Science.gov

Sample records for mineral electronic components

  1. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  2. Cooling system for electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2016-05-17

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  3. Cooling system for electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2015-12-15

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  4. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  5. Component Based Electronic Voting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, David

    An electronic voting system may be said to be composed of a number of components, each of which has a number of properties. One of the most attractive effects of this way of thinking is that each component may have an attached in-depth threat analysis and verification strategy. Furthermore, the need to include the full system when making changes to a component is minimised and a model at this level can be turned into a lower-level implementation model where changes can cascade to as few parts of the implementation as possible.

  6. Towards Prognostics for Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Celaya, Jose R.; Wysocki, Philip F.; Goebel, Kai F.

    2013-01-01

    Electronics components have an increasingly critical role in avionics systems and in the development of future aircraft systems. Prognostics of such components is becoming a very important research field as a result of the need to provide aircraft systems with system level health management information. This paper focuses on a prognostics application for electronics components within avionics systems, and in particular its application to an Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT). This application utilizes the remaining useful life prediction, accomplished by employing the particle filter framework, leveraging data from accelerated aging tests on IGBTs. These tests induced thermal-electrical overstresses by applying thermal cycling to the IGBT devices. In-situ state monitoring, including measurements of steady-state voltages and currents, electrical transients, and thermal transients are recorded and used as potential precursors of failure.

  7. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

    1994-07-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

  8. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.

    1994-03-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents in electronic component cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. In addition, the use of robotic and automated systems can reduce the manual handling of parts that necessitates additional cleaning. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

  9. Bacteriostatic conformal coating for electronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, C.; Le Doux, F. N.

    1967-01-01

    Coating for electronic components used in space applications has bacteriostatic qualities capable of hindering bacterial reproduction, both vegetative and sporulative viable microorganisms. It exhibits high electrical resistivity, a low outgassing rate, and is capable of restraining electronic components when subjected to mechanical vibrations.

  10. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  12. Mineral components and anti-oxidant activities of tropical seaweeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshi, Suzuki; Yumiko, Yoshie-Stark; Joko, Santoso

    2005-07-01

    Seaweeds are known to hold substances of high nutritional value; they are the richest resources of minerals important to the biochemical reactions in the human body. Seaweeds also hold non-nutrient compounds like dietary fiber and polyphenols. However, there is not enough information on the mineral compounds of tropical seaweeds. Also we are interested in the antioxidant activities of seaweeds, especially those in the tropical area. In this study, Indonesian green, brown and red algae were used as experimental materials with their mineral components analyzed by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The catechins and flavonoids of these seaweeds were extracted with methanol and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); the antioxidant activities of these seaweeds were evaluated in a fish oil emulsion system. The mineral components of tropical seaweeds are dominated by calcium, potassium and sodium, as well as small amounts of copper, iron and zinc. A green alga usually contains epigallocatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate and catechin. However, catechin and its isomers are not found in some green and red algae. In the presence of a ferrous ion catalyst, all the methanol extracts from the seaweeds show significantly lower peroxide values of the emulsion than the control, and that of a green alga shows the strongest antioxidant activity. The highest chelation on ferrous ions is also found in the extract of this alga, which is significantly different from the other methanol extracts in both 3 and 24 h incubations.

  13. Quantitative interpretation of mineral hyperspectral images based on principal component analysis and independent component analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiping; Jiang, Yu; Wu, Fang; Wu, Fenghuang

    2014-01-01

    Interpretation of mineral hyperspectral images provides large amounts of high-dimensional data, which is often complicated by mixed pixels. The quantitative interpretation of hyperspectral images is known to be extremely difficult when three types of information are unknown, namely, the number of pure pixels, the spectrum of pure pixels, and the mixing matrix. The problem is made even more complex by the disturbance of noise. The key to interpreting abstract mineral component information, i.e., pixel unmixing and abundance inversion, is how to effectively reduce noise, dimension, and redundancy. A three-step procedure is developed in this study for quantitative interpretation of hyperspectral images. First, the principal component analysis (PCA) method can be used to process the pixel spectrum matrix and keep characteristic vectors with larger eigenvalues. This can effectively reduce the noise and redundancy, which facilitates the abstraction of major component information. Second, the independent component analysis (ICA) method can be used to identify and unmix the pixels based on the linear mixed model. Third, the pure-pixel spectrums can be normalized for abundance inversion, which gives the abundance of each pure pixel. In numerical experiments, both simulation data and actual data were used to demonstrate the performance of our three-step procedure. Under simulation data, the results of our procedure were compared with theoretical values. Under the actual data measured from core hyperspectral images, the results obtained through our algorithm are compared with those of similar software (Mineral Spectral Analysis 1.0, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources). The comparisons show that our method is effective and can provide reference for quantitative interpretation of hyperspectral images.

  14. Low-Temperature Electronic Components Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad

    1999-01-01

    In many future NASA missions, such as deep space planetary exploration and the Next Generation Space Telescope, electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in extremely low temperature environments. Most modern electronic components cannot operate below moderately low operating temperatures (-40 to -55 C). The low-temperature electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is focusing on the development and characterization of low-temperature components and the integration of the developed devices into demonstrable very low-temperature (-200 C) power systems such as dc-dc converters. Such low-temperature electronics will not only tolerate hostile environments but also will reduce system size and weight by eliminating radioisotope heating units, thereby reducing launch cost, improving reliability and lifetime, and increasing energy densities. Low-temperature electronic components will also have a great influence on terrestrial applications such as medical instrumentation, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic and antarctic exploration. Lewis researchers are now performing extensive evaluations of commercially available as well as custom-made devices. These include various types of energy storage and signal capacitors, power switching devices, magnetic and superconducting materials, and primary lithium batteries, to name a few.

  15. Prognostics for Electronics Components of Avionics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose R.; Saha, Bhaskar; Wysocki, Philip F.; Goebel, Kai F.

    2009-01-01

    Electronics components have and increasingly critical role in avionics systems and for the development of future aircraft systems. Prognostics of such components is becoming a very important research filed as a result of the need to provide aircraft systems with system level health management. This paper reports on a prognostics application for electronics components of avionics systems, in particular, its application to the Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT). The remaining useful life prediction for the IGBT is based on the particle filter framework, leveraging data from an accelerated aging tests on IGBTs. The accelerated aging test provided thermal-electrical overstress by applying thermal cycling to the device. In-situ state monitoring, including measurements of the steady-state voltages and currents, electrical transients, and thermal transients are recorded and used as potential precursors of failure.

  16. Electron Correlation in 4-Component Relativistic Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, Luuk; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The full 4-component Dirac-Coulomb equation can nowadays be used in molecular calculations, The first step in solving this relativistic many-electron equation usually consists of solving the closed or open-shell Diarc-Fock equations. Like in non-relativistic calculations the outcome does not account for the effects of electron correlation. This can in principle be remedied by developing relativistic variants of electron correlation methods like Configuration Interaction or Coupled Cluster. In this talk the differences and similarities of such relativistic approaches as compared to non-relativistic methods will be reviewed. Results of Configuration Interaction calculations on the PtH molecule and on the MeF(sub 6, sup 2-) (Me= Co, Rh, Ir) complexes will be presented to give an impression of the kind of results that currently can be obtained.

  17. Applications of scanning electron microscopy to the study of mineral matter in peat

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Andrejko, M.J.; Bardin, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) have been used for in situ analysis of minerals in peats by combining methods for producing oriented microtome sections of peat with methods for critical point drying. The combined technique allows SEM analysis of the inorganic components and their associated botanical constituents, along with petrographic identification of the botanical constituents. In peat deposits with abundant fluvial- or marine-derived minerals, one may use the above technique and/or medium- or low-temperature ashing followed by x-ray diffraction to readily identify the various mineral components. However, in some freshwater environments the scarcity of non-silica minerals makes the above techniques impractical. By separating the inorganic residues from the peat, one can isolate the non-silica mineral matter in the SEM for analysis by EDS. Furthermore, such separation allows SEM analysis of features and textures of both silica and non-silica mineral particles that might otherwise be unidentifiable. Results indicate the occurrence of detritial minerals in both Okefenokee and Snuggedy Swamp peats, the presence of authigenic or diagenetic minerals growing within peats, and dissolution features on freshwater sponge spicules that may account for the absence of spicules in Tertiary lignites.

  18. Cryogenic Applications of Commercial Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Ernest D.; Benford, Dominic J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a range of techniques useful for constructing analog and digital circuits for operation in a liquid Helium environment (4.2K), using commercially available low power components. The challenges encountered in designing cryogenic electronics include finding components that can function usefully in the cold and possess low enough power dissipation so as not to heat the systems they are designed to measure. From design, test, and integration perspectives it is useful for components to operate similarly at room and cryogenic temperatures; however this is not a necessity. Some of the circuits presented here have been used successfully in the MUSTANG and in the GISMO camera to build a complete digital to analog multiplexer (which will be referred to as the Cryogenic Address Driver board). Many of the circuit elements described are of a more general nature rather than specific to the Cryogenic Address Driver board, and were studied as a part of a more comprehensive approach to addressing a larger set of cryogenic electronic needs.

  19. Cryogenic applications of commercial electronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Ernest D.; Benford, Dominic J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Harvey Moseley, S.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a range of techniques useful for constructing analog and digital circuits for operation in a liquid Helium environment (4.2 K), using commercially available low power components. The challenges encountered in designing cryogenic electronics include finding components that can function usefully in the cold and possess low enough power dissipation so as not to heat the systems they are designed to measure. From design, test, and integration perspectives it is useful for components to operate similarly at room and cryogenic temperatures; however this is not a necessity. Some of the circuits presented here have been used successfully in the MUSTANG [1] and in the GISMO [2] camera to build a complete digital to analog multiplexer (which will be referred to as the Cryogenic Address Driver board). Many of the circuit elements described are of a more general nature rather than specific to the Cryogenic Address Driver board, and were studied as a part of a more comprehensive approach to addressing a larger set of cryogenic electronic needs.

  20. High Thermal Conductivity Graphite Electronic Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, S. O.; Young, G. L.; Mellberg, W. J.; Wellman, A. F.; Cooney, J. E.

    1996-08-01

    This project will apply high thermal conductivity graphite to three major spacecraft electronic components: (1) the thermal plane of a printed wiring board, (2) the subassembly or tray that holds the board, and (3) the equipment panel that the tray mounts on. The complete heat transfer path from chip level heat source to radiative rejection on the exterior surface of the equipment panel will therefore be addressed. Thermal and structural requirements representative of current spacecraft will drive an optimized solution strategy. The project will be completed by fabricating the three prototypical test articles and measuring their performance in a representative space environment.

  1. System for Cooling of Electronic Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, L. L.; Grakovich, L. P.; Dragun, L. A.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Olekhnovich, V. A.; Rabetskii, M. I.

    2017-01-01

    Results of computational and experimental investigations of heat pipes having a predetermined thermal resistance and a system based on these pipes for air cooling of electronic components and diode assemblies of lasers are presented. An efficient compact cooling system comprising heat pipes with an evaporator having a capillary coating of a caked copper powder and a condenser having a developed outer finning, has been deviced. This system makes it possible to remove, to the ambient air, a heat flow of power more than 300 W at a temperature of 40-50°C.

  2. Pamela observational capabilities of Jovian electrons component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Felice, V.; PAMELA Collaboration

    PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment that will be launched in the first half of 2006 It will make long duration measurements of cosmic radiation over an extended energy range 80Mev to 200 GeV Specifically PAMELA will measure the cosmic-ray antiproton and positron spectra over the largest energy range ever achieved 80MeV -- 190 GeV and will search for antinuclei with unprecedented sensitivity Furthermore it will measure the light nuclear component of cosmic rays and investigate phenomena connected with solar and earth physics The apparatus consists of a time of flight system a magnetic spectrometer an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter a shower tail catcher scintillator a neutron detector and an anticoincidence system In this work a study of the PAMELA capabilities to detect Jovian electrons is presented The Jovian magnetosphere is a powerful accelerator of electrons to several tens of MeV as observed at first by Pioneer 10 spacecraft 1973 The propagation of Jovian electrons to Earth is affected by modulation due to Corotating Interaction Regions CIR Their flux at Earth is moreover modulated because every sim 13 months Earth and Jupiter are aligned along the average direction of the Parker spiral of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field PAMELA will be able to measure the high energy tail of the Jovian electrons in the energy range from 50 MeV up to 130 MeV Moreover it will be possible to extract the Jovian component reaccelated at the solar wind termination shock above 130 MeV up to 2 GeV from the galactic flux

  3. Measurement of Cu and Zn adsorption onto surficial sediment components: new evidence for less importance of clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Yu

    2011-05-30

    Clay minerals in surficial sediment samples, collected from the Songhua River in China, were separated via sedimentation after removal of Fe/Mn oxides and organic materials; Cu and Zn adsorption onto the sediment components was then evaluated. Clay minerals were examined via X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Clay minerals were found to consist mainly of illite, kaolinite, chlorite and an illite/smectite mixed layer. Non-clay minerals were dominated by quartz and orthoclase. The retention of Cu and Zn by clay minerals was 1.6 and 2.5 times, respectively, greater than that of the whole, untreated surficial sediment. Compared to the other critical components in sediments related to metal sorption (Mn oxides, Fe oxides and organic materials), the adsorption capacity of clay minerals was found to be relatively lower on a unit mass basis. These data suggest that, although clay minerals may be important in the adsorption of heavy metals to aquatic sediments, their role is less significant than Fe/Mn oxides and organic materials.

  4. Imaging Cytoskeleton Components by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Svitkina, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex of detergent-insoluble components of the cytoplasm playing critical roles in cell motility, shape generation, and mechanical properties of a cell. Fibrillar polymers—actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments—are major constituents of the cytoskeleton, which constantly change their organization during cellular activities. The actin cytoskeleton is especially polymorphic, as actin filaments can form multiple higher order assemblies performing different functions. Structural information about cytoskeleton organization is critical for understanding its functions and mechanisms underlying various forms of cellular activity. Because of the nanometer-scale thickness of cytoskeletal fibers, electron microscopy (EM) is a key tool to determine the structure of the cytoskeleton. This article describes application of rotary shadowing (or metal replica) EM for visualization of the cytoskeleton. The procedure is applicable to thin cultured cells growing on glass coverslips and consists of detergent extraction of cells to expose their cytoskeleton, chemical fixation to provide stability, ethanol dehydration and critical point drying to preserve three-dimensionality, rotary shadowing with platinum to create contrast, and carbon coating to stabilize replicas. This technique provides easily interpretable three-dimensional images, in which individual cytoskeletal fibers are clearly resolved, and individual proteins can be identified by immunogold labeling. More importantly, replica EM is easily compatible with live cell imaging, so that one can correlate the dynamics of a cell or its components, e.g., expressed fluorescent proteins, with high resolution structural organization of the cytoskeleton in the same cell. PMID:26498781

  5. Scanning electron microscopy of clays and clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, B.F.; Hughes, R.E.

    1971-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) proves to be ideally suited for studying the configuration, texture, and fabric of clay samples. Growth mechanics of crystalline units-interpenetration and interlocking of crystallites, crystal habits, twinning, helical growth, and topotaxis-also are uniquely revealed by the SEM. Authigenic kaolins make up the bulk of the examples because their larger crystallite size, better crystallinity, and open texture make them more suited to examination by the SEM than most other clay mineral types. ?? 1971.

  6. Pulmonary mineral dust. A study of ninety patients by electron microscopy, electron microanalysis, and electron microdiffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J. P.; Henoc, P.; Galle, P.; Pariente, R.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study of 90 patients are presented. Intrapulmonary mineral deposits were characterized by electron diffraction and electron probe microanalysis. Using this method, pneumoconioses may be distinguidhed from other pneumopathies. In cases of pneumoconiosis, there exists a specific relationship between the etiology of the dust exposure and the crystallographic characteristics of the intrapulmonary deposits. The nature of the deposits may be indicative of a specific type of pneumoconiosis. This method is particularly useful in differentiating between asbestos bodies and ferruginous bodies. The value of the method in general and its importance in the study of pneumoconiosis are discussed. Images Figure 4 Figure 13 Figure 5 Figure 14 Figure 6 Figure 15 Figure 7 Figure 16 Figure 8 Figure 17 Figure 1 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 3 Figure 12 PMID:937507

  7. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-10-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis.

  8. Infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy: an innovative strategy for analyzing mineral components in energy relevant systems.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Delle Piane, Claudio; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-10-31

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis.

  9. Bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization following orthograde mineral trioxide aggregate obturation: a scanning electron microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jun Sang; Chang, Seok-Woo; Oh, So Ram; Perinpanayagam, Hiran; Lim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Oh, Yeo-Rok; Woo, Sang-Bin; Han, Seung-Hyun; Zhu, Qiang; Kum, Kee-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    The time domain entombment of bacteria by intratubular mineralization following orthograde canal obturation with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Single-rooted human premolars (n=60) were instrumented to an apical size #50/0.06 using ProFile and treated as follows: Group 1 (n=10) was filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS); Group 2 (n=10) was incubated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks, and then filled with PBS; Group 3 (n=20) was obturated orthograde with a paste of OrthoMTA (BioMTA, Seoul, Korea) and PBS; and Group 4 (n=20) was incubated with E. faecalis for 3 weeks and then obturated with OrthoMTA–PBS paste. Following their treatments, the coronal openings were sealed with PBS-soaked cotton and intermediate restorative material (IRM), and the roots were then stored in PBS for 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. After each incubation period, the roots were split and their dentin/MTA interfaces examined in both longitudinal and horizontal directions by SEM. There appeared to be an increase in intratubular mineralization over time in the OrthoMTA-filled roots (Groups 3 and 4). Furthermore, there was a gradual entombment of bacteria within the dentinal tubules in the E. faecalis inoculated MTA-filled roots (Group 4). Therefore, the orthograde obturation of root canals with OrthoMTA mixed with PBS may create a favorable environment for bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization. PMID:25012869

  10. Bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization following orthograde mineral trioxide aggregate obturation: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun Sang; Chang, Seok-Woo; Oh, So Ram; Perinpanayagam, Hiran; Lim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Oh, Yeo-Rok; Woo, Sang-Bin; Han, Seung-Hyun; Zhu, Qiang; Kum, Kee-Yeon

    2014-12-01

    The time domain entombment of bacteria by intratubular mineralization following orthograde canal obturation with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Single-rooted human premolars (n=60) were instrumented to an apical size #50/0.06 using ProFile and treated as follows: Group 1 (n=10) was filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS); Group 2 (n=10) was incubated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks, and then filled with PBS; Group 3 (n=20) was obturated orthograde with a paste of OrthoMTA (BioMTA, Seoul, Korea) and PBS; and Group 4 (n=20) was incubated with E. faecalis for 3 weeks and then obturated with OrthoMTA-PBS paste. Following their treatments, the coronal openings were sealed with PBS-soaked cotton and intermediate restorative material (IRM), and the roots were then stored in PBS for 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. After each incubation period, the roots were split and their dentin/MTA interfaces examined in both longitudinal and horizontal directions by SEM. There appeared to be an increase in intratubular mineralization over time in the OrthoMTA-filled roots (Groups 3 and 4). Furthermore, there was a gradual entombment of bacteria within the dentinal tubules in the E. faecalis inoculated MTA-filled roots (Group 4). Therefore, the orthograde obturation of root canals with OrthoMTA mixed with PBS may create a favorable environment for bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization.

  11. JPL preferred parts list: Reliable electronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covey, R. E.; Scott, W. R.; Hess, L. M.; Steffy, T. G.; Stott, F. R.

    1982-01-01

    The JPL Preferred Parts List was prepared to provide a basis for selection of electronic parts for JPL spacecraft programs. Supporting tests for the listed parts were designed to comply with specific spacecraft environmental requirements. The list tabulates the electronic, magnetic, and electromechanical parts applicable to all JPL electronic equipment wherein reliability is a major concern. The parts listed are revelant to equipment supplied by subcontractors as well as fabricated at the laboratory.

  12. Multilayer electronic component systems and methods of manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dane (Inventor); Wang, Guoan (Inventor); Kingsley, Nickolas D. (Inventor); Papapolymerou, Ioannis (Inventor); Tentzeris, Emmanouil M. (Inventor); Bairavasubramanian, Ramanan (Inventor); DeJean, Gerald (Inventor); Li, RongLin (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Multilayer electronic component systems and methods of manufacture are provided. In this regard, an exemplary system comprises a first layer of liquid crystal polymer (LCP), first electronic components supported by the first layer, and a second layer of LCP. The first layer is attached to the second layer by thermal bonds. Additionally, at least a portion of the first electronic components are located between the first layer and the second layer.

  13. Quantitative determination of mineral types and abundances from reflectance spectra using principal components analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. O.; Adams, J. B.; Johnson, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure was developed for analyzing remote reflectance spectra, including multispectral images, that quantifies parameters such as types of mineral mixtures, the abundances of mixed minerals, and particle sizes. Principal components analysis reduced the spectral dimensionality and allowed testing the uniqueness and validity of spectral mixing models. By analyzing variations in the overall spectral reflectance curves, the type of spectral mixture was identified, mineral abundances quantified and the effects of particle size identified. The results demonstrate an advantage in classification accuracy over classical forms of analysis that ignore effects of particle-size or mineral-mixture systematics on spectra. The approach is applicable to remote sensing data of planetary surfaces for quantitative determinations of mineral abundances.

  14. Integrated Analysis of Piezoelectric Resonators as Components of Electronic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-07

    design cycle of a military electronic system. Our experiment and theoretical modeling results so far 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE...2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Integrated Analysis of Piezoelectric Resonators as Components of Electronic ...31-Aug-2014 ABSTRACT Final Report: Integrated Analysis of Piezoelectric Resonators as Components of Electronic Systems Report Title The goal of this

  15. Electron probe microanalysis for high pressure minerals investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentiev, Y. G.; Sobolev, N. V.; Korolyuk, V. N.; Usova, L. V.

    2007-12-01

    In the early 1968 in Siberian Branch of the Academy of Sciences of USSR, Novosibirsk, electron probe microanalyzer MS-46 was installed and started to operate for high pressure minerals EPMA investigation. In collaboration with Geophysical Laboratory of Carnegie Institution (Drs. F.R. Boyd, F. Schairer) a set of standards for silicates analysis was developed. Technique for quantitative analysis was developed (Lavrentiev et al., 1974, Zavodsk. Lab., v. 40, p. 657-661) and applied for the first in the USSR analyses of pyropes, associated with Siberian diamonds both as inclusions and xenoliths of diamondiferous peridotites (Sobolev et al., 1969, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, v. 188, p. 1141-1143; v. 189, p. 162-165). As a result of that research, unique Cr-rich subcalcic pyropes with high knorringite content were found in diamond-bearing kimberlites only and new mineralogical criteria for diamond exploration were developed (Sobolev 1971, Geol. Geofiz., v. 12, p. 70-80) which are still in use worldwide. Further development of electron probe instruments (JXA-5A, Camebax Micro, JXA-8100) and computers, as well as development of analysis technique led to creation of large analytical database. In another field of EPMA - determination of small concentrations of elements - for the first time importance of 0.01-0.3% Na2O admixtures in garnets (Sobolev, Lavrentiev, 1971, Contrib. Min. Petr., v. 31, p. 1-12) and K2O in clinopyroxenes (Sobolev et al., 1970, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, v. 192, p. 1349-1352) were demonstrated. Since then, determination of sodium content in EPMA of garnets and potassium in pyroxenes became a routine technique. Last generation analyzer (JXA-8100) provided record results down to 6 ppm in detection limit of Ni in pyropes (Lavrentiev et al., Rus. Geol. Geophys., 2006, v. 47, p. 1090-1093). As a result, application of EPMA for single mineral geothermometry (currently based mainly on PIXE method) becomes possible.

  16. Electron microscopy analysis of mineral fibers in human lung tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrichs, K.H.; Brockmann, M.; Fischer, M.; Wick, G. )

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, lung samples from 126 autopsied cases were examined to determine the content of mineral fibers using analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM). The cases were divided into four groups (22 lungs of persons exposed to ambient environmental pollution, 32 cases of mesothelioma, 38 cases of primary lung cancer, and 34 asbestosis cases, 13 of these with additional pleural plaques). Fibers were counted, measured, and mineralogically identified using a combination of X-ray microanalysis and electron diffraction of the non-oriented fiber. Concentration of fibrous particles (defined as particles above 1 micron in length with roughly parallel long sides and an aspect ratio of 5:1 and greater) was calculated as fibers 10(6)/g dry lung weight. The concentration of chrysotile was found to be similar throughout the groups except for two cases in the asbestosis group with comparably high numbers of chrysotile. However, a remarkable difference for amphiboles could be observed between the groups. Asbestos bodies were mostly found in the asbestosis group. There was a rather good correlation between numbers of amphibole fibers and asbestos bodies, with an average ratio of 10:1. For comparison purposes between occupationally exposed/non-exposed individuals, a transition was found in the concentration range of 3-10(7) asbestos fibers/g dried lung weight.

  17. Electrical and electronic devices and components: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Components and techniques which may be useful in the electronics industry are described. Topics discussed include transducer technology, printed-circuit technology, solid state devices, MOS transistors, Gunn device, microwave antennas, and position indicators.

  18. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  19. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  20. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  1. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  2. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  3. [Principal component analysis of mineral elements and fatty acids composition in flaxseed from ten different regions].

    PubMed

    Xing, Li; Zhao, Feng-Min; Cao, You-Fu; Wang, Mei; Mei, Shuai; Li, Shao-Ping; Cai, Zhi-Yong

    2014-09-01

    Flaxseed is a kind of biomass with high edible and medical value. It is rich in many kinds of nutrients and mineral elements. China is one of the important producing places of flaxseed. In order to explore the main characteristic constituents of mineral elements and fatty acids in flaxseed, the study of analyzing the mineral elements and fatty acid composition from 10 different regions was carried out. The contents of seventeen kinds of mineral elements in flaxseed were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The contents of fatty acids of the flaxseed oil obtained under the same conditions were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The principal component analysis (PCA) method was applied to the study of analyzing the mineral elements and fatty acid compositions in flaxseeds. The difference in mineral elements and fatty acids of flaxseed from different regions were discussed. The main characteristic constituents of mineral elements and fatty acids were analyzed. The results showed that K, Sr, Mg, Ni, Co, Cr, Cd, Se, Zn and Cu were the main characteristic constituents of the mineral elements. At the same time, C16:0, C18:0, C18: 2, C18:3, C20:0 and C20:1 were the main characteristic constituents of the fatty acids. The combination of ICP-MS, GS-MS and PCA can reveal the characteristics and difference of mineral elements and fatty acids from different regions. The results would provide important theoretical basis for the reasonable and effective utilization of flaxseed.

  4. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including keeping your bones, muscles, heart, and brain working properly. Minerals are also important for making enzymes and hormones. ...

  5. State of the mineral component of rat bone tissue during hypokinesia and the recovery period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volozhin, A. I.; Stupakov, G. P.; Pavlova, M. N.; Muradov, I. S.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on young growing rats. Hypokinesia lasting from 20 to 200 days caused retarded gain in weight and volume of the femur and delayed development of the cortical layer of the diaphysis. In contrast, the density of the cortical layer of the femoral diaphysis increased due to elevation of the mineral saturation of the bone tissue microstructures. Incorporation of Ca into the bone tissue in hypokinesia had a tendency to reduce. Partial normalization of the bone tissue mineral component occurred during a 20 day recovery period following hypokinesia.

  6. The effects of abiotic and biotic environmental components on the microbial mineralization of selected xenobiotic compounds in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Knaebel, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    This research investigated the effects of environmental components on the microbial mineralization of xenobiotic compounds in soils. The soils' chemical and physical characteristics, microbial community structure, organic and inorganic components, and other associated biota (plants) were examined for their effects on the biodegradation process. The biodegradation of {sup 14}C foreign, synthetic ({double bond} xenobiotic) compounds was measured by quantifying {sup 14} CO{sub 2} production over time. Mineralization kinetics were estimated by first-order and 3/2 order mineralization models. The compounds displayed different mineralization kinetics in the different soils, which were due to nature of the xenobiotic chemical and to abiotic and biotic soil characteristics. Specific soil components (montmorillonite, humic acids and fulvic acids) inhibited mineralization. Other soil components (sand, illite, kaolinite) had less effect on the biodegradation process. Modified soil microbial communities mineralized the compounds differently. Bacteria-enhanced soils metabolized the compounds to greater extents than the fungi-enhanced soils, which both mineralized the compounds more than actinomycete-enhanced soils. However, the rates of mineralization were only significantly different between the bacteria-enhanced soils and the actinomycete-enhanced soil. Plants significantly increased soil microbial biomass and activity, and stimulated the rate of microbial mineralization of xenobiotic compounds. However, they had no effect on the total amounts of mineralization. In summary, these diverse abiotic and biotic environmental components exerted tremendous influences on the microbial turnover of xenobiotic compounds in soils. Therefore, these components should be considered when modeling the fate of xenobiotic chemicals in the environment.

  7. The enabling technology for recovery of valued components from minerals in the upper and Mid Amur region

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, A.P.; Rimkevich, V.S.; Dem'yanova, L.P.; Artemenko, T.V.

    2009-05-15

    Based on the physico-technical operations involved in the mineral processing technologies, the optimal production conditions are found for refractory fiber materials, aluminium, silicium, their compounds and other valued components. Ecologically safe and efficient aggregate technologies are developed for recovery of valued components from nonmetallic minerals and anthracides (brown coals).

  8. Extinction spectra of mineral dust aerosol components in an environmental aerosol chamber: IR resonance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogili, Praveen K.; Yang, K. H.; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. To better understand the impact that mineral dust aerosol may have on climate forcing and on remote sensing, we have initiated a study of the optical properties of important components of mineral dust aerosol including silicate clays (illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite), quartz, anhydrite, and calcite. The extinction spectra are measured in an environmental simulation chamber over a broad wavelength range, which includes both the IR (650-5000 cm -1) and UV-vis (12,500-40,000 cm -1) spectral regions. In this paper, we focus on the IR region from 800 to 1500 cm -1, where many of these mineral dust constituents have characteristic vibrational resonance features. Experimental spectra are compared with Mie theory simulations based on published mineral optical constants. We find that Mie theory generally does a poor job in fitting the IR resonance peak positions and band profiles for nonspherical aerosols in the accumulation mode size range ( D˜0.1-2.5 μm). We explore particle shape effects on the IR resonance line profiles by considering analytic models for extinction of particles with characteristic shapes (i.e. disks, needles, and ellipsoids). Interestingly, Mie theory often appears to give more accurate results for the absorption line profiles of larger particles that fall in the coarse mode size range.

  9. Electron Diffraction and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy of Mineral Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Gordon L., Jr.

    This book is a well-written English translation of the original 1981 Russian edition, Strukturnoye issledovaniye mineralov metodami mikrodifraktsii i elechtronnoi mikroskopii vysokogo razresheniya. The 1987 English version has been extensively updated and includes references up to 1986. The book is essentially a text on the theoretical and experimental aspects of transmission electron microscopy and has chapters on the reciprocal lattice, electron diffraction (both kinematic and dynamic), and high-resolution electron microscopy.Electron diffraction is emphasized, especially its use for structure analysis of poorly crystalline and fine-grained phases not readily determined by the more exact X ray diffraction method. Two methods of electron diffraction are discussed: selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and oblique-texture electron diffraction (OTED); the latter technique is rarely used in the west and is never discussed in western electron microscopy texts. A SAED pattern is formed by isolating a small micrometer-size area with an aperture and obtaining single-crystal patterns from the diffracted beams. By tilting the sample and obtaining many patterns, a complete picture of the reciprocal lattice can be taken. An OTED pattern is formed when the incident electron beam passes through an inclined preparation consisting of a great number of thin platy crystals lying normal to the texture axis (axis normal to the support grid). To form an OTED pattern, the plates must all lie on a common face, such as a basal plane in phyllosilicates. Upon tilting the plates, an elliptical powder diffraction pattern is formed. Intensities measured from these patterns are used for a structural analysis of the platy minerals.

  10. Sensory evaluation and electronic tongue for sensing flavored mineral water taste attributes.

    PubMed

    Sipos, László; Gere, Attila; Szöllősi, Dániel; Kovács, Zoltán; Kókai, Zoltán; Fekete, András

    2013-10-01

    In this article a trained sensory panel evaluated 6 flavored mineral water samples. The samples consisted of 3 different brands, each with 2 flavors (pear-lemon grass and josta berry). The applied sensory method was profile analysis. Our aim was to analyze the sensory profiles and to investigate the similarities between the sensitivity of the trained human panel and an electronic tongue device. Another objective was to demonstrate the possibilities for the prediction of sensory attributes from electronic tongue measurements using a multivariate statistical method (Partial Least Squares regression [PLS]). The results showed that the products manufactured under different brand name but with the same aromas had very similar sensory profiles. The panel performance evaluation showed that it is appropriate (discrimination ability, repeatability, and panel consensus) to compare the panel's results with the results of the electronic tongue. The samples can be discriminated by the electronic tongue and an accurate classification model can be built. Principal Component Analysis BiPlot diagrams showed that Brand A and B were similar because the manufacturers use the same aroma brands for their products. It can be concluded that Brand C was quite different compared to the other samples independently of the aroma content. Based on the electronic tongue results good prediction models can be obtained with high correlation coefficient (r(2) > 0.81) and low prediction error (RMSEP < 13.71 on the scale of the sensory evaluation from 0 to 100).

  11. Terrestrial and Martian weathering signatures of xenon components in shergottite mineral separates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Ocker, K. D.; Crowther, S. A.; Burgess, R.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2010-08-01

    Xenon-isotopic ratios, step-heating release patterns, and gas concentrations of mineral separates from Martian shergottites Roberts Massif (RBT) 04262, Dar al Gani (DaG) 489, Shergotty, and Elephant Moraine (EET) 79001 lithology B are reported. Concentrations of Martian atmospheric xenon are similar in mineral separates from all meteorites, but more weathered samples contain more terrestrial atmospheric xenon. The distributions of xenon from the Martian and terrestrial atmospheres among minerals in any one sample are similar, suggesting similarities in the processes by which they were acquired. However, in opaque and maskelynite fractions, Martian atmospheric xenon is released at higher temperatures than terrestrial atmospheric xenon. It is suggested that both Martian and terrestrial atmospheric xenon were initially introduced by weathering (low temperature alteration processes). However, the Martian component was redistributed by shock, accounting for its current residence in more retentive sites. The presence or absence of detectable 129Xe from the Martian atmosphere in mafic minerals may correspond to the extent of crustal contamination of the rock's parent melt. Variable contents of excess 129Xe contrast with previously reported consistent concentrations of excess 40Ar, suggesting distinct sources contributed these gases to the parent magma.

  12. Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Davenhall, Leisa B.; Rubin, James B.; Taylor, Craig M. V.

    2008-06-03

    Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components. The composition is a mixture of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. The method includes exposing a substrate to at least one pulse of the composition in a supercritical state to remove photoresist materials from the substrate.

  13. Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Davenhall, Leisa B.; Rubin, James B.; Taylor, Craig M.

    2005-01-25

    Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components. The composition is a mixture of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. The method includes exposing a substrate to at least one pulse of the composition in a supercritical state to remove photoresist materials from the substrate.

  14. Porphyrins as Molecular Electronic Components of Functional Devices

    PubMed Central

    Jurow, Matthew; Schuckman, Amanda E.; Batteas, James D.; Drain, Charles Michael

    2010-01-01

    The proposal that molecules can perform electronic functions in devices such as diodes, rectifiers, wires, capacitors, or serve as functional materials for electronic or magnetic memory, has stimulated intense research across physics, chemistry, and engineering for over 35 years. Because biology uses porphyrins and metalloporphyrins as catalysts, small molecule transporters, electrical conduits, and energy transducers in photosynthesis, porphyrins are an obvious class of molecules to investigate for molecular electronic functions. Of the numerous kinds of molecules under investigation for molecular electronics applications, porphyrins and their related macrocycles are of particular interest because they are robust and their electronic properties can be tuned by chelation of a metal ion and substitution on the macrocycle. The other porphyrinoids have equally variable and adjustable photophysical properties, thus photonic applications are potentiated. At least in the near term, realistic architectures for molecular electronics will require self-organization or nanoprinting on surfaces. This review concentrates on self-organized porphyrinoids as components of working electronic devices on electronically active substrates with particular emphasis on the effect of surface, molecular design, molecular orientation and matrix on the detailed electronic properties of single molecules. PMID:20936084

  15. Current Space Station Experiments Investigating Component Level Electronics Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, John W.; Struk, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    The Soldering in a Reduced Gravity Experiment (SoRGE) and Component Repair Experiment (CRE)-1 are tests performed on the International Space Station to determine the techniques, tools, and training necessary to allow future crews to perform manual electronics repairs at the component level. SoRGE provides information on the formation and internal structure of through-hole solder joints, illustrating the challenges and implications of soldering in reduced gravity. SoRGE showed a significant increase in internal void defects for joints formed in low gravity compared to normal gravity. Methods for mitigating these void defects were evaluated using a modified soldering process. CRE-1 demonstrated the removal, cleaning, and replacement of electronics components by manual means on functional circuit boards. The majority of components successful passed a post-repair functional test demonstrating the feasibility of component-level repair within the confines of a spacecraft. Together, these tasks provide information to recommend material and tool improvements, training improvements, and future work to help enable electronics repairs in future space missions.

  16. Screen printed passive components for flexible power electronics.

    PubMed

    Ostfeld, Aminy E; Deckman, Igal; Gaikwad, Abhinav M; Lochner, Claire M; Arias, Ana C

    2015-10-30

    Additive and low-temperature printing processes enable the integration of diverse electronic devices, both power-supplying and power-consuming, on flexible substrates at low cost. Production of a complete electronic system from these devices, however, often requires power electronics to convert between the various operating voltages of the devices. Passive components-inductors, capacitors, and resistors-perform functions such as filtering, short-term energy storage, and voltage measurement, which are vital in power electronics and many other applications. In this paper, we present screen-printed inductors, capacitors, resistors and an RLC circuit on flexible plastic substrates, and report on the design process for minimization of inductor series resistance that enables their use in power electronics. Printed inductors and resistors are then incorporated into a step-up voltage regulator circuit. Organic light-emitting diodes and a flexible lithium ion battery are fabricated and the voltage regulator is used to power the diodes from the battery, demonstrating the potential of printed passive components to replace conventional surface-mount components in a DC-DC converter application.

  17. Antenna with distributed strip and integrated electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Payne, Jason A.; Ottesen, Cory W.

    2008-08-05

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element can be in proximity to a ground conductor and/or arranged as a dipole. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. An antenna can comprise a distributed strip patterned on a printed wiring board, integrated with electronic components mounted on top of or below the distributed strip, and substantially within the extents of the distributed strip. Mounting of electronic components on top of or below the distributed strip has little effect on the performance of the antenna, and allows for realizing the combination of the antenna and integrated components in a compact form. An embodiment of the invention comprises an antenna including a distributed strip, integrated with a battery mounted on the distributed strip.

  18. [Analysis of the mineral elements of Lactuca sativa under the condition of different spectral components].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Li; Guo, Wen-Zhong; Xue, Xu-Zhang; Wang, Li-Chun; Li, Liang; Chen, Fei

    2013-08-01

    Mineral elements absorption and content of Lactuca sativa under different spectral component conditions were studied by ICP-AES technology. The results showed that: (1) For Lactuca sativa, the average proportion for Ca : Mg : K : Na : P was 5.5 : 2.5 : 2.3 : 1.5 : 1.0, the average proportion for Fe : Mn : Zn : Cu : B was 25.9 : 5.9 : 2.8 : 1.1 : 1.0; (2) The absorptions for K, P, Ca, Mg and B are the largest under the LED treatment R/B = 1 : 2.75, red light from fluorescent lamps and LED can both promote the absorptions of Fe and Cu; (3)The LED treatments exhibiting relatively higher content of mineral elements are R/B = 1 : 2.75 and R/W = 1 : 1 while higher dry matter accumulations are R/B = 1 : 2.75 and B/W = 1 : 1.

  19. 77 FR 68829 - Certain Electronic Digital Media Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Digital Media Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements... limited exclusion order against certain electronic digital media devices and components thereof imported by respondents Samsung Electronics Co, Ltd. of Korea; Samsung Electronics America, Inc. of...

  20. 78 FR 6130 - Certain Electronic Digital Media Devices and Components Thereof: Commission Determination To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Digital Media Devices and Components Thereof: Commission Determination To... certain electronic digital media devices and components thereof by reason of infringement of certain... notice of investigation are Samsung Electronics Co, Ltd. of Korea; Samsung Electronics America, Inc....

  1. Screen printed passive components for flexible power electronics

    PubMed Central

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Deckman, Igal; Gaikwad, Abhinav M.; Lochner, Claire M.; Arias, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Additive and low-temperature printing processes enable the integration of diverse electronic devices, both power-supplying and power-consuming, on flexible substrates at low cost. Production of a complete electronic system from these devices, however, often requires power electronics to convert between the various operating voltages of the devices. Passive components—inductors, capacitors, and resistors—perform functions such as filtering, short-term energy storage, and voltage measurement, which are vital in power electronics and many other applications. In this paper, we present screen-printed inductors, capacitors, resistors and an RLC circuit on flexible plastic substrates, and report on the design process for minimization of inductor series resistance that enables their use in power electronics. Printed inductors and resistors are then incorporated into a step-up voltage regulator circuit. Organic light-emitting diodes and a flexible lithium ion battery are fabricated and the voltage regulator is used to power the diodes from the battery, demonstrating the potential of printed passive components to replace conventional surface-mount components in a DC-DC converter application. PMID:26514331

  2. Component technologies for a recirculating linac free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N.; Madey, John M. J.; Vinokurov, Nikolai A.

    1994-05-01

    The key component technologies required for a high average power free-electron laser (FEL) are described. Some basic aspects of approaches for high average power (scalable to megawatt level) accelerators and FELs are presented. A short description of the Novosibirsk 100 kW average power near infrared (IR) FEL driven by a race-track microtron-recuperator is given. The current status and plans for this facility are provided by Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk).

  3. Electronic Components and Circuits for Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electrical power management and control systems that are capable of efficient and reliable operation in very low temperature environments. Presently, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. Electronics capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures will not only tolerate the hostile environment of deep space but also reduce system size and weight by eliminating or reducing the radioisotope heating units and their associate structures; thereby reducing system development as well as launch costs. In addition, power electronic circuits designed for operation at low temperatures are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature. This improvement results from better behavior and tolerance in the electrical and thermal properties of semiconductor and dielectric materials at low temperatures. The Low Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electrical components, circuits, and systems suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices and systems for reliable use down to cryogenic temperatures. Some of the commercial-off-the-shelf as well as developed components that are being characterized include switching devices, resistors, magnetics, and capacitors. Semiconductor devices and integrated circuits including digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators are also being investigated for potential use in low temperature applications. An overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center Low Temperature Electronic Program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with

  4. Low-energy electron scattering by cellulose and hemicellulose components.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Eliane M; da Costa, Romarly F; Sanchez, Sergio d'A; Natalense, Alexandra P P; Bettega, Márcio H F; Lima, Marco A P; Varella, Márcio T do N

    2013-02-07

    We report elastic integral, differential and momentum transfer cross sections for low-energy electron scattering by the cellulose components β-D-glucose and cellobiose (β(1 → 4) linked glucose dimer), and the hemicellulose component β-D-xylose. For comparison with the β forms, we also obtain results for the amylose subunits α-D-glucose and maltose (α(1 → 4) linked glucose dimer). The integral cross sections show double peaked broad structures between 8 eV and 20 eV similar to previously reported results for tetrahydrofuran and 2-deoxyribose, suggesting a general feature of molecules containing furanose and pyranose rings. These broad structures would reflect OH, CO and/or CC σ* resonances, where inspection of low-lying virtual orbitals suggests significant contribution from anion states. Though we do not examine dissociation pathways, these anion states could play a role in dissociative electron attachment mechanisms, in case they were coupled to the long-lived π* anions found in lignin subunits [de Oliveira et al., Phys. Rev. A, 2012, 86, 020701(R)]. Altogether, the resonance spectra of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose components establish a physical-chemical basis for electron-induced biomass pretreatment that could be applied to biofuel production.

  5. Transmission electron microscopic examination of phosphoric acid fuel cell components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pebler, A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to physically characterize tested and untested phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) components. Those examined included carbon-supported platinum catalysts, carbon backing paper, and Teflon-bonded catalyst layers at various stages of fabrication and after testing in pressurized PAFC's. Applicability of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy for identifying the various phases was explored. The discussion focuses on the morphology and size distribution of platinum, the morphology and structural aspects of Teflon in catalyst layers, and the structural evidence of carbon corrosion. Reference is made to other physical characterization techniques where appropriate. A qualitative model of the catalyst layer that emerged from the TEM studies is presented.

  6. Airborne mineral components and trace metals in Paris region: spatial and temporal variability.

    PubMed

    Poulakis, E; Theodosi, C; Bressi, M; Sciare, J; Ghersi, V; Mihalopoulos, N

    2015-10-01

    A variety of mineral components (Al, Fe) and trace metals (V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) were simultaneously measured in PM2.5 and PM10 fractions at three different locations (traffic, urban, and suburban) in the Greater Paris Area (GPA) on a daily basis throughout a year. Mineral species and trace metal levels measured in both fractions are in agreement with those reported in the literature and below the thresholds defined by the European guidelines for toxic metals (Cd, Ni, Pb). Size distribution between PM2.5 and PM10 fractions revealed that mineral components prevail in the coarse mode, while trace metals are mainly confined in the fine one. Enrichment factor analysis, statistical analysis, and seasonal variability suggest that elements such as Mn, Cr, Zn, Fe, and Cu are attributed to traffic, V and Ni to oil combustion while Cd and Pb to industrial activities with regional origin. Meteorological parameters such as rain, boundary layer height (BLH), and air mass origin were found to significantly influence element concentrations. Periods with high frequency of northern and eastern air masses (from high populated and industrialized areas) are characterized by high metal concentrations. Finally, inner city and traffic emissions were also evaluated in PM2.5 fraction. Significant contributions (>50 %) were measured in the traffic site for Mn, Fe, Cr, Zn, and Cu, confirming that vehicle emissions contribute significantly to their levels, while in the urban site, the lower contributions (18 to 33 %) for all measured metals highlight the influence of regional sources on their levels.

  7. Do metabolic syndrome and its components have an impact on bone mineral density in adolescents?

    PubMed

    da Silva, Valéria Nóbrega; Fiorelli, Luciana Nunes Mosca; da Silva, Carla Cristiane; Kurokawa, Cilmery Suemi; Goldberg, Tamara Beres Lederer

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing concern about the occurrence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) at an early age and its effects on bone mass in adolescents. Adolescence is considered a critical period for bone mass gain. Impaired bone acquisition during this phase can lead to "suboptimal" peak bone mass and increase the risk of osteopenia/osteoporosis and fractures in old age. The objective of this review was to perform a critical analysis of articles that specifically focus on this age group, evaluating the influence of MetS and its components on bone mineral density in adolescents. A possible relationship between this syndrome and bone mass has been demonstrated, but the number of studies addressing this topic in adolescents is small. Despite the scarcity of evidence, the results of those studies show that Metabolic Syndrome is negatively correlated with bone mass and also that some components of MetS are negatively correlated with bone mineral density in adolescents. However, the associations between MetS and bone mass development need to be further explored in the age group corresponding to adolescence. Further good-quality studies are necessary to complement the understanding of this relationship.

  8. Infrared extinction spectra of mineral dust aerosol: Single components and complex mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectra and aerosol size distributions have been measured for some components of mineral dust aerosol including feldspars (albite, oligoclase) and diatomaceous earth, as well as more complex authentic dust samples that include Iowa loess and Saharan sand. Spectral simulations for single-component samples, derived from Rayleigh-theory models for characteristic particle shapes, better reproduce the experimental spectra including the peak position and band shape compared to Mie theory. The mineralogy of the authentic dust samples was inferred using analysis of FTIR spectra. This approach allows for analysis of the mineralogy of complex multicomponent dust samples. Extinction spectra for the authentic dust samples were simulated from the derived sample mineralogy using published optical constant data for the individual mineral constituents and assuming an external mixture. Nonspherical particle shape effects were also included in the simulations and were shown to have a significant effect on the results. The results show that the position of the peak and the shape of the band of the IR characteristic features in the 800 to 1400 cm-1 spectral range are not well simulated by Mie theory. The resonance peaks are consistently shifted by more than +40 cm-1 relative to the experimental spectrum in the Mie simulation. Rayleigh model solutions for different particle shapes better predict the peak position and band shape of experimental spectra, even though the Rayleigh condition may not be strictly obeyed in these experiments.

  9. Iron-oxide minerals affect extracellular electron-transfer paths of Geobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Kato, Souichiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    Some bacteria utilize (semi)conductive iron-oxide minerals as conduits for extracellular electron transfer (EET) to distant, insoluble electron acceptors. A previous study demonstrated that microbe/mineral conductive networks are constructed in soil ecosystems, in which Geobacter spp. share dominant populations. In order to examine how (semi)conductive iron-oxide minerals affect EET paths of Geobacter spp., the present study grew five representative Geobacter strains on electrodes as the sole electron acceptors in the absence or presence of (semi)conductive iron oxides. It was found that iron-oxide minerals enhanced current generation by three Geobacter strains, while no effect was observed in another strain. Geobacter sulfurreducens was the only strain that generated substantial amounts of currents both in the presence and absence of the iron oxides. Microscopic, electrochemical and transcriptomic analyses of G. sulfurreducens disclosed that this strain constructed two distinct types of EET path; in the absence of iron-oxide minerals, bacterial biofilms rich in extracellular polymeric substances were constructed, while composite networks made of mineral particles and microbial cells (without polymeric substances) were developed in the presence of iron oxides. It was also found that uncharacterized c-type cytochromes were up-regulated in the presence of iron oxides that were different from those found in conductive biofilms. These results suggest the possibility that natural (semi)conductive minerals confer energetic and ecological advantages on Geobacter, facilitating their growth and survival in the natural environment.

  10. Iron-Oxide Minerals Affect Extracellular Electron-Transfer Paths of Geobacter spp

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    Some bacteria utilize (semi)conductive iron-oxide minerals as conduits for extracellular electron transfer (EET) to distant, insoluble electron acceptors. A previous study demonstrated that microbe/mineral conductive networks are constructed in soil ecosystems, in which Geobacter spp. share dominant populations. In order to examine how (semi)conductive iron-oxide minerals affect EET paths of Geobacter spp., the present study grew five representative Geobacter strains on electrodes as the sole electron acceptors in the absence or presence of (semi)conductive iron oxides. It was found that iron-oxide minerals enhanced current generation by three Geobacter strains, while no effect was observed in another strain. Geobacter sulfurreducens was the only strain that generated substantial amounts of currents both in the presence and absence of the iron oxides. Microscopic, electrochemical and transcriptomic analyses of G. sulfurreducens disclosed that this strain constructed two distinct types of EET path; in the absence of iron-oxide minerals, bacterial biofilms rich in extracellular polymeric substances were constructed, while composite networks made of mineral particles and microbial cells (without polymeric substances) were developed in the presence of iron oxides. It was also found that uncharacterized c-type cytochromes were up-regulated in the presence of iron oxides that were different from those found in conductive biofilms. These results suggest the possibility that natural (semi)conductive minerals confer energetic and ecological advantages on Geobacter, facilitating their growth and survival in the natural environment. PMID:23363619

  11. Electron transfer from humic substances to biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) oxyhydroxide minerals.

    PubMed

    Piepenbrock, Annette; Schröder, Christian; Kappler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Microbial humic substance (HS) reduction and subsequent abiotic electron transfer from reduced HS to poorly soluble Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides, a process named electron shuttling, significantly increases microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction rates. However, the importance of electron shuttling in nature and notably the electron transfer from HS to biogenic Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides have thus far not been determined. In this study, we have quantified the rate and extent of electron transfer from reduced and nonreduced Pahokee Peat humic acids (PPHA) and fresh soil organic matter (SOM) extracts to both synthetic and environmentally relevant biogenic Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides. We found that biogenic Fe(III) minerals were reduced faster and to an equal or higher degree than their abiogenic counterparts. Differences were attributed to differences in crystallinity and the association of bacterial biomass with biogenic minerals. Compared to purified PPHA, SOM extract transferred fewer electrons per milligram of carbon and electron transfer was observed only to poorly crystalline ferrihydrite but not to more crystalline goethite. This indicates a difference in redox potential distribution of the redox-active functional groups in extracted SOM relative to the purified PPHA. Our results suggest that HS electron shuttling can also contribute to iron redox processes in environments where biogenic Fe(III) minerals are present.

  12. 77 FR 34063 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof... devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof by reason of infringement of... certain electronics devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof...

  13. 77 FR 27078 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof... Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones... electronic devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof. The complaint...

  14. 76 FR 22918 - In the Matter of Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components... States after importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and... importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and components thereof...

