and use bedside monitoring is still being elucidated. To create a basic platform for care and a foundation for further research the Neurocritical Care Society in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the Society for Critical Care Medicine and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to develop recommendations about physiologic bedside monitoring. This supplement contains a Consensus Summary Statement with recommendations and individual topic reviews as a background to the recommendations. In this article, we highlight the recommendations and provide additional conclusions as an aid to the reader and to facilitate bedside care.

  11. Effect of UV-B Irradiation on Physiologically Active Substance Content and Antioxidant Properties of the Medicinal Caterpillar Fungus Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes).

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Jeng; Lin, Chun-Ping; Mau, Jeng-Leun; Li, Yu-Shan; Tsai, Shu-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light irradiation is a well-known technique for converting vitamin D2 from ergosterol in mushroom fruit bodies. Mushrooms are a natural and nonanimal food source of vitamin D2. We studied the effect of UV-B light irradiation on the amount of vitamin D2 and physiologically active substances in Cordyceps militaris and their antioxidant properties. After UV-B irradiation for 2 hours, the vitamin D2 content of freshly harvested C. militaris fruiting bodies, mycelia, whole submerged culture (WSC), and homogenized submerged culture (HSC) increased from 0 to 0.03 to 0.22 to 1.11 mg/g, but the ergosterol content was reduced from 1.36 to 2.50 to 1.24 to 2.06 mg/g, respectively. After UV-B irradiation, the amount of adenosine, cordycepin, and ergothioneine of fruiting bodies dramatically increased 32-128%, but the polysaccharide content slightly decreased 36%. The reverse trends were observed in mycelia, WSC, and HSC. UV-B irradiation could reduce the effective concentrations at 50% of fruiting bodies for ethanolic and hot water extracts in reducing power, scavenging, and chelating abilities, whereas mycelia, WSC, and HSC of ethanolic extracts increased effective concentrations at 50% in reducing power, scavenging, and chelating abilities. UV-B irradiation slightly increased flavonoid content (10-56%) and slightly affected total phenol content.

  12. Lasers In Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    Fifty people around have participated in the workshop "Lasers in Medicine": most of them participants on the previous days on the conference "Laser Technologies in Industry", also some invited physicians and others interested in the topic from various University Departments.

  13. Advanced MRI in Acute Military TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    the related study PT072599 at several national and international meetings. Initial results have been published in The New England Journal of Medicine . Key...Flaherty, and D. L. Brody “Detection of Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury in US Military Personnel” New England Journal of Medicine 2011: 364: 2091

  14. Transfusion medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  15. [Organization of medical equipment and stock supply of military medical facilities and groups of Disaster Medicine Service of the Russian Defense Ministry in emergency situations].

    PubMed

    Korniushko, I G; Iakovlev, S V; Krasavin, K D; Lemeshkin, R N

    2011-10-01

    The article outlined the modern concept of medical equipment and stock supply of medical facilities and groups of Disaster Medicine Service of the Russian Defense Ministry involved into the remedial of the medical actions of emergency situations. The structure of the units of medical supplies in these conditions is presented.

  16. Toward a definition of teamwork in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Rosemarie; Kozlowski, Steve W J; Shapiro, Marc J; Salas, Eduardo

    2008-11-01

    The patient safety literature from the past decade emphasizes the importance of teamwork skills and human factors in preventing medical errors. Simulation has been used within aviation, the military, and now health care domains to effectively teach and assess teamwork skills. However, attempts to expand and generalize research and training principles have been limited due to a lack of a well-defined, well-researched taxonomy. As part of the 2008 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on "The Science of Simulation in Healthcare," a subset of the group expertise and group assessment breakout sections identified evidence-based recommendations for an emergency medicine (EM) team taxonomy and performance model. This material was disseminated within the morning session and was discussed both during breakout sessions and via online messaging. Below we present a well-defined, well-described taxonomy that will help guide design, implementation, and assessment of simulation-based team training programs.

  17. Soviet Computers and Cybernetics: Shortcomings and Military Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Soviet Military Decision Making, Thesis (Delivered to the Ninth National Conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies , October...Thesis. Ninth NatLonal Conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies , October 1978. Myagi, A. "Problemi khozrascheta VTs

  18. Mashkiki: Old Medicine Nourishing the New. American Indians and Alaska Natives in Biomedical Research Careers--II. Proceedings of the Conference (Duluth, Minnesota, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Edwin W., Ed.; Aitken, Larry P., Ed.

    This book consists of papers and panel discussions presented at a conference that focused on encouraging American Indian and Alaska Native students to enter the field of biomedical research. Research and treatment of diseases among Native populations can best be carried out by American Indian and Alaska Native researchers who have a background in…

  19. Mashkiki: Old Medicine Nourishing the New. American Indians and Alaska Natives in Biomedical Research Careers--II. Proceedings of the Conference (Duluth, Minnesota, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Edwin W., Ed.; Aitken, Larry P., Ed.

    This book consists of papers and panel discussions presented at a conference that focused on encouraging American Indian and Alaska Native students to enter the field of biomedical research. Research and treatment of diseases among Native populations can best be carried out by American Indian and Alaska Native researchers who have a background in…

  20. Broadening Participation in Science, Technology and Medicine: Proceedings of the Annual Technological Literacy Conference (6th, Washington, D.C., February 1-3, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Dennis W., Ed.

    This document contains the text of 50 papers presented at a national conference that focused on the relationships among science, technology, and society (STS). Most of the papers presented featured one of five major thematic areas around which the National Association for Science, Technology and Society is organized: education and information;…

  1. Military Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton; Hayes, Bill

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores questions of military authority. The first article looks at the French Army mutinies in World War I and how the French Army dealt with them. The second article examines President Truman's firing of popular and powerful General Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. The final article…

  2. The investigation of the correlation between metabolic syndrome and Chinese medicine constitution types in senior retired military personnel of the People's Liberation Army.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ying-lu; Zheng, Guo-yin; Ling, Chang-quan

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and the distribution of constitutional pattern in elderly retired personnel of the People's Liberation Army. Adopting the method of cross-sectional field investigation, from June to December in 2008, the investigation questionnaires were completed by the aged over 60 and collected from 69 military retired residences in the 4 cities of Shanghai, Nanjing, Hangzhou and Qingdao. Other data, including demographic characteristics, physiological characteristics, life style and former medical history, were collected and analyzed. The statistical analysis for the database was drawn up by the software Epidata 3.0. A total of 4,502 people were included in this study, and 35.3% of them were diagnosed with MS. There was no obvious difference in mobility among ages (60 to 69, 70 to 79 and over 80, P>0.05). Referring to the MS patients in the 70s age group, both the phlegm-dampness and dampness-heat constitutional types were evidently higher than those in the 60s age group (P=0.019, P=0.008); while MS patients in 80s and older showed a significantly lower incidence of dampness-heat constitution than those in the 60s (P=0.00); and ql-deficiency constitution was obviously higher in the 80s age group than those in the other two groups (P=0.00). The top 3 constitutions in MS people were, respectively, phlegm-dampness, dampness-heat and qi-deficiency constitution; while in non-MS people, the top 3 constitutions were gentleness, qi-deficiency and phlegm-dampness. When the patient's body mass index (BMI) was more than 25 kg/m(2), the rate of phlegm-dampness and dampness-heat constitution significantly increased, while the rate of qi-deficiency constitution declined; the discrepancy was significant (P=0.00). The prevalence rate of MS in military senior people was 35.3%, which did not vary among the three age groups. Phlegm-dampness, dampness-heat and qi-deficiency constitution were the three dominant constitutional types seen in the

  3. The Nexus of Military Missions and Means

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    is being published to formally record the state of the Missions and Means Framework (MMF) circa 2002. However, since that time, the MMF has...continued to evolve and has been presented in updated forms at various conferences. See, for example, the "Military Missions and Means Framework " paper

  4. The 0351 Military Occupational Specialty Realignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-07

    conferences the need to restructure some of the skills and weapon systems within the Assaultman and the Anti-Tank Guided Missileman military occupational...specialty: The 0352 Missileman . Taking the Javelin from the Assaultman allowed for the expansion of the Assaultman’s breaching, mobility

  5. Marketing: applications in a military health care setting.

    PubMed

    Roark, G A; Tucker, S L

    1997-08-01

    Military health care leaders must recognize the importance of satisfied consumers. As part of this recognition, the focus of military medicine must change from a coercive-power to a reward-power system. This change highlights the need for business practices such as marketing. Encouraging military health care administrators to learn and understand the applications of the marketing variables will enhance demand management and health care delivery for beneficiaries. This paper describes some applications of marketing variables, informs the military health care administrator about the process of marketing, and describes the utility of marketing in the current paradigm shift in military health care delivery.

  6. Military unique curriculum: identifying and prioritizing content.

    PubMed

    Cloonan, Clifford; Fauver, Howard E; Holloway, Harry C; Hospenthal, Duane R; Hutton, John; Lewis, Evelyn; Madrigal, Vinicio E; Maliner, Beverly; Nelson, Michael; Reynolds, Paul C; Staunton, Michael; Wayne, Barry A; Roy, Michael J

    2003-09-01

    We have identified and prioritized a series of objectives that warrant inclusion in the continuum of military medical education. Although participants in the 16th Conference on Military Medicine also discussed whether each objective should be taught at the medical student, resident, or staff physician level, to a large extent this distinction is not helpful, since many, if not most, of these topic areas would likely require incorporation at each of these three levels to achieve the desired level of competence in staff physicians. Incorporation of new curricular elements poses a significant challenge, since it is already difficult to fit the existing curriculum into the available time. It is not reasonable to consider increasing the number of lecture hours. Therefore, it is probable that some elements of the existing curriculum will need to be pared down or eliminated to incorporate new material. In the past, when new material has been added to the existing curriculum, such as when the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus was added, it has generally been done at the individual teacher or at most departmental level. Although this approach has the advantage of having a subject matter expert decide how best to insert new material within the fabric of the existing curriculum, there are a couple of problems with widespread use of this approach. First, some of these new objectives may not fit clearly within an existing course curriculum or department's educational mission. Second, such an approach may not provide the degree of coordination that is necessary to ensure that a new curricular item is adequately covered in all respects, and it may result in unnecessary overlap in instruction when different professors incorporate similar elements. Therefore, the prioritization of newer curricular items, as has been done during this conference, may serve as a useful guide in this process. However, a corresponding effort is needed to identify and prioritize existing

  7. HIV in military.

    PubMed

    1996-05-31

    The House of Representatives approved a defense authorization bill that requires the Pentagon to discharge service members who test positive for HIV antibodies. This is the second measure of its kind. Last year, Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-CA) pushed through Congress a similar measure that was repealed after encountering public opposition. President Clinton said he will veto the defense bill in its current form. The bill provides $13 billion in spending beyond the amount the Pentagon requested, resurrects plans for the Star Wars missile defense system, and rescinds Clinton's don't ask, don't tell policy toward gay men and lesbians in the military. Rep. Peter Torkildsen (R-MA) is confident that the HIV provision can be stricken when the bill goes to a House-Senate conference committee in a few weeks.

  8. Conference Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, W. Warner, Ed.; Beckhard, Richard, Ed.

    This book, written to instruct in the use of a conference as a medium of social intercourse, is divided into four sections. Section I, which contains five articles, deals with factors to be considered in planning a conference. Specific techniques one can employ to improve a conference and several different techniques for evaluating the…

  9. Mathematical Models for Simulating Physiological Responses to Severe Military Stress: Renal Function Details,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Stress(Physiology), *Mathematical models, *Response(Biology), Urinary system, Air force, Kidneys, Medical research, Military medicine, Blood pressure, Computerized simulation, Osmosis , Experimental data, Metabolism

  10. Military Strategy,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-01-01

    with a grass surface. This aircraft has the following cal- culated characteristics: maximum «peed 2500-2700 km/hour, service cell - ing up to...mobi- lisation of all the national resources to repel the enemy, and the systematic growth of the technical equipment of our Armed Forces. For...bombers. Cannon- machlnegun aircraft weapons have been replaced by rocket weapons. In recent years the speed and celling of military planes has

  11. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Nuclear physics, lasers, and medicine(Scientific session of the General Meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 14 December 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    The scientific session of the General Meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held in the Conference Hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, on 14 December 2009. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Kotov Yu D (National Research Nuclear University 'Moscow Engineering Physics Institute' (MEPhI), Institute of Astrophysics, Moscow) "High-energy solar flare processes and their investigation onboard Russian satellite missions CORONAS"; (2) Pakhlov P N (Russian Federation State Scientific Center 'Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,' Moscow) "Exotic charmonium"; (3) Shcherbakov I A (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Laser and plasma technologies in medicine"; (4) Balakin V E (Center for Physics and Technology, Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Protvino, Moscow region) "New-generation equipment and technologies for the ray therapy of oncological diseases using a proton beam"; (5) Kravchuk L V (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Development of nuclear physics medicine at the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS." Papers based on reports 1, 3, and 5 are published below. The expanded content of the report by Pakhlov is presented in review form in Physics-Uspekhi 53 219 (2010). • High-energy solar flare processes and their investigation onboard Russian satellite missions CORONAS, Yu D Kotov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 6, Pages 619-631 • Laser physics in medicine, I A Shcherbakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 6, Pages 631-635 • Development of nuclear physics medicine at the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, L V Kravchuk Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 6, Pages 635-639

  12. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... have good news and bad news for military families. MORE Military Families Brace for What’s Next In Syria President Trump ordered an airstrike in Syria leaving military families wondering what's next. More April is the Month ...

  13. Preventive and Community Medicine in Primary Care. Teaching of Preventive Medicine Vol. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, William H., Ed.

    This monograph is the result of a conference on the role of preventive and community medicine in primary medical care and education. The following six papers were presented at the conference: (1) Roles of Departments of Preventive Medicine; (2) Competency-Based Objectives in Preventive Medicine for the Family Physician; (3) Preventive Medicine…

  14. The Birmingham military trauma registrar. A personal view.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, A C

    2012-01-01

    The military registrar is responsible for the co-ordination of care of returning battlefield casualties at Role 4 Royal Centre for Defence Medicine (RCDM). Traditionally two military specialty registrars (StR) providing a 24-hour a day service 365 days a year have shared this responsibility. For Military StR3 General Surgical trainees this is now a recognized training post providing military trainees the opportunity of gaining exposure to battlefield casualties at an early stage in their specialty training. This is a personal account of my time as the military registrar and the training opportunities to be gained for this model of military medical training. Whilst the post is busy and the on call rota demanding the opportunities for surgical trainees are excellent and the requirements of the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme (ISCP) can be met ensuring seamless progression to StR 4 training. This is a highly desirable post for junior military registrars.

  15. Gender and Military Contextual Risk Factors for Intimate Partner Aggression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Loneliness and aggressive behaviour. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 2, 243–252. Chief of Naval Operations. (2006, December 29). Office of...A. W., & Russell , M. L. (2006). Variables associated with intimate partner violence in a deploying military sample. Military Medicine, 171, 627–631

  16. Physical Fitness Influences Stress Reactions to Extreme Military Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-09

    Research Center, 140 Sylvester Road, San Diego, CA 92106. tJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205...examining individual differences in buman perfor- 738 MILITARY MEDICINE, Vol. 173, August 2008 Physical Fitness and Military Stress manee and stress

  17. The Effect of Military Personnel Requirements on the Future Supply of Scientists and Engineers in the United States. Papers and a Conference Report (Washington, D.C., June 10, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Human Resources.

    This document contains two papers commissioned by the Human Resources Commission of the National Research Council to explore the potential effects of military personnel requirements on the supply of scientists and engineers, and reaction to the papers from a one-day seminar of invited participants. The first paper, by Dr. Dael Wolfle, considers…

  18. The International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care: evidentiary tables: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Bösel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Roberson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    A variety of technologies have been developed to assist decision-making during the management of patients with acute brain injury who require intensive care. A large body of research has been generated describing these various technologies. The Neurocritical Care Society (NCS) in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium (LABIC) organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to perform a systematic review of the published literature to help develop evidence-based practice recommendations on bedside physiologic monitoring. This supplement contains a Consensus Summary Statement with recommendations and individual topic reviews on physiologic processes important in the care of acute brain injury. In this article we provide the evidentiary tables for select topics including systemic hemodynamics, intracranial pressure, brain and systemic oxygenation, EEG, brain metabolism, biomarkers, processes of care and monitoring in emerging economies to provide the clinician ready access to evidence that supports recommendations about neuromonitoring.

