Science.gov

Sample records for mineral processing operations

  1. Mineral Processing Sector

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find environmental regulatory and compliance information for the nonmetallic mineral processing sector (NAICS 327), including NESHAPs for asbestos and hazardous waste, and wastewater permit information.

  2. Mineral Spirits Purification Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the mineral spirits to decompose 1,2- propanediol dinitrate and remove hydrogen cyandide and other gaseous decomposition produces, and then distill the mineral spirits from the remaining contaminants.

  3. Process for the physical segregation of minerals

    DOEpatents

    Yingling, Jon C.; Ganguli, Rajive

    2004-01-06

    With highly heterogeneous groups or streams of minerals, physical segregation using online quality measurements is an economically important first stage of the mineral beneficiation process. Segregation enables high quality fractions of the stream to bypass processing, such as cleaning operations, thereby reducing the associated costs and avoiding the yield losses inherent in any downstream separation process. The present invention includes various methods for reliably segregating a mineral stream into at least one fraction meeting desired quality specifications while at the same time maximizing yield of that fraction.

  4. A Mineral Processing Field Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmody, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a field course in Cornwall looking at mineral processing with the focus on the chemistry involved. The course was split into two parts. The first looked at tin mining based around Penzance. This involved visiting mines, hunting for mineral samples, carrying out a stream survey and visiting the Camborne School of Mines…

  5. A Mineral Processing Field Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmody, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a field course in Cornwall looking at mineral processing with the focus on the chemistry involved. The course was split into two parts. The first looked at tin mining based around Penzance. This involved visiting mines, hunting for mineral samples, carrying out a stream survey and visiting the Camborne School of Mines…

  6. Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2000-09-01

    This document represents the roadmap for Processing Technology Research in the US Mining Industry. It was developed based on the results of a Processing Technology Roadmap Workshop sponsored by the National Mining Association in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies. The Workshop was held January 24 - 25, 2000.

  7. Geochemical processes at mineral surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.A.; Hayes, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume includes 32 papers which were presented at a symposium on geochemical processes at mineral-water interfaces in 1985 and which bring to bear on this area a very wide range of expertise. The discontinuities in properties which occur at the mineral-water interface have profound effects on the movement of naturally occurring ions. Weathering and precipitation processes control the concentrations and speciation of ions in natural waters and the movements of these within the hydrosphere; both classes of processes take place at mineral-water interfaces. After an introductory overview, the book is divided into seven major sections, each dealing with one of the aspects of the processes occurring at the mineral-water interface. Five papers deal with the physical properties of the mineral-water interface; these represent a well-balanced mix of experimental and theoretical (mathematical modeling) work. Adsorption phenomena are dealt with in another five papers; these are largely experimental in character. Ion-exchange processes are discussed in four papers, one of which addresses the use of relaxation methods to study ion exchange kinetics at the microscopic level. Spectroscopic techniques (including electron-spin resonance and Moessbauer spectroscopy) are utilized in four papers. Chemical reactions, mainly redox processes, at mineral-water interfaces are treated in four papers, one of which deals with non-biological organic reactions. Solid-solution formation and equilibria are the subjects of another set of four articles, and the last group of papers deals with the processes involved in precipitation and dissolution, including weathering.

  8. Tribology of earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Rick D.

    2001-01-01

    Earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing each involve frequent, and often severe, mechanical interactions between metals, and between metals and abrasive nonmetallic and metallic materials (i.e., mineral bearing ores). The abrasive nature of ores causes significant wear to extracting, handling, and processing equipment. Consequently, wear in earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing operations results in the removal of large amounts of material from the wear surfaces of scraping, digging, and ore processing equipment. From an energy point of view, material wear of this nature is classified as an indirect tribological loss (Imhoff et al., 1985). Additionally, a significant amount of energy is expended to overcome frictional forces in the operation of all earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing machinery (i.e., a direct tribological loss). However, in these particular processes, wear losses are more than five times those of frictional losses. In general, the amount of material lost from a particular component in these operations, before it becomes unserviceable, is far greater than that which can be tolerated in typical metal-to-metal wear situations (e.g., lubricated bearing-shaft wear couples in machinery). Consequently, much of the equipment used in earthmoving, mining, and ore processing makes use of easily replaceable or repairable, and preferably low-cost, wear components. The mechanisms by which metal-to-metal and abrasive wear occurs, and the relationships between material properties and wear behavior, are reasonably well-understood in general terms. However, the specific wear mechanisms/wear material interactions that occur during earthmoving, digging, and the processing of ore are more complex, and depend on the wear material, and on the nature of abrasive, the type of loading, and the environment. As a result of this general knowledge, reliable predictions can be made regarding the performance of particular materials under a range of in

  9. Soil washing using mineral processing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bolles, T.R.

    1995-12-31

    Mineral processing technologies are being used in the environmental arena for remediation and secondary recovery. Comminution and/or scrubbing for liberation, coupled with separation of the liberated particles, is known as sod washing. Other metallurgical unit operations have found application in remediation and recycling: size classification, gravity concentration, flotation, magnetic, eddy current and electromagnetic separation, solid/liquid separation, and solvent extraction. This paper presents specific examples of the use of these technologies to clean up contaminated soils and plant residues.

  10. Native Language Processing using Exegy Text Miner

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J

    2007-10-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's New Architectures Testbed recently evaluated Exegy's Text Miner appliance to assess its applicability to high-performance, automated native language analysis. The evaluation was performed with support from the Computing Applications and Research Department in close collaboration with Global Security programs, and institutional activities in native language analysis. The Exegy Text Miner is a special-purpose device for detecting and flagging user-supplied patterns of characters, whether in streaming text or in collections of documents at very high rates. Patterns may consist of simple lists of words or complex expressions with sub-patterns linked by logical operators. These searches are accomplished through a combination of specialized hardware (i.e., one or more field-programmable gates arrays in addition to general-purpose processors) and proprietary software that exploits these individual components in an optimal manner (through parallelism and pipelining). For this application the Text Miner has performed accurately and reproducibly at high speeds approaching those documented by Exegy in its technical specifications. The Exegy Text Miner is primarily intended for the single-byte ASCII characters used in English, but at a technical level its capabilities are language-neutral and can be applied to multi-byte character sets such as those found in Arabic and Chinese. The system is used for searching databases or tracking streaming text with respect to one or more lexicons. In a real operational environment it is likely that data would need to be processed separately for each lexicon or search technique. However, the searches would be so fast that multiple passes should not be considered as a limitation a priori. Indeed, it is conceivable that large databases could be searched as often as necessary if new queries were deemed worthwhile. This project is concerned with evaluating the Exegy Text Miner installed in the New

  11. Value of first principles and phenomenological modeling in mineral processing

    SciTech Connect

    Concha, F.

    1995-12-31

    There is confusion in naming the several models developed in Mineral Processing. The authors often hear of empirical, first principle, mechanistic and phenomenological models. The objective of this paper is to clarify and distinguish between these models, based on a philosophical and linguistic analysis. A state of the art review for mathematical modeling in Mineral Processing is also made. The advantage of considering Mineral Processing as a series of unit operations was recognized by Gaudin a long time ago. He divided the area into four unit operations: (1) comminution, (2) classification, (3) concentration and (4) dewatering.

  12. Dissolution of minerals and hydrometallurgical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habashi, Fathi

    1983-08-01

    Physical, chemical, electrochemical, and electrolytic processes involved in the dissolution of minerals in aqueous solutions are identified and characterized. Their importance to hydrometallurgy is outlined.

  13. 36 CFR 292.68 - Mineral material operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mineral material operations... NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Mineral Materials § 292.68 Mineral material... officer may approve contracts and permits for the sale or other disposal of mineral materials,...

  14. 36 CFR 292.68 - Mineral material operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mineral material operations... NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Mineral Materials § 292.68 Mineral material... officer may approve contracts and permits for the sale or other disposal of mineral materials,...

  15. 36 CFR 292.68 - Mineral material operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mineral material operations... NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Mineral Materials § 292.68 Mineral material... officer may approve contracts and permits for the sale or other disposal of mineral materials,...

  16. 36 CFR 292.68 - Mineral material operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mineral material operations... NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Mineral Materials § 292.68 Mineral material... officer may approve contracts and permits for the sale or other disposal of mineral materials,...

  17. 36 CFR 292.68 - Mineral material operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mineral material operations... NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Mineral Materials § 292.68 Mineral material... officer may approve contracts and permits for the sale or other disposal of mineral materials,...

  18. Microscopy mineral image enhancement through center operator construction.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiangzhi

    2015-05-20

    Enhancing a microscopy mineral image to produce clear and rich details is important for mineral analysis. To enhance effectively, an algorithm utilizing the constructed center operator is proposed in this paper. First, the center operator is constructed from the opening and closing based toggle operator. Second, the mineral image features are extracted by using the constructed center operator. Third, the multiscale mineral features are extracted through multiscale morphological theory using the multiscale structuring elements. Fourth, the final features for mineral image enhancement are calculated from the extracted multiscale features based on the weight strategy. Finally, the mineral image is effectively enhanced through importing the final features into the original mineral image. Experimental results on various microscopy mineral images verified that the proposed algorithm performed well for enhancement and had competing performance compared with some existing algorithms.

  19. Processes controlling the composition of heavy mineral assemblages in sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Andrew C.; Hallsworth, Claire R.

    1999-03-01

    Sandstone compositions result from a complex interplay between provenance and factors that operate during the sedimentation cycle. Accurate identification and discrimination of provenance depends on isolating provenance-sensitive features, and avoiding parameters that are influenced by other factors. Heavy mineral analysis offers a high-resolution approach to determination of sandstone provenance, because of the diversity of mineral species found in sandstones and because the factors affecting assemblages have been comprehensively evaluated. This paper presents the current understanding of the effects of processes operative during the sedimentation cycle. The original provenance signal may be overprinted by weathering at source prior to incorporation in the transport system; by mechanical breakdown during transport; by weathering during periods of alluvial storage on the floodplain; by hydraulic processes during transport and final deposition; by diagenesis during deep burial; and by weathering at outcrop. The most influential of these processes are hydraulics, which fractionates the relative abundance of minerals with different hydraulic behaviour, and burial diagenesis, which reduces mineral diversity through progressive dissolution of unstable mineral species. There is also evidence that weathering during alluvial storage plays a significant role. Two alternative, complementary approaches are recommended to identify provenance from heavy mineral data. The relative abundances of minerals with similar hydraulic and diagenetic behaviour are largely unaffected by processes operative during the sedimentation cycle, and utilize information gained from the entire heavy mineral suite. Determination of such ratios can be augmented by acquisition of varietal data, concentrating on the varieties shown by mineral types within the assemblage. A number of different varietal techniques are recommended, including optical differentiation of types based on colour, habit and

  20. Multiscale toggle contrast operator-based mineral image enhancement.

    PubMed

    Bai, X; Zhou, F

    2011-08-01

    Mineral image is one type of crucial data for mineral research and analysis. However, some mineral images are not clear in some cases. To efficiently enhance mineral images and therefore benefit the applications of these images, a multiscale toggle contrast operator based algorithm is proposed in this paper. First, the toggle contrast operator is discussed. Secondly, the multiscale toggle contrast operator using structuring elements with different sizes is given. Thirdly, the multiscale toggle contrast operator is used to enhance the original image at different scales. Finally, the final enhanced image is constructed from the multiscale enhanced results. Because multiscale structuring elements are used, the algorithm performs efficiently and produces few noises. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is efficient for mineral image enhancement. More importantly, the proposed algorithm could be also used in other types of images, such as visual image, medical image and so on, for image enhancement. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2011 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Soil-washing: Mineral processing technology in environmental engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Bunge, R.; Bachmann, A.; Ngo, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    The remediation of contaminated sites has gained great importance in many industrialized countries. One method for cleaning the polluted soils from such sites is soil washing, the scope of which is the separation of the contaminants from the soil. Soil washing is an outstanding example for a successful transfer of technology from Mineral Processing to Environmental Engineering. This presentation intends to introduce the Mineral Processing Engineer to soil washing through a short review of the fundamentals, and the discussion of an example for a successful soil cleaning operation in Switzerland.

  2. LEACHING OF METALS FROM MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to test the leaching of Mineral Processing Waste (MPW) contaminated with heavy metals using scientifically defendable leaching tests other than TCLP. Past experience and literature have shown that TCLP underestimates the levels of metals such as oxo...

  3. LEACHING OF METALS FROM MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to test the leaching of Mineral processing Waste (MPW) contaminated with heavy metals using scientifically defendable leaching tests other than TCLP. Past experience and literature have shown that TCLP underestiates the levels of metals such as oxoa...

  4. LEACHING OF METALS FROM MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to test the leaching of Mineral Processing Waste (MPW) contaminated with heavy metals using scientifically defendable leaching tests other than TCLP. Past experience and literature have shown that TCLP underestimates the levels of metals such as oxo...

  5. LEACHING OF METALS FROM MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to test the leaching of Mineral processing Waste (MPW) contaminated with heavy metals using scientifically defendable leaching tests other than TCLP. Past experience and literature have shown that TCLP underestiates the levels of metals such as oxoa...

  6. Oxalic acid mineralization by electrochemical oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Hui; Shih, Yu-Jen; Liu, Cheng-Hong

    2011-04-15

    In this study, two electrochemical oxidation processes were utilized to mineralize oxalic acid which was a major intermediate compound in the oxidation of phenols and other aromatic compounds. The anode rod and cathode net were made of a titanium coated with RuO(2)/IrO(2) (Ti-DSA) and stainless steel (S.S. net, SUS304), respectively. First, the Fered-Fenton process, which used H(2)O(2) and Fe(2+) as additive reagents, achieved 85% of TOC removal. It proceeded with ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT), which was evidenced by the accumulation of metallic foil on the selected cathode. However, in the absence of H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+), it showed a higher TOC removal efficiency while using Cl(-) only as an additive reagent due to the formation of hypochlorite on the anode. It was also found that the mineralization of oxalic acid by electrolysis generated hypochlorite better than the dosage of commercial hypochlorite without electricity. Also, pH value was a major factor that affected the mineralization efficiency of the oxalic acid due to the chlorine chemistry. 99% TOC removal could be obtained by Cl(-) electrolysis in an acidic environment.

  7. Metal, mineral waste processing and secondary recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, R.G.

    1987-04-01

    Approximately 40 million tons of precious metals chemical wastes are produced in the United States every year. An estimated five percent of these wastes are being reused/recycled to recover the precious and critical metals they contain. The rest of these chemical wastes are disposed of by the methods incineration, dumping at sea and dumping on land. In this paper, an attempt is made to review the research work published during 1985-1986 on metal, mineral waste processing, secondary recovery and safe disposal.

  8. Microbial-mineral interaction during freezing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Park, Y. K.; Koo, T. H.; Kim, K.; Yoo, K. C.; Kim, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Dissolution of Fe from iron oxides and Fe-bearing clay minerals through biotic/abiotic process is of important as a source of bioavailable iron in Antarctic region. In the present study, the dissolution of iron oxide particles during freezing process was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. Batch experiments of microbe-mineral interaction under the various temperatures (from 4 ° to -4 °, pH 7) were performed to understand the mechanism of biogeochemical dissolution of iron oxides at the seasonal temperature changes in Antarctic region. The dissolution of iron oxides by microbial Fe-respiration in aqueous phase may accelerate the Fe-dissolution accompanying with the abiotic "freeze concentration effect" in the ice phase. The dissolved iron under aqueous phase was mainly in the ferrous form, which indicates that the dissolution was induced by a reductive process. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice phase is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect" (Kim et al., 2012) which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The association of microbial Fe-reduction at low temperature in Fe-dissolution will be discussed.

  9. Dust control in coal preparation and mineral processing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Divers, E.F.; Cecala, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper briefly evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of basic dust control techniques presently used by the U.S. coal preparation and mineral processing plants. These include ventilation, baghouse-type collectors, wet scrubbers, elastrostatic precipitators, source control, sprays, good housekeeping, and personal protection devices. Two specific problems in these types of operations are also considered: dust collector system duct clogging, and control room dust control. Information provided in this report results from dust control research projects conducted by the Bureau at various coal preparation and mineral processing plants over the past decade to reduce workers' dust exposure. These studies indicate that plant ventilation system normally provide the most cost-effective method for dust control. Baghouses and scrubbers were also effective in specific applications, and examples of each are given. In extreme dust conditions, personal protection devices, such as respirators or the dust helmet, can also be highly cost effective.

  10. Clays and other minerals in prebiotic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Clays and other minerals have been investigated in context with prebiotic processes, mainly in polymerization of amino acids. It was found that peptides adsorbed on the clay, prior to polymerization, influence the reaction. The ratio between the amount of the peptides adsorbed and that of the clay is important for the yield as well as for the degrees of polymerization obtained. Adsorption prior to reaction produces a certain order in the aggregates of the clay particles which might induce better reaction results. Excess of added peptides disturbs this order and causes lesser degrees of polymerization. In addition to adsorption, clays are also able to occlude between their layers substances out of the environment, up to very high concentrations.

  11. 30 CFR 47.2 - Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner... Training § 47.2 Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training. (a) This part applies to any operator producing or using a hazardous chemical to which a miner can be exposed under normal conditions...

  12. 30 CFR 47.2 - Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner... Training § 47.2 Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training. (a) This part applies to any operator producing or using a hazardous chemical to which a miner can be exposed under normal conditions...

  13. 30 CFR 47.2 - Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner... Training § 47.2 Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training. (a) This part applies to any operator producing or using a hazardous chemical to which a miner can be exposed under normal conditions...

  14. 30 CFR 47.2 - Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner... Training § 47.2 Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training. (a) This part applies to any operator producing or using a hazardous chemical to which a miner can be exposed under normal conditions...

  15. The Operations Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-26

    preparation of the battlefield (IPB), targeting, composite risk management ( CRM ), and ISR synchronization are integrated throughout the MDMP. RECEIPT OF...chapter 2 for a detailed discussion on verifying assumptions.) Begin Composite Risk Management B-41. CRM is the Army’s primary process for... relationships . Command relationships define superior and subordinate relationships between unit commanders. By specifying a chain of command

  16. Operant Variability: Procedures and Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Armando; Tonneau, Francois

    2012-01-01

    Barba's (2012) article deftly weaves three main themes in one argument about operant variability. From general theoretical considerations on operant behavior (Catania, 1973), Barba derives methodological guidelines about response differentiation and applies them to the study of operant variability. In the process, he uncovers unnoticed features of…

  17. Operant Variability: Procedures and Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Armando; Tonneau, Francois

    2012-01-01

    Barba's (2012) article deftly weaves three main themes in one argument about operant variability. From general theoretical considerations on operant behavior (Catania, 1973), Barba derives methodological guidelines about response differentiation and applies them to the study of operant variability. In the process, he uncovers unnoticed features of…

  18. Enhancing microscopy images of minerals through morphological center operator-based feature extraction.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiangzhi

    2013-02-01

    To well enhance the mineral image and image details obtained by microscopes, an effective mineral image enhancement algorithm through feature extraction using the morphological center operator is proposed in this work. First, mineral image feature extraction based on the morphological center operator is proposed and discussed. Second, the multiscale extension of the mineral image feature extraction is given by using the multiscale structuring elements. Third, the important mineral image features at multiscales of image are extracted and used to construct the final mineral features for mineral image enhancement. Finally, the original mineral image is well enhanced through importing the extracted final mineral image features into the original mineral image. Experimental results on different types of microscopy images of minerals verified the effective performance of the proposed algorithm for microscopy mineral image enhancement. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Principles of image processing in machine vision systems for the color analysis of minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhova, Daria B.; Gorbunova, Elena V.; Chertov, Aleksandr N.; Korotaev, Valery V.

    2014-09-01

    At the moment color sorting method is one of promising methods of mineral raw materials enrichment. This method is based on registration of color differences between images of analyzed objects. As is generally known the problem with delimitation of close color tints when sorting low-contrast minerals is one of the main disadvantages of color sorting method. It is can be related with wrong choice of a color model and incomplete image processing in machine vision system for realizing color sorting algorithm. Another problem is a necessity of image processing features reconfiguration when changing the type of analyzed minerals. This is due to the fact that optical properties of mineral samples vary from one mineral deposit to another. Therefore searching for values of image processing features is non-trivial task. And this task doesn't always have an acceptable solution. In addition there are no uniform guidelines for determining criteria of mineral samples separation. It is assumed that the process of image processing features reconfiguration had to be made by machine learning. But in practice it's carried out by adjusting the operating parameters which are satisfactory for one specific enrichment task. This approach usually leads to the fact that machine vision system unable to estimate rapidly the concentration rate of analyzed mineral ore by using color sorting method. This paper presents the results of research aimed at addressing mentioned shortcomings in image processing organization for machine vision systems which are used to color sorting of mineral samples. The principles of color analysis for low-contrast minerals by using machine vision systems are also studied. In addition, a special processing algorithm for color images of mineral samples is developed. Mentioned algorithm allows you to determine automatically the criteria of mineral samples separation based on an analysis of representative mineral samples. Experimental studies of the proposed algorithm

  20. A novel mineral flotation process using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, T; Ohmura, N; Saiki, H

    1999-08-01

    Oxidative leaching of metals by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans has proven useful in mineral processing. Here, we report on a new use for T. ferrooxidans, in which bacterial adhesion is used to remove pyrite from mixtures of sulfide minerals during flotation. Under control conditions, the floatabilities of five sulfide minerals tested (pyrite, chalcocite, molybdenite, millerite, and galena) ranged from 90 to 99%. Upon addition of T. ferrooxidans, the floatability of pyrite was significantly suppressed to less than 20%. In contrast, addition of the bacterium had little effect on the floatabilities of the other minerals, even when they were present in relatively large quantities: their floatabilities remained in the range of 81 to 98%. T. ferrooxidans thus appears to selectively suppress pyrite floatability. As a consequence, 77 to 95% of pyrite was removed from mineral mixtures while 72 to 100% of nonpyrite sulfide minerals was recovered. The suppression of pyrite floatability was caused by bacterial adhesion to pyrite surfaces. When normalized to the mineral surface area, the number of cells adhering to pyrite was significantly larger than the number adhering to other minerals. These results suggest that flotation with T. ferrooxidans may provide a novel approach to mineral processing in which the biological functions involved in cell adhesion play a key role in the separation of minerals.

  1. A Novel Mineral Flotation Process Using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Toru; Ohmura, Naoya; Saiki, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Oxidative leaching of metals by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans has proven useful in mineral processing. Here, we report on a new use for T. ferrooxidans, in which bacterial adhesion is used to remove pyrite from mixtures of sulfide minerals during flotation. Under control conditions, the floatabilities of five sulfide minerals tested (pyrite, chalcocite, molybdenite, millerite, and galena) ranged from 90 to 99%. Upon addition of T. ferrooxidans, the floatability of pyrite was significantly suppressed to less than 20%. In contrast, addition of the bacterium had little effect on the floatabilities of the other minerals, even when they were present in relatively large quantities: their floatabilities remained in the range of 81 to 98%. T. ferrooxidans thus appears to selectively suppress pyrite floatability. As a consequence, 77 to 95% of pyrite was removed from mineral mixtures while 72 to 100% of nonpyrite sulfide minerals was recovered. The suppression of pyrite floatability was caused by bacterial adhesion to pyrite surfaces. When normalized to the mineral surface area, the number of cells adhering to pyrite was significantly larger than the number adhering to other minerals. These results suggest that flotation with T. ferrooxidans may provide a novel approach to mineral processing in which the biological functions involved in cell adhesion play a key role in the separation of minerals. PMID:10427053

  2. 36 CFR 292.66 - Operating plan requirements-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.66 Section 292.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.66 Operating plan requirements—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Proposals for mineral...

  3. 36 CFR 292.66 - Operating plan requirements-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.66 Section 292.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.66 Operating plan requirements—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Proposals for mineral...

  4. 36 CFR 292.66 - Operating plan requirements-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.66 Section 292.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.66 Operating plan requirements—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Proposals for mineral...

  5. Improved process control alarm operation.

    PubMed

    Bristol, E H

    2001-01-01

    Alarms are the main connection from the automation to the operator, when addressing process operation outside of its normal function. They are often as much a source of operator overload and consternation as help. Better engineering of the relative role of the operator and automation would materially help overcome the difficulties. Expert systems have been proposed as a solution. But Expert systems are really another form of automation. There remains that aspect of the alarms, which must address our inability to cover and understand a possibly larger domain of the operation not appropriate to traditional controls or present-day automation. Appropriate tools for this domain must support operator discretion and initiative. The paper suggests a set of such general, computer science based, tools requiring only the most basic configuration. They are viewed as implemented on top of those properly detailed alarm displays and interlocks, which reflect the more formal plant operating policies. They include: (a) Various forms of alarm logging and trending; (b) Short, automatically generated, word summaries of alarm activity, which allow low level data to propagate to the highest levels, including: one word and priority summaries; (c) Causal alarm pattern analyses that help the operator to predict or diagnose alarm behavior; (d) Automatic adaptation of alarms and alarm limits to varying process situations; (e) Uniform use of alarm policies to simplify alarm configuration.

  6. 36 CFR 292.67 - Operating plan approval-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.67 Section 292.67 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.67 Operating plan approval—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Upon receipt of an operating...

  7. 36 CFR 292.67 - Operating plan approval-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.67 Section 292.67 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.67 Operating plan approval—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Upon receipt of an operating...

  8. 36 CFR 292.67 - Operating plan approval-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.67 Section 292.67 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.67 Operating plan approval—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Upon receipt of an operating...

  9. 36 CFR 292.67 - Operating plan approval-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.67 Section 292.67 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.67 Operating plan approval—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Upon receipt of an operating...

  10. 36 CFR 292.67 - Operating plan approval-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.67 Section 292.67 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.67 Operating plan approval—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Upon receipt of an operating...

  11. Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1982-01-26

    The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

  12. Clean Air Act Standards and Guidelines for Mineral Processing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the stationary sources of air pollution for the mineral processing industries, and their corresponding air pollution regulations. To learn more about the regulations for each industry, just click on the links below.

  13. Material instability hazards in mine-processing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Fredland, J.W.; Wu, K.K.; Kirkwood, D.W.

    1993-10-01

    Many accidents occur in the mining industry as a result of the instability of material during handling and processing operation. Accidents due to dump point instability at stockpiles, and at spoil or waste piles, for example, occur with alarming frequency. Miners must be trained to be better aware of these hazards. Information on safe working procedures at stockpiles and surge piles is provided. Mine operators must review their training and operating procedures regularly to ensure that hazardous conditions are avoided.

  14. 30 CFR 47.2 - Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training. 47.2 Section 47.2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Purpose, Scope, Applicability, and Initial...

  15. Mineral homeostasis and regulation of mineralization processes in the skeletons of sharks, rays and relatives (Elasmobranchii).

    PubMed

    Dean, Mason N; Ekstrom, Laura; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat; Ballantyne, Jim; Witten, P Eckhard; Riley, Cyrena; Habraken, Wouter; Omelon, Sidney

    2015-10-01

    Sharks, rays and other elasmobranch fishes are characterized by a skeletal type that is unique among living vertebrates, comprised predominantly of an unmineralized cartilage, covered by a thin outer layer of sub-millimeter, mineralized tiles called tesserae. The mineralized portion of the skeleton appears to grow only by apposition, adding material at the edges of each tessera; maintenance of non-mineralized joints between tesserae is therefore vital, with precise control of mineral deposition and inhibition at the many thousands of growth fronts in the skeleton. Yet, we have only scattered evidence as to how the elasmobranchs mineralize and grow their skeletons. In this review, we take an "environment to skeleton" approach, drawing together research from a vast range of perspectives to track calcium and phosphate from the typical elasmobranch habitats into and through the body, to their deposition at tesseral growth fronts. In the process, we discuss the available evidence for skeletal resorption capability, mineral homeostasis hormones, and nucleation inhibition mechanisms. We also outline relevant theories in crystal nucleation and typical errors in measurements of serum calcium and phosphate in the study of vertebrate biology. We assemble research that suggests consensus in some concepts in elasmobranch skeletal development, but also highlight the very large gaps in our knowledge, particularly in regards to endocrine functional networks and biomineralization mechanisms. In this way, we lay out frameworks for future directions in the study of elasmobranch skeletal biology with stronger and more comparative links to research in other disciplines and into other taxa.

  16. Atmospherically deposited trace metals from bulk mineral concentrate port operations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark Patrick

    2015-05-15

    Although metal exposures in the environment have declined over the last two decades, certain activities and locations still present a risk of harm to human health. This study examines environmental dust metal and metalloid hazards (arsenic, cadmium, lead and nickel) associated with bulk mineral transport, loading and unloading port operations in public locations and children's playgrounds in the inner city of Townsville, northern Queensland. The mean increase in lead on post-play hand wipes (965 μg/m(2)/day) across all sites was more than 10-times the mean pre-play loadings (95 μg/m(2)/day). Maximum loading values after a 10-minute play period were 3012 μg/m(2), more than seven times the goal of 400 μg/m(2) used by the Government of Western Australia (2011). Maximum daily nickel post-play hand loadings (404 μg/m(2)) were more than 26 times above the German Federal Immission Control Act 2002 annual benchmark of 15 μg/m(2)/day. Repeat sampling over the 5-day study period showed that hands and surfaces were re-contaminated daily from the deposition of metal-rich atmospheric dusts. Lead isotopic composition analysis of dust wipes ((208)Pb/(207)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb) showed that surface dust lead was similar to Mount Isa type ores, which are exported through the Port of Townsville. While dust metal contaminant loadings are lower than other mining and smelting towns in Australia, they exceeded national and international benchmarks for environmental quality. The lessons from this study are clear - even where operations are considered acceptable by managing authorities, targeted assessment and monitoring can be used to evaluate whether current management practices are truly best practice. Reassessment can identify opportunities for improvement and maximum environmental and human health protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring iron mineralization processes using nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Kristina

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements can be used to probe the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of water in the pore space of geological materials. In geophysics, NMR relaxation measurements are used in to measure water content and estimate permeability in the top 100 m of Earth's surface. The goal of the research presented in this thesis is to determine if NMR can also be used in geophysical applications to monitor iron mineralization processes associated with contaminant remediation. The first part of the research presented in this thesis focuses on understanding the effect of iron mineral form and redox state on the NMR relaxation response of water in geologic material. Laboratory NMR measurements were made on Fe(III)-bearing minerals (ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite, goethite, and hematite), Fe(II)-bearing minerals (siderite, pyrite, and troilite), and a mixed valence iron-bearing mineral (magnetite). The results of these measurements show that the relaxation rate of water is strongly dependent on the mineral form of iron. Shown in the final section of this thesis are results from an experiment exploring temporal changes in the measured NMR relaxation rates during the reaction of ferrihydrite with aqueous Fe(II). These results show that NMR can be used to monitor temporal chemical changes in iron minerals. I conclude that this research shows that NMR indeed has the potential to be used as a tool for monitoring geochemical reactions associated with contaminant remediation.

  18. Numerical modeling of mineral dissolution - precipitation kinetics integrating interfacial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azaroual, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms of mineral dissolution/precipitation are complex and interdependent. Within a same rock, the geochemical modelling may have to manage kinetic reactions with high ratios between the most reactive minerals (i.e., carbonates, sulfate salts, etc.) and less reactive minerals (i.e., silica, alumino-silicates, etc.). These ratios (higher than 10+6) induce numerical instabilities for calculating mass and energy transfers between minerals and aqueous phases at the appropriate scales of time and space. The current scientific debate includes: i) changes (or not) of the mineral reactive surface with the progress of the dissolution/precipitation reactions; ii) energy jumps (discontinuity) in the thermodynamic affinity function of some dissolution/precipitation reactions and iii) integration of processes at the "mineral - aqueous solution" interfaces for alumino-silicates, silica and carbonates. In recent works dealing with the specific case of amorphous silica, measurements were performed on nano-metric cross-sections indicating the presence of surface layer between the bulk solution and the mineral. This thin layer is composed by amorphous silica and hydrated silica "permeable" to the transfer of water and ionic chemical constituents. The boundary/interface between the initial mineral and the silica layer is characterized by a high concentration jump of chemical products at the nanoscale and some specific interfacial dissolution/precipitation processes.In this study, the results of numerical simulations dealing with different mechanisms of silicate and carbonate dissolution/precipitation reactions and integrating interfacial processes will be discussed. The application of this approach to silica precipitation is based on laboratory experiments and it highlights the significant role of the "titration" surface induced by surface complexation reactions in the determination of the kinetics of precipitation.

  19. Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Bulakh, Andrei

    2004-06-01

    This introduction to mineralogy for undergraduate and graduate students in geology and materials science has been designed for a semester course. Covering all aspects of mineralogy in an integrated way, it links mineral properties with broader geological processes, and conveys their economic importance throughout the text. Handy reference tables and a glossary of terms make this study an indispensable guide for the next generation of mineralogy students.

  20. Morphological enhancement of microscopy mineral image using opening- and closing-based toggle operator.

    PubMed

    Bai, X

    2014-01-01

    To enhance unclear microscopy mineral images, an algorithm based on toggle operator using opening and closing is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the specified toggle operator using opening and closing through designing the selection rules is analysed. Secondly, after importing the multiscale theory into the specified toggle operator, useful mineral image features, especially the mineral details, are extracted using the multiscale theory-based toggle operator. Finally, the mineral image is enhanced through the strategy of enlarging the contrast between the extracted bright and dark image features. Experimental results on different types of mineral images verified that the proposed algorithm could effectively enhance mineral images and performed better than some other algorithms. The enhanced mineral image is clear and contains rich mineral details, whereas the grey scale distribution of the original mineral image is appropriately maintained. This would be useful for the further mineral analysis. Therefore, the proposed algorithm could be widely used for image-based mineral applications. © 2013 The Author Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Mineral image enhancement based on sequential combination of toggle and top-hat based contrast operator.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiangzhi

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing mineral image especially making mineral image details clear is very useful for mineral analysis. To effectively enhance mineral image, an algorithm based on the toggle contrast operator and top-hat based contrast operator is proposed in this paper. Sequentially combining the toggle contrast operator and top-hat based contrast operator could be used to identify image features especially the image details. So, appropriately exacting the identified image features by the sequentially combined toggle and top-hat based contrast operator is important for mineral image enhancement, which is analyzed firstly in this paper. After that, the multi-scale extension of feature extraction is given and used to construct the final features for mineral image enhancement. By importing the final extracted image features into the original mineral image through contrast enlargement, the original mineral image is well enhanced and the mineral image details are very clear. Experimental results on different types of mineral images verified the effective performance of the proposed algorithm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including keeping your bones, muscles, heart, and brain working properly. Minerals are also important for making enzymes and hormones. ...

  3. Aluminous Minerals for Caustic Processing of Scheelite Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Li, Zhao; Li, Xuewei; Qu, Jun; Zhang, Qiwu

    2017-06-01

    Dry milling of the mixture of scheelite concentrate and solid NaOH is conducted to develop a caustic process for tungsten (W) extraction. Aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) is further added to the milling to control the calcium dissolution of one reaction product, calcium hydroxide, in the next aqueous extraction of soluble tungstate to form an insoluble substance. For practical application, several aluminous minerals of kaolin, gibbsite, and diaspore with different alumina concentrations and water percentages are used to replace the pure chemical Al(OH)3, and the feasibility of using these minerals as calcium immobilization additives is confirmed to give rise to the formation of Na2WO4 and water-insoluble katoite (Ca3Al2(SiO4)3- x (OH)4 x ) in the form of powders. Tungsten recovery is found to depend on the compositions of the used mineral, and the conditions for improving W recovery are studied with respect to the compositions of aluminum hydroxide and water inside the minerals. The developed process allows the caustic extraction of W by applying the nearby available aluminous minerals.

  4. METALS LEACHING FROM A MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE: A COLUMN STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mineral processing waste was used to study the effect of liquid to solid ratio (L/S) on the leaching behavior of metals. Leaching tests in the form of column and batch studies were carried out to investigate liquid to solid ratios ranging from 0.7 to 50. Although the waste pass...

  5. Carbon dioxide mineralization process design and evaluation: concepts, case studies, and considerations.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Yeo Tze; Sharratt, Paul N; Jie, Bu

    2016-11-01

    Numerous carbon dioxide mineralization (CM) processes have been proposed to overcome the slow rate of natural weathering of silicate minerals. Ten of these proposals are mentioned in this article. The proposals are described in terms of the four major areas relating to CM process design: pre-treatment, purification, carbonation, and reagent recycling operations. Any known specifics based on probable or representative operating and reaction conditions are listed, and basic analysis of the strengths and shortcomings associated with the individual process designs are given in this article. The processes typically employ physical or chemical pseudo-catalytic methods to enhance the rate of carbon dioxide mineralization; however, both methods have its own associated advantages and problems. To examine the feasibility of a CM process, three key aspects should be included in the evaluation criteria: energy use, operational considerations as well as product value and economics. Recommendations regarding the optimal level of emphasis and implementation of measures to control these aspects are given, and these will depend very much on the desired process objectives. Ultimately, a mix-and-match approach to process design might be required to provide viable and economic proposals for CM processes.

  6. New mineral occurrences and mineralization processes: Wuda coal-fire gas vents of Inner Mongolia

    SciTech Connect

    Stracher, G.B.; Prakash, A.; Schroeder, P.; McCormack, J.; Zhang, X.M.; Van Dijk, P.; Blake, D.

    2005-12-01

    Five unique mineral assemblages that include the sulfates millosevichite, alunogen, anhydrite, tschermigite, coquimbite, voltaite, and godovikovite, as well as the halide salammoniac and an unidentified phase, according to X-ray diffraction and EDS data, were found as encrustations on quartzofeldspathic sand and sandstone adjacent to coal-fire gas vents associated with underground coal fires in the Wuda coalfield of Inner Mongolia. The mineral assemblage of alunogen, coquimbite, voltaite, and the unidentified phase collected front the same gas vent, is documented for the first time. Observations suggest that the sulfates millosevichite, alunogen, coquimbite, voltaite, godovikovite, and the unidentified phase, crystallized in response to a complex sequence of processes that include condensation, hydrothermal alteration, crystallization from solution, fluctuating vent temperatures, boiling, and dehydration reactions, whereas the halide salammoniac crystallized during the sublimation of coal-fire gas. Tschermigite and anhydrite formed by the reaction of coal-fire gas with quartzofelds pathic rock or by hydrothermal alteration of this rock and crystallization from an acid-rich aqueous solution. These minerals have potentially important environmental significance and may be vectors for the transmission of toxins. Coal fires also provide insight for the recognition in the geologic record of preserved mineral assemblages that are diagnostic of ancient fires.

  7. Homogenous VUV advanced oxidation process for enhanced degradation and mineralization of antibiotics in contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Pourakbar, Mojtaba; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-03-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the degradation and mineralization of amoxicillin(AMX), using VUV advanced process. The effect of pH, AMX initial concentration, presence of water ingredients, the effect of HRT, and mineralization level by VUV process were taken into consideration. In order to make a direct comparison, the test was also performed by UVC radiation. The results show that the degradation of AMX was following the first-order kinetic. It was found that direct photolysis by UVC was able to degrade 50mg/L of AMX in 50min,while it was 3min for VUV process. It was also found that the removal efficiency by VUV process was directly influenced by pH of the solution, and higher removal rates were achieved at high pH values.The results show that 10mg/L of AMX was completely degraded and mineralized within 50s and 100s, respectively, indicating that the AMX was completely destructed into non-hazardous materials. Operating the photoreactor in contentious-flow mode revealed that 10mg/L AMX was completely degraded and mineralized at HRT values of 120s and 300s. it was concluded that the VUV advanced process was an efficient and viable technique for degradation and mineralization of contaminated water by antibiotics.

  8. UV-based processes for reactive azo dye mineralization.

    PubMed

    Peternel, Igor; Koprivanac, Natalija; Kusic, Hrvoje

    2006-02-01

    In the present study, advanced oxidation processes, UV/H2O2, UV/O3, and UV/H2O2/O3 have been applied to bleach and degrade organic dye C.I. Reactive Red 45 in water solution. Influence of pH and hydrogen peroxide dosage on process efficiency was investigated. The rate of color removal was studied by measuring the absorbance at the characteristic wavelength while mineralization rates were obtained on the basis of total organic carbon (TOC) and adsorbable organic halides (AOX) measurements. Complete bleaching was achieved by all applied processes after 60 min while the maximal mineralization extent depended on the reaction conditions for each of the processes. It has been found that UV/H2O2/O3 process was the most efficient with 61.1% TOC removal and 72.0% AOX removal, respectively, achieved after a 1-h treatment. Time required for complete mineralization of RR45 by UV/H2O2 and UV/H2O2/O3 processes was determined as well.

  9. Trace element diffusion in minerals: the role of multiple diffusion mechanisms operating simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohmen, R.; Marschall, H.; Wiedenbeck, M.; Polednia, J.; Chakraborty, S.

    2016-12-01

    Diffusion of trace elements, often with ionic charge that differs from those of ions in the regular structural sites of a mineral, controls a number of important processes in rocks, such as: (i) Closure of radiogenic isotopic systems, (e.g. Pb diffusion in rutile; REE diffusion in garnet); (ii) Closure of trace element thermometers (e.g., Zr in rutile, Mg in plagioclase, Al in olivine); (iii) Closure of element exchange between melt inclusions and host minerals (e.g., H, REE in olivine). In addition, preserved trace element zoning profiles in minerals can be used for diffusion chronometry (e.g. Nb in rutile, Mg in plagioclase). However, experimentally determined diffusion coefficients of these trace elements are in many cases controversial (e.g., REE in olivine: [1] vs. [2]; Mg in plagioclase: [3] vs. [4]). We have carried out experiments to study the diffusion behavior in olivine, rutile, and plagioclase, and are able to show that two mechanisms of diffusion, differing in rates by up to four orders of magnitude, may operate simultaneously in a given crystal. The two mechanisms result in complex diffusion profile shapes. As a general rule, the incorporation of heterovalent substituting elements in relatively high concentrations is necessary to activate two diffusion mechanisms. This behavior is produced by the control of these elements on the point defect chemistry of a mineral - these impurities become a majority point defect when a threshold concentration limit is exceeded. In certain cases, e.g., for Li in olivine, the trace element can also be incorporated in different sites, resulting in interaction of the different species with other point defects (vacancies) during diffusion. Thus, depending on the diffusion couple used in the experiment, the associated concentration gradients within the mineral, and the analytical techniques used to measure the diffusion profile, only one diffusion mechanism may be activated or detected. These studies allow us to explain

  10. Natural radionuclide concentrations in processed materials from Thai mineral industries.

    PubMed

    Chanyotha, S; Kranrod, C; Chankow, N; Kritsananuwat, R; Sriploy, P; Pangza, K

    2012-11-01

    The naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) distributed in products, by-products and waste produced from Thai mineral industries were investigated. Samples were analysed for radioactivity concentrations of two principal NORM isotopes: (226)Ra and (228)Ra. The enrichment of NORM was found to occur during the treatment process of some minerals. The highest activity of (226)Ra (7 × 10(7) Bq kg(-1)) was in the scale from tantalum processing. The radium concentration in the discarded by-product material from metal ore dressing was also enriched by 3-10 times. Phosphogypsum, a waste produced from the production of phosphate fertilisers, contained 700 times the level of (226)Ra concentration found in phosphate ore. Hence, these residues were also sources of exposure to workers and the public, which needed to be controlled.