  15. 78 FR 56245 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for... limited exclusion order against certain wireless consumer electronics devices and components thereof... Corporation of Kyoto, Japan; Kyocera Communications, Inc. of San Diego, California; LG Electronics, Inc....

  16. Electronic Components for use in Extreme Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electrical power management and control systems designed for use in planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electronics that are capable of efficient and reliable operation under extreme temperature conditions. Space-based infra-red satellites, all-electric ships, jet engines, electromagnetic launchers, magnetic levitation transport systems, and power facilities are also typical examples where the electronics are expected to be exposed to harsh temperatures and to operate under severe thermal swings. Most commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices are not designed to function under such extreme conditions and, therefore, new parts must be developed or the conventional devices need to be modified. For example, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. At the other end, built-in radiators and coolers render the operation of electronics possible under hot conditions. These thermal measures lead to design complexity, affect development costs, and increase size and weight. Electronics capable of operation at extreme temperatures, thus, will not only tolerate the hostile operational environment, but also make the overall system efficient, more reliable, and less expensive. The Extreme Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electronics suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices, including COTS parts, for potential use under extreme temperatures. These components include semiconductor switching devices, passive devices, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators. An overview of the program will be presented along with some experimental findings.

  17. Selected CERES electronic component survivability under simulated overvoltage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, John J.; Grant, Michael S.; Bockman, James; Clark, Vernon M.; Hess, Phillip C.

    1999-09-01

    In August, 1998, a Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument telemetry housekeeping parameter generated a yellow warning message that indicated an on- board +15V Data Acquisition Assembly (DAA) power converter deregulation anomaly. An exhaustive investigation was undertaken to understand this anomaly and the long-term consequnces which have severely reduced CERES operations on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. Among investigations performed were groudn tests that approximated the on-board electronic circuitry using a small quantity of flight identical components exposed to maximum spacecraft bus over-voltage conditions. These components include monolithic integrated microcircuits that perform analog signal conditions on instrument sensor signals and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for the entire DAA. All microcircuit packages have either a bipolar silicon design with internal current limiting protections or have a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) design with bias protections. Ground test that have been running for approximately 8 months have indicated that these components are capable of withstanding as much as twice their input supply voltage ratings without noticeable performance degradation. This data provided CERES operators with assured confidence to be able to continue instrument science operations over the remaining life of the TRMM. This paper will discuss this anomaly and some possible cause, a simulator of affected electronics, test results, prognosis for future CERES operations, and conclusions.

  18. Light and redox switchable molecular components for molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L

    2010-01-01

    The field of molecular and organic electronics has seen rapid progress in recent years, developing from concept and design to actual demonstration devices in which both single molecules and self-assembled monolayers are employed as light-responsive components. Research in this field has seen numerous unexpected challenges that have slowed progress and the initial promise of complex molecular-based computers has not yet been realised. Primarily this has been due to the realisation at an early stage that molecular-based nano-electronics brings with it the interface between the hard (semiconductor) and soft (molecular) worlds and the challenges which accompany working in such an environment. Issues such as addressability, cross-talk, molecular stability and perturbation of molecular properties (e.g., inhibition of photochemistry) have nevertheless driven development in molecular design and synthesis as well as our ability to interface molecular components with bulk metal contacts to a very high level of sophistication. Numerous groups have played key roles in progressing this field not least teams such as those led by Whitesides, Aviram, Ratner, Stoddart and Heath. In this short review we will however focus on the contributions from our own group and those of our collaborators, in employing diarylethene based molecular components.

  19. Component Repair Experiment-1: An Experiment Evaluating Electronic Component-Level Repair During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, John W.; Struk, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The Component Repair Experiment-1 (CRE-1) examines the capability for astronauts to perform electronics repair tasks in space. The goal is to determine the current capabilities and limits for the crew, and to make recommendations to improve and expand the range of work that astronauts may perform. CRE-1 provided two-layer, functional circuit boards and replacement components, a small tool kit, written and video training materials, and 1 hr of hands on training for the crew slated to perform the experiment approximately 7 months prior to the mission. Astronauts Michael Fincke and Sandra Magnus performed the work aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in February and March 2009. The astronauts were able to remove and replace components successfully, demonstrating the feasibility of performing component-level electronics repairs within a spacecraft. Several unsuccessful tasks demonstrated areas in need of improvement. These include improved and longer training prior to a mission, an improved soldering iron with a higher operating temperature and steady power source, video training and practice boards for refresher work or practice before a repair, and improved and varied hand tools and containment system.

  20. The ‘porin–cytochrome’ model for microbe-to-mineral electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, David J.; Butt, Julea N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-05-30

    Many species of bacteria can couple anaerobic growth to the respiratory reduction of insoluble minerals containing Fe(III) or Mn(III/IV). It has been suggested that in Shewanella species electrons cross the outer membrane to extracellular substrates via 'porin-cytochrome' electron transport modules. The molecular structure of an outer-membrane extracellular-facing deca-haem terminus for such a module has recently been resolved. It is debated how, once outside the cells, electrons are transferred from outer-membrane cytochromes to insoluble electron sinks. This may occur directly or by assemblies of cytochromes, perhaps functioning as 'nanowires', or via electron shuttles. Here we review recent work in this field and explore whether it allows for unification of the electron transport mechanisms supporting extracellular mineral respiration in Shewanella that may extend into other genera of Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Severe shock and vibration environments for electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Electronic components used in system applications must be qualified to mechanical shock and vibration environments. Often these environments are severe, requiring the development and use of special test techniques and procedures. Environmental specifications are based upon analytical model predictions and measured test data. Test specifications are determined after careful consideration of simulation techniques, input levels, dynamic behavior of the test fixturing, as well as an assessment of the degree of conservatism imposed by the specification and testing procedures. The process of determining component shock and vibration specifications is discussed, beginning with the initial description of system and subsystem level environments, and concluding with component level test specifications. Included is a discussion of the difference between environmental specifications and test specifications, and the instrumentation/measurement problems associated with obtaining valid field measurements for severe shock data. The role of finite element analysis in predicting the dynamic structural response of components is also explained. Shock data analysis techniques are described including both time-domain and frequency-domain characterizations of the data. The resonant plate shock testing technique for simulating severe shock environments is presented, including difficulties that arise in practical applications. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  2. HPM (high power microwave) testing of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Antinone, R.; Ng, W.C.

    1989-05-10

    This report documents the results of a study of high power microwave (HPM) vulnerability of electronic components commonly used in weapon systems. The study was carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from August through October 1988. The objective of this study was to determine the threshold levels for upset or disturbance and damage of the devices under test (DUT). In these tests pulsed microwave energy was directly injected into the terminal of the DUT and in most cases a 50-ohm microstrip test fixture was used to ensure that 50-ohm transmission was maintained as close to the DUT as possible. 3 refs., 41 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. A new active solder for joining electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH,RONALD W.; VIANCO,PAUL T.; HERNANDEZ,CYNTHIA L.; LUGSCHEIDER,E.; RASS,I.; HILLEN,F.

    2000-05-11

    Electronic components and micro-sensors utilize ceramic substrates, copper and aluminum interconnect and silicon. The joining of these combinations require pre-metallization such that solders with fluxes can wet such combinations of metals and ceramics. The paper will present a new solder alloy that can bond metals, ceramics and composites. The alloy directly wets and bonds in air without the use flux or premetallized layers. The paper will present typical processing steps and joint microstructures in copper, aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and silicon joints.

  4. Solder Reflow Failures in Electronic Components During Manual Soldering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander; Greenwell, Chris; Felt, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the solder reflow failures in electronic components that occur during manual soldering. It discusses the specifics of manual-soldering-induced failures in plastic devices with internal solder joints. The failure analysis turned up that molten solder had squeezed up to the die surface along the die molding compound interface, and the dice were not protected with glassivation allowing solder to short gate and source to the drain contact. The failure analysis concluded that the parts failed due to overheating during manual soldering.

  5. Analysis of minerals containing dissolved traces of the fluid phase components water and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann

    1991-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made towards a better understanding of the dissolution of common gas/fluid phase components, notably H2O and CO2, in minerals. It has been shown that the dissolution mechanisms are significantly more complex than currently believed. By judiciously combining various solid state analytical techniques, convincing evidence was obtained that traces of dissolved gas/fluid phase components undergo, at least in part, a redox conversion by which they split into reduced H2 and and reduced C on one hand and oxidized oxygen, O(-), on the other. Analysis for 2 and C as well as for any organic molecules which may form during the process of co-segregation are still impeded by the omnipresent danger of extraneous contamination. However, the presence of O(-), an unusual oxidized form of oxygen, has been proven beyond a reasonable doubt. The presence of O(-) testifies to the fact that a redox reaction must have taken place in the solid state involving the dissolved traces of gas/fluid phase components. Detailed information on the techniques used and the results obtained are given.

  6. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  7. Microbial mineralization of VC and DCE under different terminal electron accepting conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    Production of 14CO2 from [1,2-14C] dichloroethene (DCE) or [1,2-14C] vinyl chloride (VC) was quantified in aquifer and stream-bed sediment microcosms to evaluate the potential for microbial mineralization as a pathway for DCE and VC biodegradation under aerobic, Fe(III)-reducing, SO4-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Mineralization of [1,2-14C] DCE and [1,2-14C] VC to 14CO2 decreased under increasingly reducing conditions, but significant mineralization was observed for both sediments even under anaerobic conditions. VC mineralization decreased in the order of aerobic > Fe(III)-reducing > SO4-reducing > methanogenic conditions. For both sediments, VC mineralization was greater than DCE mineralization under all electron-accepting conditions examined. For both sediments, DCE mineralization was at least two times greater under aerobic conditions than under anaerobic conditions. Although significant microbial mineralization of DCE was observed under anaerobic conditions, recovery of 14CO2 did not differ substantially between anaerobic treatments.

  8. Secondary Mineralization of Components in CV3 Chondrites: Nebular and Asteroidal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Krot, A. N.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1995-09-01

    Our review of mineralogical variations among CV3 chondrites suggests that all components, chondrules, matrices, and CAIs, were affected by various degrees of secondary mineralization. Chondrules and CAIs are rimmed with fayalitic olivine [1, 2]; metal in all components is oxidized and sulfidized to magnetite, Ni-rich metal and sulfides [3]; silicates in all components are aqueously altered to phyllosilicates [4]; and nepheline, sodalite, wollastonite, and hedenbergite replace primary minerals in CAIs [5]. In those CV3s with altered CAIs, nepheline etc. are also present in chondrule mesostases [6] and in matrices [7]. Correlated occurrences of secondary minerals indicate that they have related origins. CV3 chondrites can be divided into three kinds according to their secondary features. Reduced CV3s (e.g., Efremovka) lack magnetite [8] and show minimal secondary features. Oxidized CV3s [8] generally show all features: those like Mokoia contain minor fayalitic rims, nepheline, etc, whereas those like Allende lack phyllosilicates but contain well developed fayalite rims and abundant nepheline, etc. Allende-like CV3 chondrites also contain abundant plate-like matrix olivine (Fa(sub)45-55). Similarities in chemistry and O isotopic composition and petrographic observations suggest that fayalitic rims and plate-like matrix olivine have related origins [1, 9]. The presence of secondary minerals in all components implies that alteration postdated component formation. The absence of secondary minerals in reduced CV3s indicates that CV3 oxidized formed from CV3 reduced-like material. Oxidized and reduced materials coexist in some breccias indicating a common parent asteroid. Nebular origins are widely accepted for most secondary features. To form fayalitic rims and matrix , Palme and colleagues [10, 11] suggest that chondritic components were briefly exposed to a hot (>1500 K), highly oxidizing nebula with H2O/H2 to about 1. Such an environment could have resulted from

  9. Electron Transport at the Microbe–Mineral Interface: A Synthesis of Current Research Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, David; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2012-12-01

    Many bacterial and archaeal species can couple growth to the respiratory reduction or oxidation of insoluble mineral oxides of transition metals. These solid substrates are abundant electron sinks and sources for life on Earth, but, since they are insoluble in water, they cannot enter the bacterial cells. So, to exploit these electron sinks and sources, specific respiratory electron-transfer mechanisms must overcome the physical limitations associated with electron transfer between a microbe and extracellular metal oxides. Recent microbiological, geochemical, biochemical, spectroscopic and structural work is beginning to shed light on the molecular mechanism and impacts of electron transfer at themicrobe–mineral interface from a nanometre to kilometre scale. The research field is attracting attention in applied quarters from those with interests in nanowires, microbial fuel cells, bioremediation and microbial cell factories.

  10. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Operational Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Michael J.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Operational Concept document was developed as a first step in developing the Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) System Architecture (NASA/TM-2011-216956). The CLEAR operational concept defines how the system will be used by the Constellation Program and what needs it meets. The document creates scenarios for major elements of the CLEAR architecture. These scenarios are generic enough to apply to near-Earth, Moon, and Mars missions. The CLEAR operational concept involves basic assumptions about the overall program architecture and interactions with the CLEAR system architecture. The assumptions include spacecraft and operational constraints for near-Earth orbit, Moon, and Mars missions. This document addresses an incremental development strategy where capabilities evolve over time, but it is structured to prevent obsolescence. The approach minimizes flight hardware by exploiting Internet-like telecommunications that enables CLEAR capabilities to remain on Earth and to be uplinked as needed. To minimize crew time and operational cost, CLEAR exploits offline development and validation to support online teleoperations. Operational concept scenarios are developed for diagnostics, repair, and functional test operations. Many of the supporting functions defined in these operational scenarios are further defined as technologies in NASA/TM-2011-216956.

  11. Functional models of power electronic components for system studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Kwa-Sur; Yang, Lifeng; Dravid, Narayan

    1991-01-01

    A novel approach to model power electronic circuits has been developed to facilitate simulation studies of system-level issues. The underlying concept for this approach is to develop an equivalent circuit, the functional model, that performs the same functions as the actual circuit but whose operation can be simulated by using larger time step size and the reduction in model complexity, the computation time required by a functional model is significantly shorter than that required by alternative approaches. The authors present this novel modeling approach and discuss the functional models of two major power electronic components, the DC/DC converter unit and the load converter, that are being considered by NASA for use in the Space Station Freedom electric power system. The validity of these models is established by comparing the simulation results with available experimental data and other simulation results obtained by using a more established modeling approach. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated by incorporating these models into a power system model and simulating the system responses and interactions between components under various conditions.

  12. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Michael J.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This document captures the system architecture for a Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) capability needed for electronics maintenance and repair of the Constellation Program (CxP). CLEAR is intended to improve flight system supportability and reduce the mass of spares required to maintain the electronics of human rated spacecraft on long duration missions. By necessity it allows the crew to make repairs that would otherwise be performed by Earth based repair depots. Because of practical knowledge and skill limitations of small spaceflight crews they must be augmented by Earth based support crews and automated repair equipment. This system architecture covers the complete system from ground-user to flight hardware and flight crew and defines an Earth segment and a Space segment. The Earth Segment involves database management, operational planning, and remote equipment programming and validation processes. The Space Segment involves the automated diagnostic, test and repair equipment required for a complete repair process. This document defines three major subsystems including, tele-operations that links the flight hardware to ground support, highly reconfigurable diagnostics and test instruments, and a CLEAR Repair Apparatus that automates the physical repair process.

  13. Collagen mineralization in human aortic valve stenosis: a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Ida; Davoli, Mariano

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Calcific aortic stenosis is a slowly progressive disorder characterized by an important extracellular matrix remodeling with fibrosis and massive deposition of minerals (primarily calcium) in the valve leaflet. The main structural components of human aortic valve are the large, thick collagen bundles that withstand the diastolic loading. Collagen has been studied in a number of reports that aim to clarify the mechanisms underlying the structural deterioration of heart valve substitutes, however to date, little is known regarding the morphological interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in the calcifying tissue of native aortic valve. Here, we have analyzed a total of 12 calcified native aortic valves by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX) to depict the morphological appearance of mineralized collagen and to determine the location of calcium phosphate minerals in the collagen matrix of the valve cusp. Our results demonstrate that crystals probably nucleate and grow in the interior of the collagen fibers in the absence of surface events.

  14. EPR and electronic absorption spectra of copper bearing turquoise mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K. B. N.; Moorthy, L. R.; Reddy, B. J.; Vedanand, S.

    1988-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectra of turquoise have been studied both at room and low temperatures. It is concluded from the EPR spectra that the ground state of Cu 2+ ion in turquoise is 2A g(d x2- y2) and it is sited in an elongated rhombic octahedron (D 2π). The observed absorption bands at 14970 and 18354 cm -1 are assigned at 2A g→ 2B 1 g( dx2- y2→ xy) and 2A g→[ su2B 3g(d x 2-y 2→d yz) respectively assuming D 2π symmetry which are inconsistent with EPR studies. The three bands in the NIR region are attributed to combinations of fundamental modes of the H 2O molecule present in the sample.

  15. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-04-05

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  16. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-08-09

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  17. Mineral element analysis of carious and sound rat dentin by electron probe microanalyzer combined with back-scattered electron image.

    PubMed

    Tjäderhane, L; Hietala, E L; Larmas, M

    1995-11-01

    We recently demonstrated the advantages of back-scattered electron images (COMPO) in the visualization of dentinal caries, and the relationship of the change in the dentin fluorescence pattern in caries lesions. However, the exact nature of these changes is not known. In this paper, the nature of the changes in the areas with reduced mineral content in COMPO images was investigated. We examined the relation of changes in mineral elements and the appearance of soft carious and sound dentin in COMPO images using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). Rat molars with small dentinal caries lesions just under the DEJ were chosen for the study. The Ca, P, Na, Mg, Zn, F, and total contents were determined by EPMA from five different dentin sites, and the Ca/P and Mg/Ca ratios were calculated. Generally, the lowest contents were found in caries lesions and highest in mantle dentin, with the exceptions of Mg and Zn. The Ca/P ratio was lowest in mantle dentin and highest in carious dentin. The results confirm that the change in fluorescence in the dentinal caries lesion is correlated with the very initial changes in mineral content, and that EPMA used in combination with COMPO images is a useful tool for determining small changes in mineral elements in the carious and adjacent areas of dentin.

  18. Optical properties of selected components of mineral dust aerosol processed with organic acids and humic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Jennifer M.; Grassian, V. H.; Young, M. A.; Kleiber, P. D.

    2015-03-01

    Visible light scattering phase function and linear polarization profiles of mineral dust components processed with organic acids and humic material are measured, and results are compared to T-matrix simulations of the scattering properties. Processed samples include quartz mixed with humic material, and calcite reacted with acetic and oxalic acids. Clear differences in light scattering properties are observed for all three processed samples when compared to the unprocessed dust or organic salt products. Results for quartz processed with humic acid sodium salt (NaHA) indicate the presence of both internally mixed quartz-NaHA particles and externally mixed NaHA aerosol. Simulations of light scattering suggest that the processed quartz particles become more moderate in shape due to the formation of a coating of humic material over the mineral core. Experimental results for calcite reacted with acetic acid are consistent with an external mixture of calcite and the reaction product, calcium acetate. Modeling of the light scattering properties does not require any significant change to the calcite particle shape distribution although morphology changes cannot be ruled out by our data. It is expected that calcite reacted with oxalic acid will produce internally mixed particles of calcite and calcium oxalate due to the low solubility of the product salt. However, simulations of the scattering for the calcite-oxalic acid system result in rather poor fits to the data when compared to the other samples. The poor fit provides a less accurate picture of the impact of processing in the calcite-oxalic acid system.

  19. Two-component magnetic structure of iron oxide nanoparticles mineralized in Listeria innocua protein cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Klem, Michael T.; Russek, Stephen E.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor; Goldfarb, Ron B.

    2010-06-01

    Magnetometry was used to determine the magnetic properties of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles formed within Listeria innocua protein cage. The electron magnetic resonance spectrum shows the presence of at least two magnetization components. The magnetization curves are explained by a sum of two Langevin functions in which each filled protein cage contains both a large magnetic iron oxide core plus an amorphous surface consisting of small noncoupled iron oxide spin clusters. This model qualitatively explains the observed decrease in the temperature dependent saturation moment and removes an unrealistic temperature dependent increase in the particle moment often observed in nanoparticle magnetization measurements.

  20. 77 FR 51572 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Institution of Investigation... Properties Limited LLC of Cupertino, California, Phoenix Digital Solutions LLC of Cupertino, California, and... United States after importation of certain wireless consumer electronics devices and components...

  1. 77 FR 44671 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Receipt of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Receipt of... received a complaint entitled Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof, DN 2904... of Technology Properties Limited LLC, Phoenix Digital Solutions LLC and Patriot...

  2. 76 FR 60870 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Communication Capabilities, Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ..., and Related Software; Notice of Institution of Investigation; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to... electronic devices with communication capabilities, components thereof, and related software by reason of... certain electronic devices with communication capabilities, components thereof, and related software...

  3. The biological factors influence on the conversion of mineral components of Extremely Arid Desert Soils (Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutovaya, Olga; Vasilenko, Elena; Lebedeva, Marina; Tkhakakhova, Azida

    2013-04-01

    Extremely arid soils of stony deserts (hamadas) along the southern periphery of the Ili Depression are considered to be analogous to extremely arid soils of Mongolia, also named as "ultra-arid primitive gray-brown soils." In general, the morphology of extremely arid soils of hamadas in the Ili Depression is similar to that of the soils of stony deserts in other parts of the world, including the Gobi, Atacama, and Tarim deserts. The diagnostics of the active communities of microorganisms were performed according to the method of Rybalkina-Kononenko. The exact identification of the living forms of microorganisms to the species level is not always possible with the use of this method. However, it allows us to study the physiological role of the microorganisms and their ecological functions, including the relationships with the soil matrix and other organisms. In particular, it is possible to estimate the contribution of the microorganisms to the transformation of mineral soil components. The obtained materials allow us to conclude that the extremely arid desert soils are characterized by the very high biological activity during short periods of the increased soil moistening after rare and strong rains. The diversity of living forms is very considerable; both prokaryotes (cyanobacteria, actinomycetes, and iron bacteria) and protists (green algae, diatoms, and dinoflagellates) are developed in the soil. Thus, during a short period after the rains, these microorganisms pass from the stage of anabiosis to the stage of active growth and reproduction. Then, upon drying of the soil, the biotic activity of the soil slows down and, finally, terminates. The organisms remain in the state of anabiosis until the next rain. During the period of active growth, the microorganisms compose a specific consortium of different species and exert a profound impact on the soil properties. They participate in the transformation of the soil minerals with the formation of amorphous substances

  4. Electron Microprobe Analyses of Lithic Fragments and Their Minerals from Luna 20 Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, G. H.; Hlava, P. F.; Green, J. A.; Moore, R. B.; Moreland, G.; Dowty, E.; Prinz, M.; Keil, K.; Nehru, C. E.; Bunch, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The bulk analyses (determined with the broad beam electron microprobe technique) of lithic fragments are given in weight percentages and are arranged according to the rock classification. Within each rock group the analyses are arranged in order of increasing FeO content. Thin section and lithic fragment numbers are given at the top of each column of analysis and correspond to the numbers recorded on photo mosaics on file in the Institute of Meteoritics. CIPW molecular norms are given for each analysis. Electron microprobe mineral analyses (given in oxide weight percentages), structural formulae and molecular end member values are presented for plagioclase, olivine, pyroxene and K-feldspar. The minerals are selected mostly from lithic fragments that were also analyzed for bulk composition. Within each mineral group the analyses are presented according to the section number and lithic fragment number. Within each lithic fragment the mineral analyses are arranged as follows: Plagioclase in order of increasing CaO; olivine and pyroexene in order of increasing FeO; and K-feldspar in order of increasing K2O. The mineral grains are identified at the top of each column of analysis by grain number and lithic fragment number.

  5. 76 FR 47610 - Certain Electronic Digital Media Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Digital Media Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Institution of... of certain electronic digital media devices and components thereof by reason of infringement of... electronic digital media devices and components thereof ] that infringe one or more of claims 1, 3-6, and...

  6. Fungal bioleaching of mineral components in a twentieth-century illuminated parchment.

    PubMed

    Pinzari, F; Colaizzi, P; Maggi, O; Persiani, A M; Schütz, R; Rabin, I

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we applied scanning electron microscopy (SEM), microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy to study the fungi inhabiting a richly illuminated parchment document and the damage induced by their activity. To that aim, we collected samples of fungal mycelium from the deteriorated areas on a removable adhesive tape specifically intended for lifting fungi without damaging the support. SEM analysis of the adhesive tape samples showed the co-occurrence of several species of fungi. One strain closely resembling Acremonium species was observed only in the tape micrographs but no agar cultures were obtained. Its fungal structures showed the production of abundant oxalates with an outstanding leaching of the calcium-based materials of parchment (typically manufactured with gypsum and lime). Needle-like crystals of calcium oxalate produced by the fungus forming a uniform and quite regular grid around conidial slimy heads were documented. As a result, the areas affected by moulds were weakened, stained and characterised by a powdery patina rich in calcium. Confocal μ-Raman confirmed the presence of oxalates while EDS showed the presence of calcium in crystals. We conclude that the defacement of the parchment was due to both collagenolytic activity, and to the biotransformation of calcium-based minerals by fungi.

  7. 78 FR 49764 - Certain Electronic Digital Media Devices and Components Thereof; Commission's Final Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Digital Media Devices and Components Thereof; Commission's Final Determination... this investigation and has issued a limited exclusion order prohibiting respondents Samsung Electronics Co, Ltd. of the Republic of Korea (``SEC''); Samsung Electronics America, Inc. of Ridgefield...

  8. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-01

    The mineral-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes, MtrC and MtrA, brought together inside a transmembrane porin, MtrB, to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system containing a pool of internalized electron carriers was used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, the established in vivo orientation, electron transfer from the interior electron carrier pool through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The rates were 103 times higher than those reported for reduction of goethite, hematite, and lepidocrocite by S. oneidensis, and the order of the reaction rates was consistent with those observed in S. oneidensis cultures. In contrast, established rates for single turnover reactions between purified MtrC and Fe(III) oxides were 103 times lower. By providing a continuous flow of electrons, the proteoliposome experiments demonstrate that conduction through MtrCAB directly to Fe(III) oxides is sufficient to support in vivo, anaerobic, solid-phase iron respiration.

  9. Centimeter-long electron transport in marine sediments via conductive minerals.

    PubMed

    Malvankar, Nikhil S; King, Gary M; Lovley, Derek R

    2015-02-01

    Centimeter-long electron conduction through marine sediments, in which electrons derived from sulfide in anoxic sediments are transported to oxygen in surficial sediments, may have an important influence on sediment geochemistry. Filamentous bacteria have been proposed to mediate the electron transport, but the filament conductivity could not be verified and other mechanisms are possible. Surprisingly, previous investigations have never actually measured the sediment conductivity or its basic physical properties. Here we report direct measurements that demonstrate centimeter-long electron flow through marine sediments, with conductivities sufficient to account for previously estimated electron fluxes. Conductivity was lost for oxidized sediments, which contrasts with the previously described increase in the conductivity of microbial biofilms upon oxidation. Adding pyrite to the sediments significantly enhanced the conductivity. These results suggest that the role of conductive minerals, which are more commonly found in sediments than centimeter-long microbial filaments, need to be considered when modeling marine sediment biogeochemistry.

  10. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    SciTech Connect

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-16

    The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system that contains methyl viologen as an internalised electron carrier has been used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally-located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, direct electron transfer from the interior through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The observed rates of conduction through the protein complex were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that observed in whole cells, demonstrating that direct electron exchange between MtrCAB and Fe(III) oxides is efficient enough to support in-vivo, anaerobic, solid phase iron respiration.

  11. Effects of mineral dust on the semivolatile inorganic aerosol components in a polluted Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Tsimpidi, A. P.; Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; Molina, L. T.; Pandis, S. N.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosols play a significant role in the atmosphere having adverse impacts on human health and directly affecting air quality, visibility and climate change. One of the most challenging tasks for models is the prediction of the partitioning of the semivolatile inorganic aerosol components (ammonia, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, etc) between the gas and particulate phases. Moreover, the effects of mineral aerosols in the atmosphere remain largely uncertain. As a result, most current models have serious difficulties in reproducing the observed particulate nitrate and chloride concentrations. The improved aerosol thermodynamic model ISORROPIA II (Fountoukis and Nenes, 2007) simulating explicitly the chemistry of Ca, Mg, and K salts has been linked to the regional chemical transport model PMCAMx (Gaydos et al., 2007). PMCAMx also includes the CMU inorganic aerosol growth module (Gaydos et al., 2003; Koo et al., 2003a) and the VSRM aqueous-phase chemistry module (Fahey and Pandis, 2001). The hybrid approach (Koo et al., 2003b) for modeling aerosol dynamics is applied in order to accurately simulate the inorganic components in the coarse mode. This approach assumes that the smallest particles are in equilibrium, while the condensation/evaporation equation is solved for the larger ones. PMCAMx is applied to the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). The emission inventory has been improved and now includes more accurate dust and NaCl emissions. The April 2003 (MCMA Campaign) and the March 2006 (MILAGRO campaign) datasets are used to evaluate the inorganic aerosol module of PMCAMx in order to test our understanding of inorganic aerosol. The results from the new modeling framework are also compared with the results from the previous version of PMCAMx in order to investigate the influence of each of the added features to the formation of the semivolatile inorganic components. References Fountoukis, C. and Nenes, A., (2007). ISORROPIA II: a computationally efficient

  12. Basic studies on the role of components of Bacillus megaterium as flotation biocollectors in sulphide mineral separation.

    PubMed

    Vasanthakumar, Balasubramanian; Ravishankar, Honnavar; Subramanian, Sankaran

    2014-03-01

    Studies were carried out to assess the utility of the cellular and extracellular constituents of Bacillus megaterium for the flotation of sphalerite and galena minerals. Based on the flotation results on the individual minerals, it was observed that sphalerite was preferentially floated compared to galena. A maximum selectivity index (SI) value of 11.7 was achieved in the presence of the soluble fraction of the thermolysed cells, which was higher than that obtained with the intact cells (SI of 6.5) and the insoluble fraction of the thermolysed cells (SI of 9.6). The results of the various enzymatic treatment tests revealed that extracellular DNA played a vital role in the selective flotation of sphalerite. A noteworthy finding was that the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) had a higher biocollector capacity vis-à-vis the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), leading to better flotation efficiency. About 95 % recovery of sphalerite could be achieved from the mineral mixture by the combined addition of the ssDNA with the non-DNA components of the bacterial cells, resulting in a maximum SI of 19.1. Calcium and phosphate components of the nutrient media were found to be essential for better selectivity of separation of sphalerite. The mechanisms of microbe-mineral interaction are discussed.

  13. Structural relations between collagen and mineral in bone as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J; Hodgens, K J; Arena, J; Song, M J; McEwen, B F

    1996-02-01

    Aspects of the ultrastructural interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in embryonic chick bone have been examined by the novel technique of high voltage electron microscopic tomography to obtain three-dimensional information concerning extracellular calcification in this tissue. Newly mineralizing osteoid along periosteal surfaces of mid-diaphyseal regions from normal chick tibiae was embedded, cut into 0.25 microns thick sections, and documented at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high voltage electron microscope. The areas of the tissue studied contained electron dense mineral crystals associated with collagen fibrils, some marked by crystals disposed along their cylindrically shaped lengths. Tomographic reconstructions of one site with two mineralizing fibrils were computed from a 5 degrees tilt series of micrographs over a +/- 60 degrees range. Reconstructions showed that the mineral crystals were platelets of irregular shape. Their sizes were variable, measured here up to 80 x 30 x 8 nm in length, width, and thickness, respectively. The longest crystal dimension, corresponding to the c-axis crystallographically, was generally parallel to the collagen fibril long axis. Individual crystals were oriented parallel to one another in each fibril examined. They were also parallel in the neighboring but apparently spatially separate fibrils. Crystals were periodically (approximately 67 nm repeat distance) arranged along the fibrils and their location appeared to correspond to collagen hole and overlap zones defined by geometrical imaging techniques. The crystals appeared to be continuously distributed along a fibril, their size and number increasing in a tapered fashion from a relatively narrow tip containing smaller and infrequent crystals to wider regions having more densely packed and larger crystals. Defined for the first time by direct visual 3D imaging, these data describe the size, shape, location, orientation, and development of early crystals in normal

  14. Structural relations between collagen and mineral in bone as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Arena, J.; Song, M. J.; McEwen, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    Aspects of the ultrastructural interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in embryonic chick bone have been examined by the novel technique of high voltage electron microscopic tomography to obtain three-dimensional information concerning extracellular calcification in this tissue. Newly mineralizing osteoid along periosteal surfaces of mid-diaphyseal regions from normal chick tibiae was embedded, cut into 0.25 microns thick sections, and documented at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high voltage electron microscope. The areas of the tissue studied contained electron dense mineral crystals associated with collagen fibrils, some marked by crystals disposed along their cylindrically shaped lengths. Tomographic reconstructions of one site with two mineralizing fibrils were computed from a 5 degrees tilt series of micrographs over a +/- 60 degrees range. Reconstructions showed that the mineral crystals were platelets of irregular shape. Their sizes were variable, measured here up to 80 x 30 x 8 nm in length, width, and thickness, respectively. The longest crystal dimension, corresponding to the c-axis crystallographically, was generally parallel to the collagen fibril long axis. Individual crystals were oriented parallel to one another in each fibril examined. They were also parallel in the neighboring but apparently spatially separate fibrils. Crystals were periodically (approximately 67 nm repeat distance) arranged along the fibrils and their location appeared to correspond to collagen hole and overlap zones defined by geometrical imaging techniques. The crystals appeared to be continuously distributed along a fibril, their size and number increasing in a tapered fashion from a relatively narrow tip containing smaller and infrequent crystals to wider regions having more densely packed and larger crystals. Defined for the first time by direct visual 3D imaging, these data describe the size, shape, location, orientation, and development of early crystals in normal

  15. ELECTRONIC COMPONENT COOLING ALTERNATIVES: COMPRESSED AIR AND LIQUID NITROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to evaluate topics used to troubleshoot circuit boards with known or suspected thermally intermittent components. Failure modes for thermally intermittent components are typically mechanical defects, such as cracks in solder paths or joints, or broken b...

  16. Electron Microprobe Analysis of Fe2+/Fe3+ in Minerals With low Total Iron Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creighton, S. D.; Matveev, S.; Stachel, T.; Luth, R. W.

    2004-12-01

    The development of the `flank method' by Höfer et al. (1994) has made it possible to quantify ferrous and ferric iron concentrations in minerals using the electron microprobe. The flank method makes use of the changes in both the wavelength and intensity of soft Fe Lα and Fe Lβ X-ray emission lines of minerals containing Fe3+ and Fe2+.By measuring at energies off the peak maxima (on the peaksAƒAøAøâ_sA¬Aøâ_zAø flanks) the differences due to variable ferric iron ratios are maximized, thus making the flank method much more sensitive than methods relying on either peak shifts or peak area ratios. Using a correction for self-absorption, the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio of minerals may be accurately and precisely determined. The original flank method was developed for minerals with high total iron concentration e.g. Fe-rich garnet end-members (almandine, andradite, and skiagite), and Fe-oxides (wüstite). To make it applicable to minerals with total iron concentrations of less than 10 wt.% as is common in mantle-derived minerals, we have modified, in three ways, the flank method to significantly improve the precision. Firstly, we have increased the number of analyses per mineral grain to 400 thereby providing a far more representative mean. Secondly, because it is necessary to accurately reproduce the exact position of the spectrometer crystal for each flank measurement, we have eliminated the need to reposition the spectrometer by serially measuring each flank position. Thirdly, we compensate for instrumental drift by measuring two 10 μ m by 10 μ m grids (1 μ m spot size and spacing) for both flank positions. Each mineral grain is measured sequentially, collecting 200 analyses on the first flank position. The procedure is identically repeated for measurements on the second flank position. The elapsed time between each grid measurement is the same for all samples and drift for either flank position is eliminated by averaging. Using these modifications to the flank

  17. Electron Probe Microanalysis of REE in Eudialyte Group Minerals: Challenges and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Petya; Krause, Joachim; Möckel, Robert; Osbahr, Inga; Gutzmer, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Accurate quantification of the chemical composition of eudialyte group minerals (EGM) with the electron probe microanalyzer is complicated by both mineralogical and X-ray-specific challenges. These include structural and chemical variability, mutual interferences of X-ray lines, in particular of the rare earth elements, diffusive volatility of light anions and cations, and instability of EGM under the electron beam. A novel analytical approach has been developed to overcome these analytical challenges. The effect of diffusive volatility and beam damage is shown to be minimal when a square of 20×20 µm is scanned with a beam diameter of 6 µm at the fastest possible speed, while measuring elements critical to electron beam exposure early in the measurement sequence. Appropriate reference materials are selected for calibration considering their volatile content and composition, and supplementary offline overlap correction is performed using individual calibration factors. Preliminary results indicate good agreement with data from laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry demonstrating that a quantitative mineral chemical analysis of EGM by electron probe microanalysis is possible once all the parameters mentioned above are accounted for.

  18. 78 FR 34132 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof... Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof, DN 2958; the Commission...

  19. 75 FR 38118 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... Associated Software; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution... processing systems, components thereof, and associated software by reason of infringement of certain claims... certain electronic devices with image processing systems, components thereof, and associated software...

  20. 75 FR 76485 - Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Commission... United States after importation of certain electronic paper towel dispensing devices and...

  1. Virtual enterprise model for the electronic components business in the Nuclear Weapons Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, T.J.; Long, K.S.; Sayre, J.A.; Hull, A.L.; Carey, D.A.; Sim, J.R.; Smith, M.G.

    1994-08-01

    The electronic components business within the Nuclear Weapons Complex spans organizational and Department of Energy contractor boundaries. An assessment of the current processes indicates a need for fundamentally changing the way electronic components are developed, procured, and manufactured. A model is provided based on a virtual enterprise that recognizes distinctive competencies within the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at the vendors. The model incorporates changes that reduce component delivery cycle time and improve cost effectiveness while delivering components of the appropriate quality.

  2. Conflict Minerals in Electronic Systems: An Overview and Critique of Legal Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Jameson, N Jordan; Song, Xin; Pecht, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The Democratic Republic of Congo has vast natural resources, many of which are regularly exploited by the electronics industry. Unfortunately, in addition to these resources, there are widespread human rights abuses committed by armed groups entrenched in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo. These armed groups are using profits from these minerals as a source of funding. Their human rights abuses have led to a growing humanitarian interest in the region and prompted the international community to action. This paper explores the conflicts in the Democratic Republic of Congo, provides an understanding of the link between human rights abuses and conflict minerals, and interprets and critiques the legal actions of the international community.

  3. Pulse-Width Dependent Radiation Effects on Electronic Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    d’un accelerateur lineaire ( LINAC ) a et6 realisee par le CRDO et d’autres groupes. Par contre, l’emploi du LINAC donne normalement des impulsions plus... LINAC ) has been performed by DREO and other groups. However, the use of a LINAC normally entails wider pulses than those expected on the battlefield...nuclear weapon on electronics, an electron linear accelerator ( LINAC ) is often used. The pulse widths available from most LINACs are longer than the

  4. Pulse-Width Dependent Radiation Effects on Electronic Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    lineaire ( LINAC ) a ete realisee par le CRDO et d’autres groupes. Par contre, l’emploi du LINAC donne normalement des impulsions plus larges que celles...xtyibudon UnUSIId~ Z -!_ ABSTRACT The simulation of the prompt gamma-ray pulse effects on electronics with an electron linear accelerator ( LINAC ) has been...performed by DREO and other groups. However, the use of a LINAC normally entails wider pulses than those expected on the battlefield. This rcport

  5. Thermal response of ceramic components during electron beam brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Voth, T.E.; Gianoulakis, S.E.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    Ceramics are being used increasingly in applications where high temperatures are encountered such as automobile and gas turbine engines. However, the use of ceramics is limited by a lack of methods capable of producing strong, high temperature joints. This is because most ceramic-ceramic joining techniques, such as brazing, require that the entire assembly be exposed to high temperatures in order to assure that the braze material melts. Alternatively, localized heating using high energy electron beams may be used to selectively heat the braze material. In this work, high energy electron beam brazing of a ceramic part is modeled numerically. The part considered consists of a ceramic cylinder and disk between which is sandwiched an annular washer of braze material. An electron beam impinges on the disk, melting the braze metal. The resulting coupled electron and thermal transport equations are solved using Monte Carlo and finite element techniques. Results indicate that increased electron beam current decreases time to melt as well as required cooling time. Vacuum furnace brazing was also simulated and predicted results indicate increased processing times relative to electron beam brazing.

  6. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2011-10-10

    The capture and storage of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in deep geologic formations represents one of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. In this regard, mineral-fluid interactions are of prime importance since such reactions can result in the long term sequestration of CO2 by trapping in mineral phases. Recently it has been recognized that interactions with neat to water-saturated non-aqueous fluids are of prime importance in understanding mineralization reactions since the introduced CO2 is likely to contain water initially or soon after injection and the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is less dense than the aqueous phase which can result in a buoyant scCO2 plume contacting the isolating caprock. As a result, unraveling the molecular/microscopic mechanisms of mineral transformation in neat to water saturated scCO2 has taken on an added important. In this study, we are examining the interfacial reactions of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) over a range of water contents up to and including complete water saturation in scCO2. The surface precipitates that form on the reacted forsterite grains are extremely fragile and difficult to experimentally characterize. In order to address this issue we have developed experimental protocols for preparing and imaging electron-transparent samples from fragile structures. These electron-transparent samples are then examined using a combination of STEM/EDX, FIB-TEM, and helium ion microscope (HIM) imaging (Figures 1-3). This combination of capabilities has provided unique insight into the geochemical processes that occur on scCO2 reacted mineral surfaces. The experimental procedures and protocols that have been developed also have useful applications for examining fragile structures on a wide variety of materials. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and

  7. Abundance and distribution of mineral components associated with Moses Rock (kimberlite) diatreme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, J. F.; Pieters, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The surface mineralogy in and around Moses Rock diatreme, a kimberlite-bearing dike in SW Utah, was examined using internally calibrated Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data. Distinct near-infrared absorption characteristics of clays, gypsum, and serpentine (a key marker for kinberlite concentration) allowed the surface units containing these components to be identified spatially and the relative abundance of each component measured. Within the dike itself, channels and dispersed components of kimberlite and blocks of country rocks were accurately determined.

  8. Constant current load matches impedances of electronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    Constant current load with negative resistance characteristics actively compensates for impedance variations in circuit components. Through a current-voltage balancing operation the internal impedance of the diodes is maintained at a constant value. This constant current load circuit can be used in simple telemetry systems.

  9. Surveyor television camera, selected materials and electronic components, Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    The locations of various parts of the Surveyor camera are presented. Tables were prepared with emphasis on: (1) exterior parts and surfaces that are directly exposed to space, (2) parts that shield others from space radiation, (3) representative or unique materials, and (4) electronic devices that may contain unique or well-characterized materials.

  10. 76 FR 12994 - In the Matter of Certain Digital Televisions and Components Thereof, and Certain Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Digital Televisions and Components Thereof, and Certain Electronic... Electronics, Inc. The complaint alleges violations of section 337 based upon the importation into the United... digital televisions and components thereof by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Patent...

  11. 78 FR 71643 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Commission Determination To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Commission Determination To... August 24, 2012, based on a complaint filed by Technology Properties Limited LLC and Phoenix Digital... of certain wireless consumer electronics devices and components thereof by reason of infringement...

  12. Three Aromatic Residues are Required for Electron Transfer during Iron Mineralization in Bacterioferritin.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Justin M; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Lawson, Tamara L; Hemmings, Andrew M; Moore, Geoffrey R; Le Brun, Nick E

    2015-12-01

    Ferritins are iron storage proteins that overcome the problems of toxicity and poor bioavailability of iron by catalyzing iron oxidation and mineralization through the activity of a diiron ferroxidase site. Unlike in other ferritins, the oxidized di-Fe(3+) site of Escherichia coli bacterioferritin (EcBFR) is stable and therefore does not function as a conduit for the transfer of Fe(3+) into the storage cavity, but instead acts as a true catalytic cofactor that cycles its oxidation state while driving Fe(2+) oxidation in the cavity. Herein, we demonstrate that EcBFR mineralization depends on three aromatic residues near the diiron site, Tyr25, Tyr58, and Trp133, and that a transient radical is formed on Tyr25. The data indicate that the aromatic residues, together with a previously identified inner surface iron site, promote mineralization by ensuring the simultaneous delivery of two electrons, derived from Fe(2+) oxidation in the BFR cavity, to the di-ferric catalytic site for safe reduction of O2.

  13. Scanning electron microscopic description of cellular activity and mineral changes in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, O; Boudigues, S; Pilet, P; Aguado, E; Heymann, D; Daculsi, G

    2001-12-01

    The cellular activity and changes in mineral composition of dental tissues involved in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions were investigated. Teeth with at least 1 lesion (n = 10) were extracted from 10 different cats that were presented primarily for chronic gingivostomatitis and/or severe periodontal disease. Scanning electron microscopic methods were used to determine the presence of resorptive cells in 8 teeth while 2 teeth were evaluated for pathologic changes in dental mineral composition. Observations were complicated by the presence of organic wear on the dental surfaces, however resorptive cells could be clearly identified in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions. Resorptive cells had morphologic features indicative of "osteoclast-like" cells or odontoclasts. Resorptive cell activity created a resorption area of darker dentin continuous with physiologic dentin. The darker dentin area seemed poorly mineralized and showed a significantly lower calcium/phosphorous ratio compared with adjacent physiologic denting in 1 tooth. A significantly higher level of magnesium combined with available carbonate ions may have increased the solubility in areas of darker dentin.

  14. Sequestered carbon on clay mineral probed by electron paramagnetic resonance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Kátia Cylene; Mangrich, Antonio Salvio; Wypych, Fernando; Rodrigues-Filho, Ubirajara Pereira; Guimarães, José L; Schreiner, Wido H

    2006-03-01

    This paper describes the interaction among soil organic matter components with kaolinite, an important clay mineral present in tropical soils, especially in Brazil. XPS data show that the soil organic matter adsorbed on kaolinite has aromatic and aliphatic structures, with phenolic and/or alcoholic functions and carbonyl carbons (CO) of amide and/or carboxylic groups. The N1s spectrum of the kaolinite shows an asymmetric peak that is assigned to amide and protonated ammines probably from humin. The interaction between them is strong enough to resist chemical oxidative or reductive attack besides loose amide functionalities. EPR data show that reductive treatment reduces some Fe3+ of the kaolinite structure, loosing organic components. A schematic representation of the reduction of structural Fe3+ in the concentrated domains and consequently increased concentration of Fe3+ ions in diluted domains of the spectrum is presented. This reinforces the hypothesis that humin is a stable carbon sink in soils when adsorbed to clays.

  15. Electronic Components for High-g Hardened Packaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    need for solder paste and flux. Solder balls provide an obstacle around which voids can form as the underfill is squeezed out to the edges of the...ball is another contaminant that will interfere with the underfill flow. Both of these defects result in voids in the underfill that decrease its...the flow of the underfill beneath the component. The fluxing underfill is not subject to contamination by flux or voids resulting from flow time

  16. Electron microscopic examination of wastewater biofilm formation and structural components.

    PubMed Central

    Eighmy, T T; Maratea, D; Bishop, P L

    1983-01-01

    This research documents in situ wastewater biofilm formation, structure, and physiochemical properties as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Cationized ferritin was used to label anionic sites of the biofilm glycocalyx for viewing in thin section. Wastewater biofilm formation paralleled the processes involved in marine biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dramatic increase in cell colonization and growth over a 144-h period. Constituents included a variety of actively dividing morphological types. Many of the colonizing bacteria were flagellated. Filaments were seen after primary colonization of the surface. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a dominant gram-negative cell wall structure in the biofilm constituents. At least three types of glycocalyces were observed. The predominant glycocalyx possessed interstices and was densely labeled with cationized ferritin. Two of the glycocalyces appeared to mediate biofilm adhesion to the substratum. The results suggest that the predominant glycocalyx of this thin wastewater biofilm serves, in part, to: (i) enclose the bacteria in a matrix and anchor the biofilm to the substratum and (ii) provide an extensive surface area with polyanionic properties. Images PMID:6881965

  17. 78 FR 32689 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... COMMISSION Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof..., Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof, DN 2958; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public... communications devices, including mobile phones and components thereof. The complaint names as respondents...

  18. 76 FR 76181 - Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Issuance of General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Issuance of General... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic paper towel... importation, sale for importation, and/or sale after importation into the United States of electronic...

  19. Effect of the mineral components of brown coals on the properties of organic matter in the interaction with solvents

    SciTech Connect

    P.N. Kuznetsov; L.I. Kuznetsova

    2008-12-15

    The cation-exchange forms of a considerable portion of metals that occur in brown coals from various deposits were identified. Based on swelling data, the interaction of the organic matter of coals with solvents was studied depending on the concentrations of mineral components. It was found that natural brown coals exhibit a densely crosslinked supramolecular structure with the predominance of molecular-size pores. In the course of decationization, the organic matter underwent partial depolymerization; the rate of diffusion and the accessibility of fragments to solvents with relatively bulky molecules dramatically increased.

  20. Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Davenhall, Leisa B.; Rubin, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier which can be used to contact substrates for electronic parts such as semiconductor wafers or chips to remove photoresist materials which are applied to the substrates during manufacture of the electronic parts. The dense phase fluid modifier is one selected from the group of cyclic, aliphatic or alicyclic compounds having the functional group: ##STR1## wherein Y is a carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus or sulfur atom or a hydrocarbon group having from 1 to 10 carbon atoms, a halogen or halogenated hydrocarbon group having from 1 to 10 carbon atoms, silicon or a fluorinated silicon group; and wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 can be the same or different substituents; and wherein, as in the case where X is nitrogen, R.sub.1 or R.sub.2 may not be present. The invention compositions generally are applied to the substrates in a pulsed fashion in order to remove the hard baked photoresist material remaining on the surface of the substrate after removal of soft baked photoresist material and etching of the barrier layer.

  1. Temperature control of electronic components using fluidised beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, R.

    1981-06-01

    This paper introduces the concept of fluidized bed cooling applied to electronic systems. It is shown that, when fluidized with air, the cooling efficiency and the pumping power are principally dependent on particle characteristics; in particular the mean diameter should not be less than 100 microns. Design rules are developed and applied to two types of fluid-bed systems: (1) a small bed of alumina particles cooling single devices of 40 W power dissipation where the fluidizing air is the main heat transporting medium, and (2) a large bed of cenospheres with a simple integrated heat exchanger to extract more than 1 KW of heat from complete sub-rack assemblies of up to 40 printed circuit boards, for a fluidizing power of about 3 W. The effect of board spacing on the overall thermal performance is considered, and a minimum spacing of 10-20 mm is shown to be required to maintain cooling efficiency.