  19. The 2016 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, "Shared Decision Making in the Emergency Department: Development of a Policy-relevant Patient-centered Research Agenda" Diagnostic Testing Breakout Session Report.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Tyler W; Rising, Kristin L; Bellolio, M Fernanda; Hall, M Kennedy; Brody, Aaron; Dodd, Kenneth W; Grieser, Mira; Levy, Phillip D; Raja, Ali S; Self, Wesley H; Weingarten, Gail; Hess, Erik P; Hollander, Judd E

    2016-12-01

    Diagnostic testing is an integral component of patient evaluation in the emergency department (ED). Emergency clinicians frequently use diagnostic testing to more confidently exclude "worst-case" diagnoses rather than to determine the most likely etiology for a presenting complaint. Increased utilization of diagnostic testing has not been associated with reductions in disease-related mortality but has led to increased overall healthcare costs and other unintended consequences (e.g., incidental findings requiring further workup, unnecessary exposure to ionizing radiation or potentially nephrotoxic contrast). Shared decision making (SDM) presents an opportunity for clinicians to discuss the benefits and harms associated with diagnostic testing with patients to more closely tailor testing to patient risk. This article introduces the challenges and opportunities associated with incorporating SDM into emergency care by summarizing the conclusions of the diagnostic testing group at the 2016 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on SDM. Three primary domains emerged: 1) characteristics of a condition or test appropriate for SDM, 2) critical elements of and potential barriers to SDM discussions on diagnostic testing, and 3) financial aspects of SDM applied to diagnostic testing. The most critical research questions to improve engagement of patients in their acute care diagnostic decisions were determined by consensus. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. Diagnostic standards for dopaminergic augmentation of restless legs syndrome: report from a World Association of Sleep Medicine-International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group consensus conference at the Max Planck Institute.

    PubMed

    García-Borreguero, Diego; Allen, Richard P; Kohnen, Ralf; Högl, Birgit; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Oertel, Wolfgang; Hening, Wayne A; Paulus, Walter; Rye, David; Walters, Arthur; Winkelmann, Juliane; Earley, Christopher J

    2007-08-01

    Augmentation of symptom severity is the main complication of dopaminergic treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). The current article reports on the considerations of augmentation that were made during a European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG)-sponsored Consensus Conference in April 2006 at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) in Munich, Germany, the conclusions of which were endorsed by the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG) and the World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM). The Consensus Conference sought to develop a better understanding of augmentation and generate a better operational definition for its clinical identification. Current concepts of the pathophysiology, clinical features, and therapy of RLS augmentation were evaluated by subgroups who presented a summary of their findings for general consideration and discussion. Recent data indicating sensitivity and specificity of augmentation features for identification of augmentation were also evaluated. The diagnostic criteria of augmentation developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conference in 2002 were reviewed in light of current data and theoretical understanding of augmentation. The diagnostic value and criteria for each of the accepted features of augmentation were considered by the group. A consensus was then developed for a revised statement of the diagnostic criteria for augmentation. Five major diagnostic features of augmentation were identified: usual time of RLS symptom onset each day, number of body parts with RLS symptoms, latency to symptoms at rest, severity of the symptoms when they occur, and effects of dopaminergic medication on symptoms. The quantitative data available relating the time of RLS onset and the presence of other features indicated optimal augmentation criteria of either a 4-h advance in usual starting time for RLS symptoms or a combination of the occurrence of other features. A paradoxical response to changes in medication dose also indicates

  1. NIH Consensus Conference. Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    1998-11-04

    To provide clinicians, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of the use and effectiveness of acupuncture to treat a variety of conditions. A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 12-member panel representing the fields of acupuncture, pain, psychology, psychiatry, physical medicine and rehabilitation, drug abuse, family practice, internal medicine, health policy, epidemiology, statistics, physiology, biophysics, and the representatives of the public. In addition, 25 experts from these same fields presented data to the panel and a conference audience of 1200. Presentations and discussions were divided into 3 phases over 2 1/2 days: (1) presentations by investigators working in areas relevant to the consensus questions during a 2-day public session; (2) questions and statements from conference attendees during open discussion periods that were part of the public session; and (3) closed deliberations by the panel during the remainder of the second day and morning of the third. The conference was organized and supported by the Office of Alternative Medicine and the Office of Medical Applications of Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. The literature, produced from January 1970 to October 1997, was searched through MEDLINE, Allied and Alternative Medicine, EMBASE, and MANTIS, as well as through a hand search of 9 journals that were not indexed by the National Library of Medicine. An extensive bibliography of 2302 references was provided to the panel and the conference audience. Expert speakers prepared abstracts of their own conference presentations with relevant citations from the literature. Scientific evidence was given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience. The panel, answering predefined questions, developed their conclusions based on the scientific evidence presented in the open forum and scientific literature. The panel composed a draft statement, which was read in its entirety and circulated to the experts and the audience

  2. Student Pugwash Conference Probes Scientists' Individual Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    Students from 25 nations and senior scientists examined ethical and social dimensions of decision making about science and technology during the 1985 Student Pugwash Conference on scientists' individual responsibilities. Working groups focused on toxic wastes, military uses of space, energy and poverty, genetic engineering, and individual rights.…

  3. Student Pugwash Conference Probes Scientists' Individual Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    Students from 25 nations and senior scientists examined ethical and social dimensions of decision making about science and technology during the 1985 Student Pugwash Conference on scientists' individual responsibilities. Working groups focused on toxic wastes, military uses of space, energy and poverty, genetic engineering, and individual rights.…

  4. Measuring Quality of Care in Patients With Multiple Clinical Conditions: Summary of a Conference Conducted by the Society of General Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Sheldon; Fung, Constance; Turner, Barbara J.

    2007-01-01

    Performance measurement has been widely advocated as a means to improve health care delivery and, ultimately, clinical outcomes. However, the evidence supporting the value of using the same quality measures designed for patients with a single clinical condition in patients with multiple conditions is weak. If clinically complex patients, defined here as patients with multiple clinical conditions, present greater challenges to achieving quality goals, providers may shun them or ignore important, but unmeasured, clinical issues. This paper summarizes the proceedings of a conference addressing the challenge of measuring quality of care in the patient with multiple clinical conditions with the goal of informing the implementation of quality measurement systems and future research programs on this topic. The conference had three main areas of discussion. First, the potential problems caused by applying current quality standards to patients with multiple conditions were examined. Second, the advantages and disadvantages of three strategies to improve quality measurement in clinically complex patients were evaluated: excluding certain clinically complex patients from a given standard, relaxing the performance target, and assigning a greater weight to some measures based on the expected clinical benefit or difficulty of reaching the performance target. Third, the strengths and weaknesses of potential novel measures such change in functional status were considered. The group concurred that, because clinically complex patients present a threat to the implementation of quality measures, high priority must be assigned to a research agenda on this topic. This research should evaluate the impact of quality measurement on these patients and expand the range of quality measures relevant to the care of clinically complex patients. PMID:17516106

  5. Slowing Military Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Military Models to Ottoman Turkey and Meiji Japan,” in Theo Farrell and Terry Terriff, eds., The Sources of Military Change: Culture, Politics, Technology...2002; Farrell and Terriff, “The Sources of Military Change”; Goldman, “The Spread of Western Military Models to Ottoman Turkey and Meiji Japan.” 107

  6. Conference scene: DGVS spring conference 2009.

    PubMed

    Kolligs, Frank Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The 3rd annual DGVS Spring Conference of the German Society for Gastroenterology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten) was held at the Seminaris Campus Hotel in Berlin, Germany, on 8-9 May, 2009. The conference was organized by Roland Schmid and Matthias Ebert from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. The central theme of the meeting was 'translational gastrointestinal oncology: towards personalized medicine and individualized therapy'. The conference covered talks on markers for diagnosis, screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer, targets for molecular therapy, response prediction in clinical oncology, development and integration of molecular imaging in gastrointestinal oncology and translational research in clinical trial design. Owing to the broad array of topics and limitations of space, this article will focus on biomarkers, response prediction and the integration of biomarkers into clinical trials. Presentations mentioned in this summary were given by Matthias Ebert (Technical University of Munich, Germany), Esmeralda Heiden (Epigenomics, Berlin, Germany), Frank Kolligs (University of Munich, Germany), Florian Lordick (University of Heidelberg, Germany), Hans Jorgen Nielsen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Anke Reinacher-Schick (University of Bochum, Germany), Christoph Röcken (University of Berlin, Germany), Wolff Schmiegel (University of Bochum, Germany) and Thomas Seufferlein (University of Halle, Germany).

  7. [The military odyssey of Norman Bethune].

    PubMed

    Alexander, C A

    2000-04-01

    While visiting the People's Republic of China in 1982, I became aware of the work of the Canadian, Norman Bethune, as a military surgeon. Bethune first served as a stretcher - bearer in an ambulance unit and later as a medical officer with the Allies during the First World War. He also participated in the Spanish Civil War as a military physician. He died in China while serving with Mao Tsetung's Eighth Route Army, fighting the Japanese invaders in Yen'an. Bethune pioneered the use of whole blood transfusions in combat areas, first in Spain and then in China. In the annals of Chinese military history, he has been given an honored place as a military surgeon and a martyr. He is also credited in China, with improving the practice of battlefield medicine, as an organizer, teacher and innovator. Bethune's fame in China is now spreading to Canada.

  8. Malaria prevention and control in the United States military.

    PubMed

    Robert, L L

    2001-01-01

    Malaria continues to be a serious threat to deployed military forces in many areas of the World. United States experiences during, and lessons learned from, World War II, Viet Nam, and Somalia have significantly changed the way that military planners, medical and preventive medicine personnel are facing the malaria challenge. Currently, the US military has a powerful arsenal of educational courses and materials, personal protective measures, and malaria surveillance and control techniques in place to fight malaria. These new tools will hopefully reduce malaria morbidity and mortality during military deployments in the future.

  9. Military specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The current situation relative to the military specification is that there is not one specific model of turbulence which people are using. Particular disagreement exists on how turbulence levels will vary with qualitative analysis. It does not tie one down to specifics. When it comes to flying quality specifications, many feel that one should stay with the definitions of the Cooper-Harper rating scale but allow the levels to shift depending on the level of turbulence. There is a ride quality specification in the MIL-SPEC having to do with flight control systems design that is related to a turbulence model. This spec (MIL-F8785C) and others are discussed.

  10. UK role 4 military infection services: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Dufty, Ngozi E; Bailey, M S

    2013-09-01

    NATO describes 'Role 4' military medical services as those provided for the definitive care of patients who cannot be treated within a theatre of operations and these are usually located in a military force's country of origin and may include the involvement of civilian medical services. The UK Defence Medical Services have a proud history of developing and providing clinical services in infectious diseases and tropical medicine, sexual health and HIV medicine, and medical microbiology and virology. These UK Role 4 Military Infection Services have adapted well to recent overseas deployments, but new challenges will arise due to current military cutbacks and a greater diversity of contingency operations in the future. Further evidence-based development of these services will require leadership by military clinicians and improved communication and support for 'reach-back' services.

  11. Conference Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    Since the first IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, March 2002) and the Second Conference (Rio de Janeiro, May 2005), progress has continued in most countries and world regions to attract girls to physics and advance women into leadership roles, and many working groups have formed. The Third Conference (Seoul, October 2008), with 283 attendees from 57 countries, was dedicated to celebrating the physics achievements of women throughout the world, networking toward new international collaborations, building each participant's capacity for career success, and aiding the formation of active regional working groups to advance women in physics. Despite the progress, women remain a small minority of the physics community in most countries.

  12. [New aspects of polytrauma treatment - current facts and developments: report of the first annual conference of the Committee on Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care and Trauma Management (Sektion NIS)].

    PubMed

    Trentzsch, H; Wölfl, C; Matthes, G; Paffrath, T; Lefering, R; Flohé, S

    2013-11-01

    Taking care of severely injured patients is a complex and ambitious mission. The committee on emergency medicine, intensive care and trauma management of the German Society of Trauma Surgery (Sektion NIS) has accepted this challenge. On the occasion of the release of the annual report of the TraumaRegistry DGU®, the committee held its first annual congress in order to provide members and an intrigued audience with current trends and results from the latest research in national trauma care ranging from the animal facility to the S3 guidelines. Topics of focus were new realizations based on data from the TraumaRegistry DGU® and means of quality assurance in trauma care. This article gives a report on the meeting and summarizes the major results of the presented studies and the latest deployments in this field of trauma research.

  13. Dementia: treating patients and caregivers with complementary and alternative medicine--results of a clinical expert conference using the World Café method.

    PubMed

    Teut, Michael; Bloedt, Susanne; Baur, Roland; Betsch, Frederik; Elies, Michael; Fruehwald, Maria; Fuesgen, Ingo; Kerckhoff, Annette; Krüger, Eckard; Schimpf, Dorothee; Schnabel, Katharina; Walach, Harald; Warme, Britta; Warning, Albercht; Wilkens, Johannes; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    In Germany the number of inhabitants with dementia is expected to increase from 1.2 million at present to 2.3 million in 2050. Our aim was to investigate which treatments complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) experts consider to be of therapeutic use in developing treatment strategies and hypotheses for further clinical studies. In a participatory group workshop the 'World Café' method was used. As questions we asked: 1) 'Based on your clinical experience, which CAM therapies are effective in the treatment of patients with dementia? 2) Based on your clinical experience, which CAM therapies are effective in the treatment of lay and professional caregivers of patients with dementia?, and 3) How should a CAM treatment program look like?' Further Delphi rounds were used to reach consensus and summarize the results. The 2-day workshop took place in January 2012 in Berlin. A total of 17 experts participated. The most important subject in the treatment was the need to understand patients' biographies in order to individualize the therapy. Therapy itself consists of the therapeutic relationship, nonmedical therapies such as sports, massage, music and arts therapy as well as medical treatment such as herbal or homeopathic medicines. With regard to caregivers the most important aim is to prevent or reduce psychological distress, e.g., by mind-body programs. Instead of single treatments, more general elements such as understanding the patients' biographies, therapeutic relationships, individualizing, networking, and self-care emerged as main results. An integrative treatment program should connect outpatient and inpatient care as well as all experts. CAM training courses should be offered to doctors, nurses, and caregivers. Future clinical studies should focus on complex intervention programs integrating these key elements. © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  14. Chemical Ingredients of Cordyceps militaris

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms, including Cordyceps militaris, have received attention in Korea because of their biological activities. In the fruiting body and in corpus of C. militaris, the total free amino acid content was 69.32 mg/g and 14.03 mg/g, respectively. In the fruiting body, the most abundant amino acids were lysine, glutamic acid, proline and threonine. The fruiting body was rich in unsaturated fatty acids, which comprised about 70% of the total fatty acids. The most abundant unsaturated acid was linoleic acid. There were differences in adenosine and cordycepin contents between the fruiting body and the corpus. The adenosine concentration was 0.18% in the fruiting body and 0.06% in the corpus, and the cordycepin concentration was 0.97% in the fruiting body and 0.36% in the corpus. PMID:23997632

  15. Consensus summary statement of the International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen M; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Böesel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Robertson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    Neurocritical care depends, in part, on careful patient monitoring but as yet there are little data on what processes are the most important to monitor, how these should be monitored, and whether monitoring these processes is cost-effective and impacts outcome. At the same time, bioinformatics is a rapidly emerging field in critical care but as yet there is little agreement or standardization on what information is important and how it should be displayed and analyzed. The Neurocritical Care Society in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the Society for Critical Care Medicine, and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to begin to address these needs. International experts from neurosurgery, neurocritical care, neurology, critical care, neuroanesthesiology, nursing, pharmacy, and informatics were recruited on the basis of their research, publication record, and expertise. They undertook a systematic literature review to develop recommendations about specific topics on physiologic processes important to the care of patients with disorders that require neurocritical care. This review does not make recommendations about treatment, imaging, and intraoperative monitoring. A multidisciplinary jury, selected for their expertise in clinical investigation and development of practice guidelines, guided this process. The GRADE system was used to develop recommendations based on literature review, discussion, integrating the literature with the participants' collective experience, and critical review by an impartial jury. Emphasis was placed on the principle that recommendations should be based on both data quality and on trade-offs and translation into clinical practice. Strong consideration was given to providing pragmatic guidance and recommendations for bedside neuromonitoring, even in the absence of high quality data.

  16. Biomedical Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of Biomedical Conferences, Vivo Metric Systems Co. has produced cardiac electrodes based on NASA technology. Frequently in science, one highly specialized discipline is unaware of relevant advances made in other areas. In an attempt to familiarize researchers in a variety of disciplines with medical problems and needs, NASA has sponsored conferences that bring together university scientists, practicing physicians and manufacturers of medical instruments.