  11. 26 CFR 1.614-3 - Rules relating to separate operating mineral interests in the case of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Rules relating to separate operating mineral....614-3 Rules relating to separate operating mineral interests in the case of mines. (a) Election to aggregate separate operating mineral interests—(1) General rule. Except in the case of oil and gas wells,...

  12. Operating Permits Program Review Process

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  13. [Effects of mineral water TIB-2 on metabolic processes in urolithiasis patients].

    PubMed

    Dzeranov, N K; Beshliev, D A; Golovanov, S A; Kon'kova, T A

    2000-01-01

    Natural low-mineralized hydrocarbonate-calcium-magnesium mineral water (total mineralization 2 g/l) in bottles has been examined for therapeutic effects on metabolism in urolithiasis patients. The complex of biochemical blood and urine indices indicative of the renal function and concentration of lithogenic components was studied in 52 patients (age 23-68 years, 23 males and 29 females). Ten of them had nephrostoma. All the patients have undergone extracorporeal lithotripsy or other operations for renal or ureteric calculi. In nephrostoma patients urine samples were obtained both from nephrostoma and urinary bladder. The tests were made before the treatment and on the treatment day 3-5 and 10-12. TIB-2 mineral water was taken 3 times a day in a dose 200 ml 30-45 minutes before meal. The data were statistically processed. From the data obtained it was concluded that mineral water TIB-2 normalizes azotemia and clearance of endogenic creatinine, plasma values of calcium and uric acid, enhances urinary elimination of uric acid and calcium oxalate microcrystals that is TIB-2 improves metabolism of lithogenic substances and ions. Indications to drinking mineral water TIB-2 for urological patients are formulated.

  14. Copper isotopes as monitors of redox processes in hydrothermal mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markl, Gregor; Lahaye, Yann; Schwinn, Gregor

    2006-08-01

    The stable copper isotope composition of 79 samples of primary and secondary copper minerals from hydrothermal veins in the Schwarzwald mining district, South Germany, shows a wide variation in δ65Cu ranging from -2.92 to 2.41‰. We investigated primary chalcopyrite, various kinds of fahlores and emplectite, as well as supergene native copper, malachite, azurite, cuprite, tenorite, olivenite, pseudomalachite and chrysocolla. Fresh primary Cu(I) ores have at most localities copper isotope ratios ( δ65Cu values) of 0 ± 0.5‰ despite the fact that the samples come from mineralogically different types of deposits covering an area of about 100 by 50 km and that they formed during three different mineralization events spanning the last 300 Ma. Relics of the primary ores in oxidized samples (i.e., chalcopyrite relics in an iron oxide matrix with an outer malachite coating) display low isotope ratios down to -2.92‰. Secondary Cu(I) minerals such as cuprite have high δ65Cu values between 0.4 and 1.65‰, whereas secondary Cu(II) minerals such as malachite show a range of values between -1.55 and 2.41‰, but typically have values above +0.5‰. Within single samples, supergene oxidation of fresh chalcopyrite with a δ value of 0‰ causes significant fractionation on the scale of a centimetre between malachite (up to 1.49‰) and relict chalcopyrite (down to -2.92‰). The results show that—with only two notable exceptions—high-temperature hydrothermal processes did not lead to significant and correlatable variations in copper isotope ratios within a large mining district mineralized over a long period of time. Conversely, low-temperature redox processes seriously affect the copper isotope compositions of hydrothermal copper ores. While details of the redox processes are not yet understood, we interpret the range in compositions found in both primary Cu(I) and secondary Cu(II) minerals as a result of two competing controls on the isotope fractionation process

  15. The Process Batteries Operations Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, Elizabeth

    The paper describes the instruments and procedures for collecting process information (information describing components of the planned educational process) for the Management Information System for Occupational Education (MISOE). The selection of variables and the decision to assess interactive rather than isolated process variables are…

  16. Asporin and the mineralization process in fluoride-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Houari, Sophia; Wurtz, Tilmann; Ferbus, Didier; Chateau, Danielle; Dessombz, Arnaud; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2014-06-01

    Microarray analysis of odontoblastic cells treated with sodium fluoride has identified the asporin gene as a fluoride target. Asporin is a member of the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan/protein (SLRP) family that is believed to be important in the mineralization process. In this study, asporin expression and distribution were investigated by systematic analysis of dentin and enamel, with and without fluoride treatment. Specific attention was focused on a major difference between the two mineralized tissues: the presence of a collagenous scaffold in dentin, and its absence in enamel. Normal and fluorotic, continually growing incisors from Wistar rats treated with 2.5 to 7.5 mM sodium fluoride (NaF) were studied by immunochemistry, in situ hybridization, Western blotting, and RT-qPCR. Asporin was continuously expressed in odontoblasts throughout dentin formation as expected. Asporin was also found, for the first time, in dental epithelial cells, particularly in maturation-stage ameloblasts. NaF decreased asporin expression in odontoblasts and enhanced it in ameloblasts, both in vivo and in vitro. The inverse response in the two cell types suggests that the effector, fluoride, is a trigger that elicits a cell-type-specific reaction. Confocal and ultrastructural immunohistochemistry evidenced an association between asporin and type 1 collagen in the pericellular nonmineralized compartments of both bone and dentin. In addition, transmission electron microscopy revealed asporin in the microenvironment of all cells observed. Thus, asporin is produced by collagen-matrix-forming and non-collagen-matrix-forming cells but may have different effects on the mineralization process. A model is proposed that predicts impaired mineral formation associated with the deficiency and excess of asporin.

  17. Column flotation: Processes, designs and practices. Process engineering for the chemical, metals and minerals industry, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, J.B. . Flotation Equipment and Process Engineering Dept.)

    1994-01-01

    Practically all mined ores of non-ferrous and rare metals and an increasing share of industrial minerals and coal are processed through flotation. This book presents the analysis of a wide range of problems in the process theory of flotation columns, including the first published analysis of models of flotation froths. The experience of pilot tests and commercial applications of column flotation for mineral processing and in waste water treatment circuits are also considered. This is the first book to consider column flotation design and operation experience and to present data on column parameters. Topics include: design of flotation columns; aerators in flotation columns; experimental methods of column aerohydrodynamics investigation; aerohydrodynamic characteristics of flotation columns; experimental investigation of the flotation process in columns; kinetics aspects of column flotation; scaling-up methods for flotation columns; structure and mass transfer in flotation froths; column flotation practice; and column flotation control.

  18. A NOVEL APPROACH TO MINERAL CARBONATION: ENHANCING CARBONATION WHILE AVOIDING MINERAL PRETREATMENT PROCESS COST

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V.G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamadallah Bearat

    2005-10-01

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our first year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the

  19. MINERAL PROCESSING BY SHORT CIRCUITS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ebel, Denton S.; D'Alessio, Paola E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org E-mail: debel@amnh.org

    2013-04-10

    Meteoritic chondrules were formed in the early solar system by brief heating of silicate dust to melting temperatures. Some highly refractory grains (Type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) also show signs of transient heating. A similar process may occur in other protoplanetary disks, as evidenced by observations of spectra characteristic of crystalline silicates. One possible environment for this process is the turbulent magnetohydrodynamic flow thought to drive accretion in these disks. Such flows generally form thin current sheets, which are sites of magnetic reconnection, and dissipate the magnetic fields amplified by a disk dynamo. We suggest that it is possible to heat precursor grains for chondrules and other high-temperature minerals in current sheets that have been concentrated by our recently described short-circuit instability. We extend our work on this process by including the effects of radiative cooling, taking into account the temperature dependence of the opacity; and by examining current sheet geometry in three-dimensional, global models of magnetorotational instability. We find that temperatures above 1600 K can be reached for favorable parameters that match the ideal global models. This mechanism could provide an efficient means of tapping the gravitational potential energy of the protoplanetary disk to heat grains strongly enough to form high-temperature minerals. The volume-filling nature of turbulent magnetic reconnection is compatible with constraints from chondrule-matrix complementarity, chondrule-chondrule complementarity, the occurrence of igneous rims, and compound chondrules. The same short-circuit mechanism may perform other high-temperature mineral processing in protoplanetary disks such as the production of crystalline silicates and CAIs.

  20. Mineral Processing by Short Circuits in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ebel, Denton S.; D'Alessio, Paola

    2013-04-01

    Meteoritic chondrules were formed in the early solar system by brief heating of silicate dust to melting temperatures. Some highly refractory grains (Type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) also show signs of transient heating. A similar process may occur in other protoplanetary disks, as evidenced by observations of spectra characteristic of crystalline silicates. One possible environment for this process is the turbulent magnetohydrodynamic flow thought to drive accretion in these disks. Such flows generally form thin current sheets, which are sites of magnetic reconnection, and dissipate the magnetic fields amplified by a disk dynamo. We suggest that it is possible to heat precursor grains for chondrules and other high-temperature minerals in current sheets that have been concentrated by our recently described short-circuit instability. We extend our work on this process by including the effects of radiative cooling, taking into account the temperature dependence of the opacity; and by examining current sheet geometry in three-dimensional, global models of magnetorotational instability. We find that temperatures above 1600 K can be reached for favorable parameters that match the ideal global models. This mechanism could provide an efficient means of tapping the gravitational potential energy of the protoplanetary disk to heat grains strongly enough to form high-temperature minerals. The volume-filling nature of turbulent magnetic reconnection is compatible with constraints from chondrule-matrix complementarity, chondrule-chondrule complementarity, the occurrence of igneous rims, and compound chondrules. The same short-circuit mechanism may perform other high-temperature mineral processing in protoplanetary disks such as the production of crystalline silicates and CAIs.

  1. NEP processing, operations, and disposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stancati, Mike

    1993-01-01

    Several recent studies by ASAO/NPO staff members at LeRC and by other organizations have highlighted the potential benefits of using Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) as the primary transportation means for some of the proposed missions of the Space Exploration Initiative. These include the potential to reduce initial mass in orbit and Mars transit time. Modular NEP configurations also introduce fully redundant main propulsion to Mars flight systems adding several abort or fall back options not otherwise available. Recent studies have also identified mission operations, such as on orbital assembly, refurbishment, and reactor disposal, as important discriminators for propulsion system evaluation. This study is intended to identify and assess 'end-to-end' operational issues associated with using NEP for transporting crews and cargo between Earth and Mars. We also include some consideration of lunar cargo transfer as well.

  2. 25 CFR 215.23a - Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... minerals other than oil and gas. 215.23a Section 215.23a Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.23a Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas. The provisions...

  3. 26 CFR 1.614-8 - Elections with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. 1... separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. (a) Election to treat separate operating mineral interests as separate...

  4. 26 CFR 1.614-8 - Elections with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. 1... separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. (a) Election to treat separate operating mineral interests as separate properties...

  5. 26 CFR 1.614-8 - Elections with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. 1... separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. (a) Election to treat separate operating mineral interests as separate properties...

  6. 26 CFR 1.614-8 - Elections with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. 1... separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. (a) Election to treat separate operating mineral interests as separate properties...

  7. 26 CFR 1.614-8 - Elections with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. 1... separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. (a) Election to treat separate operating mineral interests as separate properties...

  8. 76 FR 79705 - Information Collection Activities: Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ..., gas, and sulphur to qualified parties. This regulation governs mining operations within the OCS and...) facilitate participation by States directly affected by OCS mining activities; (c) provide opportunities for... complying with the regulations that implement the mining operations program for minerals other than oil, gas...

  9. A Novel Approach To Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2006-06-21

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our second year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. As our second year progress is intimately related to our earlier work, the report is presented in that context to provide better overall understanding of the progress made. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly

  10. Performing process migration with allreduce operations

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Peters, Amanda; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-12-14

    Compute nodes perform allreduce operations that swap processes at nodes. A first allreduce operation generates a first result and uses a first process from a first compute node, a second process from a second compute node, and zeros from other compute nodes. The first compute node replaces the first process with the first result. A second allreduce operation generates a second result and uses the first result from the first compute node, the second process from the second compute node, and zeros from others. The second compute node replaces the second process with the second result, which is the first process. A third allreduce operation generates a third result and uses the first result from first compute node, the second result from the second compute node, and zeros from others. The first compute node replaces the first result with the third result, which is the second process.

  11. 30 CFR 921.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 921.764 Section 921.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for...

  12. 30 CFR 921.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 921.764 Section 921.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... Coal Mining Operations, pertaining to petitioning, initial processing, hearing requirements,...

  13. 30 CFR 933.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 933.764 Section 933.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... Coal Mining Operations, pertaining to petitioning, initial processing, hearing requirements, decisions... surface coal mining and reclamation operations beginning one year after the effective date of this program....

  14. 30 CFR 942.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 942.764 Section 942.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... Mining Operations, shall apply to surface coal mining and reclamation operations. (b) The Secretary...

  15. 30 CFR 942.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 942.764 Section 942.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... Mining Operations, shall apply to surface coal mining and reclamation operations. (b) The Secretary...

  16. 30 CFR 933.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 933.764 Section 933.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... Coal Mining Operations, pertaining to petitioning, initial processing, hearing requirements, decisions... surface coal mining and reclamation operations beginning one year after the effective date of this program....

  17. 30 CFR 942.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 942.764 Section 942.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... Mining Operations, shall apply to surface coal mining and reclamation operations. (b) The Secretary...

  18. 30 CFR 921.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 921.764 Section 921.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... Coal Mining Operations, pertaining to petitioning, initial processing, hearing requirements,...

  19. 30 CFR 933.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 933.764 Section 933.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... Coal Mining Operations, pertaining to petitioning, initial processing, hearing requirements, decisions... surface coal mining and reclamation operations beginning one year after the effective date of this program....

  20. 30 CFR 942.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 942.764 Section 942.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... Mining Operations, shall apply to surface coal mining and reclamation operations. (b) The Secretary...

  1. 30 CFR 942.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 942.764 Section 942.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... Mining Operations, shall apply to surface coal mining and reclamation operations. (b) The Secretary...

  2. 30 CFR 933.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 933.764 Section 933.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... Coal Mining Operations, pertaining to petitioning, initial processing, hearing requirements, decisions... surface coal mining and reclamation operations beginning one year after the effective date of this program....

  3. 30 CFR 933.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 933.764 Section 933.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... Coal Mining Operations, pertaining to petitioning, initial processing, hearing requirements, decisions... surface coal mining and reclamation operations beginning one year after the effective date of this program....

  4. The Tempo of Magmatic Processes From Zoning Patterns in Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, F.; Chakraborty, S.

    2006-12-01

    In spite of the accomplishments of igneous petrology and geochemistry in identifying the main processes and variables responsible for magma generation and differentiation, we still lack an understanding of the timescales of these processes. The temporal information is crucial for quantifying the rates of many geological processes on different scales - from the thermal and mass fluxes between the mantle and the crust to the relationship between replenishment rates of magma reservoirs of active volcanoes and the frequency of their eruptions. The two main classes of methods for obtaining this temporal information are those based on radioactive decay of U and Th (either using bulk rocks or in-situ, spatially resolved analyses of minerals) and those based on modelling the compositional zonation preserved in minerals using Fick's law of diffusion. In this presentation we will concentrate on the information on duration of processes that can be obtained from modelling the chemical zoning patterns of minerals. Several case studies based on our own work and data from the literature reveal that coupling of a hierarchy of timescales, like the different sized gears of a mechanical clockwork, underlies the evolution of a magmatic system. For example, transport times from the mantle to the surface, as obtained from mantle xenoliths and isolated crystals indicate times of a few hours to a few months based on H and Fe-Mg zoning profiles in olivine. Such short times are comparable to those obtained for bubble nucleation and degassing obtained from H profiles in volcanic glass. Examples from subduction-related volcanoes show that time scales of silicic-silicic and mafic-silicic magma mixing can be on the order of a few months to a few decades based on data from multiple elements and minerals. Durations of a few years have been obtained for assimilation of the continental crust by ascending basalts based on zoning of multiple elements in olivine. Significantly longer timescales have

  5. Defense Waste Processing Facility -- Radioactive operations -- Part 3 -- Remote operations

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, W.M.; Kerley, W.D.; Hughes, P.D.

    1997-06-01

    The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, South Carolina is the nation`s first and world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction period and nearly three years of non-radioactive testing, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. Radioactive glass is poured from the joule heated melter into the stainless steel canisters. The canisters are then temporarily sealed, decontaminated, resistance welded for final closure, and transported to an interim storage facility. All of these operations are conducted remotely with equipment specially designed for these processes. This paper reviews canister processing during the first nine months of radioactive operations at DWPF. The fundamental design consideration for DWPF remote canister processing and handling equipment are discussed as well as interim canister storage.

  6. Defense waste processing facility radioactive operations. Part 1 - operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Little, D.B.; Gee, J.T.; Barnes, W.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first and the world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction program and a 3 year non-radioactive test program, DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. This paper presents the results of the first 9 months of radioactive operations. Topics include: operations of the remote processing equipment reliability, and decontamination facilities for the remote processing equipment. Key equipment discussed includes process pumps, telerobotic manipulators, infrared camera, Holledge{trademark} level gauges and in-cell (remote) cranes. Information is presented regarding equipment at the conclusion of the DWPF test program it also discussed, with special emphasis on agitator blades and cooling/heating coil wear. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  7. A model of the early mineralization process of mantle dentin.

    PubMed

    Dechichi, Paula; Biffi, João Carlos Gabrielli; Moura, Camilla Christian Gomes; de Ameida, Antônio Wilson

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between proteoglycans (PGs) and collagen fibrils at the early mineralization process of mantle dentin. Ten first molar dental germs of rats were removed and fixed in glutaraldehyde/formaldehyde in cacodylate buffer and post-fixed in osmium tetroxide. The samples were dehydrated and embedded in epoxy resin. Ultrathin sections were contrasted and analyzed in TEM before and after treatment with EDTA, chondroitinases AC and ABC. After EDTA treatment, a electrondense substance associated with collagen fibril was removed, and did not stain again. A high magnification of these areas showed globular structures with 15 nm diameter surrounding collagen fibrils. In advanced mineralization areas, collagen fibrils showed a banded pattern and at high magnification the fibrils presented a light 10 nm ring inside and a dark 10 nm ring outside. After chondroitinase treatment, the electrondense substance associated with collagen fibrils was removed, showing a banded pattern of clear and dark areas along them. From morphological data, the authors proposed a model of interaction between PGs and collagen fibrils, where glicosaminoglycans chains are inside the fibrils, while the protein core remains outside. That stereochemical arrangement would start the crystal nucleation.

  8. Non surgical perforation repair by mineral trioxide aggregate under dental operating microscope

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Mousumi; Mazumdar, Dibyendu; Neyogi, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    Root perforation repair has historically been an unpredictable treatment modality, with an unacceptably high rate of clinical failure. Recent developments in the techniques and materials utilized in root perforation repair have dramatically enhanced the prognosis of both surgical and nonsurgical procedures. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate is a relatively new material that is being successfully used to repair perforations. Technological advancements such as the use of a Dental Operating Microscope for correction of these inevitable procedural errors are a major breakthrough in dentistry today. This article presents one clinical case of nonsurgical root perforation repair by Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, using the Dental Operating Microscope. PMID:21691514

  9. 30 CFR 910.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 910.764 Section 910.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface...

  10. 30 CFR 903.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 903.764 Section 903.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface...

  11. 30 CFR 905.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 905.764 Section 905.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface...

  12. 30 CFR 912.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 912.764 Section 912.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface...

  13. Differential operator approach for Fourier image processing.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Ismael; Ferrari, José A

    2007-08-01

    We present a differential operator approach for Fourier image processing. We demonstrate that when the mask in the processor Fourier plane is an analytical function, it can be described by means of a differential operator that acts directly on the input field to give the processed output image. In many cases (e.g., Schlieren imaging) this approach simplifies the calculations, which usually involve the evaluation of convolution integrals, and gives a new insight into the image-processing procedure.

  14. A Novel Approach to Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Michael J. McKelvy; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2007-06-21

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cl-, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus

  15. Geophysical aspects of underground fluid dynamics and mineral transformation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khramchenkov, Maxim; Khramchenkov, Eduard

    2014-05-01

    The description of processes of mass exchange between fluid and poly-minerals material in porous media from various kinds of rocks (primarily, sedimentary rocks) have been examined. It was shown that in some important cases there is a storage equation of non-linear diffusion equation type. In addition, process of filtration in un-swelling soils, swelling porous rocks and coupled process of consolidation and chemical interaction between fluid and particles material were considered. In the latter case equations of physical-chemical mechanics of conservation of mass for fluid and particles material were used. As it is well known, the mechanics of porous media is theoretical basis of such branches of science as rock mechanics, soil physics and so on. But at the same moment some complex processes in the geosystems lacks full theoretical description. The example of such processes is metamorphosis of rocks and correspondent variations of stress-strain state. In such processes chemical transformation of solid and fluid components, heat release and absorption, phase transitions, rock destruction occurs. Extensive usage of computational resources in limits of traditional models of the mechanics of porous media cannot guarantee full correctness of obtained models and results. The process of rocks consolidation which happens due to filtration of underground fluids is described from the position of rock mechanics. As an additional impact, let us consider the porous media consolidating under the weight of overlying rock with coupled complex geological processes, as a continuous porous medium of variable mass. Problems of obtaining of correct storage equations for coupled processes of consolidation and mass exchange between underground fluid and skeleton material are often met in catagenesi processes description. The example of such processes is metamorphosis of rocks and correspondent variations of stress-strain state. In such processes chemical transformation of solid and fluid

  16. Mineralization of the biocide chloroxylenol by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Skoumal, Marcel; Arias, Conchita; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Centellas, Francesc; Garrido, José Antonio; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Brillas, Enric

    2008-04-01

    Electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) are environmentally friendly methods based on the destruction of organic pollutants in wastewaters with in situ electrogenerated hydroxyl radical. This species is formed in anodic oxidation (AO) from water oxidation at the anode and in indirect electro-oxidation methods like electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) also from reaction between catalytic Fe2+ and H2O2 continuously produced at the O2-diffusion cathode. The PEF method involves the irradiation of the treated solution with UVA light to enhance the photolysis of organics including Fe(III) complexes. In this work, the oxidation power of such EAOPs to decontaminate synthetic wastewaters of the biocide chloroxylenol (4-chloro-3,5-dimethylphenol) at pH 3.0 is comparatively examined with an undivided electrolytic cell containing a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a stainless steel or O2-diffusion cathode. The initial chlorine is released as Cl(-) ion, which remains stable in the medium using Pt or is oxidized to Cl2 on BDD. The biocide solutions can be completely decontaminated using AO with a BDD anode, as well as PEF with a Pt or BDD anode. The PEF procedure with a BDD anode is the most powerful method leading to total mineralization in about 300 min, practically independent of current density. When current density rises, the degradation rate of processes increases, but they become less efficient due to the larger enhancement of waste reactions of oxidants. Chloroxylenol is much more rapidly removed in EF and PEF than in AO. 2,6-dimethylhydroquinone, 2,6-dimethyl-p-benzoquinone and 3,5-dimethyl-2-hydroxy-p-benzoquinone are identified as aromatic by-products, and maleic, malonic, pyruvic, acetic and oxalic acids are found as generated carboxylic acids. A general pathway for chloroxylenol mineralization by all EAOPs including the above by-products is proposed.

  17. 26 CFR 1.614-4 - Treatment under the Internal Revenue Code of 1939 with respect to separate operating mineral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1964....614-4 Treatment under the Internal Revenue Code of 1939 with respect to separate operating mineral... been enacted. For purposes of this section, the term property means each separate operating...

  18. Productive Skills for Process Operatives. Skills Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, L.; Kodz, J.; Evans, C.

    A study of process operatives examined the developments in processing work in 20 organizations within the chemical and food and drink processing industries. Seven exploratory interviews were followed by 20 employer interviews. Technological innovations caused job losses and layoffs. Organizational responses adopted to meet increasing competitive…

  19. Electrochemical mineralization of the antibiotic levofloxacin by electro-Fenton-pyrite process.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, Natija; Labiadh, Lazhar; Oturan, Mehmet A; Oturan, Nihal; Gadri, Abdellatif; Ammar, Salah; Brillas, Enric

    2015-12-01

    Levofloxacin is a large spectrum antibiotic from fluoroquinolones family, widely used and detected in natural waters. Here, this drug was degraded by a novel heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) process, so-called EF-pyrite, in which pyrite powder in suspension regulates the solution pH to 3.0 and supplies 0.2mM Fe(2+) as catalyst to the solution. Trials were performed with a stirred boron-doped diamond (BDD)/carbon-felt cell under O2 bubbling for cathodic H2O2 generation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the BDD anode and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between Fe(2+) and H2O2 were the main oxidizing agents. The effect of applied current and antibiotic concentration over the mineralization rate and degree, mineralization current efficiency and specific energy consumption was studied. An almost total mineralization was achieved for a 0.23mM drug solution operating at 300mA for 8h. The kinetic decay of the drug was followed by reversed-phase HPLC and obeyed a pseudo-first-order reaction. Ion-exclusion HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic and oxamic acids, the most persistent final products, were the predominant pollutants remaining in solution at long electrolysis time. Ion chromatography analysis confirmed the release of F(-), NO3(-) and NH4(+) ions during levofloxacin mineralization.

  20. Occurrence reporting and processing of operations information

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-21

    DOE O 232.1A, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information, and 10 CFR 830.350, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information (when it becomes effective), along with this manual, set forth occurrence reporting requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) Departmental Elements and contractors responsible for the management and operation of DOE-owned and -leased facilities. These requirements include categorization of occurrences related to safety, security, environment, health, or operations (``Reportable Occurrences``); DOE notification of these occurrences; and the development and submission of documented follow-up reports. This Manual provides detailed information for categorizing and reporting occurrences at DOE facilities. Information gathered by the Occurrence Reporting and processing System is used for analysis of the Department`s performance in environmental protection, safeguards and security, and safety and health of its workers and the public. This information is also used to develop lessons learned and document events that significantly impact DOE operations.

  1. 77 FR 802 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations..., Interior. ACTION: Notice of the availability of environmental documents prepared for OCS mineral proposals..., 2011, for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities that were proposed on the Gulf...

  2. 76 FR 38673 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY... availability of environmental documents prepared for OCS mineral proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region... Impact (FONSI), prepared by BOEMRE for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities...

  3. 76 FR 16632 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY... Environmental Documents Prepared for OCS Mineral Proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region. SUMMARY: The Bureau...), prepared by BOEMRE for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities proposed on the Gulf...

  4. 77 FR 57581 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations... (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of the availability of environmental documents prepared for ocs mineral..., gas, and mineral-related activities that were proposed in the Gulf of Mexico, or more...

  5. 76 FR 11809 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY... availability of environmental documents prepared for OCS mineral proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region... Impact (FONSI), prepared by BOEMRE for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities...

  6. 76 FR 54782 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY... Availability of Environmental Documents Prepared for OCS Mineral Proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region... Impact (FONSI), prepared by BOEMRE for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities...

  7. 75 FR 67996 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Enforcement Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of... Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of Environmental Documents Prepared for OCS Mineral... mineral-related activities proposed on the Gulf of Mexico. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  8. 75 FR 67994 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... and Enforcement Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the... for OCS mineral proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Ocean Energy... following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities proposed on the Gulf of Mexico. FOR FURTHER...

  9. Modeling operators' emergency response time for chemical processing operations.

    PubMed

    Murray, Susan L; Harputlu, Emrah; Mentzer, Ray A; Mannan, M Sam

    2014-01-01

    Operators have a crucial role during emergencies at a variety of facilities such as chemical processing plants. When an abnormality occurs in the production process, the operator often has limited time to either take corrective actions or evacuate before the situation becomes deadly. It is crucial that system designers and safety professionals can estimate the time required for a response before procedures and facilities are designed and operations are initiated. There are existing industrial engineering techniques to establish time standards for tasks performed at a normal working pace. However, it is reasonable to expect the time required to take action in emergency situations will be different than working at a normal production pace. It is possible that in an emergency, operators will act faster compared to a normal pace. It would be useful for system designers to be able to establish a time range for operators' response times for emergency situations. This article develops a modeling approach to estimate the time standard range for operators taking corrective actions or following evacuation procedures in emergency situations. This will aid engineers and managers in establishing time requirements for operators in emergency situations. The methodology used for this study combines a well-established industrial engineering technique for determining time requirements (predetermined time standard system) and adjustment coefficients for emergency situations developed by the authors. Numerous videos of workers performing well-established tasks at a maximum pace were studied. As an example, one of the tasks analyzed was pit crew workers changing tires as quickly as they could during a race. The operations in these videos were decomposed into basic, fundamental motions (such as walking, reaching for a tool, and bending over) by studying the videos frame by frame. A comparison analysis was then performed between the emergency pace and the normal working pace operations

  10. Physics and chemistry of minerals under laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, O.; Leonenko, N.

    2016-04-01

    New experimental data of the influence of laser irradiation on the phase composition minerals of bauxite and red mud and their technological features have been represented. The mechanisms of formation of micro- and nanophases on mineral surfaces under the influence of laser irradiation were shown. It is underlined that changes of condition of surface atoms, concentration of metals, agglomeration of titanium minerals and new phase formation occurred under laser irradiation on bauxites and red mud.

  11. Bibliography of articles and reports on mineral-separation techniques, processes, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    A bibliography of published articles and reports on mineral-separation techniques, processes, and applications is presented along with an author and subject index. This information is intended for use in the mineral-separation facility of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory at the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center and as an aid and reference to persons involved or interested in mineral separation.

  12. Multidimensional energy operator for image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragos, Petros; Bovik, Alan C.; Quatieri, Thomas F.

    1992-11-01

    The 1-D nonlinear differential operator (Psi) (f) equals (f')2 - ff' has been recently introduced to signal processing and has been found very useful for estimating the parameters of sinusoids and the modulating signals of AM-FM signals. It is called an energy operator because it can track the energy of an oscillator source generating a sinusoidal signal. In this paper we introduce the multidimensional extension (Phi) (f) equals (parallel)DELf(parallel)2 - fDEL2f of the 1-D energy operator and briefly outline some of its applications to image processing. We discuss some interesting properties of the multidimensional operator and develop demodulation algorithms to estimate the amplitude envelope and instantaneous frequencies of 2-D spatially-varying AM-FM signals, which can model image texture. The attractive features of the multidimensional operator and the related amplitude/frequency demodulation algorithms are their simplicity, efficiency, and ability to track instantaneously- varying spatial modulation patterns.

  13. Modeling the processing of mineral iron during dust transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsberg, Ulrike; Wolke, Ralf; Tilgner, Andreas; Tegen, Ina; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    The Saharan desert and the Gobi desert are the main contributors to Aeolian desert dust, which is a major source of micronutrients to the remote ocean regions. Micronutrients, such as transition metals like iron or copper, are regarded essential for biological processes of different marine species. In this context recent studies have shown that soluble iron, since it is generally the most abundant transition metal in dust particles, has the ability to control marine productivity and thereby likely influence the CO2- budget. Nevertheless, the processing of desert dust leading to the release of soluble iron still lacks sufficient understanding since several factors control the solubilization process. Especially anthropogenic emissions are regarded to significantly add to the amount of soluble iron by acidification of dust particles or by the direct emission of soluble iron comprised, e.g. in coal fly ash. For the investigation of the dissolution process of iron that takes place during dust transportation the spectral air parcel model SPACCIM is used. A mechanism describing the precipitation and dissolution of mineral particles by heterogeneous surface reactions has been implemented. Trajectory properties were derived from COSMO-MUSCAT simulations or from re-analysis data by HYSPLIT. Differences in the chemical composition and the amount of anthropogenic and naturally emitted species on the North African continent and the highly industrialized region of South-East Asia have considerable impact on the acidification of the desert dust. Under this aspect, special cases of dust outbreaks of the Saharan desert and the Gobi desert are investigated and compared with focus on soluble iron produced.

  14. 30 CFR 912.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for... WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  15. 30 CFR 910.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for... WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  16. 30 CFR 921.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for... WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface...

  17. 30 CFR 912.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for... WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  18. 30 CFR 922.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for... WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  19. 30 CFR 921.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for... WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface...

  20. 30 CFR 939.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for... WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  1. 30 CFR 922.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for... WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  2. 30 CFR 939.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for... WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  3. 30 CFR 910.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for... WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  4. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2004-08-01

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, wear problems of mineral processing equipment including screens, sieve bends, heavy media vessel, dewatering centrifuge, etc., were identified. A novel surface treatment technology, high density infrared (HDI) surface coating process was proposed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated samples were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of AISI 4140 and ASTM A36 steels can be increased 3 and 5 folds, respectively by the application of HDI coatings.

  5. A process for reducing rocks and concentrating heavy minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strong, Thomas R.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.

    2016-03-30

    Once the rock is reduced to grains, it is necessary to separate the grains into paramagnetic and nonparamagnetic and heavy and light mineral fractions. In separating grains by property, those minerals chemically suited for radiometric dating are abundantly concentrated. Grams of mineralogical material can then be analyzed and characterized by multiple methods including trace element chemistry, laser ablation, and in particular, ion geochronology.

  6. REACTIVE MINERALS IN AQUIFERS: FORMATION PROCESSES AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will focus on the occurrence, form, and characterization of reactive iron minerals in aquifers and soils. The potential for abiotic reductive transformations of contaminants at the mineral-water interface will be discussed along with available tools for site min...

  7. Direct observations of the atmospheric processing of Asian mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Guazzotti, S. A.; Sodeman, D. A.; Prather, K. A.

    2007-02-01

    The accumulation of secondary acids and ammonium on individual mineral dust particles during ACE-Asia has been measured with an online single-particle mass spectrometer, the ATOFMS. Changes in the amounts of sulphate, nitrate, and chloride mixed with dust particles correlate with air masses from different source regions. The uptake of secondary acids depended on the individual dust particle mineralogy; high amounts of nitrate accumulated on calcium-rich dust while high amounts of sulphate accumulated on aluminosilicate-rich dust. Oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) by iron in the aluminosilicate dust is a possible explanation for this enrichment of sulphate, which has important consequences for the fertilization of remote oceans by soluble iron. This study shows the segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride in individual aged dust particles for the first time. A transport and aging timeline provides an explanation for the observed segregation. Our data suggests that sulphate became mixed with the dust first. This implies that the transport pathway is more important than the reaction kinetics in determining which species accumulate on mineral dust. Early in the study, dust particles in volcanically influenced air masses were mixed predominately with sulphate. Dust mixed with chloride then dominated over sulphate and nitrate when a major dust front reached the R. V. Ronald Brown. We hypothesize that the rapid increase in chloride on dust was due to mixing with HCl(g) released from acidified sea salt particles induced by heterogeneous reaction with volcanic SO2(g), prior to the arrival of the dust front. The amount of ammonium mixed with dust correlated strongly with the total amount of secondary acid reaction products in the dust. Submicron dust and ammonium sulphate were internally mixed, contrary to frequent reports that they exist as external mixtures. The size distribution of the mixing state of dust with these secondary species validates previous mechanisms of

  8. Architecture for processing image algebra operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffield, Patrick C.

    1992-06-01

    The proposed architecture is a logical design specifically for image algebra and other matrix related operations. The design is a fine grain SIMD concept consisting of three tightly coupled components: a spatial configuration processor, a weighting processor (point-wise), and an accumulation processor (point-wise). The flow of data and image processing operations are directed by a control buffer and pipe lined to each of the three processing components. The low-level abstraction of the proposed computational system is founded on the mathematical principle of discrete convolution and its geometrical decomposition. This geometrical decomposition combined with array processing requires redefining specific algebraic operations and reorganizing their order of parsing in the abstract syntax. The logical data flow of such an abstraction leads to a division of operations, those defined by point-wise operations, the others in terms of spatial configuration. The effect of this particular decomposition allows convolution type operations to be computed strictly as a function of the number of elements in the template (mask, filter, etc.) instead of the number of picture elements in the image. The potential utility of this architectural design lies in its ability to provide order statistic filtering and all the arithmetic and logic operations of the image algebra's generalized matrix product. The generalized matrix product is the most powerful fundamental formulation in the algebra, thus allowing a wide range of applications.

  9. 30 CFR 905.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 905.764 Section 905.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  10. 30 CFR 910.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 910.764 Section 910.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  11. 30 CFR 912.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 912.764 Section 912.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  12. 30 CFR 903.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 903.764 Section 903.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  13. 30 CFR 922.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 922.764 Section 922.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining...

  14. Innovation processes in technologies for the processing of refractory mineral raw materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanturiya, V. A.

    2008-12-01

    Analysis of the grade of mineral resources of Russia and other countries shows that end products that are competitive in terms of both technological and environmental criteria in the world market can only be obtained by the development and implementation of progressive technologies based on the up-to-date achievements of fundamental sciences. The essence of modern innovation processes in technologies developed in Russia for the complex and comprehensive processing of refractory raw materials with a complex composition is ascertained. These processes include (i) radiometric methods of concentration of valuable components, (ii) high-energy methods of disintegration of highly dispersed mineral components, and (iii) electrochemical methods of water conditioning to obtain target products for solving specific technological problems.

  15. Understanding processes affecting mineral deposits in humid environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, Robert R.; Ayuso, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent interdisciplinary studies by the U.S. Geological Survey have resulted in substantial progress toward understanding the influence that climate and hydrology have on the geochemical signatures of mineral deposits and the resulting mine wastes in the eastern United States. Specific areas of focus include the release, transport, and fate of acid, metals, and associated elements from inactive mines in temperate coastal areas and of metals from unmined mineral deposits in tropical to subtropical areas; the influence of climate, geology, and hydrology on remediation options for abandoned mines; and the application of radiogenic isotopes to uniquely apportion source contributions that distinguish natural from mining sources and extent of metal transport. The environmental effects of abandoned mines and unmined mineral deposits result from a complex interaction of a variety of chemical and physical factors. These include the geology of the mineral deposit, the hydrologic setting of the mineral deposit and associated mine wastes, the chemistry of waters interacting with the deposit and associated waste material, the engineering of a mine as it relates to the reactivity of mine wastes, and climate, which affects such factors as temperature and the amounts of precipitation and evapotranspiration; these factors, in turn, influence the environmental behavior of mineral deposits. The role of climate is becoming increasingly important in environmental investigations of mineral deposits because of the growing concerns about climate change.

  16. T Lymphocytes Influence the Mineralization Process of Bone.

    PubMed

    El Khassawna, Thaqif; Serra, Alessandro; Bucher, Christian H; Petersen, Ansgar; Schlundt, Claudia; Könnecke, Ireen; Malhan, Deeksha; Wendler, Sebastian; Schell, Hanna; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Duda, Georg N

    2017-01-01

    Bone is a unique organ able to regenerate itself after injuries. This regeneration requires the local interplay between different biological systems such as inflammation and matrix formation. Structural reconstitution is initiated by an inflammatory response orchestrated by the host immune system. However, the individual role of T cells and B cells in regeneration and their relationship to bone tissue reconstitution remain unknown. Comparing bone and fracture healing in animals with and without mature T and B cells revealed the essential role of these immune cells in determining the tissue mineralization and thus the bone quality. Bone without mature T and B cells is stiffer when compared to wild-type bone thus lacking the elasticity that helps to absorb forces, thus preventing fractures. In-depth analysis showed dysregulations in collagen deposition and osteoblast distribution upon lack of mature T and B cells. These changes in matrix deposition have been correlated with T cells rather than B cells within this study. This work presents, for the first time, a direct link between immune cells and matrix formation during bone healing after fracture. It illustrates specifically the role of T cells in the collagen organization process and the lack thereof in the absence of T cells.

  17. Ampicillin Mineralization by Denitrifying Process: Kinetic and Metabolic Effects.

    PubMed

    Islas-García, Irasema; Romo-Gómez, Claudia; de María Cuervo-López, Flor

    2017-04-29

    The impact of the antibiotic ampicillin (AMP) on the metabolic and kinetics of denitrification process as well as the sludge ability for oxidizing it was evaluated in batch assays. Denitrifying reference assays with acetate-C and nitrate-N (C/N ratio of 1.1) were conducted for establishing the metabolic and kinetic performance of the denitrifying sludge. Assays amended with 10 mg AMP-C L(-1) were also performed. In reference assays, acetate and nitrate consumption efficiencies of 100% with a total conversion to HCO3(-) and N2 were achieved within 1.5 h. When 10 mg AMP-C L(-1) was added, total and simultaneous consumption of nitrate-N, acetate-C, and AMP-C was achieved within 12 h. The substrates were completely reduced to N2 and oxidized to HCO3(-), respectively. No nitrite-N was registered at the end of culture. AMP caused a reversible inhibitory effect on specific nitrate and acetate consumption and N2 production rates. Complete consumption and mineralization of AMP associated to nitrate reduction to N2 were achieved. This work provides the first evidences on the metabolic and kinetic performance of a denitrifying sludge exposed to AMP. These results might be considered for proposing useful wastewater treatments where β-Lactam antibiotics can be present.

  18. T Lymphocytes Influence the Mineralization Process of Bone

    PubMed Central

    El Khassawna, Thaqif; Serra, Alessandro; Bucher, Christian H.; Petersen, Ansgar; Schlundt, Claudia; Könnecke, Ireen; Malhan, Deeksha; Wendler, Sebastian; Schell, Hanna; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Duda, Georg N.

    2017-01-01

    Bone is a unique organ able to regenerate itself after injuries. This regeneration requires the local interplay between different biological systems such as inflammation and matrix formation. Structural reconstitution is initiated by an inflammatory response orchestrated by the host immune system. However, the individual role of T cells and B cells in regeneration and their relationship to bone tissue reconstitution remain unknown. Comparing bone and fracture healing in animals with and without mature T and B cells revealed the essential role of these immune cells in determining the tissue mineralization and thus the bone quality. Bone without mature T and B cells is stiffer when compared to wild-type bone thus lacking the elasticity that helps to absorb forces, thus preventing fractures. In-depth analysis showed dysregulations in collagen deposition and osteoblast distribution upon lack of mature T and B cells. These changes in matrix deposition have been correlated with T cells rather than B cells within this study. This work presents, for the first time, a direct link between immune cells and matrix formation during bone healing after fracture. It illustrates specifically the role of T cells in the collagen organization process and the lack thereof in the absence of T cells. PMID:28596766

  19. Mineralization at Titanium Surfaces is a Two-Step Process

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, Håkan; Ilver, Lars; Malmberg, Per

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the initial reaction of implants with blood or cell culture medium is important for the understanding of the healing process in bone. In the present study, the formation of low crystalline carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) onto commercially pure titanium (Ti) implants from cell culture medium and blood, is described as an early event in bone healing at implants. The Ti-implants were incubated with cell culture medium (DMEM) or whole blood and the surface concentration of Ca, P and HA was analyzed by XPS, EDX and Tof-SIMS. After incubation with DMEM for 16 h and 72 h, EDX and XPS analysis showed stable levels of Ca and P on the Ti-surface. ESEM images showed an even distribution of Ca and P. Further analysis of the XPS results indicated that CHA was formed at the implants. Analysis with ToF-SIMS yielded high m.w. fragments of HA, such as Ca2PO4 at m/z 174.9 and Ca3PO5 at m/z 230.8, as secondary ions at the Ti-surfaces. Analysis of implants incubated in blood for 16 h, with ToF-SIMS, showed initial formation of CHA yielding CaOH as secondary ion. The results indicate that early mineralization at Ti-surfaces is an important step in the healing of implants into bone. PMID:26999231

  20. Bioelectro-Fenton: A sustainable integrated process for removal of organic pollutants from water: Application to mineralization of metoprolol.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Vargas, Hugo; Cocerva, Tatiana; Oturan, Nihal; Buisson, Didier; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-12-05

    The relevant environmental hazard related to the presence of pharmaceuticals in water sources requires the development of high effective and suitable wastewater treatment technologies. In the present work, a hybrid process coupling electro-Fenton (EF) process and aerobic biological treatment (Bio-EF process) was implemented for the efficient and cost-effective mineralization of beta-blocker metoprolol (MPTL) aqueous solutions. Firstly, operating factors influencing EF process were assessed. MTPL solutions were completely mineralized after 4h-electrolysis under optimal operating conditions and BDD anode demonstrated its oxidation superiority. The absolute rate constant of MTPL oxidation byOH (kMTPL) was determined by the competition kinetics method and found to be (1.72±0.04)×10(9)M(-1)s(-1). A reaction pathway for the mineralization of the drug was proposed based on the identification of oxidation by-products. Secondly, EF process was used as pre-treatment. An increase of BOD5/COD ratio from 0.012 to 0.44 was obtained after 1h EF treatment, along with 47% TOC removal and a significant decrease of toxicity, demonstrating the feasibility of a post-biological treatment. Finally, biological treatment successfully oxidized 43% of the total TOC content. An overall 90% mineralization of MPTL solutions was achieved by the Bio-EF process, demonstrating its potentiality for treating wastewater containing pharmaceutical residues.