  2. Textile-Based Electronic Components for Energy Applications: Principles, Problems, and Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Vishakha; Lee, Jaehong; Hong, Juree; Lee, Seulah; Lee, Sanggeun; Seo, Jungmok; Mahata, Chandreswar; Lee, Taeyoon

    2015-01-01

    Textile-based electronic components have gained interest in the fields of science and technology. Recent developments in nanotechnology have enabled the integration of electronic components into textiles while retaining desirable characteristics such as flexibility, strength, and conductivity. Various materials were investigated in detail to obtain current conductive textile technology, and the integration of electronic components into these textiles shows great promise for common everyday applications. The harvest and storage of energy in textile electronics is a challenge that requires further attention in order to enable complete adoption of this technology in practical implementations. This review focuses on the various conductive textiles, their methods of preparation, and textile-based electronic components. We also focus on fabrication and the function of textile-based energy harvesting and storage devices, discuss their fundamental limitations, and suggest new areas of study. PMID:28347078

  3. The Composition of Bovine Peritubular Dentin: Matching TOF-SIMS, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Biochemical Component Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Gotliv, Bat Ami; Veis, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    Peritubular dentin (PTD) is a hypermineralized phase within the dentinal tubules in some vertebrate teeth as an interface between the intertubular dentin (ITD) and the cell processes. Our aim has been to understand the composition, structure and role of PTD as a mineralized tissue. We have utilized the technique of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to map the distribution of positive and negative inorganic ions as well as organic components in the fully mineralized, intact PTD structure in bovine tooth cross-sections, and correlated these with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in standard and backscatter modes. In recent work, we developed a procedure to freeze fracture the teeth and separate PTD from the less dense ITD by the use of aqueous sodium phosphotungstate step density gradients, after degrading the ITD collagen with NaOCl. Here, PTD-containing fragments were characterized by SEM and TOF-SIMS surface structure analysis. The TOF-SIMS data show that the isolated PTD does not contain collagen, but its surface is rich in glutamic acid-containing protein(s). The TOF-SIMS spectra also indicated that the intact PTD fragments contain phospholipids, and chemical analyses showed phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine as the principal lipid components. In SEM sections, untreated PTD shows as a smooth collar around the tubule, but after digestion with ethylenediamine to remove all organic components, the porous nature of the mineral phase of small, thin platy apatite crystals becomes evident. Thus, the organic matrix of PTD appears to be a proteolipid-phospholipid complex. PMID:18728348

  4. Pulmonary epithelial response in the rat lung to instilled Montserrat respirable dusts and their major mineral components

    PubMed Central

    Housley, D; Berube, K; Jones, T; Anderson, S; Pooley, F; Richards, R

    2002-01-01

    Background: The Soufriere Hills, a stratovolcano on Montserrat, started erupting in July 1995, producing volcanic ash, both from dome collapse pyroclastic flows and phreatic explosions. The eruptions/ash resuspension result in high concentrations of suspended particulate matter in the atmosphere, which includes cristobalite, a mineral implicated in respiratory disorders. Aims: To conduct toxicological studies on characterised samples of ash, together with major components of the dust mixture (anorthite, cristobalite), and a bioreactive mineral control (DQ12 quartz). Methods: Rats were challenged with a single mass (1 mg) dose of particles via intratracheal instillation and groups sacrificed at one, three, and nine weeks. Acute bioreactivity of the particles was assessed by increases in lung permeability and inflammation, changes in epithelial cell markers, and increase in the size of bronchothoracic lymph nodes. Results: Data indicated that respirable ash derived from pyroclastic flows (20.1% cristobalite) or phreatic explosion (8.6% cristobalite) had minimal bioreactivity in the lung. Anorthite showed low bioreactivity, in contrast to pure cristobalite, which showed progressive increases in lung damage. Conclusion: Results suggests that either the percentage mass of cristobalite particles present in Montserrat ash was not sufficient as a catalyst in the lung environment, or its surface reactivity was masked by the non-reactive volcanic glass components during the process of ash formation. PMID:12107295

  5. An overview of the NASA electronic components information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, G.; Waterbury, S.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Parts Project Office (NPPO) comprehensive data system to support all NASA Electric, Electronic, and Electromechanical (EEE) parts management and technical data requirements is described. A phase delivery approach is adopted, comprising four principal phases. Phases 1 and 2 support Space Station Freedom (SSF) and use a centralized architecture with all data and processing kept on a mainframe computer. Phases 3 and 4 support all NASA centers and projects and implement a distributed system architecture, in which data and processing are shared among networked database servers. The Phase 1 system, which became operational in February of 1990, implements a core set of functions. Phase 2, scheduled for release in 1991, adds functions to the Phase 1 system. Phase 3, to be prototyped beginning in 1991 and delivered in 1992, introduces a distributed system, separate from the Phase 1 and 2 system, with a refined semantic data model. Phase 4 extends the data model and functionality of the Phase 3 system to provide support for the NASA design community, including integration with Computer Aided Design (CAD) environments. Phase 4 is scheduled for prototyping in 1992 to 93 and delivery in 1994.

  6. Application of Quantitative Analytical Electron Microscopy to the Mineral Content of Insect Cuticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasch, Ron; Cribb, Bronwen W.; Barry, John; Palmer, Christopher M.

    2003-04-01

    Quantification of calcium in the cuticle of the fly larva Exeretonevra angustifrons was undertaken at the micron scale using wavelength dispersive X-ray microanalysis, analytical standards, and a full matrix correction. Calcium and phosphorus were found to be present in the exoskeleton in a ratio that indicates amorphous calcium phosphate. This was confirmed through electron diffraction of the calcium-containing tissue. Due to the pragmatic difficulties of measuring light elements, it is not uncommon in the field of entomology to neglect the use of matrix corrections when performing microanalysis of bulk insect specimens. To determine, firstly, whether such a strategy affects the outcome and secondly, which matrix correction is preferable, phi-rho (z) and ZAF matrix corrections were contrasted with each other and without matrix correction. The best estimate of the mineral phase was found to be given by using the phi-rho (z) correction. When no correction was made, the ratio of Ca to P fell outside the range for amorphous calcium phosphate, possibly leading to flawed interpretation of the mineral form when used on its own.

  7. Porous tantalum tibial component prevents periprosthetic loss of bone mineral density after total knee arthroplasty for five years-a matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Yukihide; Kobayashi, Akio; Ikebuchi, Mitsuhiko; Iwaki, Hiroyoshi; Inori, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    In 21 knees receiving porous tantalum tibial component and 21 knees receiving a cemented cobalt-chromium tibial component, dual x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed for five years post-operatively. The postoperative decrease in the bone mineral density in the lateral aspect of the tibia was significantly less in knees with porous tantalum tibial components (11.6%) than in knees with cemented cobalt-chromium tibial components (29.6%) at five years (p < 0.05). No prosthetic migration or periprosthetic fracture was detected in either group. The present study is one of the studies with the longest follow-up period on bone mineral density after total knee arthroplasty. Porous tantalum tibial component has a favorable effect on the bone mineral density of the proximal tibia after total knee arthroplasty up to five years.

  8. Apollo 15 rake sample microbreccias and non-mare rocks: Bulk rock, mineral and glass electron microprobe analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlava, P. F.; Green, J. A.; Prinz, M.; Nehru, C. E.; Keil, K.; Dowty, E.; Bunch, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    Quantitative electron microprobe data of Apollo 15 nonmare rake samples are presented. Bulk analyses of lithic fragments in the nomare rocks (expressed in oxide weight-percent) and the corresponding CIPW molecular norms are given. The mineralogy of the rocks and lithic fragments are also given; structural formulae for complete analyses and molecular end-members for all mineral analyses are included. The mineral analyses include pyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, barian K-feldspar, spinel and ilmenite, cobaltian metallic nickel-iron as well as SiO2-K2O-rich residual glass. Electron micropobe analyses (oxide weight percent) of glasses in loose fines and microbreccia samples and their CIPW molecular norms are presented along with electron microprobe data on bulk, mineral, and matrix glass from chondrules.

  9. 78 FR 63492 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade...

  10. 78 FR 12354 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Commission Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Commission Determination Concerning an Initial Determination Granting a Motion To Amend Complaint and Notice of Investigation...

  11. Moiré fringe method of using warping deformation measurement of electronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanping; Huang, Biaobing; Xu, Hongji; Yan, Dongmei; Li, Wenpeng

    2010-10-01

    Computers, mobile phones, cameras and video equipment and other electronic products, Moving in the light, thin, small, high speed, high reliability, multi-functional aspects of development, Namely, 3G technology and the SOC of. Therefore, the various components of the packaging technology have become increasingly demanding, Electronic components of residual stress after encapsulation and the use of temperature changes during, Body will be made electronic packaging warpage, Seriously affect the quality of the product. Therefore, to establish a set of micron, sub-micron-level detection method for testing. In this paper, Moiré fringe method to measure warpage of electronic packages body volume, Was first proposed application of Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory, Proof presented in this paper with a small spacing diffraction grating problems arising from the assumption can be overcome, Greatly improved the precision deformation measurement of electronic components.

  12. Radiation studies of optical and electronic components used in astronomical satellite studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becher, J.; Kernell, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The synchronous orbit of the IUE carries the satellite through Earth's outer electron belt. A 40 mCi Sr90 source was used to simulate these electrons. A 5 mCi source of Co60 was used to simulate bremmstrahlung. A 10 MeV electron Linac and a 1.7 MeV electron Van de Graaf wer used to investigate the energy dependence of radiation effects and to perform radiations at a high flux rate. A 100 MeV proton cyclotron was used to simulate cosmic rays. Results are presented for three instrument systems of the IUE and measurements for specific components are reported. The three instrument systems were the ultraviolet converter, the fine error sensor (FES), and the SEC vidicon camera tube. The components were optical glasses, electronic components, silicon photodiodes, and UV window materials.

  13. Mineral and organic matrix interaction in normally calcifying tendon visualized in three dimensions by high-voltage electron microscopic tomography and graphic image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Song, M. J.; Leith, A.; McEwen, L.; McEwen, B. F.

    1993-01-01

    To define the ultrastructural accommodation of mineral crystals by collagen fibrils and other organic matrix components during vertebrate calcification, electron microscopic 3-D reconstructions were generated from the normally mineralizing leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. Embedded specimens containing initial collagen mineralizing sites were cut into 0.5-micron-thick sections and viewed and photographed at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high-voltage electron microscope. Tomographic 3-D reconstructions were computed from a 2 degree tilt series of micrographs taken over a minimum angular range of +/- 60 degrees. Reconstructions of longitudinal tendon profiles confirm the presence of irregularly shaped mineral platelets, whose crystallographic c-axes are oriented generally parallel to one another and directed along the collagen long axes. The reconstructions also corroborate observations of a variable crystal length (up to 170 nm measured along crystallographic c-axes), the presence of crystals initially in either the hole or overlap zones of collagen, and crystal growth in the c-axis direction beyond these zones into adjacent overlap and other hole regions. Tomography shows for the first time that crystal width varies (30-45 nm) but crystal thickness is uniform (approximately 4-6 nm at the resolution limit of tomography); more crystals are located in the collagen hole zones than in the overlap regions at the earliest stages of tendon mineralization; the crystallographic c-axes of the platelets lie within +/- 15-20 degrees of one another rather than being perfectly parallel; adjacent platelets are spatially separated by a minimum of 4.2 +/- 1.0 nm; crystals apparently fuse in coplanar alignment to form larger platelets; development of crystals in width occurs to dimensions beyond single collagen hole zones; and a thin envelope of organic origin may be present along or just beneath the surfaces of individual mineral platelets. Implicit in the

  14. 77 FR 4059 - Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof; Receipt...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Images, and Components Thereof, DN 2869; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public interest... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof; Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of Comments Relating to the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S....

  15. 76 FR 58841 - Certain Digital Televisions and Components Thereof, and Certain Electronic Devices Having a Blu...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... COMMISSION Certain Digital Televisions and Components Thereof, and Certain Electronic Devices Having a Blu... investigation on March 9, 2011, based on complaints filed by LG Electronics, Inc. of Seoul, Korea (``LGE''). 76... the sale within the United States after importation of certain digital televisions and...

  16. Spatial distribution of mineral components in microcombinations of agrogrey soils with the second humus horizon in the Vladimir opolie area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhikova, N. P.; Karpova, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    Mineralogical composition of silt and clay fractions (<1.1-5 and 5-10 µm) in heavy loamy agrogrey soils (Luvic Retic Phaeozems) considerably changes both in the vertical (along the soil profile) and horizontal (along soil microcatenas) directions. The eluvial-illuvial distribution pattern of the clay fraction in the podzolized agrogrey soils with the second humus horizon is replaced by the homogeneous distribution in the agrogrey soils with residual carbonates. The distribution of silt fractions in the soil profiles is relatively homogeneous. The clay (<1 µm) fraction of the parent material is represented by the poorly ordered micasmectite interstratifications minerals, the proportion between which changes in the soil profiles in dependence on the particular pedogenetic processes. Hydromicas represent the second important component of the clay fraction. They consist of di- and trioctahedral varieties, the proportion between which changes in the soil profiles. Kaolinite and iron-magnesium chlorite are present in smaller amounts. The second humus horizon is characterized by the lowest content of mica-smectite interstratifications minerals with the high content of smectitic layers and by the lowest content of the clay fraction. Silt fractions are composed of quartz, micas, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases.

  17. THREE-COMPONENT BOREHOLE MAGNETOMETER PROBE FOR MINERAL INVESTIGATIONS AND GEOLOGIC RESEARCH.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, James H.; Olson, Gary G.

    1985-01-01

    A small-diameter three-component fluxgate magnetometer probe with gyroscopic and inclinometer orientation has been developed to meet U. S. Geological Survey design and performance specifications for measurement of the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field in vertical and inclined boreholes. The orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer elements have a measurement resolution of 10 nanoteslas (nT) and a range of plus or minus 80,000 nT. The gyroscope has an effective resolution of one degree, and the orthogonal inclinometers, 0. 1 degree. The magnetometer probe has been field tested in several holes drilled through volcanic rocks in Nevada. Results indicate that reversals of polarization can be detected, and some rock units in this area appear to be characterized by unique magnetic signatures.

  18. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation of a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.

  19. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    DOE PAGES

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; ...

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation ofmore » a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.« less

  20. Reliability considerations of electronics components for the deep underwater muon and neutrino detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1980-02-01

    The reliability of some electronics components for the Deep Underwater Muon and Neutrino Detection (DUMAND) System is discussed. An introductory overview of engineering concepts and technique for reliability assessment is given. Component reliability is discussed in the contest of major factors causing failures, particularly with respect to physical and chemical causes, process technology and testing, and screening procedures. Failure rates are presented for discrete devices and for integrated circuits as well as for basic electronics components. Furthermore, the military reliability specifications and standards for semiconductor devices are reviewed.

  1. Critical density for Landau damping in a two-electron-component plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, Constantin F.; López, Rodrigo A.; Araneda, Jaime A.

    2015-10-15

    The asymptotic evolution of an initial perturbation in a collisionless two-electron-component plasma with different temperatures is studied numerically. The transition between linear and nonlinear damping regimes is determined by slowly varying the density of the secondary electron-component using high-resolution Vlasov-Poisson simulations. It is shown that, for fixed amplitude perturbations, this transition behaves as a critical phenomenon with time scales and field amplitudes exhibiting power-law dependencies on the threshold density, similar to the critical amplitude behavior in a single-component plasma.

  2. CALCMIN - an EXCEL™ Visual Basic application for calculating mineral structural formulae from electron microprobe analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandelik, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    CALCMIN, an open source Visual Basic program, was implemented in EXCEL™. The program was primarily developed to support geoscientists in their routine task of calculating structural formulae of minerals on the basis of chemical analysis mainly obtained by electron microprobe (EMP) techniques. Calculation programs for various minerals are already included in the form of sub-routines. These routines are arranged in separate modules containing a minimum of code. The architecture of CALCMIN allows the user to easily develop new calculation routines or modify existing routines with little knowledge of programming techniques. By means of a simple mouse-click, the program automatically generates a rudimentary framework of code using the object model of the Visual Basic Editor (VBE). Within this framework simple commands and functions, which are provided by the program, can be used, for example, to perform various normalization procedures or to output the results of the computations. For the clarity of the code, element symbols are used as variables initialized by the program automatically. CALCMIN does not set any boundaries in complexity of the code used, resulting in a wide range of possible applications. Thus, matrix and optimization methods can be included, for instance, to determine end member contents for subsequent thermodynamic calculations. Diverse input procedures are provided, such as the automated read-in of output files created by the EMP. Furthermore, a subsequent filter routine enables the user to extract specific analyses in order to use them for a corresponding calculation routine. An event-driven, interactive operating mode was selected for easy application of the program. CALCMIN leads the user from the beginning to the end of the calculation process.

  3. Minerals and aligned collagen fibrils in tilapia fish scales: structural analysis using dark-field and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tagaya, Motohiro; Chen, Song; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    The mineralized structure of aligned collagen fibrils in a tilapia fish scale was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques after a thin sample was prepared using aqueous techniques. Electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy data indicated that a mineralized internal layer consisting of aligned collagen fibrils contains hydroxyapatite crystals. Bright-field imaging, dark-field imaging, and energy-filtered TEM showed that the hydroxyapatite was mainly distributed in the hole zones of the aligned collagen fibrils structure, while needle-like materials composed of calcium compounds including hydroxyapatite existed in the mineralized internal layer. Dark-field imaging and three-dimensional observation using electron tomography revealed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were mainly found in the matrix between the collagen fibrils. It was observed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were preferentially distributed on the surface of the hole zones in the aligned collagen fibrils structure and in the matrix between the collagen fibrils in the mineralized internal layer of the scale.

  4. QEMSCAN° (Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by Scanning Electron Microscopy): capability and application to fracture characterization in geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayling, B.; Rose, P. E.; Zemach, E.; Drakos, P. S.; Petty, S.

    2011-12-01

    Fractures are important conduits for fluids in geothermal systems, and the creation and maintenance of fracture permeability is a fundamental aspect of EGS (Engineered Geothermal System) development. Hydraulic or chemical stimulation techniques are often employed to achieve this. In the case of chemical stimulation, an understanding of the minerals present in the fractures themselves is desirable to better design a stimulation effort (i.e. which chemical to use and how much). Borehole televiewer surveys provide important information about regional and local stress regimes and fracture characteristics (e.g. fracture aperture), and XRD is useful for examining bulk rock mineralogy, but neither technique is able to quantify the distribution of these minerals in fractures. QEMSCAN° is a fully-automated micro-analysis system that enables quantitative chemical analysis of materials and generation of high-resolution mineral maps and images as well as porosity structure. It uses a scanning electron microscopy platform (SEM) with an electron beam source in combination with four energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometers (EDS). The measured backscattered electron and electron-induced secondary X-ray emission spectra are used to classify sample mineralogy. Initial applications of QEMSCAN° technology were predominantly in the minerals industry and application to geothermal problems has remained limited to date. In this pilot study, the potential application of QEMSCAN° technology to fracture characterization was evaluated using samples of representative mineralized fractures in two geothermal systems (Newberry Volcano, Oregon and Brady's geothermal field, Nevada). QEMSCAN° results were compared with XRD and petrographic techniques. Nine samples were analyzed from each field, collected from the drill core in the 1000-1500 m depth range in two shallow wells (GEO-N2 at Newberry Volcano and BCH-3 at Brady's). The samples were prepared as polished thin sections for QEMSCAN° analysis

  5. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 chemotaxis proteins and electron-transport chain components essential for congregation near insoluble electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Harris, H Wayne; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2012-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells utilize a behaviour response called electrokinesis to increase their speed in the vicinity of IEAs (insoluble electron acceptors), including manganese oxides, iron oxides and poised electrodes [Harris, El-Naggar, Bretschger, Ward, Romine, Obraztsova and Nealson (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 326-331]. However, it is not currently understood how bacteria remain in the vicinity of the IEA and accumulate both on the surface and in the surrounding medium. In the present paper, we provide results indicating that cells that have contacted the IEAs swim faster than those that have not recently made contact. In addition, fast-swimming cells exhibit an enhancement of swimming reversals leading to rapid non-random accumulation of cells on, and adjacent to, mineral particles. We call the observed accumulation near IEAs 'congregation'. Congregation is eliminated by the loss of a critical gene involved with EET (extracellular electron transport) (cymA, SO_4591) and is altered or eliminated in several deletion mutants of homologues of genes that are involved with chemotaxis or energy taxis in Escherichia coli. These genes include chemotactic signal transduction protein (cheA-3, SO_3207), methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins with the Cache domain (mcp_cache, SO_2240) or the PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain (mcp_pas, SO_1385). In the present paper, we report studies of S. oneidensis MR-1 that lend some insight into how microbes in this group can 'sense' the presence of a solid substrate such as a mineral surface, and maintain themselves in the vicinity of the mineral (i.e. via congregation), which may ultimately lead to attachment and biofilm formation.

  6. Ulysses observations of electron and proton components in a magnetic cloud and related wave activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a smooth rotation of the magnetic field vector, magnetic clouds have a low proton temperature T(sub p). Their expansion in the solar wind leads to depletion and therefore the ion component cools down. It has been shown recently that the electron component in magnetic clouds behaves differently: when the cloud expands, electron temperature Te anti correlates with density and therefore Te increases in the cloud, creating favorable conditions for the rise of ion-acoustic waves. For the magnetic cloud observed by Ulysses on June 10 - 12, 1993 at 4.64 AU at S 32.5 deg, we present observations for both electron and proton components and related plasma wave activity. Our results confirm the anti correlation between T(sub e) and electron density and also exhibit a high ratio of T(sub e)/T(sub P) in the cloud. Since Landau damping is not effective for T(sub e)/T(sub p) much greater than 1, Doppler shifted ion acoustic waves are expected in the cloud. Calculation of ion acoustic wave frequencies in the cloud and comparison with observed wave activity confirm this expectation. As in our previous work, we show that the electron component in the cloud obeys a polytropic law with gamma is less than 1 (gamma approximately equals 0.3-0.4). The dynamics of the magnetic cloud are determined to a large degree by the dominating electron pressure.

  7. Effect of Three-year Multi-Component Exercise Training on Bone Mineral Density and Content in a Postmenopausal Woman with Osteoporosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Movaseghi, Farzaneh; Sadeghi, Heydar

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of 3-years of moderate multi-component exercise training on bone mineral density and bone mineral content in a female subject with osteoporosis. A 57-year-old postmenopausal woman, a known case of osteoporosis following an accident, participated in this study. Bone mineral density and bone mineral content was measured in the femoral neck area and the lumbar spine by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The measurements lasted four years, first year without any exercise training and three succeeding years with exercise intervention. After three years of exercise training, bone mineral density and bone mineral content were improved in both regions, despite the increase in age and decrease in weight. This case highlights the importance of exercise training in maintaining and increasing bone mineral density and bone mineral content of the spine and hip in post-menopausal women. Considering its positive effects, regular and lifelong exercise training must be incorporated into peoples' life due to the chronic nature of bone loss in aging process.

  8. Results from computational and experimental modeling of runaway electron damage on plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Niemer, K.A.; Gilligan, J.G.; Croessmann, C.D.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to extend the theoretical and experimental knowledge of runaway electron damage-impact-bombardment on plasma facing components and materials in magnetic fusion devices. The emphasis of this work involved computational modeling and experimental studies to investigate runaway electron energy deposition and thermal response in plasma facing materials. The goals were: (1) to develop a computational model to study and analyze runaway electron damage; (2) to characterize runaway electron parameters; and (3) to perform experiments to analyze runaway electron damage. These goals were accomplished by first assembling the PTA code package. PTA is a unique application of PATRAN, the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS), and ABAQUS for modeling high energy electron impact on magnetic fusion materials and components. The PTA code package provides a three-dimensional, time dependent, computational code package which predicts material response from runaway bombardment under most runaway conditions (i.e., electron energy, incident angle, energy density, and deposition time). As part of this research, PTA was used to study energy deposition and material response in several design applications, to analyze damaged material, and to analyze several experiments. Runaway electron characterization was determined through parametric studies, analysis of damaged materials, and analysis of experimental results. Characterization provided information on electron energy, incident angle, current, deposition time, and volume of material impacted by runaway electrons. Finally an experiment was performed on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study runaway electron damage. The experiment provided information on the runaway electron energy and current in ATF, as well as supplemented the existing experimental knowledge of runaway electron damage.

  9. The use of the scanning electron microscope in the determination of the mineral composition of Ballachulish slate

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Joan A.

    2007-11-15

    Slate is a fine-grained, low-grade metamorphic rock derived from argillaceous sediments or occasionally volcanic ash. Although most slates contain mainly quartz, chlorite and white mica, they vary considerably in their durability, some lasting centuries while others fail after a few years of service. A detailed characterisation of their mineralogy is required for the assessment of performance, and to establish the provenance of a used slate. A combination of methods was used to examine Ballachulish slates; XRD analysis to determine the principal minerals present, XRF analysis to determine the total chemical composition, and scanning electron microscopy to determine the chemical composition of individual minerals. It was found that the white mica in Ballachulish slate is phengite and the chlorite is ripidolite. Feldspar is present as albite and carbonate as ferroan dolomite. Several accessory minerals were also identified, including chloritoid, monzonite and zircon. There was considerable variation in the ratio of the principal minerals, making it impossible to identify used slates by this criterion. Instead, chemical composition of the individual minerals, and possibly key accessory minerals, should be used to determine the provenance of slates.

  10. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Rhyolite and γ-Irradiated Trona Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köksal, F.; Köseoğlu, R.; Bașaran, E.

    2003-06-01

    Rhyolite from the "Yellow Stone of Nevșehir" and γ-irradiated trona from the Ankara Mine have been investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance at ambient temperature and at 113 K. Rhyolite was examined by X-ray powder diffraction and found to consist mainly of SiO2. Before γ-irradiation, the existing paramagnetic species in rhyolite were identified as ṖO42-, ĊH2OH, ĊO3-, ṠO2-, ĊO33-, and ĊO2- free radicals and Fe3+ at ambient temperature. At 113 K ṠO2- , ĊO33- , and ĊO2- radicals and Fe3+ were observed. The γ-irradiation produced neither new species nor detectable effects on these free radicals. The disappearance of some of the radicals at 113 K is attributed to the freezing of their motions. Before γ-irradiation, the trona mineral shows only Mn2+ lines, but after γ-irradiation it indicated the inducement of ĊO33- and ĊO2- radicals at ambient temperature, 113 K, in addition to the Mn2+ lines. The g and a values of the species were determined.

  11. Laboratory studies of reactions of atmospheric gases with components of mineral dust aerosol and research in chemical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer Dianne

    Mineral dust aerosol surfaces provide a medium in the atmosphere for heterogeneous chemistry to occur, which can alter the chemical balance of the Earth's atmosphere. It is becoming increasingly clear that the heterogeneous chemistry of these aerosols is a function of relative humidity (RH), as water on the surface of these particles can enhance or inhibit reactivity depending on the reaction. In this thesis, the uptake of water on clays and oxides was investigated, as well as phase transitions for atmospherically relevant salts. Reactions of carbon dioxide and nitric acid on oxide particles in the presence and absence of water were also examined. Following the reaction of HNO 3 on an alumina surface, photoirradiation experiments were preformed to determine the effect of irradiation on the adsorbed nitrate. The results presented in this thesis provide insight into the heterogeneous reactivity of mineral dust aerosol in the presence and absence of co-adsorbed water, as well as a fundamental understanding of water uptake on soluble and insoluble aerosols. A new method, using a quartz crystal microbalance, was developed to attempt to obtain a better fundamental understanding of different mineral dust components. In addition to the laboratory research, research in chemical education is also presented in this thesis. Two different types of work being done in the area of chemical education are shown. First a new experiment was implemented into an undergraduate physical chemistry course. The technique, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, was chosen for its ability to expose students to a technique that is commonly used in laboratory research as well as the ease for which high quality results can be obtained. Students used ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor sulfate, SO 42-, adsorption on TiO2 thin films. Second, the role of cognitive load and problem difficulty was accessed with data acquired while students completed an introductory-level chemistry word problem using a web-based tool

  12. Thermoelectric-enhanced, liquid-based cooling of a multi-component electronic system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2015-11-10

    Methods are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The methods include providing: a liquid-cooled structure, a thermal conduction path coupling the electronic component and the liquid-cooled structure, a coolant loop in fluid communication with a coolant-carrying channel of the liquid-cooled structure, and an outdoor-air-cooled heat exchange unit coupled to facilitate heat transfer from the liquid-cooled structure via, at least in part, the coolant loop. The thermoelectric array facilitates transfer of heat from the electronic component to the liquid-cooled structure, and the heat exchange unit cools coolant passing through the coolant loop by dissipating heat from the coolant to outdoor ambient air. In one implementation, temperature of coolant entering the liquid-cooled structure is greater than temperature of the outdoor ambient air to which heat is dissipated.

  13. Thermoelectric-enhanced, liquid-based cooling of a multi-component electronic system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2015-05-12

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled structure, a thermal conduction path coupling the electronic component and the liquid-cooled structure, a coolant loop in fluid communication with a coolant-carrying channel of the liquid-cooled structure, and an outdoor-air-cooled heat exchange unit coupled to facilitate heat transfer from the liquid-cooled structure via, at least in part, the coolant loop. The thermoelectric array facilitates transfer of heat from the electronic component to the liquid-cooled structure, and the heat exchange unit cools coolant passing through the coolant loop by dissipating heat from the coolant to outdoor ambient air. In one implementation, temperature of coolant entering the liquid-cooled structure is greater than temperature of the outdoor ambient air to which heat is dissipated.

  14. Phenomenological characteristic of the electron component in gamma-quanta initiated showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolsky, S. I.; Stamenov, J. N.; Ushev, S. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The phenomenological characteristics of the electron component in showers initiated by primary gamma-quanta were analyzed on the basis of the Tien Shan experimental data. It is shown that the lateral distribution of the electrons ion gamma-quanta initiated showers can be described with NKG - function with age parameters bar S equals 0, 76 plus or minus 0, 02, different from the same parameter for normal showers with the same size bar S equals 0, 85 plus or minus 0, 01. The lateral distribution of the correspondent electron energy flux in gamma-quanta initiated showers is steeper as in normal cosmic ray showers.

  15. Melt rock components in KREEPy breccia 15205: Petrography and mineral chemistry of KREEP basalts and quartz-normative mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.; Vetter, Scott K.

    1993-01-01

    Many current models for the origin of lunar highland rocks feature as an essential component the assimilation of KREEPy material by primitive magmas parental to the Mg-rich suite and alkali suite plutonic rocks. Similar models have also been proposed for the origin of various mare basalt suites. However, any model which considers assimilation of KREEP an important petrologic process must sooner-or-later deal with the question: what is KREEP? Because pristine KREEP basalts are rare, and most known samples are small (e.g., 15382/15386), the geochemical variability of KREEP basalts is poorly known. Other KREEP compositions which are commonly used in these models include the hypothetical 'high-K KREEP' component of Warren and Wasson, which is derived from Apollo 14 soil data, and the 'superKREEP' quartz-monzodiorite 15405. Lunar breccia 15205 is a polymict regolith breccia that consists of approximately 20% KREEP basalt clasts and 20% quartz-normative basalt clasts in a KREEP-rich matrix. Bulk rock mixing calculations show that this sample comprises about 84% KREEP. The clasts range up to 1 cm in size, but most are considerably smaller. The primary aim is to characterize pristine KREEP basalts petrographically, to establish the range in chemical compositions of KREEP basalts, and to test models that were proposed for their origin. In addition, we may be able to extend the compositional range recognized in the quartz-normative basalt suite and cast some light on its origin as well. Preliminary whole rock geochemical data on the KREEP basalts are presented in a companion paper by M.M. Lindstrom and co-workers. Concentration is on petrography and mineral chemistry of these clasts, and the implications these data have for the origin of the different melt rock suites.

  16. Analysis of the thermal response of plasma facing components during a runaway electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Robert Cameron

    The generation of runaway electrons during a thermal plasma disruption is a concern for the safe and economical operation of a tokamak power system. Runaway electrons have high energy, 10--300 MeV, and may potentially cause extensive damage to plasma facing components through large temperature increases, melting of metallic components, surface erosion, and possible burnout of coolant tubes. The EPQ code system was developed to simulate the thermal response of plasma facing components to a runaway electron impact. The EPQ code system consists of several parts: UNIX scripts which control the operation of an electron-photon monte carlo code to calculate the interaction of the runaway electrons with the plasma facing materials; a finite difference code to calculate the thermal response, melting, and surface erosion of the materials using the modified heat conduction equation; a code to process, scale, transform, and convert the electron monte carlo data to volumetric heating rates for use in the thermal code; and several minor and auxiliary codes for the manipulation and post-processing of the data. The electron-photon monte carlo code used was the Electron-Gamma-Shower (EGS) code, developed and maintained by the National Research Center of Canada. The other codes were written in C++ for this study. The thermal code, called QTTN, solves the two-dimensional cylindrical modified heat conduction equation using the Quickest third-order accurate and stable explicit finite difference method and is capable of tracking melting or surface erosion. The EPQ code system was validated using a series of analytical solutions and simulations of experiments. QTTN and EPQ was verified and validated as able to calculate the temperature distribution, phase change, and surface erosion successfully. EPQ was then employed in a parametric study to simulate a typical runaway electron disruption impact on the FIRE design's plasma facing components. The results of the FIRE parametric study

  17. Marginal Adaptation of New Bioceramic Materials and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Nekoofar, Mohmmad Hossein; Ashoftehyazdi, Kazem; Zahraee, Shohreh; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the marginal adaptation of new bioceramic materials, EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM putty and ERRM paste), to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six extracted human single-rooted teeth were prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and AH-26 sealer. The roots were resected 3 mm from the apex. Root-end cavities were then prepared with an ultrasonic retrotip. The specimens were divided into three groups (n=12) and filled with MTA, ERRM putty or ERRM paste. Epoxy resin replicas from the resected root-end surfaces and longitudinally sectioned roots were fabricated. The gaps at the material/dentin interface were measured using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transversal, longitudinal, and overall gap sizes were measured for each specimen. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: In transversal sections, no significant difference was found between MTA, ERRM putty and ERRM paste (P=0.31). However, in longitudinal sections, larger gaps were evident between ERRM paste and dentinal walls compared to MTA and ERRM putty (P=0.002 and P=0.033, respectively). Considering the overall gap size values, the difference between three tested materials was not statistically significant (P=0.17). Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, the marginal adaptation of ERRM paste and putty was comparable to that of MTA. However, ERRM putty might be more suitable for filling the root-end cavities because of its superior adaptation compared to ERRM paste in longitudinal sections. PMID:24688585

  18. The Use of Backscattered Electron Imaging and Transmission Electron Microscopy to Assess Bone Architecture and Mineral Loci: Effect of Intermittent Slow-Release Sodium Fluoride Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.; Bellotto, Dennis; Prostak, Kenneth S.; Hagler, Herbert K.; Pak, Charles Y. C.

    1996-04-01

    Backscattered electron imaging (BEI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the effects of treatment with intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride (SRNaF) and continuous calcium citrate on bone architecture and crystallinity. Examination was performed in nondecalcified biopsies obtained from patients following up to four years of therapy (placebo or SRNaF) and compared to pretreatment biopsies from each patient, as well as to bone from young, normal subjects. BEI images disclosed increased areas of recent bone formation following fluoride administration. There was no evidence of a mineralization defect in any biopsy and both cortical and trabecular architecture remained normal. TEM analysis demonstrated intrafibrillar platelike crystals and extrafibrillar needlelike crystals for both the pre- and post-treatment biopsies as well as for the bone from young normal subjects. There was no evidence of increased crystal size or of an increase in extrafibrillar mineral deposition. These observations suggest that intermittent SRNaF and continuous calcium therapy exerts an anabolic action on the skeleton not accompanied by a mineralization defect or an alteration of bone mineral deposition. The use of BEI and TEM holds promise for the study of the pathophysiology and treatment of metabolic bone diseases.

  19. 75 FR 28651 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Notice... the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic paper towel dispensing... electronic paper towel dispensing devices or components thereof that infringe one or more of claims 1-7 of...

  20. Thermoelectricity Generation and Electron-Magnon Scattering in a Natural Chalcopyrite Mineral from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent.

    PubMed

    Ang, Ran; Khan, Atta Ullah; Tsujii, Naohito; Takai, Ken; Nakamura, Ryuhei; Mori, Takao

    2015-10-26

    Current high-performance thermoelectric materials require elaborate doping and synthesis procedures, particularly in regard to the artificial structure, and the underlying thermoelectric mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we report that a natural chalcopyrite mineral, Cu1+x Fe1-x S2 , obtained from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent can directly generate thermoelectricity. The resistivity displayed an excellent semiconducting character, and a large thermoelectric power and high power factor were found in the low x region. Notably, electron-magnon scattering and a large effective mass was detected in this region, thus suggesting that the strong coupling of doped carriers and antiferromagnetic spins resulted in the natural enhancement of thermoelectric properties during mineralization reactions. The present findings demonstrate the feasibility of thermoelectric energy generation and electron/hole carrier modulation with natural materials that are abundant in the Earth's crust.

  1. Low keV electron probe analysis of silicate minerals for Mg, Al, and Si using pure-element standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, G. G.

    1972-01-01

    Accurate electron probe values for Mg, Al, and Si in silicate minerals may be obtained with pure-element standards. Analysis must be done at low (6 kV) accelerating potential and for best results, the average atomic number of the sample should be within about plus or minus 1 of the atomic number of the pure-element standard. This last requirement is automatically fulfilled for most common silicate minerals, as their average atomic numbers usually fall within the 11 to 15 range. Examples studied include a wet-chemically analyzed cordierite containing 17.71 weight percent Al, for which a value of 17.6 plus or minus 0.3 percent was obtained with the electron probe, and a hornblende containing 19.15 percent Si, which gave 19.0 plus or minus 0.3 percent using the probe method.

  2. Carrier generation and electronic properties of a single-component pure organic metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Terauchi, Takeshi; Sumi, Satoshi; Matsushita, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Metallic conduction generally requires high carrier concentration and wide bandwidth derived from strong orbital interaction between atoms or molecules. These requisites are especially important in organic compounds because a molecule is fundamentally an insulator; only multi-component salts with strong intermolecular interaction--namely, only charge transfer complexes and conducting polymers--have demonstrated intrinsic metallic behaviour. Herein we report a single-component electroactive molecule, zwitterionic tetrathiafulvalene(TTF)-extended dicarboxylate radical (TED), exhibiting metallic conduction even at low temperatures. TED exhibits d.c. conductivities of 530 S cm-1 at 300 K and 1,000 S cm-1 at 50 K with copper-like electronic properties. Spectroscopic and theoretical investigations of the carrier-generation mechanism and the electronic states of this single molecular species reveal a unique electronic structure with a spin-density gradient in the extended TTF moieties that becomes, in itself, a metallic state.

  3. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals. 1. Electrochemical quantification of electron-donating and -accepting capacities of smectites.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Christopher A; Aeschbacher, Michael; Soltermann, Daniela; Voegelin, Andreas; Baeyens, Bart; Marques Fernandes, Maria; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Sander, Michael

    2012-09-04

    Clay minerals often contain redox-active structural iron that participates in electron transfer reactions with environmental pollutants, bacteria, and biological nutrients. Measuring the redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals using electrochemical approaches, however, has proven to be difficult due to a lack of reactivity between clay minerals and electrodes. Here, we overcome this limitation by using one-electron-transfer mediating compounds to facilitate electron transfer between structural Fe in clay minerals and a vitreous carbon working electrode in an electrochemical cell. Using this approach, the electron-accepting and -donating capacities (Q(EAC) and Q(EDC)) were quantified at applied potentials (E(H)) of -0.60 V and +0.61 V (vs SHE), respectively, for four natural Fe-bearing smectites (i.e., SWa-1, SWy-2, NAu-1, and NAu-2) having different total Fe contents (Fe(total) = 2.3 to 21.2 wt % Fe) and varied initial Fe(2+)/Fe(total) states. For every SWa-1 and SWy-2 sample, all the structural Fe was redox-active over the tested E(H) range, demonstrating reliable quantification of Fe content and redox state. Yet for NAu-1 and NAu-2, a significant fraction of the structural Fe was redox-inactive, which was attributed to Fe-rich smectites requiring more extreme E(H)-values to achieve complete Fe reduction and/or oxidation. The Q(EAC) and Q(EDC) values provided here can be used as benchmarks in future studies examining the extent of reduction and oxidation of Fe-bearing smectites.

  4. Interpretation of analysis of variance models using principal component analysis to assess the effect of a maternal anticancer treatment on the mineralization of rat bones.

    PubMed

    Stanimirova, I; Michalik, K; Drzazga, Z; Trzeciak, H; Wentzell, P D; Walczak, B

    2011-03-09

    The goal of the present study is to assess the effects of anticancer treatment with cyclophosphamide and cytarabine during pregnancy on the mineralization of mandible bones in 7-, 14- and 28-day-old rats. Each bone sample was described by its X-ray fluorescence spectrum characterizing the mineral composition. The data collected are multivariate in nature and their structure is difficult to visualize and interpret directly. Therefore, methods like analysis of variance-principal component analysis (ANOVA-PCA) and ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA), which are suitable for the analysis of highly correlated spectral data and are able to incorporate information about the underlined experimental design, are greatly valued. In this study, the ASCA methodology adapted for unbalanced data was used to investigate the impact of the anticancer drug treatment during pregnancy on the mineralization of the mandible bones of newborn rats and to examine any changes in the mineralization of the bones over time. The results showed that treatment with cyclophosphamide and cytarabine during pregnancy induces a decrease in the K and Zn levels in the mandible bones of newborns. This suppresses the development of mandible bones in rats in the early stages (up to 14 days) of formation. An interesting observation was that the levels of essential minerals like K, Mg, Na and Ca vary considerably in the different regions of the mandible bones.

  5. Irradiation of electronic components and circuits at the Portuguese Research Reactor: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, J.G.; Ramos, A.R.; Fernandes, A.C.; Santos, J.P.

    2015-07-01

    The behavior of electronic components and circuits under radiation is a concern shared by the nuclear industry, the space community and the high-energy physics community. Standard commercial components are used as much as possible instead of radiation hard components, since they are easier to obtain and allow a significant reduction of costs. However, these standard components need to be tested in order to determine their radiation tolerance. The Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) is a 1 MW pool-type reactor, operating since 1961. The irradiation of electronic components and circuits is one area where a 1 MW reactor can be competitive, since the fast neutron fluences required for testing are in most cases well below 10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}. A program was started in 1999 to test electronics components and circuits for the LHC facility at CERN, initially using a dedicated in-pool irradiation device and later a beam line with tailored neutron and gamma filters. Neutron filters are essential to reduce the intensity of the thermal neutron flux, which does not produce significant defects in electronic components but produces unwanted radiation from activation of contacts and packages of integrated circuits and also of the printed circuit boards. In irradiations performed within the line-of-sight of the core of a fission reactor there is simultaneous gamma radiation which complicates testing in some cases. Filters can be used to reduce its importance and separate testing with a pure gamma radiation source can contribute to clarify some irradiation results. Practice has shown the need to introduce several improvements to the procedures and facilities over the years. We will review improvements done in the following areas: - Optimization of neutron and gamma filters; - Dosimetry procedures in mixed neutron / gamma fields; - Determination of hardness parameter and 1 MeV-equivalent neutron fluence; - Temperature measurement and control during irradiation; - Follow-up of reactor

  6. Graphene radio frequency and microwave passive components for low cost wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianjun; Leng, Ting; Hsin Chang, Kuo; Cing Chen, Jia; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Hu, Zhirun

    2016-06-01

    Graphene RF and microwave passive components such as coplanar waveguide transmission lines, open/short-circuited resonators and wideband antenna on paper substrate were designed, screen printed and characterized in this work. The experimental results demonstrate that the screen printed graphene passive components can be used for RF signal transmitting, processing and radiating/receiving; revealing that graphene ink can be a low cost alternative to much more expensive metal nanoparticle inks, such as silver nanoparticle ink. The screen printed graphene is processed at low temperature so that it is compatible with heat-sensitive flexible materials like papers, PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) and textiles. The screen printed graphene passive components reported here are of high conductivity, high flexibility, light weight and low cost, making them ideal candidate for low cost wearable electronics. This work makes it prospective to manufacture RF and microwave passive components in mass production by screen printing in much lower cost to any other known techniques.

  7. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy Analysis of the Effects of Erbium, Chromium:Yattrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) Laser Irradiation on Bone Mineral and Organic Components.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Carolina; Ana, Patricia Aparecida; Bachmann, Luciano; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-12-01

    The effects of varying the energy density of a high-intensity erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser on the mineral and organic components of bone tissue were evaluated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Bone samples obtained from the tibias of rabbits were irradiated with five energy densities (3, 6, 8, 12, and 15 J/cm(2)), and the effects on the carbonate to phosphate ratio and in the organic components were compared with those of nonirradiated samples. The increased temperature during the laser irradiation was also measured using infrared thermography to relate the observed spectral changes to the laser thermal effects. The analyses of the infrared spectra suggests that the irradiation with Er,Cr:YSGG promoted changes in bone tissue in both the mineral and organic components that depend on the laser energy density, pointing to the importance of using the proper energy density in clinical procedures.

  8. Approach to In Situ Component Level Electronics Assembly Repair (CLEAR) for Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Oeftering, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance resupply is a significant issue for long duration space missions. Currently, the International Space Station (ISS) approaches maintenance primarily around replaceable modules called Orbital Replacement Units (ORU). While swapping out ORUs has served the ISS well keeping crew time for maintenance to a minimum, this approach assumes a substantial logistics capacity to provide replacement ORUs and return ORUs to Earth for repair. The ORUs used for ISS require relatively large blocks of replacement hardware even though the actual failed component may be several orders of magnitude smaller. The Component Level Electronics Assembly Repair (CLEAR) task was created to explore electronics repair down to the component level for future space missions. From 2006 to 2009, CLEAR was an activity under the Supportability project of the Exploration Technology Development Program. This paper describes the activities of CLEAR including making a case for component-level electronics repair, examination of current terrestrial repair hardware, and potential repair needs. Based on those needs, the CLEAR team proposes an architecture for an in-situ repair capability aboard a spacecraft or habitat. Additionally, this paper discusses recent progress toward developing in-space repair capabilities--including two spaceflight experiments-- and presents technology concepts which could help enable or benefit the same.

  9. Mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) in female Fischer 344 rats; accumulation of wax components; implications for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Barp, Laura; Biedermann, Maurus; Grob, Koni; Blas-Y-Estrada, Florence; Nygaard, Unni C; Alexander, Jan; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Female Fischer 344 rats were exposed to three MOSH mixtures: oils largely below and above C25 (S-C25 and L-C25) and a 1:1 mixture of L-C25 with a wax; doses of 400, 1000 and 4000mg/kg feed were administered during 120days. MOSH were determined by on-line HPLC-GC-FID in liver, spleen, adipose tissue and the carcass. The composition of the hydrocarbons accumulated in the tissues was further analyzed by comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GC×GC). MOSH in the mass range of C26-30 were more strongly accumulated than those between C20-25, which does not support the present classification of MOSH differentiating at n-C25 for risk assessment. Compared to the total of the MOSH, n-alkanes and n-alkyl monocyclic naphthenes were generally enriched in adipose tissue. In liver and spleen, n-alkanes up to C25 were eliminated, but strongly accumulated at around C30. Based on this profile, poor solubility and the melting points, it is hypothesized that crystallization protects these wax components against metabolism and elimination. In the liver, relative retention of n-alkanes decreased again beyond C30, accentuated at high exposure, suggesting reduced absorption. Compared to the animal data, accumulation of n-alkanes from food sources, such as apples, into human tissues seems low, perhaps because of low absorption due to their presence in crystalline form. A series of dominant isoalkanes, accumulated in all tissues analyzed, was characterized, though without proposing a structure. Implications on present regulation of white mineral oil products are discussed.

  10. Sequential energy and electron transfer in a three-component system aligned on a clay nanosheet.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2016-02-21

    To achieve the goal of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer across three molecules, a phenomenon often utilized in artificial light harvesting systems, we have assembled a light absorber (that also serves as an energy donor), an energy acceptor (that also serves as an electron donor) and an electron acceptor on the surface of an anionic clay nanosheet. Since neutral organic molecules have no tendency to adsorb onto the anionic surface of clay, a positively charged water-soluble organic capsule was used to hold neutral light absorbers on the above surface. A three-component assembly was prepared by the co-adsorption of a cationic bipyridinium derivative, cationic zinc porphyrin and cationic octaamine encapsulated 2-acetylanthracene on an exfoliated anionic clay surface in water. Energy and electron transfer phenomena were monitored by steady state fluorescence and picosecond time resolved fluorescence decay. The excitation of 2-acetylanthracene in the three-component system resulted in energy transfer from 2-acetylanthracene to zinc porphyrin with 71% efficiency. Very little loss due to electron transfer from 2-acetylanthracene in the cavitand to the bipyridinium derivative was noticed. Energy transfer was followed by electron transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the cationic bipyridinium derivative with 81% efficiency. Analyses of fluorescence decay profiles confirmed the occurrence of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer. Merging the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry we realized sequential energy and electron transfer between three hydrophobic molecules in water. Exfoliated transparent saponite clay served as a matrix to align the three photoactive molecules at a close distance in aqueous solutions.

  11. Modeling of runaway electron damage for the design of tokamak plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Niemer, K.A.; Gilligan, J.G. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Croessmann, C.D. ); Bolt, H.H. . NET Design Team)

    1990-04-01

    Cracking, craters, spotty damage (discoloration), and missing chunks of material have been observed on limiters and along the midplane of tokamak inner walls. This damage is assumed to be due to runaway electron discharges. These runaway electrons have been predicted to range in energy from a few MeV to several hundred MeV. The energy density from the runaway electron discharges ranges from 10 to 500 MJ/m{sup 2} over pulse lengths of 5 to 50 msec. The PTA code package is a three dimensional, time dependent, computational code package used to predict energy deposition, temperature rise, and damage on tokamak first wall and limiter materials form runaway electron impact. Two experiments were modeled to validate the PTA code package. The first experiment tested the thermal and structural response from high energy electron impact on different fusion materials, and the second experiment simulated runaway electrons scattering through a plasma facing surface (graphite) into an internal structure (copper). The PTA calculations compared favorably with the experimental results. In particular, the PTA models identified gap conductance, thermal contact, x-ray generation in materials, and the placement of high stopping power materials as key factors in the design of plasma facing components, resistant to runaway electron damage. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shwarze, G.E.; Niedra, J.M.; Frasca, A.J.; Wieserman, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the CSTI high capacity power project will be presented in this paper: (1) Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) Temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) Temperature effects on rare earth permanent magnets.

  13. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI high capacity power project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.; Frasca, Albert J.; Wieserman, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) high capacity power project are presented: (1) neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) temperature effects on rare earth permanent magnets.

  14. The nanometre-scale physiology of bone: steric modelling and scanning transmission electron microscopy of collagen–mineral structure

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Benjamin; Daulton, Tyrone L.; Genin, Guy M.; Lipner, Justin; Pasteris, Jill D.; Wopenka, Brigitte; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    The nanometre-scale structure of collagen and bioapatite within bone establishes bone's physical properties, including strength and toughness. However, the nanostructural organization within bone is not well known and is debated. Widely accepted models hypothesize that apatite mineral (‘bioapatite’) is present predominantly inside collagen fibrils: in ‘gap channels’ between abutting collagen molecules, and in ‘intermolecular spaces’ between adjacent collagen molecules. However, recent studies report evidence of substantial extrafibrillar bioapatite, challenging this hypothesis. We studied the nanostructure of bioapatite and collagen in mouse bones by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using electron energy loss spectroscopy and high-angle annular dark-field imaging. Additionally, we developed a steric model to estimate the packing density of bioapatite within gap channels. Our steric model and STEM results constrain the fraction of total bioapatite in bone that is distributed within fibrils at less than or equal to 0.42 inside gap channels and less than or equal to 0.28 inside intermolecular overlap regions. Therefore, a significant fraction of bone's bioapatite (greater than or equal to 0.3) must be external to the fibrils. Furthermore, we observe extrafibrillar bioapatite between non-mineralized collagen fibrils, suggesting that initial bioapatite nucleation and growth are not confined to the gap channels as hypothesized in some models. These results have important implications for the mechanics of partially mineralized and developing tissues. PMID:22345156

  15. The nanometre-scale physiology of bone: steric modelling and scanning transmission electron microscopy of collagen-mineral structure.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Benjamin; Daulton, Tyrone L; Genin, Guy M; Lipner, Justin; Pasteris, Jill D; Wopenka, Brigitte; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-08-07

    The nanometre-scale structure of collagen and bioapatite within bone establishes bone's physical properties, including strength and toughness. However, the nanostructural organization within bone is not well known and is debated. Widely accepted models hypothesize that apatite mineral ('bioapatite') is present predominantly inside collagen fibrils: in 'gap channels' between abutting collagen molecules, and in 'intermolecular spaces' between adjacent collagen molecules. However, recent studies report evidence of substantial extrafibrillar bioapatite, challenging this hypothesis. We studied the nanostructure of bioapatite and collagen in mouse bones by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using electron energy loss spectroscopy and high-angle annular dark-field imaging. Additionally, we developed a steric model to estimate the packing density of bioapatite within gap channels. Our steric model and STEM results constrain the fraction of total bioapatite in bone that is distributed within fibrils at less than or equal to 0.42 inside gap channels and less than or equal to 0.28 inside intermolecular overlap regions. Therefore, a significant fraction of bone's bioapatite (greater than or equal to 0.3) must be external to the fibrils. Furthermore, we observe extrafibrillar bioapatite between non-mineralized collagen fibrils, suggesting that initial bioapatite nucleation and growth are not confined to the gap channels as hypothesized in some models. These results have important implications for the mechanics of partially mineralized and developing tissues.