  17. Translations on USSR Military Affairs, No. 1394.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    lucid and multifaceted."’ Utilizing the advantages of the planned socialist economy is of primary importance in accomplishing the mission of...same dreams and concerns as our people. Their intense military labor flows into the common channel of the Soviet people’s creative activity and their...to participate in defense measures — all of this is past. One can only dream about readers’ conferences since the only CD literature that you can

  18. Current State of Military Hybrid Vehicle Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-31

    include:  Allison Hybrid EP System™ - Transit buses two-mode parallel hybrid with continuously variable transmission (CVT)  Azure Balance Hybrid...Heavy-Duty Transit Buses , Proceeding of the Vehicular Technology Conference, Vol. 5, pp 3310-3315, October 2003. [3] E. Rosenthal, U.S. Military...cars and commercial applications such as delivery trucks and transit busses. One of the biggest justifications for hybrids is their fuel efficiency

  19. The command of biotechnology and merciful conquest in military opposition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ji-Wei

    2006-11-01

    Biotechnology has an increasingly extensive use for military purposes. With the upcoming age of biotechnology, military operations are depending more on biotechnical methods. Judging from the evolving law of the theory of command, the command of biotechnology is feasible and inevitable. The report discusses some basic characteristics of modern theories of command, as well as the mature possibility of the command theory of military biotechnology. The evolution of the command theory is closely associated with the development of military medicine. This theory is expected to achieve successes in wars in an ultramicro, nonlethal, reversible, and merciful way and will play an important role in biotechnological identification and orientation, defense and attack, and the maintenance of fighting powers and biological monitoring. The command of military biotechnology has not become a part of the virtual military power yet, but it is an exigent strategic task to construct and perfect this theory.

  20. [Military medical and health care system in the Song Dynasty].

    PubMed

    DU, J

    2016-05-01

    The military medical and health care system in the Song Dynasty manifested as two aspects, namely disease prevention and medical treatment. Disease prevention included ensuring food and drink safety, avoiding dangerous stations and enjoying regular vacations, etc. Medical treatment included sending medical officials to patrol, stationing military physicians to follow up, applying emergency programs, establishing military medical and pharmacy centers, dispensing required medicines, and accommodating and nursing sick and injured personnel, etc. Meanwhile, the imperial court also supervised the implementation of military medical mechanism, in order to check the soldiers' foods, check and restrict the military physicians' responsibilities, etc., which did play a positive role in protecting soldier's health, guaranteeing the military combat effectiveness, and maintaining national security.

  1. Advising China, 1924-1948: The Role of Military Culture in Foreign Advisory Missions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-27

    Conferences. Edited by Judith L. Bellafaire. Washington, D.C.: Center of Military History, United States Army, 1998. Kirby, Stanley. The Decisive...Battles. Vol. 3, The War Against Japan. Edited by Sir James Butler . London: HMSO, 1965. Kraus, Theresa L. US Army Campaigns of World War II: China...Papers from the Army’s Commemorative Conferences, Judith L. Bellafaire, ed. (Washington, D.C.: Center of Military History, United States Army, 1998

  2. History of Disaster Medicine.

    PubMed

    Suner, Selim

    2015-10-01

    Erik Noji, mentioned, tongue in cheek, Noah as the first disaster manager during a lecture in 2005. The canonical description of "The Genesis Flood" does describe Noah as a master planner and executer of an evacuation of biblical proportions. After gaining knowledge of a potential catastrophic disaster he planned and executed an evacuation to mitigate the effects of the "Genesis Flood" by building the Ark and organizing a mass exodus. He had to plan for food, water, shelter, medical care, waste disposal and other needs of all the evacuees. Throughout history, management of large disasters was conducted by the military. Indeed, the military still plays a large role in disaster response in many countries, particularly if the response is overseas and prolonged. The histories of emergency preparedness, disaster management and disaster medicine have coevolved and are inextricably intertwined. While disaster management in one form or another existed as long as people started living together in communities, the development of disaster medicine took off with the emergence of modern medicine. Similar to disaster management, disaster medicine also has roots in military organizations.

  3. [The reform of military medical education and the tasks of the Military Medical Academy in improving personnel training].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Iu L

    1994-08-01

    The Military Medical Academy is a military educational institution which carries out the primary profile training of physicians for the Armed Services and all types of post-graduation training and advanced training of the scientific-pedagogical and medical specialists. Internship as a first stage of the post-graduation training is intended to improve practical medical training of the graduates of the Russian Military Medical Academy and other medico-military educational institutions by means of their primary specialization in one of the clinical or profile branches of medicine. The reforming of the post-graduation training rest system in the Military Medical Academy aims at its further development and putting specialists' training system into accordance with the Armed Forces reorganizations. This will make it possible to ensure high professional qualification of military doctors at the level of national and international standards.

  4. Civil-Military Medicine: On Dangerous Ground

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    relief, such as water and sanitation, food , health, and shelter. Others focus on targeting specific vulnerable groups with appropriate skill sets for...particular attention to the most vulnerable in the population , such as children, women and the elderly. The dignity and rights of all victims must be... food , water and shelter to the affected populations , regardless of the conflict. As in the first part of this scenario, they would seek access to

  5. Superior Sensor Making Sense in Military, Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A fiber-optic voltage sensor developed a decade ago for NASA's aircraft and space power systems has been the building block for a string of new sensor products offering safe, accurate detection and measurement for electrically noisy and hazardous environments.

  6. Third Santorini conference pharmacogenomics workshop report: "Pharmacogenomics at the crossroads: what else than good science will be needed for the field to become part of Personalized Medicine?".

    PubMed

    Llerena, Adrián; Michel, Gerd; Jeannesson, Elise; Wong, Steven; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Hockett, Richard Dean; Boubekeur, Karima; Siest, Gérard; Beaune, Philippe; Haefliger, Carolina; Arnold, Hans Peter; Junien, Claudine; Petrovic, Nenad; Molloy, Roisin; Bekers, Otto; Donnelly, Claudine; Arens, Hans-Juergen; Kaput, Jim; McComb, Joel

    2007-01-01

    This workshop discussed the use of pharmacogenomics knowledge in clinical practice. It was organized in three sections: educational needs, definition of industry as a potential trigger, and regulatory aspects. Regarding pharmacogenomics education, it appears that this is truly lacking, except for patients, who are becoming increasingly educated thanks to the media. Regarding administrators, education is mainly a problem of cost. Indeed, even if cost-effective for society on the whole, pharmacogenomic tests will be expensive for hospitals. Physicians are facing an overabundance of information. They must be helped to bridge the gap between knowledge/research and clinical application. Collaboration between the pharmaceutical industry and the diagnostics industry could be one of the triggers. Moreover, there is a lack of qualification of this information, even though some guidelines are being produced. The Food and Drug Administration organizes workshops that often lead to publications on pharmacogenomic education, genomic data aims and development concepts, which can finally be translated into guidelines. Industry can contribute to pharmacogenomic development, not only through research, but also through marketing activities, which would promote the use of pharmacogenomics by physicians. Legal aspects were also considered in terms of the problem of availability and the degree of qualification of commercial drug tests on the market. The Innovative Medicine Initiative was also presented, which is a public-private partnership to create a biomedical research and development leader to benefit patients and society. Finally, a technical report from the Institute for Prospective Technological Studies on the socioeconomic impact of pharmacogenomics in the EU was presented.

  7. Wilderness Medicine Newsletter, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Holly A., Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of the six issues of the "Wilderness Medicine Newsletter" published during 1996. The newsletter addresses the treatment and prevention of medical emergencies in the wilderness and training resources. Issues typically include feature articles, interviews with doctors in the wilderness, conferences and training…

  8. Wilderness Medicine Newsletter, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilderness Medicine Newsletter, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This document consists of the six issues of "Wilderness Medicine Newsletter" published in 1992. This journal, subtitled "For the recognition, treatment, and prevention of wilderness emergencies," includes feature articles, book reviews, product reviews, letters to the editor, notices of upcoming wilderness conferences, and…

  9. Selected Papers Presented at MODSIM World 2011 Conference and Expo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E. (Compiler); Bullock, Leanna S. (Compiler)

    2012-01-01

    Selected papers from MODSIM World 2011 Conference & Expo are contained in this NASA Conference Publication (CP). MODSIM World 2011 was held in Virginia Beach, Virginia, October 11-14, 2011. The theme of the 2011 conference & expo was "Overcoming Critical Global Challenges with Modeling & Simulation". The conference program consisted of five technical tracks - Defense, Homeland Security & First Responders; Education; Health & Medicine; The Human Dimension; and Serious Games & Virtual Worlds.

  10. Military nursing competencies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mary Candice

    2010-06-01

    Competencies for military nurses are much broader in scope than their civilian counterparts. Not only must they be proficient at basic nursing skills, but they must also quickly master such military skills as protecting themselves and others during attack or threat of attack, caring for major trauma victims under austere conditions, and preparing such patients for transport through the military system of evacuation. This requires consistent and specialized training. This article describes the competencies necessary for practice by military nurses.

  11. Military Business Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT Military Business Success By: Lieutenant...TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Military Business Success 6. AUTHOR(S) Ahmad, Mohamad Krastev, Radostin Puciato, Arkadiusz 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING...unlimited. MILITARY BUSINESS SUCCESS Mohamad Ahmad, Lieutenant Colonel, Malaysian Air Force Radostin Krastev, Captain, Bulgarian Air

  12. The military physician and contested medical humanitarianism: a dueling identity?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Stuart

    2014-11-01

    A critical issue in the study of humanitarianism is who counts as a medical humanitarian. Military physicians are often characterized as caught between the potentially incompatible roles of physician and military professional. Medical NGOs, such as Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), have also vociferously rejected military medical humanitarianism: questioning the mandate, skills, and appropriateness of military involvement in humanitarian medicine as well as the potential impact on 'humanitarian space'. Yet many military doctors contest this. Consequently this study examines the ways in which primarily British military physicians identify and manage their identities as both medical humanitarians and soldiers. The research utilized a mixed method, grounded theory approach involving systematic document searches/expert identification of a core literature of 300 policy and peer reviewed documents, plus grey literature and 53 formal medical post operational reports from units serving in Iraq and Afghanistan between 2004 and 2012. Semi structured interviews involved purposive sampling (34 respondents) ranging from a former Surgeon General to more junior staff. Methods also included an analysis of the original data and literature from the 2003 Medical Services Delphi study (involving an additional 40 experts and an extensive literature review) on military medical identity/future roles as well as direct observation of military doctors in Iraq and Afghanistan (two, 2 month research trips). The research concluded that military physicians conceived of themselves as autonomous medical humanitarians with an individual morality rooted in civilian medical ethics that facilitated resistance to the potentially hegemonic military identity. Nevertheless military physicians were part of a medical organization with fundamentally different priorities from those of civilian humanitarian physicians. Furthermore, the perceived emergence of multiple civilian 'humanitarianisms' has

  13. Aviation gas turbine lubricants - military and civil aspects: aviation fuel and lubricants - performance testing; Proceedings of the Aerospace Technology Conference and Exposition, Long Beach, CA, October 14-17, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Research and development programs in the areas of gas turbine lubricants for civil and military aviation and the performance testing of aviation gas turbine fuels and lubricants are discussed. The topics addressed include: laboratory and field evaluation of a high temperature jet engine oil, performance advantages of high load aviation lubricants, fluorocarbon elastomer compatibility with gas turbine lubricants, potential benefits in the development of a dedicated helicopter transmission lubricant, and feasibility of formulating advanced four centistoke gas turbine oils. Also covered are: advanced lubricants for aircraft turbine engines, future trends for U.S. Naval aviation propulsion system lubricants, electrochemical evaluation of corrosivity in turbine engine oils, the influence of esters on elastomer seals, deposition in gas turbine oil systems, development of the portable water separometer for the WSIM test, influence of JFTOT operating parameters on the assessment of fuel thermal stability, and evaluation of JFTOT tube deposits by carbon burnoff.

  14. Military Personnel: Enhanced Collaboration and Process Improvements Needed for Determining Military Treatment Facility Medical Personnel Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    dentists, medical service corps, and veterinarians , to name a few, at the work center level across Army fixed military treatment facilities. The model uses...1072 - 896 903 Hematology /Oncology 41 40 43 - 12 17 - 18 14 Infectious Disease 63 59 62 - 29 34 - 16 17 Internal Medicine 315 e 254 e 277 e

  15. Proceedings of the 1982 Army Science Conference Held at the United States Military Academy, West Point, New York on 15-18 June 1982. Volume I. Principal Authors A through G.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-18

    against v l. Test methods have been d~scribed byJ + 1 Anscombe (16) or Anscombe and Tukey (17). The fitting of a regression line by ordinary least...Soc., 127 , 1444 (1980). V 8. R. L. Higgins, Proceedings of the 29th Power Sources Conference, p . 147 (1980). 9. R. J. Staniewicz, J. Electrochem Soc...RCOUISITIO. is JUN 82 UNCLASSIFIED F 5/25/2 J,, L2 MIR~ P UWT ETCM MICROCOPYOP RESOLUTIO TEST C*$A MATO O -R OF STNAD -1963-ANL UfU FsTIMS-W I"I

  16. Regenerative Medicine: Creating the Future for Military Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    fundamentals to uncover discoveries and make advances THERAPEUTICS Creating novel therapies TISSUES & ORGANS Regenerating function and restoring lives...cell-based therapies to improve healing of soft and hard tissue injuries and developing cell sorter technologies, to name a few. Over the years, the...Washington have created a research program to evaluate for ways to control inflammation and tissue repair with the goal to develop new therapies

  17. Conference Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Cait

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes an original conference, organised by the Child Care Research Forum (http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/ccrf/), which brought together experts from all over Northern Ireland to showcase some of the wealth of research with children and young people that is going on in the country today. Developed around the six high-level outcomes of…

  18. The conference

    Treesearch

    Gordon M. Heisler; Lee P. Herrington

    1977-01-01

    This is a report on the Conference on Metropolitan Physical Environment, held in August 1975 at Syracuse, N.Y., where some 160 scientists and planners met to discuss the use of vegetation, space, and structures to improve the amenities for people who live in metropolitan areas.

  19. Conference Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillett, Wade

    2016-01-01

    The following is an exploration of the spatial configurations (and their implications) within a typical panel session at an academic conference. The presenter initially takes up different roles and hyperbolically describes some possible messages that the spatial arrangement sends. Eventually, the presenter engages the audience members in atypical…

  20. Conference Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillett, Wade

    2016-01-01

    The following is an exploration of the spatial configurations (and their implications) within a typical panel session at an academic conference. The presenter initially takes up different roles and hyperbolically describes some possible messages that the spatial arrangement sends. Eventually, the presenter engages the audience members in atypical…

  1. Computational Biology Support: RECOMB Conference Series (Conference Support)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Waterman

    2006-06-15

    This funding was support for student and postdoctoral attendance at the Annual Recomb Conference from 2001 to 2005. The RECOMB Conference series was founded in 1997 to provide a scientific forum for theoretical advances in computational biology and their applications in molecular biology and medicine. The conference series aims at attracting research contributions in all areas of computational molecular biology. Typical, but not exclusive, the topics of interest are: Genomics, Molecular sequence analysis, Recognition of genes and regulatory elements, Molecular evolution, Protein structure, Structural genomics, Gene Expression, Gene Networks, Drug Design, Combinatorial libraries, Computational proteomics, and Structural and functional genomics. The origins of the conference came from the mathematical and computational side of the field, and there remains to be a certain focus on computational advances. However, the effective use of computational techniques to biological innovation is also an important aspect of the conference. The conference had a growing number of attendees, topping 300 in recent years and often exceeding 500. The conference program includes between 30 and 40 contributed papers, that are selected by a international program committee with around 30 experts during a rigorous review process rivaling the editorial procedure for top-rate scientific journals. In previous years papers selection has been made from up to 130--200 submissions from well over a dozen countries. 10-page extended abstracts of the contributed papers are collected in a volume published by ACM Press and Springer, and are available at the conference. Full versions of a selection of the papers are published annually in a special issue of the Journal of Computational Biology devoted to the RECOMB Conference. A further point in the program is a lively poster session. From 120-300 posters have been presented each year at RECOMB 2000. One of the highlights of each RECOMB conference is a

  2. Military psychiatry in India

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, H. R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Military personnel, because of the unique nature of their duties and services, are likely to be under stress which at times has no parallel in civilian life. The stress of combat and service in extreme weather conditions often act as major stressors. The modern practices in military psychiatry had their beginning during the two World Wars, more particularly, the IInd World War. The GHPU concept had the beginning in India with military hospitals having such establishments in the care of their clientele. As the nation gained independence, many of the military psychiatrists shifted to the civil stream and contributed immensely in the development of modern psychiatry in India. In the recent years military psychiatry has been given the status of a subspecialty chapter and the military psychiatrists have been regularly organizing CMEs and training programs for their members to prepare them to function in the special role of military psychiatrists. PMID:21836702

  3. Report on Quality Control Review of Arthur Andersen, LLP, for OMB Circular NO. A-133 Audit Report of the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 1998

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    private partnerships in that area. The audit is required by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular No. A-133, i-Audits of States, Local...Maryland, is a non-profit organization that was chartered by Congress in 1983 to support military medical research and education and to promote public

  4. Old Challenges and New Perspectives on Developing Military Physicians: The First 4 Years of the New Israeli Model.

    PubMed

    Hartal, Michael; Yavnai, Nirit; Yaniv, Gal; Gertz, S David; Fleshler, Erica; Kreiss, Yitshak

    2016-02-01

    Military medicine comprises a set of unique characteristics that differentiate it from other medical specialties. Faced with challenges in recruiting, educating, and training military physicians, the Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps redefined the paradigm for educating military physicians by establishing the Army Program for Excellence in medicine (APEX). This program created a military medical track at the Hebrew University-Hadassah School of Medicine in Jerusalem. All military track students attend a single medical school, which allows for a more focused and efficient program. The students study, dorm, and train together, forming a strong social network. They also receive significant financial, logistical, academic, and educational support. Finally, the program provides a full curriculum in military medical studies, composed of academic courses given for credits and an integrated training schedule designed to build and improve physical and mental fitness for the military environment. In this article, we provide an overview of APEX, including the admissions process and a descriptive analysis of the student body, and present our comprehensive approach to teaching academic military medicine. To the best of our knowledge, APEX represents one of the few fully integrated undergraduate longitudinal military medical education programs, allowing us to educate military physicians "from day one." Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  5. [On the military physician Cui and his academic achievements].