  1. Mineral processing techniques for recycling investment casting shell

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Nilsen, David N.; Dahlin, David C.; Hunt, Alton H.; Collins, W. Keith

    2002-01-01

    The Albany Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy used materials characterization and minerals beneficiation methods to separate and beneficially modify spent investment-mold components to identify recycling opportunities and minimize environmentally sensitive wastes. The physical and chemical characteristics of the shell materials were determined and used to guide bench-scale research to separate reusable components by mineral-beneficiation techniques. Successfully concentrated shell materials were evaluated for possible use in new markets.

  2. Process for operating equilibrium controlled reactions

    DOEpatents

    Nataraj, Shankar; Carvill, Brian Thomas; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard

    2001-01-01

    A cyclic process for operating an equilibrium controlled reaction in a plurality of reactors containing an admixture of an adsorbent and a reaction catalyst suitable for performing the desired reaction which is operated in a predetermined timed sequence wherein the heating and cooling requirements in a moving reaction mass transfer zone within each reactor are provided by indirect heat exchange with a fluid capable of phase change at temperatures maintained in each reactor during sorpreaction, depressurization, purging and pressurization steps during each process cycle.

  3. BILL E. KUNKLE INTERDISCIPLINARY BEEF SYMPOSIUM: Assessing the mineral supplementation needs in pasture-based beef operations in the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Greene, L W

    2016-12-01

    Macro- and microminerals are required for all physiological processes in beef cattle. When mineral deficiencies occur in pasture-based production systems, a multitude of deficiency symptoms may occur, and most often, these deficiencies result in hidden losses to include reduced production potential, reduced immunity, and reproductive failure. More severe deficiencies will result in specific deficiency symptoms, depending on the specific mineral deficiency. In pasture-based beef operations, specific deficiency symptoms are seldom observed. Forage mineral supply is highly variable and dependent on the forage type, stage of forage growth, and soil fertility. Grazing cattle mineral requirements change throughout the production cycle. With the variability of forage mineral supply and the changing mineral requirements, care must be taken when developing mineral supplementation programs for grazing cattle. The macrominerals function in nerve transmission, bone development, and metabolism and as electrolytes. These are Ca, P, Mg, Na, K, Cl, and S. The microminerals function in various areas of metabolism, immune responsiveness, reproductive efficiency, and many other functions. These minerals are Zn, Cu, Fe, I, Mn, Se, Mo, and Co. Of these macro- and microminerals, those that are important for supplementation to pasture-based cattle include Ca, P, Mg, Na, Cl, Zn, Cu, I, Mn, Se, and Co. However, the amounts to be supplemented will depend on the specific mineral requirements and the forage supply of the minerals. Consequently, the development of free-choice mineral supplementation programs is a moving target. Generally, this entangled mess is sorted by taking one mineral at a time into consideration. However, in doing so, one has to be cognizant of the many interactions that occur when changing intake of just 1 mineral in the supplement with respect to the amount supplied in the base forage. Often times, mineral nutrition problems of one or more minerals are created when

  4. Mineral trapping of CO2 in operated geothermal reservoirs - Numerical simulations on various scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Michael; Stanjek, Helge; Peiffer, Stefan; Clauser, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    A novel approach to store CO2 not only by hydrodynamic trapping within a reservoir, but to convert dissolved CO2 into the geochemically more stable form of calcite in a reaction with calcium obtained from dissolution of sulphates and alkalinity from feldspars or fly ashes is described here. The presentation gives answers to the key questions: • Where are potential geothermal reservoirs with anhydrite abundant? • Does the transfer of anhydrite into calcite work at all and what are the reaction rates? • What are probable alkalinity sources and how fast are they available? Numerical simulation is a means to quantify the entire process of CO2 storage and to deepen the understanding of the detailed chemical processes. We performed numerical simulations on multiple scales. The relevant scales reach from the micro or thin section scale (ca. 1 cm) to the reservoir scale (ca. 10 km). The idea is to provide constraints for smaller scale models from the larger scale and derive functionality from smaller scale models of processes which cannot be resolved in larger scale models, due to restrictions of discretization of the applied numerical mesh. With regard to the 3 questions above we can conclude that the combination of CO2 storage and geothermal energy production is generally feasible because candidate sites are available, anhydrite is transformable into calcite and alkalinity can be provided by fly ashes (Back et al. 2010) or even in-situ (Kühn and Clauser 2006). Based on our laboratory investigations and numerical studies we are able to estimate the storage potential for mineral trapping of CO2 in geothermal reservoirs (Kühn et al. 2009). On the one hand the maximum is unfortunately less than a million tons over the life time of a geothermal heating plant. On the other hand significant storage capacities are available in geological formations with regard to hydrodynamic trapping for millions of tonnes of carbon dioxide. This is why under the current circumstances

  5. Processing module operating methods, processing modules, and communications systems

    DOEpatents

    McCown, Steven Harvey; Derr, Kurt W.; Moore, Troy

    2014-09-09

    A processing module operating method includes using a processing module physically connected to a wireless communications device, requesting that the wireless communications device retrieve encrypted code from a web site and receiving the encrypted code from the wireless communications device. The wireless communications device is unable to decrypt the encrypted code. The method further includes using the processing module, decrypting the encrypted code, executing the decrypted code, and preventing the wireless communications device from accessing the decrypted code. Another processing module operating method includes using a processing module physically connected to a host device, executing an application within the processing module, allowing the application to exchange user interaction data communicated using a user interface of the host device with the host device, and allowing the application to use the host device as a communications device for exchanging information with a remote device distinct from the host device.

  6. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation: process mineralogy of feed and products

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, G.E.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Collins, W. Keith

    2002-05-01

    Direct mineral carbonation was investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO[2] into a geologically stable final form. The process utilizes a slurry of water, with bicarbonate and salt additions, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg[2]SiO[4]) or serpentine [Mg[3]Si[2]O[5](OH)[4

  7. Trouble-shooting process operations, Second Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    This expanded edition of the bestselling Trouble-shooting Refinery Process, now includes chapters on fluidized catalytic cracking, natural gas production, and delayed coking. Contents include: Crude unit; Delayed coking cycles; Delayed coking process; Amine regeneration and scrubbing; Sulfur recovery; Alkylation; Fluidized catalyst cracking units; FCU product fractionation; Saving energy at reduced feed rates; Refrigeration systems; Centrifugal pumps; Distillation towers; Vacuum towers; Treating liquid hydrocarbons; Process heaters; Water coolers; Alarms and trips; Unstable gas plant operations; Fouled trays; Dehydrating light end towers; Vapor-liquid separation; Refining metallurgy for novices; Unusual noises and vibrations; Natural gas drying; Enhancing natural gas production; Suggestions for new operations engineers; Planning a performance test; Understanding control board instruments; How to make field measurements; The people problem; Calculating dew point, bubble point, and pressure drop; Index.

  8. The activated sludge process: Fundamentals of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Junkins, R.; Deeny, K.J.; Eckhoff, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures given here - based on extensive and intensive experience. Background information on process mechanics is followed by detailed consideration of control and troubleshooting practices. Contents: PREFACE AND INTRODUCTION; PROCESS MECHANICS; Basic Mechanism of Activated Sludge Systems; Formation of Activated Sludge; Growth of Microorganisms; Classifications of Microorganisms: Type, Environment, Age; Solids Separation and Return; FACTORS AFFECTING OPERATION; Raw Wastewater Strength; Dissolved Oxygen; pH; Temperature; Nutrients; Toxicity; Mixing; Detention Time; Hydraulics; PROCESS MODIFICATIONS; Conventional; Complete Mix; Contact-Stabilization; Extended Aeration; Others; PROCESS MONITORING; Visual; Analytical Indicators; OPERATIONAL CONTROL; Sludge Volume Index; Sludge Age; Mean Cell Residence Time; Food/Microorganism Ratio; Organic Loading Rate; Solids Loading Rate; Clarifier Overflow Rate; Weir Overflow Rate; Sludge Recycle Rate, Sludge Wastage Rate; Chemical Feed Rate; TROUBLESHOOTING; Low BOD Removal; Low D.O. in Aeration Baisn; Poor Settling; PLANT START-UP; Introduction; Pre Start-up Checkup; Wastewater Analysis; Seed Screening; Process Checklist; Mechanical Checklist; Familiarization and Training; Start-up; Seeding; Process Monitoring; Transition; Typical Start-up Problems; Foaming; Settling Problems; Low BOD Removal; INDEX.

  9. A software architecture for automating operations processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kevin J.

    1994-01-01

    The Operations Engineering Lab (OEL) at JPL has developed a software architecture based on an integrated toolkit approach for simplifying and automating mission operations tasks. The toolkit approach is based on building adaptable, reusable graphical tools that are integrated through a combination of libraries, scripts, and system-level user interface shells. The graphical interface shells are designed to integrate and visually guide a user through the complex steps in an operations process. They provide a user with an integrated system-level picture of an overall process, defining the required inputs and possible output through interactive on-screen graphics. The OEL has developed the software for building these process-oriented graphical user interface (GUI) shells. The OEL Shell development system (OEL Shell) is an extension of JPL's Widget Creation Library (WCL). The OEL Shell system can be used to easily build user interfaces for running complex processes, applications with extensive command-line interfaces, and tool-integration tasks. The interface shells display a logical process flow using arrows and box graphics. They also allow a user to select which output products are desired and which input sources are needed, eliminating the need to know which program and its associated command-line parameters must be executed in each case. The shells have also proved valuable for use as operations training tools because of the OEL Shell hypertext help environment. The OEL toolkit approach is guided by several principles, including the use of ASCII text file interfaces with a multimission format, Perl scripts for mission-specific adaptation code, and programs that include a simple command-line interface for batch mode processing. Projects can adapt the interface shells by simple changes to the resources configuration file. This approach has allowed the development of sophisticated, automated software systems that are easy, cheap, and fast to build. This paper will

  10. Process for the obtainment of boric acid from colemanite and/or howlite minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Polendo-Loredo, J.

    1988-07-12

    A process for obtaining boric acid from colemanite minerals, howlite minerals, or mixtures thereof is described comprising: treating the mineral with sulfuric acid to dissolve boron compounds; separating the solution thus formed from the insoluble solids in suspension; reacting the solution with hydrogen sulfide to precipitate arsenic and iron impurities; separating the impurities precipitated from the remaining solution; cooling the remaining solution to precipitate boric acid; and separating the boric acid from the remaining solution.

  11. Bismuth mineral inclusions in gold-bearing magnetite from the giant Beiya gold deposit, SW China: insights into mineralization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haoyang; Sun, Xiaoming

    2017-04-01

    Bismuth minerals are commonly found in a wide range of gold deposits and could offer valuable information on the process of gold mineralization. This is because Bi minerals always show immediate association with gold and are sensitive to chemical-physical variations (Afifi et al., 1988). Specifically, native bismuth has a melting point of 271°C and could melt at lower temperatures when gold is added (Okamoto et al,, 1983). It has been verified that Bi melt could efficiently scavenge gold from hydrothermal fluids (Tooth et al., 2008, 2011). The Beiya deposit, situated in the Sanjiang Tethyan tectonic domain in the southwestern China, is one of the largest gold deposits in China 10.4 Moz Au @ 2.47g/t). Located along the contacts between a 36 Ma quartz syenite porphyry and the Triassic limestones, the deposit contains abundant massive Au-bearing magnetite ores, which are considered as a product of skarn mineralization. However, the pivotal processes accounting for the huge accumulation of gold resource at Beiya area are poorly constrained. In the massive magnetite ores, abundant native gold was observed to be present as submicron-scale inclusions hosted by magnetite (Zhou et al., 2017). We also noted that abundant Bi minerals occur within these ores (Zhou et al., 2016), which provide critical clues to reveal the processes of gold mineralization. An assemblage of Bi minerals, composed of native bismuth, maldonite and bismuthinite, is present as tiny inclusions in these Au-bearing magnetite grains. Mineralogical study illustrates the encapsulation of native bismuth and maldonite as melts during magnetite growth, which is also supported by the ore-forming temperatures over 300°C derived from previous fluid inclusions study (He et al., 2016). Our thermodynamic modeling demonstrates that Bi melts scavenged gold from hydrothermal fluids. Subsequently, sulfidation of Bi melts resulted in precipitation of gold, which was captured by growing magnetite. We thus propose that

  12. Entering the operative correction machining processes CNC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrasov, R. Yu; Starikov, A. I.; Lasukov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The article describes the solution to the problem of compensation of errors occurring during machining on CNC machines. We propose a method of mathematical modeling of processes diagnostics and control of technological equipment. The results of the diagnosis of the CNC machine, as well as the mathematical model describing the dependence of the positioning error of the executive bodies of operating component of cutting force PZ, in the range of movement OX.

  13. 77 FR 51107 - Mineral Range, Inc.-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Rail Line of Lake Superior & Ishpeming...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Mineral Range, Inc.--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Rail Line of Lake Superior & Ishpeming Railroad Company Mineral Range, Inc. (MRI), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice...

  14. 77 FR 34405 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations... implement the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), announces the availability of NEPA-related Site... oil, gas, and mineral-related activities that were proposed on the Gulf of Mexico, or...

  15. 26 CFR 1.614-2 - Election to aggregate separate operating mineral interests under section 614(b) prior to its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... costs of production are required to be taken into account by the taxpayer for purposes of computing the... depletion computed under section 613, or such costs would be so required to be taken into account if the... determining whether a mineral interest is an operating mineral interest, costs of production do not include...

  16. 26 CFR 1.614-2 - Election to aggregate separate operating mineral interests under section 614(b) prior to its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... costs of production are required to be taken into account by the taxpayer for purposes of computing the... depletion computed under section 613, or such costs would be so required to be taken into account if the... determining whether a mineral interest is an operating mineral interest, costs of production do not include...

  17. 78 FR 12085 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations... (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of Environmental Documents Prepared for OCS Mineral... were prepared during the period October 1, 2012, through December 31, 2012, for oil, gas, and...

  18. 78 FR 72096 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations... (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of the availability of environmental documents prepared for OCS mineral... were prepared during the period July 1, 2013, through September 30, 2013, for oil, gas, and...

  19. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2000-08-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation before and/or during carbonation may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (i) its structural and chemical simplicity, (ii) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (iii) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for cost optimization of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process.

  20. Modeling particulate matter emissions during mineral loading process under weak wind simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaochun; Chen, Weiping; Ma, Chun; Zhan, Shuifen

    2013-04-01

    The quantification of particulate matter emissions from mineral handling is an important problem for the quantification of global emissions on industrial sites. Mineral particulate matter emissions could adversely impact environmental quality in mining regions, transport regions, and even on a global scale. Mineral loading is an important process contributing to mineral particulate matter emissions, especially under weak wind conditions. Mathematical models are effective ways to evaluate particulate matter emissions during the mineral loading process. The currently used empirical models based on the form of a power function do not predict particulate matter emissions accurately under weak wind conditions. At low particulate matter emissions, the models overestimated, and at high particulate matter emissions, the models underestimated emission factors. We conducted wind tunnel experiments to evaluate the particulate matter emission factors for the mineral loading process. A new approach based on the mathematical form of a logistical function was developed and tested. It provided a realistic depiction of the particulate matter emissions during the mineral loading process, accounting for fractions of fine mineral particles, dropping height, and wind velocity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. U Mineral Hosts and Enrichment Processes in Altered Oceanic Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, L. C.; Plank, T.; Kelley, K.; Alt, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    The U-Pb-Th isotopic system is a primary tool for understanding mantle and continental evolution and for quantifying the flow of mass and heat through the Earth's reservoirs. One of the major sites of U-Pb-Th fractionation is the oceanic crust, which is a sink for seawater U. For example, the upper, oxidized oceanic crust (U ~0.4ppm) may be as much as 4x enriched over pristine igneous values (U ~0.09ppm) with a minor net change in Pb and Th. Little, however, is understood about the mechanisms controlling uranium enrichment, its mineral hosts, or the timing of the process. We have used laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and electron microprobe data to study the distribution of U in the oldest sampled crust in the Pacific, Jurassic mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) from ODP Site 801C (1000 km seaward of the Mariana trench), formed at fast spreading rates. Seventeen thin sections, 8 with the highest whole rock U content (HUC) (0.61-1.7ppm) and 9 with low U content (LUC) (U <0.4ppm) were analyzed in detail. Twelve of the thin sections contain various types of carbonates (veins, vugs, vesicles, and inter-flow material) in a variety of crystal morphologies (radial, inclusion-rich, and sparry). A 50-micron laser beam was rastered across various alteration zones, such as halos, veins, and the surrounding host to provide in-situ multi-element analysis (U, Th, Pb, REE, alkalis, etc). HUC are exclusively associated with low-Mg calcites (< 1wt% Mg), whereas LUC are typically associated with high-Mg calcites (10-20 wt% Mg). U also correlates positively with Sr and negatively with total rare earth element (REE) concentration. High U carbonates inherit the seawater REE pattern with both HREE and LREE enrichment, whereas LUC inherit the LREE depletion of the MORB host. Thus, there appear to be distinct generations of fluids that precipitate carbonate; those with the high Sr and low REE of seawater tend to precipitate U-rich calcites (up to 4.5 ppm U

  2. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2005-08-01

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, a novel surface treatment technology, laser surface engineering (LSE) surface coating process was proposed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimen were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and AISI 4140 steels can be increased 10 and 25 folds, respectively by the application of LSE process. Initial field testing showed a 2 times improvement of the service life of a raw coal screen panel.

  3. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; R. Honaker; B. K. Parekh

    2007-09-20

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, novel surface treatment technologies, High Density Infrared (HDI) and Laser Surface Engineering (LSE) surface coating processes were developed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral and coal processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimens were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and can be significantly increased by applying HDI and LSE coating processes. Field testing has been performed using a LSE-treated screen panel and it showed a significant improvement of the service life.

  4. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2006-07-20

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, novel surface treatment technologies, High Density Infrared (HDI) and Laser Surface Engineering (LSE) surface coating processes were developed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimens were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and can be significantly increased by applying HDI and LSE coating processes. Field testing has been performed using a LSE-treated screen panel and it showed a 2 times improvement of the service life.

  5. Investigation of sulfur-bearing minerals in raw and processed oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G.M.

    1989-11-01

    Raw oil shale samples were investigated to provide baseline information on sulfur-bearing mineral composition. The sulfur-bearing mineral identified in raw oil in this study was primarily pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). Sulfur-bearing alteration minerals were gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center dot}2H{sub 2}O) and copiapite (Fe{sub 14}O{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 18}{center dot}63H{sub 2}O), which appeared as crystalline masses on the surfaces of sulfide minerals. Investigation of spent (or processed) oil shale demonstrated that heat-induced mineralogical reactions can drastically alter the crystalline structure of materials. Hexagonal pyrrhotite is the kinetically and structurally preferred sulfur-bearing mineral formed during oil shale processing. The Ca-monosulfide oldhamite was identified in processed Green River Formation oil shale resulting from WRI's TREE process. Oldhamite which has not been identified in terrestrial rocks, formed as a result of high sulfur gases present during the thermal processing of a Ca-rich oil shale. This work provided information concerning (1) thermal alteration of pyrite to pyrrhotite (and pyrrhotite-type minerals) and (2) the disclosure of a mineral not previously reported in oil shale. It is essential for processing and disposal considerations that metastable and unstable mineral forms be identified and more completely understood. Information concerning processing characteristics and sulfur-bearing mineral forms in raw and processed oil shale can be incorporated into the future strategies of solid waste management for fossil fuels. 56 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Tin-tungsten mineralizing processes in tungsten vein deposits: Panasqueira, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, P.; Pinto, F.; Vieira, R.; Wälle, M.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tungsten has a high heat resistance, density and hardness, which makes it widely applied in industry (e.g. steel, tungsten carbides). Tungsten deposits are typically magmatic-hydrothermal systems. Despite the economic significance of tungsten, there are no modern quantitative analytical studies of the fluids responsible for the formation of its highest-grade deposit type (tungsten vein deposits). Panasqueira (Portugal) is a tungsten vein deposit, one of the leading tungsten producers in Europe and one of the best geologically characterized tungsten vein deposits. In this study, compositions of the mineralizing fluids at Panasqueira have been determined through combination of detailed petrography, microthermometric measurements and LA-ICPMS analyses, and geochemical modeling has been used to determine the processes that lead to tungsten mineralization. We characterized the fluids related to the various mineralizing stages in the system: the oxide stage (tin and tungsten mineralization), the sulfide stage (chalcopyrite and sphalerite mineralization) and the carbonate stage. Thus, our results provide information on the properties of fluids related with specific paragenetic stages. Furthermore we used those fluid compositions in combination with host rock mineralogy and chemistry to evaluate which are the controlling factors in the mineralizing process. This study provides the first quantitative analytical data on fluid composition for tungsten vein deposits and evaluates the controlling mineralization processes helping to determine the mechanisms of formation of the Panasqueira tin-tungsten deposit and providing additional geochemical constraints on the local distribution of mineralization.

  7. Phosphate Mineral Deposits Characterization Using Multivariate Data and SOM-based Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, L. P.; da Cunha, L. S.; Friedel, M. J.; Campos, J. E.; de Mendonça, F. C.

    2014-12-01

    Phosphate deposits provide an important primary nutrient for fertilizer and agricultural industries worldwide in addition to feedstock for phosphate chemical processing plants. Phosphate mineral formation as well as its concentration may vary in tropical areas, due to strong weathering processes. Phosphate mineralization at Bonfim Hill, Central North Brazil, is stratiform, lens-shaped with deposition controlled by paleochannels and erosion controlling structures. Identification and characterization of phosphate mineral deposit at Bonfim Hill were performed analyzing geochemistry, electrical resistivity, x-ray fluorescence, mineral types and lithotypes using Kohonen's unsupervised neural network, the so-called self organizing maps (SOM). SOM-based data analysis enables and facilitates thorough investigations of multivariate data systems and provide additional statistical information compared to traditional methods.The geochemical and geophysical data set was also used to train and validate a SOM-based classification system to detect phosphate mineral deposit, achieving 78% of correct classification.

  8. The TESS Science Processing Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jon; Twicken, Joseph D.; McCauliff, Sean; Campbell, Jennifer; Sanderfer, Dwight; Lung, David; Mansouri-Samani, Masoud; Girouard, Forrest; Tenenbaum, Peter; Klaus, Todd; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Chacon, Aaron; Henze, Christopher; Heiges, Cory A.; Latham, David; Morgan, Edward; Swade, Daryl; Rinehart, Stephen; Vanderspek, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will conduct a search for Earth’s closest cousins starting in late 2017. TESS will discover approx.1,000 small planets and measure the masses of at least 50 of these small worlds. The Science Processing Operations Center (SPOC) is being developed based on the Kepler science pipeline and will generate calibrated pixels and light curves on the NAS Pleiades supercomputer. The SPOC will search for periodic transit events and generate validation products for the transit-like features in the light curves. All TESS SPOC data products will be archived to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.

  9. Application of the electro-Fenton process for cutting fluid mineralization.

    PubMed

    Chachou, L; Gueraini, Y; Bouhalouane, Y; Poncin, S; Li, H Z; Bensadok, K

    2015-01-01

    Organic compound is the main pollutant in industrial effluent. Conventional wastewater treatment processes are inefficient for the removal of toxic or non-biodegradable organic pollutants. Advanced electrochemical depollution is a very efficient and economic method, suitable when the wastewater contains toxic and recalcitrant organic pollutants. The aim of the present study was to investigate the application of the electro-Fenton (EF) process for the degradation and mineralization of a stable oil-in-water emulsion (0.01% in v/v). The effects of operating parameters such as cathode material (graphite, Ti/Pt and steel), nature (Na2SO4, NaNO3 and NaCl) and dose of electrolyte (25-75 mM), initial ferrous ions concentration (1-75 mM), current intensity (0.1-0.2 A) and operating time, on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, were studied. Results showed that the EF method can be used efficiently for the degradation of stable cutting oil emulsion. For considered initial conditions (bubbling compressed air at 1 L/min, 0.15 A, pH 3, [Na2SO4]=0.05 M, [FeSO4]=0.015 M, COD0=400 mg O2/L), the best removal efficiencies were obtained under the following conditions: graphite as cathode material, 180 min for treatment duration and 0.05 M [Na2SO4]. For these conditions, treatment of 250 mL of emulsion led to 93.6% of cutting fluid mineralization, which correspond to 25 mg O2/L of final COD, 19 kWh/m3 of treated wastewater and 24.039 kWh/kg of COD removal.

  10. PLANCK LFI Level 1 Processing During Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisset, N.; Rohlfs, R.; Türler, M.; Meharga, M.; Binko, P.; Beck, M.; Frailis, M.; Zacchei, A.; Galeotta, S.

    2008-08-01

    The PLANCK satellite with two on-board instruments, a Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) and a High Frequency Instrument (HFI) is foreseen to be launched in August 2008 with Ariane 5. The Data Processing Centre (DPC) in Trieste, Italy for LFI is responsible for processing the PLANCK LFI data. The ISDC data centre in Switzerland is responsible for developing/installing and maintaining the software for the LFI Level 1 data processing presented here. The main tasks of the Level 1 processing are to retrieve the daily available consolidated scientific and housekeeping (HK) data of the LFI instrument from the Mission Operation Centre in Darmstadt (MOC); to sort them by time and by type (detector, observing mode, etc...); to extract the spacecraft attitude information from auxiliary files; to flag the data according to several criteria; and to archive the resulting Time Ordered Information (TOI). The TOI data generated by the level 1 pipeline are the input for the more scientific LFI level 2 processing. The TOI are first stored in FITS format and then ingested into the Data Management Component (DMC) system, which is the interface to the LFI DPC database. In addition, the ISDC also developed software tools to display and perform a quick look analysis of the data.

  11. Mineral-organic interfacial processes: potential roles in the origins of life.

    PubMed

    Cleaves, H James; Michalkova Scott, Andrea; Hill, Frances C; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Sahai, Nita; Hazen, Robert

    2012-08-21

    Life is believed to have originated on Earth ∼4.4-3.5 Ga ago, via processes in which organic compounds supplied by the environment self-organized, in some geochemical environmental niches, into systems capable of replication with hereditary mutation. This process is generally supposed to have occurred in an aqueous environment and, likely, in the presence of minerals. Mineral surfaces present rich opportunities for heterogeneous catalysis and concentration which may have significantly altered and directed the process of prebiotic organic complexification leading to life. We review here general concepts in prebiotic mineral-organic interfacial processes, as well as recent advances in the study of mineral surface-organic interactions of potential relevance to understanding the origin of life.

  12. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation: process mineralogy of feed and products

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, G.E.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Collins, W. Keith

    2001-01-01

    Direct mineral carbonation has been investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO2 into a geologically stable final form. The process utilizes a slurry of water, with bicarbonate and salt additions, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg2SiO4) or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. Carbon dioxide is dissolved into this slurry, resulting in dissolution of the mineral and precipitation of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3). Optimum results have been achieved using heat pretreated serpentine feed material and high partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2). Specific conditions include: 155?C; PCO2=185 atm; 15% solids. Under these conditions, 78% conversion of the silicate to the carbonate was achieved in 30 minutes. Process mineralogy has been utilized to characterize the feed and process products, and interpret the mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation reaction paths.

  13. [Analysis of changes in minerals contents during cider fermentation process by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ye, Meng-qi; Yue, Tian-li; Gao, Zhen-peng; Yuan, Ya-hong; Nie, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The changes in mineral elements during cider fermentation process were determined using ICP-MS. The results showed that the main minerals in the fermentation liquor included K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Sr and B. The content of K was the highest in both the apple juice and the cider, being 1 853. 83 and 1 654. 38 mg . L-1 respectively. The content of minerals was in dynamic changes along with the fermentation process. As a whole, during 72-120 h and 144-216 h, most of the minerals contents underwent great fluctuation. Especially when fermented for 192 h, the content of most of the minerals reached peak value or valley value. The content of Fe and Zn achieved their peak value, while the content of K, Na, Ca, Mg, Mn and B achieved valley value. But during the following 24 h, the content of minerals underwent a sharp reversal. After fermentation, the content of K, Mg, Cu, Zn and B decreased significantly, while the content of Na, Ca, Mn, Fe and Sr did not change significantly. The correlational analysis was conducted to evaluate the correlation between the mineral elements, and the result showed that the correlation between Ca and Mn was the most significant, with the correlation index reaching 0. 924. The information of this study will supply sufficient data for the fermentation process control and quality improvement of cider.

  14. Development of a method for characterizing changes in coal and mineral surfaces resulting from beneficiation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Slomka, B.J.; Seward, K.J.; Dawson, M.R.; Buttermore, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    A novel method was developed for characterizing changes in coal and mineral surfaces resulting from sonication and other cleaning processes. This method employs a unique flow-cell to permit the dynamic measurement of dye adsorption on coal and mineral particle surfaces. The rates and extents of adsorption of ionic dyes on Illinois No. 6 coal were found to be dependent on mineral content and particle size of ground coal samples. A significant correlation was observed between the adsorbed quantity of dye and the total mineral content of coal. In preliminary experiments with methylene blue dye, clay was found to absorb significantly more of the dye than quartz, pyrite, calcite, or clean coal'' surfaces. By using dyes of differing adsorption selectivity, it is demonstrated that sonication reduces the apparent mineral content on the surface of coal. 9 refs., 7 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Homogeneous sonophotolysis of food processing industry wastewater: Study of synergistic effects, mineralization and toxicity removal.

    PubMed

    Durán, A; Monteagudo, J M; Sanmartín, I; Gómez, P

    2013-03-01

    The mineralization of industrial wastewater coming from food industry using an emerging homogeneous sonophotolytic oxidation process was evaluated as an alternative to or a rapid pretreatment step for conventional anaerobic digestion with the aim of considerably reducing the total treatment time. At the selected operation conditions ([H(2)O(2)]=11,750ppm, pH=8, amplitude=50%, pulse length (cycles)=1), 60% of TOC is removed after 60min and 98% after 180min when treating an industrial effluent with 2114ppm of total organic carbon (TOC). This process removed completely the toxicity generated during storing or due to intermediate compounds. An important synergistic effect between sonolysis and photolysis (H(2)O(2)/UV) was observed. Thus the sonophotolysis (ultrasound/H(2)O(2)/UV) technique significantly increases TOC removal when compared with each individual process. Finally, a preliminary economical analysis confirms that the sono-photolysis with H(2)O(2) and pretreated water is a profitable system when compared with the same process without using ultrasound waves and with no pretreatment.

  16. The TESS science processing operations center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Twicken, Joseph D.; McCauliff, Sean; Campbell, Jennifer; Sanderfer, Dwight; Lung, David; Mansouri-Samani, Masoud; Girouard, Forrest; Tenenbaum, Peter; Klaus, Todd; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Chacon, A. D.; Henze, Christopher; Heiges, Cory; Latham, David W.; Morgan, Edward; Swade, Daryl; Rinehart, Stephen; Vanderspek, Roland

    2016-08-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will conduct a search for Earth's closest cousins starting in early 2018 and is expected to discover 1,000 small planets with Rp < 4 R⊕ and measure the masses of at least 50 of these small worlds. The Science Processing Operations Center (SPOC) is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center based on the Kepler science pipeline and will generate calibrated pixels and light curves on the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division's Pleiades supercomputer. The SPOC will also search for periodic transit events and generate validation products for the transit-like features in the light curves. All TESS SPOC data products will be archived to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST).

  17. The TESS Science Processing Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Twicken, Joseph D.; McCauliff, Sean; Campbell, Jennifer; Sanderfer, Dwight; Lung, David; Mansouri-Samani, Masoud; Girouard, Forrest; Tenenbaum, Peter; Klaus, Todd; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will conduct a search for Earth's closest cousins starting in early 2018 and is expected to discover approximately 1,000 small planets with R(sub p) less than 4 (solar radius) and measure the masses of at least 50 of these small worlds. The Science Processing Operations Center (SPOC) is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center based on the Kepler science pipeline and will generate calibrated pixels and light curves on the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division's Pleiades supercomputer. The SPOC will also search for periodic transit events and generate validation products for the transit-like features in the light curves. All TESS SPOC data products will be archived to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST).

  18. Operation of a mineral recovery unit on brine from the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resource Area. Report of investigations/1982

    SciTech Connect

    Schultze, L.E.; Bauer, D.J.

    1982-07-01

    The Bureau of Mines operated a mineral recovery unit to recover metal values from post-flash geothermal brines from the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area as part of its research into the use of plentiful resources. The brine was available for metals recovery after its heat content had been used to generate electricity. The brine source was treated with lime to precipitate the contained iron, manganese, lead, and zinc before injection of the heat-depleted brine into the underground reservoir. Data are presented on the effects of process variables, such as rate and method of lime addition and air oxidation versus air exclusion. Variations in precipitation of metal values, composition of precipitates, effectiveness of slurry thickeners, and methods of treating the precipitates to recover metal values are discussed.

  19. Operation of a mineral-recovery unit on brine from the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area

    SciTech Connect

    Schultze, L.E.; Bauer, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines operated a mineral recovery unit to recover metal values from post-flash geothermal brines from the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area as part of its research into the use of plentiful resources. The brine was available for metals recovery after its heat content had been used to generate electricity. The brine source was treated with lime to precipitate the contained iron, manganese, lead, and zinc before injection of the heat-depleted brine into the underground reservoir. Data are presented on the effects of process variables, such as rate and method of lime addition and air oxidation versus air exclusion. Variations in precipitation of metal values, composition of precipitates, effectiveness of slurry thickeners, and methods of treating the precipitates to recover metal values are discussed.

  20. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2001-10-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation, before and/or during carbonation, may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (i) its structural and chemical simplicity, (ii) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (iii) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for minimizing the cost of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process. This report covers the third year progress of this grant, as well as providing an integrated overview of the progress in years 1-3, as we have been granted a one-year no-cost extension to wrap up a few studies and publications to optimize project impact.

  1. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2002-11-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation, before and/or during carbonation, may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (1) its structural and chemical simplicity, (2) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (3) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for minimizing the cost of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process. This final report covers the overall progress of this grant.

  2. Processing nanoengineered scaffolds through electrospinning and mineralization suitable for biomimetic bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Liao, Susan; Murugan, Ramalingam; Chan, Casey K; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2008-07-01

    Processing scaffolds that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural bone in structure and chemical composition is a potential promising option for engineering physiologically functional bone tissue. In this article, we report a novel method, by combining electrospinning and mineralization, to process a series of nano-fibrous scaffolding systems with desirable characteristics suitable for biomimetic bone tissue engineering. We have chosen two types of polymers, namely collagen and poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), natural and synthetic of its kind, respectively, to electrospin into nano-fibrous scaffolds. The electrospun scaffolds have high surface area, high porosity and well connected open pore network. In order to mimic the chemical composition of native bone ECM, the electrospun scaffolds were subjected to mineralization under optimal conditions. From the experimental results, we observed that the formation of bone-like apatite into collagen was relatively abundant and significantly more uniform than PLGA. The major finding of this study has suggested that the surface functional groups of the scaffolding material, such as carboxyl and carbonyl groups of collagen, are important for the mineralization in vitro. In addition, this study revealed that the mineralization process predominantly induce the formation of nanosize carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) during collagen mineralization, whilst nanosize hydroxyapatite (HA) is formed during PLGA mineralization. These findings are critically important while selecting the material for processing bone scaffolding system.

  3. Effect of cadmium on microorganisms and microbe-mediated mineralization process in the soil

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, C.K.; Reddy, T.K.R.

    1988-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is increasingly used in many industries, culminating in a sharp increase in environmental contamination. Cadmium also reaches the soil through contaminated water from industries, sewage sludge, alloys, plastics, wear of automobiles tires and phosphatic fertilizers. Mineralization of nitrogen is essential to the nitrogen nutrition of higher plants. The response of important nitrogen recycling organisms to Cd could be of crucial importance in the balance of nitrogen in the soil. The effect of heavy metals on mineralization of nitrogen and on pure cultures of microorganisms has been recognized. Although the toxic effect of Cd on fungi in soil, in pure culture and at low soil pH levels was tested not much attention was given to study simultaneous effect of Cd on both microorganisms and microbe-mediated mineralization process in the soil at different intervals. This study was performed to determine simultaneously the effect of Cd on both microbial population and microbe-mediated mineralization process in the soil.

  4. Kennedy Space Center Orion Processing Team Planning for Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letchworth, Gary; Schlierf, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Topics in this presentation are: Constellation Ares I/Orion/Ground Ops Elements Orion Ground Operations Flow Orion Operations Planning Process and Toolset Overview, including: 1 Orion Concept of Operations by Phase 2 Ops Analysis Capabilities Overview 3 Operations Planning Evolution 4 Functional Flow Block Diagrams 5 Operations Timeline Development 6 Discrete Event Simulation (DES) Modeling 7 Ground Operations Planning Document Database (GOPDb) Using Operations Planning Tools for Operability Improvements includes: 1 Kaizen/Lean Events 2 Mockups 3 Human Factors Analysis

  5. The influence of technology and energy on the locations of mineral processing in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, I.C.; Ruffing, L.T.

    1982-01-01

    The present paper discusses in detail certain factors which affect the location of mineral processing in developing countries. The analysis focuses on three different minerals at several stages in the processing chain, namely bauxite, copper and iron ore. The success of developing countries in processing these different minerals varies. For example, developing countries produce 51.4% of the world's bauxite, 18.6% of its alumina but only 8.8% of its aluminium, 43.4% of the world's copper ores and concentrates and 22.3% of its refined copper; 25.1% of the world's iron ore but only 7.4% of its steel. Developing countries have been urged to move downstream to escape the instability in primary export earnings and the decline in their terms of trade. A decision on a specific processing project can only be based on a careful evaluation of the economics of the project rather than on general exhortations.

  6. Selected Geochemical Data for Modeling Near-Surface Processes in Mineral Systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giles, Stuart A.; Granitto, Matthew; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    The database herein was initiated, designed, and populated to collect and integrate geochemical, geologic, and mineral deposit data in an organized manner to facilitate geoenvironmental mineral deposit modeling. The Microsoft Access database contains data on a variety of mineral deposit types that have variable environmental effects when exposed at the ground surface by mining or natural processes. The data tables describe quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses determined by 134 analytical laboratory and field methods for over 11,000 heavy-mineral concentrate, rock, sediment, soil, vegetation, and water samples. The database also provides geographic information on geology, climate, ecoregion, and site contamination levels for over 3,000 field sites in North America.

  7. The diesel exhaust in miners study: I. Overview of the exposure assessment process.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Patricia A; Coble, Joseph B; Vermeulen, Roel; Schleiff, Patricia; Blair, Aaron; Lubin, Jay; Attfield, Michael; Silverman, Debra T

    2010-10-01

    measured REC exposure level by facility ranged from 40 to 384 μg m⁻³ for the underground workers and from 2 to 6 μg m⁻³ for the surface workers. For one prevalent underground job, 'miner operator', the maximum annual REC exposure estimate by facility ranged up to 685% greater than the corresponding 1998-2001 value. A comparison of the historical CO estimates from the time trend models with 1976-1977 CO measurements not used in the modeling found an overall median relative difference of 29%. Other comparisons showed similar levels of agreement. The assessment process indicated large differences in REC exposure levels over time and across the underground operations. Method evaluations indicated that the final estimates were consistent with those from alternative time trend models and demonstrated moderate to high agreement with external data.

  8. Evaluation of Mineral Deposits Along the Little Wind River, Riverton, WY, Processing Site

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Sam; Dam, Wiliam

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) began reassessing the former Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site area for potential contaminant sources impacting groundwater. A flood in 2010 along the Little Wind River resulted in increases in groundwater contamination (DOE 2013).This investigation is a small part of continued efforts by DOE and other stakeholders to update human health and ecological risk assessments, to make a comprehensive examination of all exposure pathways to ensure that the site remains protective through established institutional controls. During field inspections at the Riverton Site in 2013, a white evaporitic mineral deposit was identified along the bank of the Little Wind River within the discharge zone of the groundwater contamination plume. In December 2013, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel collected a sample for analysis by X-ray fluorescence (Figure 1 shows the type of material sampled). The sample had a uranium concentration of approximately 64 to 73 parts per million. Although the uranium in this mineral deposit is within the expected range for evaporatic minerals in the western United States (SRNL 2014), DOE determined that additional assessment of the mineral deposit was warranted. In response to the initial collection and analysis of a sample of the mineral deposit, DOE developed a work plan (Work Plan to Sample Mineral Deposits Along the Little Wind River, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site [DOE 2014]) to further define the extent of these mineral deposits and the concentration of the associated contaminants (Appendix A). The work plan addressed field reconnaissance, mapping, sampling, and the assessment of risk associated with the mineral deposits adjacent to the Little Wind River.

  9. Extraction of reusable water from a mineral mining process

    SciTech Connect

    Gleim, W.K.

    1982-01-19

    A method for the treatment of an aqueous effluent slime derived from a tar sand extraction process is disclosed. The effluent slime ph is adjusted to an acidic ph and treated with an anionic surface active agent to create flocculation of solid asphaltic material entrained within the slime. A solvent solution comprising chlorinated hydrocarbon and a solvent therefor is added so that upon centrifuging of the treated slime three physical layers of material comprising (1) water; (2) asphaltics in the solvent solution and (3) clay are formed.