  16. Low energy electron induced fragmentation and reactions of DNA and its molecular components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Andrew

    2005-05-01

    Much research has been stimulated by the recognition that ionizing radiation can, in condensed matter, generate large numbers of secondary electrons with energies less than 20 eV [1] and by the experimental demonstration that such electrons may induce both single and double strand breaks in plasmid DNA [2]. Identifying the underlying mechanisms involves several research methodologies, from further experiments with DNA to studies of the electron interaction with the component `sub-units' of DNA in both the gas and condensed phases [3]. In particular, understanding electron-induced strand break damage, the type of damage most difficult for organisms to repair, necessitates study of the sub-units of DNA back-bone, and here Tetrahyrofuran (THF) and its derivatives, provide a useful model for the furyl ring at the centre of the deoxyribose sugar. In this contribution, we review with particular reference to DNA and related molecules, the use of electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to study electron-induced fragmentation and reactions in thin molecular solids. We describe a newly completed instrument that combines laser post-ionization with a time-of-flight mass analyzer for highly sensitive ion and neutral detection. Use of the instrument is illustrated with results for THF and derivatives. Anion desorption measurements reveal the role of transient negative ions (TNI) and Dissociative Electron Attachment in significant molecular fragmentation and permit effective cross sections for this electron-induced damage to be obtained. The neutral yield functions also illustrate the importance of TNI, mirroring features seen in recently measured cross sections for electron induced aldehyde production in THF [4]. 1. J. A. Laverne and S. M. Pimblott, Radiat. Res. 141, 208 (1995) 2. B. Boudaiffa, et al, Science 287, 1658 (2000) 3. L. Sanche. Physica Scripta. 68, C108, (2003) 4. S.-P. Breton, et al.,J. Chem. Phys. 121, 11240 (2004)

  17. Determination of Mineral Components in the Cultivation Substrates of Edible Mushrooms and Their Uptake into Fruiting Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Yun; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Bo-Bae; Kim, Sun-Mi

    2009-01-01

    The mineral contents of the cultivation substrates, fruiting bodies of the mushrooms, and the postharvest cultivation substrates were determined in cultivated edible mushrooms Pleurotus eryngii, Flammulina velutipes, and Hypsizigus marmoreus. The major mineral elements both in the cultivation substrates and in the fruiting bodies were K, Mg, Ca, and Na. Potassium was particularly abundant ranging 10~13 g/kg in the cultivation substrates and 26~30 g/kg in the fruiting bodies. On the contrary, the calcium content in the fruiting bodies was very low despite high concentrations in the cultivation substrates, indicating Ca in the cultivation substrates is in a less bio-available form or the mushrooms do not have efficient Ca uptake channels. Among the minor mineral elements determined in this experiment, Cu, Zn, and Ni showed high percentage of transfer from the cultivation substrates to the fruiting bodies. It is noteworthy that the mineral contents in the postharvest cultivation substrates were not changed significantly which implies that the spent cultivation substrates are nutritionally intact in terms of mineral contents and thus can be recycled as mineral sources and animal feeds. PMID:23983518

  18. Recommendations for Enabling Manual Component Level Electronic Repair for Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Easton, John W.; Funk, Gregory P.; Latta, Gary S.; Ganster, Andrew W.; Estes, Brett E.

    2011-01-01

    Long duration missions to the Moon and Mars pose a number of challenges to mission designers, controllers, and the crews. Among these challenges are planning for corrective maintenance actions which often require a repair. Current repair strategies on the International Space Station (ISS) rely primarily on the use of Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs), where a faulty unit is replaced with a spare, and the faulty unit typically returns to Earth for analysis and possible repair. The strategy of replace to repair has posed challenges even for the ISS program. Repairing faulty hardware at lower levels such as the component level can help maintain system availability in situations where no spares exist and potentially reduce logistic resupply mass.This report provides recommendations to help enable manual replacement of electronics at the component-level for future manned space missions. The recommendations include hardware, tools, containment options, and crew training. The recommendations are based on the work of the Component Level Electronics Assembly Repair (CLEAR) task of the Exploration Technology Development Program from 2006 to 2009. The recommendations are derived based on the experience of two experiments conducted by the CLEAR team aboard the International Space Station as well as a group of experienced Miniature/Microminiature (2M) electronics repair technicians and instructors from the U.S. Navy 2M Project Office. The emphasis of the recommendations is the physical repair. Fault diagnostics and post-repair functional test are discussed in other CLEAR reports.

  19. Principal component analysis of global maps of the total electronic content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikova, Yu. S.; Bochkarev, V. V.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present results of the spatial distribution analysis of the total electron content (TEC) performed by the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) with the use of global maps of TEC provided by the JPL laboratory (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA, USA) for the period from 2004 to 2010. We show that the obtained components of the decomposition of TEC essentially depend on the representation of the initial data and the method of their preliminary processing. We propose a technique for data centering that allows us to take into account the influence of diurnal and seasonal factors. We establish a correlation between amplitudes of the first components of the decomposition of TEC (connected with the equatorial anomaly) and the solar activity index F10.7, as well as with the flow of high energy particles of the solar wind.

  20. Ion acoustic solitons in unmagnetized inhomogeneous multi-ion component plasmas with vortex distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Asif; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.

    2010-11-15

    The ion acoustic solitons are studied in an inhomogeneous multi-ion component plasma in the presence of heavy and light adiabatic ions and two temperature electrons with vortex distribution. The modified Korteweg-de Vries equation with an additional term due to density gradients is derived by employing reductive perturbation technique. It is found that the amplitude of the soliton enhances as the concentration ratio of cold to hot electrons, density gradient parameter and ion temperature are increased in the system. The effects of mass, charge ratios of heavy to light ions and electron temperature are also investigated on the structural as well as propagation characteristics of solitary wave. The equilibrium density profile is taken to be exponential. The phase velocity of ion acoustic wave is also studied as a function of various plasma parameters. The numerical results are presented for illustration.

  1. Planarity and multiple components promote organic photovoltaic efficiency by improving electronic transport.

    PubMed

    Goldey, Matthew B; Reid, Daniel; de Pablo, Juan; Galli, Giulia

    2016-11-23

    Establishing how the conformation of organic photovoltaic (OPV) polymers affects their electronic and transport properties is critical in order to determine design rules for new OPV materials and in particular to understand the performance enhancements recently reported for ternary blends. We report coupled classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showing that polymer linkage twisting significantly reduces optical absorption efficiency, as well as hole transport rates in donor polymers. We predict that blends with components favoring planar geometries contribute to the enhancement of the overall efficiency of ternary OPVs. Furthermore, our electronic structure calculations for the PTB7-PID2-PC71BM system show that hole transfer rates are enhanced in ternary blends with respect to their binary counterpart. Finally, our results point at thermal disorder in the blend as a key reason responsible for device voltage losses and at the need to carry out electronic structure calculations at finite temperature to reliably compare with experiments.

  2. Electronic transmission and switch effect in kappa-component Fibonacci nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Ruili; Li, De; Peng, Ruwen; Wang, Mu

    2010-11-01

    We present the electronic transport in the k-component Fibonacci (KCF) nanowires, in which kappa different incommensurate intervals are arranged according to a substitution rule. For the KCF nanowires with an identical kappa, by increasing the length of the nanowire, the minima in transmission extend gradually into the band gap over which the transmission is blocked. Meanwhile more transmission peaks appear. For finite KCF nanowire, by increasing the number of different incommensurate intervals kappa, the width of electronic band gap is enlarged. Moreover, when the value of kappa is sufficiently large, the transmission is shut off, except at a few resonant energies. These properties make it possible to use the KCF nanowires as switching devices. Furthermore, a dimensional spectrum of singularities associated with the transmission spectrum demonstrates that the electronic propagation in the KCF nanowire shows multifractality. These investigations open a unique way to control quantum transport in nanodevices.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTI-PHASE AND MULTI-COMPONENT FLOW MODEL WITH REACTION IN POROUS MEDIA FOR RISK ASSESSMENT ON SOIL CONTAMINATION DUE TO MINERAL OIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yasuhide; Nishiwaki, Junko; Hara, Junko; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Sugai, Yuichi; Komai, Takeshi

    In late years, soil contamination due to mineral oil in vacant lots of oil factory and oil field has become obvious. Measure for soil contamina tion and risk assessment are neces sary for sustainable development of industrial activity. Especially, in addition to contaminated sites, various exposure paths for human body such as well water, soil and farm crop are supposed. So it is very important to comprehend the transport phenomena of contaminated material under the environments of soil and ground water. In this study, mineral oil as c ontaminated material consisting of mu lti-component such as aliphatic and aromatic series was modeled. Then numerical mode l for transport phenomena in surface soil and aquifer was constructed. On the basis of modeling for mineral oil, our numerical model consists of three-phase (oil, water and gas) forty three-component. This numerical model becomes base program for risk assessment system on soil contamination due to mineral oil. Using this numerical model, we carried out some numerical simulation for a laboratory-scale experiment on oil-water multi-phase flow. Relative permeability that dominate flow behavior in multi-phase condition was formulated and the validity of the numerical model developed in this study was considered.

  4. Transmission Electron Microscopy of the Matrix Minerals in the Tagish Lake Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Kasama, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Tachikawa, O.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the Tagish Lake matrix minerals by TEM. The result shows similarities to CIs (and CRs) and differences from CMs, but its heterogeneity (e.g., carbonate abundance, saponite/serpentine ratio) suggests its complex history. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. 76 FR 32373 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices Having a Digital Television Receiver and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices Having a Digital Television Receiver and Components... Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C. 1337, on behalf of Zenith Electronics LLC of Lincolnshire, Illinois... devices having a digital television receiver and components thereof by reason of infringement of...

  6. 75 FR 51842 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Commission... for importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic paper towel dispensing devices and components thereof by reason of infringement of certain claims of...

  7. Effects of particle shape, hematite content and semi-external mixing with carbonaceous components on the optical properties of accumulation mode mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Tripathi, S. N.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Arola, A.

    2010-12-01

    The radiative forcing estimation of the polluted mineral dust is limited due to lack of morphological analysis, mixing state with the carbonaceous components and the hematite content in the pure dust. The accumulation mode mineral dust has been found to mix with anthropogenically produced black carbon, organic carbon and brown carbon during long range transport. The above features of the polluted dust are not well accounted in the optical models and lead the uncertainty in the numerical estimation of their radiative impact. The Semi-external mixing being a prominent mixing of dust and carbonaceous components has not been studied in details so for compared to core-shell, internal and external mixing studies. In present study, we consider the pure mineral dust composed of non-metallic components (such as Quartz, Feldspar, Mica and Calcite) and metalic component like hematite (Fe2O3). The hematite percentage in the pure mineral dust governs its absorbance. Based on this hematite variation, the hematite fraction in pure mineral dust has been constrained between 0-8%. The morphological and mineralogical characterization of the polluted dust led to consider the three sphere, two sphere and two spheroid model shapes for polluted dust particle system. The pollution gives rise to various light absorbing aerosol components like black carbon, brown carbon and organic carbon (comprising of HUmic-Like Substances, HULIS) in the atmosphere. The entire above discussed model shapes have been considered for the mineral dust getting polluted with (1) organic carbon (especially HULIS component) (2) Brown carbon and (3) black carbon by making a semi-external mixture with pure mineral dust. The optical properties (like Single Scattering Albedo, SSA; Asymmetry parameter, g and Extinction efficiency, Qext) of above model shapes for the polluted dust have been computed using Discrete Dipole Approximation, DDA code. For above model shapes, the SSA was found to vary depending on hematite

  8. Nutritional properties of green gram germinated in mineral fortified soak water: II. Effect of cooking on total and bioaccessible nutrients and bioactive components.

    PubMed

    Oghbaei, Morteza; Prakash, Jamuna

    2017-03-01

    The effect of pressure and microwave cooking on total and bioaccessible nutrients and bioactive components in whole and dehulled green gram (GG) germinated in mineral fortified soak water was studied. Whole GG was soaked in water fortified with iron (100 or 200 mg/100 ml) or zinc (50 or 100 mg/100 ml), germinated, cooked by two methods and analyzed. Results showed that method of cooking did not affect the nutrient composition of whole or dehulled grains, however, phytic acid and dietary fiber were higher in microwave cooked samples. Minor differences were noted in total and percent available nutrients in differently cooked samples, significance being observed only for starch, protein and zinc in few samples. Significant differences were observed among variations, wherein the mineral fortified samples had a higher level of bioaccessibility compared to non-fortified samples. Cooking reduced the content of bioactive components in germinated GG, though bioaccessibility was higher. Comparison between raw and cooked grains showed that starch digestibility increased on cooking, though protein digestibility was not affected significantly. Bioactive components were also lower in cooked samples in comparison to the raw counterparts. In conclusion, the cooking methods did not affect the nutrient composition of green gram germinated in mineral fortified soak water, though available nutrients were higher in cooked legumes.

  9. Evaluation of Power Electronic Components and Systems at Cryogenic Temperatures For Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Power electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space applications and outer planetary exploration are required to operate reliably and efficiently under extreme temperature conditions. This requirement is dictated by the fact that the operational environments associated with some of the space missions would encompass temperatures as low as -183 C. The development and utilization of electronics capable of low temperature operation would not only fulfill the advanced technology requirements, but also would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing development and launch costs. These benefits are generally achieved by the improved intrinsic properties of some of the electronic materials at low temperature, reduced device losses, and the elimination of heating elements used in conventional systems at low temperatures. Power electronic circuits are widely used in space power systems in the areas of power management, conditioning, and control. In this work, the performance of certain power electronic components and systems was investigated under low temperature. These include inductors, capacitors, pulse-width-modulation (PWM) controllers, and advanced commercial DC/DC converter modules. Different properties were determined as a function of temperature in the range of 20 C to -140 C, at various current and voltages levels. The experimental procedures along with the experimental data obtained are presented and discussed in this paper.

  10. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    DOE PAGES

    Scanza, R. A.; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, S.; ...

    2014-07-02

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral componentsmore » in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as +0.05 W m−2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy and compare this both with simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 W m−2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, −0.05 and −0.17 W m−2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in-situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.« less

  11. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    DOE PAGES

    Scanza, R. A.; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, S.; ...

    2015-01-15

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale, using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral componentsmore » in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as + 0.05 Wm−2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy. We compare this to the radiative forcing from simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 Wm−2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, −0.05 and −0.17 Wm−2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.« less

  12. Emergence of the Dirac Electron System in a Single-Component Molecular Conductor under High Pressure.

    PubMed

    Kato, Reizo; Cui, HengBo; Tsumuraya, Takao; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Suzumura, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-08

    Single-component molecular conductors can provide a variety of electronic states. We demonstrate here that the Dirac electron system emerges in a single-component molecular conductor under high pressure. First-principles density functional theory calculations revealed that Dirac cones are formed in the single-component molecular conductor [Pd(dddt)2] (dddt = 5,6-dihydro-1,4-dithiin-2,3-dithiolate), which shows temperature-independent resistivity (zero-gap behavior) at 12.6 GPa. The Dirac cone formation in [Pd(dddt)2] can be understood by a tight-binding model. The Dirac points originate from the HOMO and LUMO bands, each of which is associated with different molecular layers. Overlap of these two bands provides a closed intersection at the Fermi level (Fermi line) if there is no HOMO-LUMO coupling. Two-step HOMO-LUMO couplings remove the degeneracy on the Fermi line, resulting in gap formation. The Dirac cones emerge at the points where the Fermi line intersects with a line on which the HOMO-LUMO coupling is zero.

  13. Vibrational Analysis of Engine Components Using Neural-Net Processing and Electronic Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Fite, E. Brian; Mehmed, Oral; Thorp, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    The use of computational-model trained artificial neural networks to acquire damage specific information from electronic holograms is discussed. A neural network is trained to transform two time-average holograms into a pattern related to the bending-induced-strain distribution of the vibrating component. The bending distribution is very sensitive to component damage unlike the characteristic fringe pattern or the displacement amplitude distribution. The neural network processor is fast for real-time visualization of damage. The two-hologram limit makes the processor more robust to speckle pattern decorrelation. Undamaged and cracked cantilever plates serve as effective objects for testing the combination of electronic holography and neural-net processing. The requirements are discussed for using finite-element-model trained neural networks for field inspections of engine components. The paper specifically discusses neural-network fringe pattern analysis in the presence of the laser speckle effect and the performances of two limiting cases of the neural-net architecture.

  14. Assessment of Selected CERES Electronic Component Survivability under Simulated Overvoltage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.; Grant, M. S.; Bockman, J.; Clark, V. M.; Hess, P. C.

    1999-01-01

    In August, 1998 a Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument telemetry housekeeping parameter generated a yellow warning message that indicated an on-board + 15V Data Acquisition Assembly (DAA) power converter deregulation anomaly. An exhaustive investigation was undertaken to understand this anomaly and the long-term consequences which have severely reduced CERES operations on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. Among investigations performed were ground tests that approximated the on-board electronic circuitry using a small quantity of flight identical components exposed to maximum spacecraft bus over-voltage conditions. These components include monolithic integrated microcircuits that perform analog signal conditioning on instrument sensor signals and an analog- to-digital converter (ADC) for the entire DAA. All microcircuit packages have either a bipolar silicon design with internal current limiting protections or have a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) design with bias protections. Ground tests that have been running for approximately 8 months have indicated that these components are capable of withstanding as much as twice their input supply voltage ratings without noticeable performance degradation. These data provide CERES operators with confidence of being able to continue science operations over the remaining life of the TRMM mission. This paper will discuss this anomaly and some possible causes, a simulator of affected electronics, test results, prognosis for future CERES operations, and conclusions.

  15. Flexible Electronic Substrate Film Fabricated Using Natural Clay and Wood Components with Cross-Linking Polymer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kiyonori; Ishii, Ryo; Nakamura, Takashi; Suzuki, Asami; Ebina, Takeo; Yoshida, Manabu; Kubota, Munehiro; Nge, Thi Thi; Yamada, Tatsuhiko

    2017-03-01

    Requirements for flexible electronic substrate are successfully accomplished by green nanocomposite film fabricated with two natural components: glycol-modified biomass lignin and Li(+) montmorillonite clay. In addition to these major components, a cross-linking polymer between the lignin is incorporated into montmorillonite. Multilayer-assembled structure is formed due to stacking nature of high aspect montmorillonite, resulting in thermal durability up to 573 K, low thermal expansion, and oxygen barrier property below measurable limit. Preannealing for montmorillonite and the cross-linking formation enhance moisture barrier property superior to that of industrial engineering plastics, polyimide. As a result, the film has advantages for electronic film substrate. Furthermore, these properties can be achieved at the drying temperature up to 503 K, while the polyimide films are difficult to fabricate by this temperature. In order to examine its applicability for substrate film, flexible electrodes are finely printed on it and touch sensor device can be constructed with rigid elements on the electrode. In consequence, this nanocomposite film is expected to contribute to production of functional materials, progresses in expansion of biomass usage with low energy consumption, and construction of environmental friendly flexible electronic devices.

  16. Detection of the high energy component of Jovian electrons at 1 AU with the PAMELA experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casolino, M.; PAMELA Collaboration

    PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment that will be launched in the first half of 2006 It will make long duration measurements of cosmic radiation over an extended energy range 80Mev to 200 GeV Specifically PAMELA will measure the cosmic-ray antiproton and positron spectra over the largest energy range ever achieved 80MeV - 190 GeV and will search for antinuclei with unprecedented sensitivity Furthermore it will measure the light nuclear component of cosmic rays and investigate phenomena connected with solar and earth physics The apparatus consists of a time of flight system a magnetic spectrometer an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter a shower tail catcher scintillator a neutron detector and an anticoincidence system The Jovian magnetosphere is a powerful accelerator of electrons to several tens of MeV as observed at first by Pioneer 10 spacecraft 1973 The propagation of Jovian electrons to Earth is affected by modulation due to Corotating Interaction Regions CIR Their flux at Earth is moreover modulated because every 13 months Earth and Jupiter are aligned along the average direction of the Parker spiral of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field For its characteristics PAMELA will be able to measure the high energy tail of the Jovian electrons in the energy range from 50 MeV up to 130 MeV With long term observation it will also be possible to detect the Jovian component reaccelated at the solar wind termination shock from the galactic flux

  17. 76 FR 53154 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Notice... Section 337 by defaulting respondents in Inv. No. 337-TA- 718, Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing... within the United States after importation of certain electronic paper towel dispensing devices...

  18. Quantitative determination of the mineral distribution in different collagen zones of calcifying tendon using high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEwen, B. F.; Song, M. J.; Landis, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    High voltage electron microscopic tomography was used to make the first quantitative determination of the distribution of mineral between different regions of collagen fibrils undergoing early calcification in normal leg tendons of the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. The tomographic 3-D reconstruction was computed from a tilt series of 61 different views spanning an angular range of +/- 60 degrees in 2 degrees intervals. Successive applications of an interactive computer operation were used to mask the collagen banding pattern of either hole or overlap zones into separate versions of the reconstruction. In such 3-D volumes, regions specified by the mask retained their original image density while the remaining volume was set to background levels. This approach was also applied to the mineral crystals present in the same volumes to yield versions of the 3-D reconstructions that were masked for both the crystal mass and the respective collagen zones. Density profiles from these volumes contained a distinct peak corresponding only to the crystal mass. A comparison of the integrated density of this peak from each profile established that 64% of the crystals observed were located in the collagen hole zones and 36% were found in the overlap zones. If no changes in crystal stability occur once crystals are formed, this result suggests the possibilities that nucleation of mineral is preferentially and initially associated with the hole zones, nucleation occurs more frequently in the hole zones, the rate of crystal growth is more rapid in the hole zones, or a combination of these alternatives. All lead to the conclusion that the overall accumulation of mineral mass is predominant in the collagen hole zones compared to overlap zones during early collagen fibril calcification.

  19. Effect of Electrostatic Discharge on Electrical Characteristics of Discrete Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Phil; Vashchenko, Vladislav; Celaya, Jose; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on preliminary results of a study conducted to examine how temporary electrical overstress seed fault conditions in discrete power electronic components that cannot be detected with reliability tests but impact longevity of the device. These defects do not result in formal parametric failures per datasheet specifications, but result in substantial change in the electrical characteristics when compared with pristine device parameters. Tests were carried out on commercially available 600V IGBT devices using transmission line pulse (TLP) and system level ESD stress. It was hypothesized that the ESD causes local damage during the ESD discharge which may greatly accelerate degradation mechanisms and thus reduce the life of the components. This hypothesis was explored in simulation studies where different types of damage were imposed to different parts of the device. Experimental results agree qualitatively with the simulation for a number of tests which will motivate more in-depth modeling of the damage.

  20. Microsupercapacitors as miniaturized energy-storage components for on-chip electronics.

    PubMed

    Kyeremateng, Nana Amponsah; Brousse, Thierry; Pech, David

    2017-01-01

    The push towards miniaturized electronics calls for the development of miniaturized energy-storage components that can enable sustained, autonomous operation of electronic devices for applications such as wearable gadgets and wireless sensor networks. Microsupercapacitors have been targeted as a viable route for this purpose, because, though storing less energy than microbatteries, they can be charged and discharged much more rapidly and have an almost unlimited lifetime. In this Review, we discuss the progress and the prospects of integrated miniaturized supercapacitors. In particular, we discuss their power performances and emphasize the need of a three-dimensional design to boost their energy-storage capacity. This is obtainable, for example, through self-supported nanostructured electrodes. We also critically evaluate the performance metrics currently used in the literature to characterize microsupercapacitors and offer general guidelines to benchmark performances towards prospective applications.

  1. Microsupercapacitors as miniaturized energy-storage components for on-chip electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyeremateng, Nana Amponsah; Brousse, Thierry; Pech, David

    2017-01-01

    The push towards miniaturized electronics calls for the development of miniaturized energy-storage components that can enable sustained, autonomous operation of electronic devices for applications such as wearable gadgets and wireless sensor networks. Microsupercapacitors have been targeted as a viable route for this purpose, because, though storing less energy than microbatteries, they can be charged and discharged much more rapidly and have an almost unlimited lifetime. In this Review, we discuss the progress and the prospects of integrated miniaturized supercapacitors. In particular, we discuss their power performances and emphasize the need of a three-dimensional design to boost their energy-storage capacity. This is obtainable, for example, through self-supported nanostructured electrodes. We also critically evaluate the performance metrics currently used in the literature to characterize microsupercapacitors and offer general guidelines to benchmark performances towards prospective applications.

  2. An instrument for the study of the composition of the electron component of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogomolov, E. A.; Karakadko, V. K.; Lubyanaya, N. D.; Romanov, V. A.; Totubalina, M. G.; Yamshchikov, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    A telescope consisting of three spark chambers and two control scintillation counters has been designed and is used for investigating the composition of the cosmic ray electron component within the range of energies from 1.0 to 10.0 BeV by the EN assymetry method. The geometrical factor of the telescope is approximately 20 sq cm ster. Discharges are recorded in the chambers on a photo film. The telescope is oriented to the azimuth with an accuracy of + or - 3 deg.

  3. Space Radiation Shielding Studies for Astronaut and Electronic Component Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, Jordan Robert

    2010-01-01

    The dosimetry component of the Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) will design, develop and characterize the response of a suite of radiation detectors and supporting instrumentation and electronics with three primary goals that will: (1) Use established space radiation detection systems to characterize the primary and secondary radiation fields existing in the experimental test-bed zones during exposures at particle accelerator facilities. (2) Characterize the responses of newly developed space radiation detection systems in the experimental test-bed zones during exposures at particle accelerator facilities, and (3) Provide CRESSE collaborators with detailed dosimetry information in experimental test-bed zones.

  4. Process development for electron beam joining of ceramic and glass components

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, P.; Gerstle, F.P.; Halbleib, J.A.; Voth, T.E.; McKenzie, B.; Clifford, J.R.; Habiger, K.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and extend the electron beam joining process to applications related to Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cermets for neutron tube fabrication, glass seals for flat panel displays, and ceramics for structural applications. The key issue is the identification of the allowable operating ranges that produce thermal conditions favorable to robust joining and sealing. High strength, hermetic braze joints between ceramic components have been produced using high energy electron beams. With a penetration depth into a typical ceramic of {approximately} 1 cm for a 10 MeV electron beam, this method provides the capability for rapid, transient brazing operations where temperature control of heat sensitive components is essential. The method deposits energy directly into a buried joint, allowing otherwise inaccessible interfaces to be brazed. The combination of transient heating, with higher thermal conductivity, lower heat capacity, and lower melting temperature of braze metals relative to the ceramic materials, enables a pulsed high power beam to melt a braze metal without producing excessive ceramic temperatures. The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of this process related to ceramic coupons a well as ceramic and glass tubes and cylindrical shapes. The transient thermal response was predicted, using as input the energy absorption predicted from the coupled electron-photon and thermal transport analysis. The joining experiments were conducted with an RF linear accelerator at 10--13 MV. Joining experiments have provided high strength joints between alumina and alumina and between alumina and cermet joints in cylindrical geometry. These joints provided good hermetic seals.

  5. Microbial mineralization of cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride as a component of natural attenuation of chloroethene contaminants under conditions identified in the field as anoxic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a key component of remediation at many chloroethene-contaminated sites. In some instances, limited accumulation of reductive dechlorination daughter products may suggest that natural attenuation is not adequate for site remediation. This conclusion is justified when evidence for parent compound (tetrachloroethene, PCE, or trichloroethene, TCE) degradation is lacking. For many chloroethene-contaminated shallow aquifer systems, however, non-conservative losses of the parent compounds are clear but the mass balance between parent compound attenuation and accumulation of reductive dechlorination daughter products is incomplete. Incomplete mass balance indicates a failure to account for important contaminant attenuation mechanisms, and is consistent with contaminant degradation to non-diagnostic mineralization products. An ongoing technical debate over the potential for mineralization of dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) to CO2 in the complete absence of diatomic oxygen has largely obscured the importance of microbial DCE/VC mineralization at dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations below the current field standard (DO < 0.1-0.5 milligrams per liter) for nominally anoxic conditions. This study demonstrates that oxygen-based microbial mineralization of DCE and VC can be substantial under field conditions that are frequently characterized as "anoxic." Because mischaracterization of operant contaminant biodegradation processes can lead to expensive and ineffective remedial actions, a modified framework for assessing the potential importance of oxygen during chloroethene biodegradation was developed.

  6. The possibility of the formation of protocells and their structural components on the basis of the apatite matrix and cocrystallizing minerals.

    PubMed

    Kostetsky, Eduard Y

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents the author's theory on the possibility of simultaneous hard-phase synthesis of various organic molecules from gas-phase elements on the basis of the apatite matrix and cocrystallizing minerals (carbonate-apatite, calcite, mica). These molecules and their ensembles gave rise to living systems and protocells of the pro- and eukaryotic types. Synthesis might have occurred through gradual substitution of the mineral matrix by crystal organic matter. The structure and size of the molecules synthesized were determined by the structure, physical parameters, and arrangement of organizing centers in the crystal lattice. Apatite phosphates were embedded in a synthesized nucleic helix and their size and purine-pyrimidine complementarity were determined. Apatite and cocrystallizing minerals were seen to be involved in the synthesis of four basic classes of cell components: apatite-DNA and nucleoproteide complexes; carbonate-apatite-enzymes, other proteins involved in DNA replication, all RNA types and their complexes with the specific proteins and enzymes of transcription and translation; calcite-cytoskeletal proteins; and mica-membrane lipids and proteins. The evidence supporting this theory is presented. A possible mechanism to account for the transition from crystal through organo-mineral crystal to liquid crystal (protocell) and a model of the occurrence of the matrix mechanism of transcription and translation are proposed. Some principal problems in the biochemistry and molecular biology of the origin of life on the Earth are discussed.

  7. A world of minerals in your mobile device

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenness, Jane E.; Ober, Joyce A.; Wilkins, Aleeza M.; Gambogi, Joseph

    2016-09-15

    Mobile phones and other high-technology communications devices could not exist without mineral commodities. More than one-half of all components in a mobile device—including its electronics, display, battery, speakers, and more—are made from mined and semiprocessed materials (mineral commodities). Some mineral commodities can be recovered as byproducts during the production and processing of other commodities. As an example, bauxite is mined for its aluminum content, but gallium is recovered during the aluminum production process. The images show the ore minerals (sources) of some mineral commodities that are used to make components of a mobile device. On the reverse side, the map and table depict the major source countries producing these mineral commodities along with how these commodities are used in mobile devices. For more information on minerals, visit http://minerals.usgs.gov.

  8. An ex-vivo comparative study of root-end marginal adaptation using grey mineral trioxide aggregate, white mineral trioxide aggregate, and Portland cement under scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Akash Kumar; Paul, Mohan L.; Mazumdar, Dibyendu; Adhikari, Haridas Das; Vyavahare, Nishant K.; Jhajharia, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Context: Where nonsurgical endodontic intervention is not possible, or it will not solve the problem, surgical endodontic treatment must be considered. A major cause of surgical endodontic failures is an inadequate apical seal, so the use of the suitable substance as root-end filling material that prevents egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue is very critical. Aims: The aim of the present ex-vivo study was to compare and evaluate the three root-end filling materials of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) family (white MTA [WMTA], grey MTA [GMTA] and Portland cement [PC]) for their marginal adaptation at the root-end dentinal wall using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Sixty human single-rooted teeth were decoronated, instrumented, and obturated with Gutta-percha. After the root-end resection and apical cavity preparation, the teeth were randomly divided into three-experimental groups (each containing 20 teeth) and each group was filled with their respective experimental materials. After longitudinal sectioning of root, SEM examination was done to determine the overall gap between retrograde materials and cavity walls in terms of length and width of the gap (maximum) at the interface. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to calculate the means with corresponding standard errors, median and ranges along with an analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Results: The least overall gap was observed in GMTA followed by PC and WMTA. While after statistically analyzing the various data obtained from different groups, there was no significant difference among these three groups in terms of marginal adaptation. Conclusion: GMTA showed the best overall adaptation to root dentinal wall compared to PC and WMTA. Being biocompatible and cheaper, the PC may be an alternative but not a substitute for MTA. PMID:26430305

  9. Optical coating performance for heat reflectors of JWST-ISIM electronic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Bousquet, Robert; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Threat, Felix; Rashford, Robert

    2008-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling reflector.

  10. Development of Standardized Power Electronic Components, Subsystems, and Systems for Increased Modularity and Scalability

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, S.; Pink, C.; Price, J.; Kroposki, B.; Kern, G.

    2007-11-01

    Power electronics devices hold substantial promise for making distributed energy applications more efficient and cost effective. This project is motivated towards developing and testing inverters that will allow distributed energy systems to provide ancillary services such as voltage and VAR regulation, and increased grid reliability by seamlessly transitioning between grid-tied and stand-alone operation modes. The objectives of this project are to identify system integration and optimization issues and technologies and to provide solutions through research, analysis, and testing of power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications that are cost-competitive and have substantially faster response times than conventional technologies. In addition, the testing of power electronics interfaces will develop a technical basis for performance assessment for distributed energy systems, subsystems, and components that will finally create a foundation for standardized measurements and test procedures. The ultimate goal for this research is to advance the potential benefits of distributed energy to provide ancillary services, enhance power system reliability, and allow customer choice.

  11. Effect of six-month hypokinesia in dogs on mineral component, reconstruction and mechanical properties of bone tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volozhin, A. I.; Pavlova, M. P.; Muradov, I. S.; Stupakov, G. P.; Korzhenyants, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    Ca45 incorporation into the bones of the limbs, particularly in the area of the muscle attachment increased in dogs as a result of 6 month hypokinesia. There were no phenomena of osteoporosis in the cortical layer of the diaphyses; however, changes in the form of osteons, an increase in the number of anastomoses between the channels and the thinning of the subperiosteal layer pointed to disturbances of the bone tissue reconstruction. Mineral saturation of the bone microstructures of the experimental dogs had a tendency to rise. No changes in the mechanical properties of the long bones occurred as a result of hypokinesia in dogs.

  12. Improved source assessment of Si, Al and related mineral components to PM10 based on a daily sampling procedure.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ge; Puxbaum, Hans; Bauer, Heidi; Jankowski, Nicole; Shi, Yao

    2010-01-01

    Samples obtained from an industrialized valley in the East Alpine region were collected daily for a half year and analyzed using X-ray fluorescence to examine the elements Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Zn, P, S and Cl. Some factors affecting the changes of these elements were considered, including time, elemental correlations, weekday, weekend and seasonal changes. Diagnostic analysis provided an insight into a decoupling behavior that occursin siliceous and carbonates minerals. A decrease in Si and Al and an increase in carbonates, Na, K, Zn and P were observed during the cold season. However, a consistently high correlation of Si and Al was observed in all seasons. It was established that such high levels originated from street surface abrasion. The increase in variability and absolute levels of carbonates during the cold season was demonstrated by adding carbonates to the street surface as gritting material to increase the grip on snowy surfaces. A marked increase in Na and Cl was observed in winter which may have been caused by thaw salt that is widely used in winter in Austria. This was associated with a significant increase in K, Zn, and P in the cold season that was the result of domestic space heating with wood. PM10 levels in December were 12 microg/m3 and were higher than levels detected in July. It was established that such high levels originated from mineral oxides, wood smoke, and inorganic ionic material(s).

  13. Water Soluble Components of 'Osteocare' Promote Cell Proliferation, Differentiation, and Matrix Mineralization in Human Osteoblast-Like SaOS-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sandeep R; Sharath Kumar, L M; Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Patki, Pralhad Sadashiv

    2014-01-01

    Osteocare, a herbal formulation, has been found to be very effective in bone mineralization and support of the microstructure of bone tissue. The water-soluble components of Osteocare (WSCO) induced osteogenic activity in human osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells. The addition of WSCO (100 μg/ml) to SaOS-2 cells was effective in increasing the cell proliferation by 41.49% and DNA content by 1.9-fold. WSCO increased matrix mineralization in SaOS-2 cells by increased alkaline phosphatase levels and calcium-rich deposits as observed by Alizarin red staining. WSCO markedly increased mRNA expression for osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN), type I collagen (Col I) in SaOS-2 cells, and it down-regulated IL-6 mRNA levels in SaOS-2 cells. The present study showed that WSCO plays an important role in osteoblastic bone formation through enhanced activities of ALP, Col I, bone matrix proteins such as OPN and OCN, down-regulation of cytokines like IL-6, as well as promoting mineralization in SaOS-2 cells.

  14. 32 CFR 21.565 - Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers? 21.565 Section 21.565 National Defense Department of... Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers? The DoD Components must... DUNS numbers with a copy to: Director for Basic Sciences, ODDR&E, 3040 Defense Pentagon, Washington,...

  15. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  16. [Hepatitis B virus components and cytoplasmic virus-like corpuscles in chronic hepatitis (electron microscopic study)].

    PubMed

    Kendrey, G

    1977-04-01

    Author in the needle-biopsy specimen of the liver of a HBsAg positive patient previously treated with immunosupressive preparates (Corticosteroid + Imuran) in the nuclei of hepatocytes by the aid of electron microscope revealed ring-shaped particula of 20-25 nm in diameter (core), in the cytoplasma of ground-glass hepatocytes in the canals of the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum filamentous formations in average of 23nm in diameter (surface antigen). In addition in a few number cytoplasmic core particula have also been revealed. Dane-particula were not seen. Further in the cytoplasma round or ring-shaped virus-like bodies of unknown origin of 80 nm in diameter were found. These particula could be easily distinguished from the Dane particula and from the B virus components (a second virus infection?). Author believe, that the immunsupressive therapy could play some role in the occurrence of the B virus components, since before the therapy with Imuran they could not be detected in the liver.

  17. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Synthetic Instrument Capabilities Assessment and Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of synthetic instruments (SIs) for Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) is to provide an external lower-level diagnostic and functional test capability beyond the built-in-test capabilities of spacecraft electronics. Built-in diagnostics can report faults and symptoms, but isolating the root cause and performing corrective action requires specialized instruments. Often a fault can be revealed by emulating the operation of external hardware. This implies complex hardware that is too massive to be accommodated in spacecraft. The SI strategy is aimed at minimizing complexity and mass by employing highly reconfigurable instruments that perform diagnostics and emulate external functions. In effect, SI can synthesize an instrument on demand. The SI architecture section of this document summarizes the result of a recent program diagnostic and test needs assessment based on the International Space Station. The SI architecture addresses operational issues such as minimizing crew time and crew skill level, and the SI data transactions between the crew and supporting ground engineering searching for the root cause and formulating corrective actions. SI technology is described within a teleoperations framework. The remaining sections describe a lab demonstration intended to show that a single SI circuit could synthesize an instrument in hardware and subsequently clear the hardware and synthesize a completely different instrument on demand. An analysis of the capabilities and limitations of commercially available SI hardware and programming tools is included. Future work in SI technology is also described.

  18. Design and characterization of the annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source for circular components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    In order to irradiate circular components with high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB), an annular cathode based on carbon fiber bunches was designed and fabricated. Using an acceleration voltage of 25 kV, the maximum pulsed irradiation current and energy of this annular cathode can reach 7.9 kA and 300 J, respectively. The irradiation current density distribution of the annular cathode HCPEB source measured along the circumferential direction shows that the annular cathode has good emission uniformity. In addition, four 9310 steel substrates fixed uniformly along the circumferential direction of a metal ring substrate were irradiated by this annular cathode HCPEB source. The surface and cross-section morphologies of the irradiated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images of the surface reveal that crater and surface undulation have been formed, which hints that the irradiation energy of the HCPEB process is large enough for surface modification of 9310 steel. Meanwhile, SEM cross-section images exhibit that remelted layers with a thickness of about 5.4 μm have been obtained in all samples, which proves that a good practical irradiation uniformity can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  19. Microfabrication of passive electronic components with printed graphene-oxide deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinar, Dogan; Knopf, George K.; Nikumb, Suwas

    2014-03-01

    Flexible electronic circuitry is an emerging technology that will significantly impact the future of healthcare and medicine, food safety inspection, environmental monitoring, and public security. Recent advances in drop-on-demand printing technology and electrically conductive inks have enabled simple electronic circuits to be fabricated on mechanically flexible polymers, paper, and bioresorbable silk. Research has shown that graphene, and its derivative formulations, can be used to create low-cost electrically conductive inks. Graphene is a one atom thick two-dimensional layer composed of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice forming a material with very high fracture strength, high Young's Modulus, and low electrical resistance. Non-conductive graphene-oxide (GO) inks can also be synthesized from inexpensive graphite powders. Once deposited on the flexible substrate the electrical conductivity of the printed GO microcircuit traces can be restored through thermal reduction. In this paper, a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 775nm and pulse width of 120fs is used to transform the non-conductive printed GO film into electrically conductive oxygen reduced graphene-oxide (rGO) passive electronic components by the process of laser assisted thermal reduction. The heat affected zone produced during the process was minimized because of the femtosecond pulsed laser. The degree of conductivity exhibited by the microstructure is directly related to the laser power level and exposure time. Although rGO films have higher resistances than pristine graphene, the ability to inkjet print capacitive elements and modify local resistive properties provides for a new method of fabricating sensor microcircuits on a variety of substrate surfaces.

  20. Electron- and Photon-stimulated Desorption of Alkali Atoms from Lunar Sample and a Model Mineral Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-01-01

    We report recent results on an investigation of source mechanisms for the origin of alkali atoms in the tenuous planetary atmospheres, with focus on non-thermal processes (photon stimulated desorption (PSD), electron stimulated desorption (ESD), and ion sputtering). Whereas alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO) are far more abundant in lunar samples than alkali oxides (Na2O, K2O), the atmosphere of the Moon contains easily measurable concentrations of Na and K, while Ca and Mg are undetected there; traces of Ca have recently been seen in the Moon's atmosphere (10-3 of Na). The experiments have included ESD, PSD and ion sputtering of alkali atoms from model mineral surface (amorphous SiO2) and from a lunar basalt sample obtained from NASA. The comparison is made between ESD and PSD efficiency of monovalent alkalis (Na, K) and divalent alkaline earths (Ba, Ca).The ultrahigh vacuum measurement scheme for ESD and PSD of Na atoms includes a highly sensitive alkali metal detector based on surface ionization, and a time-of-flight technique. For PSD measurements, a mercury arc light source (filtered and chopped) is used. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by ultraviolet photons or by low energy electrons (E>4 eV) causes desorption of hot alkali atoms. This results are consistent with the model developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and from water ice: electron- or photon-induced charge transfer from the substrate to the ionic adsorbate causes formation of a neutral alkali atom in a repulsive configuration, from which desorption occurs. The two-electron charge transfer to cause desorption of divalent alkaline eath ions is a less likely process.The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  1. Electron microprobe analysis of trace elements in minerals at 10 PPM concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, G. A.; Seymour, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    An improved technique is developed for measuring backgrounds during trace element analysis of crystals and glass using electron microprobes. This technique overcomes major difficulties encountered with conventional techniques, such as the problem of obtaining the net X-ray intensity of the characteristic emission line of interest with sufficient precision and accuracy, as well as the error due to the inability to directly measure the intensity at the wavelength of the characteristic line on the sample being analyzed. It is shown that this technique can yield reproducible results to within 4 ppm in olivine, and has a minimum uncertainty and detection limit of 10 ppm Nd in olivine.

  2. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  3. Role of soil mineral components in the stabilization of organic matter in Umbric Ferralsols of South Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Molina, Marta; Berns, Anne E.; Macias, Felipe; Knicker, Heike

    2013-04-01

    Climatic conditions of subtropical and tropical regions support fast carbon (C) mineralization, and thus an accelerated degradation of soil organic matter (SOM) if compared to temperate region (Sánchez & Logan, 1992). However, even in those regions, there are still soil horizons that show notable C accumulation. Examples for the latter are umbric horizons in typical tropical soils, such as Ferralsols. The occurrence of this soils with thick umbric epipedons (× 100 cm thickness) in areas of South Brazil is a paradox, that still needs a better understanding (Marques et al., 2011), in particular since the processes that are responsible for the thickness and darkness of the umbric horizons are of special interest with respect to the role of soils as carbon sink. One major contributor to SOM stabilization represents the soil mineral phase. Therefore the main goal of this work its to study the impact of this factor on the SOM sequestration in Umbric Ferralsols from Atibaia, Campinas (São Paulo State) and Chapecó (Santa Catarina State) developed under different environmental conditions. With this objective the mineral fractions have been isolated by selective extraction of iron and aluminium oxides with different extracting solutions (sodium pyrophosphate, ammonium oxalate and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate solution) and related to SOM quality and quantity. The latter was studied by the use of solid-state cross polarisation (CPMAS) 13C NMR spectroscopy after demineralization with hydrofluoric acid (Gonçalves et al., 2003). Quantification of the NMR spectra was performed by integration of the respective chemical shift regions under consideration of the contribution of spinning side bands. For our study the following regions were distinguished (Knicker & Lüdemann, 1995): alkyl C (0-45 ppm), N-alkyl C (45-60ppm), O-alkyl C (60-110 ppm), aryl C (110-160 ppm), carbonyl C (160-245 ppm). Preliminary results show that, the minimum vertical variation of total Fe into the

  4. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy of Amphibole Fibers From the Lungs of Quebec Miners.

    PubMed

    Germine, Mark; Puffer, John H

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the morphology, molecular structure, and chemistry of amphibole fibers from lung samples from workers in the chrysotile mines at Asbestos and Thetford Mines, Quebec. A fibrous tremolite-actinolite contaminant in an asbestos ore sample from the deposit at Asbestos was used for comparison. Lattice imaging was performed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Silica-rich amorphous coatings (SIRA) that may be related to carcinogenesis are noted on all of the HRTEM photographs of fibers retained in lung, but not on fiber surfaces of the bulk comparison sample. Fibers found in lung samples and in a bulk comparison sample are produced primarily by splitting of thicker crystals and, as such, might not be considered asbestos fibers on the basis of certain mineralogical criteria. Implications of SIRA coatings with respect to carcinogenesis are worthy of further study.

  5. Mineralization of collagen may occur on fibril surfaces: evidence from conventional and high-voltage electron microscopy and three-dimensional imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Song, M. J.; Arena, J.; Kiyonaga, S.; Marko, M.; Owen, C.; McEwen, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in the normally calcifying leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, has been investigated at an ultrastructural level with conventional and high-voltage electron microscopy, computed tomography, and three-dimensional image reconstruction methods. Specimens treated by either aqueous or anhydrous techniques and resin-embedded were appropriately sectioned and regions of early tendon mineralization were photographed. On the basis of individual photomicrographs, stereoscopic pairs of images, and tomographic three-dimensional image reconstructions, platelet-shaped crystals may be demonstrated for the first time in association with the surface of collagen fibrils. Mineral is also observed in closely parallel arrays within collagen hole and overlap zones. The mineral deposition at these spatially distinct locations in the tendon provides insight into possible means by which calcification is mediated by collagen as a fundamental event in skeletal and dental formation among vertebrates.

  6. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they...

  7. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they...

  8. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they...

  9. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they...

  10. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they...

  11. Spatial and temporal variation of total electron content as revealed by principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaat, Elsayed R.; Zhu, Xun

    2016-11-01

    Eleven years of global total electron content (TEC) data derived from the assimilated thermosphere-ionosphere electrodynamics general circulation model are analyzed using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) decomposition and the corresponding principal component analysis (PCA) technique. For the daily averaged TEC field, the first EOF explains more than 89 % and the first four EOFs explain more than 98 % of the total variance of the TEC field, indicating an effective data compression and clear separation of different physical processes. The effectiveness of the PCA technique for TEC is nearly insensitive to the horizontal resolution and the length of the data records. When the PCA is applied to global TEC including local-time variations, the rich spatial and temporal variations of field can be represented by the first three EOFs that explain 88 % of the total variance. The spectral analysis of the time series of the EOF coefficients reveals how different mechanisms such as solar flux variation, change in the orbital declination, nonlinear mode coupling and geomagnetic activity are separated and expressed in different EOFs. This work demonstrates the usefulness of using the PCA technique to assimilate and monitor the global TEC field.

  12. Toxicity of electronic waste leachates to Daphnia magna: screening and toxicity identification evaluation of different products, components, and materials.

    PubMed

    Lithner, Delilah; Halling, Maja; Dave, Göran

    2012-05-01

    Electronic waste has become one of the fastest growing waste problems in the world. It contains both toxic metals and toxic organics. The aim of this study was to (1) investigate to what extent toxicants can leach from different electronic products, components, and materials into water and (2) identify which group of toxicants (metals or hydrophobic organics) that is causing toxicity. Components from five discarded electronic products (cell phone, computer, phone modem, keyboard, and computer mouse) were leached in deionised water for 3 days at 23°C in concentrations of 25 g/l for metal components, 50 g/l for mixed-material components, and 100 g/l for plastic components. The water phase was tested for acute toxicity to Daphnia magna. Eighteen of 68 leachates showed toxicity (with immobility of D. magna ≥ 50% after 48 h) and came from metal or mixed-material components. The 8 most toxic leachates, with 48 h EC(50)s ranging from 0.4 to 20 g/l, came from 2 circuit sheets (key board), integrated drive electronics (IDE) cable clips (computer), metal studs (computer), a circuit board (computer mouse), a cord (phone modem), mixed parts (cell phone), and a circuit board (key board). All 5 electronic products were represented among them. Toxicity identification evaluations (with C18 and CM resins filtrations and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid addition) indicated that metals caused the toxicity in the majority of the most toxic leachates. Overall, this study has shown that electronic waste can leach toxic compounds also during short-term leaching with pure water.

  13. [Evaluating exposure of population to dust, with consideration of components and dispersion contents of industrial discharges from enterprise extracting and processing mineral raw materials (discussion)].

    PubMed

    Mai, I V; Zagorodnov, S Iu; Popova, E V

    2014-01-01

    The article covers results of study concerning disperse content of solid components of discharges from main dust- generating technologic operations in extraction and processing of mineral raw materials (pouring ore to conveyor, drying with combustion gas in fluid-bed, pouring of end product, sorting ore on riddle, drying on vibration dry and cool device, etc). Findings are that fractions under 10 and 2.5 micrometers approach 50% in general structure of dust discharges. Maximal share of low-disperse dust enters ambient air from vibraion dry and cool devices, riddles and pouring places. Exceeded reference values for acute and chronic exposure are registered on TSP and PM10 at a sanitary protection zone border and in the nearest living area points--that can forecast intolerable risks for health of population exposed and necessitate instrumental confirmation of the detected jeopardy level.

  14. Electron transfer at the mineral/water interface: Selenium reduction by ferrous iron sorbed on clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlet, L.; Scheinost, A. C.; Tournassat, C.; Greneche, J. M.; Géhin, A.; Fernández-Martínez, A.; Coudert, S.; Tisserand, D.; Brendle, J.

    2007-12-01

    The mobility and availability of the toxic metalloid selenium in the environment are largely controlled by sorption and redox reactions, which may proceed at temporal scales similar to that of subsurface water movement under saturated or unsaturated conditions. Since such waters are often anaerobic and rich in Fe 2+, we investigated the long-term (⩽1 month) kinetics of selenite (Se(IV)O3-) sorption to montmorillonite in the presence of Fe 2+ under anoxic conditions. A synthetic montmorillonite was used to eliminate the influence of structural Fe. In the absence of aqueous Fe 2+, selenite was sorbed as outer-sphere sorption complex, covering only part of the positive edge sites, as verified by a structure-based MUSIC model and Se K-edge XAS (X-ray absorption spectroscopy). When selenite was added to montmorillonite previously equilibrated with Fe 2+ solution however, slow reduction of Se and formation of a solid phase was observed with Se K-edge XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine-structure) spectroscopy. Iterative transformation factor analysis of XANES and EXAFS spectra suggested that only one Se reaction product formed, which was identified as nano-particulate Se(0). Even after one month, only 75% of the initially sorbed Se(IV) was reduced to this solid species. Mössbauer spectrometry revealed that before and after addition and reduction of Se, 5% of total sorbed Fe occurred as Fe(III) species on edge sites of montmorillonite (≈2 mmol kg -1). The only change observed after addition of Se was the formation of a new Fe(II) species (15%) attributed to the formation of an outer-sphere Fe(II)-Se sorption complex. The combined Mössbauer and XAS results hence clearly suggest that the Se and Fe redox reactions are not directly coupled. Based on the results of a companion paper, we hypothesize that the electrons produced in the absence of Se by oxidation of sorbed Fe(II) are stored, for example by formation of

  15. Measurement of the intrinsic electron neutrino component in the T2K neutrino beam with the ND280 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Floetotto, L.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iwai, E.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Naples, D.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    The T2K experiment has reported the first observation of the appearance of electron neutrinos in a muon neutrino beam. The main and irreducible background to the appearance signal comes from the presence in the neutrino beam of a small intrinsic component of electron neutrinos originating from muon and kaon decays. In T2K, this component is expected to represent 1.2% of the total neutrino flux. A measurement of this component using the near detector (ND280), located 280 m from the target, is presented. The charged current interactions of electron neutrinos are selected by combining the particle identification capabilities of both the time projection chambers and electromagnetic calorimeters of ND280. The measured ratio between the observed electron neutrino beam component and the prediction is 1.01±0.10 providing a direct confirmation of the neutrino fluxes and neutrino cross section modeling used for T2K neutrino oscillation analyses. Electron neutrinos coming from muons and kaons decay are also separately measured, resulting in a ratio with respect to the prediction of 0.68±0.30 and 1.10±0.14, respectively.

  16. Minerals discovered in paleolithic black pigments by transmission electron microscopy and micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmin, E.; Vignaud, C.; Salomon, H.; Farges, F.; Susini, J.; Menu, M.

    2006-05-01

    Analysis of archeological materials aims to rediscover the know-how of prehistoric men by determining the nature of the painting matter, its preparation mode, and the geographic origin of its raw materials. The preparation mode of the painting matter of the paleolithic rock art apparently consisted of mixing, grinding, and also heat-treatment. In this study, we focus on black pigments and more particularly manganese oxides. Using the combined approach of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, we analyzed a variety of archeological black painted samples. The studied pigments arise from the caves of Ekain (Basque country, Spain), Labastide and Gargas (Hautes-Pyrénées, France). In addition, a black “crayon” (i.e., a “pen”) from the cave of Combe Saunière (Dordogne, France) was also investigated. From the analysis of these painting matters, several unusual minerals have been identified as black pigment, such as manganite, groutite, todorokite and birnessite. These conclusions enable us to estimate the technical level of paleolithic artists: they didn’t use heat-treatment to prepare black painting matter. Consequently, the unusual mineralogy found in some of these pigments suggests that some of the manganese ores are coming from geological settings that are sometimes relatively far away from the Dordogne and Basque region such as in Ariège (central-oriental Pyrénées).