    PubMed

    Wang, S

    1996-01-01

    Based on the 385 pieces of recipes and its discourses quoted from Cui's by Wai Tai Mi Yao (Medical secret of an official), this author discusses the brief biography of Cui Zhiti, a military physician of the Tang Dynasty and his achievements on field epidemics, field internal medicine, field surgery and comes to a conclusion that Cui Zhiti and his "Cui's Collected Essential Recipes" is of significance in China's military medical history.

  6. Medical Aspects of Sickle Hemoglobin in Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Brodine, C. E.; Uddin, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD) will soon issue a directive to test all incoming military personnel for the presence of hemoglobin S. The military testing program for hemoglobin S is an occupational medicine program. This report includes a discussion of armed services physical standards, a description of the Navy effort to evaluate an automated system for detection of hemoglobin S, and the proposed DOD directive. PMID:833894

  7. Medical aspects of sickle hemoglobin in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Brodine, C E; Uddin, D E

    1977-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD) will soon issue a directive to test all incoming military personnel for the presence of hemoglobin S. The military testing program for hemoglobin S is an occupational medicine program. This report includes a discussion of armed services physical standards, a description of the Navy effort to evaluate an automated system for detection of hemoglobin S, and the proposed DOD directive.

  8. 14th Annual Expeditionary Warfare Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-19

    USN, Deputy Commander, Military Sealift Command Wednesday, 18 November, 2009 GUEST SPEAKER · Vice Admiral Kevin McCoy, USN, Commander, Naval...Resources in Support of Expeditionary Warfare in Complex Joint Operating Environments Moderator: Rear Admiral Kevin Scott, USN, Deputy Director for...00 AM Conference Remarks 8:00 - 8:45 AM Guest Speaker Vice Admiral Kevin McCoy, USN, Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command 8:45 - 9:50 AM

  9. 75 FR 45647 - National Library of Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Library of Medicine Special Emphasis Panel, Conflicted Applications. Date: September 22... Library of Medicine, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 301, Bethesda, MD 20817. (Telephone Conference...

  10. The evolution of sports medicine in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Benedict

    2013-10-01

    Sports medicine is a relatively new subspecialty in Singapore. This commentary chronicles its evolution in Singapore from 1969, through various milestones, to the present day. The first sports medicine clinic in Singapore was established in 1971 at Farrer Park. Notable institutions that followed include the Sports Medicine and Research Centre (1973), Soldier Performance Centre, Changi Sports Medicine Centre (2003), Singapore Sports Medicine Centre (2006), and other multidisciplinary centres of restructured hospitals. Formal groundwork to establish sports medicine as a subspecialty began in 2005, with its first trainee commencing traineeship at the Changi Sports Medicine Centre in 2007, and culminated in the subspecialty register at the beginning of 2011. Also captured in this discussion are the broader scopes of sports medicine, including military sports medicine, the sports sciences, exercise medicine, and event medical coverage.

  11. Chemical exposure guidelines for deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, V D

    2000-02-01

    In light of the absence of guidelines and standards applicable to deployed military personnel, the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) has completed Technical Guide 230A, Short-term Chemical Exposure Guidelines for Deployed Military Personnel. This guide provides estimated concentration levels associated with various types of effects for short-term exposures from 1 hour up to 2 weeks. A second TG (TG230B, Long-term Chemical Exposure Guidelines for Deployed Military Personnel) is being developed to address potentially longer deployment related exposures (i.e. greater than 2 weeks up to 1 year). This article focuses on TG230A which describes varying severity levels and health effects associated with short-term chemical exposures in a format consistent with the existing doctrinal military risk management paradigm. It is a consolidated reference tool for trained military medical staff to evaluate different chemical hazards, and will ensure more expedient risk management decisions during deployments. The TG also establishes the standard reference for pre- and post-deployment evaluations and risk management decisions, including determinations of resource requirements and equipment specifications.

  12. Implementing Coordinated Patient Education: A Practical Approach for the 80's. Proceedings from a Conference Held at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (New York, New York, November 12, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corry, James, Ed.; And Others

    A conference on implementing coordinated patient education was held for 45 participants from various health care occupations, including nursing, social work, and dietetics. The morning session of the conference consisted of lectures by patient education directors who described implementation strategies that they have used, as well as continuing…

  13. Patient Education: A Better Way to Achieve Compliance in the Ambulatory Care Setting. Proceedings from a Conference Held at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (New York, New York, May 29, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Nicholas, Ed.; And Others

    These proceedings consist of the texts of eight papers presented at a conference on patient education. Included in the volume are the following conference presentations: "An Educational Framework in the Ambulatory Care Setting," by Jeannette J. Simmons; "The Status of Education in Ambulatory Care: A Report of the American Hospital…

  14. Patient Education: A Better Way to Achieve Compliance in the Ambulatory Care Setting. Proceedings from a Conference Held at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (New York, New York, May 29, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Nicholas, Ed.; And Others

    These proceedings consist of the texts of eight papers presented at a conference on patient education. Included in the volume are the following conference presentations: "An Educational Framework in the Ambulatory Care Setting," by Jeannette J. Simmons; "The Status of Education in Ambulatory Care: A Report of the American Hospital…

  15. About Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 15K ...

  16. Civil-Military Roles of Indigenous Armed Forces (CRIAF). Volume 1. Executive Summary. Volume 2. Main Report. Volume 3. Appendixes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-07-01

    AD-A009 190 CIVIL-MILITARY ROLES OF INDIGENOUS ARMED FORCES (CRIAF). VOLUME I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . VOLUME II MAIN REPORT . VOLUME III...H FINAL REPORT VOLUME I - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY VOLUME II - MAIN REPORT VOLUME III - APPENDIXES o o DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY...Sussex: Conference of Political Development, 1968. 23. Einaudi, Luigi R. The Peruvian Military: A Summary Political Analysis . Santa

  17. Using Collar worn Sensors to Forecast Thermal Strain in Military Working Dogs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-22

    Using Collar-worn Sensors to Forecast Thermal Strain in Military Working Dogs James R. Williamson, Austin R. Hess, Christopher J. Smalt, Delsey M...Medicine Natick, MA 01760 Abstract—Military working dogs (MWDs) are at high risk of heat strain both during training and missions. Body heat in MWD...correlation of r=0.49 between actual and predicted Tc. I. INTRODUCTION Military Working Dogs (MWDs), working in a team with a handler, are susceptible

  18. Next conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Toney, Michael F.

    2010-11-01

    After the successful conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science (SRPS) in Rolduc Abbey (the Netherlands), we are now looking forward to the next meeting in this topical series started in 1995 by H G Zachmann, one of the pioneers of the use of synchrotron radiation techniques in polymer science. Earlier meetings were held in Hamburg (1995), Sheffield (2002), Kyoto (2006), and Rolduc (2009). In September of 2012 the Synchrotron Radiation and Polymer Science V conferences will be organized in a joint effort by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Advanced Light Source at LBL Advanced Light Source at LBL The conference will be organised in the heart of beautiful San Francisco. The program will consist of invited and contributed lectures divided in sessions on the use of synchrotron SAXS/WAXD, imaging and tomography, soft x-rays, x-ray spectroscopy, GISAXS and reflectivity, micro-beams and hyphenated techniques in polymer science. Poster contributions are more than welcome and will be highlighted during the poster sessions. Visits to both SLAC as well as LBL will be organised. San Francisco can easily be reached. It is served by two major international airports San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport. Both are being served by most major airlines with easy connections to Europe and Asia as well as national destinations. Both also boast excellent connections to San Francisco city centre. We are looking forward to seeing you in the vibrant city by the Bay in September 2012. Golden gate bridge Alexander Hexemer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Michael F Toney Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Pk, CA 94025, USA E-mail: ahexemer@lbl.gov, mftoney@slac.stanford.edu

  19. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  20. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    MILITARY RESEARCH, * NUTRITION , MILITARY PERSONNEL, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), METABOLISM, NUTRIENTS, HIGH ENERGY, MEDICAL RESEARCH, FOOD, DIET, MENTAL ABILITY, WORKSHOPS, BIOMEDICINE, CAFFEINE, SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.

  1. Postpartum Depression and Timing of Spousal Military Deployment Relative to Pregnancy and Delivery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-03

    Naval Health Research Center Postpartum Depression and Timing of Spousal Military Deployment Relative to Pregnancy and Delivery Jordan A...3521 MATERNAL-FETAL MEDICINE Postpartum depression and timing of spousal military deployment relative to pregnancy and delivery Jordan A. Levine...are conducted to ensure accuracy and consistency. A percentage of hard-copy medical records are compared with corresponding electronic records to

  2. Hebrew Military Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abarbanel, Joel I.

    Designed to give the military student a broad range of vocabulary on military subjects and a general understanding of the structure and operations of the Israel Defense Forces, this reader parallels advanced materials prepared for Foreign Service students of Hebrew and consists of short reading passages, each followed by a vocabulary list…

  3. Military Perspectives on Cyberpower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Zimet and Charles L. Barry Military cyberpower is the application of the domain of cyber- space to operational concepts to accomplish military objec...pable global backbone, unrestrained information sharing among com- mands, and truly interoperable networks wherein every authorized user can access...Special Operations Forces (SOF), and space forces performing missions around the world, and their supporting in- telligence networks. DOD divides

  4. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  5. Sustaining the Military Arts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    pidgin isn’t the antidote for strategic illiteracy. The military arts of strategy, operations, and tactics are merely the creative bridges that allow...Strategic pidgin isn’t the antidote for strategic illiteracy. about military arts and sciences is not merely a ’question of rhetorical clarity. Indeed

  6. Military Culture and Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    mines the success of transformation. The period between 1914 and 1945 shows the dynamic nature of military innova - tion and the difficulty military...maximized unity of effort. Leaders can foster a disciplined culture that encourages change and innova - tion by “creating a consistent system with clear

  7. Advising Transfer Military Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Today's students can come from a larger area than just high school. With the entire world's conflicts and today's society, more and more of our present day students may have come from the military ranks. Though we have not come to an actual draft system, more and more modern day students have served their time in the military, to keep America…

  8. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  9. Case report: Military subcultural competency.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric

    2013-07-01

    The military is comprised of numerous subcultures. These subcultures can dramatically impact perceptions of illness and care. Although efforts are currently underway to improve the military cultural competence of all health care providers, efforts to improve the subcultural competence of military providers require attention. Military providers, although part of the military culture, may not appreciate their patients' military subculture or be aware of the impact their own subculture plays on the encounter. To illustrate potential difficulties, a case is described where limited military subcultural competence disrupted care. As the military medical corps continues to integrate across service lines, this case underscores the importance of training military physicians to assess the influence of a service member's specific military subculture. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  10. Proceedings of the tenth annual battery conference on applications and advances

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This is a collection of papers presented at the 1995 Annual Battery Conference on Application and Advances. The goal of the conference is to fill the need for improved communication between the developers and users of battery systems and the designers of interfacing electronic power conversion and control components and systems. The Conference attempts to attain that goal through deliberations on issues involving the interactions between those battery and electronic systems in commercial, industrial, space and military applications.

  11. Robotics in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, D. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technologies play a very important role in our lives. It is hard to imagine how people can get along without personal computers, and companies - without powerful computer centers. Nowadays, many devices make modern medicine more effective. Medicine is developing constantly, so introduction of robots in this sector is a very promising activity. Advances in technology have influenced medicine greatly. Robotic surgery is now actively developing worldwide. Scientists have been carrying out research and practical attempts to create robotic surgeons for more than 20 years, since the mid-80s of the last century. Robotic assistants play an important role in modern medicine. This industry is new enough and is at the early stage of development; despite this, some developments already have worldwide application; they function successfully and bring invaluable help to employees of medical institutions. Today, doctors can perform operations that seemed impossible a few years ago. Such progress in medicine is due to many factors. First, modern operating rooms are equipped with up-to-date equipment, allowing doctors to make operations more accurately and with less risk to the patient. Second, technology has enabled to improve the quality of doctors' training. Various types of robots exist now: assistants, military robots, space, household and medical, of course. Further, we should make a detailed analysis of existing types of robots and their application. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the most popular types of robots used in medicine.

  12. After the International Ethics Conference, What Is Next?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndebele, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The International Ethics Conference held at the University of Botswana from 6-10 December 2009 brought together over 250 delegates, speakers, and other participants from a wide range of disciplines. The theme of the conference, "Retrieving the Human Face of Science: Understanding Ethics and Integrity in Healthcare, Medicine and…

  13. Comparison of Sasang Constitutional Medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Yeol; Pham, Duong Duc; Koh, Byung Hee

    2011-01-01

    Sasang constitutional medicine (SCM), traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Ayurveda are three different forms of Asian traditional medicine. Although these traditions share a lot in common as holistic medicines, the different philosophical foundations found in each confer distinguishing attributes and unique qualities. SCM is based on a constitution-based approach, and is in this way relatively more similar to the Ayurvedic tradition than to the TCM, although many of the basic SCM theories were originally derived from TCM, a syndrome-based medicine. SCM and TCM use the same botanical materials that are distributed mainly in the East Asian region, but the basic principles of usage and the underlying rationale are completely different from each other. Meanwhile, the principles of the Ayurvedic use of botanical resources are very similar to those seen in SCM, but the medicinal herbs used in Ayurveda generally originate from the West Asian region which displays a different spectrum of flora. PMID:21949669

  14. Homosexuality and the military.

    PubMed

    Jones, F D; Koshes, R J

    1995-01-01

    Homosexuality has remained a focus of military concern despite society's increasing acceptance of homosexual men and women and evidence that homosexuals have served and currently serve in the U.S. armed forces. President Clinton has stated a determination to end discrimination against homosexuals in the military and reverse the exclusionary policy on homosexuals serving in the armed forces. The authors review the history of the policy of the U.S. military to exclude homosexuals from serving in the armed forces. The data for this study were drawn from military archives and court cases that have shaped U.S. policy excluding homosexuals from serving in the armed forces. The three main arguments are addressed: 1) homosexuality is a mental disorder rendering a person unstable, 2) homosexual service members are a source of poor morale for military units, and 3) homosexual service members are poor security risks. Considerable evidence demonstrates that homosexuals in the military pose no documented threat to national security and show no evidence of poor work performance. Although issues of morale and fraternization in the military remain challenges, no evidence in this review supports the exclusion of homosexuals from service in the U.S. armed forces.