  10. Atmospheric processing outside clouds increases soluble iron in mineral dust.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zongbo; Krom, Michael D; Bonneville, Steeve; Benning, Liane G

    2015-02-03

    Iron (Fe) is a key micronutrient regulating primary productivity in many parts of the global ocean. Dust deposition is an important source of Fe to the surface ocean, but most of this Fe is biologically unavailable. Atmospheric processing and reworking of Fe in dust aerosol can increase the bioavailable Fe inputs to the ocean, yet the processes are not well understood. Here, we experimentally simulate and model the cycling of Fe-bearing dust between wet aerosol and cloud droplets. Our results show that insoluble Fe in dust particles readily dissolves under acidic conditions relevant to wet aerosols. By contrast, under the higher pH conditions generally relevant to clouds, Fe dissolution tends to stop, and dissolved Fe precipitates as poorly crystalline nanoparticles. If the dust-bearing cloud droplets evaporated again (returning to the wet aerosol stage with low pH), those neo-formed Fe nanoparticles quickly redissolve, while the refractory Fe-bearing phases continue to dissolve gradually. Overall, the duration of the acidic, wet aerosol stage ultimately increases the amount of potentially bioavailable Fe delivered to oceans, while conditions in clouds favor the formation of Fe-rich nanoparticles in the atmosphere.

  11. Chemical distribution of hazardous natural radionuclides during monazite mineral processing.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mostafa M; Hilal, M A; Borai, E H

    2016-10-01

    It is very important to calculate the radioactivity concentration for low-grade monazite ore (50%) and different other materials produced as results of chemical processing stages to avoid the risk to workers. Chemical processing of low-grade monazite pass through different stages, washing by hydrochloric acid and digested with sulfuric acid and influence of pH on the precipitation of rare earth elements has been studied. The radioactivity concentrations of (238)U((226)Ra) and (232)Th as well as (40)K were calculated in crude low-grade ore and found to be 54,435 ± 3138, 442,105 ± 29,200 and 5841 ± 345 Bq/kg, respectively. These values are greatly higher than the exempt levels 25 Bq/kg. After chemical digestion of the ore, the results demonstrated that un-reacted material contains significant radioactivity reached to approximately 8, 13 and 23% for (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The results show that 60% of (232)Th are located in the digested white slurry with small portions of (238)U and (40)K. Most of (238)U radioactivity is extracted in the green phosphoric acid which produced from conversion of P2O5 by H2SO4 into phosphoric acid. The average values of the Raeq for monazite ore, un-reacted black precipitate, white precipitate, brown precipitate and crystalline material samples were calculated and found to be 687,095 ± 44,921, 85,068 ± 5339, 388,381 ± 22,088, 313,046 ± 17,923 and 4531 ± 338 Bq/kg, respectively. The calculated values of Raeq are higher than the average world value (it must be less than 370 Bq/kg). Finally the external hazardous, internal hazardous and Iγr must be less than unity. This means that specific radiation protection program must be applied and implemented during monazite processing.

  12. Process validation: achieving the Operational Qualification phase.

    PubMed

    Buffaloe, Vera

    2004-01-01

    The OQ phase of process validation is very important and is where the complete understanding of the process is determined by experimentation. This understanding is useful to: * establish optimal process parameters * understand variation that affect the process * aid in investigating process deviations. OQ is an important part of the entire process validation activity and essential to understanding a manufacturing process. The benefits of completing the OQ and overall process validation are the reasons that it makes business sense and receive the long-term benefits of producing high quality product and achieving customer satisfaction.

  13. Oriented hydroxyapatite in turkey tendon mineralized via the polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, S.S.; DiMasi, E.; Kasinath, R.K.; Kim, Y.Y.; Gower, L.

    2010-12-03

    Bone is a hierarchically structured composite which imparts it with unique mechanical properties and bioresorptive potential. These properties are primarily influenced by the underlying nanostructure of bone, which consists of nanocrystals of hydroxyapatite embedded and uniaxially aligned within collagen fibrils. There is also a small fraction of non-collagenous proteins in bone, and these are thought to play an important role in bone's formation. In our in vitro model system of bone formation, polyanionic peptides are used to mimic the role of the non-collagenous proteins. In our prior studies, we have shown that intrafibrillar mineralization can be achieved in synthetic reconstituted collagen sponges using a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. This led to a nanostructured arrangement of hydroxyapatite crystals within the individual fibrils which closely mimics that of bone. This report demonstrates that biogenic collagen scaffolds obtained from turkey tendon, which consist of densely packed and oriented collagen fibrils, can also be mineralized by the PILP process. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies show that the mineralization process leads to a high degree of crystallographic orientation at the macroscale, thus emulating that found in the biological system of naturally mineralizing turkey tendon.

  14. Microbial mineralization of struvite: a promising process to overcome phosphate sequestering crisis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Arvind; Singh, Amit; Kumar, Sumit; Khare, Sunil Kumar; Ramanan, Arunachalam

    2014-05-01

    Due to extensive exploitation of non-renewable phosphate minerals, their natural reserves will exhaust very soon. This necessitates looking for alternatives and an efficient methodology through which indispensable phosphorus can be harvested back. The current study was undertaken to explore the potential of a metallophilic bacterium Enterobacter sp. EMB19 for the recovery of phosphorus as phosphate rich mineral. A very low phosphate concentration strategy was adopted. The process led to the mineralization of phosphorus as homogeneous struvite crystals. For each gram of Epsom salt added, the cells effectively mineralized about 20% of the salt into struvite. The effect of different inorganic sources, culture profile and plausible mechanism involved in crystal formation was also explored. The synthesized struvite crystals typically possessed a prismatic crystal habit. The characterization and identification of the crystals were done using single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The thermal characteristics were studied using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) processes. The synthesis of struvite by this bacterium seems to be a promising and viable strategy since it serves dual purpose (i) obtaining phosphorus and nitrogen rich fertilizer and (ii) conservation of natural phosphate reserves. This study is very significant in the sense that the process may be used for harvesting and synthesizing other valuable minerals. Also, it will provide new insights into phosphate biomineralization mechanisms.

  15. Predicting the Mineral Composition of Dust Aerosols. Part 1; Representing Key Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Garcia-Pando, C. Perez; Miller, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    Soil dust aerosols created by wind erosion are typically assigned globally uniform physical and chemical properties within Earth system models, despite known regional variations in the mineral content of the parent soil. Mineral composition of the aerosol particles is important to their interaction with climate, including shortwave absorption and radiative forcing, nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals, heterogeneous formation of sulfates and nitrates, and atmospheric processing of iron into bioavailable forms that increase the productivity of marine phytoplankton. Here, aerosol mineral composition is derived by extending a method that provides the composition of a wet-sieved soil. The extension accounts for measurements showing significant differences between the mineral fractions of the wetsieved soil and the emitted aerosol concentration. For example, some phyllosilicate aerosols are more prevalent at silt sizes, even though they are nearly absent at these diameters in a soil whose aggregates are dispersed by wet sieving. We calculate the emitted mass of each mineral with respect to size by accounting for the disintegration of soil aggregates during wet sieving. These aggregates are emitted during mobilization and fragmentation of the original undispersed soil that is subject to wind erosion. The emitted aggregates are carried far downwind from their parent soil. The soil mineral fractions used to calculate the aggregates also include larger particles that are suspended only in the vicinity of the source. We calculate the emitted size distribution of these particles using a normalized distribution derived from aerosol measurements. In addition, a method is proposed for mixing minerals with small impurities composed of iron oxides. These mixtures are important for transporting iron far from the dust source, because pure iron oxides are more dense and vulnerable to gravitational removal than most minerals comprising dust aerosols. A limited comparison to

  16. Predicting the mineral composition of dust aerosols - Part 1: Representing key processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.

    2015-10-01

    Soil dust aerosols created by wind erosion are typically assigned globally uniform physical and chemical properties within Earth system models, despite known regional variations in the mineral content of the parent soil. Mineral composition of the aerosol particles is important to their interaction with climate, including shortwave absorption and radiative forcing, nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals, heterogeneous formation of sulfates and nitrates, and atmospheric processing of iron into bioavailable forms that increase the productivity of marine phytoplankton. Here, aerosol mineral composition is derived by extending a method that provides the composition of a wet-sieved soil. The extension accounts for measurements showing significant differences between the mineral fractions of the wet-sieved soil and the emitted aerosol concentration. For example, some phyllosilicate aerosols are more prevalent at silt sizes, even though they are nearly absent at these diameters in a soil whose aggregates are dispersed by wet sieving. We calculate the emitted mass of each mineral with respect to size by accounting for the disintegration of soil aggregates during wet sieving. These aggregates are emitted during mobilization and fragmentation of the original undispersed soil that is subject to wind erosion. The emitted aggregates are carried far downwind from their parent soil. The soil mineral fractions used to calculate the aggregates also include larger particles that are suspended only in the vicinity of the source. We calculate the emitted size distribution of these particles using a normalized distribution derived from aerosol measurements. In addition, a method is proposed for mixing minerals with small impurities composed of iron oxides. These mixtures are important for transporting iron far from the dust source, because pure iron oxides are more dense and vulnerable to gravitational removal than most minerals comprising dust aerosols. A limited comparison to

  17. Predicting the Mineral Composition of Dust Aerosols. Part 1; Representing Key Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Garcia-Pando, C. Perez; Miller, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    Soil dust aerosols created by wind erosion are typically assigned globally uniform physical and chemical properties within Earth system models, despite known regional variations in the mineral content of the parent soil. Mineral composition of the aerosol particles is important to their interaction with climate, including shortwave absorption and radiative forcing, nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals, heterogeneous formation of sulfates and nitrates, and atmospheric processing of iron into bioavailable forms that increase the productivity of marine phytoplankton. Here, aerosol mineral composition is derived by extending a method that provides the composition of a wet-sieved soil. The extension accounts for measurements showing significant differences between the mineral fractions of the wetsieved soil and the emitted aerosol concentration. For example, some phyllosilicate aerosols are more prevalent at silt sizes, even though they are nearly absent at these diameters in a soil whose aggregates are dispersed by wet sieving. We calculate the emitted mass of each mineral with respect to size by accounting for the disintegration of soil aggregates during wet sieving. These aggregates are emitted during mobilization and fragmentation of the original undispersed soil that is subject to wind erosion. The emitted aggregates are carried far downwind from their parent soil. The soil mineral fractions used to calculate the aggregates also include larger particles that are suspended only in the vicinity of the source. We calculate the emitted size distribution of these particles using a normalized distribution derived from aerosol measurements. In addition, a method is proposed for mixing minerals with small impurities composed of iron oxides. These mixtures are important for transporting iron far from the dust source, because pure iron oxides are more dense and vulnerable to gravitational removal than most minerals comprising dust aerosols. A limited comparison to

  18. [Role of microscopic fungi in the process of weathering of pegmatite deposit rocks and minerals].

    PubMed

    Avakian, Z A; Karavaiko, G I; Mel'nikova, E O; Krutsko, V S; Ostroushko, Iu I

    1981-01-01

    The object of this work was to study the effect of microscopic fungi isolated from the weathering zone of a pegmatite deposit on the transport of elements and the degradation of rocks and minerals. Regardless of the chemical composition of rocks and minerals, microscopic fungi accelerated the leaching of elements as compared to the purely chemical process. The extraction of Li, Si, Al and Fe under the action of microorganisms increased by factors of 1.4-1.7, 2.7-4.0, 5.0-8.7 and 4-18, respectively. In the case of chemical weathering, the extraction of elements occurred at a high rate only at the beginning; then the process either decelerated or stopped. The mechanism of action of microscopic fungi on rocks and minerals is discussed as well as the role of these microorganisms in the weathering of spodumene and the surrounding rocks, pegmatites an shales, which occurs in the zone of hypergenesis.

  19. Pilot scale mineralization of organic acids by electro-Fenton process plus sunlight exposure.

    PubMed

    Casado, Juan; Fornaguera, Jordi; Galán, Maria Isabel

    2006-07-01

    The viability of the electro-Fenton degradation of aqueous solutions of benzoic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and oxalic acid has been studied at 20 A using a pilot flow reactor containing an anode and an oxygen diffusion cathode, both of 100 cm(2) section. Pollutants were preferentially oxidized by hydroxyl radicals formed in solution from reaction of Fe(2+) with electrogenerated H(2)O(2), allowing mineralization of benzoic acid and 2,4-D. For oxalic acid no electrochemical mineralization was observed. After electrolysis, samples of the different effluents were exposed to sunlight (Helielectro-Fenton process) and almost complete mineralization was reached after ca. 30-50 min without additional cost. Effects of parameters such as electrolysis time, pH and solar irradiation time on the process efficiencies were studied.

  20. 26 CFR 1.614-3 - Rules relating to separate operating mineral interests in the case of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Rules relating to separate operating mineral interests in the case of mines. 1.614-3 Section 1.614-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources §...

  1. 26 CFR 1.614-4 - Treatment under the Internal Revenue Code of 1939 with respect to separate operating mineral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1964... interests for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1964, in the case of oil and gas wells. (a) General... section 226(a) of the Revenue Act of 1964. All references in this section to section 614(d) are references...

  2. 26 CFR 1.614-4 - Treatment under the Internal Revenue Code of 1939 with respect to separate operating mineral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1964... interests for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1964, in the case of oil and gas wells. (a) General... section 226(a) of the Revenue Act of 1964. All references in this section to section 614(d) are references...

  3. 26 CFR 1.614-2 - Election to aggregate separate operating mineral interests under section 614(b) prior to its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... interests under section 614(b) prior to its amendment by Revenue Act of 1964. 1.614-2 Section 1.614-2... interests under section 614(b) prior to its amendment by Revenue Act of 1964. (a) General rule. (1) The...(a) of the Revenue Act of 1964, to aggregate separate operating mineral interests, and, unless...

  4. 26 CFR 1.614-2 - Election to aggregate separate operating mineral interests under section 614(b) prior to its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... interests under section 614(b) prior to its amendment by Revenue Act of 1964. 1.614-2 Section 1.614-2... interests under section 614(b) prior to its amendment by Revenue Act of 1964. (a) General rule. (1) The...(a) of the Revenue Act of 1964, to aggregate separate operating mineral interests, and, unless...

  5. 26 CFR 1.614-2 - Election to aggregate separate operating mineral interests under section 614(b) prior to its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... interests under section 614(b) prior to its amendment by Revenue Act of 1964. 1.614-2 Section 1.614-2... interests under section 614(b) prior to its amendment by Revenue Act of 1964. (a) General rule. (1) The...(a) of the Revenue Act of 1964, to aggregate separate operating mineral interests, and, unless...

  6. Process Flow Diagrams for Training and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, Jacobus

    This paper focuses on the use of process flow diagrams for training first responders who execute search and seizure warrants at electronic crime scenes. A generic process flow framework is presented, and the design goals and layout characteristics of process flow diagrams are discussed. An evaluation of the process flow diagrams used in training courses indicates that they are beneficial to first responders performing searches and seizures, and they speed up investigations, including those conducted by experienced personnel.

  7. Process for removal of mineral particulates from coal-derived liquids

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Suspended mineral solids are separated from a coal-derived liquid containing the solids by a process comprising the steps of: (a) contacting said coal-derived liquid containing solids with a molten additive having a melting point of 100.degree.-500.degree. C. in an amount of up to 50 wt. % with respect to said coal-derived liquid containing solids, said solids present in an amount effective to increase the particle size of said mineral solids and comprising material or mixtures of material selected from the group of alkali metal hydroxides and inorganic salts having antimony, tin, lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, beryllium, aluminum, zinc, molybdenum, cobalt, nickel, ruthenium, rhodium or iron cations and chloride, iodide, bromide, sulfate, phosphate, borate, carbonate, sulfite, or silicate anions; and (b) maintaining said coal-derived liquid in contact with said molten additive for sufficient time to permit said mineral matter to agglomerate, thereby increasing the mean particle size of said mineral solids; and (c) recovering a coal-derived liquid product having reduced mineral solids content. The process can be carried out with less than 5 wt. % additive and in the absence of hydrogen pressure.

  8. Mineralization of the antibiotic levofloxacin in aqueous medium by electro-Fenton process: kinetics and intermediate products analysis.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Muna Sh; El Karbane, Miloud; Oturan, Nihal; El Kacemi, Kacem; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the feasibility of using electro-Fenton (EF) process for the oxidative degradation of antibiotic levofloxacin (LEV). The EF experiments have been performed in an electrochemical cell using a carbon-felt cathode. The effect of applied current in the range 60-500 mA and catalyst concentration in the range 0.05-0.5 mM on the kinetics of oxidative degradation and mineralization efficiency have been investigated. Degradation of LEV by hydroxyl radicals was found to follow pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The absolute rate constant for oxidative degradation of LEV by hydroxyl radical has been determined by a competition kinetics method and found to be (2.48 ± 0.18) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). An optimum current value of 400 mA and a catalyst (Fe(2+)) concentration of 0.1 mM were observed to be optimal for an effective degradation of LEV under our operating conditions. Mineralization of aqueous solution of LEV was performed by the chemical oxygen demand analysis and an almost mineralization degree (>91%) was reached at the end of 6 h of electrolysis. A number of intermediate products have been identified using high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chrmatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Based on these identified reaction intermediates, a plausible reaction pathway has been suggested for the mineralization process. The formation and evolution of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions released to the medium during the process were also discussed.

  9. The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study: I. Overview of the Exposure Assessment Process

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Patricia A.; Coble, Joseph B.; Vermeulen, Roel; Schleiff, Patricia; Blair, Aaron; Lubin, Jay; Attfield, Michael; Silverman, Debra T.

    2010-01-01

    measured REC exposure level by facility ranged from 40 to 384 μg m−3 for the underground workers and from 2 to 6 μg m−3 for the surface workers. For one prevalent underground job, ‘miner operator’, the maximum annual REC exposure estimate by facility ranged up to 685% greater than the corresponding 1998–2001 value. A comparison of the historical CO estimates from the time trend models with 1976–1977 CO measurements not used in the modeling found an overall median relative difference of 29%. Other comparisons showed similar levels of agreement. The assessment process indicated large differences in REC exposure levels over time and across the underground operations. Method evaluations indicated that the final estimates were consistent with those from alternative time trend models and demonstrated moderate to high agreement with external data. PMID:20876233

  10. Formation Processes and Impacts of Reactive and Nonreactive Minerals in Permeable Reactive Barriers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., changes in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction,...

  11. FORMATION PROCESSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF REACTIVE AND NON-REACTIVE MINERAL PRECIPITATES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., change in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction, ...

  12. Leaching Behavior Of Mineral Processing Waste: Comparison Of Batch And Column Investigations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, a comparison of laboratory batch and column experiments on metal release profile from a mineral processing waste (MPW) is presented. Batch (equilibrium) and column (dynamic) leaching tests were conducted on ground MPW at different liquid–solid ratios (LS) to determ...

  13. Formation Processes and Impacts of Reactive and Nonreactive Minerals in Permeable Reactive Barriers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., changes in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction,...

  14. FORMATION PROCESSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF REACTIVE AND NON-REACTIVE MINERAL PRECIPITATES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., change in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction, ...

  15. Leaching Behavior Of Mineral Processing Waste: Comparison Of Batch And Column Investigations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, a comparison of laboratory batch and column experiments on metal release profile from a mineral processing waste (MPW) is presented. Batch (equilibrium) and column (dynamic) leaching tests were conducted on ground MPW at different liquid–solid ratios (LS) to determ...

  16. EFFECT OF LIQUID TO SOLID RATIO ON LEACHING OF METALS FROM MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various anthropogenic activities generate hazardous solid wastes that are affluent in heavy metals, which can cause significant damage to the environment an human health. A mineral processing waste was used to study the effect of liquid to solid ratio (L/S) on the leaching behav...

  17. ARSENIC LEACHING FROM IRON RICH MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE: INFLUENCE OF PH AND REDOX POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the effect of pH and redox potential on the potential mobility of arsenic (As) from a contaminated mineral processing waste. The selected waste contained about 0.47 g kg-1 of As and 66.2 g kg-1 of iron (Fe). The characteristic of the wast...

  18. Launch Processing System operations with a future look to Operations Analyst (OPERA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Astrid E.

    1987-01-01

    The Launch Processing System architecture and the ground support operations required to provide Shuttle System engineers with the capability to safely process and launch an Orbiter are described. The described ground operations are the culmination of eleven years of experience and redesign. Some of the 'lessons learned' are examined, and problem areas which ground support operations have identified over the years as the Shuttle and Launch Processing Systems continue to grow in complexity are discussed. The Operational Analyst for Distributed Systems (OPERA), a proposed set of expert systems for the Launch Processing System Operational assistance, is discussed along with its extensions to prospective future configurations and components for the Launch Processing System.

  19. Method & apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Ward, Pamela Denise; Stevenson, Joel O'Don

    2004-10-19

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process and, more specifically, to the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates to a plasma monitoring module that may be adjusted in at least some manner so as to re-evaluate a previously monitored plasma process. For instance, optical emissions data on a plasma process that was previously monitored by the plasma monitoring module may be replayed through the plasma monitoring module after making at least one adjustment in relation to the plasma monitoring module.

  20. A new approach to mineralization of biocompatible hydrogel scaffolds: An efficient process towards 3-dimensional bonelike composites

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jie; Saiz, Eduardo; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    2002-09-16

    As a first step toward the design and fabrication of biomimetic bonelike composite materials, we have developed a template-driven nucleation and mineral growth process for the high-affinity integration of hydroxyapatite with a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) hydrogel scaffold. A mineralization technique was developed that exposes carboxylate groups on the surface of cross-linked pHEMA, promoting high-affinity nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate on the surface, along with extensive calcification of the hydrogel interior. Robust surface mineral layers a few microns thick were obtained. The same mineralization technique, when applied to a hydrogel that is less prone to surface hydrolysis, led to distinctly different mineralization patterns, in terms of both the extent of mineralization and the crystallinity of the apatite grown on the hydrogel surface. This template-driven mineralization technique provides an efficient approach toward bonelike composites with high mineral -hydrogel interfacial adhesion strength.

  1. Process control strategies key to refining operations

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-22

    Panelists and attendees at the most recent National Petroleum Refiners Association Question and Answer Session on Refining and Petrochemical Technology discussed process control issues in detail. Participants shared their experiences on: personal computers (PCs) in process control; programmable logic control issues; neural networks; fieldbus technology; and statistical analyses of refinery data. Questions and answers on each of these subjects are presented.

  2. Predicting the mineral composition of dust aerosols - Part 1: Representing key processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.

    2015-02-01

    Soil dust aerosols created by wind erosion are typically assigned globally uniform physical and chemical properties within Earth system models, despite known regional variations in the mineral content of the parent soil. Mineral composition of the aerosol particles is important to their interaction with climate, including shortwave absorption and radiative forcing, nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals, coating by heterogeneous uptake of sulfates and nitrates, and atmospheric processing of iron into bioavailable forms that increase the productivity of marine phytoplankton. Here, aerosol mineral composition is derived by extending a method that provides the composition of a wet-sieved soil. The extension accounts for measurements showing significant differences between the mineral fractions of the wet-sieved soil and the resulting aerosol concentration. For example, some phyllosilicate aerosols are more prevalent at silt sizes, even though they are nearly absent in a soil whose aggregates are dispersed by wet sieving during analysis. We reconstruct the undispersed size distribution of the original soil that is subject to wind erosion. An empirical constraint upon the relative emission of clay and silt is applied that further differentiates the soil and aerosol mineral composition. In addition, a method is proposed for mixing minerals with small impurities composed of iron oxides. These mixtures are important for transporting iron far from the dust source, because pure iron oxides are more dense and vulnerable to gravitational removal than most minerals comprising dust aerosols. A limited comparison to measurements from North Africa shows that the extension brings the model into better agreement, consistent with a more extensive comparison to global observations as well as measurements of elemental composition downwind of the Sahara, as described in companion articles.

  3. Mineralization of 2-chlorophenol by sequential electrochemical reductive dechlorination and biological processes.

    PubMed

    Arellano-González, Miguel Ángel; González, Ignacio; Texier, Anne-Claire

    2016-08-15

    In this work, a novel approach was applied to obtain the mineralization of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) in an electrochemical-biological combined system where an electrocatalytic dehydrogenation process (reductive dechlorination) was coupled to a biological denitrification process. Reductive dechlorination of 2-CP was conducted in an ECCOCEL-type reactor on a Pd-Ni/Ti electrode at a potential of -0.40V vs Ag/AgCl(s)/KCl(sat), achieving 100 percent transformation of 2-CP into phenol. The electrochemically pretreated effluent was fed to a rotating cylinder denitrifying bioreactor where the totality of phenol was mineralized by denitrification, obtaining CO2 and N2 as the end products. The total time required for 2-CP mineralization in the combined electrochemical-biological process was 7.5h. This value is close to those previously reported for electrochemical and advanced oxidation processes but in this case, an efficient process was obtained without accumulation of by-products or generation of excessive energy costs due to the selective electrochemical pretreatment. This study showed that the use of electrochemical reductive pretreatment combined with biological processes could be a promising technology for the removal of recalcitrant molecules, such as chlorophenols, from wastewaters by more efficient, rapid, and environmentally friendly processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sustaining Operational Resiliency: A Process Improvement Approach to Security Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    5 2 Operational Resiliency Defined....................................................................6 2.1 What is Resiliency...30 4.3.5 Increasing levels of competency............................................... 30 5 A Process Improvement Framework for...mission.................................. 19 Figure 5 : Foundation for operational resiliency ..................................................... 21

  5. Nutritional and mineral contents of honey extracted by centrifugation and pressed processes.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Samir Moura; Zaluski, Rodrigo; Orsi, Ricardo de Oliveira

    2017-03-01

    In this study, wild honey samples extracted by two different methods (centrifugation and pressed processing) were characterized and compared based on their physicochemical, and nutritional properties, macro- and micro-mineral contents, and pollen counts. Twelve colonies of Africanized Apis mellifera were used; six honey samples were obtained by centrifugation and six by honeycomb press. All physicochemical parameters of honey samples (moisture, pH, total acidity, ash, dry matter, and qualitative absence of hydroxymethylfurfural) were within the limits established by EU legislation, and all parameters in pressed honey were superior (p<0.05). Nutritional contents (total carbohydrates, total lipids, total proteins, flavonoids, and ascorbic acid) and minerals (K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Li, Zn) were also higher in pressed honey. The quantity of pollen in pressed honey samples was 5.6-fold higher than in centrifuged samples. Pressed honey, can be marked as a differentiated product with a higher mineral content and several nutritional properties.

  6. Raman signal processing software for automated identification of mineral phases and biosignatures on Mars.

    PubMed

    Sobron, Pablo; Sobron, Francisco; Sanz, Aurelio; Rull, Fernando

    2008-04-01

    Data from the ESA ExoMars Rover Mission will provide invaluable input for further studies in astro/exobiology. The search for mineral products as indicators of present and/or past biogenetic activities in Mars' surface and subsurface samples is the main objective of the compact Raman-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument. The inherent features of Raman spectroscopy and LIBS make the combined instrument a unique and very powerful tool in the search for biomarkers and hence it is regarded as the highest priority instrument for mineral analysis within the mission. We have developed a software package for the on-board processing of the instrument's data outputs, including spectral conditioning and search-match characterization of mineral phases and biomarkers. In this paper we show the mathematical and physical basis of the software package.

  7. Progress in bioleaching: part B: applications of microbial processes by the minerals industries.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Corale L; Brierley, James A

    2013-09-01

    This review presents developments and applications in bioleaching and mineral biooxidation since publication of a previous mini review in 2003 (Olson et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 63:249-257, 2003). There have been discoveries of newly identified acidophilic microorganisms that have unique characteristics for effective bioleaching of sulfidic ores and concentrates. Progress has been made in understanding and developing bioleaching of copper from primary copper sulfide minerals, chalcopyrite, covellite, and enargite. These developments point to low oxidation-reduction potential in concert with thermophilic bacteria and archaea as a potential key to the leaching of these minerals. On the commercial front, heap bioleaching of nickel has been commissioned, and the mineral biooxidation pretreatment of sulfidic-refractory gold concentrates is increasingly used on a global scale to enhance precious metal recovery. New and larger stirred-tank reactors have been constructed since the 2003 review article. One biooxidation-heap process for pretreatment of sulfidic-refractory gold ores was also commercialized. A novel reductive approach to bioleaching nickel laterite minerals has been proposed.

  8. Interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation processes during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; King, Helen E.; Patiño-López, Luis D.; Putnis, Christine V.; Geisler, Thorsten; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos M.; Putnis, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The chemical weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals on the Earth's surface controls important geochemical processes such as erosion rates and soil formation, ore genesis or climate evolution. The dissolution of most of these minerals is typically incongruent, and results in the formation of surface coatings (altered layers, also known as leached layers). These coatings may significantly affect mineral dissolution rates over geological timescales, and therefore a great deal of research has been conducted on them. However, the mechanism of leached layer formation is a matter of vigorous debate. Here we report on an in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and real-time Mach-Zehnder phase-shift interferometry (PSI) study of the dissolution of wollastonite, CaSiO3, and dolomite, CaMg(CO3)2, as an example of surface coating formation during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals. Our in situ results provide clear direct experimental evidence that leached layers are formed in a tight interface-coupled two-step process: stoichiometric dissolution of the pristine mineral surfaces and subsequent precipitation of a secondary phase (silica in the case of wollastonite, or hydrated magnesium carbonate in the case of dolomite) from a supersaturated boundary layer of fluid in contact with the mineral surface. This occurs despite the bulk solution remaining undersaturated with respect to the secondary phase. The validation of such a mechanism given by the results reported here completely changes the conceptual framework concerning the mechanism of chemical weathering, and differs significantly from the concept of preferential leaching of cations postulated by most currently accepted incongruent dissolution models.

  9. Methylparaben removal using heterogeneous photocatalysis: effect of operational parameters and mineralization/biodegradability studies.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Benítez, Henry; Peñuela, Gustavo A

    2017-03-01

    Methylparaben (MePB) is an organic compound employed mainly in the manufacture of different personal care products. However, it has been recently listed as a potential endocrine disrupter chemical. Therefore, the main objective of this work was to evaluate the degradation of MePB in aqueous solutions using heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO2 and hydrogen peroxide. In this way, effects of pH and the initial concentrations of catalyst, H2O2, and pollutant on treatment were analyzed. A face centered, central composite design was used for determination of the influence of each parameter in the process and the conditions under which the pollutant suffers the highest rates of degradation were selected. In general, results indicate that combination TiO2/H2O2/light irradiation leads to ∼90 % of substrate removal after 30 min of reaction and that hydroxyl free radicals are the main specie responsible for organic matter elimination. Finally, in terms of mineralization and biodegradability, experimental results indicated that part of the organic matter was transformed into CO2 and water and the photo-treatment promoted an increase in samples biodegradability.

  10. Biomimetic mineralization of collagen via an enzyme-aided PILP process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, Sang Soo; Culver, Lauren; Li, Yuping; Douglas, Elliot P.; Gower, Laurie B.

    2010-04-01

    The development of bone-like collagen-hydroxyapatite composites is highly desirable because bone has outstanding mechanical properties and resorptive potential, and a combination of these characteristics could ultimately lead to a load-bearing and bioresorbable bone substitute. Our prior work has shown that intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen can be achieved using a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. In our in vitro model system, polyaspartate is used to mimic the acidic non-collagenous proteins involved in bone formation. We have previously shown that the anionic polypeptide sequesters ions to induce an amorphous calcium phosphate precursor, and we have put forth the hypothesis that the early-stage precursor is highly hydrated, enabling fluidic droplets to be drawn into the gaps and grooves of collagen fibrils by capillary action. Here, we further our biomimetic approach by using alkaline phosphatase to provide a slow release of inorganic phosphate ions from a phosphate ester, mimicking the biochemical processes of ion regulation found in natural bone formation. The collagen-hydroxyapatite composites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), which show that nanocrystals of hydroxyapatite are intrafibrillar and [0 0 1] oriented along the collagen fibril axis. With repeated mineralization steps, the fibrils become cemented together with a non-descript extrafibrillar mineral coating. Although the degree of intrafibrillar mineralization was not as high as our usual method, we believe that with further optimization this enzyme-aided PILP process could provide a closer mimic to the biochemical processes involved in bone formation, and serve as a useful in vitro model system for studying the mechanisms involved in bone formation.

  11. Energy accounting of apple processing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, R.; Singh, R.P.; Brown, D.

    1981-01-01

    A thermal-energy accounting study was conducted at an apple processing plant. An analysis is given of thermal energy use and thermal efficiencies of an apple-juice single-effect evaporator and an apple-sauce cooker. 3 refs.

  12. Processes Operative During Delay of Gratification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, J. Frank; Revelle, Glenda L.

    This study focused on the processes occurring during the waiting period in delay of gratification situations. Sixty-four middle class preschool children chose between waiting for a preferred item and receiving a less desired item immediately. The items were of different classes, i. e., one food and one toy, and subjects waited with one, both, or…

  13. Ultrasonically aided mineral processing technique for remediation of soil contaminated by heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Kyllönen, Hanna; Pirkonen, Pentti; Hintikka, Väinö; Parvinen, Pekka; Grönroos, Antti; Sekki, Hannu

    2004-05-01

    In this study, power ultrasound was used as aiding method for the mineral processing technique, which have recently been developed for the remediation of soil contaminated by heavy metal containing bullets, their broken parts and alteration products. Power ultrasound was used to disperse the soil to remove metals and metal compounds from soil particle surfaces instead of attrition conditioning. The soil diluted with water was treated using 22 kHz ultrasound power of 100 W up to 500 W. The effect of different ultrasonic treatment time and pulsation of ultrasound were studied on the purity of sink and float fractions in heavy medium separation process, screen fractions, and mineral concentrates and tailings from flotation process. Ultrasound enhanced the remediation of soil fractions in all the studied cases. Optimisation of the ultrasonic power will be done in the continuation study.

  14. Mesoscale Phenomena Associated with Mineral Surfaces and Pathway-Dependent Chemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, G. E.; Johnson, N. C.; Garcia Del Real, P.; Maher, K.; Bird, D. K.; Rosenbauer, R. J.; Thomas, B.; Levard, C.

    2012-12-01

    Multiphase physicochemical transport and interfacial processes in natural and synthetic permeable media are pervasive in energy and Earth systems, where interfacial chemical reactions play an enormous role. These coupled reactions control the composition of our environment, including the atmosphere, oceans, and groundwaters, and the soils derived from interactions of atmospheric gases and natural waters with solid phases. Aqueous fluids, liquid hydrocarbons, and gases flow through permeable geological media along pathways that can be exceedingly complex at the nano- to microscales. Adding to this complexity are the chemical reactions occurring along these pathways that can irreversibly alter permeability and porosity as well as the compositions of fluid, gas, and solid phases, depending on physicochemical conditions. This talk will discuss the role of chemical reactions on mineral surfaces in several areas, including the structure of the electrical double layer at mineral/water interfaces and how it changes as a function of solution conditions, sequestration and transformation of environmental contaminants on mineral surfaces, mineral carbonation reactions and CO2 sequestration, and nanoparticle stability and transformations in natural systems. It will also include examples of pathway-dependent mesoscale chemical processes in the synthetic world involving energy materials. Examples in this area will include a synchrotron-based high-resolution 3D tomography study of Li-NiO battery electrodes under in operando conditions and metal-organic framework structures that can be used for hydrogen storage, separation, catalysis, and sequestration.

  15. Quantitative computer simulations of extraterrestrial processing operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Nikravesh, P. E.

    1989-01-01

    The automation of a small, solid propellant mixer was studied. Temperature control is under investigation. A numerical simulation of the system is under development and will be tested using different control options. Control system hardware is currently being put into place. The construction of mathematical models and simulation techniques for understanding various engineering processes is also studied. Computer graphics packages were utilized for better visualization of the simulation results. The mechanical mixing of propellants is examined. Simulation of the mixing process is being done to study how one can control for chaotic behavior to meet specified mixing requirements. An experimental mixing chamber is also being built. It will allow visual tracking of particles under mixing. The experimental unit will be used to test ideas from chaos theory, as well as to verify simulation results. This project has applications to extraterrestrial propellant quality and reliability.

  16. UNDERSTANDING OLIVINE CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS AT THE ATOMIC LEVEL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McKelvy; H. Bearat; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; R. Nunez; R.W. Carpenter

    2003-08-01

    Carbonation of Mg-rich minerals offers an intriguing candidate carbon sequestration process technology, which can provide large-scale CO{sub 2} disposal. Such disposal bypasses many long-term storage problems by (i) providing containment in the form of mineral carbonates that have proven stable over geological time, (ii) generating only environmentally benign materials, and (iii) essentially eliminating the need for continuous site monitoring. The primary challenge for viable process development is reducing process cost. This is the primary focus of the CO{sub 2} Mineral Sequestration Working Group managed by Fossil Energy at DOE, which includes members from the Albany Research Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, Penn State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the University of Utah, as well as from our research group at Arizona State University. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a leading process candidate, which converts CO{sub 2} into the mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). As olivine carbonation is exothermic, it offers intriguing low-cost potential. Recent studies at the Albany Research Center have found aqueous-solution carbonation is a promising approach. Cost effectively enhancing carbonation reactivity is central to reducing process cost. Many of the mechanisms that impact reactivity occur at the solid/solution interface. Understanding these mechanisms is central to the ability to engineer new and modified processes to enhance carbonation reactivity and lower cost. Herein, we report the results of our UCR I project, which focused on exploring the reaction mechanisms that govern aqueous-solution olivine carbonation using model olivine feedstock materials. Carbonation was found to be a complex process associated with passivating silica layer formation, which includes the trapping of magnesite nanocrystals within the passivating

  17. Common Workflow Service: Standards Based Solution for Managing Operational Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinio, A. W.; Hollins, G. A.

    2017-06-01

    The Common Workflow Service is a collaborative and standards-based solution for managing mission operations processes using techniques from the Business Process Management (BPM) discipline. This presentation describes the CWS and its benefits.

  18. Information processing in convex operational theories

    SciTech Connect

    Barnum, Howard Nelch; Wilce, Alexander G

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the source and extent of the greater-than-classical information processing power of quantum systems, one wants to characterize both classical and quantum mechanics as points in a broader space of possible theories. One approach to doing this, pioneered by Abramsky and Coecke, is to abstract the essential categorical features of classical and quantum mechanics that support various information-theoretic constraints and possibilities, e.g., the impossibility of cloning in the latter, and the possibility of teleportation in both. Another approach, pursued by the authors and various collaborators, is to begin with a very conservative, and in a sense very concrete, generalization of classical probability theory--which is still sufficient to encompass quantum theory--and to ask which 'quantum' informational phenomena can be reproduced in this much looser setting. In this paper, we review the progress to date in this second programme, and offer some suggestions as to how to link it with the categorical semantics for quantum processes developed by Abramsky and Coecke.

  19. Guide to good practices for operations aspects of unique processes

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Operations Aspects of Facility Chemistry and Unique Processes, Chapter XIII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing employee training and facility management programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Operations Aspects of Unique Processes is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for all personnel to coordinate interrelated activities affecting unique processes.

  20. Improved process control through real-time measurement of mineral content

    SciTech Connect

    Turler, Daniel; Karaca, Murat; Davis, William B.; Giauque, Robert D.; Hopkins, Deborah

    2001-11-02

    In a highly collaborative research and development project with mining and university partners, sensors and data-analysis tools are being developed for rock-mass characterization and real-time measurement of mineral content. Determining mineralogy prior to mucking in an open-pit mine is important for routing the material to the appropriate processing stream. A possible alternative to lab assay of dust and cuttings obtained from drill holes is continuous on-line sampling and real-time x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. Results presented demonstrate that statistical analyses combined with XRF data can be employed to identify minerals and, possibly, different rock types. The objective is to create a detailed three-dimensional mineralogical map in real time that would improve downstream process efficiency.

  1. Investigation of the mineralization process of biosystems by IR diffuse reflection spectroscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotarev, V. M.

    2014-04-01

    Particular features of the application of Fourier-transform IR diffuse reflection spectroscopy methods to the in situ investigation of spectra of porous rough objects have been considered. The reciprocal influence of the scattering and absorption of porous objects on the formation of the impurity-band contour in the diffuse reflection spectrum when the impurity center is in the vicinity of the fundamental IR absorption band has been analyzed. Using methods of Fourier-transform IR diffuse reflection spectroscopy, processes of mineralization of fragments of mammoth tusks from a multilayer paleolithic site at Yudinovo (Bryansk oblast, Russia) and fragments of mammoth tusks from Yakutia (Russia) have been investigated. Particular features of mineralization processes (carbonate formation and silicification) on the surface and in the volume of objects at different conditions of their burial (humidity, temperature, soil acidity) have been studied.

  2. Environmental Engineering Unit Operations and Unit Processes Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John T., Ed.

    This manual was prepared for the purpose of stimulating the development of effective unit operations and unit processes laboratory courses in environmental engineering. Laboratory activities emphasizing physical operations, biological, and chemical processes are designed for various educational and equipment levels. An introductory section reviews…

  3. Environmental Engineering Unit Operations and Unit Processes Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John T., Ed.

    This manual was prepared for the purpose of stimulating the development of effective unit operations and unit processes laboratory courses in environmental engineering. Laboratory activities emphasizing physical operations, biological, and chemical processes are designed for various educational and equipment levels. An introductory section reviews…

  4. Process Operations Program is the First of Its Kind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elements of Technology, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The goal of the program is to produce a graduate with the technical background and expertise necessary for direct entry into a process operator training program in a petro-chemical plant. It is a unique program offered through Lambton College, Canada, in co-operation with the process industries in Sarnia's "Chemical Valley". (Author/DS)

  5. Evidence of reduced bone turnover and disturbed mineralization process in a boy with Stickler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al Kaissi, A; Roschger, P; Nawrot-Wawrzyniak, K; Krebs, A; Grill, F; Klaushofer, K

    2010-02-01

    We describe a tall-statured 14-year-old boy who illustrated the full phenotypic and radiographic features of Stickler syndrome type I. A bone biopsy showed evidence of reduced bone mass and bone turnover, such as reduced BV/TV (-43%), TbTh (-29%), and OS/BS (-48%), Ob.S/BS (-27%), and Oc/BS (-47%) compared to "age-matched" controls. Moreover, there was evidence that the mineralization process was severely disturbed. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging revealed that the bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) of cancellous (Cn) as well as cortical (Ct) bone was shifted toward lower mineralization compared to a young control reference cohort. BMDD parameters of mean degree of mineralization, Cn Ca (-9.8%) and Ct Ca (-18.0%), were dramatically decreased. To the best of our knowledge this is the first clinical report describing bone biopsy findings in a boy with Stickler syndrome. Such a severe undermineralization of bone matrix might essentially contribute to the compromised mechanical competence of the skeleton found in this patient.