  17. Space radiation shielding studies for astronaut and electronic component risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Jordan; Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard

    The space radiation environment is comprised of a complex and variable mix of high energy charged particles, gamma rays and other exotic species. Elements of this radiation field may also interact with intervening matter (such as a spaceship wall) and create secondary radiation particles such as neutrons. Some of the components of the space radiation environment are highly penetrating and can cause adverse effects in humans and electronic components aboard spacecraft. Developing and testing materials capable of providing effective shielding against the space radiation environment presents special challenges to researchers. Researchers at the Cen-ter for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View AM University (PVAMU) perform accelerator based experiments testing the effectiveness of various materials for use as space radiation shields. These experiments take place at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center, and the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory where charged particles and neutrons are produced at energies similar to those found in the space radiation environment. The work presented in this paper constitutes the beginning phase of an undergraduate research project created to contribute to this ongoing space radiation shielding project. Specifically, this student project entails devel-oping and maintaining a database of information concerning the historical data from shielding experiments along with a systematic categorization and storage system for the actual shielding materials. The shielding materials referred to here range in composition from standard materi-als such as high density polyethylene and aluminum to exotic multifunctional materials such as spectra-fiber infused composites. The categorization process for each material includes deter-mination of the density thickness of individual

  18. Electronic spectra of DyF studied by four-component relativistic configuration interaction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi; Tatewaki, Hiroshi

    2015-03-07

    The electronic states of the DyF molecule below 3.0 eV are studied using 4-component relativistic CI methods. Spinors generated by the average-of-configuration Hartree-Fock method with the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian were used in CI calculations by the KRCI (Kramers-restricted configuration interaction) program. The CI reference space was generated by distributing 11 electrons among the 11 Kramers pairs composed mainly of Dy [4f], [6s], [6p] atomic spinors, and double excitations are allowed from this space to the virtual molecular spinors. The CI calculations indicate that the ground state has the dominant configuration (4f{sup 9})(6s{sup 2})(Ω = 7.5). Above this ground state, 4 low-lying excited states (Ω = 8.5, 7.5, 7.5, 7.5) are found with dominant configurations (4f{sup 10})(6s). These results are consistent with the experimental studies of McCarthy et al. Above these 5 states, 2 states were observed at T{sub 0} = 2.39 eV, 2.52 eV by McCarthy et al. and were named as [19.3]8.5 and [20.3]8.5. McCarthy et al. proposed that both states have dominant configurations (4f{sup 9})(6s)(6p), but these configurations are not consistent with the large R{sub e}’s (∼3.9 a.u.) estimated from the observed rotational constants. The present CI calculations provide near-degenerate states of (4f{sup 10})(6p{sub 3/2,1/2}), (4f{sup 10})(6p{sub 3/2,3/2}), and (4f{sup 9})(6s)(6p{sub 3/2,1/2}) at around 3 eV. The former two states have larger R{sub e} (3.88 a.u.) than the third, so that it is reasonable to assign (4f{sup 10})(6p{sub 3/2,1/2}) to [19.3]8.5 and (4f{sup 10})(6p{sub 3/2,3/2}) to [20.3]8.5.

  19. Kingian Co-Evolution of the Water and Mineral/Rock Components for Earth and Mars: Implications for Planetary Habitability (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, V. R.

    2013-12-01

    Planetary habitability may fluctuate episodically against a background provided by the co-evolution of a planet's mineral/rock (geosphere) components and its water (hydrosphere) in relation to its position in a circumstellar system. The water/rock (geosphere/hydrosphere) co-evolution can be inferred from the geological histories of the terrestrial planets of the solar system, particularly from the very extensive understanding of Earth and Mars. Habitability and water/rock co-evolution have components that are tychistic (i.e., driven by chance) and anancastic (i.e., dynamically driven largely by deterministic forces). They also have a final, end-directed (i.e., teleomatic) aspect that operates in accordance with natural laws. This is a larger perspective on the idea of planetary habitability than is generally associated with an astronomical approach, and it incorporates additional insights from a geological perspective on the issue. The geological histories of Mars and Earth are punctuated with critical, short-term epochs of extreme change, which for Earth are known to be associated with major disruptions of its biosphere. These catastrophic epochs can be described as a type of non-Darwinian evolution that was envisioned by the geologist Clarence King. In an 1877 paper King proposed that accelerated evolutionary change occurs during sudden environmental disruptions. Such Kingian disruptions in mineral/rock and water evolution mark the planetary histories of Mars and Earth, including the early formation and condensation of a steam atmosphere, an impacting cataclysm at about 3.9 to 4 Ga, episodes of concentrated volcanism and tectonism, and associated rapid changes in the linked atmosphere and hydrosphere. These disruptions are closely tied to migrations of water between different planetary reservoirs, the nature of planetary accretion, the origin of a physically coupled atmosphere and ocean, the prospects for initiating plate tectonics, and punctuated greenhouse

  20. Microstructural and micromechanical study of a Ti6Al4V component made by electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherillo, F.; Franchitti, S.; Borrelli, R.; Pirozzi, C.; Squillace, A.; Langella, A.; Carrino, L.

    2016-10-01

    Additive Layer Manufacturing is one of the most promising and investigated manufacturing system due to its advantages to produces near net shape components, also with a very complex shape, in a single shot. Among the different techniques now available, the Electron Beam Melting (EBM) is of particular interest in the production of metal components. Particularly the application of this technique to titanium alloys allows to produces components with a very low buy to fly ratio. In the present paper the microstructure attained is accurately described and mini tensile tests performed allowed to understand the fracture behavior of specimen with the specific microstructure realized under static load.

  1. Disassembly and physical separation of electric/electronic components layered in printed circuit boards (PCB).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeryeong; Kim, Youngjin; Lee, Jae-chun

    2012-11-30

    Although printed circuit boards (PCBs) contain various elements, only the major elements (i.e., those with content levels in wt% or over grade) of and precious metals (e.g., Ag, Au, and platinum groups) contained within PCBs can be recycled. To recover other elements from PCBs, the PCBs should be properly disassembled as the first step of the recycling process. The recovery of these other elements would be beneficial for efforts to conserve scarce resources, reuse electric/electronic components (EECs), and eliminate environmental problems. This paper examines the disassembly of EECs from wasted PCBs (WPCBs) and the physical separation of these EECs using a self-designed disassembling apparatus and a 3-step separation process of sieving, magnetic separation, and dense medium separation. The disassembling efficiencies were evaluated by using the ratio of grinding area (E(area)) and the weight ratio of the detached EECs (E(weight)). In the disassembly treatment, these efficiencies were improved with an increase of grinder speed and grinder height. 97.7% (E(area)) and 98% (E(weight)) could be accomplished ultimately by 3 repetitive treatments at a grinder speed of 5500 rpm and a grinder height of 1.5mm. Through a series of physical separations, most groups of the EECs (except for the diode, transistor, and IC chip groups) could be sorted at a relatively high separation efficiency of about 75% or more. To evaluate the separation efficiency with regard to the elemental composition, the distribution ratio (R(dis)) and the concentration ratio (R(conc)) were used. 15 elements could be separated with the highest R(dis) and R(conc) in the same separated division. This result implies that the recyclability of the elements is highly feasible, even though the initial content in EECs is lower than several tens of mg/kg.

  2. Separation between Allowed and Forbidden Component of the He I 447 nm Line in High Electron Density Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivkovic, M.; Jovicevic, S.; Konjevic, N.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Gigosos, M. A.

    2008-10-22

    Stark broadened He I 447.1 nm line is measured and the dependence of the separation between its allowed and forbidden components upon electron density is analyzed. Experimental results are compared with computer simulation results and with former experimental results.

  3. Slowly moving test charge in two-electron component non-Maxwellian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.; Eliasson, B.

    2015-08-15

    Potential distributions around a slowly moving test charge are calculated by taking into account the electron-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma. Considering a neutralizing background of static positive ions, the supra-thermal hot and cold electrons are described by the Vlasov equations to account for the Kappa (power-law in velocity space) and Maxwell equilibrium distributions. Fourier analysis further leads to the derivation of electrostatic potential showing the impact of supra-thermal hot electrons. The test charge moves slowly in comparison with the hot and cold electron thermal speeds and is therefore shielded by the electrons. This gives rise to a short-range Debye-Hückel potential decaying exponentially with distance and to a far field potential decaying as inverse third power of the distance from the test charge. The results are relevant for both laboratory and space plasmas, where supra-thermal hot electrons with power-law distributions have been observed.

  4. Single-Particle Cryo-EM and 3D Reconstruction of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Electron-Dense Components.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guimei; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Chuan; Mao, Chengde; Jiang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), accompanied with 3D reconstruction, is a broadly applicable tool for the structural characterization of macromolecules and nanoparticles. Recently, the cryo-EM field has pushed the limits of this technique to higher resolutions and samples of smaller molecular mass, however, some samples still present hurdles to this technique. Hybrid particles with electron-dense components, which have been studied using single-particle cryo-EM yet with limited success in 3D reconstruction due to the interference caused by electron-dense elements, constitute one group of such challenging samples. To process such hybrid particles, a masking method is developed in this work to adaptively remove pixels arising from electron-dense portions in individual projection images while maintaining maximal biomass signals for subsequent 2D alignment, 3D reconstruction, and iterative refinements. As demonstrated by the success in 3D reconstruction of an octahedron DNA/gold hybrid particle, which has been previously published without a 3D reconstruction, the devised strategy that combines adaptive masking and standard single-particle 3D reconstruction approach has overcome the hurdle of electron-dense elements interference, and is generally applicable to cryo-EM structural characterization of most, if not all, hybrid nanomaterials with electron-dense components.

  5. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Spacecraft Circuit Diagnostics by Analog and Complex Signature Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Wade, Raymond P.; Izadnegahdar, Alain

    2011-01-01

    The Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is aimed at developing technologies that will enable space-flight crews to perform in situ component-level repair of electronics on Moon and Mars outposts, where there is no existing infrastructure for logistics spares. These technologies must provide effective repair capabilities yet meet the payload and operational constraints of space facilities. Effective repair depends on a diagnostic capability that is versatile but easy to use by crew members that have limited training in electronics. CLEAR studied two techniques that involve extensive precharacterization of "known good" circuits to produce graphical signatures that provide an easy-to-use comparison method to quickly identify faulty components. Analog Signature Analysis (ASA) allows relatively rapid diagnostics of complex electronics by technicians with limited experience. Because of frequency limits and the growing dependence on broadband technologies, ASA must be augmented with other capabilities. To meet this challenge while preserving ease of use, CLEAR proposed an alternative called Complex Signature Analysis (CSA). Tests of ASA and CSA were used to compare capabilities and to determine if the techniques provided an overlapping or complementary capability. The results showed that the methods are complementary.

  6. The EPQ Code System for Simulating the Thermal Response of Plasma-Facing Components to High-Energy Electron Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Robert Cameron; Steiner, Don

    2004-06-15

    The generation of runaway electrons during a thermal plasma disruption is a concern for the safe and economical operation of a tokamak power system. Runaway electrons have high energy, 10 to 300 MeV, and may potentially cause extensive damage to plasma-facing components (PFCs) through large temperature increases, melting of metallic components, surface erosion, and possible burnout of coolant tubes. The EPQ code system was developed to simulate the thermal response of PFCs to a runaway electron impact. The EPQ code system consists of several parts: UNIX scripts that control the operation of an electron-photon Monte Carlo code to calculate the interaction of the runaway electrons with the plasma-facing materials; a finite difference code to calculate the thermal response, melting, and surface erosion of the materials; a code to process, scale, transform, and convert the electron Monte Carlo data to volumetric heating rates for use in the thermal code; and several minor and auxiliary codes for the manipulation and postprocessing of the data. The electron-photon Monte Carlo code used was Electron-Gamma-Shower (EGS), developed and maintained by the National Research Center of Canada. The Quick-Therm-Two-Dimensional-Nonlinear (QTTN) thermal code solves the two-dimensional cylindrical modified heat conduction equation using the Quickest third-order accurate and stable explicit finite difference method and is capable of tracking melting or surface erosion. The EPQ code system is validated using a series of analytical solutions and simulations of experiments. The verification of the QTTN thermal code with analytical solutions shows that the code with the Quickest method is better than 99.9% accurate. The benchmarking of the EPQ code system and QTTN versus experiments showed that QTTN's erosion tracking method is accurate within 30% and that EPQ is able to predict the occurrence of melting within the proper time constraints. QTTN and EPQ are verified and validated as able

  7. Finite-element-method study of stresses on simulated electronic components encapsulated in polystyrene-bead foam

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, G.D.

    1981-03-01

    As part of an encapsulant evaluation for a high voltage electronic assembly, the linear elastic finite element method computer code SASL was used to calculate the stress distribution in an axisymmetric solder joint under load. A simulated electronic component in the form of a thumb tack was used as a physical model to calculate lead wire loads when encapsulated in 0.6 g/cm/sup 3/ polystyrene bead form. The calculated lead wire loads disagreed with previous experimental data. Reanalysis of those data revealed nonlinear effects which were not adequately modeled in the SASL calculation.

  8. Rolled-Up Optical and Electronic Components for On-Chip Integrative Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-10

    attracted broad interest to create new three- dimensional electronics such as wrapable solar cells , pressure sensors and paper displays. The adaption to...cone-like microtube cavities Rolled-up electronics 1. Energy storage elements based on hybrid organic/inorganic nanomembranes 2.High performance...fabricated in this way to detect and analyze individual cells , biomolecules, and their bioactivities. 3.2 Three-dimensional confinement in asymmetric

  9. Stakeholder engagement: a key component of integrating genomic information into electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Hartzler, Andrea; McCarty, Catherine A.; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Williams, Marc S.; Brilliant, Murray; Bowton, Erica A.; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Faucett, William A.; Ferryman, Kadija; Field, Julie R.; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Horowitz, Carol R.; Koenig, Barbara A.; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Ralston, James D.; Sanderson, Saskia C.; Smith, Maureen E.; Trinidad, Susan Brown

    2014-01-01

    Integrating genomic information into clinical care and the electronic health record can facilitate personalized medicine through genetically guided clinical decision support. Stakeholder involvement is critical to the success of these implementation efforts. Prior work on implementation of clinical information systems provides broad guidance to inform effective engagement strategies. We add to this evidence-based recommendations that are specific to issues at the intersection of genomics and the electronic health record. We describe stakeholder engagement strategies employed by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network, a national consortium of US research institutions funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute to develop, disseminate, and apply approaches that combine genomic and electronic health record data. Through select examples drawn from sites of the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network, we illustrate a continuum of engagement strategies to inform genomic integration into commercial and homegrown electronic health records across a range of health-care settings. We frame engagement as activities to consult, involve, and partner with key stakeholder groups throughout specific phases of health information technology implementation. Our aim is to provide insights into engagement strategies to guide genomic integration based on our unique network experiences and lessons learned within the broader context of implementation research in biomedical informatics. On the basis of our collective experience, we describe key stakeholder practices, challenges, and considerations for successful genomic integration to support personalized medicine. PMID:24030437

  10. Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients and imaginary part of the complex refractive indices of mineral dust components measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2015-01-01

    Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients (MACs) and the imaginary part (κ) of the refractive indices of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at the wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. The MAC values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. Values of κ were calculated from the measured and particle-loss-corrected data by using a Mie-theory-based retrieval algorithm. The determined values could be used for comparisons with calculated wavelength-dependent κ values typically deduced from bulk-phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk-phase measurements.

  11. Preservation of protein globules and peptidoglycan in the mineralized cell wall of nitrate-reducing, iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria: a cryo-electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Miot, J; Maclellan, K; Benzerara, K; Boisset, N

    2011-11-01

    Iron-oxidizing bacteria are important actors of the geochemical cycle of iron in modern environments and may have played a key role all over Earth's history. However, in order to better assess that role on the modern and the past Earth, there is a need for better understanding the mechanisms of bacterial iron oxidation and for defining potential biosignatures to be looked for in the geologic record. In this study, we investigated experimentally and at the nanometre scale the mineralization of iron-oxidizing bacteria with a combination of synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We show that the use of cryo-TEM instead of conventional microscopy provides detailed information of the successive iron biomineralization stages in anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron-oxidizing bacteria. These results suggest the existence of preferential Fe-binding and Fe-oxidizing sites on the outer face of the plasma membrane leading to the nucleation and growth of Fe minerals within the periplasm of these cells that eventually become completely encrusted. In contrast, the septa of dividing cells remain nonmineralized. In addition, the use of cryo-TEM offers a detailed view of the exceptional preservation of protein globules and the peptidoglycan within the Fe-mineralized cell walls of these bacteria. These organic molecules and ultrastructural details might be protected from further degradation by entrapment in the mineral matrix down to the nanometre scale. This is discussed in the light of previous studies on the properties of Fe-organic interactions and more generally on the fossilization of mineral-organic assemblies.

  12. Significant deterioration in nanomechanical quality occurs through incomplete extrafibrillar mineralization in rachitic bone: evidence from in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering and backscattered electron imaging.

    PubMed

    Karunaratne, Angelo; Esapa, Christopher R; Hiller, Jennifer; Boyde, Alan; Head, Rosie; Bassett, J H Duncan; Terrill, Nicholas J; Williams, Graham R; Brown, Matthew A; Croucher, Peter I; Brown, Steve D M; Cox, Roger D; Barber, Asa H; Thakker, Rajesh V; Gupta, Himadri S

    2012-04-01

    Bone diseases such as rickets and osteoporosis cause significant reduction in bone quantity and quality, which leads to mechanical abnormalities. However, the precise ultrastructural mechanism by which altered bone quality affects mechanical properties is not clearly understood. Here we demonstrate the functional link between altered bone quality (reduced mineralization) and abnormal fibrillar-level mechanics using a novel, real-time synchrotron X-ray nanomechanical imaging method to study a mouse model with rickets due to reduced extrafibrillar mineralization. A previously unreported N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mouse model for hypophosphatemic rickets (Hpr), as a result of missense Trp314Arg mutation of the phosphate regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidase on the X chromosome (Phex) and with features consistent with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) in man, was investigated using in situ synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering to measure real-time changes in axial periodicity of the nanoscale mineralized fibrils in bone during tensile loading. These determine nanomechanical parameters including fibril elastic modulus and maximum fibril strain. Mineral content was estimated using backscattered electron imaging. A significant reduction of effective fibril modulus and enhancement of maximum fibril strain was found in Hpr mice. Effective fibril modulus and maximum fibril strain in the elastic region increased consistently with age in Hpr and wild-type mice. However, the mean mineral content was ∼21% lower in Hpr mice and was more heterogeneous in its distribution. Our results are consistent with a nanostructural mechanism in which incompletely mineralized fibrils show greater extensibility and lower stiffness, leading to macroscopic outcomes such as greater bone flexibility. Our study demonstrates the value of in situ X-ray nanomechanical imaging in linking the alterations in bone nanostructure to nanoscale mechanical deterioration in a metabolic

  13. Some Aspects of the Implementation of Double Group Symmetry and Electron Correlation in Molecular 4-Component Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The efficient implementation of method for electron correlation in molecular 4-component calculations demands that symmetry be exploited where possible. Algorithms for the construction of matrices and the transformation of integrals over symmetry-adapted basis functions, where the point group is restricted to D(sub 2h) and subgroups, will be presented. The merits of keeping the primitive integrals in the scalar basis will be compared with those of transforming them to the 2-spinor basis.

  14. Ecology and thermal inactivation of microbes in and on interplanetary space vehicle components. [examined with a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    The uses of scanning electron microscopy in assessing changes that occur in spores exposed to wet and dry heat cycles at elevated temperatures were examined. Several species of Bacillus and other nonspore-forming species of organisms were used for the experiment. Surface morphology of viable and nonviable organisms was clearly detectable by this method, making it a potentially useful technique for investigating microbial inactivation on space vehicle surfaces and components. Micrographs of the spores and bacterial cells are provided.

  15. Dynamics of coupled simplest chaotic two-component electronic circuits and its potential application to random bit generation

    SciTech Connect

    Modeste Nguimdo, Romain; Tchitnga, Robert; Woafo, Paul

    2013-12-15

    We numerically investigate the possibility of using a coupling to increase the complexity in simplest chaotic two-component electronic circuits operating at high frequency. We subsequently show that complex behaviors generated in such coupled systems, together with the post-processing are suitable for generating bit-streams which pass all the NIST tests for randomness. The electronic circuit is built up by unidirectionally coupling three two-component (one active and one passive) oscillators in a ring configuration through resistances. It turns out that, with such a coupling, high chaotic signals can be obtained. By extracting points at fixed interval of 10 ns (corresponding to a bit rate of 100 Mb/s) on such chaotic signals, each point being simultaneously converted in 16-bits (or 8-bits), we find that the binary sequence constructed by including the 10(or 2) least significant bits pass statistical tests of randomness, meaning that bit-streams with random properties can be achieved with an overall bit rate up to 10×100 Mb/s =1Gbit/s (or 2×100 Mb/s =200 Megabit/s). Moreover, by varying the bias voltages, we also investigate the parameter range for which more complex signals can be obtained. Besides being simple to implement, the two-component electronic circuit setup is very cheap as compared to optical and electro-optical systems.

  16. Heterogeneity of the electron exchange capacity of kitchen waste compost-derived humic acids based on fluorescence components.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Tan, Wen-Bing; He, Xiao-Song; Xi, Bei-Dou; Gao, Ru-Tai; Zhang, Hui; Dang, Qiu-Ling; Li, Dan

    2016-11-01

    Composting is widely used for recycling of kitchen waste to improve soil properties, which is mainly attributed to the nutrient and structural functions of compost-derived humic acids (HAs). However, the redox properties of compost-derived HAs are not fully explored. Here, a unique framework is employed to investigate the electron exchange capacity (EEC) of HAs during kitchen waste composting. Most components of compost-derived HAs hold EEC, but nearly two-thirds of them are found to be easily destroyed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and thus result in an EEC lower than the electron - donating capacity in compost-derived HAs. Fortunately, a refractory component also existed within compost-derived HAs and could serve as a stable and effective electron shuttle to promote the MR-1 involved in Fe(III) reduction, and its EEC was significantly correlated with the aromaticity and the amount of quinones. Nevertheless, with the increase of composting time, the EEC of the refractory component did not show an increasing trend. These results implied that there was an optimal composting time to maximize the production of HAs with more refractory and redox molecules. Recognition of the heterogeneity of EEC of the compost-derived HAs enables an efficient utilization of the composts for a variety of environmental applications. Graphical abstract Microbial reduction of compost-derived HAs.

  17. Electronic Components, Transducers, and Basic Circuits. A Study Guide of the Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Donald R.

    This study guide is part of a program of studies entitled the Science and Engineering Technician (SET) Curriculum developed for the purpose of training technicians in the use of electronic instruments and their applications. The program integrates elements from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, mathematics, mechanical technology, and…

  18. Modeling the effects of low-LET cosmic rays on electronic components.

    PubMed

    Keating, A; Goncalves, P; Pimenta, M; Brogueira, P; Zadeh, A; Daly, E

    2012-08-01

    The effects of cosmic radiation in single cells, organic tissues and electronics are a major concern for space exploration and manned missions. Standard heavy ions radiation tests employ ion cocktails with energy of the order of 10 MeV per nucleon and with a linear energy transfer ranging from a few MeV cm(2) mg(-1) to hundreds of MeV cm(2) mg(-1). In space, cosmic rays show significant fluxes at energies up to the order of GeV per nucleon. The present work aims at investigating single event damage due to low-, high- and very-high-energy ions. The European Space Agency reference single event upset monitor data are used to support the discussion. Finally, the effect of ionization induced directly by primary particles and ionization induced by recoils produced in an electronic device is investigated for different types of devices.

  19. Arrangement of electron transport chain components in bovine mitochondrial supercomplex I1III2IV1

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, Thorsten; Mills, Deryck J; Popot, Jean-Luc; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The respiratory chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane contains three large multi-enzyme complexes that together establish the proton gradient for ATP synthesis, and assemble into a supercomplex. A 19-Å 3D map of the 1.7-MDa amphipol-solubilized supercomplex I1III2IV1 from bovine heart obtained by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy reveals an amphipol belt replacing the membrane lipid bilayer. A precise fit of the X-ray structures of complex I, the complex III dimer, and monomeric complex IV indicates distances of 13 nm between the ubiquinol-binding sites of complexes I and III, and of 10–11 nm between the cytochrome c binding sites of complexes III and IV. The arrangement of respiratory chain complexes suggests two possible pathways for efficient electron transfer through the supercomplex, of which the shorter branch through the complex III monomer proximal to complex I may be preferred. PMID:21909073

  20. Arrangement of electron transport chain components in bovine mitochondrial supercomplex I1III2IV1.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Thorsten; Mills, Deryck J; Popot, Jean-Luc; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2011-09-09

    The respiratory chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane contains three large multi-enzyme complexes that together establish the proton gradient for ATP synthesis, and assemble into a supercomplex. A 19-Å 3D map of the 1.7-MDa amphipol-solubilized supercomplex I(1)III(2)IV(1) from bovine heart obtained by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy reveals an amphipol belt replacing the membrane lipid bilayer. A precise fit of the X-ray structures of complex I, the complex III dimer, and monomeric complex IV indicates distances of 13 nm between the ubiquinol-binding sites of complexes I and III, and of 10-11 nm between the cytochrome c binding sites of complexes III and IV. The arrangement of respiratory chain complexes suggests two possible pathways for efficient electron transfer through the supercomplex, of which the shorter branch through the complex III monomer proximal to complex I may be preferred.

  1. De novo designed coiled-coil proteins with variable conformations as components of molecular electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Shlizerman, Clara; Atanassov, Alexander; Berkovich, Inbal; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2010-04-14

    Conformational changes of proteins are widely used in nature for controlling cellular functions, including ligand binding, oligomerization, and catalysis. Despite the fact that different proteins and artificial peptides have been utilized as electron-transfer mediators in electronic devices, the unique propensity of proteins to switch between different conformations has not been used as a mechanism to control device properties and performance. Toward this aim, we have designed and prepared new dimeric coiled-coil proteins that adopt different conformations due to parallel or antiparallel relative orientations of their monomers. We show here that controlling the conformation of these proteins attached as monolayers to gold, which dictates the direction and magnitude of the molecular dipole relative to the surface, results in quantitative modulation of the gold work function. Furthermore, charge transport through the proteins as molecular bridges is controlled by the different protein conformations, producing either rectifying or ohmic-like behavior.

  2. In-situ formation of multiphase electron beam physical vapor deposited barrier coatings for turbine components

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base columnar thermal barrier coating (20) on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide sheath material (32' or 34') covers the columns (28), and the sheath material is the reaction product of a precursor ceramic oxide sheath material and the base thermal barrier coating material.

  3. Optical Coating Performance for Heat Reflectors of the JWST-ISIM Electronic Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashford, Robert A.; Perrygo, Charles M.; Garrison, Matthew B.; White, Bryant K.; Threat, Felix T.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Jeans, James W.; Huber, Frank K.; Bousquet, Robert R.; Shaw, Dave

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a thermal radiator design consisting of lightweight composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings for use on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) structure. The structure will have a Thermal Subsystem unit to provide passive cooling to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) control electronics. The ISIM, in the JWST observatory, is the platform that provides the mounting surfaces for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the control electronic generated-heat away from JWST is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft s own heat does not interfere with the infrared-light gathering of distant cosmic sources. The need to have lateral control in the emission direction of the IEC (ISIM Electronics Compartment) radiators led to the development of a directional baffle design that uses multiple curved mirrorlike surfaces. This concept started out from the so-called Winston non-imaging optical concentrators that use opposing parabolic reflector surfaces, where each parabola has its focus at the opposite edge of the exit aperture. For this reason they are often known as compound parabolic concentrators or CPCs. This radiator system with the circular section was chosen for the IEC reflectors because it offers two advantages over other designs. The first is that the area of the reflector strips for a given radiator area is less, which results in a lower mass baffle assembly. Secondly, the fraction of energy emitted by the radiator strips and subsequently reflected by the baffle is less. These fewer reflections reduced the amount of energy that is absorbed and eventually re-emitted, typically in a direction outside the design emission range angle. A baffle frame holds the mirrors in position above a radiator panel on the IEC. Together, these will direct the majority of the heat from the IEC above the sunshield away towards empty space.

  4. Comparison of rice husk- and dairy manure-derived biochars for simultaneously removing heavy metals from aqueous solutions: role of mineral components in biochars.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Cao, Xinde; Zhao, Ling

    2013-08-01

    Rice husk biochar (RHBC) and dairy manure biochar (DMBC) were prepared as sorbents for simultaneously removing Pb, Cu, Zn, and Cd from aqueous solutions. DMBC was more effective in removing all the four heavy metals than RHBC, with the removal capacities of above 486 mmol kg(-1) for each metal, much higher than those of RHBC (65.5-140 mmol kg(-1)). RHBC showed stronger competition for metal removal than DMBC when the four metals coexisted, with Pb the least affected and Cd the most inhibited. When each metal was 1mM in the multi-metal system, the metal removal by RHBC was reduced by 38.4-100%, much higher than that reduced by 2-40.9% for DMBC. The stronger competition for metals removal by RHBC was due to the fact that all metals competed only for the ionized phenolic-O(-) groups, while the removal of metals by DMBC resulted not only from the complexation with ionized hydroxyl-O(-) groups but also from the precipitation of metals with CO3(2-) and/or PO4(3-) that were rich in DMBC, resulting in less competition. The different mechanisms for the removal of metals by the two biochars were evidenced by the instrumental analysis of XRD, FTIR, and SEM as well as chemical modeling of Visual MINTEQ. Results indicated the waste biomass can be converted into value-added biochar as sorbents for removal of heavy metals and the removal ability varies with different biochar feedstock sources where the mineral components such as CO3(2-), PO4(3-) originated from the feedstock play an important role in the sorption nature of biochar.

  5. Degradation of Silicone Oils Exposed to Geostationary Environment Components: Ultraviolet Radiations and Electron Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochem, H.; Rejsek-Riba, V.; Maerten, E.; Baceiredo, A.; Remaury, S.

    Degradation of polydimethylsiloxane and vinyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane oils exposed to UV radiation or 1.25 MeV electron flux was investigated using EPR, GC Headspace, NMR, GPC and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. To examine the influence of synthetic method, these two oils were prepared by ring opening polymerization using either an inorganic initiator KOH or an organic catalyst N-Heterocyclic carbene. Under UV radiation, any chemical change is observed for polydimethylsiloxane, whereas vinyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane presents a decrease of vinyl functions and an increase of chain length. Both polydimethylsiloxane and vinyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane demonstrated a degradation of thermo-optical properties, more significant for oils synthesized with organic catalyst. By improving oil purification, the degradation of thermo-optical properties can be reduced. Effects of electron flux are similar for each oil, thus independently of synthetic method and end functions. Electron flux generates important chemical damages initiated by homolytic chain scissions. Radical recombination produces gases (methane and ethane), new functions (Si-H) and bonds across silicone chains leading to a solid state material. Crosslinking of chains occurs by formation of R-Si-(O)3 and Si-CH2-Si groups. Silyl radicals are trapped in the polymer network and can be detected even 1 week after the end of irradiation.

  6. Metacarpal head biomechanics: a comparative backscattered electron image analysis of trabecular bone mineral density in Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus, and Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Zeininger, Angel; Richmond, Brian G; Hartman, Gideon

    2011-06-01

    Great apes and humans use their hands in fundamentally different ways, but little is known about joint biomechanics and internal bone variation. This study examines the distribution of mineral density in the third metacarpal heads in three hominoid species that differ in their habitual joint postures and loading histories. We test the hypothesis that micro-architectural properties relating to bone mineral density reflect habitual joint use. The third metacarpal heads of Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus, and Homo sapiens were sectioned in a sagittal plane and imaged using backscattered electron microscopy (BSE-SEM). For each individual, 72 areas of subarticular cortical (subchondral) and trabecular bone were sampled from within 12 consecutive regions of the BSE-SEM images. In each area, gray levels (representing relative mineralization density) were quantified. Results show that chimpanzee, orangutan, and human metacarpal III heads have different gray level distributions. Weighted mean gray levels (WMGLs) in the chimpanzee showed a distinct pattern in which the 'knuckle-walking' regions (dorsal) and 'climbing' regions (palmar) are less mineralized, interpreted to reflect elevated remodeling rates, than the distal regions. Pongo pygmaeus exhibited the lowest WMGLs in the distal region, suggesting elevated remodeling rates in this region, which is loaded during hook grip hand postures associated with suspension and climbing. Differences among regions within metacarpal heads of the chimpanzee and orangutan specimens are significant (Kruskal-Wallis, p < 0.001). In humans, whose hands are used for manipulation as opposed to locomotion, mineralization density is much more uniform throughout the metacarpal head. WMGLs were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in subchondral compared to trabecular regions in all samples except humans. This micro-architectural approach offers a means of investigating joint loading patterns in primates and shows significant differences in

  7. Homologous electron transport components fail to increase fatty acid hydroxylation in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Laura L.; Browse, John

    2013-01-01

    Ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid (HFA) present in castor ( Ricinus communis) seeds, is an important industrial commodity used in products ranging from inks and paints to polymers and fuels. However, due to the deadly toxin ricin and allergens also present in castor, it would be advantageous to produce ricinoleic acid in a different agricultural crop. Unfortunately, repeated efforts at heterologous expression of the castor fatty acid hydroxylase (RcFAH12) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have produced only 17-19% HFA in the seed triacylglycerols (TAG), whereas castor seeds accumulate up to 90% ricinoleic acid in the endosperm TAG. RcFAH12 requires an electron supply from NADH:cytochrome b5 reductase (CBR1) and cytochrome b5 (Cb5) to synthesize ricinoleic acid. Previously, our laboratory found a mutation in the Arabidopsis CBR1 gene, cbr1-1, that caused an 85% decrease in HFA levels in the RcFAH12 Arabidopsis line. These results raise the possibility that electron supply to the heterologous RcFAH12 may limit the production of HFA. Therefore, we hypothesized that by heterologously expressing RcCb5, the reductant supply to RcFAH12 would be improved and lead to increased HFA accumulation in Arabidopsis seeds. Contrary to this proposal, heterologous expression of the top three RcCb5 candidates did not increase HFA accumulation. Furthermore, coexpression of RcCBR1 and RcCb5 in RcFAH12 Arabidopsis also did not increase in HFA levels compared to the parental lines. These results demonstrate that the Arabidopsis electron transfer system is supplying sufficient reductant to RcFAH12 and that there must be other bottlenecks limiting the accumulation of HFA. PMID:24555099

  8. Elemental electron energy loss mapping of a precipitate in a multi-component aluminium alloy.

    PubMed

    Mørtsell, Eva A; Wenner, Sigurd; Longo, Paolo; Andersen, Sigmund J; Marioara, Calin D; Holmestad, Randi

    2016-07-01

    The elemental distribution of a precipitate cross section, situated in a lean Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Ag-Ge alloy, has been investigated in detail by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and aberration corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). A correlative analysis of the EELS data is connected to the results and discussed in detail. The energy loss maps for all relevant elements were recorded simultaneously. The good spatial resolution allows elemental distribution to be evaluated, such as by correlation functions, in addition to being compared with the HAADF image. The fcc-Al lattice and the hexagonal Si-network within the precipitates were resolved by EELS. The combination of EELS and HAADF-STEM demonstrated that some atomic columns consist of mixed elements, a result that would be very uncertain based on one of the techniques alone. EELS elemental mapping combined with a correlative analysis have great potential for identification and quantification of small amounts of elements at the atomic scale.

  9. Influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on electron-ion collision in two-component semiclassical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-01-15

    The influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on the electron-ion collision process is investigated in two-component semiclassical plasmas. The eikonal method and micropotential taking into account the quantum diffraction and shielding are used to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the collision energy, density parameter, Debye length, electron de Broglie wavelength, and the impact parameter. The result shows that the quantum diffraction and shielding effects suppress the eikonal scattering phase shift as well as the differential eikonal collision cross section, especially, in small-impact parameter regions. It is also shown that the quantum shielding effect on the eikonal collision cross section is more important in low-collision energies. In addition, it is found that the eikonal collision cross section increases with an increase in the density parameter. The variations of the eikonal cross section due to the quantum diffraction and shielding effects are also discussed.

  10. Quantum diffraction and shielding effects on the low-energy electron-ion bremsstrahlung in two-component semiclassical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-10-15

    The quantum diffraction and shielding effects on the low-energy bremsstrahlung process are investigated in two-component semiclassical plasmas. The impact-parameter analysis with the micropotential taking into account the quantum diffraction and shielding effects is employed to obtain the electron-ion bremsstrahlung radiation cross section as a function of the de Broglie wavelength, density parameter, impact parameter, photon energy, and projectile energy. The result shows that the influence of quantum diffraction and shielding strongly suppresses the bremsstrahlung radiation spectrum in semiclassical plasmas. It is found that the quantum diffraction and shielding effects have broaden the photon emission domain. It is also found that the photon emission domain is almost independent of the radiation photon energy. In addition, it is found that the influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on the bremsstrahlung spectrum decreases with an increase of the projectile energy. The density effect on the electron-ion bremsstrahlung cross section is also discussed.

  11. Decoloration and mineralization of reactive dyes using electron beam irradiation, Part I: Effect of the dye structure, concentration and absorbed dose (single, binary and ternary systems)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahdat, Ali; Bahrami, S. Hajir; Arami, M.; Bahjat, A.; Tabakh, F.; Khairkhah, M.

    2012-07-01

    In this study, three different reactive dyes (C.I. Reactive Red 4, C.I. Reactive Blue 2 and C.I. Reactive Yellow 4) and their blend solutions were irradiated with 10 MeV electron beam. Effect of absorbed dose, dye structure and primary solution concentrations on the pH value changes, degree of decoloration and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of solutions were investigated. Results show that this method is effective in decomposition and decoloration of the dyes solutions. This method can be applied in mineralization of wastewater containing different dyes.

  12. Comparison of electron beam and laser beam powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process for high temperature turbine component materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A; Ryan, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The evolving 3D printer technology is now at the point where some turbine components could be additive manufactured (AM) for both development and production purposes. However, this will require a significant evaluation program to qualify the process and components to meet current design and quality standards. The goal of the project was to begin characterization of the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nickel Alloy X (Ni-22Cr-18Fe-9Mo) test bars fabricated by powder bed fusion (PBF) AM processes that use either an electron beam (EB) or laser beam (LB) power source. The AM materials produced with the EB and LB processes displayed significant differences in microstructure and resultant mechanical properties. Accordingly, during the design analysis of AM turbine components, the specific mechanical behavior of the material produced with the selected AM process should be considered. Comparison of the mechanical properties of both the EB and LB materials to those of conventionally processed Nickel Alloy X materials indicates the subject AM materials are viable alternatives for manufacture of some turbine components.

  13. Electronic Nose Based on Independent Component Analysis Combined with Partial Least Squares and Artificial Neural Networks for Wine Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Teodoro; Lozano, Jesús; Paredes, José A.; Álvarez, Fernando J.; Suárez, José I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose an alternative way for wine classification and prediction based on an electronic nose (e-nose) combined with Independent Component Analysis (ICA) as a dimensionality reduction technique, Partial Least Squares (PLS) to predict sensorial descriptors and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for classification purpose. A total of 26 wines from different regions, varieties and elaboration processes have been analyzed with an e-nose and tasted by a sensory panel. Successful results have been obtained in most cases for prediction and classification. PMID:22969387

  14. Efficient and Accurate Identification of Platinum-Group Minerals by a Combination of Mineral Liberation and Electron Probe Microanalysis with a New Approach to the Offline Overlap Correction of Platinum-Group Element Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Osbahr, Inga; Krause, Joachim; Bachmann, Kai; Gutzmer, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Identification and accurate characterization of platinum-group minerals (PGMs) is usually a very cumbersome procedure due to their small grain size (typically below 10 µm) and inconspicuous appearance under reflected light. A novel strategy for finding PGMs and quantifying their composition was developed. It combines a mineral liberation analyzer (MLA), a point logging system, and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). As a first step, the PGMs are identified using the MLA. Grains identified as PGMs are then marked and coordinates recorded and transferred to the EPMA. Case studies illustrate that the combination of MLA, point logging, and EPMA results in the identification of a significantly higher number of PGM grains than reflected light microscopy. Analysis of PGMs by EPMA requires considerable effort due to the often significant overlaps between the X-ray spectra of almost all platinum-group and associated elements. X-ray lines suitable for quantitative analysis need to be carefully selected. As peak overlaps cannot be avoided completely, an offline overlap correction based on weight proportions has been developed. Results obtained with the procedure proposed in this study attain acceptable totals and atomic proportions, indicating that the applied corrections are appropriate.

  15. Pb-free surface-finishing on electronic components' terminals for Pb-free soldering assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tanimoto, Morimasa; Matsuda, Akira; Uno, Takeo; Kurihara, Masaaki; Shiga, Shoji

    1999-11-01

    Pb-free solderable surface finishing is essential to implement Pb-free solder assembly in order to meet with the growing demand of environmental consciousness to eliminate Pb from electronic products. Two types of widely applicable Pb-free surface finishing technologies are developed. One is the multilayer-system including Pd with Ni undercoat. Heat-resistance of Pd enables whole-surface-plating on to leadframe before IC-assembling process. The other is the double-layer-system with low-melting-point-materials, for example, thicker Sn underlayer and thinner Sn-Bi alloy overlayer, dilutes Sn-Bi alloy's defects of harmful reactivity along with substrate metal and mechanical brittleness with keeping its advantages of solder-wettability and no whisker.

  16. Specialty Task Force: A Strategic Component to Electronic Health Record (EHR) Optimization.

    PubMed

    Romero, Mary Rachel; Staub, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Post-implementation stage comes after an electronic health record (EHR) deployment. Analyst and end users deal with the reality that some of the concepts and designs initially planned and created may not be complementary to the workflow; creating anxiety, dissatisfaction, and failure with early adoption of system. Problems encountered during deployment are numerous and can vary from simple to complex. Redundant ticket submission creates backlog for Information Technology personnel resulting in delays in resolving concerns with EHR system. The process of optimization allows for evaluation of system and reassessment of users' needs. A solid and well executed optimization infrastructure can help minimize unexpected end-user disruptions and help tailor the system to meet regulatory agency goals and practice standards. A well device plan to resolve problems during post implementation is necessary for cost containment and to streamline communication efforts. Creating a specialty specific collaborative task force is efficacious and expedites resolution of users' concerns through a more structured process.

  17. Liquid on Paper: Rapid Prototyping of Soft Functional Components for Paper Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Long Han, Yu; Liu, Hao; Ouyang, Cheng; Jian Lu, Tian; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to fabricate paper-based electric circuits consisting of a paper matrix embedded with three-dimensional (3D) microchannels and liquid metal. Leveraging the high electric conductivity and good flowability of liquid metal, and metallophobic property of paper, it is possible to keep electric and mechanical functionality of the electric circuit even after a thousand cycles of deformation. Embedding liquid metal into paper matrix is a promising method to rapidly fabricate low-cost, disposable, and soft electric circuits for electronics. As a demonstration, we designed a programmable displacement transducer and applied it as variable resistors and pressure sensors. The unique metallophobic property, combined with softness, low cost and light weight, makes paper an attractive alternative to other materials in which liquid metal are currently embedded. PMID:26129723

  18. Liquid on Paper: Rapid Prototyping of Soft Functional Components for Paper Electronics.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu Long; Liu, Hao; Ouyang, Cheng; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to fabricate paper-based electric circuits consisting of a paper matrix embedded with three-dimensional (3D) microchannels and liquid metal. Leveraging the high electric conductivity and good flowability of liquid metal, and metallophobic property of paper, it is possible to keep electric and mechanical functionality of the electric circuit even after a thousand cycles of deformation. Embedding liquid metal into paper matrix is a promising method to rapidly fabricate low-cost, disposable, and soft electric circuits for electronics. As a demonstration, we designed a programmable displacement transducer and applied it as variable resistors and pressure sensors. The unique metallophobic property, combined with softness, low cost and light weight, makes paper an attractive alternative to other materials in which liquid metal are currently embedded.

  19. Liquid on Paper: Rapid Prototyping of Soft Functional Components for Paper Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long Han, Yu; Liu, Hao; Ouyang, Cheng; Jian Lu, Tian; Xu, Feng

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to fabricate paper-based electric circuits consisting of a paper matrix embedded with three-dimensional (3D) microchannels and liquid metal. Leveraging the high electric conductivity and good flowability of liquid metal, and metallophobic property of paper, it is possible to keep electric and mechanical functionality of the electric circuit even after a thousand cycles of deformation. Embedding liquid metal into paper matrix is a promising method to rapidly fabricate low-cost, disposable, and soft electric circuits for electronics. As a demonstration, we designed a programmable displacement transducer and applied it as variable resistors and pressure sensors. The unique metallophobic property, combined with softness, low cost and light weight, makes paper an attractive alternative to other materials in which liquid metal are currently embedded.

  20. Control of Vertebrate Skeletal Mineralization by Polyphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Omelon, Sidney; Georgiou, John; Henneman, Zachary J.; Wise, Lisa M.; Sukhu, Balram; Hunt, Tanya; Wynnyckyj, Chrystia; Holmyard, Douglas; Bielecki, Ryszard; Grynpas, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Skeletons are formed in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and compositions of organic and mineral components. Many invertebrate skeletons are constructed from carbonate or silicate minerals, whereas vertebrate skeletons are instead composed of a calcium phosphate mineral known as apatite. No one yet knows why the dynamic vertebrate skeleton, which is continually rebuilt, repaired, and resorbed during growth and normal remodeling, is composed of apatite. Nor is the control of bone and calcifying cartilage mineralization well understood, though it is thought to be associated with phosphate-cleaving proteins. Researchers have assumed that skeletal mineralization is also associated with non-crystalline, calcium- and phosphate-containing electron-dense granules that have been detected in vertebrate skeletal tissue prepared under non-aqueous conditions. Again, however, the role of these granules remains poorly understood. Here, we review bone and growth plate mineralization before showing that polymers of phosphate ions (polyphosphates: (PO3−)n) are co-located with mineralizing cartilage and resorbing bone. We propose that the electron-dense granules contain polyphosphates, and explain how these polyphosphates may play an important role in apatite biomineralization. Principal Findings/Methodology The enzymatic formation (condensation) and destruction (hydrolytic degradation) of polyphosphates offers a simple mechanism for enzymatic control of phosphate accumulation and the relative saturation of apatite. Under circumstances in which apatite mineral formation is undesirable, such as within cartilage tissue or during bone resorption, the production of polyphosphates reduces the free orthophosphate (PO43−) concentration while permitting the accumulation of a high total PO43− concentration. Sequestering calcium into amorphous calcium polyphosphate complexes can reduce the concentration of free calcium. The resulting reduction of both free PO43− and free

  1. A quantitative estimation of the exhaust, abrasion and resuspension components of particulate traffic emissions using electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinbruch, Stephan; Worringen, Annette; Ebert, Martin; Scheuvens, Dirk; Kandler, Konrad; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Bruckmann, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The contribution of the three traffic-related components exhaust, abrasion, and resuspension to kerbside and urban background PM10 and PM1 levels was quantified based on the analysis of individual particles by scanning electron microscopy. A total of 160 samples was collected on 38 days between February and September 2009 at a kerbside and an urban background station in the urban/industrial Ruhr area (Germany). Based on size, morphology, chemical composition and stability under electron bombardment, the 111,003 particles studied in detail were classified into the following 14 particle classes: traffic/exhaust, traffic/abrasion, traffic/resuspension, carbonaceous/organic, industry/metallurgy, industry/power plants, secondary particles, (aged) sea salt, silicates, Ca sulfates, carbonates, Fe oxides/hydroxides, biological particles, and other particles. The traffic/exhaust component consists predominantly of externally mixed soot particles and soot internally mixed with secondary particles. The traffic/abrasion component contains all particles with characteristic tracer elements (Fe, Cu, Ba, Sb, Zn) for brake and tire abrasion. The traffic/resuspension component is defined by the mixing state and comprises all internally mixed particles with a high proportion of silicates or Fe oxides/hydroxides which contain soot or abrasion particles as minor constituent. In addition, silicates and Fe oxides/hydroxides internally mixed with chlorine and sulphur containing particles were also assigned to the traffic/resuspension component. The total contribution of traffic to PM10 was found to be 27% at the urban background station and 48% at the kerbside station, the corresponding values for PM1 are 15% and 39%. These values lie within the range reported in previous literature. The relative share of the different traffic components for PM10 at the kerbside station was 27% exhaust, 15% abrasion, and 58% resuspension (38%, 8%, 54% for PM1). For the urban background, the following

  2. Combined 4-component and relativistic pseudopotential study of ThO for the electron electric dipole moment search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnikov, L. V.

    2016-12-01

    A precise theoretical study of the electronic structure of heavy atom diatomic molecules is of key importance to interpret the experiments in the search for violation of time-reversal (T) and spatial-parity (P) symmetries of fundamental interactions in terms of the electron electric dipole moment, eEDM, and dimensionless constant, kT,P, characterizing the strength of the T,P-odd pseudoscalar-scalar electron-nucleus neutral current interaction. The ACME collaboration has recently improved limits on these quantities using a beam of ThO molecules in the electronic H3Δ1 state [J. Baron et al., Science 343, 269 (2014)]. We apply the combined direct relativistic 4-component and two-step relativistic pseudopotential/restoration approaches to a benchmark calculation of the effective electric field, Eeff, parameter of the T,P-odd pseudoscalar-scalar interaction, WT,P, and hyperfine structure constant in Δ31 state of the ThO molecule. The first two parameters are required to interpret the experimental data in terms of the eEDM and kT,P constant. We have investigated the electron correlation for all of the 98 electrons of ThO simultaneously up to the level of the coupled cluster with single, double, and noniterative triple amplitudes, CCSD(T), theory. Contributions from iterative triple and noniterative quadruple cluster amplitudes for the valence electrons have been also treated. The obtained values are Eeff = 79.9 GV/cm, WT,P = 113.1 kHz. The theoretical uncertainty of these values is estimated to be about two times smaller than that of our previous study [L. V. Skripnikov and A. V. Titov, J. Chem. Phys., 142, 024301 (2015)]. It was found that the correlation of the inner- and outer-core electrons contributes 9% to the effective electric field. The values of the molecule frame dipole moment of the Δ31 state and the H3Δ1 →X1Σ+ transition energy of ThO calculated within the same methods are in a very good agreement with the experiment.

  3. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Holographic sensors for diagnostics of solution components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiskii, A. V.; Postnikov, V. A.; Suitanov, T. T.; Khamidulin, A. V.

    2010-02-01

    The properties of holographic sensors of two types are studied. The sensors are based on a three-dimensional polymer-network matrix of copolymers of acrylamide, acrylic acid (which are sensitive to the medium acidity and bivalent metal ions) and aminophenylboronic acid (sensitive to glucose). It is found that a change in the ionic composition of a solution results in changes in the distance between layers and in the diffraction efficiency of holograms. Variations in the shape of spectral lines, which are attributed to the inhomogeneity of a sensitive layer, and nonmonotonic changes in the emulsion thickness and diffraction efficiency were observed during transient processes. The composition of the components of a hydrogel medium is selected for systems which can be used as a base for glucose sensors with the mean holographic response in the region of physiological glucose concentration in model solutions achieving 40 nm/(mmol L-1). It is shown that the developed holographic sensors can be used for the visual and instrumental determination of the medium acidity, alcohol content, ionic strength, bivalent metal salts and the quality of water, in particular, for drinking.

  4. Electron microscopy, micro-analysis, and X-ray diffraction characterization of the mineral-like tissue deposited by human cementum tumor-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Arzate, H; Alvarez-Pérez, M A; Alvarez-Fregoso, O; Wusterhaus-Chávez, A; Reyes-Gasga, J; Ximénez-Fyvie, L A

    2000-01-01

    The nature and characteristics of the mineralized-like tissue deposited by cementoblasts are not well-known due to the difficulties in obtaining and culturing cells representing the cementum phenotype. We hypothesized that a putative cementoblastic cell line derived from a human cementoblastoma could serve as a suitable model to study the physical, chemical, and morphological features of the cementum-like tissue deposited in vitro. The cementoblastoma cell line was studied by transmission electron, high resolution, scanning, and atomic force microscopy and compared with human cellular cementum, human osteoblasts, and human alveolar bone. The analyses of the crystals and mineral-like tissue in the cell line were performed by x-ray diffraction microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray micro-analysis. TEM examination of cementoblastoma cells revealed the presence of electron-dense intracellular vesicles surrounded by a membrane that contained filaments and needle-like structures. The diffraction patterns obtained from the intracellular material and human cellular cementum were similar, with D-spacings of 3.36 and 2.8, consistent with those of hydroxyapatite (3.440 and 2.814). The composition of the mineral-like tissue had a Ca/P ratio of 1.60 for cementoblastoma cells and 1.97 for human cellular cementum. Na (5.29%) and Cl (1.47%) were present in the composition of cementoblastoma cells. Human cellular cementum additionally contained Mg (4.95%). Osteoblastic cells showed a Ca/P ratio of 1.6280. Na represented 4.52% and Cl 1.22% of its composition. Human alveolar bone had a Ca/P ratio value of 2.01. Na (6.63%), Mg (2.10%), and Cl (0.84%) were also present. All samples examined represented biological-type hydroxyapatite. Based on the compositional and morphological features, these findings indicate that cementoblastoma-derived cells express the human cellular cementum phenotype.