  15. Between a humanitarian ethos and the military efficiency: the early days of the Spanish Red Cross, 1864-1876.

    PubMed

    Arrizabalaga, Jon; García-Reyes, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Spain was officially represented at the preliminary international conference the "International Committee for the Assistance to Sick and Wounded Soldiers" (better known as the "Geneva Committee") organised at Geneva in October 1863; and joined the Red Cross one year later on the occasion of the first Geneva Convention in August 1864. This article explores the ambivalence between the humanitarian ethos and the military efficiency in the early Spanish Red Cross through the works of Nicasio Landa (1830-1891). A medical major of the Spanish Military Health Service, the co-founder of the Spanish section of the Red Cross in 1864, and its general inspector in 1867, Landa was its most active promoter, and responsible for its connections with the Geneva Committee and other national sections of this international association during its early times. He was not only an active correspondent, but also a prolific author of monographs, leaflets and articles in specialized and daily newspapers on humanitarianism and war medicine, in addition to being the founder of the Spanish Red Cross journal La Caridad en la Guerra in 1870.

  16. [The Russian Armed Forces Military Medical Service: condition and ways of improvement].

    PubMed

    Fisun, A Ia

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 the main efforts of the Medical Service were aimed at the following tasks: optimization of management system of military medical service, improvement of medical evacuation system, medical service security for military contingents, assigned according to territory principle to military-medical facilities of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation, implementation of innovations at all stages of medical evacuation in peace- and wartime, security of combat and mobilization readiness of regulatory bodies of the Medical Service, medical military units and military medical facilities, medical service of troops battle training, improvement of material and technical resources, security of regular pharmacy and equipment supply, activation of research work in the Medical Service interests. Lines of military medicine development in 2014 are: transfer of treatment facilities that are not used by the Ministry of Defence into the Federal Biomedical Agency till the end of 2014, prevention of pneumonia and meningitis in military personnel, improvement of early diagnosis system, medical service for military contingents according to territory principle, improvement of diagnostic and treatment work in military-medical units and subunits and military-medical facilities by means of development of material and technical resources, monitor the implementation of innovative diagnostic and treatment technologies, completion of construction projects of central military hospitals and etc.

  17. Military Careers: A Guide to Military Occupations and Selected Military Career Paths, 1992-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This book was developed to help educators and youth learn about career opportunities in the military. It is a compendium of military occupational, training, and career information and is designed for use by students interested in the military. The first section, military occupations, contains descriptions of 197 enlisted and officer occupations.…

  18. Development of High Cordycepin-Producing Cordyceps militaris Strains.

    PubMed

    Kang, Naru; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Park, Inmyoung; Seo, Young-Su

    2017-03-01

    Cordyceps militaris, known as Dong-Chong-Xia-Cao, produces the most cordycepin among Cordyceps species and can be cultured artificially. For these reasons, C. militaris is widely used as herb or functional food in the East Asia. In this study, we developed a new strain of C. militaris that produces higher cordycepin content than parent strains through mating-based sexual reproduction. Twenty parent strains were collected and identified as C. militaris based on internal trasncrived spacer and rDNA sequences. Seven single spores of MAT 1-1 idiomorph and five single spores of MAT 1-2 idiomorph were isolated from 12 parent strains. When 35 combinations were mated on the brown rice medium with the isolated single spores, eight combinations formed a stroma with a normal perithecia and confirmed mated strains. High pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that mated strain KSP8 produced the most cordycepin in all the media among all the tested strains. This result showed due to genetic recombination occurring during the sexual reproduction of C. militaris. The development of C. militaris strain with increased cordycepin content by this approach can help not only to generate new C. militaris strains, but also to contribute to the health food or medicine industry.

  19. Development of High Cordycepin-Producing Cordyceps militaris Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Naru; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Park, Inmyoung

    2017-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris, known as Dong-Chong-Xia-Cao, produces the most cordycepin among Cordyceps species and can be cultured artificially. For these reasons, C. militaris is widely used as herb or functional food in the East Asia. In this study, we developed a new strain of C. militaris that produces higher cordycepin content than parent strains through mating-based sexual reproduction. Twenty parent strains were collected and identified as C. militaris based on internal trasncrived spacer and rDNA sequences. Seven single spores of MAT 1-1 idiomorph and five single spores of MAT 1-2 idiomorph were isolated from 12 parent strains. When 35 combinations were mated on the brown rice medium with the isolated single spores, eight combinations formed a stroma with a normal perithecia and confirmed mated strains. High pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that mated strain KSP8 produced the most cordycepin in all the media among all the tested strains. This result showed due to genetic recombination occurring during the sexual reproduction of C. militaris. The development of C. militaris strain with increased cordycepin content by this approach can help not only to generate new C. militaris strains, but also to contribute to the health food or medicine industry. PMID:28435352

  20. First Barcelona Conference on Epigenetics and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Anna; Perucho, Manuel; Esteller, Manel; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The Barcelona Conference on Epigenetics and Cancer (BCEC) entitled “Challenges, opportunities and perspectives” took place November 21–22, 2013 in Barcelona. The 2013 BCEC is the first edition of a series of annual conferences jointly organized by five leading research centers in Barcelona. These centers are the Institute of Predictive and Personalized Medicine of Cancer (IMPPC), the Biomedical Campus Bellvitge with its Program of Epigenetics and Cancer Biology (PEBC), the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), the Institute for Biomedical Research (IRB), and the Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB). Manuel Perucho and Marcus Buschbeck from the Institute of Predictive and Personalized Medicine of Cancer put together the scientific program of the first conference broadly covering all aspects of epigenetic research ranging from fundamental molecular research to drug and biomarker development and clinical application. In one and a half days, 23 talks and 50 posters were presented to a completely booked out audience counting 270 participants. PMID:24413145

  1. Family practice career attrition, 1969 to 1993: a comparison of 336 civilian and military graduates of one medical school.

    PubMed

    Jacques, L B; Gray, G R

    2000-08-01

    Instability of specialty choice and career after initial residency entry will affect health personnel projections. Military physicians may differ from civilian physicians in their specialty choice behaviors during their careers. A cohort of 336 graduates who chose family medicine residency training was identified from the graduating classes of 1969 through 1993 at a large private medical school. Current specialty identification was determined, and attrition from family medicine was computed. As of 1997, 275 graduates (82%) were still in family medicine careers, defined by American Academy of Family Physicians membership or current American Board of Family Practice certification. Of graduates who entered military programs, 22 of 77 (28%) had left family medicine careers; 39 of 259 (15%) of the graduates who entered civilian programs had left. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.007). Family medicine career retention is lower for males in military programs compared with males in civilian programs or females in military programs.

  2. Evaluating Health Effects of Military Service: The Millennium Cohort Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    important information to the field of preventive medicine and public health, benefiting both military and civilian populations. Previous cohort ... studies , including the Framingham Heart Study and the Nurses’ Cohort Study, have expanded our understanding of causes of heart disease and cancer. The

  3. Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, David B.

    2014-07-01

    This conference on ``Multi-wavelength AGN Surveys and Studies'' has provided a detailed look at the explosive growth over the past decade, of available astronomical data from a growing list of large scale sky surveys, from radio-to-gamma rays. We are entering an era were multi-epoch (months to weeks) surveys of the entire sky, and near-instantaneous follow-up observations of variable sources, are elevating time-domain astronomy to where it is becoming a major contributor to our understanding of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). While we can marvel at the range of extragalactic phenomena dispayed by sources discovered in the original ``Markarian Survey'' - the first large-scale objective prism survey of the Northern Sky carried out at the Byurakan Astronomical Observtory almost a half-century ago - it is clear from the talks and posters presented at this meeting that the data to be be obtained over the next decade will be needed if we are to finally understand which phase of galaxy evolution each Markarian Galaxy represents.

  4. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  5. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  6. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  7. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  8. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  9. Military usage of connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schade, R.

    1972-01-01

    Military specifications with general purpose parameters and termination data covering flat connectors and flat cables are proposed. The material, design, coating, and insulation are discussed, and drafts of specifications for flat cables including quality assurance provisions, and inspection are presented.

  10. Change in the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A survey was made of much of the current literature on the behavioral aspects of organizational change and how it pertains to the military. The survey is broad in nature and extends to processes for affecting change presently in use in the armed services. The study further describes some of the various opinions expressed in current articles on the affect of societal changes on the military.

  11. USSR Report, Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-04

    area. Convinced of its tec ity, the USA still hopesXto achieve the unachievable—to gain ty over the Soviet Union and to militarize outer space... militarism was a victory for progress over reaction. It demonstrated the invincible strength of the socialist system and its great advantages over...The scientific-technical progress in military affairs, progress that has been stimulated by the military-industrial complex, a union of militarism and

  12. Evaluating Military Compensation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    has also compared the out-of-pocket health costs of families who use its preferred-provider organization ( PPO ) or fee-for-service options with those...comparison controlled for demographic differ- ences between military and civilian families. EVALUATING MILITARY COMPENSATION 17using PPO plans. In 2005...governments would have to absorb the difference. A PP E N D IX A Total Compensation for the Median Enlisted MemberUsing a different approach from

  13. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    o Suicide Bereavement in Military and their Families, Dr. Julie Cerel, University of Kentucky, (Appendix 4) o Window to Hope: Evaluating a...Managing Suicide Risk in Primary Care . Presented at Community Based Outpatient Clinic, Appleton, WI, October 11, 2011. Gutierrez, P. M., Suicide...Appendix Pages: 32-34 A4. Suicide Bereavement in Military and their Families, Dr. Julie Cerel, University of Kentucky Appendix Pages: 35

  14. Resilience among military youth.

    PubMed

    Easterbrooks, M Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Much research on children in military families has taken a deficit approach--that is, it has portrayed these children as a population susceptible to psychological damage from the hardships of military life, such as frequent moves and separation from their parents during deployment. But M. Ann Easterbrooks, Kenneth Ginsburg, and Richard M. Lerner observe that most military children turn out just fine. They argue that, to better serve military children, we must understand the sources of strength that help them cope with adversity and thrive. In other words, we must understand their resilience. The authors stress that resilience is not a personal trait but a product of the relationships between children and the people and resources around them. In this sense, military life, along with its hardships, offers many sources for resilience--for example, a strong sense of belonging to a supportive community with a shared mission and values. Similarly, children whose parents are deployed may build their self-confidence by taking on new responsibilities in the family, and moving offers opportunities for adventure and personal growth. As the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan drew more and more service members into combat, the military and civilian groups alike rolled out dozens of programs aimed at boosting military children's resilience. Although the authors applaud this effort, they also note that few of these programs have been based on scientific evidence of what works, and few have been rigorously evaluated for their effectiveness. They call for a program of sustained research to boost our understanding of military children's resilience.

  15. Movies and the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-01-01

    motion picture history- movies (with two exceptions discussed below) were not made about the war. Anti-war films , and films with...of this aberration. Motion pictures are made to make money, and producers of films about the military make movies which reflect the anti-military...screen. Much of our culture is defined and transmitted by movies .2 The images implanted in the mind by motion pictures are vivid and lasting.

  16. Military Air Cargo Containerization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    MILITARY AIR CARGO CONTAINERIZATION GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Joseph W. Mancy, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 : ."•" ’* ■- ’ DEPARTMENT OF...Approved to public release; Distribution UnHmlted ? DTIC QUALITY INSPECTED 1 AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 MILITARY AIR CARGO CONTAINERIZATION GRADUATE RESEARCH...PAPER Joseph W. Mancy, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 19960617 134 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited The views expressed in this

  17. Military Production Urgencies System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-08-17

    echelons. I4. To guide preparation of specific urgency lists for the time -phased demands of supporting industrial resources. 5. To indicate the...AD-A270 736 ELECTE aeprlnt Incorporating Transmittal 61-2 Au-uast 17, 1955 Department of Defense Directive SUBJECT Military Production Urgencies ...Departaent of Defense Military Production Urgencies System which will provide authoritative information for guidance as to the relative urgency of desired

  18. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Reduction in self- esteem may impact this relationship such that if self-esteem is not reduced as a result of bullying , psychological distress and sui...resources of the military, impact unit morale, and take a large emotional toll on the involved friends, family, and commanders. There is significant...practice that will have a direct impact on suicide-related and other mental health outcomes for military personnel. 3. Disseminate Consortium

  19. Military Personnel Law Deskbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    February 2006). B. Purpose of the Physical Disability Evaluation System (PDES). 1. Personnel Management. a. Effective and Fit Military b. Quality ...discipline, or morale of troops on the base under his command.”). 3. Limitations. There must be some nexus between the authority sought and the effect on...preparing group for and steeling it to violent action). A-7 (2) Military Standard: Speech which undermines the effectiveness of response to command

  20. Wilderness Medicine Newsletter, Volume 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Holly A., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document consists of the six issues of the "Wilderness Medicine Newsletter" published during 1997. The newsletter provides medical and rescue information for the non-physician in remote wilderness areas. Issues typically include feature articles, conference and training courses schedules, an "Ask the Expert" column, and…

  1. Wilderness Medicine Newsletter, Volume 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Holly A., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of the six issues of the "Wilderness Medicine Newsletter" published during 1998. The newsletter provides medical and rescue information for the non-physician in remote wilderness areas. Issues typically include feature articles, conference and training courses schedules, and personal narratives. Feature articles in…

  2. Radiometry in military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof

    2001-08-01

    Missiles guided using optoelectronic methods, optoelectronic imaging systems (thermal imaging systems, night vision devices, LLLTV cameras, TV cameras), and optoelectronic countermeasures (smoke screens, camouflage paints and nets, IR flares, decoys, jamming systems, warning systems) are one of the most important components of modern military armament. There are numerous military standards, some of them secret, that precise radiometric parameters to be measured and the testing methods to be used. There is also much literature on the subject of testing of the systems mentioned above, although mostly on subject of testing of the thermal imaging systems. In spite of this apparently numerous literature, there still significant confusion in this area due to secrecy of some parameters and testing methods, differences in recommendations of different military standards, fast progress in military optoelectronics, and also due to enormous number of different types of optoelectronics systems used in the military armament. A review of testing methods of the three basic groups of optoelectronics systems used in modern military armament: the missiles guided using optoelectronics methods, the optoelectronic imaging systems, and the optoelectronic countermeasures is presented in this paper. Trends in the measuring sets.

  3. The Second Joint NASA/FAA/DoD Conference on Aging Aircraft. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Conference was to bring together world leaders in aviation safety research, aircraft design and manufacturing, fleet operation and aviation maintenance to disseminate information on current practices and advanced technologies that will assure the continued airworthiness of the aging aircraft in the military and commercial fleets. The Conference included reviews of current industry practices, assessments of future technology requirements, and status of aviation safety research. The Conference provided an opportunity for interactions among the key personnel in the research and technology development community, the original equipment manufacturers, commercial airline operators, military fleet operators, aviation maintenance, and aircraft certification and regulatory authorities. Conference participation was unrestricted and open to the international aviation community. Appendix B contains the name and addresses of the 623 participants in the Conference.

  4. "Throwing a rock at their armored tank": civilian authority and military tobacco control.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Quinn; Smith, Elizabeth A; Malone, Ruth E

    2014-12-17

    Tobacco use is a major cause of chronic disease, disability and death among military personnel and veterans. However, civilian public health and tobacco control advocates have been relatively silent on the issue. Research on the tobacco industry shows a long history of interference in military tobacco policy through relationships with the United States (US) Congress. The military cannot autonomously implement tobacco control, but is subject to Congressional oversight. Thus, the primary obstacles to effective tobacco control in the military are Congressional political opposition and tobacco industry influence, and by extension, a lack of civilian awareness and support in the policy arena. As part of a larger project to explore the topic of civilian support for military tobacco control, we analyzed data from focus groups with public health professionals to better understand their sense of agency and authority in regards to military tobacco control. Researchers conducted 4 focus groups with a total of 36 public health professionals at key conferences for those working in public health and tobacco control. Data were coded and the research team developed an interpretive account that captured patterns and variations in the data. Public health and tobacco control participants shared a sense of futility regarding civilian efforts to engage in military tobacco control. This stemmed from feeling ignorant of military culture and structure, identifying powerful discourses that opposed tobacco control, particularly in a military context, and the very-real presence of the tobacco industry lobby throughout the policy process. A strong public health voice on military tobacco control might serve to begin problematizing the tobacco industry's influence in the military policy arena. As the military moves to institute stronger tobacco control policy, public health and tobacco control professionals should work to engage with and aid its efforts from the outside. Only with such civilian

  5. [The value of surgical experience gained during the Great Patriotic War for the modern military surgery].