  6. Decolorization and mineralization of Allura Red AC aqueous solutions by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Abdoulaye; Sirés, Ignasi; Garrido, José A; Rodríguez, Rosa M; Brillas, Enric

    2015-06-15

    The decolorization and mineralization of solutions containing 230 mg L(-1) of the food azo dye Allura Red AC at pH 3.0 have been studied upon treatment by electrochemical oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (EO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). Experiments were performed with a stirred tank reactor containing a boron-doped diamond (BDD) or Pt anode and an air-diffusion cathode to generate H2O2. The main oxidants were hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between H2O2 and added Fe(2+). The oxidation ability increased in the sequence EO-H2O2 < EF < PEF and faster degradation was always obtained using BDD. PEF process with BDD yielded almost total mineralization following similar trends in SO4(2-), ClO4(-) and NO3(-) media, whereas in Cl(-) medium, mineralization was inhibited by the formation of recalcitrant chloroderivatives. GC-MS analysis confirmed the cleavage of the −N=N− bond with formation of two main aromatics in SO4(2-) medium and three chloroaromatics in Cl(-) solutions. The effective oxidation of final oxalic and oxamic acids by BDD along with the photolysis of Fe(III)-oxalate species by UVA light accounted for the superiority of PEF with BDD. NH4(+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) ions were released during the mineralization.

  7. In vitro availability of some essential minerals in commonly eaten processed and unprocessed Caribbean tuber crops.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, Lowell L; Omoruyi, Felix O; Asemota, Helen N

    2007-02-01

    The levels of three essential minerals Ca, Fe and Mg and the extent of their availability were assessed in four commonly eaten Caribbean tuber crops [dasheen (Xanthosoma spp.), Irish potato (Solanum tuberosum), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and yellow yam (Dioscorea cayenensis)] in their processed and unprocessed states. Calcium was highest in cooked dasheen (5150+/-50 mg/kg) while Magnesium was highest in uncooked Irish potato (3600+/-200 mg/kg). There was no significant loss of calcium from the food samples upon cooking. All the uncooked food samples displayed higher levels minerals assessed compared to the cooked samples except for cooked Irish potato that recorded the level of iron (182.25+/-8.75 mg/kg). Availability of these minerals in the cooked and uncooked tubers crops upon digestion also showed a similar pattern. In conclusion, the consumption of these tuber crops in the Caribbean may not be responsible for the reported cases of iron deficiency in the region. However, the availability of minerals from these tuber crops when consumed with other foods (the usual practice in the Caribbean) needs further investigation.

  8. Hydrochemical features and mineralization processes in coastal groundwater of Oualidia, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadili, Ahmed; Najib, Saliha; Mehdi, Khalid; Riss, Joëlle; Makan, Abdelhadi; Boutayeb, Khadija; Guessir, Hakima

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the influence of different hydrochemical processes, potential salinity sources, and seawater intrusion on groundwater quality in the coastal region of Oualidia. For this purpose, chemical analyses were performed on 19 wells sampled during three campaigns: June and December, 2010 and May, 2011. Investigations were conducted to identify the significant chemical variations between different campaigns. In addition, chemical variations were controlled by two main factors, which are the distance from the coast and the morphological aspect. Furthermore, statistical analysis allows the identification of two clusters of samples. The first groups, near the ocean, are highly mineralized with dominance of Na+ and Cl- ions, while the second group, much farther from the coast, are slightly mineralized with dominance of Ca2+ and HCO3- ions. Besides, ionic ratio, ionic delta, saturation index, and Gibbs diagram were applied to evaluate geochemical processes responsible for groundwater mineralization. Results showed that salinity was due mainly to seawater intrusion, especially in the first kilometers from the ocean covering the first group of wells. Moreover, cation exchange between Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+, evaporation, and evaporate dissolution are principal processes, which also contribute to groundwater salinization. In overall, this investigation provided a basis of geochemical data to effectively manage groundwater resource and efficiently mitigate impacts on aquifers.

  9. Solar photo-Fenton process for the treatment of colored soft drink wastewater: decolorization, mineralization and COD removal of oolong tea effluent.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Makoto; Salehi, Zeinab; Tokumura, Masahiro; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    The decolorization and mineralization of dark-brown-colored oolong tea effluent by the solar photo-Fenton process has been examined. The solar photo-Fenton process for a fine day achieved 92% decolorization after 60 min and 94% mineralization after 80 min. For a cloudy day, about 88% decolorization and 85% mineralization were obtained after 290 min. For reference the UV light photo-Fenton process was also conducted. Very similar degradation efficiencies were found between the solar and UV light photo-Fenton processes. However, the intrinsic low cost associated with abundant solar energy turned out to be more efficient in treating oolong tea effluent as compared with UV light. The decolorization and mineralization profiles under the different light intensities could be unified with the accumulated light energy instead of with irradiation time. This implies that the solar photo-Fenton process should be designed and operated on the basis of the accumulated energy rather than the reaction time. The COD removal was 99.3% after 75 min under the fine condition. This removal rate for a fine day was approximately twice as fast than that for a cloudy day and comparable to that by the UV light irradiation. The results obtained in this study suggest that the solar photo-Fenton process offers a promising technology for decolorization and degradation of oolong tea effluent.

  10. The 21st application of computers and operations research in the mineral industry

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, A.

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on computer applications and research programs in the mining industry. Topics covered are: decision making in mineral exploration, exploration of uranium deposits and expert systems of uranium mines; lignite deposits; longwall mining; underground mining of coal {emdash} ventilation, automation, and methane control and optimization; computer graphics applied to mineral resources; Canadian coal/oil sands mines {emdash} research programs, and uses of artificial intelligence, computers and softwares in U.S. coal industry; and mining of India, and Federal Republic of Germany.

  11. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... State lands or the minerals to be explored are owned by the State, a mineral lease issued by the...

  12. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... State lands or the minerals to be explored are owned by the State, a mineral lease issued by the...

  13. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... State lands or the minerals to be explored are owned by the State, a mineral lease issued by the...

  14. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... State lands or the minerals to be explored are owned by the State, a mineral lease issued by the...

  15. Environmental consequences of processing manure to produce mineral fertilizer and bio-energy.

    PubMed

    De Vries, J W; Groenestein, C M; De Boer, I J M

    2012-07-15

    Liquid animal manure and its management contributes to environmental problems such as, global warming, acidification, and eutrophication. To address these environmental issues and their related costs manure processing technologies were developed. The objective here was to assess the environmental consequences of a new manure processing technology that separates manure into a solid and liquid fraction and de-waters the liquid fraction by means of reverse osmosis. This results in a liquid mineral concentrate used as mineral nitrogen and potassium fertilizer and a solid fraction used for bio-energy production or as phosphorus fertilizer. Five environmental impact categories were quantified using life cycle assessment: climate change (CC), terrestrial acidification (TA), marine eutrophication (ME), particulate matter formation (PMF), and fossil fuel depletion (FFD). For pig as well as dairy cattle manure, we compared a scenario with the processing method and a scenario with additional anaerobic digestion of the solid fraction to a reference situation applying only liquid manure. Comparisons were based on a functional unit of 1 ton liquid manure. System boundaries were set from the manure storage under the animal house to the field application of all end products. Scenarios with only manure processing increased the environmental impact for most impact categories compared to the reference: ME did not change, whereas, TA and PMF increased up to 44% as a result of NH3 and NO(x) emissions from processing and storage of solid fraction. Including digestion reduced CC by 117% for pig manure and 104% for dairy cattle manure, mainly because of substituted electricity and avoided N2O emission from storage of solid fraction. FFD decreased by 59% for pig manure and increased 19% for dairy cattle manure. TA and PMF remained higher compared to the reference. Sensitivity analysis showed that CH4 emission from manure storage, NH3 emission from processing, and the replaced nitrogen

  16. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich; Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2010-01-19

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  17. Mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furby, N. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of lubricants made from mineral oils are discussed. Types and compositions of base stocks are reviewed and the product demands and compositions of typical products are outlined. Processes for commercial production of mineral oils are examined. Tables of data are included to show examples of product types and requirements. A chemical analysis of three types of mineral oils is reported.

  18. New Windows based Color Morphological Operators for Biomedical Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Juan; Bouchet, Agustina; Brun, Marcel; Ballarin, Virginia

    2016-04-01

    Morphological image processing is well known as an efficient methodology for image processing and computer vision. With the wide use of color in many areas, the interest on the color perception and processing has been growing rapidly. Many models have been proposed to extend morphological operators to the field of color images, dealing with some new problems not present previously in the binary and gray level contexts. These solutions usually deal with the lattice structure of the color space, or provide it with total orders, to be able to define basic operators with required properties. In this work we propose a new locally defined ordering, in the context of window based morphological operators, for the definition of erosions-like and dilation-like operators, which provides the same desired properties expected from color morphology, avoiding some of the drawbacks of the prior approaches. Experimental results show that the proposed color operators can be efficiently used for color image processing.

  19. Hen uterine gene expression profiling during eggshell formation reveals putative proteins involved in the supply of minerals or in the shell mineralization process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The chicken eggshell is a natural mechanical barrier to protect egg components from physical damage and microbial penetration. Its integrity and strength is critical for the development of the embryo or to ensure for consumers a table egg free of pathogens. This study compared global gene expression in laying hen uterus in the presence or absence of shell calcification in order to characterize gene products involved in the supply of minerals and / or the shell biomineralization process. Results Microarrays were used to identify a repertoire of 302 over-expressed genes during shell calcification. GO terms enrichment was performed to provide a global interpretation of the functions of the over-expressed genes, and revealed that the most over-represented proteins are related to reproductive functions. Our analysis identified 16 gene products encoding proteins involved in mineral supply, and allowed updating of the general model describing uterine ion transporters during eggshell calcification. A list of 57 proteins potentially secreted into the uterine fluid to be active in the mineralization process was also established. They were classified according to their potential functions (biomineralization, proteoglycans, molecular chaperone, antimicrobials and proteases/antiproteases). Conclusions Our study provides detailed descriptions of genes and corresponding proteins over-expressed when the shell is mineralizing. Some of these proteins involved in the supply of minerals and influencing the shell fabric to protect the egg contents are potentially useful biological markers for the genetic improvement of eggshell quality. PMID:24649854

  20. Relating sulfide mineral zonation and trace element chemistry to subsurface processes in the Reykjanes geothermal system, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libbey, R. B.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfide minerals and their trace element chemistry in the seawater-dominated Reykjanes geothermal system was determined through the study of cuttings and core from wells that intersect different regions of the hydrothermal cell, from the near surface to depths of > 3000 m. The observed sulfide mineral zonation and trace element enrichment correlate well with the present-day thermal structure of the system. Isocubanite and pyrrhotite are confined to the deep, low permeability regions, whereas an assemblage of chalcopyrite and pyrite predominates in the main convective upflow path. The presence of marcasite in the uppermost regions of the system reflects weakly acidic conditions (pH < 5) marginal to the upflow, where outflow and downward percolating fluids have dissolved deeply exsolved CO2. The presence of "chalcopyrite disease" in sphalerite may be an indication that the system is experiencing a heating trend, following the logic of "zone-refining" in volcanogenic massive sulfide systems. Sulfide sulfur at all analyzed depths in the Reykjanes geothermal system was derived from a mixture of basaltic and reduced seawater sources. Petrographic evidence suggests that seawater-derived hydrothermal fluids have altered primary igneous sulfides in the host rocks, a process that has been proposed as a major control of aqueous sulfide production in mid-ocean ridge environments. Calculations show that igneous sulfides in the host basalts likely account for less than 5% of the total available ore metal budget in the system, however, their contribution to fluid metal budgets is probably significant because of their relatively high solubility. The processes documented by this study are likely analogous to those operating in the feeder and deep reaction zones of mid-ocean ridge seafloor hydrothermal systems. The results show that sulfide mineral zonation and trace element chemistry vary as a function of physicochemical parameters that are relevant

  1. Carbon Isotope Systematics in Mineral-Catalyzed Hydrothermal Organic Synthesis Processes at High Temperature and Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, R. A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Observation of methane in the Martian atmosphere has been reported by different detection techniques. Reduction of CO2 and/or CO during serpentization by mineral surface catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) synthesis may be one possible process responsible for methane generation on Mars. With the evidence a recent study has discovered for serpentinization in deeply buried carbon rich sediments, and more showing extensive water-rock interaction in Martian history, it seems likely that abiotic methane generation via serpentinization reactions may have been common on Mars. Experiments involving mineral-catalyzed hydrothermal organic synthesis processes were conducted at 750 C and 5.5 Kbars. Alkanes, alcohols and carboxylic acids were identified as organic compounds. No "isotopic reversal" of delta C-13 values was observed for alkanes or carboxylic acids, suggesting a different reaction pathway than polymerization. Alcohols were proposed as intermediaries formed on mineral surfaces at experimental conditions. Carbon isotope data were used in this study to unravel the reaction pathways of abiotic formation of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems at high temperatures and pressures. They are instrumental in constraining the origin and evolution history of organic compounds on Mars and other planets.

  2. Electrochemical destruction of trans-cinnamic acid by advanced oxidation processes: kinetics, mineralization, and degradation route.

    PubMed

    Flores, Nelly; Thiam, Abdoulaye; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Centellas, Francesc; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Garrido, José Antonio; Brillas, Enric; Sirés, Ignasi

    2017-03-01

    Acidic solutions of trans-cinnamic acid at pH 3.0 have been comparatively treated by anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). The electrolytic experiments were carried out with a boron-doped diamond (BDD)/air-diffusion cell. The substrate was very slowly abated by AO-H2O2 because of its low reaction rate with oxidizing (•)OH produced from water discharge at the BDD anode. In contrast, its removal was very rapid and at similar rate by EF and PEF due to the additional oxidation by (•)OH in the bulk, formed from Fenton's reaction between cathodically generated H2O2 and added Fe(2+). The AO-H2O2 treatment yielded the lowest mineralization. The EF process led to persistent final products like Fe(III) complexes, which were quickly photolyzed upon UVA irradiation in PEF to give an almost total mineralization with 98 % total organic carbon removal. The effect of current density and substrate concentration on all the mineralization processes was examined. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of electrolyzed solutions allowed identifying five primary aromatics and one heteroaromatic molecule, whereas final carboxylic acids like fumaric, acetic, and oxalic were quantified by ion exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). From all the products detected, a degradation route for trans-cinnamic acid is proposed.

  3. Open air mineral treatment operations and ambient air quality: assessment and source apportionment.

    PubMed

    Escudero, M; Alastuey, A; Moreno, T; Querol, X; Pérez, P

    2012-11-01

    We present a methodology for evaluating and quantifying the impact of inhalable mineral dust resuspension close to a potentially important industrial point source, in this case an open air plant producing sand, flux and kaolin in the Capuchinos district of Alcañiz (Teruel, NE Spain). PM(10) levels at Capuchinos were initially high (42 μg m(-3) as the annual average with 91 exceedances of the EU daily limit value during 2007) but subsequently decreased (26 μg m(-3) with 16 exceedances in 2010) due to a reduced demand for minerals from the ceramic industry and construction sector during the first stages of the economic crisis. Back trajectory and local wind pattern analyses revealed only limited contribution from exotic PM sources such as African dust intrusions whereas there was clearly a strong link with the mineral stockpiles of the local industry. This link was reinforced by chemical and mineral speciation and source apportionment analysis which showed a dominance of mineral matter (sum of CO(3)(2-), SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), Ca, Fe, K, Mg, P, and Ti: mostly aluminosilicates) which in 2007 contributed 76% of the PM(10) mass (44 μg m(-3) on average). The contribution from Secondary Inorganic Aerosols (SIA, sum of SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+)) reached 8.4 μg m(-3), accounting for 14% of the PM(10) mass, similar to the amount of calcareous road dust estimated to be present (8 μg m(-3); 13%). Organic matter and elemental carbon contributed 5.3 μg m(-3) (9%) whereas marine aerosol (Na + Cl) levels were minor with an average concentration of 0.4 μg m(-3) (1% of the PM(10) mass). Finally, chemical and mineralogical analysis of stockpile samples and comparison with filter samples confirmed the local industry to be the major source of ambient PM(10) in the area.

  4. Mineralization of flumequine in acidic medium by electro-Fenton and photoelectro-Fenton processes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Garrido, José A; Rodríguez, Rosa M; Cabot, Pere L; Centellas, Francesc; Arias, Conchita; Brillas, Enric

    2012-05-01

    The mineralization of flumequine, an antimicrobial agent belonging to the first generation of synthetic fluoroquinolones which is detected in natural waters, has been studied by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) like electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) with UVA light. The experiments were performed in a cell containing a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and an air-diffusion cathode to generate H(2)O(2) at constant current. The Fe(2+) ion added to the medium increased the solubility of the drug by the formation of a complex of intense orange colour and also reacted with electrogenerated H(2)O(2) to form hydroxyl radical from Fenton reaction. Oxidant hydroxyl radicals at the BDD surface were produced from water oxidation. A partial mineralization of flumequine in a solution near to saturation with optimum 2.0mM Fe(2+) at pH 3.0 was achieved by EF. The PEF process was more powerful, giving an almost total mineralization with 94-96% total organic carbon removal. Increasing current accelerated both treatments, but with decreasing mineralization current efficiency. Comparative treatments using a real wastewater matrix led to similar degradation degrees. The kinetics for flumequine decay always followed a pseudo-first-order reaction and its rate constant, similar for both EAOPs, raised with increasing current. Generated carboxylic acids like malonic, formic, oxalic and oxamic acids were quantified by ion-exclusion HPLC. Fe(III)-oxalate and Fe(III)-oxamate complexes were the most persistent by-products under EF conditions and their quicker photolysis by UVA light explains the higher oxidation power of PEF. The release of inorganic ions such as F(-), NO(3)(-) and in lesser extent NH(4)(+) was followed by ionic chromatography. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Processes of particle deposition in membrane operation and fabrication.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, M R; Tarabara, V; Cortalezzi, M

    2005-01-01

    The processes that control particle deposition on surfaces that are of interest in understanding operational aspects of membrane filtration, also hold significance in controlling the morphology of particle deposits as intermediate steps in membrane fabrication. This paper summarizes processes controlling particle deposit morphology. The implications of these processes for understanding membrane fouling by particles and in fabricating membranes are then considered.

  6. 9 CFR 590.547 - Albumen flake process drying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Albumen flake process drying... INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.547 Albumen flake process drying operations. (a) The fermentation, drying, and curing rooms shall be kept in a dust-free clean condition and...

  7. 9 CFR 590.547 - Albumen flake process drying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Albumen flake process drying... INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.547 Albumen flake process drying operations. (a) The fermentation, drying, and curing rooms shall be kept in a dust-free clean condition and...

  8. 9 CFR 590.547 - Albumen flake process drying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Albumen flake process drying... INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.547 Albumen flake process drying operations. (a) The fermentation, drying, and curing rooms shall be kept in a dust-free clean condition and...

  9. 9 CFR 590.547 - Albumen flake process drying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Albumen flake process drying... INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.547 Albumen flake process drying operations. (a) The fermentation, drying, and curing rooms shall be kept in a dust-free clean condition and...

  10. 9 CFR 590.547 - Albumen flake process drying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Albumen flake process drying operations. 590.547 Section 590.547 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.547 Albumen flake process drying...

  11. Processing of Landsat imagery to map surface mineral alteration on the Alaska Peninsula: A section in USGS research on mineral resources, 1985 program and abstracts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; York, James

    1985-01-01

    Landsat images were digitally processed to facilitate assessment of the mineral resources of the Port Moller, Stepovak Bay, and Simeonof Island 1:250,000 quadrangles. Field mapping and assessment of these quadrangles were begun in 1983 as part of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). It was quickly realized that time and budget constraints would limit mapping coverage. Therefore, at the suggestion of Roger Ashley, we used existing Landsat multispectral scanner imagery to aid in locating surface alteration, which could be field checked or related to stream-sediment or hand-sample geochemical data.

  12. The Computer-Aided Analytic Process Model. Operations Handbook for the Analytic Process Model Demonstration Package

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    Research Note 86-06 THE COMPUTER-AIDED ANALYTIC PROCESS MODEL : OPERATIONS HANDBOOK FOR THE ANALYTIC PROCESS MODEL DE ONSTRATION PACKAGE Ronald G...ic Process Model ; Operations Handbook; Tutorial; Apple; Systems Taxonomy Mod--l; Training System; Bradl1ey infantry Fighting * Vehicle; BIFV...8217. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * - ~ . - - * m- .. . . . . . . item 20. Abstract -continued companion volume-- "The Analytic Process Model for

  13. CO2-mineral Wettability and Implications for Understanding Leakage Processes from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarens, A. F.; Edwards, I.; Wang, S.

    2011-12-01

    In geological carbon sequestration (GCS), leakage events will be difficult to predict because parcels of CO2 will travel over long length scales and encounter a number of heterogeneous formations and endogenous brine in their rise to the surface. A constitutive model of a rising parcel of CO2 includes at least three main forces: 1) buoyant forces, 2) surface tension forces, and 3) shear drag forces. Of these, surface tension forces are of great significance, especially for predicting capillary and mineral trapping, and are affected by surface tension and the three-phase contact angle between CO2, brine, and the solid host mineral surfaces. Very limited experimental data on contact angles in GCS relevant systems has been reported in the academic literature. Here, the contact angle of several of the rock and clay species prevailing near GCS sites, e.g. quartz, feldspar, calcite, kaolinite, smectite and illite, were measured under a range of relevant temperature, pressure and ionic strength conditions. The measurements were made in a custom-built high-pressure view cell by introducing precisely controlled pendant CO2 droplets of constant volume to smooth and clean mineral surfaces after saturating the surrounding brine with CO2 and images were recorded using a high resolution digital camera. Images were processed and the contact angle measured using ImageJ software with a plug-in designed for this purpose. To measure the contact angle of CO2 on clay surfaces, ultra-pure microscope glass slides were coated with cleaned and particle-size-separated clay particles using hydrolyzed polyvinyl alcohol to ensure adhesion and a continuous coating on the surface. The uniform morphology of the surface was confirmed using electron microscopy. Preliminary results demonstrate differences in contact angle between the tested minerals, with calcite > quartz > feldspar. The absolute differences between the minerals were on the order of 3-7%. The

  14. Peroxone mineralization of chemical oxygen demand for direct potable water reuse: Kinetics and process control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Englehardt, James D

    2015-04-15

    Mineralization of organics in secondary effluent by the peroxone process was studied at a direct potable water reuse research treatment system serving an occupied four-bedroom, four bath university residence hall apartment. Organic concentrations were measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD) and kinetic runs were monitored at varying O3/H2O2 dosages and ratios. COD degradation could be accurately described as the parallel pseudo-1st order decay of rapidly and slowly-oxidizable fractions, and effluent COD was reduced to below the detection limit (<0.7 mg/L). At dosages ≥4.6 mg L(-1) h(-1), an O3/H2O2 mass ratio of 3.4-3.8, and initial COD <20 mg/L, a simple first order decay was indicated for both single-passed treated wastewater and recycled mineral water, and a relationship is proposed and demonstrated to estimate the pseudo-first order rate constant for design purposes. At this O3/H2O2 mass ratio, ORP and dissolved ozone were found to be useful process control indicators for monitoring COD mineralization in secondary effluent. Moreover, an average second order rate constant for OH oxidation of secondary effluent organics (measured as MCOD) was found to be 1.24 × 10(7) ± 0.64 × 10(7) M(-1) S(-1). The electric energy demand of the peroxone process is estimated at 1.73-2.49 kW h electric energy for removal of one log COD in 1 m(3) secondary effluent, comparable to the energy required for desalination of medium strength seawater. Advantages/disadvantages of the two processes for municipal wastewater reuse are discussed.

  15. 19. VIEW OF PROCESSING ROOM. AFTER 1957, BUILDING 771 OPERATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF PROCESSING ROOM. AFTER 1957, BUILDING 771 OPERATIONS CONSISTED PRIMARILY OF AQUEOUS PLUTONIUM RECOVERY FROM SCRAP METAL. (6/20/60) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  16. Process control strategy for ITER central solenoid operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, R.; Takami, S.; Iwamoto, A.; Chang, H.-S.; Forgeas, A.; Chalifour, M.

    2016-12-01

    ITER Central Solenoid (CS) pulse operation induces significant flow disturbance in the forced-flow Supercritical Helium (SHe) cooling circuit, which could impact primarily on the operation of cold circulator (SHe centrifugal pump) in Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB). Numerical studies using Venecia®, SUPERMAGNET and 4C have identified reverse flow at the CS module inlet due to the substantial thermal energy deposition at the inner-most winding. To assess the reliable operation of ACB-CS (dedicated ACB for CS), the process analyses have been conducted with a dynamic process simulation model developed by Cryogenic Process REal-time SimulaTor (C-PREST). As implementing process control of hydrodynamic instability, several strategies have been applied to evaluate their feasibility. The paper discusses control strategy to protect the centrifugal type cold circulator/compressor operations and its impact on the CS cooling.

  17. Systems engineering and integration processes involved with manned mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranz, Eugene F.; Kraft, Christopher C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper will discuss three mission operations functions that are illustrative of the key principles of operations SE&I and of the processes and products involved. The flight systems process was selected to illustrate the role of the systems product line in developing the depth and cross disciplinary skills needed for SE&I and providing the foundation for dialogue between participating elements. FDDD was selected to illustrate the need for a structured process to assure that SE&I provides complete and accurate results that consistently support program needs. The flight director's role in mission operations was selected to illustrate the complexity of the risk/gain tradeoffs involved in the development of the flight techniques and flight rules process as well as the absolute importance of the leadership role in developing the technical, operational, and political trades.

  18. Mineral Properties and Dietary Value of Raw and Processed Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L.)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yixiang; Ramirez, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) has a long history of usage and is currently receiving attention as a source of fiber and alternative medicine. In many cultures, nettle is also eaten as a leafy vegetable. In this study, we focused on nettle yield (edible portion) and processing effects on nutritive and dietary properties. Actively growing shoots were harvested from field plots and leaves separated from stems. Leaf portions (200 g) were washed and processed by blanching (1 min at 96–98°C) or cooking (7 min at 98-99°C) with or without salt (5 g·L−1). Samples were cooled immediately after cooking and kept in frozen storage before analysis. Proximate composition, mineral, amino acid, and vitamin contents were determined, and nutritive value was estimated based on 100 g serving portions in a 2000 calorie diet. Results show that processed nettle can supply 90%–100% of vitamin A (including vitamin A as β-carotene) and is a good source of dietary calcium, iron, and protein. We recommend fresh or processed nettle as a high-protein, low-calorie source of essential nutrients, minerals, and vitamins particularly in vegetarian, diabetic, or other specialized diets. PMID:26904610

  19. Mineral Properties and Dietary Value of Raw and Processed Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L.).

    PubMed

    Rutto, Laban K; Xu, Yixiang; Ramirez, Elizabeth; Brandt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) has a long history of usage and is currently receiving attention as a source of fiber and alternative medicine. In many cultures, nettle is also eaten as a leafy vegetable. In this study, we focused on nettle yield (edible portion) and processing effects on nutritive and dietary properties. Actively growing shoots were harvested from field plots and leaves separated from stems. Leaf portions (200 g) were washed and processed by blanching (1 min at 96-98°C) or cooking (7 min at 98-99°C) with or without salt (5 g·L(-1)). Samples were cooled immediately after cooking and kept in frozen storage before analysis. Proximate composition, mineral, amino acid, and vitamin contents were determined, and nutritive value was estimated based on 100 g serving portions in a 2000 calorie diet. Results show that processed nettle can supply 90%-100% of vitamin A (including vitamin A as β-carotene) and is a good source of dietary calcium, iron, and protein. We recommend fresh or processed nettle as a high-protein, low-calorie source of essential nutrients, minerals, and vitamins particularly in vegetarian, diabetic, or other specialized diets.

  20. Hydrothermal processing of MSWI fly ash--towards new stable minerals and fixation of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Bayuseno, A P; Schmahl, W W; Müllejans, Th

    2009-08-15

    A hydrothermal processing strategy of MSWI fly ash is presented for obtaining stable minerals with low toxic potential. Different hydrothermal conditions were tested to obtain high yields of new stable minerals. Experimental parameters including temperature, nature and molarity of alkali reagents, and reaction time were evaluated. The chemical stability of hydrothermal products was examined by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test and subsequent XRD for the leached residue. The significant amounts of Al-substituted 11A tobermorite and katoite in addition to minor amounts of zeolites were formed under experimental conditions at 0.5M NaOH, 180 degrees C for 48 h, however KOH treatment in a similar regime resulted in smaller amounts of Al-substituted 11A tobermorite and katoite. Similarly, a product of mixed Al-substituted 11A tobermorite and katoite could be formed from the washed fly ash treated in 0.5M NaOH at 180 degrees C for 48 h. Under the acidic condition, the treated fly ash exhibited an excellent stability of the mineral assemblage and less release of heavy metals relative to the untreated parent materials.

  1. Numerical Study of Usage Efficiency of Multistage Filters on Mineral Leaching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkarbekov, Medet; Kuljabekov, Alibek; Alibayeva, Karlygash; Kaltayev, Aidarkhan

    2013-11-01

    The numerical study of the usage efficiency of the multistage filters setting technology is carried out on the basis of mathematical simulation. And its application on in-situ mineral leaching process is considered. So long as mineral bearing sandstone in deposit mostly is separated by interbedded layers of sands and clays, it's expedient to use multistage filters setting technology at the mineral extraction. A comparison of the extraction degree at single and multistage filters is implemented. The results of calculations show that the distribution of flow (inflow) on well height is not uniform. In the calculations the well accepted as high-permeability channel, depending on the construction of the filter. Obtained results for a multistage filters setting qualitatively conform to the experimental findings. Wellbore is considered as a surface with a constant reduced pressure in the bottomhole formation zone. But such assumption does not show a qualitative picture of the fluid flow in the bottomhole zone [Brovin K.G., Grabovnikov V.A., 1997]. To construct an accurate mathematical model it's necessary to use Navier-Stokes equation for the interior of a vertical wellbore, and the filtration law for modeling the filtration in the reservoir. Strictly speaking, it would have had to sew two laws on the contact surface of a rock and filter. Such review requires enormous computing, as far as computational grid must be sufficiently thick to cover the interior of the wellbore.

  2. The utilization natural mineral in the process of palm oil glycerolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujdalipah, Siti

    2015-09-01

    The reaction of glycerolysis currently has weakness, which uses a catalyst with a high price and performed at a high temperature. Indonesia is rich in minerals that have the potential to be used as a catalyst. Besides that, the solvent allows the glycerolysis reaction done in a low temperature so that it can maintain the quality of product. The purpose of this research is to study the influence of a type of solvent and a type of natural mineral to the chemistry and physical characteristic of palm oil glycerolysis product. The research activity consists of four steps. The first is the analysis of chemistry characteristics of palm oil. The second is the process of palm oil as the effect of a type of solvent and a type of natural mineral factors. The third is the analysis of chemistry and physical characteristics of glycerolysis product. The last is the analysis of data. Based on the analysis variant at α=0.05, it shows that type of solvent and type of natural mineral doesnot influence significantly to the ability of glycerolysis product in decreasing the water surface tension and to the free glycerol content. The best product is able to decrease the water surface tension from 44.933 dyne/cm to 29.00 dyne/cm. It contains the free glycerol content of 1.30%, 1-monoglyceride content of 43.10%, acid number of 0.146 mg KOH/g sample, and it has simillar fatty acid composition with the raw material.

  3. Processing and integration of geochemical data for mineral exploration: Application of statistics, geostatistics and GIS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Jeff R.

    2002-04-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) used in concert with statistical and geostatistical software provide the geologist with a powerful tool for processing, visualizing and analysing geoscience data for mineral exploration applications. This thesis focuses on different methods for analysing, visualizing and integrating geochemical data sampled from various media (rock, till, soil, humus), with other types of geoscience data. Different methods for defining geochemical anomalies and separating geochemical anomalies due to mineralization from other lithologic or surficial factors (i.e. true from false anomalies) are investigated. With respect to lithogeochemical data, this includes methods to distinguish between altered and un-altered samples, methods (normalization) for identifying lithologic from mineralization effects, and various statistical and visual methods for identifying anomalous geochemical concentrations from background. With respect to surficial geochemical data, methods for identifying bedrock signatures, and scavenging effects are presented. In addition, a new algorithm, the dispersal train identification algorithm (DTIA), is presented which broadly helps to identify and characterize anisotropies in till data due to glacial dispersion and more specifically identifies potential dispersal trains using a number of statistical parameters. The issue of interpolation of geochemical data is addressed and methods for determining whether geochemical data should or should not be interpolated are presented. New methods for visualizing geochemical data using red-green-blue (RGB) ternary displays are illustrated. Finally data techniques for integrating geochemical data with other geoscience data to produce mineral prospectivity maps are demonstrated. Both data and knowledge-driven GIS modeling methodologies are used (and compared) for producing prospectivity maps. New ways of preparing geochemical data for input to modeling are demonstrated with the aim of getting

  4. Assessing the addition of mineral processing waste to green waste-derived compost: an agronomic, environmental and economic appraisal.

    PubMed

    Jones, D L; Chesworth, S; Khalid, M; Iqbal, Z

    2009-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of mixing two large volume wastes, namely mineral processing waste and source-segregated green waste compost, on the growth performance of plants targeted towards high (horticulture/agriculture) and low (amenity/restoration) value markets. The secondary aims were to evaluate the influence of mineral waste type on plant growth performance and to undertake a simple economic analysis of the use of mineral-compost mixtures in land restoration. Our results showed that in comparison to organic wastes, mineral wastes contained a low available nutrient content which reduces compost quality. This is supported by growth trials with tomato, wheat and grass which showed that, irrespective of mineral source, plants performed poorly in compost blended with mineral waste in comparison to those grown in green waste or peat-based compost alone. In terms of consumer confidence, unlike other wastes (e.g. biosolids and construction/demolition waste) the mineral quarry wastes can be expected to be free of potentially toxic elements, however, the production costs of compost-mineral waste mixtures and subsequent transport costs may limit its widespread use. In addition, handling of the material can be difficult under wet conditions and effective blending may require the purchase of specialist equipment. From our results, we conclude that mineral fines may prove useful for low quality, low value landscaping activities close to the source of production but are unsuited to high value markets.

  5. Application of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes to the mineralization of the herbicide diuron.

    PubMed

    Pipi, Angelo R F; Sirés, Ignasi; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Brillas, Enric

    2014-08-01

    Here, solutions with 0.185mM of the herbicide diuron of pH 3.0 have been treated by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) like electrochemical oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (EO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) or solar PEF (SPEF). Trials were performed in stirred tank reactors of 100mL and in a recirculation flow plant of 2.5L using a filter-press reactor with a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and an air-diffusion cathode for H2O2 electrogeneration. Oxidant hydroxyl radicals were formed from water oxidation at the anode and/or in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between added Fe(2+) and generated H2O2. In both systems, the relative oxidation ability of the EAOPs increased in the sequence EO-H2O2processes were more powerful due to the photolysis of intermediates by UV radiation. In the stirred tank reactor, the PEF treatment with BDD was the most potent method, yielding 93% mineralization after 360 min at 100 mA cm(-2). In the flow plant, the SPEF process attained a maximum mineralization of 70% at 100 mA cm(-2). Lower current densities slightly reduced the mineralization degree in SPEF, enhancing the current efficiency and dropping the energy consumption. The diuron decay always obeyed a pseudo-first-order kinetics, with a much greater apparent rate constant in EF and SPEF compared to EO-H2O2. Oxalic and oxamic acids were detected as final carboxylic acids. Ammonium and chloride ions were also released, the latter ion being partially converted into chlorate and perchlorate ions at the BDD surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Final Regulatory Determination for Special Wastes From Mineral Processing (Mining Waste Exclusion) - Federal Register Notice, June 13, 1991

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This action presents the Agency's final regulatory determination required by section 3001(b)(3)(C) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for 20 special wastes from the processing of ores and minerals.

  7. The operations manual: a mechanism for improving the research process.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Ann; Wyman, Jean F; Peters, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    The development and use of an operations manual has the potential to improve the capacity of nurse scientists to address the complex, multifaceted issues associated with conducting research in today's healthcare environment. An operations manual facilitates communication, standardizes training and evaluation, and enhances the development and standard implementation of clear policies, processes, and protocols. A 10-year review of methodology articles in relevant nursing journals revealed no attention to this topic. This article will discuss how an operations manual can improve the conduct of research methods and outcomes for both small-scale and large-scale research studies. It also describes the purpose and components of a prototype operations manual for use in quantitative research. The operations manual increases reliability and reproducibility of the research while improving the management of study processes. It can prevent costly and untimely delays or errors in the conduct of research.

  8. Mineral-Water Interface Processes Affecting Uranium Fate in Contaminated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread uranium contamination of soil, sediments, and groundwater systems has resulted from mining activities, nuclear weapon production, and energy generation. The fate and transport of uranium in such systems is strongly affected by geochemical processes occurring at mineral-water interfaces. I will present a summary of the mineral-water interface processes found to affect uranium fate in example contaminated sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford sites and in related model systems. Processes occurring under oxic conditions will be the primary focus of this talk as under these conditions uranium is most mobile and thus presents the greatest hazard. Three dominant solid-phase uranium species are observed in contaminated soil and sediments at the Hanford site: uranyl silicates, uranyl phosphates, and uranyl adsorbed to clays and iron oxides. In deep sediments, uranyl silicates are found in microfractures in feldspar grains, likely because slow diffusion in such fractures maintains a high silicate activity. Such silicates are also found in waste-impacted shallow sediments and soil; waste fluids or evaporative processes may have generated the silicate activity needed to produce such phases. Uranyl phosphates are less abundant, occurring primarily in shallow sediments exposed to P-bearing waste fluids. However, remediation approaches under consideration may produce substantial quantities of uranyl phosphates in the future. Adsorbed uranyl is dispersed throughout contaminated soils and shallow sediments and likely has the greatest potential for remobilization. Analogue studies show that precipitation of uranyl phosphates is rapid when such phases are supersaturated and that both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation may occur. Specific adsorption of uranyl to minerals is strongly affected by the presence of complexation anions. Carbonate suppresses uranyl adsorption but also forms uranyl-carbonate ternary surface complexes. At conditions below

  9. Opportunities for membrane technologies in the treatment of mining and mineral process streams and effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Awadalla, F.T.; Kumar, A. )

    1994-06-01

    The membrane separation technologies of microfiltration, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, and reverse osmosis are suitable for treating many dilute streams and effluents generated in mining and mineral processing. Membrane technologies are capable of treating these dilute streams in order to produce clean permeate water for recycle and a concentrate that can potentially be used for valuable metals recovery. Membrane technologies can be utilized alone, or in combination with other techniques as a polishing step, in these separation processes. A review of potential applications of membranes for the treatment of different process streams and effluents for water recycling and pollution control is given here. Although membranes may not be optimum in all applications, these technologies are recognized in the mining sector for the many potential advantages they can provide. 59 refs.

  10. Atmospheric Processing of Iron-Containing Mineral Dust Aerosol: A Major Source of Bioavailable Iron to Ocean Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubasinghege, G. R. S.; Hurub, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the present day, it has become more apparent that redox reactions involving mineral dust are of great interest, especially for Fe-containing mineral dust, as they transported and deposited into certain regions of the ocean that dissolved iron is often a limiting nutrient for ocean life. Given that heterogeneous reactions of Fe-containing mineral dust with acidic gases and their precursors, i.e. HNO3, dimethyl sulfide( DMS), lead to lower pH environments, the amount of bioavailable iron can increase as they are transported through the atmosphere. The current work focuses on chemical and photochemical processing of Fe-containing mineral dust particles in the presence of HNO3, SO2 and DMS under atmospherically relevant conditions. Here, various spectroscopic methods are combined with dissolution measurements to investigate atmospheric processing of iron containing aerosol dust, with a specific focus on mineralogy and environmental conditions, i.e. pH, relative humidity, temperature and solar flux. Ilmenite (FeTiO3) is used as one of the proxies for Fe-containing minerals that have enough complexity to mimic the mineral dust, yet simple enough to know the details of the reaction pathways. During these studies, above factors are found to play significant roles in the dissolution of iron from mineral dust aerosol. More importantly, data suggest that presence of titanium in the lattice structure of ilmenite enhances iron dissolution, at least by 3-fold in a comparison with hematite. Further, growth and activity of ocean diatoms (Cyclotella meneghiniana) are monitored in the presence of Fe-containing mineral dust under the same conditions. Here, diatoms are added to the reactors containing pre-dissolved iron from a prior 48hr reaction. Results show a high correlation between the growth of diatoms and the amount of bioavailable from iron containing minerals. The current study thus highlights these important, yet unconsidered, factors in the atmospheric processing of iron

  11. Improving a Dental School's Clinic Operations Using Lean Process Improvement.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Fonda G; Cunningham, Larry L; Turner, Sharon P; Lindroth, John; Ray, Deborah; Khan, Talib; Yates, Audrey

    2016-10-01

    The term "lean production," also known as "Lean," describes a process of operations management pioneered at the Toyota Motor Company that contributed significantly to the success of the company. Although developed by Toyota, the Lean process has been implemented at many other organizations, including those in health care, and should be considered by dental schools in evaluating their clinical operations. Lean combines engineering principles with operations management and improvement tools to optimize business and operating processes. One of the core concepts is relentless elimination of waste (non-value-added components of a process). Another key concept is utilization of individuals closest to the actual work to analyze and improve the process. When the medical center of the University of Kentucky adopted the Lean process for improving clinical operations, members of the College of Dentistry trained in the process applied the techniques to improve inefficient operations at the Walk-In Dental Clinic. The purpose of this project was to reduce patients' average in-the-door-to-out-the-door time from over four hours to three hours within 90 days. Achievement of this goal was realized by streamlining patient flow and strategically relocating key phases of the process. This initiative resulted in patient benefits such as shortening average in-the-door-to-out-the-door time by over an hour, improving satisfaction by 21%, and reducing negative comments by 24%, as well as providing opportunity to implement the electronic health record, improving teamwork, and enhancing educational experiences for students. These benefits were achieved while maintaining high-quality patient care with zero adverse outcomes during and two years following the process improvement project.

  12. Optical properties of selected components of mineral dust aerosol processed with organic acids and humic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Jennifer M.; Grassian, V. H.; Young, M. A.; Kleiber, P. D.

    2015-03-01

    Visible light scattering phase function and linear polarization profiles of mineral dust components processed with organic acids and humic material are measured, and results are compared to T-matrix simulations of the scattering properties. Processed samples include quartz mixed with humic material, and calcite reacted with acetic and oxalic acids. Clear differences in light scattering properties are observed for all three processed samples when compared to the unprocessed dust or organic salt products. Results for quartz processed with humic acid sodium salt (NaHA) indicate the presence of both internally mixed quartz-NaHA particles and externally mixed NaHA aerosol. Simulations of light scattering suggest that the processed quartz particles become more moderate in shape due to the formation of a coating of humic material over the mineral core. Experimental results for calcite reacted with acetic acid are consistent with an external mixture of calcite and the reaction product, calcium acetate. Modeling of the light scattering properties does not require any significant change to the calcite particle shape distribution although morphology changes cannot be ruled out by our data. It is expected that calcite reacted with oxalic acid will produce internally mixed particles of calcite and calcium oxalate due to the low solubility of the product salt. However, simulations of the scattering for the calcite-oxalic acid system result in rather poor fits to the data when compared to the other samples. The poor fit provides a less accurate picture of the impact of processing in the calcite-oxalic acid system.

  13. Launch processing system operations with a future look to operations analyst (OPERA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Astrid E.