  5. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals. 2. Electrochemical and spectroscopic characterization of electron transfer irreversibility in ferruginous smectite, SWa-1.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2012-09-04

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important, albeit poorly characterized, redox-active phase found in many natural and engineered environments. This work develops an experimental approach to directly assess the redox properties of a natural Fe-bearing smectite (ferruginous smectite, SWa-1, 12.6 wt % Fe) with mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO). By utilizing a suite of one-electron-transfer mediating compounds to facilitate electron transfer between structural Fe in SWa-1 and a working electrode, we show that the Fe2+/Fe3+ couple in SWa-1 is redox-active over a large range of potentials (from E(H) = -0.63 V to +0.61 V vs SHE). Electrochemical and spectroscopic analyses of SWa-1 samples that were subject to reduction and re-oxidation cycling revealed both reversible and irreversible structural Fe rearrangements that altered the observed apparent standard reduction potential (E(H)(ø)) of structural Fe. E(H)(ø)-values vary by as much as 0.56 V between SWa-1 samples with different redox histories. The wide range of E(H)-values over which SWa-1 is redox-active and redox history-dependent E(H)(ø)-values underscore the importance of Fe-bearing clay minerals as redox-active phases in a wide range of redox regimes.

  6. Design and fabrication of circular and rectangular components for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Coffield, F.E.; Lang, D.D.; Rubert, R.R.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    The electron-cyclotron-resonant heating (ECRH) systems of rectangular waveguides on Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) operated with a overall efficiency of 50%, each system using a 28-GHz, 200-kW pulsed gyrotron. We designed and built four circular-waveguide systems with greater efficiency and greater power-handling capabilities to replace the rectangular waveguides. Two of these circular systems, at the 5-kG second-harmonic heating locations, have a total transmission efficiency of >90%. The two systems at the 10-kG fundamental heating locations have a total transmission efficiency of 80%. The difference in efficiency is due to the additional components required to launch the microwaves in the desired orientation and polarization with respect to magnetic-field lines at the 10-kG points. These systems handle the total power available from each gyrotron but do not have the arcing limitation problem of the rectangular waveguide. Each system requires several complex components. The overall physical layout and the design considerations for the rectangular and circular waveguide components are described here.

  7. Conceptual Design of Vacuum Chamber for testing of high heat flux components using electron beam as a source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. S.; Swamy, Rajamannar; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Divertors Division, Prototype

    2012-11-01

    A conceptual design of vacuum chamber is proposed to study the thermal response of high heat flux components under energy depositions of the magnitude and durations expected in plasma fusion devices. It is equipped with high power electron beam with maximum beam power of 200 KW mounted in a stationary horizontal position from back side of the chamber. The electron beam is used as a heat source to evaluate the heat removal capacity, material performance under thermal loads & stresses, thermal fatigue etc on actively cooled mock - ups which are mounted on a flange system which is the front side door of the chamber. The tests mock - ups are connected to a high pressure high temperature water circulation system (HPHT-WCS) operated over a wide range of conditions. The vacuum chamber consists of different ports at different angles to view the mock -up surface available for mock -up diagnostics. The vacuum chamber is pumped with different pumps mounted on side ports of the chamber. The chamber is shielded from X - rays which are generated inside the chamber when high-energy electrons are incident on the mock-up. The design includes development of a conceptual design with theoretical calculations and CAD modelling of the system using CATIA V5. These CAD models give an outline on the complete geometry of HHF test chamber, fabrication challenges and safety issues. FEA analysis of the system has been performed to check the structural integrity when the system is subjected to structural & thermal loads.

  8. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria

  9. The effect of phytostabilization on Zn speciation in a dredged contaminated sediment using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, EXAFS spectroscopy, and principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfili, Frédéric; Manceau, Alain; Sarret, Géraldine; Spadini, Lorenzo; Kirpichtchikova, Tatiana; Bert, Valérie; Laboudigue, Agnès; Marcus, Matthew A.; Ahamdach, Noureddine; Libert, Marie-Françoise

    2005-05-01

    The maintenance of waterways generates large amounts of dredged sediments, which are deposited on adjacent land surfaces. These sediments are often rich in metal contaminants and present a risk to the local environment. Understanding how the metals are immobilized at the molecular level is critical for formulating effective metal containment strategies such as phytoremediation. In the present work, the mineralogical transformations of Zn-containing phases induced by two graminaceous plants (A grostis tenuis and Festuca rubra) in a contaminated sediment ([Zn] = 4700 mg kg -1, [P 2O 5] = 7000 mg kg -1, pH = 7.8), untreated or amended with hydroxylapatite (AP) or Thomas basic slag (TS), were investigated after two yr of pot experiment by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS), synchrotron-based X-ray microfluorescence (μ-SXRF), and powder and laterally resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure (μ-EXAFS) spectroscopy. The number and nature of Zn species were evaluated by principal component (PCA) and least-squares fitting (LSF) analysis of the entire set of μ-EXAFS spectra, which included up to 32 individual spectra from regions of interest varying in chemical composition. Seven Zn species were identified at the micrometer scale: sphalerite, gahnite, franklinite, Zn-containing ferrihydrite and phosphate, (Zn-Al)-hydrotalcite, and Zn-substituted kerolite-like trioctahedral phyllosilicate. Bulk fractions of each species were quantified by LSF of the powder EXAFS spectra to linear combinations of the identified Zn species spectra. In the untreated and unvegetated sediment, Zn was distributed as ˜50% (mole ratio of total Zn) sphalerite, ˜40% Zn-ferrihydrite, and ˜10 to 20% (Zn-Al)-hydrotalcite plus Zn-phyllosilicate. In unvegetated but amended sediments (AP and TS), ZnS and Zn-ferrihydrite each decreased by 10 to 20% and were replaced by Zn-phosphate (˜30˜40%). In the presence of plants, ZnS was almost completely

  10. Experiments and Computational Theory for Electrical Breakdown in Critical Components: THz Imaging of Electronic Plasmas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zutavern, Fred J.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Bigman, Verle Howard; Gallegos, Richard Joseph

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the development of ultra-short pulse laser (USPL) induced terahertz (THz) radiation to image electronic plasmas during electrical breakdown. The technique uses three pulses from two USPLs to (1) trigger the breakdown, (2) create a 2 picosecond (ps, 10 -12 s), THz pulse to illuminate the breakdown, and (3) record the THz image of the breakdown. During this three year internal research program, sub-picosecond jitter timing for the lasers, THz generation, high bandwidth (BW) diagnostics, and THz image acquisition was demonstrated. High intensity THz radiation was optically-induced in a pulse-charged gallium arsenide photoconductive switch. The radiation was collected, transported, concentrated, and co-propagated through an electro-optic crystal with an 800 nm USPL pulse whose polarization was rotated due to the spatially varying electric field of the THz image. The polarization modulated USPL pulse was then passed through a polarizer and the resulting spatially varying intensity was detected in a high resolution digital camera. Single shot images had a signal to noise of %7E3:1. Signal to noise was improved to %7E30:1 with several experimental techniques and by averaging the THz images from %7E4000 laser pulses internally and externally with the camera and the acquisition system (40 pulses per readout). THz shadows of metallic films and objects were also recorded with this system to demonstrate free-carrier absorption of the THz radiation and improve image contrast and resolution. These 2 ps THz pulses were created and resolved with 100 femtosecond (fs, 10 -15 s) long USPL pulses. Thus this technology has the capability to time-resolve extremely fast repetitive or single shot phenomena, such as those that occur during the initiation of electrical breakdown. The goal of imaging electrical breakdown was not reached during this three year project. However, plans to achieve this goal as part of a follow-on project are described in this document

  11. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Principles of construction of a multiport associative memory from quantum-electronics components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V. B.

    1995-11-01

    The principles of construction are proposed, the feasibility of implementation is considered, and the main parameters are estimated of an optoelectronic multiport associative memory which allows M users to carry out simultaneously and independently a parallel associative search for keys and selection of data associated with these keys from a shared memory with the capacity of N words. Addressed writing of keys and data through M ports is also possible. The main base components of such a memory should be arrays of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, optical threshold inverters and photodetectors, and memory arrays based on hybrid memory boards with electrically controlled optical pixels, in combination with spherical free-space optics and electronic control circuits.

  12. Mass transfer in fuel cells. [electron microscopy of components, thermal decomposition of Teflon, water transport, and surface tension of KOH solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Results of experiments on electron microscopy of fuel cell components, thermal decomposition of Teflon by thermogravimetry, surface area and pore size distribution measurements, water transport in fuel cells, and surface tension of KOH solutions are described.

  13. ePhenotyping for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network: Algorithm Development and Konstanz Information Miner Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Borthwick, Kenneth M; Smelser, Diane T; Bock, Jonathan A; Elmore, James R; Ryer, Evan J; Ye, Zi; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Carrell, David S.; Michalkiewicz, Michael; Thompson, William K; Pathak, Jyotishman; Bielinski, Suzette J; Denny, Joshua C; Linneman, James G; Peissig, Peggy L; Kho, Abel N; Gottesman, Omri; Parmar, Harpreet; Kullo, Iftikhar J; McCarty, Catherine A; Böttinger, Erwin P; Larson, Eric B; Jarvik, Gail P; Harley, John B; Bajwa, Tanvir; Franklin, David P; Carey, David J; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Tromp, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective We designed an algorithm to identify abdominal aortic aneurysm cases and controls from electronic health records to be shared and executed within the “electronic Medical Records and Genomics” (eMERGE) Network. Materials and methods Structured Query Language, was used to script the algorithm utilizing “Current Procedural Terminology” and “International Classification of Diseases” codes, with demographic and encounter data to classify individuals as case, control, or excluded. The algorithm was validated using blinded manual chart review at three eMERGE Network sites and one non-eMERGE Network site. Validation comprised evaluation of an equal number of predicted cases and controls selected at random from the algorithm predictions. After validation at the three eMERGE Network sites, the remaining eMERGE Network sites performed verification only. Finally, the algorithm was implemented as a workflow in the Konstanz Information Miner, which represented the logic graphically while retaining intermediate data for inspection at each node. The algorithm was configured to be independent of specific access to data and was exportable (without data) to other sites. Results The algorithm demonstrated positive predictive values (PPV) of 92.8% (CI: 86.8-96.7) and 100% (CI: 97.0-100) for cases and controls, respectively. It performed well also outside the eMERGE Network. Implementation of the transportable executable algorithm as a Konstanz Information Miner workflow required much less effort than implementation from pseudo code, and ensured that the logic was as intended. Discussion and conclusion This ePhenotyping algorithm identifies abdominal aortic aneurysm cases and controls from the electronic health record with high case and control PPV necessary for research purposes, can be disseminated easily, and applied to high-throughput genetic and other studies. PMID:27054044

  14. Ice nucleation properties of the most abundant mineral dust phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Frank; Weinbruch, Stephan; Schütz, Lothar; Hofmann, Heiko; Ebert, Martin; Kandler, Konrad; Worringen, Annette

    2008-12-01

    The ice nucleation properties of the nine most abundant minerals occurring in desert aerosols (quartz, albite, microcline, kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite, calcite, gypsum, and hematite) were investigated by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). In this instrument, the pure minerals are exposed to water vapor at variable pressures and temperatures. The crystallization of ice on the mineral particles is observed by secondary electron imaging, and the supersaturation for an activated particle fraction of 1-3% is determined as function of temperature. In all experiments, condensation of water prior to ice formation was not observed within detectable limits, even at water supersaturation. The highest temperatures for 1-3% activation vary between -10°C and -16°C for the nine minerals investigated, and the corresponding onset relative humidities relative to ice RHi between 107 and 117%. Supersaturation temperature curves for initial ice formation (1-3% activation) in the temperature range typical for mixed-phase clouds were measured for all nine minerals. The temperature dependence of the onset relative humidity is strongly dependent on mineralogy. Kaolinite, montmorillonite, and hematite show a strong increase in RHi with decreasing temperature, whereas RHi is almost constant for illite, albite, quartz, and calcite. The highly variable ice nucleation properties of the various mineral dust components should be considered for parameterization schemes. Illite and kaolinite are the most important minerals to consider, as they have high ice nucleation efficiency and are common components of desert aerosols.

  15. All-electron formalism for total energy strain derivatives and stress tensor components for numeric atom-centered orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Franz; Carbogno, Christian; Atalla, Viktor; Blum, Volker; Scheffler, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    We derive and implement the strain derivatives of the total energy of solids, i.e., the analytic stress tensor components, in an all-electron, numeric atom-centered orbital based density-functional formalism. We account for contributions that arise in the semi-local approximation (LDA/GGA) as well as in the generalized Kohn-Sham case, in which a fraction of exact exchange (hybrid functionals) is included. In this work, we discuss the details of the implementation including the numerical corrections for sparse integrations grids which allow to produce accurate results. We validate the implementation for a variety of test cases by comparing to strain derivatives performed via finite differences. Additionally, we include the detailed definition of the overlapping atom-centered integration formalism used in this work to obtain total energies and their derivatives.

  16. Impact of the amount of working fluid in loop heat pipe to remove waste heat from electronic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitka, Martin; Kolková, Z.; Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, M.

    2014-03-01

    One of the options on how to remove waste heat from electronic components is using loop heat pipe. The loop heat pipe (LHP) is a two-phase device with high effective thermal conductivity that utilizes change phase to transport heat. It was invented in Russia in the early 1980's. The main parts of LHP are an evaporator, a condenser, a compensation chamber and a vapor and liquid lines. Only the evaporator and part of the compensation chamber are equipped with a wick structure. Inside loop heat pipe is working fluid. As a working fluid can be used distilled water, acetone, ammonia, methanol etc. Amount of filling is important for the operation and performance of LHP. This work deals with the design of loop heat pipe and impact of filling ratio of working fluid to remove waste heat from insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT).

  17. Non-rigid registration and non-local principle component analysis to improve electron microscopy spectrum images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.; Zhang, Chenyu; Oh, Albert; Slater, Thomas J. A.; Azough, Feridoon; Freer, Robert; Haigh, Sarah J.; Willett, Rebecca; Voyles, Paul M.

    2016-09-01

    Image registration and non-local Poisson principal component analysis (PCA) denoising improve the quality of characteristic x-ray (EDS) spectrum imaging of Ca-stabilized Nd2/3TiO3 acquired at atomic resolution in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Image registration based on the simultaneously acquired high angle annular dark field image significantly outperforms acquisition with a long pixel dwell time or drift correction using a reference image. Non-local Poisson PCA denoising reduces noise more strongly than conventional weighted PCA while preserving atomic structure more faithfully. The reliability of and optimal internal parameters for non-local Poisson PCA denoising of EDS spectrum images is assessed using tests on phantom data.

  18. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device

    PubMed Central

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Häring, Peter; Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    Background In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. Methods The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. Results The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. Conclusion The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines. PMID:26604840

  19. X-ray spectroscopy of warm and hot electron components in the CAPRICE source plasma at EIS testbench at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, D.; Celona, L.; Maimone, F.; Maeder, J.; Castro, G.; Romano, F. P.; Musumarra, A.; Altana, C.; Caliri, C.; Torrisi, G.; Neri, L.; Gammino, S.; Tinschert, K.; Spaedtke, K. P.; Rossbach, J.; Lang, R.; Ciavola, G.

    2014-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to detect X radiation emitted by the plasma of the CAPRICE source - operating at GSI, Darmstadt - has been carried out. Two different detectors (a SDD - Silicon Drift Detector and a HpGe - hyper-pure Germanium detector) have been used to characterize the warm (2-30 keV) and hot (30-500 keV) electrons in the plasma, collecting the emission intensity and the energy spectra for different pumping wave frequencies and then correlating them with the CSD of the extracted beam measured by means of a bending magnet. A plasma emissivity model has been used to extract the plasma density along the cone of sight of the SDD and HpGe detectors, which have been placed beyond specific collimators developed on purpose. Results show that the tuning of the pumping frequency considerably modifies the plasma density especially in the warm electron population domain, which is the component responsible for ionization processes: a strong variation of the plasma density near axis region has been detected. Potential correlations with the charge state distribution in the plasma are explored.

  20. Direct observation of nitrate and sulfate formations from mineral dust and sea-salts using low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, HeeJin; Ro, Chul-Un

    In the present work, it is demonstrated that a single particle analytical technique, named low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis, is a practically useful tool for the study of heterogeneous reactions of mineral dust and sea-salts when this analytical technique was applied to a sample collected during an Asian Dust storm event. The technique does not require a special treatment of sample to identify particles reacted in the air. Also, quantitative chemical speciation of reacted particles can provide concrete information on what chemical reaction, if any, occurred for individual particles. Among overall 178 analyzed particles, the number of reacted particles is 81 and heterogeneous chemical reactions mostly occurred on CaCO 3 mineral dust (54 particles) and sea-salts (26 particles). Several observations made for the Asian Dust sample in the present work are: (1) CaCO 3 species almost completely reacted to produce mostly Ca(NO 3) 2 species, and CaSO 4 to a much lesser extent. (2) When reacted particles contain CaSO 4, almost all of them are internally mixed with nitrate. (3) Reacted CaCO 3 particles seem to contain moisture when they were collected. (4) Some reacted CaCO 3 particles have unreacted mineral species, such as aluminosilicates, iron oxide, SiO 2, etc., in the core region. (5) All sea-salt particles are observed to have reacted in the air. Some of them were recrystallized in the air before being collected and they are observed as crystalline NaNO 3 particles. (6) Many sea-salts were collected as water drops, and some of them were fractionally recrystallized on Ag collecting substrate. When sea-salts were not recrystallized on the substrate, they are found as particles internally mixed with NaNO 3 and Mg(NO 3) 2, and in some cases SO 4 and Cl species as additional anions.

  1. Investigation of the mineral components of porcelain raw material and their phase evolution during a firing process by using a Rietveld quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaegyeom; Heo, Eunae; Kim, Seung-Joo; Kim, Jong-Young

    2016-01-01

    A ceramic raw material for white porcelain and its phase evolution during a firing process were investigated by using Rietveld method based on powder X-ray diffraction data. The raw material was mainly composed of five mineral phases: quartz (SiO2), microcline (KAlSi3O8), albite (NaAlSi3O8), muscovite (KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2), and kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4). The amount of each mineral phase could be determined by using Rietveld quantitative phase analyses. During the firing process, the microcline, albite, muscovite and kaolinite phases started to react with each other to produce the mullite phase embedded in an amorphous matrix. The amount of quartz remained nearly unchanged until a temperature above 1200 °C; then, it converted to an amorphous phase at higher temperatures.

  2. HYPER-FORM—A Hypercard® program for Macintosh® microcomputers to calculate mineral formulae from electron microprobe and wet chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bjerg, Silvia C.; Mogessie, Aberra; Bjerg, Ernesto

    1992-07-01

    The program HYPER-FORM permits the input and calculation of a mineral formula from wet chemical and electron microprobe analysis. It includes autosaving of data, search routines, and other database functions. The calculated formula can be exported to wordprocessing programs such as MacWrite® or Microsoft Word® and can be edited as required. It also is possible to export the calculated data to graphic programs such as Cricket Graph® or Kaleidagraph® for a graphic representation of the data. HYPER-FORM is an interactive program written in HyperTalk™ (HyperCard® environment) and is designed to correspond to the Macintosh® interface.

  3. Determination of trace element mineral/liquid partition coefficients in melilite and diopside by ion and electron microprobe techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehner, S. M.; Laughlin, J. R.; Grossman, L.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    The applicability of ion microprobe (IMP) for quantitative analysis of minor elements (Sr, Y, Zr, La, Sm, and Yb) in the major phases present in natural Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) was investigated by comparing IMP results with those of an electron microprobe (EMP). Results on three trace-element-doped glasses indicated that it is not possible to obtain precise quantitative analysis by using IMP if there are large differences in SiO2 content between the standards used to derive the ion yields and the unknowns.

  4. Mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furby, N. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of lubricants made from mineral oils are discussed. Types and compositions of base stocks are reviewed and the product demands and compositions of typical products are outlined. Processes for commercial production of mineral oils are examined. Tables of data are included to show examples of product types and requirements. A chemical analysis of three types of mineral oils is reported.

  5. Management status of end-of-life vehicles and development strategies of used automotive electronic control components recycling industry in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjun; Chen, Ming

    2012-11-01

    Recycling companies play a leading role in the system of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) in China. Automotive manufacturers in China are rarely involved in recycling ELVs, and they seldom provide dismantling information for recycling companies. In addition, no professional shredding plant is available. The used automotive electronic control components recycling industry in China has yet to take shape because of the lack of supporting technology and profitable models. Given the rapid growth of the vehicle population and electronic control units in automotives in China, the used automotive electronic control components recycling industry requires immediate development. This paper analyses the current recycling system of ELVs in China and introduces the automotive product recycling technology roadmap as well as the recycling industry development goals. The strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges of the current used automotive electronic control components recycling industry in China are analysed comprehensively based on the 'strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats' (SWOT) method. The results of the analysis indicate that this recycling industry responds well to all the factors and has good opportunities for development. Based on the analysis, new development strategies for the used automotive electronic control components recycling industry in accordance with the actual conditions of China are presented.

  6. Mineral mining installations

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, G.; Wisniewski, P.

    1983-12-15

    A mineral mining installation serves to win mineral by explosive blasting. The installation employs a shuttle conveyor arranged alongside a mineral face. Roof supports stand side-by-side at the side of the conveyor remote from the conveyor. The roof supports are connected to the conveyor through shifting rams and have roof-engageable caps or the like supported on hydraulic props. The pans of the conveyor have upstanding walls at the rear side nearest the roof supports which carry rails at their upper ends. The roof caps have wall components pivoted thereto and hydraulic piston and cylinder units serve to swing the wall components up and down. When explosive blasting takes place the wall components are swung down to engage on the walls of the conveyor pans to form a screen between the winning region and the access region of the working.

  7. Analytic energy gradients for the spin-free exact two-component theory using an exact block diagonalization for the one-electron Dirac Hamiltonian.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2011-08-28

    We report the implementation of analytic energy gradients for the evaluation of first-order electrical properties and nuclear forces within the framework of the spin-free (SF) exact two-component (X2c) theory. In the scheme presented here, referred to in the following as SFX2c-1e, the decoupling of electronic and positronic solutions is performed for the one-electron Dirac Hamiltonian in its matrix representation using a single unitary transformation. The resulting two-component one-electron matrix Hamiltonian is combined with untransformed two-electron interactions for subsequent self-consistent-field and electron-correlated calculations. The "picture-change" effect in the calculation of properties is taken into account by considering the full derivative of the two-component Hamiltonian matrix with respect to the external perturbation. The applicability of the analytic-gradient scheme presented here is demonstrated in benchmark calculations. SFX2c-1e results for the dipole moments and electric-field gradients of the hydrogen halides are compared with those obtained from nonrelativistic, SF high-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess, and SF Dirac-Coulomb calculations. It is shown that the use of untransformed two-electron interactions introduces rather small errors for these properties. As a first application of the analytic geometrical gradient, we report the equilibrium geometry of methylcopper (CuCH(3)) determined at various levels of theory.

  8. Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy reveals 100 kDa component in a protein complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Min; Wang, Chun-Hsiung; Chang, Jen-wei; Chen, Yi-yun; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Chang, Wei-Hau

    2013-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become a powerful technique for obtaining near atomic structures for large protein assemblies or large virus particles, but the application to protein particles smaller than 200-300 kDa has been hampered by the feeble phase contrast obtained for such small samples and the limited number of electrons tolerated by them without incurring excessive radiation damage. By implementing a thin-film quarter-wave phase plate to a cryo-EM, Nagayama, one of the present authors, has recently restored the long-lost very low spatial frequencies, generating in-focus phase contrast superior to that of conventional defocusing phase contrast, and successfully applied the so-called Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM to target various biological samples in native state. Nevertheless, the sought-after goal of using enhanced phase contrast to reveal a native protein as small as 100 kDa waits to be realized. Here, we report a study in which 200 kV Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM with a plate cut-on periodicity of 36 nm was applied to visualize 100 kDa components of various protein complexes, including the small domains on the surface of an icosahedral particle of ˜38 nm derived from the dragon grouper nervous necrosis virus (DGNNV) and the labile sub-complex dissociated from yeast RNA polymerase III of 17 nm. In the former case, we observed a phase contrast reversal phenomenon at the centre of the icosahedral particle and traced its root cause to the near matching of the cut-on size and the particle size. In summary, our work has demonstrated that Zernike phase-plate implementation can indeed expand the size range of proteins that can be successfully investigated by cryo-EM, opening the door for countless proteins. Finally, we briefly discuss the possibility of using a transfer lens system to enlarge the cut-on periodicity without further miniaturizing the plate pinhole.

  9. Temperature dependence of electron magnetic resonance spectra of iron oxide nanoparticles mineralized in Listeria innocua protein cages.

    PubMed

    Usselman, Robert J; Russek, Stephen E; Klem, Michael T; Allen, Mark A; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark; Idzerda, Yves U; Singel, David J

    2012-10-15

    Electron magnetic resonance (EMR) spectroscopy was used to determine the magnetic properties of maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles formed within size-constraining Listeria innocua (LDps)-(DNA-binding protein from starved cells) protein cages that have an inner diameter of 5 nm. Variable-temperature X-band EMR spectra exhibited broad asymmetric resonances with a superimposed narrow peak at a gyromagnetic factor of g ≈ 2. The resonance structure, which depends on both superparamagnetic fluctuations and inhomogeneous broadening, changes dramatically as a function of temperature, and the overall linewidth becomes narrower with increasing temperature. Here, we compare two different models to simulate temperature-dependent lineshape trends. The temperature dependence for both models is derived from a Langevin behavior of the linewidth resulting from "anisotropy melting." The first uses either a truncated log-normal distribution of particle sizes or a bi-modal distribution and then a Landau-Liftshitz lineshape to describe the nanoparticle resonances. The essential feature of this model is that small particles have narrow linewidths and account for the g ≈ 2 feature with a constant resonance field, whereas larger particles have broad linewidths and undergo a shift in resonance field. The second model assumes uniform particles with a diameter around 4 nm and a random distribution of uniaxial anisotropy axes. This model uses a more precise calculation of the linewidth due to superparamagnetic fluctuations and a random distribution of anisotropies. Sharp features in the spectrum near g ≈ 2 are qualitatively predicted at high temperatures. Both models can account for many features of the observed spectra, although each has deficiencies. The first model leads to a nonphysical increase in magnetic moment as the temperature is increased if a log normal distribution of particles sizes is used. Introducing a bi-modal distribution of particle sizes resolves

  10. Temperature dependence of electron magnetic resonance spectra of iron oxide nanoparticles mineralized in Listeria innocua protein cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Russek, Stephen E.; Klem, Michael T.; Allen, Mark A.; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark; Idzerda, Yves U.; Singel, David J.

    2012-10-01

    Electron magnetic resonance (EMR) spectroscopy was used to determine the magnetic properties of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles formed within size-constraining Listeria innocua (LDps)-(DNA-binding protein from starved cells) protein cages that have an inner diameter of 5 nm. Variable-temperature X-band EMR spectra exhibited broad asymmetric resonances with a superimposed narrow peak at a gyromagnetic factor of g ≈ 2. The resonance structure, which depends on both superparamagnetic fluctuations and inhomogeneous broadening, changes dramatically as a function of temperature, and the overall linewidth becomes narrower with increasing temperature. Here, we compare two different models to simulate temperature-dependent lineshape trends. The temperature dependence for both models is derived from a Langevin behavior of the linewidth resulting from "anisotropy melting." The first uses either a truncated log-normal distribution of particle sizes or a bi-modal distribution and then a Landau-Liftshitz lineshape to describe the nanoparticle resonances. The essential feature of this model is that small particles have narrow linewidths and account for the g ≈ 2 feature with a constant resonance field, whereas larger particles have broad linewidths and undergo a shift in resonance field. The second model assumes uniform particles with a diameter around 4 nm and a random distribution of uniaxial anisotropy axes. This model uses a more precise calculation of the linewidth due to superparamagnetic fluctuations and a random distribution of anisotropies. Sharp features in the spectrum near g ≈ 2 are qualitatively predicted at high temperatures. Both models can account for many features of the observed spectra, although each has deficiencies. The first model leads to a nonphysical increase in magnetic moment as the temperature is increased if a log normal distribution of particles sizes is used. Introducing a bi-modal distribution of particle sizes resolves the unphysical

  11. [Research on the mineral phase and component of non-crystalline and nano-crystalline corrosion products on bronzes unearthed from Shang Tomb in Xingan].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao-lin; Pan, Lu

    2012-05-01

    The patinas on bronzes in Shang Tomb of Xingan were powdery, pale green, which were more like "bronze disease", but the mineral composition of patinas was not paratacamite or atacamite. Micro X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high performance transmission electroscope (HTEM) showed that the patinas were mainly composed of non-crystalline and nano-crystalline SnO2, and the size of nano-crystalline particle was in the range of 4-5.7 nm; Moreover, the energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry showed that element tin is the primary ingredient of the sample, as well as little copper, silicon, lead and iron were detected. By studying the crystal lattice stripe image of the nanometer SnO2, it was deduced that the chemical formula of nano-crystalline SnO2 did not include other elements; The Raman spectrum of the sample showed that there were not any characteristic peaks of SnO2, the spectrum was more like non-crystalline SnO2, and the weak and broad peak of 973 cm(-1) indicated that the sample may contain silicate grains, It was inferred that little of copper, silicon, lead and iron should exist in the form of non-crystalline silicate particles.

  12. Hygroscopic properties of large aerosol particles using the example of aged Saharan mineral dust - a semi-automated electron microscopy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Markus; Heim, Lars-Oliver; Ebert, Martin; Weinbruch, Stephan; Kandler, Konrad

    2015-04-01

    Hygroscopic properties of large aerosol particles using the example of aged Saharan mineral dust - a semi-automated electron microscopy approach Markus Hartmann(1), Lars-Oliver Heim(2), Martin Ebert(1), Stephan Weinbruch(1), Konrad Kandler(1) The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) took place at Barbados from June 10 to July 15 2013. During this period, dust was frequently transported from Africa across the Atlantic Ocean toward the Caribbean. In this study, we investigate the atmospheric aging of the dust aerosol based on its hygroscopicity. Aerosol samples were collected ground-based at Ragged Point (13°9'54.4"N, 59°25'55.7"W) with a single round jet cascade impactor on nickel-substrates. The particles from the stage with a 50% efficiency cutoff size of 1 µm were analyzed with an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) and a cooling stage. In an initial automated run, information on particle size and chemical composition for elements heavier than carbon were gathered. Afterwards, electron microscope images of the same sample areas as before were taken during a stepwise increase of relative humidities (between 50 % and 92%), so that the hygroscopic growth of the droplets could be directly observed. The observed hygroscopic growth can be correlated to the chemical composition of the respective particles. For the automated analysis of several hundred images of droplets an image processing algorithm in Python was developed. The algorithm is based on histogram equalization and watershed segmentation. Since SEM images can only deliver two-dimensional information, but the hygroscopic growth factor usually refers to the volume of a drop, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to derive an empirical function for the drop volume depending on the apparent drop diameter in the electron images. Aside from the mineral dust, composed of mostly silicates and

  13. Sensor fusion of phase measuring profilometry and stereo vision for three-dimensional inspection of electronic components assembled on printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Hong, Deokhwa; Lee, Hyunki; Kim, Min Young; Cho, Hyungsuck; Moon, Jeon Il

    2009-07-20

    Automatic optical inspection (AOI) for printed circuit board (PCB) assembly plays a very important role in modern electronics manufacturing industries. Well-developed inspection machines in each assembly process are required to ensure the manufacturing quality of the electronics products. However, generally almost all AOI machines are based on 2D image-analysis technology. In this paper, a 3D-measurement-method-based AOI system is proposed consisting of a phase shifting profilometer and a stereo vision system for assembled electronic components on a PCB after component mounting and the reflow process. In this system information from two visual systems is fused to extend the shape measurement range limited by 2pi phase ambiguity of the phase shifting profilometer, and finally to maintain fine measurement resolution and high accuracy of the phase shifting profilometer with the measurement range extended by the stereo vision. The main purpose is to overcome the low inspection reliability problem of 2D-based inspection machines by using 3D information of components. The 3D shape measurement results on PCB-mounted electronic components are shown and compared with results from contact and noncontact 3D measuring machines. Based on a series of experiments, the usefulness of the proposed sensor system and its fusion technique are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  14. Principal component analysis of electron beams generated in K-shell aluminum X-pinch plasma produced by a compact LC-generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, M. F.; Danisman, Y.; Larour, J.; Aranchuk, L.

    2015-06-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) method is applied and compared with the line ratios of H-like and He-like transitions, in order to investigate the effects of electron beam on the K-shell Aluminum synthetic spectra. It is also used as a diagnostics to estimate the plasma parameters of K-shell Al X-pinch plasma spectrum. This spectrum is produced by the explosion of two 25-μm Al wires on a compact LC (40 kV, 200 kA) generator. The database for the principal component extraction is created over a previously developed, non-LTE, collisional radiative K-shell Aluminum model. As a result, PCA shows an agreement with the line ratios which are sensitive to plasma electron temperatures, densities and beam fractions. Principal component analysis also illustrates that the addition to the non-LTE model of a fraction f of electrons in an energetic beam, generates the clusters in a three dimensional vector space which are translations of each other and follows reverse v-shaped cascade trajectories, except for the f = 0.0 case. Modeling of a typical shot by PCA gives the plasma electron temperature of Te = 100 eV, density of Ne = 1 × 1020 cm-3 and hot electron fraction of f = 0.2 (with a beam energy centered at 10 keV).

  15. Evaluation of sealing ability of Biodentine™ and mineral trioxide aggregate in primary molars using scanning electron microscope: A randomized controlled in vitro trial

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Allwyn; Asokan, Sharath; Geetha Priya, P. R.; Thomas, Seby

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Biodentine™ when used to repair the furcal perforations in primary molars using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Study Design: The study sample comprised forty recently extracted primary molars. These teeth were placed in a 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution for 24 h and washed with tap water. Access cavities were made using a round bur in high-speed handpiece. Perforations were made in the center of the floor of the pulpal chamber using a 0.5 mm round bur. The teeth were randomly assigned into two experimental groups based on the material used to seal the perforation: Group A – MTA and Group B – Biodentine™. The packed materials were allowed to set for 24 h. The samples were sectioned longitudinally and the extent of marginal adaptation was measured by SEM. Wilcoxon-signed rank test was used for statistical analysis using SPSS software. Results: All teeth exhibited microleakage, but Biodentine™ showed significantly less leakage (0.149) compared to MTA (0.583). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, Biodentine™ showed lesser microleakage compared to MTA and thus may be a good alternative to MTA. PMID:27630495

  16. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching. PMID:27656061

  17. Organo-mineral interactions in Pseudomonas putida-birnessite assemblages: Impact on mineral reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanova, Anna; Kroll, Alexandra; Pena, Jasquelin

    2016-04-01

    The ability of microorganisms to precipitate biogenic birnessite nanoparticles is widely spread in the bacterial and fungal trees of life, with this process accounting largely for the formation of birnessite in nature. Birnessite minerals occur typically as nanoparticles that exhibit significant chemical and structural disorder. Furthermore, the mineral is embedded within a biomass matrix composed of microbial cells and extracellular polymeric substances, where the biomass not only provides reactive surfaces but can mediate electron transfer reactions. The overarching question guiding our research is: How do nanoscale properties and admixing with microbial biomass modify the reactivity of Mn oxide minerals? In this study, we investigate the biomass-birnessite composites of Pseudomonas putida GB-1 biomass and δ-MnO2 nanoparticles. We characterized the structure and composition of the mineral fraction using X-ray diffraction, Mn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical methods. To characterize the biomass fraction, we employed FTIR spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography analysis of the extracellular polymeric substances. Finally, we measured Ni(II) sorption isotherms at pH 6 and Ni K-edge EXAFS spectra to determine the extent and mechanism of Ni sorption in the biomass-mineral composites and in biomass-only and mineral-only systems. This approach provided direct and indirect evidence for the extent of organo-mineral interactions in the composites, as well as a direct measure of sorption reactivity in the composites relative to biomass-only and mineral-only systems. We found that admixing of mineral nanoparticles with biomass reduced the reactivity of the edge sites of birnessite particles towards Ni(II) through the attachment of organic moieties to the mineral particles and/or modification of the assemblage surface charge properties. In addition, the interaction of biomass components with MnO2 particles leads to partial Mn(IV) reduction and

  18. Observation of nitrate coatings on atmospheric mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. J.; Shao, L. Y.

    2009-03-01

    Nitrate compounds have received much attention because of their ability to alter the hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. However, very little is known about specific characteristics of ambient nitrate-coated mineral particles on an individual particle scale. In this study, sample collection was conducted during brown haze and dust episodes between 24 May and 21 June 2007 in Beijing, northern China. Sizes, morphologies, and compositions of 332 mineral dust particles together with their coatings were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalyses. Structures of some mineral particles were verified using selected-area electron diffraction (SAED). TEM observation indicates that approximately 90% of the collected mineral particles are covered by visible coatings in haze samples whereas only 5% are coated in the dust sample. 92% of the analyzed mineral particles are covered with Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings, and 8% are associated with K- and S-rich coatings. The majority of coatings contain Ca, Mg, O, and N with minor amounts of S and Cl, suggesting that they are possibly nitrates mixed with small amounts of sulfates and chlorides. These nitrate coatings are strongly correlated with the presence of alkaline mineral components (e.g., calcite and dolomite). CaSO4 particles with diameters from 10 to 500 nm were also detected in the coatings including Ca(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2. Our results indicate that mineral particles in brown haze episodes were involved in atmospheric heterogeneous reactions with two or more acidic gases (e.g., SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3). Mineral particles that acquire hygroscopic nitrate coatings tend to be more spherical and larger, enhancing their light scattering and CCN activity, both of which have cooling effects on the climate.

  19. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Analysis of the Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA) Database of the International Space Station On-Orbit Electrical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program is investigating and developing technologies to support human exploration of the Moon and Mars. The Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) task is part of the Supportability Project managed by the Exploration Technology Development Program. CLEAR is aimed at enabling a flight crew to diagnose and repair electronic circuits in space yet minimize logistics spares, equipment, and crew time and training. For insight into actual space repair needs, in early 2008 the project examined the operational experience of the International Space Station (ISS) program. CLEAR examined the ISS on-orbit Problem Reporting and Corrective Action database for electrical and electronic system problems. The ISS has higher than predicted reliability yet, as expected, it has persistent problems. A goal was to identify which on-orbit electrical problems could be resolved by a component-level replacement. A further goal was to identify problems that could benefit from the additional diagnostic and test capability that a component-level repair capability could provide. The study indicated that many problems stem from a small set of root causes that also represent distinct component problems. The study also determined that there are certain recurring problems where the current telemetry instrumentation and built-in tests are unable to completely resolve the problem. As a result, the root cause is listed as unknown. Overall, roughly 42 percent of on-orbit electrical problems on ISS could be addressed with a component-level repair. Furthermore, 63 percent of on-orbit electrical problems on ISS could benefit from additional external diagnostic and test capability. These results indicate that in situ component-level repair in combination with diagnostic and test capability can be expected to increase system availability and reduce logistics. The CLEAR approach can increase the flight crew s ability to act decisively to resolve problems while reducing

  20. Korteweg-deVries-Burgers (KdVB) equation in a five component cometary plasma with kappa described electrons and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Manesh; Willington, Neethu T.; Jayakumar, Neethu; Sebastian, Sijo; Sreekala, G.; Venugopal, Chandu

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the existence of ion-acoustic shock waves in a five component cometary plasma consisting of positively and negatively charged oxygen ions, kappa described hydrogen ions, hot solar electrons, and slightly colder cometary electrons. The KdVB equation has been derived for the system, and its solution plotted for different kappa values, oxygen ion densities, as well as the temperature ratios for the ions. It is found that the amplitude of the shock wave decreases with increasing kappa values. The strength of the shock profile decreases with increasing temperatures of the positively charged oxygen ions and densities of negatively charged oxygen ions.

  1. Effect of acid etching on marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate to apical dentin: microcomputed tomography and scanning electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Fouzan, Khalid; Al-Garawi, Ziad; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Javed, Fawad; Al-Shalan, Thakib; Rotstein, Ilan

    2012-12-01

    The present investigation assessed the effect of acid etching on marginal adaptation of white- and gray-colored mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to apical dentin using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sixty-four extracted single-rooted human maxillary teeth were used. Following root-end resection and apical preparation, the teeth were equally divided into four groups according to the following root end filling materials: (i) white-colored MTA (WMTA), (ii) etched WMTA (EWMTA), (iii) gray-colored MTA (GMTA) and (iv) etched GMTA (EGMTA). After 48 h, the interface between root-end filling materials and the dentinal walls was assessed using micro-CT and SEM. Data were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests. Micro-CT analysis revealed gap volumes between the apical cavity dentin walls and EGMTA, GMTA, EWMTA and WMTA of (0.007 1±0.004) mm(3), (0.053±0.002) mm(3), (0.003 6±0.001) mm(3) and (0.005 9±0.002) mm(3) respectively. SEM analysis revealed gap sizes for EGMTA, WMTA, EWMTA and GMTA to be (492.3±13.8) µm, (594.5±17.12) µm, (543.1±15.33) µm and (910.7±26.2) µm respectively. A significant difference in gap size between root end preparations filled with GMTA and EGMTA was found (P<0.05). No significance difference in gap size between WMTA and EWMTA were found in either SEM or micro-CT analysis. In conclusion, pre-etching of apical dentin can provide a better seal for GMTA but not for WMTA.

  2. Comparing the Marginal Adaptation of Cold Ceramic and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate by Means of Scanning Electron Microscope: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Modaresi, Jalil; Javadi, Gholamreza; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term success of endodontic surgeries is often influenced by the type of root-end filling material (RFM). The aim of present study was to compare the marginal adaptation of two different RFM, cold ceramic (CC) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: About 20 extracted human single-rooted teeth were collected and stored into sodium hypochlorite 5.25%. The teeth were decronated from the cemento-enamel junction to prepare 16 mm roots. The working length was measured, and 1/3 coronal of the canal was prepared by Gates-Glidden drills. Apical flaring was followed by K file size # 40-70 based on step back technique. After filling of the canals, 3 mm above the apex was cut at 90° to the long axis. Furthermore, 3 mm of the filling was removed from the apical part using the ultrasonic device. All of the prepared specimens were divided into two groups and were retro filled by MTA and CC. The roots were cut horizontally from 1 mm above the apical part, and dentin-filling material interface was observed by SEM. Finally, the collected data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney test and using SPSS software version 18 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: The mean interfacial adaptation was higher in CC group. However, no significant differences were observed by statistical test (P = 0.35). Conclusion: Both CC and MTA had similar marginal adaptation as RFM however in vivo studies are recommended for better determination. PMID:26435608

  3. Student Activities, Electronic Learners, and the Future: Integrating a Technological Component into Your Role as an Advisor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Jason Foster

    1996-01-01

    Provides advice to faculty advisers of student organizations on understanding the learning styles, needs, cultures, and strengths of today's "electronic learners." Advisers need to understand technology-related learning patterns and become technologically literate to work with college students. (MDM)

  4. 76 FR 54496 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices Having a Digital Television Receiver and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    .... The Commission's notice of investigation named the following respondents: Sony Corporation of Japan; Sony Corporation of America of New York, New York; and Sony Electronics, Inc. of San Diego,...

  5. Higher-order contributions to ion-acoustic solitary waves in a multicomponent plasma consisting of warm ions and two-component nonisothermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Das, K.P.; Majumdar, S.R.; Paul, S.N. ||

    1995-05-01

    An integrated form of the governing equations in terms of pseudopotential higher-order nonlinear and dispersive effects is obtained by applying the reductive perturbation method for ion-acoustic solitary waves in a collisionless unmagnetized multicomponent plasma having warm ions and two-component nonisothermal electrons. The present method is advantageous because instead of solving an inhomogeneous second-order differential equation at each order, as in the standard procedure, we solve a first-order inhomogeneous equation at each order except at the lowest. The expressions of both Mach number and width of the solitary wave are obtained as a function of the amplitude of the wave for third-order nonlinear and dispersive effects. The variations of potential, width, and Mach number against soliton amplitude are shown graphically, taking into consideration the nonisothermality of two-component electrons in the plasma.

  6. The Space Radiation Environment as it Relates to Electronic System Performance: Or Why Not to Fly Commercial Electronic Components in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.; Xapsos, Michael A.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Polvey, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation offers an overview of the space radiation environment, primarily in near-Earth environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The presentation describes the Halloween solar event of 2003 as an example of how solar activity can affect spacecraft electronic systems. The lunar radiation environment is also briefly summarized.

  7. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  8. Electron energy distribution function in plasma determined using numerical simulations of multiple harmonic components on Langmuir probe characteristic: efficiency of the method.

    PubMed

    Jauberteau, J L; Jauberteau, I

    2007-04-01

    The method proposed to determine the electron energy distribution is based on the numerical simulation of the effect induced by a sinusoidal perturbation superimposed to the direct current voltage applied to the probe. The simulation is generating a multiple harmonic components signal over the rough experimental data. Each harmonic component can be isolated by means of finite impulse response filters. Then, the second derivative is deduced from the second harmonic component using the Taylor expansion. The efficiency of the method is proved first on simple cases and second on typical Langmuir probes characteristics recorded in the expansion of a microwave plasma containing argon or nitrogen-hydrogen gas mixture. Results obtained using this method are compared to those, which are determined using a classical Savitzsky-Golay filter.

  9. Electron energy distribution function in plasma determined using numerical simulations of multiple harmonic components on Langmuir probe characteristic--Efficiency of the method

    SciTech Connect

    Jauberteau, J. L.; Jauberteau, I.

    2007-04-15

    The method proposed to determine the electron energy distribution is based on the numerical simulation of the effect induced by a sinusoidal perturbation superimposed to the direct current voltage applied to the probe. The simulation is generating a multiple harmonic components signal over the rough experimental data. Each harmonic component can be isolated by means of finite impulse response filters. Then, the second derivative is deduced from the second harmonic component using the Taylor expansion. The efficiency of the method is proved first on simple cases and second on typical Langmuir probes characteristics recorded in the expansion of a microwave plasma containing argon or nitrogen-hydrogen gas mixture. Results obtained using this method are compared to those, which are determined using a classical Savitzsky-Golay filter.

  10. Two-component relativistic density-functional calculations of the dimers of the halogens from bromine through element 117 using effective core potential and all-electron methods.

    PubMed

    Mitin, Alexander V; van Wüllen, Christoph

    2006-02-14

    A two-component quasirelativistic Hamiltonian based on spin-dependent effective core potentials is used to calculate ionization energies and electron affinities of the heavy halogen atom bromine through the superheavy element 117 (eka-astatine) as well as spectroscopic constants of the homonuclear dimers of these atoms. We describe a two-component Hartree-Fock and density-functional program that treats spin-orbit coupling self-consistently within the orbital optimization procedure. A comparison with results from high-order Douglas-Kroll calculations--for the superheavy systems also with zeroth-order regular approximation and four-component Dirac results--demonstrates the validity of the pseudopotential approximation. The density-functional (but not the Hartree-Fock) results show very satisfactory agreement with theoretical coupled cluster as well as experimental data where available, such that the theoretical results can serve as an estimate for the hitherto unknown properties of astatine, element 117, and their dimers.

  11. H I free-bound emission of planetary nebulae with large abundance discrepancies: Two-component models versus κ-distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    The 'abundance discrepancy' problem in the study of planetary nebulae (PNe), viz., the problem concerning systematically higher heavy-element abundances derived from optical recombination lines relative to those from collisionally excited lines, has been under discussion for decades, but no consensus on its solution has yet been reached. In this paper, we investigate the hydrogen free-bound emission near the Balmer jump region of four PNe that are among those with the largest abundance discrepancies, aiming to examine two recently proposed solutions to this problem: two-component models and κ electron energy distributions. We find that the Balmer jump intensities and the spectrum slopes cannot be simultaneously matched by the theoretical calculations based upon single Maxwell-Boltzmann electron-energy distributions, whereas the fitting can be equally improved by introducing κ electron energy distributions or an additional Maxwell-Boltzmann component. We show that although H I free-bound emission alone cannot distinguish between the two scenarios, it can provide important constraints on the electron energy distributions, especially for cold and low-κ plasmas.

  12. Connecting the irreversible capacity loss in Li-ion batteries with the electronic insulating properties of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) components.

    DOE PAGES

    Leung, Kevin; Lin, Yu -Xiao; Liu, Zhe; ...

    2016-01-01

    The formation and continuous growth of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer are responsible for the irreversible capacity loss of batteries in the initial and subsequent cycles, respectively. In this article, the electron tunneling barriers from Li metal through three insulating SEI components, namely Li2CO3, LiF and Li3PO4, are computed by density function theory (DFT) approaches. Based on electron tunneling theory, it is estimated that sufficient to block electron tunneling. It is also found that the band gap decreases under tension while the work function remains the same, and thus the tunneling barrier decreases under tension and increases under compression.more » A new parameter, η, characterizing the average distances between anions, is proposed to unify the variation of band gap with strain under different loading conditions into a single linear function of η. An analytical model based on the tunneling results is developed to connect the irreversible capacity loss, due to the Li ions consumed in forming these SEI component layers on the surface of negative electrodes. As a result, the agreement between the model predictions and experimental results suggests that only the initial irreversible capacity loss is due to the self-limiting electron tunneling property of the SEI.« less

  13. Connecting the irreversible capacity loss in Li-ion batteries with the electronic insulating properties of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Xiao; Liu, Zhe; Leung, Kevin; Chen, Long-Qing; Lu, Peng; Qi, Yue

    2016-03-01

    The formation and continuous growth of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer are responsible for the irreversible capacity loss of batteries in the initial and subsequent cycles, respectively. In this article, the electron tunneling barriers from Li metal through three insulating SEI components, namely Li2CO3, LiF and Li3PO4, are computed by density function theory (DFT) approaches. Based on electron tunneling theory, it is estimated that sufficient to block electron tunneling. It is also found that the band gap decreases under tension while the work function remains the same, and thus the tunneling barrier decreases under tension and increases under compression. A new parameter, η, characterizing the average distances between anions, is proposed to unify the variation of band gap with strain under different loading conditions into a single linear function of η. An analytical model based on the tunneling results is developed to connect the irreversible capacity loss, due to the Li ions consumed in forming these SEI component layers on the surface of negative electrodes. The agreement between the model predictions and experimental results suggests that only the initial irreversible capacity loss is due to the self-limiting electron tunneling property of the SEI.

  14. Connecting the irreversible capacity loss in Li-ion batteries with the electronic insulating properties of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) components.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Lin, Yu -Xiao; Liu, Zhe; Chen, Long -Qing; Lu, Peng; Qi, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The formation and continuous growth of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer are responsible for the irreversible capacity loss of batteries in the initial and subsequent cycles, respectively. In this article, the electron tunneling barriers from Li metal through three insulating SEI components, namely Li2CO3, LiF and Li3PO4, are computed by density function theory (DFT) approaches. Based on electron tunneling theory, it is estimated that sufficient to block electron tunneling. It is also found that the band gap decreases under tension while the work function remains the same, and thus the tunneling barrier decreases under tension and increases under compression. A new parameter, η, characterizing the average distances between anions, is proposed to unify the variation of band gap with strain under different loading conditions into a single linear function of η. An analytical model based on the tunneling results is developed to connect the irreversible capacity loss, due to the Li ions consumed in forming these SEI component layers on the surface of negative electrodes. As a result, the agreement between the model predictions and experimental results suggests that only the initial irreversible capacity loss is due to the self-limiting electron tunneling property of the SEI.