    PubMed

    Efimenko, N A; Samokhvalov, L M

    2015-05-01

    The surgical experience gained during the Great Patriotic War (1941-1945) is a basis of the modern Russian military surgery, which allows providing any options for surgical care to the wounded. The article describes the main achievements of the military surgeons in our country during the Great Patriotic War, which helped the Soviet (Russian) military field surgery to achieve a leading position in the world of military medicine. The role of the united martial medical doctrine, three editions of "Guidelines for the military surgery", the qualified surgical assistance as a mean that helped to deliver surgical care to the wounded, the introduction of specialized medical care, technology development of medical triage, as well as the origins of the tactics of a multi-stage surgical treatment of combat trauma and special treatment of minimally wounded during the war. The problems in establishing registers of combat injuries. and training military surgeons are analysed.

  6. Searching, Teaching, Healing: American Indians and Alaskan Natives in Biomedical Research Careers. Proceedings of a Conference Sponsored by the National Institutes of Health Held at the School of Medicine, University of Minnesota (Duluth, Minnesota, August 1-3, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Edwin W., Ed.; Myers, Ruth A., Ed.

    This document contains edited versions of tape-recorded speeches given at a conference titled "American Indians and Alaskan Natives in Biomedical Research." The proceedings is divided into two sections: "Research in the Biomedical Sciences: American Indians Speak Out" that includes presentations on aspects of biomedical careers and their federal…

  7. Searching, Teaching, Healing: American Indians and Alaskan Natives in Biomedical Research Careers. Proceedings of a Conference Sponsored by the National Institutes of Health Held at the School of Medicine, University of Minnesota (Duluth, Minnesota, August 1-3, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Edwin W., Ed.; Myers, Ruth A., Ed.

    This document contains edited versions of tape-recorded speeches given at a conference titled "American Indians and Alaskan Natives in Biomedical Research." The proceedings is divided into two sections: "Research in the Biomedical Sciences: American Indians Speak Out" that includes presentations on aspects of biomedical careers and their federal…

  8. Perceptions of the impact a military career has on children.

    PubMed

    Rowe, S L; Keeling, M; Wessely, S; Fear, N T

    2014-10-01

    The perceived effects of a military career on service personnel's children have been largely overlooked. To examine the views of military personnel about the impact their career has on their children in relation to socio-demographic variables, military characteristics and mental health symptoms. Service personnel (regular and reserve) with one or more children (<18 years) were included. Data were taken from a large UK military cohort study completed between 2007 and 2009. Participants were asked to report whether they viewed their military career as having a positive, negative or no impact on their children. There were 3198 participants. Just over half (51%) of service personnel perceived their military career as having a negative impact on their children. Not being in a relationship (multinomial odds ratio 2.65, 95% CI 1.81-3.88), deployment for 13 months or more within a 3 year period (1.85, 1.31-2.62), symptoms of common mental health disorder (2.21, 1.65-2.96) and probable post-traumatic stress disorder (3.26, 1.39-7.66) were associated with perceiving military career as affecting children negatively. Reserves were less likely than regulars (0.37, 0.27-0.51) and other ranks were less likely than non-commissioned officers (0.67, 0.46-0.98) to report negative effects of their military career on their children. Contrary to previous research findings, regulars were more likely to report a negative impact, reflecting this study's focus on the wider military context, rather than just deployment. These findings are consistent with existing research showing links between deployment length and negative impact. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Army Medicine and the Law

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1964-01-01

    D. Blood Alcohol Tests and Drunken Drivers E. Hypnosis in the Law F. Lie-Detectors Can Lie! G, Forensic Pathology and the Law H. The Medicolegal...The Federal Tort Claims Act, copyright, 1963. b. Consent to Medical Procedures, copyright 1963. c. Hypnosis in the Law, copyright 1964. d. Blood...Tort Claims Act, copyright 1963. b. Forensic Pathology and the Law, copyright 1964. c. Some Legal Aspects of Military Preventive Medicine, copyright

  10. Ninth Conference on Space Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The papers presented in this conference provided an international dialogue and a meaningful exchange in the simulation of space environments as well as the evolution of these technological advances into other fields. The papers represent a significant contribution to the understanding of space simulation problems and the utilization of this knowledge. The topics of the papers include; spacecraft testing; facilities and test equipment; system and subsystem test; life sciences, medicine and space; physical environmental factors; chemical environmental factors; contamination; space physics; and thermal protection.

  11. Spinal disabilities in military and civil aviators.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Narinder

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the nature and cause of spinal disabilities among military and civil aircrew in India. Studies suggest that military aircrew may be more prone than nonaviators to develop spinal disabilities. An in-depth analysis of such disabilities can enable policy makers to develop data-driven preventive health programs. Extensive literature search did not reveal even a single study focusing on spinal disabilities in symptomatic aircrew. A case record of each aircrew is maintained at the Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Indian Air Force, Bangalore, India These records were accessed for all aircrew evaluated for spinal disabilities from the year 2000 to 2006. The total data comprises of 239 military and 11 civil aircrew. Most of the military aircrew were from the fighter stream. The spectrum of causes for spinal disabilities ranged from ejection, aircraft accidents to road traffic accidents, and falls. Degenerative disc disease was the leading cause in helicopter and transport pilots, whereas fractures were the predominant category in fighter pilots. A total of 153 vertebral fractures and 190 intervertebral discs were involved. There were significant differences in the age and distribution of this aircrew. Spinal disabilities assume significance for variety of reasons. Firstly, a large number of spinal disabilities caused by vehicular trauma are preventable. Second, they generally entail a prolonged course of recovery. Third, they can result in loss of trained human resources, especially when the individual cannot return to his or her original workspace. This study provides insights into the nature of spinal disabilities in civil and military aviation. Ejection and aircraft accidents remain the leading cause of vertebral fractures. Disc degenerative disease is a cause of concern. Physical conditioning and regular physical exercise may possibly minimize spinal disabilities in susceptible aircrew.

  12. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  13. The Impact of Managed Care on Internal Medicine Graduate Medical Education at Brooke Army Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    managed care among residents and staff physicians (Simon, Pan , Sullivan, Clark-Chiarelli, Connelly, Peters, Singer, Inui, and Block, 1999). In fact...have Internal Medicine GME 11 shown that managed care has decreased time for research and teaching (Simon, Pan , Sullivan, Clark-Chiarelli, Connely...Residents on Operational Medicine, Managed Care, Graduate Medical Education, and Continued Military Service. Military Medicine, 163(6), 392. Simon, S. R., Pan

  14. Military Gay Ban Revisited: Is our Military Ready for Change?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-20

    Military gay ban revisited: Is our military ready for change? Captain LS...2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military gay ban revisited: Is our military ready for change? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender ] (LGBT) rights is exploited by those seeking to divide us. But at its core, this issue is about who we are as

  15. [Role of the army physician in health protection of military personnel of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Belevitin, A B; Shelepov, A M; Kul'nev, S V; Mironkin, N A

    2011-01-01

    In the article are considered: the history of formation of military medicine in Russia; requirements, presented to the level of processing of military doctors and formulated in the form of competences. The disadvantages are analyzed and single out the ways of perfection in work of the troop echelon of medical service in modern conditions of reforming of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

  16. Electrocution fatalities in military personnel in Ankara, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Tugcu, Harun; Ozsoy, Sait; Balandiz, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate various cases of death caused by electrical injuries among Turkish military personnel. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed fatality cases of military personnel between 1994 and 2013 at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey, the only forensic medicine center for the Turkish Armed Forces. Medical records and autopsy reports of cases of electrical fatalities were reviewed and analyzed in terms of age and gender-specific incidence, voltage, contact details, body region distribution, location, and season of incident, site, and severity of injuries sustained, and histopathological and toxicological findings. Results: Sixteen (3.5%) out of the 450 autopsy cases involved electrocution. All deaths were accidental and most frequently occurred outdoors (75%). Eight (50%) died due to high voltage while 6 (37.5%) died due to low voltage. The entry and exit lesions were determined most frequently in cases with high voltage injury. The low voltage deaths commonly occurred at the scene of the event (66.6%), while almost all high voltage deaths occurred in the hospital (87.5%, p=0.03). Electrical burns were most commonly detected in the upper extremities (32.6%, n=14). Conclusion: The present study shows that deaths due to high voltage electrocution are more frequent than low voltage electrocution among military personnel. PMID:25630009

  17. Electrocution fatalities in military personnel in Ankara, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tugcu, Harun; Özsoy, Sait; Balandiz, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate various cases of death caused by electrical injuries among Turkish military personnel. We retrospectively reviewed fatality cases of military personnel between 1994 and 2013 at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey, the only forensic medicine center for the Turkish Armed Forces. Medical records and autopsy reports of cases of electrical fatalities were reviewed and analyzed in terms of age and gender-specific incidence, voltage, contact details, body region distribution, location, and season of incident, site, and severity of injuries sustained, and histopathological and toxicological findings. Sixteen (3.5%) out of the 450 autopsy cases involved electrocution. All deaths were accidental and most frequently occurred outdoors (75%). Eight (50%) died due to high voltage while 6 (37.5%) died due to low voltage. The entry and exit lesions were determined most frequently in cases with high voltage injury. The low voltage deaths commonly occurred at the scene of the event (66.6%), while almost all high voltage deaths occurred in the hospital (87.5%, p=0.03). Electrical burns were most commonly detected in the upper extremities (32.6%, n=14). The present study shows that deaths due to high voltage electrocution are more frequent than low voltage electrocution among military personnel.

  18. 2005 Defense Economics Conference: Perspectives on the Military Medical Mission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-22

    organized, formal level to take certain areas like congestive heart failure, diabetes, asthma, obesity —areas where we see a lot of expenditure of...to be competitive because people do have choices in our system today. We need to be accessible. I think I’ve heard, as recently as this morning, that...then the rest of us can follow suit. The food is behind the doors where breakfast was served. Pick it up, bring it back, and we will eat in this room

  19. International Conference (11th) on Applied Military Psychology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    use the test in the selection of blacks, or women, or those for whom English is not the first language ? Carpenter suggested that the hard way of...English version of the test, as appropriate, with separate norms and validation data for the two language groups. This Is not a final answer, either...national sub-groups.) 8 C-15-75 Looking at language differences from an international rather than an intra- national perspective, Bremond (France

  20. Conference on Space and Military Applications of Automation and Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Topics addressed include: robotics; deployment strategies; artificial intelligence; expert systems; sensors and image processing; robotic systems; guidance, navigation, and control; aerospace and missile system manufacturing; and telerobotics.

  1. Conference on Space and Military Applications of Automation and Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Topics addressed include: robotics; deployment strategies; artificial intelligence; expert systems; sensors and image processing; robotic systems; guidance, navigation, and control; aerospace and missile system manufacturing; and telerobotics.

  2. Defense Economics Conference (2004). Military Compensation: Informing the Debate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-09

    the Debate 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Institute for Defense Analyses 4850 Mark Center Drive Alexandria, VA 22311-1882 8. PERFORMING...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM( S ) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT

  3. LOYALTY AND THE MILITARY PROFESSION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-06

    service member possesses, the author asserts that loyalty is the cornerstone for successful service. Military loyalty extends beyond commitment and...analysis of the common trends displays the role military loyalty plays in the profession of arms as key to successful military operations in peace...not be successful . The oath of office inspires or demands service members’ loyalty while the military leaders must ensure it is given. Therefore, a

  4. Aerospace and military

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.A.; Esch, K

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews military and aerospace developments of 1989. The Voyager spacecraft returned astounding imagery from Neptune, sophisticated sensors were launched to explore Venus and Jupiter, and another craft went into earth orbit to explore cosmic rays, while a huge telescope is to be launched early in 1990. The U.S. space shuttle redesign was completed and access to space has become no longer purely a governmental enterprise. In the military realm, events within the Soviet bloc, such as the Berlin Wall's destruction, have popularized arms control. Several big treaties could be signed within the year. Massive troop, equipment, and budget reductions are being considered, along with a halt or delay of major new weapons systems. For new missions, the U.S. military is retreating to its role of a century ago - patrolling the nation's borders, this time against narcotics traffickers.

  5. Financial Times Global Pharmaceutical & Biotechnology Conference 2009.

    PubMed

    Scattereggia, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The Financial Times Global Pharmaceutical & Biotechnology conference, held in London, included topics covering the current and future challenges confronting the pharma and biotech industry, and presented possible solutions to those challenges. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the industry challenges for big pharma companies, diversification as a solution to industry problems, overcoming challenges with collaborations and M&As, and the role of emerging markets in the pharma industry. Other subjects discussed included the expected impact of personalized medicine on the industry, the entry of big pharma into the generics market and the problems that are confronting the small pharma and biotech industry.

  6. U.S.-China Military Contacts: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-19

    China’s cooperation on international security issues. There might be benefits in cooperation in military medicine to prevent pandemics of diseases ... Disease ,” Washington Post, April 10, 2003; “Feature: A Chinese Doctor’s Extraordinary April in 2003,” People’s Daily, June 13, 2003. U.S.-China Military...sent a team to Tibet to recover wreckage from a site where a C-46 aircraft crashed during World War II. September 24-27 The USS Cushing , a destroyer

  7. [The domestic aviation and space medicine reflected in phaleristics].

    PubMed

    Zhdan'ko, I M; Ryzhenko, S P; Khomenko, M N; Golosov, S Iu; Sobolenko, D A

    2013-04-01

    The article is devoted to the connection between the badges of medical institutions that are material evidence of formation and development of domestic aviation and space medicine and the history of Armed forces. The authors describe development of aviation and space medicine phaleristics, which is an important factor for patriotic education of modem scientific and military medical personnel.

  8. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts from nine selected papers presented at the 1982 Association for Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference are provided. Copies of conference proceedings may be obtained for fifteen dollars from the Association. (MP)

  9. List of ARI Conference Papers, Journal Articles, Books, and Book Chapters: 1982-1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    conference of the Military Testing Association, San Antonio, TX. Busciglio, H.H. (1990, November). Incrementing ASVAB validity with spatial and perceptual...Paper presented at the meeting of the Military Testing Association, Arlington, VA. Czarnolewski , M.Y., & Martin, C.J. (1986, November). Correlations...Association, New London, CT. Czarnolewski , M.Y., & Miles, J.L. (1990). Measures of effectiveness: Increasing their sensitivity to personnel

  10. Technical Education in the Military

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Charles O.

    1974-01-01

    Cooperation between military and civilian technical training institutions has included evaluation and accreditation of five military training schools by a civilian evaluation team, which was impressed by the level, completeness and quality of the instruction. Additional cooperation and improved communications between military and civilian training…

  11. Academic and Military Instructional Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Robert K.

    This paper examines the practices and accomplishments of the military in the area of instructional technology. An examination of historical background is used to increase the precision of the definition of instructional technology. Specific contributions of the military are described and then uses of instructional technology in the military and…

  12. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-99-1-9478 TITLE: COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION ...COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 99 – 31 Dec 06 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION RESEARCH 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...report presents the activities of the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Military Nutrition Research (CMNR) for the

  13. Measuring Underemployment Among Military Spouses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    widespread underemployment among military wives, this underemployment does not necessarily translate into dissatisfaction with the military...households (DMDC, 2004). Thus, a per- sistent lack of employment opportunity affects a spouse’s quality of life, and perennial dissatisfaction with...its own right, since wives’ dissatisfaction may translate into higher service member attrition from military service. The primary outcome of interest

  14. Military Psychology: An Overview,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Department of Leadership and Law, provide academic and personal counseling to midshipmen, and conduct research. An example of psychological research...AD-Ai40 866 MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY : AN OYERYIEM(U) NAVY PERSONNEL i/i RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER SAN DIEGO CR C NEMETH ET AL. MAY 84 UNCLASSIFIED F...G 5/1@ NL L 8 -1.25 1 1.4 11.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATKiAk BURAMF OF STANDARDS- 1963-A %% a • v VjUU.U. 1 // 00 Military Psychology : An

  15. Fraternization - A Military Offense?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    34While Jiaf-ing of an appropriate regulation might be diffcult, %e recommend it to the responsible military services" (8:1.60). :iteen years later in...rank or positions for personal gain, and are prejudicial to good order and discipline, action must be taken against those involved. "The basic role and...vital, and responsive military oiqa[)_Jiza-1cn5: addition, the Air Force encourages open members*,:_ arc --_ _cpation in base *recreat ional1 ac t ivi t

  16. Moral injury: A new challenge for complementary and alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kopacz, Marek S; Connery, April L; Bishop, Todd M; Bryan, Craig J; Drescher, Kent D; Currier, Joseph M; Pigeon, Wilfred R

    2016-02-01

    Moral injury represents an emerging clinical construct recognized as a source of morbidity in current and former military personnel. Finding effective ways to support those affected by moral injury remains a challenge for both biomedical and complementary and alternative medicine. This paper introduces the concept of moral injury and suggests two complementary and alternative medicine, pastoral care and mindfulness, which may prove useful in supporting military personnel thought to be dealing with moral injury. Research strategies for developing an evidence-base for applying these, and other, complementary and alternative medicine modalities to moral injury are discussed.