    The launch processing system at Kennedy Space Center is used to process a Shuttle vehicle from its initial arrival in an Orbiter processing facility to a launch pad. This paper describes the launch processing system architecture and the ground support operations required to provide Shuttle system engineers with the capability to safely process and launch an Orbiter. The described ground operations are the culmination of 11 years of experience and redesign. In this paper, I examine some of the "lessons learned" and discuss problem areas which ground support operations have identified over the years as the Shuttle and launch processing systems continue to grow in complexity. As we strive to maintain the efficient level of support currently provided, some benefits have been gained through standard information management and automation techniques. However, problems requiring complex correlational analyses of information have defied resolution until artificial intelligence research developed expert system applications technology. The operational analyst for distributed systems (OPERA), a proposed set of expert systems for launch processing system operational assistance, is discussed along with its extensions to prospective future configurations and components for the launch processing system.

  14. Compressed Aeronautical Chart Processing Operator’s Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the processing thread A4A denotes a CAC ODI build for an (A) aeronautical chart at the (4) operational navigation chart (ONC) (1:1M) scale with...builds when both charts are at the same scale. For example, the processing thread A4A denotes a CAC ODI build for an (A) aeronautical chart at the (4

  15. Onboard Processing and Autonomous Operations on the IPEX Cubesat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Ortega, Kevin; Flatley, Tom; Crum, Gary; Geist, Alessandro; Lin, Michael; Williams, Austin; Bellardo, John; Puig-Suari, Jordi; hide

    2012-01-01

    IPEX is a 1u Cubesat sponsored by NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO), the goals or which are: (1) Flight validate high performance flight computing, (2) Flight validate onboard instrument data processing product generation software, (3) flight validate autonomous operations for instrument processing, (4) enhance NASA outreach and university ties.

  16. Process for Managing and Customizing HPC Operating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, David ML

    2014-04-02

    A process for maintaining a custom HPC operating system was developed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) over the past ten years. This process is generic and flexible to manage continuous change as well as keep systems updated while managing communication through well defined pieces of software.

  17. Design requirements for operational earth resources ground data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, C. J.; Bradford, L. H.; Burnett, E. S.; Hutson, D. E.; Kinsler, B. A.; Kugle, D. R.; Webber, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    Realistic tradeoff data and evaluation techniques were studied that permit conceptual design of operational earth resources ground processing systems. Methodology for determining user requirements that utilize the limited information available from users is presented along with definitions of sensor capabilities projected into the shuttle/station era. A tentative method is presented for synthesizing candidate ground processing concepts.

  18. Quantifying atmospheric processing of mineral dust as a source of bioavailable phosphorus to the open oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Ross; Stockdale, Anthony; Carslaw, Ken; Krom, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The transport and deposition of mineral dust is known to be the dominant source of phosphorus (P) to the surface waters of the open oceans. However, the fraction of this P that is deemed available for primary productivity remains a key uncertainty due to a limited understanding of the processes occurring during transport of the dust. Through a series of detailed laboratory experiments using desert dust and dust precursors, we show that the dissolution behaviour of P in these samples is controlled by a surface-bound labile pool, and an additional mineral pool primarily consisting of apatite. The acid dissolution of the apatite occurs rapidly and is controlled by the absolute number of H+ ions present in the solution surrounding the dust. Using these results we develop a new conceptual model that reproduces the major processes controlling P dissolution in the atmosphere. We then use a global aerosol microphysics model with a global soil database to quantify the deposition of bioavailable P to the open oceans and ice sheets. We show that, globally, the labile pool contributes 2.4 Gg P a-1 to the oceans and, from a potential pool of 11.5 Gg P a-1, the dissolved apatite pool contributes 0.24 Gg P a-1. A series of sensitivity studies identifying sources of acid in the atmosphere show that anthropogenic emissions of SO2 contribute 61% of the global mass of dissolved apatite, volcanic events contribute 11%, and DMS emissions contribute 10%. Finally, we show that the fraction of mineral dust P that is available for primary productivity varies, regionally, from <20% in the North Atlantic Ocean to >50% in the South Pacific Ocean; this explains the variability in the fraction of bioavailable P commonly observed in important oceanic regions.

  19. An investigation of operating variables in the fine coal dewatering and briquetting process

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, S.W.; Wilson, J.W.; Dharman, T.

    1998-07-01

    Illinois basin coals contain minerals, including pyrite, which are finely disseminated in micron-size particles. To liberate these mineral matters from the coal matrix, an ultra-fine grinding operation is required, followed by a wet physical cleaning process, such as column flotation. However, the resulting product possesses large surface areas that conventional dewatering techniques cannot perform effectively, and this creates transportation, storage and handling problems at utility plants. To take full advantage of these cleaning technologies, a new dewatering and coal consolidation method must be developed at the downstream end of the deep coal-cleaning process. Following an initial study at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR), briquetting was chosen to perform the dual purpose of dewatering and consolidating the fine coal. A bitumen-based emulsion, Orimulsion, proved to be an effective binder and dewatering agent in the briquetting process that assisted in the expulsion of water from the fine coal. This paper describes the investigation aimed at examining the relationships between several controllable operating variables. An experimental matrix was designed to examine a range of operating parameters based on earlier work conducted at the Department of Mining Engineering, University of Missouri-Rolla. A total of 13 experiments were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal samples that had a size fraction of 16 mesh x 0 and a moisture content of 31%. Based on results obtained from previous experiments and because of the complexity of the briquetting process, only two variables, roll speed and the briquetting form pressure, were studied for their influence on moisture content, abrasion resistance and friability of briquettes. Concurring with results from previous work, the curing time of the briquettes formed had a significant impact on the moisture content and friability of the compacted fine coal product. Also, the statistical regression models generated from

  20. Evaluation of premeability-porosity relationships linked to mineral dissolution-precipitation using global implicit approach with a reduction scheme and operator splitting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolfaghari, R.; Shao, H.; Kolditz, O.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical simulation of reactive transport processes is essential in long term behavior assessment of hazardous materials. To simulate reactive transport processes global implicit approach (GIA) and operator splitting approach are commonly used. GIA has been getting more attentions due to advances in computational power and the lack of numerical accuracy and efficacy of operator splitting methods for simulating long term processes over the past few years. We have investigated the Efficiency and accuracy of these methods in handling slow reacting-processes in long term scenarios. GIA with reduction scheme proposed by Kräutel et al. (2010) and sequential non-iterative approach (SNIA) approach have been implemented into OpenGeoSys (OGS6) to solve reactive transport problems. The new reduction scheme in GIA uses a reformulation to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations by decoupling of equations and elimination of unknowns. The new reformulation divides components and species of the chemical system into decoupled linear reaction invariant components and coupled nonlinear reaction variant ones. A local chemical solver is used to handle the chemical problem in GIA and SNIA approaches. Equilibrium/ kinetic mineral reaction is treated as a complementarity problem in the local problem. In this context, a series of benchmarks have been adopted to assess the performance of GIA with reduction scheme and SNIA. The benchmarks objective is to simulate mineral dissolution-precipitation induced porosity changes and the resulting effects on the solute migration. The Carman-Kozeny relationship is used to describe changes in permeability as a function of porosity. The results produced by three codes of OGS6, OGS-PHREEQC and MIN3P have been compared and evaluated based on the benchmarks for the numerical accuracy and efficacy.

  1. Standard for metal/nonmetal mining and metal mineral processing facilities. 2004 ed.

    SciTech Connect

    2004-07-01

    This standard addresses the protection of diesel-powered equipment and the storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids at these specialized sites. The 2004 edition consolidates requirements from NFPA 122 and 121 : Standard on Fire Protection for Self-Propelled and Mobile Surface Mining Equipment. Major changes include a new chapter on fire protection of surface metal mineral processing plants. The Standard is also revised to emphasize the use of a fire risk assessment when determining fire protection criteria. Chapter headings are: Administration; Referenced publications; Definitions; General; Fire risk assessment and risk reduction; Fire detection and suppression equipment; Fire protection for diesel-powered equipment in underground mines; Transfer of flammable or combustible liquids in underground mines; Flammable liquid storage in underground mines; Combustible liquid storage in underground mines; Fire suppression for flammable or combustible liquid storage areas in underground mines; Fire protection of surface mobile and self-propelled equipment; and Fire protection of surface metal mineral processing plants. 3 annexes.

  2. Geochemical Considerations Regarding the Processes Involved in Mineral Deposition in Sedimentary Rock-Hosted Veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, J. W.; Gledhill, D. K.

    2005-12-01

    In order for mineral deposition to take place in a vein, first the opposite reaction-dissolution of the mineral must occur from some source rock to place the requisite dissolved components into solution. Then the dissolved components must be transported to the vein either by advective or diffusive means before deposition can ensue. Finally conditions must be such in the vein that a supersaturated solution is produced and conditions are favorable for the nucleation and precipitation of the vein filling mineral. Although these general principles are widely accepted, there are many fundamental questions remaining regarding the chemistry that controls these processes. The controlling parameters are far more complex than simple temperature and pressure variations that are readily dealt with by equilibrium thermodynamic models. Answers for many questions reside, at least in a substantial part, in a better understanding of mineral solubility behavior, and precipitation and dissolution kinetics in high ionic strength solutions (brines) typically found in the subsurface. (Fluid inclusions commonly indicate that vein-filling minerals have precipitated from high ionic strength solutions.) We give as an example of the chemical complexities involving mineral reactions in brines the dissolution of calcite. The good news is that the calcite dissolution reaction is close to first order at high ionic strengths. In addition, common inhibitors, such as magnesium, are not very effective in influencing the rate constant, probably as a result of surface site competition. However, the bad news is that the sensitivity of the rate constant to composition increases with increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure and becomes most strongly influenced by total ionic strength. It is hypothesized that this is the result of a depressed water activity in brines that decreases the rate of cation hydration. We also observed that the inhibitory influence of anionic brine components, such as sulfate

  3. Iron isotope constraints on the mineralization processes of the Sandaowanzi telluride gold deposit, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Liu, Junlai; Lu, Di; Ren, Shunli; Liu, Zhengyang

    2016-04-01

    located at level +130m, but decreases gradually towards deeper and shallower levels. It is generally accepted that the isotopically light iron preferentially deposited early during the evolution process of mineralizing fluids and in the residues heavy Fe isotopes are enriched. Two stages of iron isotope fractionation are thus expected: enrichment of the isotopically light iron in the early stage at the level 170m and enrichment of the isotopically heavy iron in the later stage at the 130m. The results, therefore, suggest that mineralization first started at the level 170m and ended at the economic bonanza veins at level 130m. Meanwhile, the δ57Fe from levels 170m and 130m may suggest that mineralization started early near the core of the ore body, but the values from the level 50m may imply that mineralization started from one end of the ore lode.

  4. Predicting the Mineral Composition of Dust Aerosols. Part 2; Model Evaluation and Identification of Key Processes with Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Garcia-Pando, C. Perez; Miller, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    A global compilation of nearly sixty measurement studies is used to evaluate two methods of simulating the mineral composition of dust aerosols in an Earth system model. Both methods are based upon a Mean Mineralogical Table (MMT) that relates the soil mineral fractions to a global atlas of arid soil type. The Soil Mineral Fraction (SMF) method assumes that the aerosol mineral fractions match the fractions of the soil. The MMT is based upon soil measurements after wet sieving, a process that destroys aggregates of soil particles that would have been emitted from the original, undisturbed soil. The second method approximately reconstructs the emitted aggregates. This model is referred to as the Aerosol Mineral Fraction (AMF) method because the mineral fractions of the aerosols differ from those of the wet-sieved parent soil, partly due to reaggregation. The AMF method remedies some of the deficiencies of the SMF method in comparison to observations. Only the AMF method exhibits phyllosilicate mass at silt sizes, where they are abundant according to observations. In addition, the AMF quartz fraction of silt particles is in better agreement with measured values, in contrast to the overestimated SMF fraction. Measurements at distinct clay and silt particle sizes are shown to be more useful for evaluation of the models, in contrast to the sum over all particles sizes that is susceptible to compensating errors, as illustrated by the SMF experiment. Model errors suggest that allocation of the emitted silt fraction of each mineral into the corresponding transported size categories is an important remaining source of uncertainty. Evaluation of both models and the MMT is hindered by the limited number of size-resolved measurements of mineral content that sparsely sample aerosols from the major dust sources. The importance of climate processes dependent upon aerosol mineral composition shows the need for global and routine mineral measurements.

  5. Predicting the Mineral Composition of Dust Aerosols. Part 2; Model Evaluation and Identification of Key Processes with Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Garcia-Pando, C. Perez; Miller, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    A global compilation of nearly sixty measurement studies is used to evaluate two methods of simulating the mineral composition of dust aerosols in an Earth system model. Both methods are based upon a Mean Mineralogical Table (MMT) that relates the soil mineral fractions to a global atlas of arid soil type. The Soil Mineral Fraction (SMF) method assumes that the aerosol mineral fractions match the fractions of the soil. The MMT is based upon soil measurements after wet sieving, a process that destroys aggregates of soil particles that would have been emitted from the original, undisturbed soil. The second method approximately reconstructs the emitted aggregates. This model is referred to as the Aerosol Mineral Fraction (AMF) method because the mineral fractions of the aerosols differ from those of the wet-sieved parent soil, partly due to reaggregation. The AMF method remedies some of the deficiencies of the SMF method in comparison to observations. Only the AMF method exhibits phyllosilicate mass at silt sizes, where they are abundant according to observations. In addition, the AMF quartz fraction of silt particles is in better agreement with measured values, in contrast to the overestimated SMF fraction. Measurements at distinct clay and silt particle sizes are shown to be more useful for evaluation of the models, in contrast to the sum over all particles sizes that is susceptible to compensating errors, as illustrated by the SMF experiment. Model errors suggest that allocation of the emitted silt fraction of each mineral into the corresponding transported size categories is an important remaining source of uncertainty. Evaluation of both models and the MMT is hindered by the limited number of size-resolved measurements of mineral content that sparsely sample aerosols from the major dust sources. The importance of climate processes dependent upon aerosol mineral composition shows the need for global and routine mineral measurements.

  6. Constellation Mission Operation Working Group: ESMO Maneuver Planning Process Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Earth Science Mission Operation (ESMO) Project created an Independent Review Board to review our Conjunction Risk evaluation process and Maneuver Planning Process to identify improvements that safely manages mission conjunction risks, maintains ground track science requirements, and minimizes overall hours expended on High Interest Events (HIE). The Review Board is evaluating the current maneuver process which requires support by multiple groups. In the past year, there have been several changes to the processes although many prior and new concerns exist. This presentation will discuss maneuver process reviews and Board comments, ESMO assessment and path foward, ESMO future plans, recent changes and concerns.

  7. Mineral status in canine medial coronoid process disease: a cohort study using analysis of hair by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Davies, M; West, J; Williams, C; Gardner, D S

    2017-02-20

    In several species, developmental skeletal diseases involving abnormal endochondral ossification have been associated with imbalanced mineral intake. Hair analysis reflects long-term mineral status. To determine the mineral content of hair from dogs with or without medial coronoid process disease (MCPD). Dogs with MCPD have a different profile of minerals known to influence metalloenzymes involved in endochondral ossification. After cleansing, chelation and acid digestion of hair samples (n=79 in total: control dogs, n=70 v MCPD, n=9), mineral profile (7 major and 25 trace elements) was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Dogs were of similar age (control, 4.05 [1.85-7.70] v MCPD, 4.30 [3.25-6.53] median (IQR) years; P=0.78) and gender (control, n=43/27 v MCPD, n=4/5 males/females). 28/70 (40 per cent) of control and 8/9 (88 per cent) of MCPD dogs were neutered, respectively. Hair from dogs with MCPD contained significantly lower amounts (µg/g/DM) of copper, sulphur and zinc (all at P<0.001). Age, sex and neutered status had no effect on hair mineral status. Based on hair analysis, a role for mineral imbalance including copper, sulphur and zinc in the aetiopathogenesis of canine MCPD is suggested. Hair mineral analysis may prove useful as a biomarker for susceptible puppies.

  8. Defense Waste Processing Facility Radioactive Operations - Year Two

    SciTech Connect

    Occhipinti, J.E.; Carter, J.T.; Edwards, R.E.; Beck, R.S.; Iverson, D.C.

    1998-03-01

    The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first high-level radioactive waste vitrification facility. This waste (130 million liters) which has been stored in carbon steel underground tanks and is now being pretreated, melted into a highly durable borosilicate glass and poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. Following a ten-year construction period and nearly three-year nonradioactive test program, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. The first nine months of radioactive operations have been reported previously. As with any complex technical facility, difficulties were encountered during the transition to radioactive operations. Results of the second year of radioactive operations are presented in this paper. The discussion includes: feed preparation and glass melting, resolution of the melter pouring issues, improvements in processing attainment and throughput, and planned improvements in laboratory attainment and throughput.

  9. Guide to good practices for operations aspects of unique processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Operations Aspects of Facility Chemistry and Unique Process, Chapter 13 of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, ``Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities.`` The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing employee training and facility management programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19.

  10. Defense Waste Processing Facility radioactive operations -- Part 2, Glass making

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.T.; Rueter, K.J.; Ray, J.W.; Hodoh, O.

    1996-12-31

    The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first and world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction period and nearly 3 year non-radioactive test program, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March, 1996. The results of the first 8 months of radioactive operations are presented. Topics include facility production from waste preparation batching to canister filling.

  11. Methodology for the systems engineering process. Volume 3: Operational availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed description and explanation of the operational availability parameter is presented. The fundamental mathematical basis for operational availability is developed, and its relationship to a system's overall performance effectiveness is illustrated within the context of identifying specific availability requirements. Thus, in attempting to provide a general methodology for treating both hypothetical and existing availability requirements, the concept of an availability state, in conjunction with the more conventional probability-time capability, is investigated. In this respect, emphasis is focused upon a balanced analytical and pragmatic treatment of operational availability within the system design process. For example, several applications of operational availability to typical aerospace systems are presented, encompassing the techniques of Monte Carlo simulation, system performance availability trade-off studies, analytical modeling of specific scenarios, as well as the determination of launch-on-time probabilities. Finally, an extensive bibliography is provided to indicate further levels of depth and detail of the operational availability parameter.

  12. Iron Mineral Catalyzed C-H Activation As a Potential Pathway for Halogenation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubbesing, C.; Schoeler, H. F.; Benzing, K.; Krause, T.; Lippe, S.; Rudloff, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to increasing drinking water demand of mankind and an expected climate change the impact of salt lakes and salt deserts will increase within the next decades. Furthermore, a rising sea level influences coastal areas like salt marshes and abets processes which will lead to elevated organohalogen formation. An additional increase of the global warming potential, of particle formation and stratospheric ozone depletion is expected. Understanding these multifaceted processes is essential for mankind to be prepared for these alterations of the atmosphere. For example, Keppler et al. (2000) described the production of volatile halogenated organic compounds via oxidation of organic matter driven by ferric iron. However, the formation of long-chained alkyl halides in salt lakes is yet undisclosed. Despite the relative "inertness" of alkanes a direct halogenation of these compounds might be envisaged. In 2005 Vaillancourt et al. discovered a nonheme iron enzyme which is able to halogenate organic compounds via generating the high valent ferryl cation as reaction center. Based on various publications about C-H activation (Bergman, 2007) we postulate a halogenation process in which an iron containing minerals catalyse the C-H bond cleavage of organic compounds in soils. The generated organic radicals are highly reactive towards halides connected to the iron complex. We suggest that next to diagenetically altered iron containing enzymes, minerals such as oxides, hydroxides and sulfides are involved in abiotic halogenation processes. We applied the amino acid methionine as organic model compound and soluble iron species as reactants. All samples were incubated in aqueous phases containing various NaCl concentrations. As a result various halogenated ethanes and ethenes were identified as reaction products. References Bergman, R. G. (2007) Nature, 446(7134) 391-393 Keppler, F., et al. (2000) Nature, 403(6767) 298-301 Vaillancourt, F. H., et al. (2005) Nature, 436(7054) 1191-1194

  13. Potential Applications of Concentrated Solar Thermal Technologies in the Australian Minerals Processing and Extractive Metallurgical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglinton, Thomas; Hinkley, Jim; Beath, Andrew; Dell'Amico, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The Australian minerals processing and extractive metallurgy industries are responsible for about 20% of Australia's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This article reviews the potential applications of concentrated solar thermal (CST) energy in the Australian minerals processing industry to reduce this impact. Integrating CST energy into these industries would reduce their reliance upon conventional fossil fuels and reduce GHG emissions. As CST technologies become more widely deployed and cheaper, and as fuel prices rise, CST energy will progressively become more competitive with conventional energy sources. Some of the applications identified in this article are expected to become commercially competitive provided the costs for pollution abatement and GHG mitigation are internalized. The areas of potential for CST integration identified in this study can be classed as either medium/low-temperature or high-temperature applications. The most promising medium/low-grade applications are electricity generation and low grade heating of liquids. Electricity generation with CST energy—also known as concentrated solar power—has the greatest potential to reduce GHG emissions out of all the potential applications identified because of the 24/7 dispatchability when integrated with thermal storage. High-temperature applications identified include the thermal decomposition of alumina and the calcination of limestone to lime in solar kilns, as well as the production of syngas from natural gas and carbonaceous materials for various metallurgical processes including nickel and direct reduced iron production. Hybridization and integration with thermal storage could enable CST to sustain these energy-intensive metallurgical processes continuously. High-temperature applications are the focus of this paper.

  14. Chemical processing does not always impair heterogeneous ice nucleation of mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Demott, P. J.; Prenni, A. J.; Minambres, L.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Moehler, O.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral dust particles are the most abundant heterogeneous ice nuclei in the atmosphere. They also frequently become mixed with secondary material during atmospheric transport. The effect that such atmospheric processing has on the ice nucleation properties of dust particles remains under investigation. We have studied changes in the ice nucleation ability of various mineral dust sources after exposure to nitric acid in an aerosol flow tube, and after heterogeneous nucleation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the AIDA cloud expansion chamber. Both chemical treatments altered and homogenized the dust particles’ heterogeneous ice nucleation properties below water-saturation, but had no apparent impact on the immersion-freezing fraction well above water saturation. The fraction of particles capable of nucleating ice at fixed mixed-phase cloud temperatures between -35 and -15 °C was determined using a continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) as the relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) was scanned from 75% to 110% RHw. Exposure to both nitric acid and SOA impaired essentially all ice nucleation in the deposition-regime below water saturation, while causing the onset of condensation-freezing to occur in a step-wise manner over a small range of RHw just below water saturation. We interpret this as the result of an increase in particle hygroscopicity following chemical treatment. This allows the mineral particles to absorb enough water to overcome solute freezing point depression effects and nucleate ice via condensation-freezing at a slightly smaller and narrower range of RHw than the less hygroscopic untreated dust can. Immersion-freezing above water saturation was not affected by either treatment. This is in stark contrast to earlier experiments where dust was exposed to sulfuric acid from a heated vapor source; ice nucleation was notably impaired in both the deposition and immersion-freezing regimes following sulfuric acid treatment.

  15. Models of unit operations used for solid-waste processing

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, G.M.; Glaub, J.C.; Diaz, L.F.

    1984-09-01

    This report documents the unit operations models that have been developed for typical refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) processing systems. These models, which represent the mass balances, energy requirements, and economics of the unit operations, are derived, where possible, from basic principles. Empiricism has been invoked where a governing theory has yet to be developed. Field test data and manufacturers' information, where available, supplement the analytical development of the models. A literature review has also been included for the purpose of compiling and discussing in one document the available information pertaining to the modeling of front-end unit operations. Separate analytics have been done for each task.

  16. Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, D. W.

    1981-02-01

    The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

  17. Modeling of atmospheric iron processing carried by mineral dust and its deposition to ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Vukovic, Ana; Vujadinovic, Mirjam

    2014-05-01

    Relatively insoluble iron in dust originating from desert soils increases its solubility after Fe carried by mineral dust is chemically processed by the atmosphere. After dust is deposited deposition to the ocean, soluble Fe as a nutrient could enhance the marine primary production. The atmospheric dust cycle is driven by the atmospheric processes often of smaller, meso-scales. The soil mineralogy of dust emitted from sources determines also how much Fe in the aerosol will be finding. Once Fe is exposed to the atmospheric processes, the atmospheric radiation, clouds and polluted air will chemically affect the iron in dust. Global dust-iron models, having typical horizontal resolutions of 100-300 km which are mostly used to numerically simulate the fate of iron in the atmosphere can provide rather global picture of the dust and iron transport, but not details. Such models often introduce simplistic approximation on the Fe content in dust-productive soils. To simulate the Fe processing we instead implemented a high resolution regional atmospheric dust-iron model with detailed 1km global map for the geographic distribution of Fe content in soil. We also introduced a parameterization of the Fe processing caused by dust mineralogy, cloud processes and solar radiation. We will present results from simulation experiments in order to explore the model capability to reproduce major observed patterns of deposited Fe into the Atlantic cruises.

  18. Tin-carrier minerals in metaluminous granites of the western Nanling Range (southern China): Constraints on processes of tin mineralization in oxidized granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru Cheng; Xie, Lei; Chen, Jun; Yu, Apeng; Wang, Lubin; Lu, Jianjun; Zhu, Jinchu

    2013-09-01

    Huashan, Guposhan and Qitianling are three similar and representative metaluminous A-type tin granites in the western Nanling Range, China. They all have a high oxidization state with magnetite as the dominant Fe-Ti oxide. This study presents an understanding of systematic mineralogy of Sn-bearing minerals (biotite, titanite, magnetite and cassiterite) in the three granites. Biotite has an annite composition and both electron-microprobe and LA-ICP-MS analyses indicate trace amounts of tin in biotite (approximately 100-20 ppm). Chloritization of biotite is accompanied by formation of Sn-rich rutile and cassiterite. Titanite has a long history of crystallization from the early-magmatic stage through the late-magmatic stage to the hydrothermal stage. Owing to its solid-solution relationship with malayaite (CaSnSiO5), titanite always contains tin to various extents. Early-magmatic titanite contains about 0.5 wt.% SnO2, while the late-magmatic titanite is markedly enriched in tin (on average 14.8 and 3.4 SnO2 in titanite from the Qitianling and Huashan granites, respectively). Magnetite grains typically display a trellis structure with ilmenite lamellae, where microinclusions of cassiterite (<1 μm in size) are present. This is likely consistent with features of the "oxy-exsolution" process of Sn-bearing titanomagnetite precursor. Cassiterite may be observed as late-magmatic phase, but most commonly appears as an alteration product of other primary minerals. All tin-bearing minerals in the three granites record a complete process of tin mineralization in granite. The features of tin in primary biotite, titanite and magnetite reflect an initial enrichment during the early stage of magmatic crystallization of the Huashan, Guposhan and Qitianling granites. Association of interstitial Sn-titanite and cassiterite suggests further tin enrichment related to fractional crystallization of granitic magmas. Fluids and alteration of primary minerals play an important role in the

  19. Vinasse organic matter quality and mineralization potential, as influenced by raw material, fermentation and concentration processes.

    PubMed

    Parnaudeau, V; Condom, N; Oliver, R; Cazevieille, P; Recous, S

    2008-04-01

    Both dilute and concentrated vinasse can be spread on agricultural fields or used as organic fertilizer. The effects of different characteristics of the original raw material on the biochemical composition of vinasse and their C and N mineralization in soil were investigated. Vinasse samples were obtained from similar industrial fermentation processes based on the growth of microorganisms on molasses from different raw material (sugar beet or sugar cane) and vinasse concentration (dilute or concentrated). The nature of the raw material used for fermentation had the greatest effect on the nature and size of the resistant organic pool. This fraction included aromatic compounds originating from the raw material or from complex molecules and seemed to be quantitatively related to acid-insoluble N. Samples derived from sugar beet were richer in N compounds and induced greater net N mineralization. The effect of evaporation varied with the nature of the raw material. Concentration led to a slight increase in the abundance of phenolic compounds, acid-insoluble fraction, and a slight decrease in the labile fraction of vinasses partly or totally derived from sugar beet. The effect of the dilute vinasse from sugar cane was greater. The concentrated vinasse had a smaller labile fraction, induced N immobilization at the beginning of incubation, and exhibited greater N concentration in the acid-insoluble fraction than the dilute vinasse.

  20. Natural Radionuclides In Mineral Sand Products From A Processing Plant In Northeastern Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Hazin, C. A.; Khoury, H. J.; Silveira, S. V.

    2008-08-07

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation carried out in a mineral sand processing plant located in the coastal region of Northeastern Brazil. The study aimed to determine the natural radionuclide content of the mineral products extracted from beach sands, with special emphasis on zircon. Measurements were performed through gamma spectrometry, by using a high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) coupled to a multichannel analyzer. Activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra were determined by measuring some of the radon progeny activity concentrations ({sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi for {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 228}Ac and {sup 208}Tl for {sup 228}Ra) and assuming an equilibrium condition upstream of the radon progeny. The results of the measurements carried out for the zircon samples showed activity concentrations ranging from 18.09 to 48.51 kBq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra. The results for {sup 228}Ra, on the other hand, were consistently lower than those obtained for {sup 226}Ra, ranging from 2.72 to 18.31 kBq kg{sup -1}.

  1. WebTraceMiner: a web service for processing and mining EST sequence trace files.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chun; Wang, Gang; Liu, Lin; Ji, Guoli; Liu, Yuansheng; Chen, Jinqiao; Webb, Jason S; Reese, Greg; Dean, Jeffrey F D

    2007-07-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) remain a dominant approach for characterizing the protein-encoding portions of various genomes. Due to inherent deficiencies, they also present serious challenges for data quality control. Before GenBank submission, EST sequences are typically screened and trimmed of vector and adapter/linker sequences, as well as polyA/T tails. Removal of these sequences presents an obstacle for data validation of error-prone ESTs and impedes data mining of certain functional motifs, whose detection relies on accurate annotation of positional information for polyA tails added posttranscriptionally. As raw DNA sequence information is made increasingly available from public repositories, such as NCBI Trace Archive, new tools will be necessary to reanalyze and mine this data for new information. WebTraceMiner (www.conifergdb.org/software/wtm) was designed as a public sequence processing service for raw EST traces, with a focus on detection and mining of sequence features that help characterize 3' and 5' termini of cDNA inserts, including vector fragments, adapter/linker sequences, insert-flanking restriction endonuclease recognition sites and polyA or polyT tails. WebTraceMiner complements other public EST resources and should prove to be a unique tool to facilitate data validation and mining of error-prone ESTs (e.g. discovery of new functional motifs).

  2. Coupling process study of lipid production and mercury bioremediation by biomimetic mineralized microalgae.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yang; Deng, Aosong; Gong, Xun; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yang

    2017-11-01

    Considering the high concentration of mercury in industrial wastewater, such as coal-fired power plants and gold mining wastewater, this research study investigated the coupling process of lipid production and mercury bioremediation using microalgae cells. Chlorella vulgaris modified by biomimetic mineralization. The cultivation was divided in two stages: a natural cultivation for 7days and 5days of Hg(2+) addition (10-100μg/L) for cultivation at different pH values (4-7) after inoculation. Next, the harvested cells were eluted, and lipid was extracted. The fluorescein diacetate (FDA) dye tests demonstrated that the mineralized layer enhanced the biological activity of microalgae cells in Hg(2+) contaminated media. Hg distribution tests showed that the Hg removal capacity of modified cells was increased from 62.85% to 94.74%, and 88.72% of eluted Hg(2+) concentration was observed in modified cells compared to 48.42% of raw cells, implying that more mercury was transferred from lipid and residuals into elutable forms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Separation and Purification of Mineral Salts from Spacecraft Wastewater Processing via Electrostatic Beneficiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, John D., II; Lunn, Griffin

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic separation is a class of material processing technologies commonly used for the sorting of coarse mixtures by means of electrical forces acting on charged or polarized particles. Most if not all of the existing tribo-electrostatic separators had been initially developed for mineral ores beneficiation. It is a well-known process that has been successfully used to separate coal from minerals. Potash (potassium) enrichment where underground salt mines containing large amounts of sodium is another use of this techno logy. Through modification this technology can be used for spacecraft wastewater brine beneficiation. This will add in closing the gap beeen traveling around Earth's Gravity well and long-term space explorations. Food has been brought on all man missions, which is why plant growth for food crops continues to be of interest to NASA. For long-term mission considerations food productions is one of the top priorities. Nutrient recovery is essential for surviving in or past low earth orbit. In our advance bio-regenerative process instead of nitrogen gas produced; soluble nitrate salts that can be recovered for plant fertilizer would be produced instead. The only part missing is the beneficiation of brine to separate the potassium from the sodium. The use of electrostatic beneficiation in this experiment utilizes the electrical charge differences between aluminum and dried brine by surface contact. The helixes within the aluminum tribocharger allows for more surface contact when being agitated. When two materials are in contact, the material with the highest affinity for electrons becomes negatively charged, while the other becomes positively charged. This contact exchange of charge may cause the particles to agglomerate depending on their residence time within the tribocharger, compromising the efficiency of separation. The aim of this experiment is to further the development in electrostatic beneficiation by optimizing the separation of ersatz and

  4. Improving operational anodising process performance using simulation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liong, Choong-Yeun Ghazali, Syarah Syahidah

    2015-10-22

    The use of aluminium is very widespread, especially in transportation, electrical and electronics, architectural, automotive and engineering applications sectors. Therefore, the anodizing process is an important process for aluminium in order to make the aluminium durable, attractive and weather resistant. This research is focused on the anodizing process operations in manufacturing and supplying of aluminium extrusion. The data required for the development of the model is collected from the observations and interviews conducted in the study. To study the current system, the processes involved in the anodizing process are modeled by using Arena 14.5 simulation software. Those processes consist of five main processes, namely the degreasing process, the etching process, the desmut process, the anodizing process, the sealing process and 16 other processes. The results obtained were analyzed to identify the problems or bottlenecks that occurred and to propose improvement methods that can be implemented on the original model. Based on the comparisons that have been done between the improvement methods, the productivity could be increased by reallocating the workers and reducing loading time.

  5. Improving operational anodising process performance using simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liong, Choong-Yeun; Ghazali, Syarah Syahidah

    2015-10-01

    The use of aluminium is very widespread, especially in transportation, electrical and electronics, architectural, automotive and engineering applications sectors. Therefore, the anodizing process is an important process for aluminium in order to make the aluminium durable, attractive and weather resistant. This research is focused on the anodizing process operations in manufacturing and supplying of aluminium extrusion. The data required for the development of the model is collected from the observations and interviews conducted in the study. To study the current system, the processes involved in the anodizing process are modeled by using Arena 14.5 simulation software. Those processes consist of five main processes, namely the degreasing process, the etching process, the desmut process, the anodizing process, the sealing process and 16 other processes. The results obtained were analyzed to identify the problems or bottlenecks that occurred and to propose improvement methods that can be implemented on the original model. Based on the comparisons that have been done between the improvement methods, the productivity could be increased by reallocating the workers and reducing loading time.

  6. 43 CFR 3602.12 - How does the mineral materials sales process affect other users of the same public lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the public land records, it creates a right to remove the materials superior to any subsequent claim... terminates. (c) This right does not prevent other uses or segregate the land from the operation of the public land laws, including the mining and mineral leasing laws. However, such subsequent uses must not...

  7. 43 CFR 3602.12 - How does the mineral materials sales process affect other users of the same public lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the public land records, it creates a right to remove the materials superior to any subsequent claim... terminates. (c) This right does not prevent other uses or segregate the land from the operation of the public land laws, including the mining and mineral leasing laws. However, such subsequent uses must not...

  8. 43 CFR 3602.12 - How does the mineral materials sales process affect other users of the same public lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the public land records, it creates a right to remove the materials superior to any subsequent claim... terminates. (c) This right does not prevent other uses or segregate the land from the operation of the public land laws, including the mining and mineral leasing laws. However, such subsequent uses must not...

  9. 43 CFR 3602.12 - How does the mineral materials sales process affect other users of the same public lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the public land records, it creates a right to remove the materials superior to any subsequent claim... terminates. (c) This right does not prevent other uses or segregate the land from the operation of the public land laws, including the mining and mineral leasing laws. However, such subsequent uses must not...

  10. Sanitary Engineering Unit Operations and Unit Processes Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Professors in Sanitary Engineering.

    This manual contains a compilation of experiments in Physical Operations, Biological and Chemical Processes for various education and equipment levels. The experiments are designed to be flexible so that they can be adapted to fit the needs of a particular program. The main emphasis is on hands-on student experiences to promote understanding.…

  11. Sanitary Engineering Unit Operations and Unit Processes Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Professors in Sanitary Engineering.

    This manual contains a compilation of experiments in Physical Operations, Biological and Chemical Processes for various education and equipment levels. The experiments are designed to be flexible so that they can be adapted to fit the needs of a particular program. The main emphasis is on hands-on student experiences to promote understanding.…

  12. Open Learning for Process Operators. ZIFF Papiere 78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geary, David

    This document describes the development and implementation of an open learning course for shift operators who work in British process industries. The course was developed collaboratively during 1979-82 by B.P. Chemicals Ltd. and Grimsby College of Technology and Arts, using the Business and Technician Education Council certification program.…

  13. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Chemical Process Technical Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois Occupational Skill Standards for programs preparing students for employment as chemical process technical operators. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and credentialing, the process…

  14. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.877 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  15. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.814 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  16. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.774 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  17. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.877 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  18. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.774 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  19. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.814 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  20. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.814 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  1. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.814 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  2. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.877 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  3. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.774 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  4. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.774 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  5. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.877 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  6. Handbook of Data Processing Administration, Operations, and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mixon, Shirley R.

    This book provides a professional and comprehensive approach to solving the problems inherent in computer software development, operations, and maintenance. The information is structured and written so that people with varying experience in data processing can benefit from it. It is intended for executives whose activities interrelate with data…

  7. A Competency-Based Instructional Program for Plant Process Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Joy; Mills, Steven

    This program guide provides materials to prepare learners for employment as Process Plant Operators through classroom instruction and practical shop experience. Contents include instructional goal and subgoals, an instructional analysis that describes development of the materials and instructional equipment and supplies and facilities…

  8. Identification of Alternative Power Sources for Dredged Material Processing Operations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    This report provides a basis for selecting alternative, renewable power sources specifically for operating dredged material processing systems. A...obtaining power from solid waste (such as incineration of trash), but was discarded. Of all the alternative power sources studied, wind electric generation seems to be the most practical and versatile to apply at this time.

  9. An innovative ultrasound, Fe(2+) and TiO(2) photoassisted process for bisphenol A mineralization.

    PubMed

    Torres-Palma, Ricardo A; Nieto, Jessica I; Combet, Evelyne; Pétrier, Christian; Pulgarin, Cesar

    2010-04-01

    This paper explores the degradation of a model pollutant, bisphenol A, by an advanced oxidation process that combines sonolysis, Fe(2+), and TiO(2) in a photoassisted process. Experiments were done under saturated oxygen conditions. The effect of different Fe(2+) (0.56 and 5.6 mg/L) and TiO(2) (10 and 50 mg/L) concentrations was investigated on both the elimination and mineralization of the pollutant. A pronounced synergistic effect that led to the complete and rapid elimination of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was observed even at low catalyst loadings. In this system, almost a complete removal of DOC (93%) was observed after 4 h using 10 and 5.6 mg/L of TiO(2) and Fe(2+), respectively, whereas at the same time, only 5, 6, and 22% of DOC was removed by an individual process alone (TiO(2) photocatalysis, ultrasound, and photo-Fenton, respectively). In this system, ultrasound has the principal role of eliminating the initial substrate and providing hydrogen peroxide for the photocatalytic systems, while photo-Fenton and TiO(2) photocatalysis are mainly responsible for the transformation of the intermediates in CO(2) and H(2)O. The role of H(2)O(2) generated from the sonochemical process is also discussed.

  10. Formation of iron nanoparticles and increase in iron reactivity in mineral dust during simulated cloud processing.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zongbo; Krom, Michael D; Bonneville, Steeve; Baker, Alex R; Jickells, Timothy D; Benning, Liane G

    2009-09-01

    The formation of iron (Fe) nanoperticles and increase in Fe reactivity in mineral dust during simulated cloud processing was investigated using high-resolution microscopy and chemical extraction methods. Cloud processing of dust was experimentally simulated via an alternation of acidic (pH 2) and circumneutral conditions (pH 5-6) over periods of 24 h each on presieved (<20 microm) Saharan soil and goethite suspensions. Microscopic analyses of the processed soil and goethite samples reveal the neo-formation of Fe-rich nanoparticle aggregates, which were not found initially. Similar Fe-rich nanoparticles were also observed in wet-deposited Saharen dusts from the western Mediterranean but not in dry-deposited dust from the eastern Mediterranean. Sequential Fe extraction of the soil samples indicated an increase in the proportion of chemically reactive Fe extractable by an ascorbate solution after simulated cloud processing. In addition, the sequential extractions on the Mediterranean dust samples revealed a higher content of reactive Fe in the wet-deposited dust compared to that of the dry-deposited dust These results suggestthat large variations of pH commonly reported in aerosol and cloud waters can trigger neo-formation of nanosize Fe particles and an increase in Fe reactivity in the dust

  11. Effects of minerals on coal-benefication processes. Quarterly report No. 9, October 1-December 31, 1979. [Fate of minerals; different coals

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, B. G.; Muter, R. B.; Buttermore, W. H.; Grady, W. C.; Alderman, J. K.; Durham, D.

    1980-09-15

    Unit operation pilot scale tests have been completed for froth flotation, tabling and jigging cleaning operations. An assessment and chemical/mineralogical data for these tests are reported herein. Tests for the heavy media cyclone and WEMCO HMS unit are on-going and will be reported in the next quarter. Also completed during the report period was an in-depth petrographic analysis of the Pocahontas No. 3 coal. Coal macerals by size and gravity were determined as volume percent of the whole coal and are contained in this report. This leaves only the Illinois No. 6 samples for detailed maceral analysis vs. screen/gravity fractions. Accumulation of XRPD data for coal minerals with Pocahontas No. 3 was continued based on the methodology presented in Quarterly Report No. 8. Standardization equations were developed for the Pocahontas No. 3 and Illinois No. 6 samples and mineralogical trends for these coals and the Pittsburgh seam samples were determined. Some generalizations are possible which should aid in interpreting the preparation plant and pilot plant cleaning of these coals. Illite and quartz constitute the majority of all LTA's whether of cleaned coals or refuse. Some minerals display the proprty of being highly separated into either the cleaned coal or the refuse, especially when fine coal sizes are cleaned. Calcite and kaolinite are prime examples in that kaolinite is greatest in the LTA's of the cleaned coal, and calcite is greatest in the LTA's of the refuse. Minerals such as apatite and siderite are most effectively separated into the cleaned coal and refuse only when large coal sizes are cleaned.