  15. Enantiomer-specific analysis of multi-component mixtures by correlated electron imaging–ion mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fanood, Mohammad M Rafiee; Ram, N. Bhargava; Lehmann, C. Stefan; Powis, Ivan; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous, enantiomer-specific identification of chiral molecules in multi-component mixtures is extremely challenging. Many established techniques for single-component analysis fail to provide selectivity in multi-component mixtures and lack sensitivity for dilute samples. Here we show how enantiomers may be differentiated by mass-selected photoelectron circular dichroism using an electron–ion coincidence imaging spectrometer. As proof of concept, vapours containing ∼1% of two chiral monoterpene molecules, limonene and camphor, are irradiated by a circularly polarized femtosecond laser, resulting in multiphoton near-threshold ionization with little molecular fragmentation. Large chiral asymmetries (2–4%) are observed in the mass-tagged photoelectron angular distributions. These asymmetries switch sign according to the handedness (R- or S-) of the enantiomer in the mixture and scale with enantiomeric excess of a component. The results demonstrate that mass spectrometric identification of mixtures of chiral molecules and quantitative determination of enantiomeric excess can be achieved in a table-top instrument. PMID:26104140

  16. Spatial distribution of the electron component parameters in the nitrogen plasma of a low-pressure electrode microwave Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Yu. A. Krashevskaya, G. V. Gogoleva, M. A.

    2016-01-15

    Spatial distributions of charged particle concentration, electron temperature, and DC potential in an electrode microwave discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 1 Torr have been measured using the double electric probe method. It has been shown that, near the electrode/antenna, the charged particle concentration exceeds a critical value. The concentration and heterogeneity of the discharge increase with increasing microwave power.

  17. 32 CFR 21.565 - Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-GENERAL MATTERS Information Reporting on Awards Subject to 31 U.S.C. Chapter 61 § 21.565 Must DoD... comply with paragraph 5.e of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) policy directive entitled... requires electronic systems that handle information about grants and cooperative agreements (which, for...

  18. 32 CFR 21.565 - Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-GENERAL MATTERS Information Reporting on Awards Subject to 31 U.S.C. Chapter 61 § 21.565 Must DoD... comply with paragraph 5.e of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) policy directive entitled... requires electronic systems that handle information about grants and cooperative agreements (which, for...

  19. Efficiency and Loss Models for Key Electronic Components of Hybrid and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles' Electrical Propulsion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, J.; Bharathan, D.; Emadi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Isolated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) are widely used in power electronic applications including electric, hybrid electric, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (EVs, HEVs, and PHEVs). The trend towards more electric vehicles (MEVs) has demanded the need for power electronic devices capable of handling power in the range of 10-100 kW. However, the converter losses in this power range are of critical importance. Therefore, thermal management of the power electronic devices/converters is crucial for the reliability and longevity of the advanced vehicles. To aid the design of heat exchangers for the IGBT modules used in propulsion motor drives, a loss model for the IGBTs is necessary. The loss model of the IGBTs will help in the process of developing new heat exchangers and advanced thermal interface materials by reducing cost and time. This paper deals with the detailed loss modeling of IGBTs for advanced electrical propulsion systems. An experimental based loss model is proposed. The proposed loss calculation method utilizes the experimental data to reconstruct the loss surface of the power electronic devices by means of curve fitting and linear extrapolating. This enables the calculation of thermal losses in different voltage, current, and temperature conditions of operation. To verify the calculation method, an experimental test set-up was designed and built. The experimental set-up is an IGBT based bi-directional DC/DC converter. In addition, simulation results are presented to verify the proposed calculation method.

  20. The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study: III. Interrelations between respirable elemental carbon and gaseous and particulate components of diesel exhaust derived from area sampling in underground non-metal mining facilities.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Roel; Coble, Joseph B; Yereb, Daniel; Lubin, Jay H; Blair, Aaron; Portengen, Lützen; Stewart, Patricia A; Attfield, Michael; Silverman, Debra T

    2010-10-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) has been implicated as a potential lung carcinogen. However, the exact components of DE that might be involved have not been clearly identified. In the past, nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and carbon oxides (CO(x)) were measured most frequently to estimate DE, but since the 1990s, the most commonly accepted surrogate for DE has been elemental carbon (EC). We developed quantitative estimates of historical exposure levels of respirable elemental carbon (REC) for an epidemiologic study of mortality, particularly lung cancer, among diesel-exposed miners by back-extrapolating 1998-2001 REC exposure levels using historical measurements of carbon monoxide (CO). The choice of CO was based on the availability of historical measurement data. Here, we evaluated the relationship of REC with CO and other current and historical components of DE from side-by-side area measurements taken in underground operations of seven non-metal mining facilities. The Pearson correlation coefficient of the natural log-transformed (Ln)REC measurements with the Ln(CO) measurements was 0.4. The correlation of REC with the other gaseous, organic carbon (OC), and particulate measurements ranged from 0.3 to 0.8. Factor analyses indicated that the gaseous components, including CO, together with REC, loaded most strongly on a presumed 'Diesel exhaust' factor, while the OC and particulate agents loaded predominantly on other factors. In addition, the relationship between Ln(REC) and Ln(CO) was approximately linear over a wide range of REC concentrations. The fact that CO correlated with REC, loaded on the same factor, and increased linearly in log-log space supported the use of CO in estimating historical exposure levels to DE.

  1. Rational engineering of Geobacter sulfurreducens electron transfer components: a foundation for building improved Geobacter-based bioelectrochemical technologies.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Joana M; Morgado, Leonor; Aklujkar, Muktak; Bruix, Marta; Londer, Yuri Y; Schiffer, Marianne; Pokkuluri, P Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Multiheme cytochromes have been implicated in Geobacter sulfurreducens extracellular electron transfer (EET). These proteins are potential targets to improve EET and enhance bioremediation and electrical current production by G. sulfurreducens. However, the functional characterization of multiheme cytochromes is particularly complex due to the co-existence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and fully oxidized states. Over the last decade, new strategies have been developed to characterize multiheme redox proteins functionally and structurally. These strategies were used to reveal the functional mechanism of G. sulfurreducens multiheme cytochromes and also to identify key residues in these proteins for EET. In previous studies, we set the foundations for enhancement of the EET abilities of G. sulfurreducens by characterizing a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E). These periplasmic cytochromes are implicated in electron transfer between the oxidative reactions of metabolism in the cytoplasm and the reduction of extracellular terminal electron acceptors at the cell's outer surface. The results obtained suggested that PpcA can couple e(-)/H(+) transfer, a property that might contribute to the proton electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane for metabolic energy production. The structural and functional properties of PpcA were characterized in detail and used for rational design of a family of 23 single site PpcA mutants. In this review, we summarize the functional characterization of the native and mutant proteins. Mutants that retain the mechanistic features of PpcA and adopt preferential e(-)/H(+) transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values compared to the wild-type protein were selected for in vivo studies as the best candidates to increase the electron transfer rate of G. sulfurreducens. For the first time G. sulfurreducens strains have been manipulated by the introduction of mutant forms of essential

  2. Rational engineering of Geobacter sulfurreducens electron transfer components: a foundation for building improved Geobacter-based bioelectrochemical technologies

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Joana M.; Morgado, Leonor; Aklujkar, Muktak; Bruix, Marta; Londer, Yuri Y.; Schiffer, Marianne; Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiheme cytochromes have been implicated in Geobacter sulfurreducens extracellular electron transfer (EET). These proteins are potential targets to improve EET and enhance bioremediation and electrical current production by G. sulfurreducens. However, the functional characterization of multiheme cytochromes is particularly complex due to the co-existence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and fully oxidized states. Over the last decade, new strategies have been developed to characterize multiheme redox proteins functionally and structurally. These strategies were used to reveal the functional mechanism of G. sulfurreducens multiheme cytochromes and also to identify key residues in these proteins for EET. In previous studies, we set the foundations for enhancement of the EET abilities of G. sulfurreducens by characterizing a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E). These periplasmic cytochromes are implicated in electron transfer between the oxidative reactions of metabolism in the cytoplasm and the reduction of extracellular terminal electron acceptors at the cell's outer surface. The results obtained suggested that PpcA can couple e−/H+ transfer, a property that might contribute to the proton electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane for metabolic energy production. The structural and functional properties of PpcA were characterized in detail and used for rational design of a family of 23 single site PpcA mutants. In this review, we summarize the functional characterization of the native and mutant proteins. Mutants that retain the mechanistic features of PpcA and adopt preferential e−/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values compared to the wild-type protein were selected for in vivo studies as the best candidates to increase the electron transfer rate of G. sulfurreducens. For the first time G. sulfurreducens strains have been manipulated by the introduction of mutant forms of essential

  3. Rational engineering of Geobacter sulfurreducens electron transfer components: A foundation for building improved Geobacter-based bioelectrochemical technologies

    DOE PAGES

    Dantas, Joana M.; Morgado, Leonor; Aklujkar, Muktak; ...

    2015-07-30

    Multiheme cytochromes have been implicated in Geobacter sulfurreducens extracellular electron transfer (EET). These proteins are potential targets to improve EET and enhance bioremediation and electrical current production by G. sulfurreducens. However, the functional characterization of multiheme cytochromes is particularly complex due to the co-existence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and fully oxidized states. Throughout the last decade, new strategies have been developed to characterize multiheme redox proteins functionally and structurally. These strategies were used to reveal the functional mechanism of G. sulfurreducens multiheme cytochromes and also to identify key residues in these proteins for EET. Inmore » previous studies, we set the foundations for enhancement of the EET abilities of G. sulfurreducens by characterizing a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E). These periplasmic cytochromes are implicated in electron transfer between the oxidative reactions of metabolism in the cytoplasm and the reduction of extracellular terminal electron acceptors at the cell's outer surface. The results obtained suggested that PpcA can couple e-/H+ transfer, a property that might contribute to the proton electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane for metabolic energy production. The structural and functional properties of PpcA were characterized in detail and used for rational design of a family of 23 single site PpcA mutants. In this review, we summarize the functional characterization of the native and mutant proteins. Mutants that retain the mechanistic features of PpcA and adopt preferential e-/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values compared to the wild-type protein were selected for in vivo studies as the best candidates to increase the electron transfer rate of G. sulfurreducens. For the first time G. sulfurreducens strains have been manipulated by the introduction of mutant forms of

  4. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    SciTech Connect

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  5. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-03-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  6. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components

    PubMed Central

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E.; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, John H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic–abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution. PMID:25143589

  7. UPGRADE TO INITIAL BPM ELECTRONICS MODULE AND BEAMLINE COMPONENTS FOR CALIBRATION OF THE LEDA BEAM POSITION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. BARR; J.D. GILPATRICK; R.B. SHURTER

    2001-06-01

    The Low-Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA), designed and built at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is part of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program and provides a platform for measuring high-power proton beam-halo formation. Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) are placed along the FODO lattice and the HEBT. The BPM systems employing log-ratio processor electronics have recently been upgraded for all fifteen BPMs along the accelerator. Two types of calibration are now used. The first corrects for errors within the electronics module and the log-amp transfer function non-conformity. The second is a single-point routine used to correct for cable plant attenuation differences. This paper will also cover the new switching systems used for various system calibration modes as well as various results from LEDA beam runs. New switching algorithms were implemented in order to remove sensitive electronic switches from within the beam tunnel radiation environment. Attention will be paid to the calibration algorithms and switching system interactions, and how well they work in practice.

  8. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components.

    PubMed

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A; Golbeck, John H; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2014-09-02

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy of chondrule minerals in the Allende meteorite: constraints on the thermal and deformational history of granular olivine-pyroxene chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Wolfgang Friedrich; Weinbruch, Stephan; Walter, Rudolf; Müller-Beneke, Gerhild

    1995-02-01

    The microstructures of minerals of three granular olivine-pyroxene chondrules from the Allende carbonaceous chondrite have been studied by methods of transmission electron microscopy, including electron diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The main issue is to deduce the thermal and deformational history of the chondrules. The chondrules consist dominantly of olivine (Fa 3-36), mostly Mg-rich ones ( < Fa 15), and low-Fe ( < 3 mol%) pyroxenes along the join Mg 2Si 2O 6CaMgSi 2O 6. In addition, Ca-rich plagioclase (An 80-An 90), awaruite, magnetite, whitlockite, pentlandite, troilite, MgFeCrAl spinels, sodalite, nepheline and corundum were observed. Pyroxenes found are orthopyroxene (Opx), clinoenstatite (Cen), pigeonite (Pig), lamellar intergrowth of pigeonite and diopside (Pig/Di) on (001) and diopside (Di). The assemblages and chemical compositions of Pig, Pig/Di and Di indicate a subsolidus closure temperature of approximately 1345°C. The lamellar intergrowth Pig/Di was formed by exsolution. The average wavelength λ (periodicity) of the lamellae is 29 nm in chondrule 1, 25 nm in chondrule 2 and 33 nm in chondrule 3. A cooling rate between 25 and 0.4°C/h for the temperature interval 1350-1200°C is estimated from the wavelength λ of the exsolution lamellae. Independent information on the cooling rate is provided by the size of the b-antiphase domains (APDs) of Ca-rich plagioclase, which reflects the time-and temperature-dependent ordering of Al/Si. The size (average diameter) of the domains is 10-30 nm. Comparison with isothermal annealing experiments on Ca-rich plagioclases (An 70-An 100) yields a cooling rate between 12 and 0.03°C/h. Cooling rates derived from the microstructure of pyroxene and plagioclase are at least one order of magnitude lower than those obtained from dynamic crystallization experiments (e.g. Hewins, R. H. Meteorites and the Early Solar System, pp. 660-679, 1988). However, our estimate is only valid in a

  10. Experimental assessment of out-of-field dose components in high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    M Alabdoaburas, Mohamad; Mege, Jean-Pierre; Chavaudra, Jean; Vũ Bezin, Jérémi; Veres, Atilla; De Vathaire, Florent; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this work was to experimentally investigate the out-of-field dose in a water phantom, with several high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy (RT). The study was carried out for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV electron beams, on three different linear accelerators, each equipped with a specific applicator. Measurements were performed in a water phantom, at different depths, for different applicator sizes, and off-axis distances up to 70 cm from beam central axis (CAX). Thermoluminescent powder dosimeters (TLD-700) were used. For given cases, TLD measurements were compared to EBT3 films and parallel-plane ionization chamber measurements. Also, out-of-field doses at 10 cm depth, with and without applicator, were evaluated. With the Siemens applicators, a peak dose appears at about 12-15 cm out of the field edge, at 1 cm depth, for all field sizes and energies. For the Siemens Primus, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak reaches 2.3%, 1%, 0.9% and 1.3% of the maximum central axis dose (Dmax) for 6, 9, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams, respectively. For the Siemens Oncor, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak dose reaches 0.8%, 1%, 1.4%, and 1.6% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 14 MeV, respectively, and these values increase with applicator size. For the Varian 2300C/D, the doses at 12.5 cm out of the field edge are 0.3%, 0.6%, 0.5%, and 1.1% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV, respectively, and increase with applicator size. No peak dose is evidenced for the Varian applicator for these energies. In summary, the out-of-field dose from electron beams increases with the beam energy and the applicator size, and decreases with the distance from the beam central axis and the depth in water. It also considerably depends on the applicator types. Our results can be of interest for the dose estimations delivered in healthy tissues outside the treatment field for the RT patient, as well as in studies exploring RT long-term effects.

  11. Identification of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate deposited during osteoblast mineralization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng-Lai; Chen, Xiao-Rong; Bian, Sha; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Tian-Lan; Wang, Kui

    2014-02-01

    The hydroxyapatite (HAP) with variable chemical substitutions has been considered as the major component in the mineralized part of bones. Various metastable crystalline phases have been suggested as transitory precursors of HAP in bone, but there are no consensuses as to the nature of these phases and their temporal evolution. In the present study, we cultured rat calvarial osteoblasts with ascorbate and β-glycerophosphate to explore which calcium phosphate precursor phases comprise the initial mineral in the process of osteoblast mineralization in vitro. At the indicated time points, the deposited calcium phosphate was analyzed after removing organic substances from the extracellular matrix with hydrazine. The features comparable to dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP), in addition to HAP, were detected in the mineral phases by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. And there was a trend of conversion from DCPD- and OCP-like phases to HAP in the course of mineralization, as indicated by Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction analyses. Besides, biochemical assay showed a progressive decrease in the ratio of mineral-associated proteins to calcium with time. These findings suggest that DCPD- and OCP-like phases are likely to occur on the course of osteoblast mineralization, and the mineral-associated proteins might be involved in modulating the mineral phase transformation.

  12. Industrial Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbury, James C.

    1978-01-01

    The past year is seen as not particularly good for industrial minerals and for industry in general. Environmental concerns continued to trouble the industry with unacceptable asbestos concentrations and chlorofluorocarbon effects on ozone. A halting U.S. economy also affected industrial progress. (MA)

  13. Arbitrary amplitude dust-acoustic waves in four-component dusty plasma using non-extensive electrons and ions distributions-soliton solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulwafa, Essam M.; Elhanbaly, Atalla M.; Mahmoud, Abeer A.; Al-Araby, Abd-alrahman F.

    2017-01-01

    The four-component dusty plasma consisting of positive and negative dust species, electrons, and ions is considered for study. The fluid dynamics equations are applied to describe the motion of the two dust species. Both the electrons and ions are described by employing non-extensive distributions. The one-dimensional arbitrary amplitude of an electrostatic solitary structure has been studied using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential and phase-portrait approaches. In addition to the existence of either the compressive or rarefactive solitary wave, the analysis shows that these two types of waves coexist and propagate in the studied plasma model. Due to the complexity involved in the structure of Sagdeev pseudo-potential, a small amplitude approximation is considered. The corresponding potential diagrams and phase portrait are investigated and the analysis supports the existence of both compressive and rarefactive solitary waves in the considered plasma.

  14. Negative-energy states in the Dirac-Hartree-Fock problem - The effect of omission of two-electron integrals involving the small component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of omission of two-electron integrals involving basis functions for the small component of the wavefunction on the eigenvalue spectrum in the Dirac-Hartree-Fock problem is studied. From an analysis of the Fock matrix it is shown that omission of these integrals moves the negative-energy states down, not up. Their complete omission does not give rise to intruder states. The appearance of intruder states occurs when only some of the core integrals are omitted, due to the nature of particular contraction schemes used for the core basis functions. Use of radially localized functions rather than atomic functions alleviates the intruder state problem.

  15. A Discussion on Uncertainty Representation and Interpretation in Model-Based Prognostics Algorithms based on Kalman Filter Estimation Applied to Prognostics of Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose R.; Saxen, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses several aspects of uncertainty representation and management for model-based prognostics methodologies based on our experience with Kalman Filters when applied to prognostics for electronics components. In particular, it explores the implications of modeling remaining useful life prediction as a stochastic process and how it relates to uncertainty representation, management, and the role of prognostics in decision-making. A distinction between the interpretations of estimated remaining useful life probability density function and the true remaining useful life probability density function is explained and a cautionary argument is provided against mixing interpretations for the two while considering prognostics in making critical decisions.

  16. The effect of the random distribution of electronic components in the output characteristics of the Howland current source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertemes-Filho, P.; Felipe, A.

    2013-04-01

    When a Howland source is designed, the components are chosen so that the designed source has the desired characteristics. However, the operational amplifier limitations and resistor tolerances causes undesired behaviours. This work proposes to take in account the influence of the random distribution of the commercial resistors in the Howland circuit over the frequency range of 10 Hz to 10 MHz. The probability density function due to small changes over the resistors was calculated by using an analytical model. Results show that both output current and impedance are very sensitive to the resistor tolerances. It is shown that the output impedance is very dependent on the open-loop gain of the Opamp rather than the resistor tolerances, especially at higher frequencies. This might improve the implementations of real current source used in electrical bioimpedance.

  17. Structural determination of carvone, a component of spearmint, by means of gas electron diffraction augmented by theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egawa, Toru; Kachi, Yukari; Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Konaka, Shigehiro

    2003-10-01

    The molecular structure and conformation of carvone, a compound with a minty odor, were investigated by means of gas electron diffraction supported by theoretical calculations. Electron diffraction patterns were recorded by heating the nozzle up to 128 °C to obtain enough scattering intensity. The infrared spectrum was also measured by using an absorption cell with a path length of 10 m. The obtained molecular scattering intensities were analyzed with the aid of theoretical calculations and infrared spectroscopy. It was revealed that the experimental data are well reproduced by assuming that carvone consists of a mixture of three conformers that have the isopropenyl group in the equatorial position and mutually differ in the torsional angle around the single bond connecting the ring and the isopropenyl group. It was also found that the puckering amplitude of the ring of carvone is close to those of menthol and isomenthol, a minty compound and its nonminty isomer. The determined structural parameters ( rg and ∠ α) of the most abundant conformer of carvone are as follows: < r(C-C)>=1.520(3) Å; < r(CC)>=1.360(5) Å; r(CO)=1.225(5) Å; < r(C-H)>=1.104(4)Å; <∠CC-C>=121.1(5)°; <∠C-C-C>=110.4(5)°; ∠C-CO-C=117.1(14)°; <∠C-C-H>=111.1(13)°. Angle brackets denote average values and parenthesized values are the estimated limits of error (3 σ) referring to the last significant digit.

  18. Controlling Electron Transfer between the Two Cofactor Chains of Photosystem I by the Redox State of One of Their Components

    PubMed Central

    Santabarbara, Stefano; Bullock, Bradford; Rappaport, Fabrice; Redding, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    Two functional electron transfer (ET) chains, related by a pseudo-C2 symmetry, are present in the reaction center of photosystem I (PSI). Due to slight differences in the environment around the cofactors of the two branches, there are differences in both the kinetics of ET and the proportion of ET that occurs on the two branches. The strongest evidence that this is indeed the case relied on the observation that the oxidation rates of the reduced phylloquinone (PhQ) cofactor differ by an order of magnitude. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues involved in the respective PhQ-binding sites resulted in a specific alteration of the rates of semiquinone oxidation. Here, we show that the PsaA-F689N mutation results in an ∼100-fold decrease in the observed rate of PhQA− oxidation. This is the largest change of PhQA− oxidation kinetics observed so far for a single-point mutation, resulting in a lifetime that exceeds that of the terminal electron donor, P700+. This situation allows a second photochemical charge separation event to be initiated before PhQA− has decayed, thereby mimicking in PSI a situation that occurs in type II reaction centers. The results indicate that the presence of PhQA− does not impact the overall quantum yield and leads to an almost complete redistribution of the fractional utilization of the two functional ET chains, in favor of the one that does not bear the charged species. The evolutionary implications of these results are also briefly discussed. PMID:25809266

  19. X-class Solar Flare Energy Partition into Radiative, Non-Thermal Acceleration of Electrons and Peak Thermal Plasma Components - Methodology and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Chamberlin, Phillip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hock, Rachel

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic processes in the solar system. X-class flares are the largest and can convert up to 1033 ergs of magnetic energy into the acceleration of charged particles and the heating of plasma. They are often accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We discuss the methodology and results of the energy partition into three main components: (1) radiative energy, (2) non-thermal acceleration of electrons, and (3) the peak thermal energy content, for a subset of the largest eruptive events from Solar Cycle 23, as derived from satellite observations and empirical models. The bolometric energy content is on the order of 1031 - 1032 ergs and is extracted from Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). The Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) contribution of the total radiative output is obtained by implementing the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). Furthermore, we partition the radiative release into impulsive and gradual phases. X-ray spectra from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) are used to deduce the energy in the non-thermal accelerated electrons, generally found to be 1031 -1032 ergs, and the peak thermal energy content of around 1030 - 1031 ergs. Aside from the CME kinetic energy, these three components contain a substantial amount of the initial available magnetic energy.

  20. Mineral bioprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    In the last 25 years, the introduction of biotechnological methods in hydrometallurgy has created new opportunities and challenges for the mineral processing industry. This was especially true for the production of metal values from mining wastes and low-and-complex-grade mineral resources, which were considered economically not amenable for processing by conventional extraction methods. Using bio-assisted heap, dump and in-situ leaching technologies, copper and uranium extractions gained their first industrial applications. The precious metal industries were the next to adopt the bio-preoxidation technique in the extraction of gold from refractory sulfide-bearing ores and concentrates. A variety of other bioleaching opportunities exist for nickel, cobalt, cadmium and zinc sulfide leaching. Recently developed bioremediation methods and biosorption technologies have shown a good potential for industrial applications to remove trace heavy metal and radionuclide concentrations from contaminated soils, and mining and processing effluents.

  1. Development of a ferromagnetic component in the superconducting state of Fe-excess Fe1.12Te1-xSex by electronic charge redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Hsien; Karna, Sunil K.; Hsu, Han; Li, Chi-Yen; Lee, Chi-Hung; Sankar, Raman; Cheng Chou, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The general picture established so far for the links between superconductivity and magnetic ordering in iron chalcogenide Fe1+y(Te1-xSex) is that the substitution of Se for Te directly drives the system from the antiferromagnetic end into the superconducting regime. Here, we report on the observation of a ferromagnetic component that developed together with the superconducting transition in Fe-excess Fe1.12Te1-xSex crystals using neutron and x-ray diffractions, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and magnetization measurements. The superconducting transition is accompanied by a negative thermal expansion of the crystalline unit cell and an electronic charge redistribution, where a small portion of the electronic charge flows from around the Fe sites toward the Te/Se sites. First-principles calculations show consistent results, revealing that the excess Fe ions play a more significant role in affecting the magnetic property in the superconducting state than in the normal state and the occurrence of an electronic charge redistribution through the superconducting transition. PMID:26077466

  2. Micro and nano-size pores of clay minerals in shale reservoirs: Implication for the accumulation of shale gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shangbin; Han, Yufu; Fu, Changqin; Zhang, han; Zhu, Yanming; Zuo, Zhaoxi

    2016-08-01

    A pore is an essential component of shale gas reservoirs. Clay minerals are the adsorption carrier second only to organic matter. This paper uses the organic maturity test, Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to study the structure and effect of clay minerals on storing gas in shales. Results show the depositional environment and organic maturity influence the content and types of clay minerals as well as their structure in the three types of sedimentary facies in China. Clay minerals develop multi-size pores which shrink to micro- and nano-size by close compaction during diagenesis. Micro- and nano-pores can be divided into six types: 1) interlayer, 2) intergranular, 3) pore and fracture in contact with organic matter, 4) pore and fracture in contact with other types of minerals, 5) dissolved and, 6) micro-cracks. The contribution of clay minerals to the presence of pores in shale is evident and the clay plane porosity can even reach 16%, close to the contribution of organic matter. The amount of clay minerals and pores displays a positive correlation. Clay minerals possess a strong adsorption which is affected by moisture and reservoir maturity. Different pore levels of clay minerals are mutually arranged, thus essentially producing distinct reservoir adsorption effects. Understanding the structural characteristics of micro- and nano-pores in clay minerals can provide a tool for the exploration and development of shale gas reservoirs.

  3. Microstructural architecture developed in the fabrication of solid and open-cellular copper components by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Diana Alejandra

    The fabrication of Cu components were first built by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) from low-purity, atomized Cu powder containing a high density of Cu2O precipitates leading to a novel example of precipitate-dislocation architecture. These microstructures exhibit cell-like arrays (1-3microm) in the horizontal reference plane perpendicular to the build direction with columnar-like arrays extending from ~12 to >60 microm in length and corresponding spatial dimensions of 1-3 microm. These observations were observed by the use of optical metallography, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness measurements were taken both on the atomized powder and the Cu components. The hardness for these architectures ranged from ~HV 83 to 88, in contrast to the original Cu powder microindentation hardness of HV 72 and the commercial Cu base plate hardness of HV 57. These observations were utilized for the fabrication of open-cellular copper structures by additive manufacturing using EBM and illustrated the ability to fabricate some form of controlled microstructural architecture by EBM parameter alteration or optimizing. The fabrication of these structures ranged in densities from 0.73g/cm3 to 6.67g/cm3. These structures correspond to four different articulated mesh arrays. While these components contained some porosity as a consequence of some unmelted regions, the Cu2O precipitates also contributed to a reduced density. Using X-ray Diffraction showed the approximate volume fraction estimated to be ~2%. The addition of precipitates created in the EBM melt scan formed microstructural arrays which contributed to hardening contributing to the strength of mesh struts and foam ligaments. The measurements of relative stiffness versus relative density plots for Cu compared very closely with Ti-6Al-4V open cellular structures - both mesh and foams. The Cu reticulated mesh structures exhibit a slope of n = 2 in contrast to a slope of n = 2

  4. Manganese oxide minerals: Crystal structures and economic and environmental significance

    PubMed Central

    Post, Jeffrey E.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese oxide minerals have been used for thousands of years—by the ancients for pigments and to clarify glass, and today as ores of Mn metal, catalysts, and battery material. More than 30 Mn oxide minerals occur in a wide variety of geological settings. They are major components of Mn nodules that pave huge areas of the ocean floor and bottoms of many fresh-water lakes. Mn oxide minerals are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and participate in a variety of chemical reactions that affect groundwater and bulk soil composition. Their typical occurrence as fine-grained mixtures makes it difficult to study their atomic structures and crystal chemistries. In recent years, however, investigations using transmission electron microscopy and powder x-ray and neutron diffraction methods have provided important new insights into the structures and properties of these materials. The crystal structures for todorokite and birnessite, two of the more common Mn oxide minerals in terrestrial deposits and ocean nodules, were determined by using powder x-ray diffraction data and the Rietveld refinement method. Because of the large tunnels in todorokite and related structures there is considerable interest in the use of these materials and synthetic analogues as catalysts and cation exchange agents. Birnessite-group minerals have layer structures and readily undergo oxidation reduction and cation-exchange reactions and play a major role in controlling groundwater chemistry. PMID:10097056

  5. Crystallization conditions and controls on trace element residence in the main minerals from the Pedra Branca Syenite, Brazil: An electron microprobe and LA-ICPMS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Bruna Borges; Janasi, Valdecir de Assis

    2012-11-01

    Major and trace-element microanalyses of the main minerals from the 610 Ma Pedra Branca Syenite, southeast Brazil, allow inferences on intensive parameters of magmatic crystallization and on the partition of trace-elements among these minerals, with important implications for the petrogenetic evolution of the pluton. Two main syenite types make up the pluton, a quartz-free syenite with tabular alkali feldspar (laminated silica-saturated syenite, LSS, with Na-rich augite + phlogopite + hematite + magnetite + titanite + apatite) and a quartz-bearing syenite (laminated silica-oversaturated syenite, LSO, with scarce corroded plagioclase plus diopside + biotite ± hornblende + ilmenite ± magnetite + titanite + apatite). Both types share a remarkable enrichment in incompatible elements as K, Ba, Sr, P and LREE. Apatite saturation temperatures of ~ 1060-1090 °C are the best estimates of liquidus, whereas the pressure of emplacement, based on Al-in-hornblende barometry, is estimated as 3.3 to 4.8 kbar. Although both units crystallized under oxidizing conditions, oxygen fugacity was probably higher in LSS, as shown by higher mg# of the mafic minerals and higher hematite contents in Hem-Ilmss. In contrast with the Ca-bearing alkali-feldspar from LSO, which hosts most of the whole-rock Sr and Pb, virtually Ca-free alkali-feldspar from LSS hosts ~ 50% of whole-rock Sr and ~ 80% of Pb, the remainder of these elements being shared by apatite, pyroxene and titanite. This contrast reflects a strong crystal-chemical control, whereby a higher proportion of an element with similar ratio and charge (Ca2 +) enhances the residence of Sr and Pb in the M-site of alkali feldspar. The more alkaline character of the LSS magma is inferred to have inhibited zircon saturation; Zr + Hf remained in solution until late in the crystallization, and were mostly accommodated in the structure of Ca-Na pyroxene and titanite, which are one order of magnitude richer in these elements compared to the

  6. 4-Component correlated all-electron study on Eka-actinium Fluoride (E121F) including Gaunt interaction: Accurate analytical form, bonding and influence on rovibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador, Davi H. T.; de Oliveira, Heibbe C. B.; Sambrano, Julio R.; Gargano, Ricardo; de Macedo, Luiz Guilherme M.

    2016-10-01

    A prolapse-free basis set for Eka-Actinium (E121, Z = 121), numerical atomic calculations on E121, spectroscopic constants and accurate analytical form for the potential energy curve of diatomic E121F obtained at 4-component all-electron CCSD(T) level including Gaunt interaction are presented. The results show a strong and polarized bond (≈181 kcal/mol in strength) between E121 and F, the outermost frontier molecular orbitals from E121F should be fairly similar to the ones from AcF and there is no evidence of break of periodic trends. Moreover, the Gaunt interaction, although small, is expected to influence considerably the overall rovibrational spectra.

  7. Structure and chemical characteristics of natural mineral deposit Terbunskaya (Lipetsk region, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyleva, S.; Shchuchka, R.; Gulidova, V.; Mertvishcheva, M.

    2015-07-01

    New knowledge about the mineralogical features Terbunsky mineral. Investigated 5 fractions isolated from the incision (2-2,5 m). Terbunskaya deposit belongs to minerals Santonian age. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of fractions isolated studied in detail. In the coarse fractions found ancient organic remains of algae and micro-organisms that have been sedimented together with the mineral component during geological periods. The share of organic inclusions does not exceed 1.5%. Chemical composition confirms the presence of silicon and carbonate organisms. Advantageously proportion of minerals having a layered structure with a plurality of micro and nano pore size 600 - 80-nm and an average chemical composition (wt%): Na (0,64), Mg (0,54), Al (13.48), Si (27 57), K (2.39) Ca (0.75).

  8. Structure and chemical characteristics of natural mineral deposit Terbunskaya (Lipetsk region, Russia)

    SciTech Connect

    Motyleva, S. Mertvishcheva, M.; Shchuchka, R.; Gulidova, V.

    2015-07-22

    New knowledge about the mineralogical features Terbunsky mineral. Investigated 5 fractions isolated from the incision (2-2,5 m). Terbunskaya deposit belongs to minerals Santonian age. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of fractions isolated studied in detail. In the coarse fractions found ancient organic remains of algae and micro-organisms that have been sedimented together with the mineral component during geological periods. The share of organic inclusions does not exceed 1.5%. Chemical composition confirms the presence of silicon and carbonate organisms. Advantageously proportion of minerals having a layered structure with a plurality of micro and nano pore size 600 - 80-nm and an average chemical composition (wt%): Na (0,64), Mg (0,54), Al (13.48), Si (27 57), K (2.39) Ca (0.75)

  9. Separate electronic attenuation allowing a spin-component-scaled second-order Møller-Plesset theory to be effective for both thermochemistry and noncovalent interactions.

    PubMed

    Goldey, Matthew; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-06-19

    Spin-component-scaled (SCS) second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) improves the treatment of thermochemistry and noncovalent interactions relative to MP2, although the optimal scaling coefficients are quite different for thermochemistry versus noncovalent interactions. This work reconciles these two different scaling regimes for SCS-MP2 by using two different length scales for electronic attenuation of the two spin components. The attenuation parameters and scaling coefficients are optimized in the aug-cc-pVTZ (aTZ) basis using the S66 database of intermolecular interactions and the W4-11 database of thermochemistry. Transferability tests are performed for atomization energies and barrier heights, as well as on further test sets for inter- and intramolecular interactions. SCS dual-attenuated MP2 in the aTZ basis, SCS-MP2(2terfc, aTZ), performs similarly to SCS-MP2/aTZ for thermochemistry while frequently outperforming MP2 at the complete basis set limit (CBS) for nonbonded interactions.

  10. [Determination of carcinogenic aromatic amines derived from azo colorants in plastic components of electrical and electronic products by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Niu, Zengyuan; Luo, Xin; Ye, Xiwen; Wang, Huihui; Li, Jingying

    2014-01-01

    A study for the simultaneous determination of 21 primary aromatic amines derived from the reduction of the azo colorants in plastic components of electrical and electronic products was conducted. Organic solvents were used to dissolve or swell the plastics to release the azo dyes existing in the plastic components. The azo colorants were reduced to aromatic amines under strong reducing condition of dithionite. Aromatic amines were extracted with methyl tert-butyl ether. Methanol-water (1: 1, v/v) was used to concentrate the extract to constant-volume for HPLC-MS analysis. The analytes were separated on a ZORBAX Eclipse XDB C18 column using the gradient elution with acetonitrile and 0.1% (v/v) formic acid aqueous solution at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. The analyte confirmation was performed using retention time and characteristic ions in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The correlation coefficients (r) of all the standard curves were more than 0.998, and the limits of quantification of the analytes were 0.5 mg/kg. The recoveries were 60.1% - 129.5% for the 21 aromatic amines with the RSDs not more than 14.0% except for a few compounds. The results showed that the banned azo colorants in the plastic products can be analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively through reductive conversion into aromatic amines. In addition, this method has high accuracy and good precision.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26

    The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength

  12. Mineralization of Carbon Dioxide: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V; Soong, Y; Carney, C; Rush, G; Nielsen, B; O'Connor, W

    2015-01-01

    CCS research has been focused on CO2 storage in geologic formations, with many potential risks. An alternative to conventional geologic storage is carbon mineralization, where CO2 is reacted with metal cations to form carbonate minerals. Mineralization methods can be broadly divided into two categories: in situ and ex situ. In situ mineralization, or mineral trapping, is a component of underground geologic sequestration, in which a portion of the injected CO2 reacts with alkaline rock present in the target formation to form solid carbonate species. In ex situ mineralization, the carbonation reaction occurs above ground, within a separate reactor or industrial process. This literature review is meant to provide an update on the current status of research on CO2 mineralization. 2

  13. Characterization of mineral particles in winter fog of Beijing analyzed by TEM and SEM.

    PubMed

    Li, Weijun; Shao, Longyi

    2010-02-01

    Aerosol samples were collected during winter fog and nonfog episodes in Beijing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to study morphologies, sizes, and compositions of aerosol particles. TEM observation indicates that most mineral particles collected in fog episode are scavenged in fog droplets. Number-size distributions of mineral particles collected in fog and nonfog episodes show two main peaks at the ranges of 0.1-0.3 and 1-2.5 microm, respectively. Based on their major compositions, mineral particles mainly include Si-rich, Ca-rich, and S-rich. Average S/Ca ratio of mineral particles collected in fog episode is 6.11, being eight times higher than that in nonfog episodes. Development mechanism of individual mineral particles in fog droplets is proposed. It is suggested that mineral particles with abundant alkaline components (e.g., "Ca-rich" particles) occurred in air should alleviate acidic degree of fog and contribute to complexity of fog droplets in Beijing.

  14. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  15. Earth mineral resource of the month: asbestos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the characteristics and feature of asbestos. According to the author, asbestos is a generic name for six needle-shaped minerals that possess high tensile strengths, flexibility, and resistance to chemical and thermal degradation. These minerals are actinolite, amosite, anthophyllite, chrysolite, crocilodite and tremolite. Asbestos is used for strengthening concrete pipe, plastic components, and gypsum plasters.

  16. Quantifying elemental compositions of primary minerals from granitic rocks and saprolite within the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybrand, R. A.; Rasmussen, C.

    2011-12-01

    Granitic terrain comprises a significant area of the earth's land surface (>15%). Quantifying weathering processes involved in the transformation of granitic rock to saprolite and soil is central to understanding landscape evolution in these systems. The quantification of primary mineral composition is important for assessing subsequent mineral transformations and soil production. This study focuses on coupling detailed analysis of primary mineral composition to soil development across an array of field sites sampled from the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone observatory (SCM-CZO) environmental gradient. The gradient spans substantial climate-driven shifts in vegetation, ranging from desert scrub to mixed conifer forests. The parent material is a combination of Precambrian and Tertiary aged granites and quartz diorite. Primary mineral type and composition are known to vary among the various aged granitic materials and this variability is hypothesized to manifest as significant variation in regolith forming processes across the SCM-CZO. To address this variability, the mineral composition and mineral formulae of rock and saprolite samples were determined by electron microprobe chemical analyses. The rocks were pre-dominantly quartz, biotite, muscovite, orthoclase and calcium/sodium-rich plagioclase feldspars. Trace minerals observed in the samples included sphene, rutile, zircon, garnet, ilmenite, and apatite. Mineral formulae from electron microprobe analyses were combined with quantitative x-ray diffraction (QXRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) data to quantify both primary and secondary mineralogical components in soil profiles from each of the field sites. Further, electron microprobe analyses of <2mm mixed conifer saprolite revealed weathered plagioclase grains coated with clay-sized particles enriched in silica and aluminum (~25% and 15%, respectively), suggesting kaolin as the secondary phase. The coatings were interspersed within each plagioclase grain, a

  17. [Mineral water as a cure].

    PubMed

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of diseases with mineral spring water belongs to the oldest medical therapies. The "remedy" mineral water is therefore of importance also within the pharmacy. The present pharmacy historical work examines the impact of the use of mineral waters, as well as of their dried components, as therapeutic agents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, i.e. from approx. 1810 to 1930, as well as the contributions given by pharmacists in the development and analysis of mineral water springs. Beside these aspects, the aim here is also to describe the role played by pharmacists in the production of artificial mineral water as well as in the sale and wholesale of natural and artificial mineral water. In the first part of this work the situation in Switzerland and its surrounding countries, such as Germany, France, Italy and Austria, is discussed. The second part contains a case-study of the particular situation in the Canton Tessin. It is known from the scientific literature published at that time that information on mineral water was frequently reported. Starting from the beginning of the 19th century the number of such publications increased tremendously. The major part of them were publications in scientific journals or contributions to medical and pharmaceutical manuals and reference books. In particular the spa-related literature, such as spa-guides, was of growing interest to a broad public. The inclusion of monographs into the Swiss, the Cantonal as well the foreign pharmacopoeias granted a legal frame for the mineral waters and their dried components. These works are of major importance from a pharmacy historical standpoint and represent a unique proof of historical evidence of the old medicinal drug heritage. The most frequently used therapies based on mineral waters were drinking and bath cures. Several diseases, particularly those of a chronic character, were treated with mineral waters. The positive influence of these cures on the recovery of the patients

  18. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  19. Mineral spirits poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Mineral spirits are liquid chemicals used to thin paint and as a degreaser. Mineral spirits poisoning occurs ... be found in: Mineral spirits ( Stoddard solvent ) Some paints Some floor and furniture waxes and polishes Some ...

  20. Microorganisms meet solid minerals: interactions and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Ng, Daphne H P; Kumar, Amit; Cao, Bin

    2016-08-01

    In natural and engineered environments, microorganisms often co-exist and interact with various minerals or mineral-containing solids. Microorganism-mineral interactions contribute significantly to environmental processes, including biogeochemical cycles in natural ecosystems and biodeterioration of materials in engineered environments. In this mini-review, we provide a summary of several key mechanisms involved in microorganism-mineral interactions, including the following: (i) solid minerals serve as substrata for biofilm development; (ii) solid minerals serve as an electron source or sink for microbial respiration; (iii) solid minerals provide microorganisms with macro or micronutrients for cell growth; and (iv) (semi)conductive solid minerals serve as extracellular electron conduits facilitating cell-to-cell interactions. We also highlight recent developments in harnessing microbe-mineral interactions for biotechnological applications.

  1. Lunar highland rocks - Element partitioning among minerals. II - Electron microprobe analyses of Al, P, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn and Fe in olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. V.; Hansen, E. C.; Steele, I. M.

    1980-01-01

    Lunar olivines from anorthosites, granulitic impactites, and rocks in the Mg-rich plutonic trend were subjected to electron probe measurements for Al, P, Ca, Ti, Cr and Mn, which show that the FeO/MnO ratio for lunar olivines lies between 80 and 110 with little difference among the rock types. The low values of Ca in lunar olivines indicate slow cooling to subsolidus temperatures, with blocking temperatures of about 750 C for 67667 and 1000 C for 60255,73-alpha determined by the Finnerty and Boyd (1978) experiments. An important paradox is noted in the low Ti content of Fe-rich olivines from anorthosites, although both Ti and Fe tend to become enriched in liquid during fractional distillation. Except for Ca and Mn, olivine from anorthosites has lower minor element values than other rock types. Formation from a chemically distinct system is therefore implied.

  2. Oxygen-isotope, X-ray-diffraction and scanning-electron-microscope examinations of authigenic-layer-silicate minerals from Mississippian and Pennsylvanian sandstones in the Michigan Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zacharias, K.F.; Sibley, D.F.; Westjohn, D.B.; Weaver, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen-isotope compositions of authigenic-layer silicates (<2-micrometer fraction) extracted from Mississippian and Pennsylvanian sandstones in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan were determined. Petrographic and scanning-electron-microscope examinations, and X-ray diffractograms show that chlorite and kaolinite are the most common authigenic-layer silicates in Mississippian sandstones. The range of oxygen-isotope compositions of chlorite and kaolinite are +10.3 to +11.9 and +12.9 to +19.3 pars per thousand (per mil) (relative to Standard Mean Ocean Water), respectively. Kaolinite is the only authigenic-isotopic compositions of kaolinite range from +16.8 to +19.0 per mil.

  3. XCT analysis of the influence of melt strategies on defect population in Ti–6Al–4V components manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    SciTech Connect

    Tammas-Williams, S.; Zhao, H.; Léonard, F.; Derguti, F.; Todd, I.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2015-04-15

    Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM) is a promising powder bed Additive Manufacturing technique for near-net-shape manufacture of high-value titanium components. However without post-manufacture HIPing the fatigue life of SEBM parts is currently dominated by the presence of porosity. In this study, the size, volume fraction, and spatial distribution of the pores in model samples have been characterised in 3D, using X-ray Computed Tomography, and correlated to the process variables. The average volume fraction of the pores (< 0.2%) was measured to be lower than that usually observed in competing processes, such as selective laser melting, but a strong relationship was found with the different beam strategies used to contour, and infill by hatching, a part section. The majority of pores were found to be small spherical gas pores, concentrated in the infill hatched region; this was attributed to the lower energy density and less focused beam used in the infill strategy allowing less opportunity for gas bubbles to escape the melt pool. Overall, increasing the energy density or focus of the beam was found to correlate strongly to a reduction in the level of gas porosity. Rarer irregular shaped pores were mostly located in the contour region and have been attributed to a lack of fusion between powder particles. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Vast majority of defects detected were small spherical gas pores. • Gas bubbles trapped in the powder granules expand and coalesce in the melt pool. • Pores have been shown not to be randomly distributed. • Larger and deeper melt pools give more opportunity for gas to escape. • Minor changes to melt strategy result in significant reductions in pore population.

  4. Correlation of ameloblastin with enamel mineral content

    PubMed Central

    Teepe, John D.; Schmitz, James E.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Fajardo, Roberto J.; Smith, Charles E.; Chun, Yong-Hee P.

    2015-01-01

    In enamel formation, the deposition of minerals as crystallites starts when the mineralization front first forms at the start of the secretory stage. During maturation, the enamel layer accumulates significant amounts of new mineral as the crystallites grow in volume. Inversely related to mineral gain is loss of protein and water from the forming enamel. Both ameloblastin (Ambn) and enamelin are essential components for formation of a functional enamel layer. The aim of this study was to quantify the proportion of mineral and non-mineral material present in developing enamel relative to Ambn concentration using Ambn mutant mice mated with others overexpressing full-length Ambn from the mouse amelogenin promoter at lower (+), similar (++) or higher (+++) concentration than normal. Mandibular incisors (age: 7 weeks, n=8) were imaged by micro-computed tomography and the enamel was analyzed from the apical region to the incisal edge in sequential 1.0 mm volumes of interest. Mineral density was determined using a series of hydroxyapatite (HA) phantoms to calibrate enamel density measurements. At the site where the mandibular incisor emerged into the oral cavity, the enamel volume, mineral weight, and mineral density were reduced when Tg Ambn was expressed at lower or higher levels than normal. While in wild-type the % mineral was >95%, it was negligible in Ambn−/−, 22.3% in Ambn−/−, Tg(+), 75.4% in Ambn−/−, Tg(++), and 45.2% in Ambn−/−, Tg(+++). These results document that the deposition of mineral and removal of non-mineral components are both very sensitive to expressed Ambn concentrations. PMID:25158178

  5. Vitamins and Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Minerals? What Do Vitamins and Minerals Do? Fuel for Growth Common Concerns en español Vitaminas y minerales Breakfast cereals advertise that they're packed with vitamins and minerals. Sports drinks claim they can rev up your flagging energy with a jolt of vitamins or minerals (sorry, ...

  6. Minerals in our environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weathers, Judy; Galloway, John; Frank, Dave

    2000-01-01

    Minerals are found everywhere in our daily lives. This poster depicts numerous items found throughout a home, and the mineral(s) or mineral resources used in the ingredients of, or construction/manufacturing of those items. Designed for K-8 Teachers this poster can be scaled and is printable at 36" x 60" and legible at 11" x 17" in size.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy as combined methods for studying zoning in minerals: The case of spinels from Archean komatiites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazhengina, S. Yu.; Rybnikova, Z. P.; Svetov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Several types of both magmatic and metamorphic spinels have been found in Archean komatiites of the Sovdozero and Kostomuksha greenstone belts in the eastern part of the Fennoscandian Shield. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed relics of cores of primary magmatic chrome-spinels with high Cr and Al contents. In the Sovdozero structure, the relics are better retained than those in the Kostomuksha structure, which is caused by a different degree of metamorphic transformation. The comparable 100 · Cr/(Al + Cr) values of spinel cores from Sovdozero and Kostomuksha reflect similar conditions of partitional melting in the mantle. These data agree with the fact that both komatiite complexes belong to the Al-undepleted petrogenic type. Wide variations in the Cr and Al contents in primary chrome-spinel cores together with a constant Mg/(Fe2+ + Mg) ratio correspond to low oxygen fugacity during magma crystallization. In general, the composition of these primary chrome-spinels is similar to that of accessory phases in peridotites from suprasubduction zones and agrees with hypothesis of komatiite complex formation in back-arc basins.

  8. In vitro enzymatic reduction kinetics of mineral oxides by membrane fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruebush, Shane S.; Icopini, Gary A.; Brantley, Susan L.; Tien, Ming

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  9. In Vitro Enzymatic Reduction Kinetics of Mineral Oxides by Membrane Fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebush,S.; Icopini, G.; Brantley, S.; Tien, M.

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  10. Protein- mediated enamel mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principals of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties as well as the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth. PMID:22652761

  11. Microbial Community Acquisition of Nutrients from Mineral Surfaces. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hochella, M. F.

    2003-06-03

    Minerals and microbes undergo complex interactions in nature that impact broad aspects of near-surface Earth chemistry. Our primary objective in this project was to gain insight into how microbial species and communities acquire critical but tightly held nutrients residing on or within minerals common in rocks and soils, and to quantitatively study related microbe-mineral interactions including cell adhesion, electron transfer, and siderophore-mineral interaction processes.

  12. Minerals in the Foods Eaten by Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla beringei)

    PubMed Central

    Cancelliere, Emma C.; DeAngelis, Nicole; Nkurunungi, John Bosco; Raubenheimer, David; Rothman, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Minerals are critical to an individual’s health and fitness, and yet little is known about mineral nutrition and requirements in free-ranging primates. We estimated the mineral content of foods consumed by mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda. Mountain gorillas acquire the majority of their minerals from herbaceous leaves, which constitute the bulk of their diet. However, less commonly eaten foods were sometimes found to be higher in specific minerals, suggesting their potential importance. A principal component analysis demonstrated little correlation among minerals in food items, which further suggests that mountain gorillas might increase dietary diversity to obtain a full complement of minerals in their diet. Future work is needed to examine the bioavailability of minerals to mountain gorillas in order to better understand their intake in relation to estimated needs and the consequences of suboptimal mineral balance in gorilla foods. PMID:25372712

  13. Minerals in the foods eaten by mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei).

    PubMed

    Cancelliere, Emma C; DeAngelis, Nicole; Nkurunungi, John Bosco; Raubenheimer, David; Rothman, Jessica M

    2014-01-01

    Minerals are critical to an individual's health and fitness, and yet little is known about mineral nutrition and requirements in free-ranging primates. We estimated the mineral content of foods consumed by mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda. Mountain gorillas acquire the majority of their minerals from herbaceous leaves, which constitute the bulk of their diet. However, less commonly eaten foods were sometimes found to be higher in specific minerals, suggesting their potential importance. A principal component analysis demonstrated little correlation among minerals in food items, which further suggests that mountain gorillas might increase dietary diversity to obtain a full complement of minerals in their diet. Future work is needed to examine the bioavailability of minerals to mountain gorillas in order to better understand their intake in relation to estimated needs and the consequences of suboptimal mineral balance in gorilla foods.

  14. Does the preferential microbial colonisation of ferromagnesian minerals affect mineral weathering in soil?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael J; Certini, Giacomo; Campbell, Colin D; Anderson, Ian C; Hillier, Stephen

    2008-09-01

    Fungal activity is thought to play a direct and effective role in the breakdown and dissolution of primary minerals and in the synthesis of clay minerals in soil environments, with important consequences for plant growth and ecosystem functioning. We have studied primary mineral weathering in volcanic soils developed on trachydacite in southern Tuscany using a combination of qualitative and quantitative mineralogical and microbiological techniques. Specifically, we characterized the weathering and microbiological colonization of the magnetically separated ferromagnesian minerals (biotite and orthopyroxene) and non-ferromagnesian constituents (K-feldspar and volcanic glass) of the coarse sand fraction (250-1,000 microm). Our results show that in the basal horizons of the soils, the ferromagnesian minerals are much more intensively colonized by microorganisms than K-feldspar and glass, but that the composition of the microbial communities living on the two mineral fractions is similar. Moreover, X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscope observations show that although the ferromagnesian minerals are preferentially associated with an embryonic form of the clay mineral halloysite, they are still relatively fresh. We interpret our results as indicating that in this instance microbial activity, and particularly fungal activity, has not been an effective agent of mineral weathering, that the association with clay minerals is indirect, and that fungal weathering of primary minerals may not be as important a source of plant nutrients as previously claimed.