  17. [Secret medicines].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, H

    2001-01-01

    Secret medicines had two characteristics: their formula remained unknown and they were prepared by many kinds of people. Before 1728 there were no general laws about these secret medicines but only peculiar rules. From 1728 to 1778, the King edicted rigorous rules in order to limit the number of secret medicines. Between 1778 and 1789, the law became more definite and the Royal Society of Medicine gave advices. The Law of Germinal An-XI forbid secret medicines but since 1805, some compromises took place. Slowly, secret medicines were replaced by pharmaceutics and new set of laws.

  18. Parent Conferences. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents six workshop sessions on parent conferences: (1) "Parents' Perspectives on Conferencing" (R. Duffy); (2) "Three Way Conferences" (G. Zeller); (3) "Conferencing with Parents of Infants" (K. Albrecht); (4) "Conferencing with Parents of School-Agers" (L. G. Miller); (5) "Cross Cultural Conferences" (J. Gonzalez-Mena); and (6) "Working with…

  19. EDITORIAL: Conference program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-04-01

    Some of the papers and talks given at the conference have not been published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The attached PDF file lists the full conference program and indicates (with an asterisk) those papers or talks which are not present in this volume.

  20. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  1. Youth Conference Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.

    This handbook is designed to provide practical aid to those who have charge of the planning and organization of a youth conference, Defined as a conference to provide practical information as well as information about possible responsibilities, risks, and consequences of actions, related to the chosen conference topic. Suggestions are given for…

  2. Epidemiology of U.K. military burns.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mark Anthony; Moledina, Jamil; Jeffery, Steve L A

    2011-01-01

    The authors review the etiology of U.K. military burns in light of increasing hybrid warfare. Analysis of the nature of these injured personnel will provide commanders with the evidence to plan for on-going and future operations. Case notes of all U.K. Armed Forces burn injured patients who were evacuated to the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine were reviewed. Demographics, burn severity, pattern, and mortality details were included. There were 134 U.K. military personnel with burns requiring return to the United Kingdom during 2001-2007. The median age was 27 (20-62) years. Overall, 60% of burns seen were "accidental." Burning waste, misuse or disrespect of fuel, and scalds were the most prevalent noncombat burns. Areas commonly burned were the face, legs, and hands. During 2006-2007 in the two major conflicts, more than 59% (n = 36) of the burned patients evacuated to the United Kingdom were injured during combat. Burns sustained in combat represent 5.8% of all combat casualties and were commonly associated with other injuries. Improvised explosive device, minestrike, and rocket-propelled grenade were common causes. The mean TBSA affected for both groups was 5% (1-70). The majority of combat burn injuries have been small in size. Greater provision of flame retardant equipment and clothing may reduce the extent and number of combat burns in the future. The numbers of noncombat burns are being reduced by good military discipline.

  3. Understanding and preventing military suicide.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Jennings, Keith W; Jobes, David A; Bradley, John C

    2012-01-01

    The continual rise in the U.S. military's suicide rate since 2004 is one of the most vexing issues currently facing military leaders, mental health professionals, and suicide experts. Despite considerable efforts to address this problem, however, suicide rates have not decreased. The authors consider possible reasons for this frustrating reality, and question common assumptions and approaches to military suicide prevention. They further argue that suicide prevention efforts that more explicitly embrace the military culture and implement evidence-based strategies across the full spectrum of prevention and treatment could improve success. Several recommendations for augmenting current efforts to prevent military suicide are proposed.

  4. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Science Education » Science Topics » Nuclear Medicine SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ... Related Documents: Nuclear Medicine Fact Sheet.pdf SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ...

  5. Herbal Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  6. Military Forces in Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    families of military professionals withdrawn from East- em Europe are living in hostels , prefabricated barracks, or tents. In some cases, conscripts...Technological Capabilities: USSR/US Semiconductor Materials and Microelectronic C ircuils Software Producibility Parallel Computer Architectures ^ r...underground leadership bunker adjacent to Moscow State University . These fa- cilities are intended for the national command authority in wartime

  7. The Military Cooperation Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    stay in their respective countries and continue to face their host nation contacts daily. For host nation relations , it may be more expedient to...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited THE MILITARY...THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this

  8. Why Military History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Josiah, III

    2008-01-01

    Interest in military history is as strong as it has ever been--except on American college campuses. Lt. Gen. Josiah Bunting III examines why today's undergraduates need to study the facts of war, and why knowing its causes and consequences remain a vital part of our common knowledge.

  9. Soviet Union, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    agency of the Soviet Union. Permission for further reproduction must be obtained from copyright owner. SOVIET UNION MILITARY AFFAIRS CONTENTS...internationalists, it has always embodied the inviolable friendship of the peoples of the USSR. But are some of us not hypnotized by this principle

  10. Resilience among Military Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors present their approach to understanding resilience among military connected young people, and they discuss some of the gaps in their knowledge. They begin by defining resilience, and then present a theoretical model of how young people demonstrate resilient functioning. Next they consider some of the research on…

  11. Darwinian medicine and psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Romaní de Gabriel, J

    2015-04-01

    Darwinian medicine, or evolutionary medicine, regards some pathological conditions as attempts by the organism to solve a problem or develop defense mechanisms. At certain stages of human evolution, some diseases may have conferred a selective advantage. Psoriasis is a high-penetrance multigenic disorder with prevalence among whites of up to 3%. Psoriatic lesions have been linked with enhanced wound-healing qualities and greater capacity to fight infection. Leprosy, tuberculosis, and infections caused by viruses similar to human immunodeficiency virus have been postulated as environmental stressors that may have selected for psoriasis-promoting genes in some human populations. The tendency of patients with severe psoriasis to develop metabolic syndrome may reflect the body's attempt to react to environmental stresses and warning signs by triggering insulin resistance and fat storage.

  12. Expanding the Availability of Lightweight Aluminum Alloy Armor Plate Procured From Detailed Military Specifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    elements was eventually designated 17S ( 2017 ) and is the progenitor of the 2 series of aluminum alloys . Alcoa obtained the rights to produce...Expanding the Availability of Lightweight Aluminum Alloy Armor Plate Procured From Detailed Military Specifications by Kevin Doherty...International Conference on Aluminum Alloys (ICAA13), pp. 541–546, Pittsburgh, PA, 3–7 June 2012. Approved for public

  13. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process.

  14. The Second Joint NASA/FAA/DOD Conference on Aging Aircraft. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Conference was to bring together world leaders in aviation safety research, aircraft design and manufacturing, fleet operation and aviation maintenance to disseminate information on current practices and advanced technologies that will assure the continued airworthiness of the aging aircraft in the military and commercial fleets. The Conference included reviews of current industry practices, assessments of future technology requirements, and status of aviation safety research. The Conference provided an opportunity for interactions among the key personnel in the research and technology development community, the original equipment manufacturers, commercial airline operators, military fleet operators, aviation maintenance, and aircraft certification and regulatory authorities. Conference participation was unrestricted and open to the international aviation community.

  15. The twelfth annual battery conference on applications and advances: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, H.A.; Seo, E.T.

    1997-12-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Battery Conference. A total of 58 papers were presented in the following technical sessions: Aircraft battery systems; Military power sources; Space and communications; Materials and processes; Testing and evaluation; Electric vehicles; Small batteries; Stationary applications; Battery electronics and management; and Power sources R and D. Fifty papers were selected and indexed for inclusion on the data base.

  16. [Research in tropical medicine].

    PubMed

    Dumas, Michel; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2013-10-01

    In France, research in tropical medicine is carried out by the Institute for Research and Development (IRD), university-affiliated institutes, and other research organizations such as INSERM, CNRS and the Pasteur Institute. Currently, this research is highly fragmented and therefore inefficient. As a result, despite significant financial means, French research in this field is not sufficiently competitive. This research activity should be coordinated by creating a "federation ", that would 1) facilitate the sharing of material and human resources, thereby improving efficiency and resulting in cost savings; 2) valorize French research in tropical medicine and its expert know-how, thus favoring the nomination of French experts in large international research programs (French experts in tropical medicine are currently under-recognized); 3) attract young researchers from France and elsewhere; and 4) adapt to the ongoing demographic and economic evolution of tropical countries. The creation of a Federation of French researchers would also make research in tropical medicine more visible. The objectives to which it leads already must include 1) a better understanding of the priorities of countries in the southern hemisphere, taking into account the social, cultural and economic contexts and ensuring the consistency of current and future projects ; 2) strengthening of research networks in close and equal partnership with researchers in the southern hemisphere, with pooling of resources (scientific, human and material) to reach the critical mass required for major projects ; 3) promoting the emergence of centers of excellence for health research in tropical countries ; and 4) contributing more effectively to training, because there can be no training without research, and no research without training This consolidation will help to empower research in tropical medicine, as in other Western countries, and will allow France to recover the place it deserves. The specific

  17. Chilean medicine under social revolution.

    PubMed

    Medina, E; Cruz-Coke, R

    1976-07-22

    During the last decade Chile has experienced a series of social changes under Christian Socialist (1964-1970), Marxist Socialist (1970-1973) and military (1973-1975) governments. These changes grossly affected the evolution of medicine and public health in Chile. Nevertheless, vital statistics show an overall improvement in health indexes, with a short interruption during the Marxist government. During this period medical standards and the quality of medical services declined when revolutionaries disrupted the organization of traditional socialized Chilean medicine founded 50 years ago. The vital statistics of 1974 suggest an overall recovery, but physical and human resources for health, eroded by revolution and the present acute economic crisis, have not yet begun to improve. Nevertheless, Chilean medicine has reasumed the technical character that should never have been abandoned.

  18. 25th Annual Vascular Surgery Seminar and Meeting of the Society for Military Vascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rich, N M

    1998-12-01

    The 25th Annual (Silver Anniversary) Vascular Surgery Seminar and Meeting of the Society for Military Vascular Surgery was held in the Jay P. Sanford Auditorium at the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), 4-6 December 1997. This highly successful exchange included active duty military surgeons, military surgeons in the reserves, retired military officers continuing second careers in civilian vascular surgery, distinguished visiting professors from the United States and abroad, International Guest Scholars, USUHS Faculty as well as colleagues and friends. The emphasis continued to be directed to ensuring that military vascular surgery remains current, recognizing the rich heritage of contributions to vascular surgery in general that have come from surgeons serving on battlefields around the world, particularly in this 20th century.

  19. A Contextual Analysis of the Combined Service: A Significant Component of the Military Sealift Command’s Breakbulk Capability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    release; distribution unlimited. IS. siIP,.uSWAI NOTES Breakbulk, Military Sealift Command, Cargo, Sealift, Merchant Marine , U.S. Flag Fleet, Sealift...TRADE -- ------------------------ 103 A. THE MERCHANT MARINE ACT OF 1970: 1970 TO 1981 -------------------------------- 103 B. U.N. CONFERENCE ON...OCEANGOING MERCHANT MARINE ------ 111 IV-VII WOIRLD FLEET SERVING U.S. TRADE --------- 132 IV-VIII MILITARY CARGO WORILOADS FOR MAJOR WEST COAST PORTS

  20. Asthma and allergy: short texts and recommendations of the expert conference of the French Speaking Pneumology Society (SPLF), in partnership with the French Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (SFAIC), the French Society of Occupational Medicine (SFMT) and the "Asthma-Allergy" association.

    PubMed

    Tillie-Leblond, Isabelle; Magnan, Antoine; Pauli, Gabrielle; Vervloet, Daniel; Wallaert, Benoît; Didier, Alain; Ameille, Jacques; Godard, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    The Asthma Plan published by the French Health Ministry in 2002, the experts conferences edited by ANAES on therapeutic education and follow-up of asthma, the inclusion of this disease in the Public Health Law have been remarkable steps in France during the last few years. The medical community, more particularly the pneumological community, has shown its commitment in the treatment of this public health problem. But allergy was not sufficiently taken into account, although it is responsible for nearly 50 to 60% cases of asthma. In most so-called developed countries the prevalence of asthma and of allergies has increased in the last twenty years. Its progress varies according to country and age group: the increased prevalence of allergy, more specifically of rhinitis and eczema, is most marked in children aged 6-7 year. The prevalence of asthma seems to have reached a plateau in certain northern countries or seems to have decreased in 13-14 year olds (Anglo-Saxon countries). There were multiple reasons, generally attributed to changes in life-style. Asthma is the result of an interaction between a genetic predisposition and the environment, where allergens are present, but also smoking. The relationships between allergy and asthma are complex. This conference discussed the various essential issues that face doctors who treat patients with asthma in their daily practice. The risk factors, the methods of exploration in children and adults and the specific treatments are, indeed, essential issues to be evaluated in a frequent pathology that interests a large number of physicians. The variety of experts is wide, representing pneumology (French Speaking Pneumology Society), the occupational medicine world (French Society of Occupational Medicine), the allergic pathology (French Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology), and patients with the patient association "Asthma & Allergy", physicians belonging to the general medicine community, general hospitals, private

  1. [Capabilities of military medical academy in the implementation of advanced scientific research].

    PubMed

    Bel'skikh, A N

    2013-06-01

    The paper describes the main areas of current and future studies of scientific schools, scientific potential and the structure of scientific complex of Military Medical Academy. Improvement and equipping of laboratory bench and test facilities of the Academy are required to perform advanced research and further development of innovative medical technologies. It is necessary to develop and increase the scientific school of the Academy in order to prepare highly qualified scientific and pedagogical staff in the interests of military medicine in the future.

  2. A Comparison of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Outcomes Between Military and Civilian Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 180, 3:56, 2015 A Comparison of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Outcomes Between Military and Civilian Burn Patients J Alan...Chung, MC USA*‡ ABSTRACT Background: The objective of this report was to compare the prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and...Development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common complication of burn injury and is associated with poor outcomes. Previous reports using

  3. Program for Research on Dietary Supplements in Military Operations and Healthcare Metabolically Optimized Brain - JWF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    minerals (17.9%), combination products (9.1%), and herbal supplements (8.3%).7 Reasons for DS use among military members were to improve health (64...Alcohol; Vitamins / Minerals / Antioxidants / Dietary supplements (not specified); Herbal Medicine (Subsets: Ginseng and Gingko Biloba); Diet...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0068 TITLE: Program for Research on Dietary Supplements In Military Operations and Healthcare Metabolically

  4. Chronic pain management in the active-duty military

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David; Cohen, Steven P.

    2012-06-01

    As in the general population, chronic pain is a prevalent and burdensome affliction in active-duty military personnel. Painful conditions in military members can be categorized broadly in terms of whether they arise directly from combat injuries (gunshot, fragmentation wound, blast impact) or whether they result from non-combat injuries (sprains, herniated discs, motor vehicle accidents). Both combat-related and non-combat-related causes of pain can further be classified as either acute or chronic. Here we discuss the state of pain management as it relates to the military population in both deployed and non-deployed settings. The term non-battle injury (NBI) is commonly used to refer to those conditions not directly associated with the combat actions of war. In the history of warfare, NBI have far outstripped battle-related injuries in terms not only of morbidity, but also mortality. It was not until improvements in health care and field medicine were applied in World War I that battle-related deaths finally outnumbered those attributed to disease and pestilence. However, NBI have been the leading cause of morbidity and hospital admission in every major conflict since the Korean War. Pain remains a leading cause of presentation to military medical facilities, both in and out of theater. The absence of pain services is associated with a low return-to-duty rate among the deployed population. The most common pain complaints involve the low-back and neck, and studies have suggested that earlier treatment is associated with more significant improvement and a higher return to duty rate. It is recognized that military medicine is often at the forefront of medical innovation, and that many fields of medicine have reaped benefit from the conduct of war.