  12. Mineralization of integrated gasification combined-cycle power-station wastewater effluent by a photo-Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Durán, A; Monteagudo, J M; San Martín, I; Aguirre, M

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study the mineralization of wastewater effluent from an integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power station sited in Spain to meet the requirements of future environmental legislation. This study was done in a pilot plant using a homogeneous photo-Fenton oxidation process with continuous addition of H(2)O(2) and air to the system. The mineralization process was found to follow pseudo-first-order kinetics. Experimental kinetic constants were fitted using neural networks (NNs). The NNs model reproduced the experimental data to within a 90% confidence level and allowed the simulation of the process for any values of the parameters within the experimental range studied. At the optimum conditions (H(2)O(2) flow rate=120 mL/h, [Fe(II)]=7.6 mg/L, pH=3.75 and air flow rate=1 m(3)/h), a 90% mineralization was achieved in 150 min. Determination of the hydrogen peroxide consumed and remaining in the water revealed that 1.2 mol of H(2)O(2) was consumed per each mol of total organic carbon removed from solution. This result confirmed that an excess of dissolved H(2)O(2) was needed to achieve high mineralization rates, so continuous addition of peroxide is recommended for industrial application of this process. Air flow slightly improved the mineralization rate due to the formation of peroxo-organic radicals which enhanced the oxidation process.

  13. Application of new optical coherence elastography to monitor the mineralization processing in bone tissue engineering constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Guangying; Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Yang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    Generation of functional tissue in vitro through tissue engineering technique is a promising direction to repair and replace malfunctioned organ and tissue in the modern medicine for various diseases which could not been treated well by conventional therapy. Similar to the embryo development, the generation of tissue in vitro is a highly dynamic processing. Obtaining the feedback of the processing real time is highly demanded. In this study, a new methodology has been explored aiming to monitor the morphological and mechanical property alteration of bone tissue engineering constructs simultaneously. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) equipped with a LDS V201 permanent magnet shaker and a modulated acoustic radiation force (ARF) to provide a vibration signal, has been used for the real time and non-destructive monitoring. A phantom construct system has been used to optimize the measurement conditions in which agar hydrogel with concentration from 0, 0.75 to 2% with/without hydroxyappatite particles have been injected to 3D porous poly (lactic acid) scaffolds to simulate the collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) and mineralized ECM. The structural and elastography images of the constructs have clearly demonstrated the linear relation with the increased mechanical property versus the increase of agar concentration within the pores of the scaffolds. The MG63 bone cells seeded in the scaffolds and cultured for 4 weeks have been monitored by the established protocol exhibiting the increased mechanical strength in the pore wall where the ECM or mineralized ECM was assumed to be formed in comparison to empty pores. This study confirms that OCE-ARF could become a valuable tool in regenerative medicine to assess the biological events during in vitro culture and conditioning.

  14. Effect of Natural Mineral on Methane Production and Process Stability During Semi-Continuous Mono-Digestion of Maize Straw.

    PubMed

    González-Suárez, A; Pereda-Reyes, I; Pozzi, E; da Silva, A José; Oliva-Merencio, D; Zaiat, M

    2016-04-01

    The effect of natural mineral on the mono-digestion of maize straw was evaluated in continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) at 38 °C. Different strategies of mineral addition were studied. The organic loading rate (OLR) was varied from 0.5 to 2.5 g volatile solid (VS) L(-1) d(-1). A daily addition of 1 g mineral L(-1) in reactor 2 (R2) diminished the methane production by about 11 % with respect to the initial phase. However, after a gradual addition of mineral, an average methane yield of 257 NmL CH4 g VS(-1) was reached and the methane production was enhanced by 30 % with regard to R1. An increase in the frequency of mineral addition did not enhance the methane production. The archaeal community was more sensitive to the mineral than the bacterial population whose similarity stayed high between R1 and R2. Significant difference in methane yield was found for both reactors throughout the operation.

  15. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter; K. Streib

    1999-09-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg(OH){sub 2} carbonation is a leading process candidate, which generates the stable naturally occurring mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}) and water. Key to process cost and viability are the carbonation reaction rate and its degree of completion. This process, which involves simultaneous dehydroxylation and carbonation is very promising, but far from optimized. In order to optimize the dehydroxylation/carbonation process, an atomic-level understanding of the mechanisms involved is needed. Since Mg(OH){sub 2} dehydroxylation is intimately associated with the carbonation process, its mechanisms are also of direct interest in understanding and optimizing the process. In the first project year, our investigations have focused on developing an atomic-level understanding of the dehydroxylation/carbonation reaction mechanisms that govern the overall carbonation reaction process in well crystallized material. In years two and three, we will also explore the roles of crystalline defects and impurities. Environmental-cell, dynamic high-resolution transmission electron microscopy has been used to directly observe the dehydroxylation process at the atomic-level for the first time. These observations were combined with advanced computational modeling studies to better elucidate the atomic-level process. These studies were combined with direct carbonation studies to better elucidate dehydroxylation/carbonation reaction mechanisms. Dehydroxylation follows a lamellar nucleation and growth process involving oxide layer formation. These layers form lamellar oxyhydroxide regions, which can

  16. The optimization of operating parameters on microalgae upscaling process planning.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-An; Huang, Hsin-Fu; Yu, Chung-Chyi

    2016-03-01

    The upscaling process planning developed in this study primarily involved optimizing operating parameters, i.e., dilution ratios, during process designs. Minimal variable cost was used as an indicator for selecting the optimal combination of dilution ratios. The upper and lower mean confidence intervals obtained from the actual cultured cell density data were used as the final cell density stability indicator after the operating parameters or dilution ratios were selected. The process planning method and results were demonstrated through three case studies of batch culture simulation. They are (1) final objective cell densities were adjusted, (2) high and low light intensities were used for intermediate-scale cultures, and (3) the number of culture days was expressed as integers for the intermediate-scale culture.

  17. Using the extended parallel process model to prevent noise-induced hearing loss among coal miners in Appalachia

    SciTech Connect

    Murray-Johnson, L.; Witte, K.; Patel, D.; Orrego, V.; Zuckerman, C.; Maxfield, A.M.; Thimons, E.D.

    2004-12-15

    Occupational noise-induced hearing loss is the second most self-reported occupational illness or injury in the United States. Among coal miners, more than 90% of the population reports a hearing deficit by age 55. In this formative evaluation, focus groups were conducted with coal miners in Appalachia to ascertain whether miners perceive hearing loss as a major health risk and if so, what would motivate the consistent wearing of hearing protection devices (HPDs). The theoretical framework of the Extended Parallel Process Model was used to identify the miners' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and current behaviors regarding hearing protection. Focus group participants had strong perceived severity and varying levels of perceived susceptibility to hearing loss. Various barriers significantly reduced the self-efficacy and the response efficacy of using hearing protection.

  18. Using the extended parallel process model to prevent noise-induced hearing loss among coal miners in Appalachia.

    PubMed

    Murray-Johnson, Lisa; Witte, Kim; Patel, Dhaval; Orrego, Victoria; Zuckerman, Cynthia; Maxfield, Andrew M; Thimons, Edward D

    2004-12-01

    Occupational noise-induced hearing loss is the second most self-reported occupational illness or injury in the United States. Among coal miners, more than 90% of the population reports a hearing deficit by age 55. In this formative evaluation, focus groups were conducted with coal miners in Appalachia to ascertain whether miners perceive hearing loss as a major health risk and if so, what would motivate the consistent wearing of hearing protection devices (HPDs). The theoretical framework of the Extended Parallel Process Model was used to identify the miners' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and current behaviors regarding hearing protection. Focus group participants had strong perceived severity and varying levels of perceived susceptibility to hearing loss. Various barriers significantly reduced the self-efficacy and the response efficacy of using hearing protection.

  19. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Stevenson, Joel O'Don; Ward, Pamela Peardon Denise

    2001-01-01

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discernible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). A final aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system.

  20. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Stevenson, Joel O'Don; Ward, Pamela Peardon Denise

    2000-01-01

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discernible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). A final aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system.

  1. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Stevenson, Joel O'Don; Ward, Pamela Peardon Denise

    2002-07-16

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discernible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). A final aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system.

  2. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Stevenson, Joel O'Don; Ward, Pamela Peardon Denise

    2001-01-01

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discemible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). A final aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system.

  3. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Stevenson, Joel O'Don; Ward, Pamela Peardon Denise

    2001-01-01

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discernible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). A final aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system.

  4. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Stevenson, Joel O'Don; Ward, Pamela Peardon Denise

    2000-01-01

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discernible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). A final aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system.

  5. Object-oriented process dose modeling for glovebox operations

    SciTech Connect

    Boerigter, S.T.; Fasel, J.H.; Kornreich, D.E.

    1999-06-01

    The Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory supports several defense and nondefense-related missions for the country by performing fabrication, surveillance, and research and development for materials and components that contain plutonium. Most operations occur in rooms with one or more arrays of gloveboxes connected to each other via trolley gloveboxes. Minimizing the effective dose equivalent (EDE) is a growing concern as a result of steadily declining allowable dose limits being imposed and a growing general awareness of safety in the workplace. In general, the authors discriminate three components of a worker`s total EDE: the primary EDE, the secondary EDE, and background EDE. A particular background source of interest is the nuclear materials vault. The distinction between sources inside and outside of a particular room is arbitrary with the underlying assumption that building walls and floors provide significant shielding to justify including sources in other rooms in the background category. Los Alamos has developed the Process Modeling System (ProMoS) primarily for performing process analyses of nuclear operations. ProMoS is an object-oriented, discrete-event simulation package that has been used to analyze operations at Los Alamos and proposed facilities such as the new fabrication facilities for the Complex-21 effort. In the past, crude estimates of the process dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred), room dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred in a given room), and facility dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred in the facility) were used to obtain an integrated EDE for a given process. Modifications to the ProMoS package were made to utilize secondary dose information to use dose modeling to enhance the process modeling efforts.

  6. Thermal Aging Characteristics of Insulation Paper in Mineral Oil under Overloaded Operating Transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Katsunori; Oe, Etsuo; Yamagata, Naoki; Miyahara, Hideyuki

    A sudden capacity increase in demand during the summer peak, or in contingencies such as malfunctioning transformers, may cause overload for normal transformers. In this paper, on the basis of examples of overloaded transformer operation in distributing substations, thermal aging testing in oil was carried out under various overload patterns, such as short time overload and long time overload, but with the winding insulation paper's life loss kept constant. From the results, various characteristics such as mean degree of polymerization and productions of furfural and (CO2+CO), and their effects on the life loss of the insulation paper were obtained.

  7. The CONSERT operations planning process for the Rosetta mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogez, Yves; Puget, Pascal; Zine, Sonia; Hérique, Alain; Kofman, Wlodek; Altobelli, Nicolas; Ashman, Mike; Barthélémy, Maud; Biele, Jens; Blazquez, Alejandro; Casas, Carlos M.; Sitjà, Marc Costa; Delmas, Cédric; Fantinati, Cinzia; Fronton, Jean-François; Geiger, Bernhard; Geurts, Koen; Grieger, Björn; Hahnel, Ronny; Hoofs, Raymond; Hubault, Armelle; Jurado, Eric; Küppers, Michael; Maibaum, Michael; Moussi-Souffys, Aurélie; Muñoz, Pablo; O'Rourke, Laurence; Pätz, Brigitte; Plettemeier, Dirk; Ulamec, Stephan; Vallat, Claire

    2016-08-01

    The COmet Nucleus Sounding Experiment by Radio wave Transmission (CONSERT / Rosetta) has been designed to sound the interior of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This instrument consists of two parts: one onboard Rosetta and the other one onboard Philae. A good CONSERT science measurement sequence requires joint operations of both spacecrafts in a relevant geometry. The geometric constraints to be fulfilled involve the position and the orientation of both Rosetta and Philae. At the moment of planning the post-landing and long-term science operations for Rosetta instruments, the actual comet shape and the landing location remained largely unknown. In addition, the necessity of combining operations of Rosetta spacecraft and Philae spacecraft makes the planning process for CONSERT particularly complex. In this paper, we present the specific methods and tools we developed, in close collaboration with the mission and the science operation teams for both Rosetta and Philae, to identify, rank and plan the operations for CONSERT science measurements. The presented methods could be applied to other missions involving joint operations between two platforms, on a complex shaped object.

  8. Operational readiness: an integral part of the facility planning process.

    PubMed

    Kidd, LeeAnne; Howe, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Large capital building projects benefit from an operational readiness strategy prior to new facility occupancy. St. Joseph's Healthcare used a structured approach for their readiness planning that included individual work plan meetings, tools for ensuring integration across programs and services and process improvement support to ensure a smooth transition. Over 1100 staff were oriented using a Train-the-Trainer model. Significant effort was required to co-ordinate the customized training, which involved "staffing up" to ensure sufficient resources for backfill. Operational readiness planning places additional demands on managers, requiring support and assistance from dedicated resources both prior to occupancy and several months post-move.

  9. Orbital transfer vehicle launch operations study. Processing flows. Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) processing flow and Resource Identification Sheets (RISs) for the ground based orbit transfer vehicle and for the space based orbit transfer vehicle are the primary source of information for the rest of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) OTV Launch Operations Study. Work is presented which identifies KSC facility requirements for the OTV Program, simplifies or automates either flow though the application technology, revises test practices and identifies crew sizes or skills used. These flows were used as the primary point of departure from current operations and practices. Analyses results were documented by revising the appropriate RIS page.

  10. Investigation of sorption interactions between organic and mineral phases of processed oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Blanche, M. S.; Bowen, J. M.

    1987-11-01

    Minerals and organic compounds representative of oil shale processing wastes were analyzed for potential sorption interactions. The analysis consisted of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry, and laser Raman spectroscopy. Montmorillonite clay was used as a representative of the smectites found in raw and spent shales, and hematite was used as a representative of iron oxide found in spent shales. Benzene, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, benzoic acid, sodium benzoate, and pyridine were used as representatives of oil shale process organic wastes. In addition, isopropylamine and dimethyl methylphosphonate, a pesticide model, were studied. A preparation methods comparison study was performed and established the validity of the solid state KBr sample preparation technique upon FTIR spectral quality. The results of this study illustrate the utility of fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis to establish and describe the potential for sorption interactions between inorganic and organic phases of oil shale processing wastes. Experimentation with the laser remain system shows promise for significant contributions in this field of research. 43 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Emergency end of life operations for CNES remote sensing satellites—Management and operational process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Régis; Alby, Fernand; Costes, Thierry; Dejoie, Joël; Delmas, Dominique-Roland; Delobette, Damien; Gibek, Isabelle; Gleyzes, Alain; Masson, Françoise; Meyer, Jean-Renaud; Moreau, Agathe; Perret, Lionel; Riclet, François; Ruiz, Hélène; Schiavon, Françoise; Spizzi, Pierre; Viallefont, Pierre; Villaret, Colette

    2012-10-01

    continue its mission using the redundancy, b/. the EOL operations must be planned within a mid-term period, or c/. the EOL operations must be implemented as soon as possible by the operational teams. The paper describes this management and operational process illustrated with study cases of failures on SPOT and PLEIADES satellites corresponding to various emergency situations.

  12. Isotopic investigations of dissolved organic N in soils identifies N mineralization as a major sink process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanek, Wolfgang; Prommer, Judith; Hofhansl, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is a major component of transfer processes in the global nitrogen (N) cycle, contributing to atmospheric N deposition, terrestrial N losses and aquatic N inputs. In terrestrial ecosystems several sources and sinks contribute to belowground DON pools but yet are hard to quantify. In soils, DON is released by desorption of soil organic N and by microbial lysis. Major losses from the DON pool occur via sorption, hydrological losses and by soil N mineralization. Sorption/desorption, lysis and hydrological losses are expected to exhibit no 15N fractionation therefore allowing to trace different DON sources. Soil N mineralization of DON has been commonly assumed to have no or only a small isotope effect of between 0-4‰, however isotope fractionation by N mineralization has rarely been measured and might be larger than anticipated. Depending on the degree of 15N fractionation by soil N mineralization, we would expect DON to become 15N-enriched relative to bulk soil N, and dissolved inorganic N (DIN; ammonium and nitrate) to become 15N-depleted relative to both, bulk soil N and DON. Isotopic analyses of soil organic N, DON and DIN might therefore provide insights into the relative contributions of different sources and sink processes. This study therefore aimed at a better understanding of the isotopic signatures of DON and its controls in soils. We investigated the concentration and isotopic composition of bulk soil N, DON and DIN in a wide range of sites, covering arable, grassland and forest ecosystems in Austria across an altitudinal transect. Isotopic composition of ammonium, nitrate and DON were measured in soil extracts after chemical conversion to N2O by purge-and-trap isotope ratio mass spectrometry. We found that delta15N values of DON ranged between -0.4 and 7.6‰, closely tracking the delta15N values of bulk soils. However, DON was 15N-enriched relative to bulk soil N by 1.5±1.3‰ (1 SD), and inorganic N was 15N

  13. Short Range-Ordered Minerals: Insight into Aqueous Alteration Processes on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Golden, D. C.

    2011-01-01

    involved. The style of aqueous alteration (hydrolytic vs. acid sulfate) impacts which phases will form (e.g., oxides, oxysulfates, and oxyhydroxides). Knowledge on the formation processes of SRO phases in basaltic materials on Earth has allowed significant enhancement in our understanding of the aqueous processes at work on Mars. The 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will provide an instrument suite that should improve our understanding of the mineralogical and chemical compositions of SRO phases. CheMin is an X-ray diffraction instrument that may provide broad X-ray diffraction peaks for SRO phases; e.g., broad peaks around 0.33 and 0.23 nm for allophane. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) heats samples and detects evolved gases of volatile-bearing phases including SRO phases (i.e., carbonates, sulfates, hydrated minerals). The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam element analyzers will provide chemical characterization of samples. The identification of SRO phases in surface materials on MSL will be challenging due to their nanocrystalline properties; their detection and identification will require utilizing the MSL instrument suite in concert. Ultimately, sample return missions will be required to definitively identify and fully characterize SRO minerals with state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation back on Earth.

  14. Short Range-Ordered Minerals: Insight into Aqueous Alteration Processes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Golden, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    involved. The style of aqueous alteration (hydrolytic vs. acid sulfate) impacts which phases will form (e.g., oxides, oxysulfates, and oxyhydroxides). Knowledge on the formation processes of SRO phases in basaltic materials on Earth has allowed significant enhancement in our understanding of the aqueous processes at work on Mars. The 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will provide an instrument suite that should improve our understanding of the mineralogical and chemical compositions of SRO phases. CheMin is an X-ray diffraction instrument that may provide broad X-ray diffraction peaks for SRO phases; e.g., broad peaks around 0.33 and 0.23 nm for allophane. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) heats samples and detects evolved gases of volatile-bearing phases including SRO phases (i.e., carbonates, sulfates, hydrated minerals). The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam element analyzers will provide chemical characterization of samples. The identification of SRO phases in surface materials on MSL will be challenging due to their nanocrystalline properties; their detection and identification will require utilizing the MSL instrument suite in concert. Ultimately, sample return missions will be required to definitively identify and fully characterize SRO minerals with state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation back on Earth.

  15. Cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-08-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT) and Köhler theory (KT) to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Wet generated regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Wet generated clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC) analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (from low solubility compounds like calcite) present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method. Based on the method of threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to describe the CCN activity of aged or hygroscopic dusts.

  16. Future electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grönwall, Christina; Schwering, Piet B.; Rantakokko, Jouni; Benoist, Koen W.; Kemp, Rob A. W.; Steinvall, Ove; Letalick, Dietmar; Björkert, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    In the electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations (ESUO) study we pave the way for the European Defence Agency (EDA) group of Electro-Optics experts (IAP03) for a common understanding of the optimal distribution of processing functions between the different platforms. Combinations of local, distributed and centralized processing are proposed. In this way one can match processing functionality to the required power, and available communication systems data rates, to obtain the desired reaction times. In the study, three priority scenarios were defined. For these scenarios, present-day and future sensors and signal processing technologies were studied. The priority scenarios were camp protection, patrol and house search. A method for analyzing information quality in single and multi-sensor systems has been applied. A method for estimating reaction times for transmission of data through the chain of command has been proposed and used. These methods are documented and can be used to modify scenarios, or be applied to other scenarios. Present day data processing is organized mainly locally. Very limited exchange of information with other platforms is present; this is performed mainly at a high information level. Main issues that arose from the analysis of present-day systems and methodology are the slow reaction time due to the limited field of view of present-day sensors and the lack of robust automated processing. Efficient handover schemes between wide and narrow field of view sensors may however reduce the delay times. The main effort in the study was in forecasting the signal processing of EO-sensors in the next ten to twenty years. Distributed processing is proposed between hand-held and vehicle based sensors. This can be accompanied by cloud processing on board several vehicles. Additionally, to perform sensor fusion on sensor data originating from different platforms, and making full use of UAV imagery, a combination of distributed and

  17. Acidic processing of mineral dust iron by anthropogenic compounds over the north Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmon, F.; Chuang, P. Y.; Meskhidze, N.; Chen, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosol by anthropogenic pollutants may be an important process by which insoluble iron can be transformed into soluble forms and become available to oceanic biota. Observations of the soluble iron fraction in atmospheric aerosol exhibit large variability, which is poorly represented in models. In this study, we implemented a dust iron dissolution scheme in a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem). The model is applied over the North Pacific Ocean during April 2001, a period when concentrations of dust and pollution within the east Asia outflow were high. Simulated fields of many key chemical constituents compare reasonably well with available observations, although some discrepancies are identified and discussed. In our simulations, the production of soluble iron varies temporally and regionally depending on pollution-to-dust ratio, primarily due to strong buffering by calcite. Overall, we show that the chemical processing mechanism produces significant amounts of dissolved iron reaching and being deposited in remote regions of the Pacific basin, with some seasonal variability. Simulated enhancements in particulate soluble iron fraction range from 0.5% to 6%, which is consistent with the observations. According to our simulations, ˜30% to 70% of particulate soluble iron over the North Pacific Ocean basin can be attributed to atmospheric processing. On the basis of April 2001 monthly simulations, sensitivity tests suggest that doubling SO2 emissions can induce a significant increase (13% on average, up to 40% during specific events) in dissolved iron production and deposition to the remote Pacific. We roughly estimate that half of the primary productivity induced by iron deposition in a north Pacific high-nutrient low-chlorophyll region is due to soluble iron derived from anthropogenic chemical processing of Asian aerosol.

  18. Zinc Isotopes as Tracers of Crust-Mantle Interactions and Mineralization Processes in Layered Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, J. M.; Moynier, F.

    2016-12-01

    Zinc isotopes are a powerful tool for studying igneous processes and may be useful for distinguishing between mantle or crustal origins for mineralization and for examining crystallization processes. Restricted ranges in δ66Zn for mantle-derived rocks (δ66Zn = 0.28±0.05‰; [{66Zn/64Znsample/66Zn/64ZnJMC-Lyon-1} × 1000] all uncertainties reported are 2SD) contrast the large δ66Zn variations in sedimentary rocks ( 0 to 1‰), or in volcanic and sedimentary hosted ore deposits (e.g., SEDEX; VHMS; MVT = -0.6 to 1.3‰). Here, we use Zn isotopes to investigate magmatic processes in the 1.27 Ga Muskox Intrusion (Canada) and 2.7 Ga Stillwater Intrusion (Montana). The Muskox main chromitite horizon has between 270-330 ppm Zn with δ66Zn ranging from 0.16 to 0.31‰. Zinc isotope compositions negatively correlate with Os isotopes. Chromitite (40a) with the lowest 187Os/188Os (0.132) has δ66Zn of 0.31±0.03‰; indistinguishable from the mantle value. CM19 glass from the co-eval Coppermine Volcanics, which has crust-like O and Nd isotopes but low 187Os/188Os (0.131), has been interpreted as the extrusive manifestation of chromitite genesis. The value of δ66Zn (0.27±0.07‰) for CM19 is within uncertainty of 40A, and permissive of formation during silicic-mafic melt mixing and large-scale chromitite crystallization. Stillwater chromitite seams exhibit a larger range in Zn (166-448 ppm), but generally lower δ66Zn (0.13±0.04‰) than Muskox chromitites, or to a JM Reef bulk sample (69 ppm Zn, δ66Zn = 0.22±0.03‰). These results suggest different sources of Zn for Ultramafic series chromitites versus the JM Reef (Banded series). Correspondingly, variations occur in Os isotopes for PGE poor chromitites (γOs = -2 to +4) versus the PGE-rich JM Reef (γOs = +12 to +34). Zinc isotope variations may be explained by either a mantle source with low δ66Zn that was subsequently contaminated by high δ66Zn crust, or from contamination of the ultramafic series by low δ66Zn

  19. Development of 2D SIP Data Processing Software for a Metallic Mineral Deposit Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PARK, M.; Kim, K. S.; Seo, H. K.; Son, J.; Park, S.; Kim, C.; Kim, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we developed commercially two dimensional SIP (Spectral Induced Polarization) data processing software for measured SIP data, because the end user to comfortably use it. In order to consider the application of the developed technique, two dimensional SIP was tested in the area of hydro-thermal mineral deposit, Haenam in South Korea. We also acquired time-domain IP data for the same profile in order to verify the accuracy of SIP data, and compared both data after data processing and analysis completed. Separation of transmitter and receiver line was used to get more accurate data, and porous pot electrode was also used to remove the polarization effect of receiver electrodes. As results of both survey methods, we knew that resistivity images were nearly same but the chargeability and phase images were slight different. From the previous experience of SIP survey on the close test, phase anomaly was closely related and expected to the mineralized zone also in this survey. The site where the test survey was conducted was a small hills, and on the top of hill silicified alteration zone was identified which were shown as a high-resistivity anomaly on the resistivity mage. Below this high-resistivity anomaly, we identified phase anomaly that showed a consistent trend originated from the deep anomaly directly under the mountain, and it continued from south to north, and deep to shallow. This trend of phase anomaly was not clearly identified on the inverted chargeability images for the averaged chargeability of time-domain IP data. But when we use new inversion algorithm which use all the chargeability data of 20 time windows simultaneously, we got similar inverted results for the middle-time IP data. Through the test survey of SIP and IP, we know that S/N ration of SIP measurements was superior to those of IP measurement because SIP measurement was made during the transmitter on but IP measurement did not. And if we use the newly developed IP inversion

  20. Microbial and mineral evolution in zero valent iron-based permeable reactive barriers during long-term operations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh; Millot, Romain; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Omoregie, Enoma; Chaurand, Perrine; Borschneck, Daniel; Bastiaens, Leen; Rose, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    Impacts of subsurface biogeochemical processes over time have always been a concern for the long-term performance of zero valent iron (Fe(0))-based permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). To evaluate the biogeochemical impacts, laboratory experiments were performed using flow-through glass columns for 210 days at controlled temperature (20 °C). Two different particle sizes of Fe(0) were used in the columns, and to simulate indigenous microbial activity, extra carbon source was provided in the two columns (biotic columns) and the remaining two columns were kept abiotic using gamma radiations. Heavy metals (Zn, As) were removed efficiently in all the columns, and no exhaustion of treatment capability or clogging was observed during our experimental duration. Newly formed Fe mineral phases and precipitates were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), and micro-XRF techniques in solid phase at the end of the experiment. In addition, 16S rRNA gene extraction was used for microbial community identification in biotic columns. During the incubation, microbial population shifted in favor of Desulfosporosinus species (sulfate-reducing bacteria) from initial dominance of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in sediments. Dominant mineral phases detected in biotic columns were mackinawite (FeS) and sulfate green rust, while in abiotic columns, magnetite/maghemite phases were more prevalent.

  1. 77 FR 18263 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral... Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of the availability of Environmental Documents Prepared for OCS Mineral... Significant Impact (FONSI), prepared by BOEM for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related...

  2. 78 FR 27422 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management MMAA104000 Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral... Mineral Proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region. SUMMARY: BOEM, in accordance with Federal Regulations..., and mineral-related activities that were proposed in the Gulf of Mexico, and are more...

  3. The Defense Waste Processing Facility: Two Years of Radioactive Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, S.L.; Gee, J.T.; Sproull, J.F.

    1998-05-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC is currently immobilizing high level radioactive sludge waste in borosilicate glass. The DWPF began vitrification of radioactive waste in May, 1996. Prior to that time, an extensive startup test program was completed with simulated waste. The DWPF is a first of its kind facility. The experience gained and data collected during the startup program and early years of operation can provide valuable information to other similar facilities. This experience involves many areas such as process enhancements, analytical improvements, glass pouring issues, and documentation/data collection and tracking. A summary of this experience and the results of the first two years of operation will be presented.

  4. Investigation of cryosorption vacuum system and operation process for COIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Liang-zhi; Wang, Jin-qu; Sang, Feng-ting; Zhao, Su-qin; Jin, Yu-qi; Fang, Ben-jie

    2007-05-01

    Cryosorption vacuum system for COIL is researched and developed. Adsorption chiller has been proposed and developed by improving the heat exchanger chiller. Compared with the heat exchanger chiller, the volume and LN II consumption of the new chiller were favourably reduced. In the present work, the new adsorption operation process, cryogenic pressure swing adsorption is adopted. Compared with thermal swing adsorption, regeneration time is shortened and LN II consumption is saved at least 80% in the new operation process. The cryosorption vacuum system was integrated to COIL and tested successfully. The weight of sorbent in adsorption bed is 22Kg, the total gas flowrate is about 0.5mol/s, the COIL's power maintains over 2kW, the total COIL's working time accounts to 100 seconds. It is concluded that the cryosorption vacuum system has the same pressure recovery capability as the large vacuum tank.

  5. Geothermal enhancement of mineral processing in Nevada: Final report, April 25, 1985-June 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Hendrix, J.L.

    1986-11-01

    This report reviews mineral recovery techniques practiced at active mines throughout Nevada and determines those that may be enhanced by the application of geothermal heat energy from a nearby resource. Of the thirty-two active precious metal mines identified, ten have hot water on or near the property and could potentially benefit. A second purpose was to collect ore samples and geothermal fluids, determine if they are compatible in the hydrometallurgical process, and carry out laboratory tests to determine the effects of heating on recovery rates. In addition, interfering or counterproductive factors were also identified. The laboratory work consisted of measuring the effects of thermally enhancing two hydrometallurgical processes; cyanide heap-leaching of gold and silver ores and bacterial leaching of sulfide rich gold ores. Thermally enhanced cyanide heap-leaching of gold and silver ores produced increases in extraction ranging from 8 to 20% for gold and 17 to 40% for silver. The temperature required for these increases is 35/sup 0/C to 40/sup 0/C, well within the range of available geothermal resources.

  6. Bio-mineralization and potential biogeochemical processes in bauxite deposits: genetic and ore quality significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskou, Magdalini; Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria

    2013-08-01

    The Parnassos-Ghiona bauxite deposit in Greece of karst type is the 11th largest bauxite producer in the world. The mineralogical, major and trace-element contents and δ18O, δ12C, δ34S isotopic compositions of bauxite ores from this deposit and associated limestone provide valuable evidence for their origin and biogeochemical processes resulting in the beneficiation of low grade bauxite ores. The organic matter as thin coal layers, overlying the bauxite deposits, within limestone itself (negative δ12C isotopic values) and the negative δ34S values in sulfides within bauxite ores point to the existence of the appropriate circumstances for Fe bio-leaching and bio-mineralization. Furthermore, a consortium of microorganisms of varying morphological forms (filament-like and spherical to lenticular at an average size of 2 μm), either as fossils or presently living and producing enzymes, is a powerful factor to catalyze the redox reactions, expedite the rates of metal extraction and provide alternative pathways for metal leaching processes resulting in the beneficiation of bauxite ore.

  7. Sedimentary processes on the Mekong subaqueous delta: Clay mineral and geochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zuo; Paul Liu, J.; DeMaster, Dave; Leithold, Elana L.; Wan, Shiming; Ge, Qian; Nguyen, Van Lap; Ta, Thi Kim Oanh

    2014-01-01

    Sedimentary processes on the inner Mekong Shelf were investigated by examining the characteristics of sediments sampled in gravity cores at 15 locations, including grain size, clay mineralogy, sediment accumulation rates, and the elemental and stable carbon isotopic composition of organic matter (atomic C/N ratios and δ13C). Deltaic deposits exhibit contrasting characteristics along different sides of the delta plain (South China Sea, SCS hereafter, to the east and Gulf of Thailand, GOT hereafter, to the west) as well as on and off the subaqueous deltaic system. On one hand, cores recovered from the subaqueous delta in the SCS/GOT are consisted of poorly/well sorted sediments with similar/different clay mineral assemblage with/from Mekong sediments. Excess 210Pb profiles, supported by 14C chronologies, indicate either "non-steady" (SCS side) or "rapid accumulation" (GOT side) processes on the subaqueous delta. The δ13C and C/N ratio indicate a mixture of terrestrial and marine-sourced organic matter in the deltaic sediment. On the other hand, cores recovered from areas with no deltaic deposits or seaward of the subaqueous delta show excess 210Pb profiles indicating "steady-state" accumulation with a greater proportion of marine-sourced organic matter. Core analysis's relevance with local depositional environment and previous acoustic profiling are discussed.

  8. Function Flow Analysis of the Land Force Operations Planning Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    perform an historical/organizational analysis of the Land Force Operations Planning Process (OPP) with a focus on the brigade level. Specifically...outlining background information, the purpose of the project, tasks to be performed , and the approach taken in this report. In the second section...the methodology used to perform the historical/organizational analysis is described. The results of this analysis are presented in the third

  9. Integration of Special Operations Forces into the Joint Targeting Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    INTEGRATION OF SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES INTO THE JOINT TARGETING PROCESS A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U. S . Army Command and General...B. S ., Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 1991 Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 2003 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) Hester, Johnny, L 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7

  10. Assessment of Hg contamination and exposure to miners and schoolchildren at a small-scale gold mining and recovery operation in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Umbangtalad, S; Parkpian, P; Visvanathan, C; Delaune, R D; Jugsujinda, A

    2007-12-01

    Gold extracted by Hg-amalgamation process, which can cause both health and environmental problems, is widespread in South East Asia including Myanmar, Laos, Cambodia, and Thailand. Small-scale gold mining operations have been carried out since the year 2000 in Phanom Pha District, Phichit Province, Thailand. Since no data is available for evaluating Hg exposure, an investigation of mercury (Hg) contamination and exposure assessment was carried out at this mine site. Environmental monitoring illustrated the total Hg in water was as high as 4 microg/l while Hg in sediment ranged between 102 to 325 microg/kg dry weight. Both Hg deposition from the air (1.28 microg/100 cm(2)/day) and concentration in surface soil (20,960 microg/kg dry weight) were elevated in the area of amalgamation. The potential of Hg exposure to miners as well as to schoolchildren was assessed. The concentrations of Hg in urine of 79 miners who were directly (group I) or indirectly (group II) involved in the gold recovery operation were 32.02 and 20.04 microg/g creatinine, respectively, which did not exceed regulatory limits (35 microg/g creatinine). Hair Hg levels in both groups (group I and group II) also were not significantly higher than the non-exposed group. In terms of risk factors, gender and nature of food preparation and consumption were the two significant variables influencing the concentration of Hg in urine of miners (P < 0.05). A hazard quotient (HQ) was estimated based on the inorganic Hg exposure of individual miners. The HQ values of group I were in a range 16 to 218 times higher than the safety level set as 1. By comparison the group II HQ index was very low (0.03-0.39). The miners in group I who worked and ate food from this area experienced potentially high exposure to Hg associated with the mining process. In a second Hg exposure assessment, a group of 59 schoolchildren who attended an elementary school near the gold mine site was evaluated for Hg exposure. A slightly higher

  11. Contactless operating table control based on 3D image processing.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Stephan; Loftfield, Nina; Langmann, Benjamin; Frank, Klaus; Reithmeier, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Interaction with mobile consumer devices leads to a higher acceptance and affinity of persons to natural user interfaces and perceptional interaction possibilities. New interaction modalities become accessible and are capable to improve human machine interaction even in complex and high risk environments, like the operation room. Here, manifold medical disciplines cause a great variety of procedures and thus staff and equipment. One universal challenge is to meet the sterility requirements, for which common contact-afflicted remote interfaces always pose a potential risk causing a hazard for the process. The proposed operating table control system overcomes this process risk and thus improves the system usability significantly. The 3D sensor system, the Microsoft Kinect, captures the motion of the user, allowing a touchless manipulation of an operating table. Three gestures enable the user to select, activate and manipulate all segments of the motorised system in a safe and intuitive way. The gesture dynamics are synchronised with the table movement. In a usability study, 15 participants evaluated the system with a system usability score by Broke of 79. This states a high potential for implementation and acceptance in interventional environments. In the near future, even processes with higher risks could be controlled with the proposed interface, while interfaces become safer and more direct.

  12. Model operating permits for natural gas processing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Arend, C.

    1995-12-31

    Major sources as defined in Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 that are required to submit an operating permit application will need to: Evaluate their compliance status; Determine a strategic method of presenting the general and specific conditions of their Model Operating Permit (MOP); Maintain compliance with air quality regulations. A MOP is prepared to assist permitting agencies and affected facilities in the development of operating permits for a specific source category. This paper includes a brief discussion of example permit conditions that may be applicable to various types of Title V sources. A MOP for a generic natural gas processing plant is provided as an example. The MOP should include a general description of the production process and identify emission sources. The two primary elements that comprise a MOP are: Provisions of all existing state and/or local air permits; Identification of general and specific conditions for the Title V permit. The general provisions will include overall compliance with all Clean Air Act Titles. The specific provisions include monitoring, record keeping, and reporting. Although Title V MOPs are prepared on a case-by-case basis, this paper will provide a general guideline of the requirements for preparation of a MOP. Regulatory agencies have indicated that a MOP included in the Title V application will assist in preparation of the final permit provisions, minimize delays in securing a permit, and provide support during the public notification process.

  13. Phosphates (V) recovery from phosphorus mineral fertilizers industry wastewater by continuous struvite reaction crystallization process.

    PubMed

    Hutnik, Nina; Kozik, Anna; Mazienczuk, Agata; Piotrowski, Krzysztof; Wierzbowska, Boguslawa; Matynia, Andrzej

    2013-07-01

    Continuous DT MSMPR (Draft Tube Mixed Suspension Mixed Product Removal) crystallizer was provided with typical wastewater from phosphorus mineral fertilizers industry (pH < 4, 0.445 mass % of PO4(3-), inorganic impurities presence), dissolved substrates (magnesium and ammonium chlorides) and solution alkalising the environment of struvite MgNH4PO4·6H2O reaction crystallization process. Research ran in constant temperature 298 K assuming stoichiometric proportions of substrates or 20% excess of magnesium ions. Influence of pH (8.5-10) and mean residence time (900-3600 s) on product size distribution, its chemical composition, crystals shape, size-homogeneity and process kinetics was identified. Crystals of mean size ca. 25-37 μm and homogeneity CV 70-83% were produced. The largest crystals, of acceptable homogeneity, were produced using 20% excess of magnesium ions, pH 9 and mean residence time 3600 s. Under these conditions nucleation rate did not exceed 9 × 10(7) 1/(s m(3)) according to SIG (Size Independent Growth) MSMPR kinetic model. Linear crystal growth rate was 4.27 × 10(-9) m/s. Excess of magnesium ions influenced struvite reaction crystallization process yield advantageously. Concentration of phosphate(V) ions decreased from 0.445 to 9.2 × 10(-4) mass %. This can be regarded as a very good process result. In product crystals, besides main component - struvite, all impurities from wastewater were detected analytically. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Process conditions for the mineralization of a biorefractory polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in soils using catalyzed hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, P.C.; Watts, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and soluble iron or mineral catalysts) was investigated as a basis for mineralizing benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a hydrophobic and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, in two soils of varied complexity. The process is based on Fenton`s reagent, which can be implemented in soils to generate hydroxyl radicals. This short-lived species reacts with most organic contaminants at near diffusion-controlled rates, providing a mechanism for potential rapid soil remediation. Benzo[a]pyrene labeled with {sup 14}C was added to silica sand and a silt loam loess soil; mineralization processes were then optimized using central composite rotatable experimental designs. Variables investigated during the optimization included H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, slurry volume, iron (II) amendment, and pH. Experimental data were evaluated by linear regression to develop empirical relationships and interactions between the variables. The equations were then used to develop three-dimensional response surfaces to describe BaP mineralization. The results from the response surfaces showed that 74% and 78% BaP mineralization was achieved in the silica sand and loess soils, respectively. The balance of the contaminant carbon remained with the soil fraction and was probably irreversibly sorbed. Desorption measurements over 5 d confirmed negligible desorption; however, oxidation reactions, which were complete within 24 h, documented >78% BaP mineralization, suggesting that the contaminant was oxidized, at least in part, in the sorbed phase. The results show that catalyzed H{sub 2}O{sub 2} has the ability to rapidly mineralize BaP that is not irreversibly sorbed.

  15. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Ward, Pamela Denise Peardon; Stevenson, Joel O'Don

    2002-01-01

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discernible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). Another aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system. A final aspect of the present invention relates to a network a plurality of plasma monitoring systems, including with remote capabilities (i.e., outside of the clean room).

  16. The application of automated operations at the Institutional Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Thomas H.

    1993-01-01

    The JPL Institutional and Mission Computing Division, Communications, Computing and Network Services Section, with its mission contractor, OAO Corporation, have for some time been applying automation to the operation of JPL's Information Processing Center (IPC). Automation does not come in one easy to use package. Automation for a data processing center is made up of many different software and hardware products supported by trained personnel. The IPC automation effort formally began with console automation, and has since spiraled out to include production scheduling, data entry, report distribution, online reporting, failure reporting and resolution, documentation, library storage, and operator and user education, while requiring the interaction of multi-vendor and locally developed software. To begin the process, automation goals are determined. Then a team including operations personnel is formed to research and evaluate available options. By acquiring knowledge of current products and those in development, taking an active role in industry organizations, and learning of other data center's experiences, a forecast can be developed as to what direction technology is moving. With IPC management's approval, an implementation plan is developed and resources identified to test or implement new systems. As an example, IPC's new automated data entry system was researched by Data Entry, Production Control, and Advance Planning personnel. A proposal was then submitted to management for review. A determination to implement the new system was made and elements/personnel involved with the initial planning performed the implementation. The final steps of the implementation were educating data entry personnel in the areas effected and procedural changes necessary to the successful operation of the new system.

  17. Quantifying process tradeoffs in the operation of chromatographic sequences.

    PubMed

    Ngiam, Sheau-Huey; Bracewell, Daniel G; Zhou, Yuhong; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel J

    2003-01-01

    A method for the rapid representation of key process tradeoffs that need to be made during the analysis of chromatographic sequences has been proposed. It involves the construction of fractionation and maximum purification factor versus yield diagrams, which can be completed easily on the basis of chromatographic data. The output of the framework developed reflects the degree of tradeoff between levels of yield and purity and provides a fast and precise prediction of the sample fraction collection strategy needed to meet a desired process specification. The usefulness of this approach for the purposes of product purification and contaminant removal in a single chromatographic step has been successfully demonstrated in an earlier paper and it is now extended by application to a chromatographic sequence: the separation of a hypothetical three-component protein system by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The HIC operation has a strong impact upon the subsequent SEC step. The studies show how the analysis of performance in such a chromatographic sequence can be carried out easily and in a straightforward fashion using the fractionation diagram approach. The methodology proposed serves as a useful tool for identifying the process tradeoffs that must be made during operation of a sequence of chromatographic steps and indicates the impact on further processing of the cut-point decisions that are made.