  15. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  16. Citrate bridges between mineral platelets in bone.

    PubMed

    Davies, Erika; Müller, Karin H; Wong, Wai Ching; Pickard, Chris J; Reid, David G; Skepper, Jeremy N; Duer, Melinda J

    2014-04-08

    We provide evidence that citrate anions bridge between mineral platelets in bone and hypothesize that their presence acts to maintain separate platelets with disordered regions between them rather than gradual transformations into larger, more ordered blocks of mineral. To assess this hypothesis, we take as a model for a citrate bridging between layers of calcium phosphate mineral a double salt octacalcium phosphate citrate (OCP-citrate). We use a combination of multinuclear solid-state NMR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and first principles electronic structure calculations to propose a quantitative structure for this material, in which citrate anions reside in a hydrated layer, bridging between apatitic layers. To assess the relevance of such a structure in native bone mineral, we present for the first time, to our knowledge, (17)O NMR data on bone and compare them with (17)O NMR data for OCP-citrate and other calcium phosphate minerals relevant to bone. The proposed structural model that we deduce from this work for bone mineral is a layered structure with thin apatitic platelets sandwiched between OCP-citrate-like hydrated layers. Such a structure can explain a number of known structural features of bone mineral: the thin, plate-like morphology of mature bone mineral crystals, the presence of significant quantities of strongly bound water molecules, and the relatively high concentration of hydrogen phosphate as well as the maintenance of a disordered region between mineral platelets.

  17. Comparison of marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate, glass ionomer cement and intermediate restorative material as root-end filling materials, using scanning electron microscope: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Gundam, Sirisha; Patil, Jayaprakash; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Yadanaparti, Sravanthi; Maddu, Radhika; Gurram, Sindhura Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The present study compares the marginal adaption of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA), Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM) as root-end filling materials in extracted human teeth using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: Thirty single rooted human teeth were obturated with Gutta-percha after cleaning and shaping. Apical 3 mm of roots were resected and retrofilled with MTA, GIC and IRM. One millimeter transverse section of the retrofilled area was used to study the marginal adaptation of the restorative material with the dentin. Mounted specimens were examined using SEM at approximately 15 Kv and 10-6 Torr under high vacuum condition. At 2000 X magnification, the gap size at the material-tooth interface was recorded at 2 points in microns. Statistical Analysis: One way ANOVA Analysis of the data from the experimental group was carried out with gap size as the dependent variable, and material as independent variable. Results: The lowest mean value of gap size was recorded in MTA group (0.722 ± 0.438 μm) and the largest mean gap in GIC group (1.778 ± 0.697 μm). Conclusion: MTA showed least gap size when compared to IRM and GIC suggesting a better marginal adaptation. PMID:25506146

  18. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  19. Mineral Distributions at the Developing Tendon Enthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Andrea G.; Pasteris, Jill D.; Genin, Guy M.; Daulton, Tyrone L.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Tendon attaches to bone across a functionally graded interface, “the enthesis”. A gradient of mineral content is believed to play an important role for dissipation of stress concentrations at mature fibrocartilaginous interfaces. Surgical repair of injured tendon to bone often fails, suggesting that the enthesis does not regenerate in a healing setting. Understanding the development and the micro/nano-meter structure of this unique interface may provide novel insights for the improvement of repair strategies. This study monitored the development of transitional tissue at the murine supraspinatus tendon enthesis, which begins postnatally and is completed by postnatal day 28. The micrometer-scale distribution of mineral across the developing enthesis was studied by X-ray micro-computed tomography and Raman microprobe spectroscopy. Analyzed regions were identified and further studied by histomorphometry. The nanometer-scale distribution of mineral and collagen fibrils at the developing interface was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A zone (∼20 µm) exhibiting a gradient in mineral relative to collagen was detected at the leading edge of the hard-soft tissue interface as early as postnatal day 7. Nanocharacterization by TEM suggested that this mineral gradient arose from intrinsic surface roughness on the scale of tens of nanometers at the mineralized front. Microcomputed tomography measurements indicated increases in bone mineral density with time. Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that the mineral-to-collagen ratio on the mineralized side of the interface was constant throughout postnatal development. An increase in the carbonate concentration of the apatite mineral phase over time suggested possible matrix remodeling during postnatal development. Comparison of Raman-based observations of localized mineral content with histomorphological features indicated that development of the graded mineralized interface is linked to endochondral

  20. Mineral distributions at the developing tendon enthesis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Andrea G; Pasteris, Jill D; Genin, Guy M; Daulton, Tyrone L; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Tendon attaches to bone across a functionally graded interface, "the enthesis". A gradient of mineral content is believed to play an important role for dissipation of stress concentrations at mature fibrocartilaginous interfaces. Surgical repair of injured tendon to bone often fails, suggesting that the enthesis does not regenerate in a healing setting. Understanding the development and the micro/nano-meter structure of this unique interface may provide novel insights for the improvement of repair strategies. This study monitored the development of transitional tissue at the murine supraspinatus tendon enthesis, which begins postnatally and is completed by postnatal day 28. The micrometer-scale distribution of mineral across the developing enthesis was studied by X-ray micro-computed tomography and Raman microprobe spectroscopy. Analyzed regions were identified and further studied by histomorphometry. The nanometer-scale distribution of mineral and collagen fibrils at the developing interface was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A zone (∼20 µm) exhibiting a gradient in mineral relative to collagen was detected at the leading edge of the hard-soft tissue interface as early as postnatal day 7. Nanocharacterization by TEM suggested that this mineral gradient arose from intrinsic surface roughness on the scale of tens of nanometers at the mineralized front. Microcomputed tomography measurements indicated increases in bone mineral density with time. Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that the mineral-to-collagen ratio on the mineralized side of the interface was constant throughout postnatal development. An increase in the carbonate concentration of the apatite mineral phase over time suggested possible matrix remodeling during postnatal development. Comparison of Raman-based observations of localized mineral content with histomorphological features indicated that development of the graded mineralized interface is linked to endochondral

  1. Underground coal miners' foot and boot problems.

    PubMed

    Wood, G; Marr, S; Berry, G; Nubé, V; Cole, J

    1999-11-01

    The New South Wales (NSW) Joint Coal Board Health and Safety Trust funded an investigation into foot problems reported by 400 randomly selected underground coal miners from 15 mines in NSW. Miners were interviewed and their responses were entered directly into laptop computers. Digital cameras were also used to take pictures of skin conditions and miners' posture. Observations of the skin results indicate that miners find gumboots to be hot, sweaty and uncomfortable. Skin breakdown and tinea, is frequent and disabling and responsible for absences from the workforce that are costly for both miner and employer. A more comfortable and better designed boot is needed, fabricated in waterproof leather together with socks that 'wick' the moisture away from the foot. Socks worn were of varying components and washed at irregular intervals, indicating a need for regular changes of socks and improved hygiene.

  2. Geochemical processes at mineral surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.A.; Hayes, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume includes 32 papers which were presented at a symposium on geochemical processes at mineral-water interfaces in 1985 and which bring to bear on this area a very wide range of expertise. The discontinuities in properties which occur at the mineral-water interface have profound effects on the movement of naturally occurring ions. Weathering and precipitation processes control the concentrations and speciation of ions in natural waters and the movements of these within the hydrosphere; both classes of processes take place at mineral-water interfaces. After an introductory overview, the book is divided into seven major sections, each dealing with one of the aspects of the processes occurring at the mineral-water interface. Five papers deal with the physical properties of the mineral-water interface; these represent a well-balanced mix of experimental and theoretical (mathematical modeling) work. Adsorption phenomena are dealt with in another five papers; these are largely experimental in character. Ion-exchange processes are discussed in four papers, one of which addresses the use of relaxation methods to study ion exchange kinetics at the microscopic level. Spectroscopic techniques (including electron-spin resonance and Moessbauer spectroscopy) are utilized in four papers. Chemical reactions, mainly redox processes, at mineral-water interfaces are treated in four papers, one of which deals with non-biological organic reactions. Solid-solution formation and equilibria are the subjects of another set of four articles, and the last group of papers deals with the processes involved in precipitation and dissolution, including weathering.

  3. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.

    1979-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes consists of HfO.sub.2 and sufficient Tb.sub.4 O.sub.7 to stabilize at least 60 volume percent of the HfO.sub.2 into the cubic structure. The ceramic component may also contain a small amount of PrO.sub.2, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 or a mixture of both to improve stability and electronic conductivity of the electrode. The component is highly resistant to corrosion by molten potassium seed and molten coal slag in the MHD fluid and exhibits both ionic and electronic conductivity.

  4. Bartering for Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Kathie

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students are assigned occupations that rely on specific minerals. To obtain the needed minerals, students learn how to trade services and commodities. Includes details on preparation, modeling behaviors, and printed materials. (DDR)

  5. Mineral Spirits Purification Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the mineral spirits to decompose 1,2- propanediol dinitrate and remove hydrogen cyandide and other gaseous decomposition produces, and then distill the mineral spirits from the remaining contaminants.

  6. Potential health risks from the use of fibrous mineral absorption granulates.

    PubMed Central

    Rödelsperger, K; Brückel, B; Manke, J; Woitowitz, H J; Pott, F

    1987-01-01

    Attapulgite (palygorskite) and sepiolite are fibrous clay minerals used commercially as components in a wide variety of products including oil and grease adsorbents, carriers for pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and pesticides. They are also components of drilling muds and animal litter and they are used as paint thickeners. The current annual worldwide production of these minerals exceeds one million tons. Although fibrous in nature, the fibre length may vary greatly depending on the location of the geological deposits. American attapulgite is short (0.1-2.5 micron in length, median of 0.4 micron) but palygorskite from other parts of the world is much longer (30% longer than 5 micron). Several samples of these materials have been submitted to scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). This paper reports the results of microscopic evaluations and makes a comparison with the data from experimental carcinogenicity studies and it is concluded that fibre length is a most important carcinogenic property. Images PMID:2954581

  7. Separation of the electron and proton cosmic-ray components by means of a calorimeter in the PAMELA satellite-borne experiment for the case of particle detection within a large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelin, A. V.; Borisov, S. V.; Voronov, S. A.; Malakhov, V. V.

    2013-06-01

    The PAMELA satellite-borne experiment is designed to study cosmic rays over a broad energy range. The apparatus has been in near-Earth cosmic space from June 2006 to the present time. It is equipped with a magnetic spectrometer for determining the sign of the particle charge and rigidity. In solving some problems, however, information from the magnetic spectrometer becomes inaccessible, so that it is necessary to employ a calorimeter to separate the electron and nuclear cosmic-ray components. A procedure for separating these components for particles arriving off the magnetic-spectrometer aperture is considered.

  8. Possible uranium mineralization, Mineral Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W. Roger; McHugh, John B.; Ficklin, Walter H.

    1979-01-01

    The Mineral Mountains block in west-central Utah is a horst whose core stands structurally high relative to all nearby basin-and-range fault blocks. Rocks of the Mineral Mountains range from Precambrian to Quaternary in age, but mostly consist of Tertiary granitic rocks. The range lies with the Wah Wah-Tusher mineral belt. Lead, silver, gold, and tungsten have been mined commercially. During a geochemical survey conducted in the summer of 1978, 30 water samples and 29 stream-sediment samples were collected from the Mineral Mountains area. The interpretation of simple plots of uranium concentrations and the results of a Q-mode factor analysis indicate that potential exists for uranium mineral deposits within the Mineral Mountains. The most favorable areas are in the granitic pluton near its contacts with sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. The most likely source of the uranium anomalies is uraninite-bearing epigenic veins along faults and fractures within the pluton. Three hypothetical models are proposed to account for the uranium mineralization.

  9. Minerals leasing for landowners

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This report delineates the provisions of the legal codes of the 13 Southeastern states relating to minerals leasing. The introduction explains land ownership and land leasing in terms of mineral rights, and describes the basic elements which a lease conveyance must contain to be valid. A checklist gives the terms which must be included in all mineral leases.

  10. A revised dosimetric characterization of the model S700 electronic brachytherapy source containing an anode-centering plastic insert and other components not included in the 2006 model

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, Jessica R.; Davis, Stephen D.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source by Xoft, Inc., was characterized by Rivard et al. in 2006. Since then, the source design was modified to include a new insert at the source tip. Current study objectives were to establish an accurate source model for simulation purposes, dosimetrically characterize the new source and obtain its TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters, and determine dose differences between the original simulation model and the current model S700 source design. Methods: Design information from measurements of dissected model S700 sources and from vendor-supplied CAD drawings was used to aid establishment of an updated Monte Carlo source model, which included the complex-shaped plastic source-centering insert intended to promote water flow for cooling the source anode. These data were used to create a model for subsequent radiation transport simulations in a water phantom. Compared to the 2006 simulation geometry, the influence of volume averaging close to the source was substantially reduced. A track-length estimator was used to evaluate collision kerma as a function of radial distance and polar angle for determination of TG-43 dosimetry parameters. Results for the 50 kV source were determined every 0.1 cm from 0.3 to 15 cm and every 1° from 0° to 180°. Photon spectra in water with 0.1 keV resolution were also obtained from 0.5 to 15 cm and polar angles from 0° to 165°. Simulations were run for 10{sup 10} histories, resulting in statistical uncertainties on the transverse plane of 0.04% at r = 1 cm and 0.06% at r = 5 cm. Results: The dose-rate distribution ratio for the model S700 source as compared to the 2006 model exceeded unity by more than 5% for roughly one quarter of the solid angle surrounding the source, i.e., θ ≥ 120°. The radial dose function diminished in a similar manner as for an {sup 125}I seed, with values of 1.434, 0.636, 0.283, and 0.0975 at 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 cm, respectively. The radial dose

  11. Authigenic minerals: Biologically influenced and induced organomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupraz, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Organominerals are minerals precipitated by interactions with organic matter without enzymatic control. Organomineralization of authigenic carbonate minerals depends on two key components: (1) the "carbonate alkalinity engine" impacting the calcium carbonate saturation index and (2) the organic matrix comprised of extracellular organic matter (EOM), which provides a template for carbonate nucleation. The alkalinity engine can be "intrinsic" when microbial metabolisms increase supersaturation or lower the kinetic barrier of precipitation, or "extrinsic" when the physicochemical environment creates the conditions for mineral formation. The organic matrix produced by various communities within the microbial mats is known to influence nucleation, morphology and mineralogy of minerals through binding of cations. By playing with these two key components, three types of authigenic minerals can be formed: (1) a purely physicochemical precipitation on an abiotic substrate, (2) a precipitation "influenced" by the presence of an organic matrix but resulting from a physicochemical forcing (environmentally driven), or (3) a "microbially-induced" precipitation, in which both supersaturation and organic matrix are resulting from microbial activity. In this keynote, we will review important processes involved in the precipitation of authigenic carbonate minerals in modern microbial mats and open the discussion on the potential use of authigenic carbonate minerals as biosignatures in the fossil record.

  12. Direct characterization of the energy level alignments and molecular components in an organic hetero-junction by integrated photoemission spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Shin, Weon-Ho; Bulliard, Xavier; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seyun; Chung, Jae Gwan; Kim, Yongsu; Heo, Sung; Kim, Seong Heon

    2016-08-01

    A novel, direct method for the characterization of the energy level alignments at bulk-heterojunction (BHJ)/electrode interfaces on the basis of electronic spectroscopy measurements is proposed. The home-made in situ photoemission system is used to perform x-ray/ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS/UPS), reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of organic-semiconductors (OSCs) deposited onto a Au substrate. Through this analysis system, we are able to obtain the electronic structures of a boron subphthalocyanine chloride:fullerene (SubPC:C60) BHJ and those of the separate OSC/electrode structures (SubPC/Au and C60/Au). Morphology and chemical composition analyses confirm that the original SubPC and C60 electronic structures remain unchanged in the electrodes prepared. Using this technique, we ascertain that the position and area of the nearest peak to the Fermi energy (EF = 0 eV) in the UPS (REELS) spectra of SubPC:C60 BHJ provide information on the highest occupied molecular orbital level (optical band gap) and combination ratio of the materials, respectively. Thus, extracting the adjusted spectrum from the corresponding SubPC:C60 BHJ UPS (REELS) spectrum reveals its electronic structure, equivalent to that of the C60 materials. This novel analytical approach allows complete energy-level determination for each combination ratio by separating its electronic structure information from the BHJ spectrum.

  13. Characterizing mineral dusts and other aerosols from the Middle East--Part 1: ambient sampling.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; McDonald, Eric V; Gillies, John A; Jayanty, R K M; Casuccio, Gary; Gertler, Alan W

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program was to provide scientifically founded information on the chemical and physical properties of dust collected over a period of approximately 1 year in Djibouti, Afghanistan (Bagram, Khowst), Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, Al Asad), and Kuwait (northern, central, coastal, and southern regions). Three collocated low-volume particulate samplers, one each for the total suspended particulate matter, < 10 micro m in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10)) particulate matter, and < 2.5 micro m in aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)) particulate matter, were deployed at each of the 15 sites, operating on a '1 in 6' day sampling schedule. Trace-element analysis was performed to measure levels of potentially harmful metals, while major-element and ion-chemistry analyses provided an estimate of mineral components. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to analyze the chemical composition of small individual particles. Secondary electron images provided information on particle size and shape. This study shows the three main air pollutant types to be geological dust, smoke from burn pits, and heavy metal condensates (possibly from metals smelting and battery manufacturing facilities). Non-dust storm events resulted in elevated trace metal concentrations in Baghdad, Balad, and Taji in Iraq. Scanning-electron-microscopy secondary electron images of individual particles revealed no evidence of freshly fractured quartz grains. In all instances, quartz grains had rounded edges and mineral grains were generally coated by clay minerals and iron oxides.

  14. The organic-mineral interaction in mollusk shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Rebecca A.

    Macromolecules are a minority but important component of the minerals formed by living organisms, or biominerals. While many proteins from the nacre and prismatic layers of mollusk shells have been identified and sequenced, the molecular interaction, organization, and rearrangements of proteins upon organic-mineral bond formation, and the effect of this interaction on crystal formation, deformation, and orientation are poorly understood. To examine the organic-mineral interaction in mollusk shells, we prepared model systems consisting of calcium carbonate grown in the presence of synthetic mollusk shell polypeptides. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) were used to examine the electronic structure and bonding environment of both the surface and bulk of model biomineral crystals, thereby determining that the organic-mineral interaction is a series of events starting with bond formation and ending with the fully formed mineral. XANES spectra acquired from the model biomineral systems showed that upon organic-mineral bond formation both the crystal and the polypeptides exhibit bond and molecular structure alterations. We acquired XANES spectra from the surface of calcium carbonate crystals grown in the presence of six synthetic polypeptides sequenced after mollusk nacre proteins: AP7N, AP24N, N16N, asp1, asp2, and ACCN. All of these model biominerals gave similar results, namely the disruption of CO bonds in calcite and enhancement of the peaks associated with C-H bonds bonds in peptides, indicating disordering of the calcite crystal and ordering of the peptides upon binding. We also show that these changes do not occur when the acidic amino acids, Asp and Glu, are replaced in the N16N sequence with Asn and Gln, respectively, demonstrating the importance of carboxyl groups in organic-mineral bond formation. We examined the bulk crystal structure of crystals grown in the presence of N16N and asp

  15. Nanowires, Capacitors, and Other Novel Outer-Surface Components Involved in Electron Transfer to Fe(III) Oxides in Geobacter Species

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek, R.

    2008-12-22

    The overall goal of this project was to better understand the mechanisms by which Geobacter species transfer electrons outside the cell onto Fe(III) oxides. The rationale for this study was that Geobacter species are often the predominant microorganisms involved in in situ uranium bioremediation and the growth and activity of the Geobacter species during bioremediation is primarily supported by electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides. These studies greatly expanded the understanding of electron transfer to Fe(III). Novel concepts developed included the potential role of microbial nanowires for long range electron transfer in Geobacter species and the importance of extracytoplasmic cytochromes functioning as capacitors to permit continued electron transfer during the hunt for Fe(III) oxide. Furthermore, these studies provided target sequences that were then used in other studies to tract the activity of Geobacter species in the subsurface through monitoring the abundance of gene transcripts of the target genes. A brief summary of the major accomplishments of the project is provided.

  16. Mineral particles, mineral fibers, and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Churg, A.; Wiggs, B.

    1985-08-01

    The total fibrous and nonfibrous mineral content of the lung has been analyzed in a series of 14 men with lung cancer but no history of occupational dust exposure, and in a series of 14 control men matched for age, smoking history, and general occupational class. The lung cancer patients had an average of 525 +/- 369 X 10(6) exogenous mineral particles and 17.4 +/- 19.6 X 10(6) exogenous mineral fibers/g dry lung, while the controls had averages of 261 +/- 175 mineral particles and 4.7 +/- 3.2 X 10(6) mineral fibers/g dry lung. These differences are statistically significant for both particles and fibers. Kaolinite, talc, mica, feldspars, and crystalline silica comprised the majority of particles of both groups. Approximately 90% of the particles were smaller than 2 micron in diameter and approximately 60% smaller than 1 micron. In both groups, patients who had smoked more than 35 pack years had greater numbers of particles than patients who had smoked less than 35 pack years. It is concluded that, in this study, lungs from patients with lung cancer had statistically greater numbers of mineral particles and fibers than lungs from controls, and that smoking influences total long-term retention of particles from all sources.

  17. Nanoindentation hardness of mineralized tissues.

    PubMed

    Oyen, Michelle L

    2006-01-01

    A series elastic and plastic deformation model [Sakai, M., 1999. The Meyer hardness: a measure for plasticity? Journal of Materials Research 14(9), 3630-3639] is used to deconvolute the resistance to plastic deformation from the plane strain modulus and contact hardness parameters obtained in a nanoindentation test. Different functional dependencies of contact hardness on the plane strain modulus are examined. Plastic deformation resistance values are computed from the modulus and contact hardness for engineering materials and mineralized tissues. Elastic modulus and plastic deformation resistance parameters are used to calculate elastic and plastic deformation components, and to examine the partitioning of indentation deformation between elastic and plastic. Both the numerical values of plastic deformation resistance and the direct computation of deformation partitioning reveal the intermediate mechanical responses of mineralized composites when compared with homogeneous engineering materials.

  18. Mineralization by nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajander, E. Olavi; Bjorklund, Michael; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    1998-07-01

    Nanobacteria are the smallest cell-walled bacteria, only recently discovered in human and cow blood and in commercial cell culture serum. In this study, we identified with energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and chemical analysis that all growth phases of nanobacteria produce biogenic apatite on their cell envelope. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy revealed the mineral as carbonate apatite. Previous models for stone formation have lead to a hypothesis that an elevated pH due to urease and/or alkaline phosphatase activity are important lithogenic factors. Our results indicate that carbonate apatite can be formed without these factors at pH 7.4 at physiological phosphate and calcium concentrations. Due to their specific macromolecules, nanobacteria can produce apatite very efficiency in media mimicking tissue fluids and glomerular filtrate and rapidly mineralizing most of available calcium and phosphate. This can be also monitored by (superscript 85)Sr incorporation and provides a unique model for in vitro studies on calcification. Recently, bacteria have been implicated in the formation of carbonate (hydroxy)fluorapatite in marine sediments. Apatite grains are found so commonly in sedimentary rocks that apatite is omitted in naming the stone. To prove that apatite and other minerals are formed by bacteria would implicate that the bacteria could be observed and their actions followed in stones. We have started to approach this in two ways. Firstly, by the use of sensitive methods for detecting specific bacterial components, like antigens, muramic acid and nucleic acids, that allow for detecting the presence of bacteria and, secondly, by follow-up of volatile bacterial metabolites observed by continuous monitoring with ion mobility spectrometry, IMCELL, working like an artificial, educatable smelling nose. The latter method might allow for remote real time detection of bacterial metabolism, a signature of life, in rocks via fractures of drillholes with or without

  19. Mineral commodity profiles: Germanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Jorgenson, John D.

    2005-01-01

    Overview -- Germanium is a hard, brittle semimetal that first came into use a half-century ago as a semiconductor material in radar units and as the material from which the first transistor was made. Today it is used principally as a component of the glass in telecommunications fiber optics; as a polymerization catalyst for polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a commercially important plastic; in infrared (IR) night vision devices; and as a semiconductor and substrate in electronics circuitry. Most germanium is recovered as a byproduct of zinc smelting, although it also has been recovered at some copper smelters and from the fly ash of coal-burning industrial powerplants. It is a highly dispersed element, associated primarily with base-metal sulfide ores. In the United States, germanium is recovered from zinc smelter residues and manufacturing scrap and is refined by two companies at four germanium refineries. One of the four refineries is dedicated to processing scrap. In 2000, producers sold zone-refined (high-purity) germanium at about $1,250 per kilogram and electronic-grade germanium dioxide (GeO2) at $800 per kilogram. Domestic refined production was valued at $22 million. Germanium is a critical component in highly technical devices and processes. It is likely to remain in demand in the future at levels at least as high as those of 2000. U.S. resources of germanium are probably adequate to meet domestic needs for several decades.

  20. Magnetic susceptibilities of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenblum, Sam; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic separation of minerals is a topic that is seldom reported in the literature for two reasons. First, separation data generally are byproducts of other projects; and second, this study requires a large amount of patience and is unusually tedious. Indeed, we suspect that most minerals probably are never investigated for this property. These data are timesaving for mineralogists who concentrate mono-mineralic fractions for chemical analysis, age dating, and for other purposes. The data can certainly be used in the ore-beneficiation industries. In some instances, magnetic-susceptibility data may help in mineral identification, where other information is insufficient. In past studies of magnetic separation of minerals, (Gaudin and Spedden, 1943; Tille and Kirkpatrick, 1956; Rosenblum, 1958; Rubinstein and others, 1958; Flinter, 1959; Hess, 1959; Baker, 1962; Meric and Peyre, 1963; Rojas and others, 1965; and Duchesne, 1966), the emphasis has been on the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ranges of extraction. For readers interested in the history of magnetic separation of minerals, Krumbein and Pettijohn (1938, p. 344-346) indicated nine references back to 1848. The primary purpose of this paper is to report the magnetic-susceptibility data on as many minerals as possible, similar to tables of hardness, specific gravity, refractive indices, and other basic physical properties of minerals. A secondary purpose is to demonstrate that the total and best extraction ranges are influenced by the chemistry of the minerals. The following notes are offered to help avoid problems in separating a desired mineral concentrate from mixtures of mineral grains.

  1. Elastic Properties of Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.; Stan, C. V.

    2012-12-01

    The most direct information about the interior structure of the Earth comes from seismic wave velocities. Interpretation of seismic data requires an understanding of how sound velocities and elastic properties of minerals vary with pressure, temperature, crystal structure, and composition as well as the role of anelasticity, melts, etc. More generally, elastic moduli are important for understanding many solid-state phenomena including mechanical stability, interatomic interactions, material strength, compressibility, and phase transition mechanisms. The database of mineral elasticity measurements has been growing rapidly in recent years. In this work, we report initial results of an ongoing survey of our current knowledge of mineral elasticity at both ambient conditions and high pressures and temperatures. The analysis is selective, emphasizing single crystal measurements but also incorporating polycrystalline measurements and volume compression data as appropriate. The goal is to synthesize our current understanding of mineral elasticity in terms of structure and composition, and to identify the major remaining needs for experimental and theoretical work. Clinopyroxenes (Cpx) provide an example of our approach. A wide range of clinopyroxene compositions are found geologically and Mg-, Ca-, and Na-rich clinopyroxenes are expected to be important components in the upper mantle. The single-crystal elastic properties of a number of endmember Cpx compositions have been measured and these exhibit a range of ~25% in shear velocity. Those with monovalent cations (spodumene, jadeite) in the M2 site exhibit the highest velocities while Fe-rich (hendenbergit, acmite) compositions have the lowest velocities. The effects on velocity due to a wide range of chemical substitutions can be defined, but there are important discrepancies and omissions in the database. New measurements of omphacites, intermediate diopside-hedenbergite compositions, aegerine/acmite, augite, etc. are

  2. Feldspar minerals as efficient deposition ice nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Ladino, L. A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-11-01

    Mineral dusts are well known to be efficient ice nuclei, where the source of this efficiency has typically been attributed to the presence of clay minerals such as illite and kaolinite. However, the ice nucleating abilities of the more minor mineralogical components have not been as extensively examined. As a result, the deposition ice nucleation abilities of 24 atmospherically relevant mineral samples have been studied, using a continuous flow diffusion chamber at -40.0 ± 0.3 °C and particles size-selected at 200 nm. By focussing on using the same experimental procedure for all experiments, a relative ranking of the ice nucleating abilities of the samples was achieved. In addition, the ice nucleation behaviour of the pure minerals is compared to that of complex mixtures, such as Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and Mojave Desert Dust (MDD), and to lead iodide, which has been previously proposed for cloud seeding. Lead iodide was the most efficient ice nucleus (IN), requiring a critical relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) of 122.0 ± 2.0% to activate 0.1% of the particles. MDD (RHi) 126.3 ± 3.4%) and ATD (RHi 129.5 ± 5.1%) have lower but comparable activity. From a set of clay minerals (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite), non-clay minerals (e.g. hematite, magnetite, calcite, cerussite, quartz), and feldspar minerals (orthoclase, plagioclase) present in the atmospheric dusts, it was found that the feldspar minerals (particularly orthoclase) and some clays (particularly kaolinite) were the most efficient ice nuclei. Orthoclase and plagioclase were found to have critical RHi values of 127.1 ± 6.3% and 136.2 ± 1.3%, respectively. The presence of feldspars (specifically orthoclase) may play a significant role in the IN behaviour of mineral dusts despite their lower percentage in composition relative to clay minerals.

  3. Feldspar minerals as efficient deposition ice nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Ladino, L. A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-06-01

    Mineral dusts are well known to be efficient ice nuclei, where the source of this efficiency has typically been attributed to the presence of clay minerals such as illite and kaolinite. However, the ice nucleating abilities of the more minor mineralogical components have not been as extensively examined. As a result, the deposition ice nucleation abilities of 24 atmospherically-relevant mineral samples have been studied, using a continuous flow diffusion chamber at -40.0 ± 0.3 °C. The same particle size (200 nm) and particle preparation procedure were used throughout. The ice nucleation behaviour of the pure minerals is compared to that of complex mixtures, such as Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and Mojave Desert Dust (MDD), and to lead iodide, which has been previously proposed for cloud seeding. Lead iodide was the most efficient ice nucleus (IN), requiring a critical relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) of 122.0 ± 2.0% to activate 0.1% of the particles. MDD (RHi 126.3 ± 3.4%) and ATD (RHi 129.5 ± 5.1%) have lower but comparable activity. From a set of clay minerals (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite), non-clay minerals (e.g. hematite, magnetite, calcite, cerussite, quartz), and feldspar minerals (orthoclase, plagioclase) present in the atmospheric dusts it was found that the feldspar minerals (particularly orthoclase), and not the clays, were the most efficient ice nuclei. Orthoclase and plagioclase were found to have critical RHi values of 127.1 ± 6.3% and 136.2 ± 1.3%, respectively. The presence of feldspars (specifically orthoclase) may play a significant role in the IN behaviour of mineral dusts despite their lower percentage in composition relative to clay minerals.

  4. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  5. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  6. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  7. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  8. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  9. Time Dependence of the Electron and Positron Components of the Cosmic Radiation Measured by the PAMELA Experiment between July 2006 and December 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Santis, C.; Di Felice, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S. A.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Potgieter, M. S.; Vos, E. E.

    2016-06-01

    Cosmic-ray electrons and positrons are a unique probe of the propagation of cosmic rays as well as of the nature and distribution of particle sources in our Galaxy. Recent measurements of these particles are challenging our basic understanding of the mechanisms of production, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. Particularly striking are the differences between the low energy results collected by the space-borne PAMELA and AMS-02 experiments and older measurements pointing to sign-charge dependence of the solar modulation of cosmic-ray spectra. The PAMELA experiment has been measuring the time variation of the positron and electron intensity at Earth from July 2006 to December 2015 covering the period for the minimum of solar cycle 23 (2006-2009) until the middle of the maximum of solar cycle 24, through the polarity reversal of the heliospheric magnetic field which took place between 2013 and 2014. The positron to electron ratio measured in this time period clearly shows a sign-charge dependence of the solar modulation introduced by particle drifts. These results provide the first clear and continuous observation of how drift effects on solar modulation have unfolded with time from solar minimum to solar maximum and their dependence on the particle rigidity and the cyclic polarity of the solar magnetic field.

  10. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source (abstract only)

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-02-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (versatile ECR for nuclear science), produce large amounts of x rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different than for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates in dependence of various ion source parameters such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  11. Time Dependence of the Electron and Positron Components of the Cosmic Radiation Measured by the PAMELA Experiment between July 2006 and December 2015.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Santis, C; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S A; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Potgieter, M S; Vos, E E

    2016-06-17

    Cosmic-ray electrons and positrons are a unique probe of the propagation of cosmic rays as well as of the nature and distribution of particle sources in our Galaxy. Recent measurements of these particles are challenging our basic understanding of the mechanisms of production, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. Particularly striking are the differences between the low energy results collected by the space-borne PAMELA and AMS-02 experiments and older measurements pointing to sign-charge dependence of the solar modulation of cosmic-ray spectra. The PAMELA experiment has been measuring the time variation of the positron and electron intensity at Earth from July 2006 to December 2015 covering the period for the minimum of solar cycle 23 (2006-2009) until the middle of the maximum of solar cycle 24, through the polarity reversal of the heliospheric magnetic field which took place between 2013 and 2014. The positron to electron ratio measured in this time period clearly shows a sign-charge dependence of the solar modulation introduced by particle drifts. These results provide the first clear and continuous observation of how drift effects on solar modulation have unfolded with time from solar minimum to solar maximum and their dependence on the particle rigidity and the cyclic polarity of the solar magnetic field.

  12. Reagan issues mineral policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Materials and Minerals Program plan and report that President Reagan sent to Congress on April 5 aims to ‘decrease America's minerals vulnerability’ while reducing future dependence on potentially unstable foreign sources of minerals. These goals would be accomplished by taking inventory of federal lands to determine mineral potential; by meeting the stockpile goals set by the Strategic and Critical Material Stockpiling Act; and by establishing a business and political climate that would encourage private-sector research and development on minerals.Now that the Administration has issued its plan, the Subcommittee on Mines and Mining of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs will consider the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), which was introduced 1 year ago by subcommittee chairman Jim Santini (D-Nev.) [Eos, May 19, 1981, p. 497]. The bill calls for establishing a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of a national minerals policy; amending tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic materials; and creating a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals. In addition, the NMSA bill would allow the secretary of the interior to make previously withdrawn public lands available for mineral development. The subcommittee will hold a hearing on the Administration's plan on May 11. Interior Secretary James Watt has been invited to testify.

  13. Mineral Processing Sector

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find environmental regulatory and compliance information for the nonmetallic mineral processing sector (NAICS 327), including NESHAPs for asbestos and hazardous waste, and wastewater permit information.

  14. Quantitative x ray microanalysis of pulmonary mineral particles in a patient with pneumoconiosis and two primary lung tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Anttila, S; Sutinen, S; Pääkkö, P; Alapieti, T; Peura, R; Sivonen, S J

    1984-01-01

    The right upper lung lobe of a 74 year old man was resected for a central tumour. Two primary cancers were found; a central small cell carcinoma and a peripheral squamous cell carcinoma. In addition, the peripheral lung tissue showed generalised peribronchiolar fibrosis extending from the non-respiratory bronchioles to the level of the alveolar ducts. Abundant asbestos bodies and large amounts of black dust were seen around the bronchioles. Pulmonary mineral particles were studied by quantitative energy dispersive x ray microanalysis (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The x ray spectra for mineral particles were measured in thin sections, and the characteristic peak intensities of the elements were converted to weight fractions (in oxides). The results enabled the minerals present to be identified and their presence confirmed by calculating the mineral formula. These originated from nine natural minerals, anthophyllite and chrysotile asbestos, talc, and quartz, feldspars, and muscovite, which are components of sand, and also from two artificial mullites used in fire clay. The exposure history of the patient explained the most likely origins of the minerals detected. The patient had been a mason for 23 years, repairing and demolishing stoves and fireplaces and using asbestos for insulation work. Images PMID:6093848

  15. Electronic states and molecular dynamics of single-component molecular conductors [M (tmdt) 2] (M =Ni , Pt) studied by 13C and 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Rina; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Yoshimura, Masahide; Gangi, Hiro; Kanoda, Kazushi; Zhou, Biao; Idobata, Yuki; Kobayashi, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The molecular conductors [M(tmdt) 2] (M =Ni , Pt) consisting of single molecular species are investigated with 13C NMR and 1H NMR. The temperature dependences of the 13C NMR shift and relaxation rate provide microscopic evidence for the metallic nature with appreciable electron correlations. Both compounds exhibit an anomalous frequency-dependent enhancement in the 1H nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in a wide temperature range. These observations signify the presence of extraordinary molecular motions with low energy excitations.

  16. Rational engineering of Geobacter sulfurreducens electron transfer components: A foundation for building improved Geobacter-based bioelectrochemical technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Dantas, Joana M.; Morgado, Leonor; Aklujkar, Muktak; Bruix, Marta; Londer, Yuri Y.; Schiffer, Marianne; Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A.

    2015-07-30

    Multiheme cytochromes have been implicated in Geobacter sulfurreducens extracellular electron transfer (EET). These proteins are potential targets to improve EET and enhance bioremediation and electrical current production by G. sulfurreducens. However, the functional characterization of multiheme cytochromes is particularly complex due to the co-existence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and fully oxidized states. Throughout the last decade, new strategies have been developed to characterize multiheme redox proteins functionally and structurally. These strategies were used to reveal the functional mechanism of G. sulfurreducens multiheme cytochromes and also to identify key residues in these proteins for EET. In previous studies, we set the foundations for enhancement of the EET abilities of G. sulfurreducens by characterizing a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E). These periplasmic cytochromes are implicated in electron transfer between the oxidative reactions of metabolism in the cytoplasm and the reduction of extracellular terminal electron acceptors at the cell's outer surface. The results obtained suggested that PpcA can couple e-/H+ transfer, a property that might contribute to the proton electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane for metabolic energy production. The structural and functional properties of PpcA were characterized in detail and used for rational design of a family of 23 single site PpcA mutants. In this review, we summarize the functional characterization of the native and mutant proteins. Mutants that retain the mechanistic features of PpcA and adopt preferential e-/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values compared to the wild-type protein were selected for in vivo studies as the best candidates to increase the electron transfer rate of G. sulfurreducens. For the first time G. sulfurreducens

  17. Compounded PHOSPHO1/ALPL deficiencies reduce dentin mineralization.

    PubMed

    McKee, M D; Yadav, M C; Foster, B L; Somerman, M J; Farquharson, C; Millán, J L

    2013-08-01

    Phosphatases are involved in bone and tooth mineralization, but their mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP, ALPL) regulates inhibitory extracellular pyrophosphate through its pyrophosphatase activity to control mineral propagation in the matrix; mice without TNAP lack acellular cementum, and have mineralization defects in dentin, enamel, and bone. PHOSPHO1 is a phosphatase found within membrane-bounded matrix vesicles in mineralized tissues, and double ablation of Alpl and Phospho1 in mice leads to a complete absence of skeletal mineralization. Here, we describe mineralization abnormalities in the teeth of Phospho1(-/-) mice, and in compound knockout mice lacking Phospho1 and one allele of Alpl (Phospho1(-/-);Alpl(+/-) ). In wild-type mice, PHOSPHO1 and TNAP co-localized to odontoblasts at early stages of dentinogenesis, coincident with the early mineralization of mantle dentin. In Phospho1 knockout mice, radiography, micro-computed tomography, histology, and transmission electron microscopy all demonstrated mineralization abnormalities of incisor dentin, with the most remarkable findings being reduced overall mineralization coincident with decreased matrix vesicle mineralization in the Phospho1(-/-) mice, and the almost complete absence of matrix vesicles in the Phospho1(-/-);Alpl(+/-) mice, whose incisors showed a further reduction in mineralization. Results from this study support prominent non-redundant roles for both PHOSPHO1 and TNAP in dentin mineralization.

  18. Compounded PHOSPHO1/ALPL Deficiencies Reduce Dentin Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    McKee, M.D.; Yadav, M.C.; Foster, B.L.; Somerman, M.J.; Farquharson, C.; Millán, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatases are involved in bone and tooth mineralization, but their mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP, ALPL) regulates inhibitory extracellular pyrophosphate through its pyrophosphatase activity to control mineral propagation in the matrix; mice without TNAP lack acellular cementum, and have mineralization defects in dentin, enamel, and bone. PHOSPHO1 is a phosphatase found within membrane-bounded matrix vesicles in mineralized tissues, and double ablation of Alpl and Phospho1 in mice leads to a complete absence of skeletal mineralization. Here, we describe mineralization abnormalities in the teeth of Phospho1-/- mice, and in compound knockout mice lacking Phospho1 and one allele of Alpl (Phospho1-/-;Alpl+/-). In wild-type mice, PHOSPHO1 and TNAP co-localized to odontoblasts at early stages of dentinogenesis, coincident with the early mineralization of mantle dentin. In Phospho1 knockout mice, radiography, micro-computed tomography, histology, and transmission electron microscopy all demonstrated mineralization abnormalities of incisor dentin, with the most remarkable findings being reduced overall mineralization coincident with decreased matrix vesicle mineralization in the Phospho1-/- mice, and the almost complete absence of matrix vesicles in the Phospho1-/-;Alpl+/- mice, whose incisors showed a further reduction in mineralization. Results from this study support prominent non-redundant roles for both PHOSPHO1 and TNAP in dentin mineralization. PMID:23694930

  19. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  20. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  1. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  2. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  3. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  4. Factors affecting ex-situ aqueous mineral carbonation using calcium and magnesium silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.; Rush, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonation of magnesium- and calcium-silicate minerals to form their respective carbonates is one method to sequester carbon dioxide. Process development studies have identified reactor design as a key component affecting both the capital and operating costs of ex-situ mineral sequestration. Results from mineral carbonation studies conducted in a batch autoclave were utilized to design and construct a unique continuous pipe reactor with 100% recycle (flow-loop reactor). Results from the flow-loop reactor are consistent with batch autoclave tests, and are being used to derive engineering data necessary to design a bench-scale continuous pipeline reactor.

  5. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  6. Digging into Minnesota Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Natural Resources, St. Paul.

    This publication presents students with facts about geology and several learning activities. Topics covered include rocks and minerals, volcanoes and earthquakes, fossils, exploration geology, mining in Minnesota, environmental issues related to mining, mineral uses, mining history, and the geology of Minnesota's state parks. A geologic timetable…

  7. Mineral physics abroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Robert

    During the 1983-1984 academic year, I spent a sabbatical leave in France, during which I had the opportunity to visit several mineral physics laboratories in Europe and meet many of our colleagues there. The purpose of this item is to report briefly on developments of interest to the U.S. mineral physics community.

  8. Mineral commodity summaries 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2016-01-01

    This report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering 2015 nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for more than 90 individual minerals and materials

  9. Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

  10. Mineral Wool Insulation Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowatsch, Stefan

    Mineral wool is considered the best known insulation type among the wide variety of insulation materials. There are three types of mineral wool, and these consist of glass, stone (rock), and slag wool. The overall manufacturing processes, along with features such as specifications and characteristics for each of these types, as well as the role of the binder within the process are described.

  11. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2002-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  12. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  13. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2001-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  14. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  15. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  16. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  17. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials

  18. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  19. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2003-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  20. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2004-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  1. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  2. Mineral commodity summaries 2017

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2017-01-31

    This report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering 2016 nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for more than 90 individual minerals and materials.

  3. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2011 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2010 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2011 contains new chapters on iron oxide pigments, wollastonite, and zeolites. The chapters on mica (natural), scrap and flake and mica (natural), sheet have been combined into a single chapter - mica (natural). Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. "Appendix C - Reserves and Resources" has been divided into "Part A - Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals" and "Part B - Sources of Reserves Data," including some information that was previously in this introduction. A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2011 are welcomed.

  4. Mineral resource of the month: diatomite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the properties and applications of the mineral diatomite. According to the author, diatomite is a soft, friable and very fine-grained siliceous sedimentary rock made of the remains of fossilized diatoms. The author adds that its properties make diatomite very useful as a filtration medium and as a component in cement.

  5. Mineral resource of the month: lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2006-01-01

    Lithium, the lightest metallic element, is silvery, white and soft, and highly reactive. It is used most frequently in chemical compounds or traded as mineral concentrates. Its thermal properties make it an ideal component in thermal shock-resistant ceramics, and its electrochemical properties make it an ideal material for several types of batteries.

  6. Mineral resource of the month: phosphate rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jasinski, Stephen M.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphate rock minerals provide the only significant global resources of phosphorus, which is an essential element for plant and animal nutrition. Phosphate rock is used primarily as a principal component of nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium fertilizers, but also to produce elemental phosphorus and animal feed.

  7. [MICROBIAL DESTRUCTION MINERAL (OIL) MOTOR OIL].

    PubMed

    Homenko, L A; Nogina, T M

    2015-01-01

    In a review information is presented about composition of mineral motor oils and their negative impact on the environment and the ability of microorganisms, in particular actinobacteria, to assimilate hydrocarbon oil components. The role of bacteria is described in the process of cleaning up polluted environments motor oils and the prospect of their use in biotechnology, environmental clean-up of these pollutants.

  8. Underground mineral extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for extracting underground minerals such as coal, which avoids the need for sending personnel underground and which enables the mining of steeply pitched seams of the mineral. The method includes the use of a narrow vehicle which moves underground along the mineral seam and which is connected by pipes or hoses to water pumps at the surface of the Earth. The vehicle hydraulically drills pilot holes during its entrances into the seam, and then directs sideward jets at the seam during its withdrawal from each pilot hole to comminute the mineral surrounding the pilot hole and combine it with water into a slurry, so that the slurried mineral can flow to a location where a pump raises the slurry to the surface.

  9. Relative contribution of combined kinetic and exchange energy terms vs the electronic component of molecular electrostatic potential in hardness potential derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Rituparna; Roy, Ram Kinkar

    2013-11-14

    The relative contribution of the sum of kinetic [(10/9)CFρ(r)2/3] and exchange energy [(4/9)CXρ(r)1/3] terms to that of the electronic part of the molecular electrostatic potential [Vel(r)] in the variants of hardness potential is investigated to assess the proposed definition of Δ+h(k) = −[VelN+1(k) – VelN(k)] and Δ–h(k) = −[VelN(k) – VelN–1(k)] (Saha; et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2013, 34, 662). Some substituted benzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (undergoing electrophilic aromatic substitution), carboxylic acids, and their derivatives are chosen to carry out the theoretical investigation as stated above. Intra- and intermolecular reactivity trends generated by Δ+h(k) and Δ–h(k) are found to be satisfactory and are correlated reasonably well with experimental results.

  10. Supply of and demand for selected energy related mineral commodities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibley, Scott F.

    2010-01-01

    In this report, subjects discussed include components of mineral supply, production, and consumption data, and information on selected mineral commodities in which the Energy Critical Elements Study Group has an interest, and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recycling studies, with some results of these studies.

  11. Minerals yearbook, 1993. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This edition of the Mineral Yearbook discusses the performance of the worlwide minerals and materials industry during 1993 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume 1, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on survey methods with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals, and a chapters on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are also included.

  12. Minerals Yearbook, centennial edition 1981. Volume I. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook Marks the centennial of the first annual publication of comprehensive mineral industry statistics by the Federal Government. This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 71 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  13. Elastic properties of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.; Prodaivoda, G.T.

    1993-09-01

    Investigations of the elastic properties of the main rock-forming minerals were begun by T.V. Ryzhova and K.S. Aleksandrov over 30 years ago on the initiative of B.P. Belikov. At the time, information on the elasticity of single crystals in general, and especially of minerals, was very scanty. In the surveys of that time there was information on the elasticity of 20 or 30 minerals. These, as a rule, did not include the main rock-forming minerals; silicates were represented only by garnets, quartz, topaz, tourmaline, zircon, beryl, and staurolite, which are often found in nature in the form of large and fairly high-quality crystals. Then and even much later it was still necessary to prove a supposition which now seems obvious: The elastic properties of rocks, and hence the velocities of elastic (seismic) waves in the earth`s crust, are primarily determined by the elastic characteristics of the minerals composing these rocks. Proof of this assertion, with rare exceptions of mono-mineralic rocks (marble, quartzite, etc.) cannot be obtained without information on the elasticities of a sufficiently large number of minerals, primarily framework, layer, and chain silicates which constitute the basis of most rocks. This also served as the starting point and main problem of the undertakings of Aleksandrov, Ryzhova, and Belikov - systematic investigations of the elastic properties of minerals and then of various rocks. 108 refs., 7 tabs.

  14. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  15. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  16. Correlative Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy for Observing the Three-Dimensional Ultrastructure of Membranous Cell Organelles in Relation to Their Molecular Components.

    PubMed

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Bochimoto, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    Although the osmium maceration method has been used to observe three-dimensional (3D) structures of membranous cell organelles with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the use of osmium tetroxide for membrane fixation and the removal of cytosolic soluble proteins largely impairs the antigenicity of molecules in the specimens. In the present study, we developed a novel method to combine cryosectioning with the maceration method for correlative immunocytochemical analysis. We first immunocytochemically stained a semi-thin cryosection cut from a pituitary tissue block with a cryo-ultramicrotome, according to the Tokuyasu method, before preparing an osmium-macerated specimen from the remaining tissue block. Correlative microscopy was performed by observing the same area between the immunostained section and the adjacent face of the tissue block. Using this correlative method, we could accurately identify the gonadotropes of pituitary glands in various experimental conditions with SEM. At 4 weeks after castration, dilated cisternae of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were distributed throughout the cytoplasm. On the other hand, an extremely dilated cisterna of the RER occupied the large region of the cytoplasm at 12 weeks after castration. This novel method has the potential to analyze the relationship between the distribution of functional molecules and the 3D ultrastructure in different composite tissues.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis for chemical and morphological characterisation of the inorganic component of gunshot residue: selected problems.

    PubMed

    Brożek-Mucha, Zuzanna

    2014-01-01

    Chosen aspects of examinations of inorganic gunshot particles by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry technique are presented. The research methodology of particles was worked out, which included a precise and repeatable procedure of the automatic detection and identification of particles as well as the representation of the obtained analytical data in the form of the frequencies of occurrence of particles of certain chemical or morphological class within the whole population of particles revealed in a specimen. On this basis, there were established relationships between the chemical and morphological properties of populations of particles and factors, such as the type of ammunition, the distance from the gun muzzle to the target, the type of a substrate the particles sediment on, and the time between shooting and collecting the specimens. Each of these aspects of examinations of particles revealed a great potential of being utilised in casework, while establishing various circumstances of shooting incidents leads to the reconstruction of the course of the studied incident.

  18. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Microanalysis for Chemical and Morphological Characterisation of the Inorganic Component of Gunshot Residue: Selected Problems

    PubMed Central

    Brożek-Mucha, Zuzanna

    2014-01-01

    Chosen aspects of examinations of inorganic gunshot particles by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry technique are presented. The research methodology of particles was worked out, which included a precise and repeatable procedure of the automatic detection and identification of particles as well as the representation of the obtained analytical data in the form of the frequencies of occurrence of particles of certain chemical or morphological class within the whole population of particles revealed in a specimen. On this basis, there were established relationships between the chemical and morphological properties of populations of particles and factors, such as the type of ammunition, the distance from the gun muzzle to the target, the type of a substrate the particles sediment on, and the time between shooting and collecting the specimens. Each of these aspects of examinations of particles revealed a great potential of being utilised in casework, while establishing various circumstances of shooting incidents leads to the reconstruction of the course of the studied incident. PMID:25025050

  19. The nanosphere iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-01-01

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these 'Mars-soil analogs' were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxyl mineral such as 'green rust', or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable meaghemite (gamma-Fe203) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (aplha-Fe203) by extensive heat treatment. Their chemical reactivity offers a plausible mechanism for the somewhat puzzling observations of the Viking biology experiments. Their unique chemical reactivities are attributed to the combined catalytic effects of the iron oxide/oxyhydroxide and silicate phase surfaces. The mode of formation of these (nanophase) iron oxides on Mars is still unknown.

  20. The nanosphere iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-11-01

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these 'Mars-soil analogs' were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxyl mineral such as 'green rust', or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable meaghemite (gamma-Fe203) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (aplha-Fe203) by extensive heat treatment. Their chemical reactivity offers a plausible mechanism for the somewhat puzzling observations of the Viking biology experiments. Their unique chemical reactivities are attributed to the combined catalytic effects of the iron oxide/oxyhydroxide and silicate phase surfaces. The mode of formation of these (nanophase) iron oxides on Mars is still unknown.