  5. Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine and surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Pogue, Brian W.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Tunnell, James W.; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    The guest editors introduce a Biomedical Optics Express feature issue that includes contributions from participants at the 2013 conference on Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XIII. PMID:24575348

  6. Politico-Military Relations, a Basis for Military Interaction between Argentina and the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-15

    POLITICO -MILITARY RELATIONS, A BASIS FOR MILITARY INTERACTION BETWEEN ARGENTINA AND THE UNITED STATES N IN w Fn STRATEGY AND CAMPAIGN DEPARTMENT...FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 11 TITLE (Include Security Classificationi Politico -Military Relations, A...America. Politico -Military relations. civil-military relations, military coups. military to military relations. South American democracy -con- 𔄃

  7. Air Force Preventive Medicine's role in the war against terrorism: new missions for the global counterinsurgency.

    PubMed

    Goff, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Since 2005, the call for the military to conduct ?softer? missions, such as humanitarian assistance and partner training, has increased. These ?medical stability operations? are in fact to be given comparable priority to combat operations. Military leadership understands their the value of Medical Stability Operations across the range of military operations from shaping through postdisaster or post-conflict operations.(1) Air Force Preventive Medicine (AFPM) teams, given more education, are suited to these medical stability operations and should be tasked.

  8. Hybrid Warfare: A Military Revolution or Revolution in Military Affairs?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-14

    4MacGregor Knox and Williamson Murray, eds., The Dynamics of Military Revolution 1300-2050 (Cambridge: Cambridge... Dynamics of Military Revolution 1300-2050.12 A case study helps compare the extrapolation of the analysis and synthesis of their writings on MR to...affairs as defined by Knox and Murray in their book The Dynamics of Military Revolution, 1300-2050. 37 Professors Knox and Murray, provide a conceptual

  9. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  10. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  11. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  12. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military pilot...

  13. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military pilot...

  14. The use of biomarkers in the military: from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Yehuda, Rachel; Neylan, Thomas C; Flory, Janine D; McFarlane, Alexander C

    2013-09-01

    This paper provides a summary of relevant issues covered in the conference, "The Use of Biomarkers in the Military: Theory to Practice" held at the New York Academy of Science on September 14, 2012. The conference covered the state of the science in identification of PTSD biomarkers, including, the definition of different classes of biomarkers pertaining to PTSD. The aim of the satellite conference was to bring together researchers who have been supported by the Department of Defense, Veterans Administration, National Institutes of Health, and other agencies around the world, who are interested in the identification of biomarkers for PTSD risk, diagnosis, symptom severity and treatment response, for a discussion of salient issues regarding biomarker development for PTSD, as well as special considerations for the use of biomarkers in the military. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. [The contribution of the Military Medical Academy to space exploration].

    PubMed

    Belevitin, A B; Tsygan, V N; Blaginin, A A; Kaltygin, M V

    2011-04-01

    The article examines the contribution of the Military Medical Academy as an educational, research and medical institutions in the establishment and development of the national Russian manned spaceflight. Lists the names of the Academy's scientists, working in laboratories and in the Cosmonaut Training Center. In 1958 the academy was formed Department of Aviation Medicine from the research laboratories of aviation medicine, psychophysiology, and encephalography, a division of pressure chambers and furnaces. Direct contribution to the preparation of the first manned space flight made by graduates of the academy, E.A. Karpov (the first chief of Cosmonauts Training Center. Yuri Gagarin) and I.A. Kolosov. Over the half century history of the Russian Space Military Medical Academy, prepared and sent to the CPC Gagarin more than 110 of its graduates.

  16. Civilian and Military Genetics: Nondiscrimination Policy in a Post-GINA World

    PubMed Central

    Baruch, Susannah; Hudson, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    Evidence is emerging of a growing societal consensus about appropriate and inappropriate uses of genetic information. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 provides new legal protections to Americans by prohibiting the discriminatory use of genetic information by health insurers and employers. Additionally, the United States military recently created new policies for fair use of genetic information in the determination of benefits for servicemen and servicewomen leaving military service. Although critical issues remain, such as the potential for genetic information to be used to deny people other forms of insurance, and how the military will use genetic medicine overall, significant progress has been made. PMID:18940308

  17. Civilian and military genetics: nondiscrimination policy in a post-GINA world.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Susannah; Hudson, Kathy

    2008-10-01

    Evidence is emerging of a growing societal consensus about appropriate and inappropriate uses of genetic information. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 provides new legal protections to Americans by prohibiting the discriminatory use of genetic information by health insurers and employers. Additionally, the United States military recently created new policies for fair use of genetic information in the determination of benefits for servicemen and servicewomen leaving military service. Although critical issues remain, such as the potential for genetic information to be used to deny people other forms of insurance, and how the military will use genetic medicine overall, significant progress has been made.

  18. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1... Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. (a) The... to appear at a specified time and place for a conference prior to a hearing, or to submit...

  19. Bulgarian military neurosurgery: from Warsaw Pact to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

    PubMed

    Enchev, Yavor; Eftimov, Tihomir

    2010-05-01

    After 45 years as a closest ally of the Soviet Union in the Warsaw Pact, founded mainly against the US and the Western Europe countries, and 15 years of democratic changes, since 2004 Bulgaria has been a full member of NATO and an equal and trusted partner of its former enemies. The unprecedented transformation has affected all aspects of the Bulgarian society. As a function of the Bulgarian Armed Forces, Bulgarian military medicine and in particular Bulgarian military neurosurgery is indivisibly connected with their development. The history of Bulgarian military neurosurgery is the history of the transition from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics military system and military medicine to NATO standards in every aspect. The career of the military neurosurgeon in Bulgaria is in many ways similar to that of the civilian neurosurgeon, but there are also many peculiarities. The purpose of this study was to outline the background and the history of Bulgarian military neurosurgery as well as its future trends in the conditions of world globalization.

  20. Disaster medicine: genealogy of a concept.

    PubMed

    Stehrenberger, Cécile Stephanie; Goltermann, Svenja

    2014-11-01

    This paper evaluates disaster medicine from a historical perspective that facilitates the understanding of its present. Today, disaster medicine and humanitarian medicine are inextricably linked and the terms are sometimes used synonymously. An in-depth analysis of an extensive body of concrete empirical cases from various sources (i.e. archival records) reveals, however, that they have not always been the same. A genealogical, history-of-knowledge approach demonstrates that the concept of disaster medicine emerged in the early 20th century in Switzerland in the context of industrialization. Even though it gained important impetus during the First World War, the concept was informed by the experiences of forensic physicians in technological disasters such as mining explosions. The Cold War constituted the historical constellation in which disaster medicine was developed in West Germany during the 1960s and 1970s in a way that was paradigmatic for other Western European countries. At the same time, it was contested there in an unusual, historically unique way. Although focusing on a Western European context, this paper explores how medical interventions in disasters were international events and how the practice of disaster medicine was developed and "trained" through being applied in the Global South. It demonstrates the historicity of disaster medicine's political character and of the controversies generated by its involvement in civil and military operations. Throughout the 20th century, the political nature and military involvement of disaster medicine resulted in a number of ethical and practical issues, which are similar to the challenges facing humanitarian medicine today. The exploration of disaster medicine's past can therefore open up critical interventions in humanitarian medicine's present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sexual functioning in military personnel: preliminary estimates and predictors.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sherrie L; Redmond, Sarah; Hassan, Anthony M

    2014-10-01

    Although the military is a young and vigorous force, service members and veterans may experience sexual functioning problems (SFPs) as a result of military service. Sexual functioning can be impaired by physical, psychological, and social factors and can impact quality of life (QOL) and happiness. This study aims to estimate rates and correlates of SFPs in male military personnel across demographic and psychosocial characteristics, to examine the QOL concomitants, and to evaluate barriers for treatment seeking. This exploratory cross-sectional study was conducted using data from a larger nationwide study conducted between October 2013 and November 2013. This sample consists of 367 male active duty service members and recent veterans (military personnel) age 40 or younger. Erectile dysfunction (ED) was determined using the five-item International Index of Erectile Function, sexual dysfunction (SD) was determined using the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale, Male, and QOL was determined using the World Health Organization Quality of Life, Brief. SFPs were associated with various demographic, physical, and psychosocial risk factors. The rates of SD and ED were 8.45% and 33.24%, respectively, for male military personnel aged 21-40. Those who were 36-40, nonmarried, nonwhite, and of lower educational attainment reported the highest rates of SFPs. Male military personnel with poor physical and psychosocial health presented the greatest risk for ED and SD. SFPs were associated with reduced QOL and lower happiness, and barriers for treatment were generally related to social barriers. SFPs in young male military personnel are an important public health concern that can severely impact QOL and happiness. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  2. Military and veteran's health integration across missions: how a college of nursing "joined forces".

    PubMed

    Morrison-Beedy, Dianne; Passmore, Denise; D'Aoust, Rita

    2015-01-01

    To address the unique needs of our returning military and veterans, the White House initiated the Joining Forces campaign and has encouraged colleges of nursing throughout the nation to support this mission. At the University of South Florida College of Nursing, we have implemented a multifaceted approach that addresses education, research, and employment. These military-related programs have been unified under our RESTORE LIVES (Research and Education to Rehabilitate and Restore the Lives of Veterans, Services Members and their Families) initiative. To accomplish this mission, we enhanced our curriculum to include veteran health care issues, developed research that addresses veteran wellness, launched an accelerated program to enable veterans and military personnel with medical experience to obtain their baccalaureate in nursing, and encouraged a culture within the college that is supportive of military-based health care and employment needs. We have shared our experiences through webinars and presentations and by hosting a national conference. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Soviet Far East military buildup: Nuclear dilemmas and Asian security

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, R.H.; Kosaka, M.

    1986-01-01

    The growing nuclearization of the Soviet military presence in the Far East has been of increasing concern to the United States and its Asian-Pacific allies. This volume brings together the diverse perspectives of multinational groups of defense and foreign policy experts associated with the Security Conference on Asia and the Pacific. Topics considered include the problems of coalition defense; strategic issues for the Soviet Union; motives and prospects; thinking about the nuclear balance; Soviet military deployments: Implications for China's security; the Soviet military buildup in Japan; theater nuclear weapons and Japan's defense policy; the Soviet military buildup in the Far East and South Korea; ANZAC perspectives on Soviet power in the Pacific; prospects for a new Korean War; Indochina, 1982-1985; links between Asian and European security; The European theater nuclear force; and European and Japanese Experiences.

  4. Military Science and Academies,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-06

    the Higher Education Institutions" note that the higher school, which has a highly qualified-staff of scientific workers at its disposal, is not taking...deemed it necessary to significantly raise the role of higher education establish- ments in the solution of the most important scientific problems. This...requirement is totally applicable also to the higher military education institutions, it obliges the professorial teaching staffs to re-examine their

  5. Soviet Military Power 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    deployed in both a fixed and mobile ver- Kremlin should cease its massive military aid rrograms. sion. the mobile SS-25, and the new version of the...Libya. Angola, Vict- ability of mobile systems, coupled with greater yield and nam, Syria, and especially Cuba, which is only 90 miles accuracy of the...of severe repression in Poland, Moscow also deployed SS-20 intermediate-range mobile nuclear missiles that These apparent contradictions in Soviet

  6. Soviet Military Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    continuously deployed it frequently in their military journals. to South Yemen and periodically deployed to Mine warfare is a major mission of the So...plague, and cholera The results of that investment are reflected in for BW purposes, as well as botulinum toxin, a number of impressive new weapons such...since World War 11. Dur- In summary: ing the siege of Leningrad, single-cell protein "* A major outbreak of anthrax occurred at (SCP) derived from wood

  7. Military Reform -- What Next?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    at the military with small pockets of support within Congress. 13. 24 End Notes 1. Association of the United States Army, "Department of Defense...strategic reappraisal and of a much overdue organizational reordering." 2. 3’ End Notes 1. Lyman L. Lemnitzer, Gen USA, (ret), "Dont Alter the Joint Chiefs...centers for strategic thinking continue to develop joint strategic concepts that match resources with national strategy. 37 End Notes I. Fredrick H

  8. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-24

    Contents: TEKHNIKA I VOORUZHENIYE No 1, 1985 (TEKHNIKA I VOORUZHENIYE, No 1, Jan 85) 18 AIR / AIR DEFENSE FORCES Party Work, Improving Technical...One night an enemy aircraft flew over us and dropped its supply of bombs which, I think, our air defense troops and fighters did not allow it to...Eastern, Carpathian, Kiev and Turkestan military districts, the Baltic Fleet, the Moscow Air Defense District, and the organizations led by comrades

  9. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and leading seaman and honor student. The brothers Giya and Guliver Nikolaishvili of Sukhumi, Dato Metreveli of Kutaisi, who is at the Kiev higher...policy is closely related to its domestic and foreign policy and the strategy of accelerating social and economic development based on scientific...and special informational publications and become acquainted with patent materials. There is yet one more important concept in our military lexicon

  10. Military Review: Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    development this, the proponent defines the life-cycle model techn:ques, and advances in our ability todefine. to be tollowed. prect,,e, the SKAs...amnns, we nust population through the Civilian Integration continue to provide leaders the critical experi- into the Personnel Proponent System ( CIPPS ... model is not easy. Demonstrating 32 May 1991 e MILITARY REVIEW - BECKCETAMD NORTH uncompromising integrity, inculcating values But accomplishing the

  11. Prospects for Military Reform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    tradition has a literary side as well, one most often expressing itself through the medium of military journals. Each year, these journals publish a...beyond cranky literary mutterings and hero-worship for deceased generals of flawed reputation? Can the critique fashioned by the alternative...special timeliness. The archetypal Mac still hovered on the fringes of American politics after having been relieved the previous 40 Parameters year

  12. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Balkin, T., Wesensten, N., 2006. Impaired decision making fol- lowing 49 h of sleep deprivation . Journal of Sleep Research 15 (1), 7–13. Kim, M., Hong, S...Portland VAMC, $307,128 (Appendix 2) o A Behavioral Sleep Intervention for Suicidal Behaviors in Military Veterans: A Randomized Controlled Study, Dr...Moscowitz A, & Hom MH. (June 2015). Perceived Stigma Toward Mental Health in Association with Sleep Disturbances and as an Acute Predictor of Suicidal

  13. Sound Military Decision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-01-01

    included all available and’ pertinent military writings. Care has also been taken to in- S~~clude, from civil sources, the findings of those...The Advisory Function. Understanding between the civil representatives of the State and the leaders of the armed forces is manifestly essential to...conduct of war thus requires that under- standing exist (see pages 9 and 10) between the civil repre- sentatives of the State and the leaders of the armed

  14. USSR Report, Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    to New Equipment ( Yu . Vikhrenko; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 28 Jun 86) 27 Maj Gen Avn Tabunshchikov on Results of Early Summer Training (A. Tabunshchikov...Interview; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 2 Jul 86). 31 Critique of Oversimplification in Pilot Training ( V . Vinokurov; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 7 Jul 86 34 Article...Discusses Career of Maj Gen Avn N. T. Antoshkin ( V . Filatov; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 7 Jun 86) 38 DOSAAF Military-Patriotic Education in Arkhangelsk

  15. Selection of Military Advisors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    this thesis will focus on the methods for selecting the best military personnel for advisor tasks. In doing so, specific qualities , capabilities...attract and keep the best personnel for subsequent advisory requirements. Finally, this document will analyze the quality and suitability of advisor...2006, p. 5-2. 5 study in its own right . Lastly, this thesis relies heavily on current published counterinsurgency doctrine since many aspects of

  16. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  17. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-20

    victorious offensive of the Soviet Army which had crushed the Nazi military machine and freed many peoples from the yoke of Naziism . 25 October is celebrated...dignation and hate for Naziism and the fascist regime grew and class contradic tions became exacerbated. In telling the people the bitter truth, the...country, Romania fought along with the Soviet Union until the complete defeat of Naziism and its troops participated in the liberation of hungary and

  18. Military Pay Comparability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    for promotions and for pay based on ability. Also included in this idea is one of equal pay for basically equal work. Thus, the sub-principle of...Report established for the first time the idea that pay within the services for basically equal jobs should be the same and that the pay should be...foundation for legislation creating the first idea of 4 P "regular military compensation" (basic pay , subsistence allowance and quarters allowance) as a

  19. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    praporshchiki] and officers bade farewell to the colors. I am sure that these instants when they pressed down to the crimson silk of the sacred military...clarify the results of the last firing in the battalion. According to the headquarters training data , those who were not at the exercise achieved...television camera, artificially developed target data is photographed and superimposed on a real air situation pre-recorded on videotape. In a matter of

  20. Rebalancing the Military Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-17

    of individual officers than the traditional ethics .”3 The authors contend this primacy of careerism over selfless service began during World War II...states the military officer, by virtue of being a professional with an oath of office and a code of ethics , is granted the moral autonomy to openly...War College on 18 April 1970, to analyze “the state of discipline, integrity, morality, ethics , and professionalism in the Army.”32 This