  18. Oxygen and carbon dioxide kinetic challenges for thermophilic mineral bioleaching processes.

    PubMed

    de Kock, S H; Barnard, P; du Plessis, C A

    2004-04-01

    Agitated bacterial tank bioleaching reactors are currently sparged with air to satisfy both oxygen and CO(2) requirements of microbial cells. Under high-sulphide loading conditions, as is the case with high-grade metal sulphide concentrates, the microbial and chemical demand for oxygen is significantly increased during the bioleaching process. Sparging with enriched oxygen gas may offer an alternative process option to increased agitation and sparged aeration, to overcome the mass transfer difficulties at elevated temperatures where thermophilic Archaea, rather than Bacteria, are used. In the case of air sparging, the DO (dissolved oxygen) concentration in tank reactors could not be increased to a point where it would become inhibitory due to the limited oxygen content of air (20.9% O(2)). The use of enriched oxygen in such reactors at large scale does, however, pose its own set of process risks. The first aim of this investigation was, therefore, to determine the effects of various DO concentrations, in both the limiting and inhibitory ranges, on the microbial activity of Sulfolobus sp. U40813, a typical thermophilic mineral-leaching archaeon. Secondly, the effect of CO(2) concentration on the rate of ferrous iron oxidation was investigated. Both the oxygen and CO(2) kinetics were examined in controlled batch cultures at 78 degrees C, using ferrous sulphate and potassium tetrathionate as energy sources. The optimal DO concentration for iron oxidation was found to be between 1.5 and 4.1 mg.l(-1). The use of elevated DO concentrations (above 4.1 mg.l(-1)) inhibited the ferrous oxidation rates. The optimal gas CO(2) concentration for ferrous iron oxidation was found to be in the range 7-17% (v/v). The iron oxidation rates were, however, severely limited at CO(2) concentrations less than 7%, indicating that the CO(2) supply was limiting in this range and inhibited the microbial growth rate.

  19. Advances in understanding mineral dust and boundary layer processes over the Sahara from Fennec aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, C. L.; McQuaid, J. B.; Flamant, C.; Washington, R.; Brindley, H. E.; Highwood, E. J.; Marsham, J. H.; Parker, D. J.; Todd, M. C.; Banks, J. R.; Brooke, J. K.; Engelstaedter, S.; Estellés, V.; Formenti, P.; Garcia-Carreras, L.; Kocha, C.; Marenco, F.; Rosenberg, P.; Sodemann, H.; Allen, C. J. T.; Bourdon, A.; Bart, M.; Cavazos-Guerra, C.; Chevaillier, S.; Crosier, J.; Darbyshire, E.; Dean, A. R.; Dorsey, J. R.; Kent, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Schepanski, K.; Szpek, K.; Woolley, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Fennec climate program aims to improve understanding of the Saharan climate system through a synergy of observations and modelling. We present a description of the Fennec airborne observations during 2011 and 2012 over the remote Sahara (Mauritania and Mali) and the advances in the understanding of mineral dust and boundary layer processes they have provided. Aircraft instrumentation aboard the UK FAAM BAe146 and French SAFIRE Falcon 20 is described, with specific focus on instrumentation specially developed and relevant to Saharan meteorology and dust. Flight locations, aims and associated meteorology are described. Examples and applications of aircraft measurements from the Fennec flights are presented, highlighting new scientific results delivered using a synergy of different instruments and aircraft. These include: (1) the first airborne measurement of dust particles sized up to 300 microns and associated dust fluxes in the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL), (2) dust uplift from the breakdown of the nocturnal low-level jet before becoming visible in SEVIRI satellite imagery, (3) vertical profiles of the unique vertical structure of turbulent fluxes in the SABL, (4) in-situ observations of processes in SABL clouds showing dust acting as CCN and IN at -15 °C, (5) dual-aircraft observations of the SABL dynamics, thermodynamics and composition in the Saharan heat low region (SHL), (6) airborne observations of a dust storm associated with a cold-pool (haboob) issued from deep convection over the Atlas, (7) the first airborne chemical composition measurements of dust in the SHL region with differing composition, sources (determined using Lagrangian backward trajectory calculations) and absorption properties between 2011 and 2012, (8) coincident ozone and dust surface area measurements suggest coarser particles provide a route for ozone depletion, (9) discrepancies between airborne coarse mode size distributions and AERONET sunphotometer retrievals under

  20. 43 CFR 3809.432 - What process will BLM follow in reviewing a modification of my plan of operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINING CLAIMS UNDER THE GENERAL MINING LAWS Surface Management Modifications of... operations and does not constitute a substantive change that requires additional analysis under the...

  1. March 2016 Memo: Planning for Removal and Remedial Activities at Hardrock Mining and Mineral Processing Sites with Fluid Hazards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Memo from EPA Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus, regarding planning for removal and remedial activities at hardrock mining and mineral processing sites with fluid hazards, and to share the Agency’s expectations for the work that is done at these sit

  2. ASSESSING THE LEACHING BEHAVIOR OF METALS FROM A MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE AS A FUNCTION OF LIQUID TO SOLID RATIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mineral processing waste was used to study the effect of liquid to solid ratio (L/S) on the leaching behavior of metals. Leaching tests in the form of column and batch studies were carried out to investigate liquid to solid ratios ranging from 0.7 to 50. Although the waste pa...

  3. Identification of Iron-Bearing Minerals in Solid Residues from Industrial Kaolin Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, F. R.; Mussel, W. N.; Fabris, J. D.; Novais, R. F.; Garg, V. K.

    2003-06-01

    During the industrial processing of kaolin, the ore material is submitted to bleaching treatments with sulfuric and phosphoric acids and metallic zinc, in order to remove colored iron-rich minerals. The effluent waste is initially strongly acidic, and is chemically neutralized with calcium oxide and left to dry in open pits dug out in the terrain surrounding the industrial plant. The dried residue is then accumulated in deposits so as to produce the ``solid reject''. The Fe in these reject deposits precipitates as poorly crystalline iron-bearing compounds, which are difficult to identify by conventional X-ray diffraction techniques, and must be further characterized by complementary 57Fe Mössbauer analysis. 298 and 80 K Mössbauer spectra of the whole sample collected from the solid reject deposit of the Caolim Azzi industrial plant, in the city of Mar de Espanha, MG, Brazil, revealed that Fe3+ is mainly in octahedral sites of silicates. After treating this whole sample with NaOH, the Mössbauer parameters at 298 and 80 K indicated mainly the presence of iron oxide (hematite; ideal formula, αFe2O3) and oxyhydroxides, such as lepidocrocite (γFeOOH), goethite (αFeOOH) and iron hydroxysulphate, as jarosite (MFe3(SO4)2(OH)6; M = mono or divalent cation).

  4. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Weird Martian Minerals: Complex Mars Surface Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Complex Mars Surface" included the following reports:A Reappraisal of Adsorbed Superoxide Ion as the Cause Behind the Reactivity of the Martian Soils; Sub-Surface Deposits of Hydrous Silicates or Hydrated Magnesium Sulfates as Hydrogen Reservoirs near the Martian Equator: Plausible or Not?; Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of Smectites: The Search for Water on Mars; Aqueous Alteration Pathways for K, Th, and U on Mars; Temperature Dependence of the Moessbauer Fraction in Mars-Analog Minerals; Acid-Sulfate Vapor Reactions with Basaltic Tephra: An Analog for Martian Surface Processes; Iron Oxide Weathering in Sulfuric Acid: Implications for Mars; P/Fe as an Aquamarker for Mars; Stable Isotope Composition of Carbonates Formed in Low-Temperature Terrestrial Environments as Martian Analogs; Can the Phosphate Sorption and Occlusion Properties Help to Elucidate the Genesis of Specular Hematite on the Mars Surface?; Sulfate Salts, Regolith Interactions, and Water Storage in Equatorial Martian Regolith; Potential Pathways to Maghemite in Mars Soils: The Key Role of Phosphate; and Mineralogy, Abundance, and Hydration State of Sulfates and Chlorides at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site.

  5. Chemolithotrophic processes in the bacterial communities on the surface of mineral-enriched biochars.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Joseph, Stephen D; Ji, Mukan; Nielsen, Shaun; Mitchell, David R G; Donne, Scott; Horvat, Joseph; Wang, Jianli; Munroe, Paul; Thomas, Torsten

    2017-02-07

    Biochar and mineral-enriched biochar (MEB) have been used as soil amendments to improve soil fertility, sequester carbon and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Such beneficial outcomes could be partially mediated by soil bacteria, however little is known about how they directly interact with biochar or MEB. We therefore analyzed the diversity and functions of bacterial communities on the surfaces of one biochar and two different MEBs after a 140-day incubation in soil. The results show that the biochar and the MEBs harbor distinct bacterial communities to the bulk soil. Communities on biochar and MEBs were dominated by a novel Gammaproteobacterium. Genome reconstruction combined with electron microscopy and high-resolution elemental analysis revealed that the bacterium generates energy from the oxidation of iron that is present on the surface. Two other bacteria belonging to the genus Thiobacillus and a novel group within the Oxalbacteraceae were enriched only on the MEBs and they had the genetic capacity for thiosulfate oxidation. All three surface-enriched bacteria also had the capacity to fix carbon dioxide, either in a potentially strictly autotrophic or mixotrophic manner. Our results show the dominance of chemolithotrophic processes on the surface of biochar and MEB that can contribute to carbon sequestration in soil.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 7 February 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.187.

  6. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Weird Martian Minerals: Complex Mars Surface Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Complex Mars Surface" included the following reports:A Reappraisal of Adsorbed Superoxide Ion as the Cause Behind the Reactivity of the Martian Soils; Sub-Surface Deposits of Hydrous Silicates or Hydrated Magnesium Sulfates as Hydrogen Reservoirs near the Martian Equator: Plausible or Not?; Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of Smectites: The Search for Water on Mars; Aqueous Alteration Pathways for K, Th, and U on Mars; Temperature Dependence of the Moessbauer Fraction in Mars-Analog Minerals; Acid-Sulfate Vapor Reactions with Basaltic Tephra: An Analog for Martian Surface Processes; Iron Oxide Weathering in Sulfuric Acid: Implications for Mars; P/Fe as an Aquamarker for Mars; Stable Isotope Composition of Carbonates Formed in Low-Temperature Terrestrial Environments as Martian Analogs; Can the Phosphate Sorption and Occlusion Properties Help to Elucidate the Genesis of Specular Hematite on the Mars Surface?; Sulfate Salts, Regolith Interactions, and Water Storage in Equatorial Martian Regolith; Potential Pathways to Maghemite in Mars Soils: The Key Role of Phosphate; and Mineralogy, Abundance, and Hydration State of Sulfates and Chlorides at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site.

  7. Aquatic ecosystems in Central Colorado are influenced by mineral forming processes and historical mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, T.S.; Church, S.E.; Clements, W.H.; Mitchell, K.A.; Fey, D. L.; Wanty, R.B.; Verplanck, P.L.; San, Juan C.A.; Klein, T.L.; deWitt, E.H.; Rockwell, B.W.

    2009-01-01

    Stream water and sediment toxicity to aquatic insects were quantified from central Colorado catchments to distinguish the effect of geologic processes which result in high background metals concentrations from historical mining. Our sampling design targeted small catchments underlain by rocks of a single lithology, which allowed the development of biological and geochemical baselines without the complication of multiple rock types exposed in the catchment. By accounting for geologic sources of metals to the environment, we were able to distinguish between the environmental effects caused by mining and the weathering of different mineralized areas. Elevated metal concentrations in water and sediment were not restricted to mined catchments. Impairment of aquatic communities also occurred in unmined catchments influenced by hydrothermal alteration. Hydrothermal alteration style, deposit type, and mining were important determinants of water and sediment quality and aquatic community structure. Weathering of unmined porphyry Cu-Mo occurrences resulted in water (median toxic unit (TU) = 108) and sediment quality (TU = 1.9) that exceeded concentrations thought to be safe for aquatic ecosystems (TU = 1). Metalsensitive aquatic insects were virtually absent from streams draining catchments with porphyry Cu-Mo occurrences (1.1 individuals/0.1 m2 ). However, water and sediment quality (TU = 0.1, 0.5 water and sediment, respectively) and presence of metalsensitive aquatic insects (204 individuals/0.1 m2 ) for unmined polymetallic vein occurrences were indistinguishable from that for unmined and unaltered streams (TU = 0.1, 0.5 water and sediment, respectively; 201 individuals/0.1 m2 ). In catchments with mined quartz-sericite-pyrite altered polymetallic vein deposits, water (TU = 8.4) and sediment quality (TU = 3.1) were degraded and more toxic to aquatic insects (36 individuals/0.1 m2 ) than water (TU = 0.4) and sediment quality (TU = 1.7) from mined propylitically altered

  8. Combining long term field experiments and nanoscale analysis to enhance process understanding of root litter stabilization by mineral interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabbi, Abad; Baumann, Karen; Remusat, Laurent; Barre, Pierre; Dignac, Marie-France; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2015-04-01

    Mineral interaction may affect the stabilisation of root litter directly or indirectly after microbial decomposition and transformation. The importance of both processes may vary within the soil profile. In this study we studied C stabilisation of isotopically labelled root litter (13C and 15N), which was incubated during 3 year in the field at different soil depth. Samples from this field experiment were recovered and subjected to nanoscale analyses in order to elucidate mineral interactions occurring in different parts of the soil profile. Our results showed enrichment of mineral associated organic matter in subsoil horizons. However, material derived from new plant litter may be stabilised at similar rates in top- and subsoil horizons. N-containing compounds are enriched in the mineral associated fraction of subsoil horizons, indicating enrichment of microbial derived material with depth. Nano scale analyses showed that indeed plant-derived material may be associated with metal oxides in topsoil horizons, whereas the mineral associated organic matter in subsoil horizons may consist of microbial cells. Interestingly, in contrast to short term laboratory analysis, decoupling of C and N through stabilisation with soil minerals was observed during this long term field experiment. Our results indicate that the nature of OM stabilised by mineral interactions is depth specific. Therefore, we suggest, that plant derived lignocellulosic material may be preserved by mineral interactions in topsoil given its incomplete degradation, thereby leading to the formation of functional groups and favouring adsorption to soil minerals. This is consistent with the higher state of lignin-degradation observed in topsoil horizons as compared to subsoil. At depth, where microorganisms are most likely energy limited, degradation of fresh plant litter may be complete, thereby diminishing the formation of lignocellulosic compounds capable of sorption onto metal oxides. As a result

  9. Evaluation of mineral-based additives as sorbents for hazardous trace metal capture and immobilization in incineration process

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesh, S.; Fournier, D.J. Jr.; Waterland, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    Considerable interest exists in the use of mineral-based sorbents for capturing and retaining hazardous constituent trace metals in the incineration process. The suitability of six minerals, silica, diatomaceous earth, kaolin, bauxite, alumina and attapulgite clay, as potential sorbents for the capture and immobilization of trace metals was evaluated. The behavior of five trace metals, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel was tested. The first five minerals constitute a spectrum of alumino-silicate compounds ranging from pure SiO{sub 2} (silica) to pure Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (alumina). The sixth mineral, attapulgite clay, is primarily a magnesium hydroxide-related test programs at the Incineration Research Facility (IRF) as a carrier of metals and organics in blended synthetic waste streams. The objective of this test program was to evaluate the candidate sorbents with respect to: (1) the degree to which they facilitate retention of the trace metals in the sorbent (2) the degree to which they retain trace metals in the sorbent when subjected to TCLP extraction. Bench-scale tests were conducted in the IRF`s thermal treatability unit (TTU). The test matrix was defined by varying: (1) mineral (sorbent) type (2) treatment temperature; treatment temperatures of 540{degrees}, 700{degrees}, and 870{degrees}C were tested (3) chlorine concentration in the feed; 0 and 4 percent by weight chlorine in the feed were tested. Given the preliminary nature of the tests the results must be viewed qualitatively. Nevertheless, overall trends indicate that under specific conditions, varying for each mineral, all of the mineral sorbents showed promise in limiting metal vaporization, and or TCLP leachability. Combining the dual criteria of limiting metal vaporization and reducing leachability, kaolin and attapulgite clay appear to have the greatest promise as potential sorbents. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. DISTRIBUTED PROCESSING TRADE-OFF MODEL FOR ELECTRIC UTILITY OPERATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Distributed processing Trade-off Model for Electric Utility Operation is based upon a study performed for the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This study presented a technique that addresses the question of trade-offs between expanding a communications network or expanding the capacity of distributed computers in an electric utility Energy Management System (EMS). The technique resulted in the development of a quantitative assessment model that is presented in a Lotus 1-2-3 worksheet environment. The model gives EMS planners a macroscopic tool for evaluating distributed processing architectures and the major technical and economic tradeoffs as well as interactions within these architectures. The model inputs (which may be varied according to application and need) include geographic parameters, data flow and processing workload parameters, operator staffing parameters, and technology/economic parameters. The model's outputs are total cost in various categories, a number of intermediate cost and technical calculation results, as well as graphical presentation of Costs vs. Percent Distribution for various parameters. The model has been implemented on an IBM PC using the LOTUS 1-2-3 spreadsheet environment and was developed in 1986. Also included with the spreadsheet model are a number of representative but hypothetical utility system examples.

  11. Biological processing in oscillatory baffled reactors: operation, advantages and potential

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, M. S. R.; Harvey, A. P.; Perez, G. Valente; Theodorou, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    The development of efficient and commercially viable bioprocesses is essential for reducing the need for fossil-derived products. Increasingly, pharmaceuticals, fuel, health products and precursor compounds for plastics are being synthesized using bioprocessing routes as opposed to more traditional chemical technologies. Production vessels or reactors are required for synthesis of crude product before downstream processing for extraction and purification. Reactors are operated either in discrete batches or, preferably, continuously in order to reduce waste, cost and energy. This review describes the oscillatory baffled reactor (OBR), which, generally, has a niche application in performing ‘long’ processes in plug flow conditions, and so should be suitable for various bioprocesses. We report findings to suggest that OBRs could increase reaction rates for specific bioprocesses owing to low shear, good global mixing and enhanced mass transfer compared with conventional reactors. By maintaining geometrical and dynamic conditions, the technology has been proved to be easily scaled up and operated continuously, allowing laboratory-scale results to be easily transferred to industrial-sized processes. This is the first comprehensive review of bioprocessing using OBRs. The barriers facing industrial adoption of the technology are discussed alongside some suggested strategies to overcome these barriers. OBR technology could prove to be a major aid in the development of commercially viable and sustainable bioprocesses, essential for moving towards a greener future. PMID:24427509

  12. DISTRIBUTED PROCESSING TRADE-OFF MODEL FOR ELECTRIC UTILITY OPERATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Distributed processing Trade-off Model for Electric Utility Operation is based upon a study performed for the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This study presented a technique that addresses the question of trade-offs between expanding a communications network or expanding the capacity of distributed computers in an electric utility Energy Management System (EMS). The technique resulted in the development of a quantitative assessment model that is presented in a Lotus 1-2-3 worksheet environment. The model gives EMS planners a macroscopic tool for evaluating distributed processing architectures and the major technical and economic tradeoffs as well as interactions within these architectures. The model inputs (which may be varied according to application and need) include geographic parameters, data flow and processing workload parameters, operator staffing parameters, and technology/economic parameters. The model's outputs are total cost in various categories, a number of intermediate cost and technical calculation results, as well as graphical presentation of Costs vs. Percent Distribution for various parameters. The model has been implemented on an IBM PC using the LOTUS 1-2-3 spreadsheet environment and was developed in 1986. Also included with the spreadsheet model are a number of representative but hypothetical utility system examples.

  13. Biological processing in oscillatory baffled reactors: operation, advantages and potential.

    PubMed

    Abbott, M S R; Harvey, A P; Perez, G Valente; Theodorou, M K

    2013-02-06

    The development of efficient and commercially viable bioprocesses is essential for reducing the need for fossil-derived products. Increasingly, pharmaceuticals, fuel, health products and precursor compounds for plastics are being synthesized using bioprocessing routes as opposed to more traditional chemical technologies. Production vessels or reactors are required for synthesis of crude product before downstream processing for extraction and purification. Reactors are operated either in discrete batches or, preferably, continuously in order to reduce waste, cost and energy. This review describes the oscillatory baffled reactor (OBR), which, generally, has a niche application in performing 'long' processes in plug flow conditions, and so should be suitable for various bioprocesses. We report findings to suggest that OBRs could increase reaction rates for specific bioprocesses owing to low shear, good global mixing and enhanced mass transfer compared with conventional reactors. By maintaining geometrical and dynamic conditions, the technology has been proved to be easily scaled up and operated continuously, allowing laboratory-scale results to be easily transferred to industrial-sized processes. This is the first comprehensive review of bioprocessing using OBRs. The barriers facing industrial adoption of the technology are discussed alongside some suggested strategies to overcome these barriers. OBR technology could prove to be a major aid in the development of commercially viable and sustainable bioprocesses, essential for moving towards a greener future.

  14. International online support to process optimisation and operation decisions.

    PubMed

    Onnerth, T B; Eriksson, J

    2002-01-01

    The information level at all technical facilities has developed from almost nothing 30-40 years ago to advanced IT--Information Technology--systems based on both chemical and mechanical on-line sensors for process and equipment. Still the basic part of information is to get the right data at the right time for the decision to be made. Today a large amount of operational data is available at almost any European wastewater treatment plant, from laboratory and SCADA. The difficult part is to determine which data to keep, which to use in calculations and how and where to make data available. With the STARcontrol system it is possible to separate only process relevant data to use for on-line control and reporting at engineering level, to optimise operation. Furthermore, the use of IT makes it possible to communicate internationally, with full access to the whole amount of data on the single plant. In this way, expert supervision can be both very local in local language e.g. Polish and at the same time very professional with Danish experts advising on Danish processes in Poland or Sweden where some of the 12 STARcontrol systems are running.

  15. Operating The Central Process Systems At Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, Carly P.

    2004-01-01

    As a research facility, the Glenn Research Center (GRC) trusts and expects all the systems, controlling their facilities to run properly and efficiently in order for their research and operations to occur proficiently and on time. While there are many systems necessary for the operations at GRC, one of those most vital systems is the Central Process Systems (CPS). The CPS controls operations used by GRC's wind tunnels, propulsion systems lab, engine components research lab, and compressor, turbine and combustor test cells. Used widely throughout the lab, it operates equipment such as exhausters, chillers, cooling towers, compressors, dehydrators, and other such equipment. Through parameters such as pressure, temperature, speed, flow, etc., it performs its primary operations on the major systems of Electrical Dispatch (ED), Central Air Dispatch (CAD), Central Air Equipment Building (CAEB), and Engine Research Building (ERB). In order for the CPS to continue its operations at Glenn, a new contract must be awarded. Consequently, one of my primary responsibilities was assisting the Source Evaluation Board (SEB) with the process of awarding the recertification contract of the CPS. The job of the SEB was to evaluate the proposals of the contract bidders and then to present their findings to the Source Selecting Official (SSO). Before the evaluations began, the Center Director established the level of the competition. For this contract, the competition was limited to those companies classified as a small, disadvantaged business. After an industry briefing that explained to qualified companies the CPS and type of work required, each of the interested companies then submitted proposals addressing three components: Mission Suitability, Cost, and Past Performance. These proposals were based off the Statement of Work (SOW) written by the SEB. After companies submitted their proposals, the SEB reviewed all three components and then presented their results to the SSO. While the

  16. An evaluation of radiation and dust hazards at a mineral sand processing plant.

    PubMed

    Johnston, G

    1991-06-01

    This three-part article discusses the results of a 2-y study on radiation and dust hazards in a mineral sand processing plant involving: (1) evaluation of external gamma radiation levels and determination of isotopic composition of the different sand products; (2) evaluation of radiation carried in long-lived radioactive dust (LLRD) particles; (3) evaluation of Rn gas concentrations within the working environs of the plant. Gamma radiation levels had a mean value of approximately 40 nSv h-1, and monazite sand returned the highest activity concentrations of 0.16% and 3.4% for 238U and 232Th, respectively. Low volume gross respirable dust sampling revealed an average long-lived airborne alpha activity concentration of 0.07 +/- 0.02 Bq m-3 and an average dust mass concentration of 3.3 +/- 2 mg m-3. Gamma spectroscopy applied to high-volume air samples showed average airborne 232Th and 238U activities of 0.012 +/- 0.004 Bq m-3 and 0.005 +/- 0.002 Bq m-3, respectively, giving an airborne 232Th: 238U ratio of 2.4:1. Air sampling using a high volume, five-stage cascade impactor indicated an average activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 3.2 microns with an associated average geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.8. Average radiation dose arising from the inhalation of LLRD was estimated to be 7 mSv per annum. CR-39 (polycarbonate plastic) nuclear track detectors indicated that Rn gas concentrations in the environs of the processing plant dry mill and main product warehouse ranged from 30 Bq m-3 to 220 Bq m-3, with an average value of 100 Bq m-3, which presents a possible inhaled dose from Rn daughters of 1.5 mSv y-1 (assuming an equilibrium ratio of 0.5).

  17. Changes in mineral concentrations and phosphorus profile during dry-grind processing of corn into ethanol.

    PubMed

    Liu, KeShun; Han, Jianchun

    2011-02-01

    For determining variation in mineral composition and phosphorus (P) profile among streams of dry-grind ethanol production, samples of ground corn, intermediate streams, and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) were obtained from three commercial plants. Most attributes (dry matter concentrations) increased significantly from corn to cooked slurry but fermentation caused most significant increase in all attributes. During centrifugation, more minerals went into thin stillage than wet grains, making minerals most concentrated in the former. Mineral increase in DDGS over corn was about 3 fold, except for Na, S, Ca, and Fe. The first three had much higher fold of increase, presumably due to exogenous addition. During fermentation, phytate P and inorganic P had 2.54 and 10.37 fold of increase over corn, respectively, while relative to total P, % phytate P decreased and % inorganic P increased significantly. These observations suggest that phytate underwent some degradation, presumably due to activity of yeast phytase.

  18. A Novel Property of DNA – As a Bioflotation Reagent in Mineral Processing

    PubMed Central

    Vasanthakumar, Balasubramanian; Ravishankar, Honnavar; Subramanian, Sankaran

    2012-01-01

    Environmental concerns regarding the use of certain chemicals in the froth flotation of minerals have led investigators to explore biological entities as potential substitutes for the reagents in vogue. Despite the fact that several microorganisms have been used for the separation of a variety of mineral systems, a detailed characterization of the biochemical molecules involved therein has not been reported so far. In this investigation, the selective flotation of sphalerite from a sphalerite-galena mineral mixture has been achieved using the cellular components of Bacillus species. The key constituent primarily responsible for the flotation of sphalerite has been identified as DNA, which functions as a bio-collector. Furthermore, using reconstitution studies, the obligatory need for the presence of non-DNA components as bio-depressants for galena has been demonstrated. A probable model involving these entities in the selective flotation of sphalerite from the mineral mixture has been discussed. PMID:22768298

  19. A novel property of DNA - as a bioflotation reagent in mineral processing.

    PubMed

    Vasanthakumar, Balasubramanian; Ravishankar, Honnavar; Subramanian, Sankaran

    2012-01-01

    Environmental concerns regarding the use of certain chemicals in the froth flotation of minerals have led investigators to explore biological entities as potential substitutes for the reagents in vogue. Despite the fact that several microorganisms have been used for the separation of a variety of mineral systems, a detailed characterization of the biochemical molecules involved therein has not been reported so far. In this investigation, the selective flotation of sphalerite from a sphalerite-galena mineral mixture has been achieved using the cellular components of Bacillus species. The key constituent primarily responsible for the flotation of sphalerite has been identified as DNA, which functions as a bio-collector. Furthermore, using reconstitution studies, the obligatory need for the presence of non-DNA components as bio-depressants for galena has been demonstrated. A probable model involving these entities in the selective flotation of sphalerite from the mineral mixture has been discussed.

  20. Process for Operating a Dual-Mode Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J. (Inventor); Dippold, Vance F. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A new dual-mode ramjet combustor used for operation over a wide flight Mach number range is described. Subsonic combustion mode is usable to lower flight Mach numbers than current dual-mode scramjets. High speed mode is characterized by supersonic combustion in a free-jet that traverses the subsonic combustion chamber to a variable nozzle throat. Although a variable combustor exit aperture is required, the need for fuel staging to accommodate the combustion process is eliminated. Local heating from shock-boundary-layer interactions on combustor walls is also eliminated.

  1. Hybrid membrane operations in water desalination and industrial process rationalisation.

    PubMed

    Drioli, E; Di Profio, G; Curcio, E

    2005-01-01

    Membrane science and technology are recognized today as powerful tools in resolving some important global problems, and developing newer industrial processes, needed from the imperative of sustainable industrial growth. In seawater desalination, for resolving the dramatic increase of freshwater demand in many regions of the world, membrane unitary operations or the combination of some of them in integrated systems are already a real means for producing water from the sea, at lower costs and minimum environmental impact, with a very interesting prospective in particular for poor economy countries. However, membranes are used or are becoming used in some important industrial fields, for developing more efficient productive cycles, with reduced waste of raw-material, reducing the polluting charge by controlling byproduct generation, and reducing overall costs. In the present paper, other than for seawater desalination applications, some industrial applications where membrane technology has led already to match the goal of process intensification are discussed.

  2. APET methodology for Defense Waste Processing Facility: Mode C operation

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P. Jr.; Massey, W.M.

    1995-04-01

    Safe operation of SRS facilities continues to be the highest priority of the Savannah River Site (SRS). One of these facilities, the Defense Waste Processing Facility or DWPF, is currently undergoing cold chemical runs to verify the design and construction preparatory to hot startup in 1995. The DWPFF is a facility designed to convert the waste currently stored in tanks at the 200-Area tank farm into a form that is suitable for long term storage in engineered surface facilities and, ultimately, geologic isolation. As a part of the program to ensure safe operation of the DWPF, a probabilistic Safety Assessment of the DWPF has been completed. The results of this analysis are incorporated into the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for DWPF. The usual practice in preparation of Safety Analysis Reports is to include only a conservative analysis of certain design basis accidents. A major part of a Probabilistic Safety Assessment is the development and quantification of an Accident Progression Event Tree or APET. The APET provides a probabilistic representation of potential sequences along which an accident may progress. The methodology used to determine the risk of operation of the DWPF borrows heavily from methods applied to the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of SRS reactors and to some commercial reactors. This report describes the Accident Progression Event Tree developed for the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of the DWPF.

  3. Centrifugal contactor operations for UREX process flowsheet. An update

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Candido; Vandegrift, George F.

    2014-08-01

    The uranium extraction (UREX) process separates uranium, technetium, and a fraction of the iodine from the other components of the irradiated fuel in nitric acid solution. In May 2012, the time, material, and footprint requirements for treatment of 260 L batches of a solution containing 130 g-U/L were evaluated for two commercial annular centrifugal contactors from CINC Industries. These calculated values were based on the expected volume and concentration of fuel arising from treatment of a single target solution vessel (TSV). The general conclusions of that report were that a CINC V-2 contactor would occupy a footprint of 3.2 m 2 (0.25 m x 15 m) if each stage required twice the nominal footprint of an individual stage, and approximately 1,131 minutes or nearly 19 hours is required to process all of the feed solution. A CINC V-5 would require approximately 9.9 m 2 (0.4 m x 25 m) of floor space but would require only 182 minutes or ~ 3 hours to process the spent target solution. Subsequent comparison with the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) at Savannah River Site (SRS) in October 2013 suggested that a more compact arrangement is feasible, and the linear dimension for the CINC V-5 may be reduced to about 8 m; a comparable reduction for the CINC V-2 yields a length of 5 m. That report also described an intermediate-scale (10 cm) contactor design developed by Argonne in the early 1980s that would better align with the SHINE operations as they stood in May 2012. In this report, we revisit the previous evaluation of contactor operations after discussions with CINC Industries and analysis of the SHINE process flow diagrams for the cleanup of the TSV, which were not available at the time of the first assessment.

  4. Transitioning GONG data processing to NOAA SWPC operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinard, A.; Marble, A.; Hill, F.; Berger, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    The NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) is the nation's official source of space weather watches, warnings, and alerts, providing 24x7 forecasting and support to critical infrastructure operators around the world. Observations of the conditions on the Sun are crucial for determining when and if a warning is needed. The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) operated by the National Solar Observatory (NSO) consists of six ground stations, allowing continuous observations of the Sun. Of particular interest for space weather purposes are the H-alpha images and magnetograms. The H-alpha data are used to identify filaments and their eruptions, to assess active region evolution and plage extent, and to help localize flare locations. The magnetograms are used to identify neutral lines, to examine potential shearing areas and to characterize the magnetic structure of active regions. GONG magnetograms also provide the initial condition for models of solar wind expansion through the heliosphere such as the WSA-Enlil model. Although beyond the scope of current space weather applications, GONG helioseismology products can be used to assess active region emergence on the far side of the Sun and to indicate the flaring potential of a front-side active region. These products are being examined as future tools in flare prediction. NSO has operated GONG as a science facility since 1995 and has provided processed space weather data products to NOAA via public internet connections for the past several years. In 2014 the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) requested that NOAA transition the GONG network to an operational space weather asset in order to ensure the continued flow of critical magnetogram data for solar wind models. NSO will continue to operate and manage the instruments and sites, but the H-alpha images and 10 minute averaged magnetogram data will be sent directly to SWPC for processing and use in space weather modeling. SWPC will make these data

  5. Transitioning GONG data processing to NOAA SWPC operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinard, Alysha; Marble, Andrew R.; Berger, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) is the nation's official source of space weather watches, warnings, and alerts, providing 24x7 forecasting and support to critical infrastructure operators around the world. Observations of the conditions on the Sun are crucial for determining when and if a warning is needed. The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) operated by the National Solar Observatory (NSO) consists of six ground stations, allowing continuous observations of the Sun. Of particular interest for space weather purposes are the H-alpha images and magnetograms. The H-alpha data are used to identify filaments and their eruptions, to assess active region evolution and plage extent, and to help localize flare locations. The magnetograms are used to identify neutral lines, to examine potential shearing areas and to characterize the magnetic structure of active regions. GONG magnetograms also provide the initial condition for models of solar wind expansion through the heliosphere such as the WSA-Enlil model. Although beyond the scope of current space weather applications, GONG helioseismology products can be used to assess active region emergence on the far side of the Sun and to indicate the flaring potential of a front-side active region. These products are being examined as future tools in flare prediction.NSO has operated GONG as a science facility since 1995 and has provided processed space weather data products to NOAA via for the past several years. In 2014 the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) requested that NOAA transition the GONG network to an operational space weather asset in order to ensure the continued flow of critical data for solar wind models. NSO will continue to operate and manage the instruments and sites, but the H-alpha images and 10 minute averaged magnetogram data will be sent directly to SWPC for processing and use in space weather modeling. SWPC will make these data available to NSO and the public via the

  6. Mineralogy and Geochemical Processes of Carbonate Mineral-rich Sulfide Mine Tailings, Zimapan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, R. J.; Deng, Y.; Loeppert, R.; Herbert, B. E.; Carrillo, R.; Gonzalez, C.

    2009-12-01

    Mining for silver, lead, zinc, and copper in Zimapan, Hidalgo State, Mexico has been ongoing since 1576. High concentrations of heavy metals have been found in several mine tailing heaps in the Zimapan area, with concentrations of arsenic observed as high as 28,690 mg/kg and levels of Pb as high as 2772 mg/kg. Unsecured tailings heaps and associated acid mine drainage has presented tremendous problems to revegetation, water quality, and dust emission control in the Zimapan area. Although acid mine drainage problems related to weathering of sulfide minerals have been extensively studied and are well known, the weathering products of sulfides in areas with a significant presence of carbonate minerals and their effect on the mobility of heavy metals warrant further study. Carbonate minerals are expected to neutralize sulfuric acid produced from weathering of sulfide minerals, however, in the Zimapan area localized areas of pH as low as 1.8 were observed within carbonate mineral-rich tailing heaps. The objectives of this study are to characterize (1) the heavy metal-containing sulfide minerals in the initial tailing materials, (2) the intermediate oxidation products of sulfide minerals within the carbonate-rich tailings, (3) chemical species of heavy metals within pH gradients between 1.8 and 8.2, the approximate natural pH of limestone, and (4) the mobility of soluble and colloidal heavy metals and arsenic within the carbonate-rich tailings. Representative mine tailings and their intermediate oxidation products have been sampled from the Zimapan area. Mineralogical characterization will be conducted with X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron microscopes and microprobes, and chemical methods. Chemical species will be extracted by selective dissolution methods. Preliminary results have identified calcite as the dominant mineral in the tailing heaps with a pH of 7, suggesting non-equilibrium with the acidic weathering products. Other minerals identified in

  7. Minimally Processed Functional Foods: Technological and Operational Pathways.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Svetlana

    2016-10-01

    This paper offers a concise review of technical and operational concepts underpinning commercialization of minimally processed functional foods (FFs), foods with fresh-like qualities commanding premium prices. The growing number of permitted nutritional content/health claims, many of which relate to well-being, coupled with emerging extraction and food processing technologies offers new exciting opportunities for small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) specializing in fresh produce to play an active role in the health market. Supporting SMEs, governments could benefit from savings in healthcare costs and value creation in the economy. Consumers could benefit from novel FF formats such as refrigerated RTE (ready-to-eat) meals, a variety of fresh-like meat-, fish-, and egg-based products, fresh-cut fruits and vegetables, cereal-based fermented foods and beverages. To preserve these valuable commodities, mild biological (enzymatic treatment, fermentation and, bio-preservation) and engineering solutions are needed. The latter include nonthermal techniques such as high-pressure treatment, cook-chill, sous-vide, mirco-encapsulation, vacuum impregnation and others. "De-constructive" culinary techniques such as 3D food printing and molecular gastronomy as well as developments in nutrigenomics and digital technologies facilitate novel product formats, personalization and access to niche markets. In the operational sense, moving from nourishment to health improvement demands a shift from defensive market-oriented to offensive market-developing strategies including collaborative networks with research organizations. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  8. Advances in understanding mineral dust and boundary layer processes over the Sahara from Fennec aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, C. L.; McQuaid, J. B.; Flamant, C.; Rosenberg, P. D.; Washington, R.; Brindley, H. E.; Highwood, E. J.; Marsham, J. H.; Parker, D. J.; Todd, M. C.; Banks, J. R.; Brooke, J. K.; Engelstaedter, S.; Estelles, V.; Formenti, P.; Garcia-Carreras, L.; Kocha, C.; Marenco, F.; Sodemann, H.; Allen, C. J. T.; Bourdon, A.; Bart, M.; Cavazos-Guerra, C.; Chevaillier, S.; Crosier, J.; Darbyshire, E.; Dean, A. R.; Dorsey, J. R.; Kent, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Schepanski, K.; Szpek, K.; Trembath, J.; Woolley, A.

    2015-07-01

    The Fennec climate programme aims to improve understanding of the Saharan climate system through a synergy of observations and modelling. We present a description of the Fennec airborne observations during 2011 and 2012 over the remote Sahara (Mauritania and Mali) and the advances in the understanding of mineral dust and boundary layer processes they have provided. Aircraft instrumentation aboard the UK FAAM BAe146 and French SAFIRE (Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement) Falcon 20 is described, with specific focus on instrumentation specially developed for and relevant to Saharan meteorology and dust. Flight locations, aims and associated meteorology are described. Examples and applications of aircraft measurements from the Fennec flights are presented, highlighting new scientific results delivered using a synergy of different instruments and aircraft. These include (1) the first airborne measurement of dust particles sizes of up to 300 microns and associated dust fluxes in the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL), (2) dust uplift from the breakdown of the nocturnal low-level jet before becoming visible in SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible Infra-Red Imager) satellite imagery, (3) vertical profiles of the unique vertical structure of turbulent fluxes in the SABL, (4) in situ observations of processes in SABL clouds showing dust acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) at -15 °C, (5) dual-aircraft observations of the SABL dynamics, thermodynamics and composition in the Saharan heat low region (SHL), (6) airborne observations of a dust storm associated with a cold pool (haboob) issued from deep convection over the Atlas Mountains, (7) the first airborne chemical composition measurements of dust in the SHL region with differing composition, sources (determined using Lagrangian backward trajectory calculations) and absorption properties between 2011 and 2012, (8) coincident ozone and dust surface area

  9. Heavy metal-rich wastes sequester in mineral phases through a glass-ceramic process.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Valles, M; Avila, G; Martinez, S; Terradas, R; Nogués, J M

    2007-08-01

    Certain sludges generated by industry are rich in contaminating elements and are a major environmental problem. In this study, we determine the ability of these contaminating elements to be incorporated into a glass-matrix and in various mineral phases after a crystallization process. The contaminating elements studied were obtained from sewage sludges (SS) and galvanic sludges (GS), our raw materials. The sludge samples were taken from urban wastewater treatment plant in Catalonia (NE Spain) with high levels of phosphorus oxide (P(2)O(5)). In silica glasses, P(2)O(5) acts as a network former. We determined the chemical composition of both the SS and GS, as well as their thermal behaviour by differential thermal analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis (DTA-TG) to obtain their melting curves. The vitreous transition temperature of the obtained glass was established by dilatometer technique at 725 degrees C. The DTA-TG curve of the glass obtained has an exothermal wide peak at 860 degrees C corresponding to crystallization of the two phases: a spinel phase and a phosphate phase. A second exothermal wide peak at 960 degrees C was attributed to the crystallization of aluminium pyroxene, anorthite and fluor-apatite, with two exothermal phenomena attributed to the evolution of these phases. An exothermal peak at 1100 degrees C was attributed to gehlenite crystallization. Scanning electron microscope observations and energy-dispersed X-ray spectroscopy microanalyses of glass-ceramic showed that the contaminating elements were concentrated in the spinel phases, which are the first phases to crystallize during the cooling of glass. Finally, the spinel structure permits the incorporation of all the contaminating elements into it.

  10. [Evaluation of bone mineral density using digital image processing in children receiving anticonvulsants].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiko; Ueda, Satoru; Umezu, Ryouji; Matsuoka, Hisafumi; Sugihara, Shigetaka

    2007-09-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) increases rapidly in a biphasic manner in childhood. During and after adolescence, BMD correlates more closely with bone age than chronological age. Digital image processing (DIP) allows the rapid assessment of BMD and bone age on one X-ray film. Herein, using DIP methods, the effects of various anticonvulsants on chronological and bone age were evaluated in 98 epilepsy patients (age range, 3-15 years) with no intellectual or motor disorders or diseases affecting bone metabolism. All patients were taking one or a combination of the following anticonvulsants: valproate sodium (VPA); carbamazepine (CBZ); and phenobarbital (PB). Bone maturation scores for radius-ulnar-short bones (RUS) were calculated using Tanner-Whitehouse 2 methods. Bone age was determined based on standard Japanese bone-maturation scores. In each patient, Z-scores for chronological and bone ages were calculated by subtracting standard BMD for gender and age from each BMD, then dividing the result by the standard deviation. The Z-score for each drug in relation to the administration period was analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. For chronological age, significant differences in BMD were observed regarding the administration periods in children taking multiple drugs, but not in children on VPA, CBZ, or PB monotherapy. For bone age, no significant differences in BMD were observed regarding the administration periods for all drugs. Children taking multiple drugs showed a significant negative correlation between administration period and Z-scores for BMD calculated based on chronological age (Spearman rank correlation: - 0.457, p = 0.008), but not bone age. Among children receiving long-term VPA administration, bone age was delayed approximately 1 year, and bone maturation may have been delayed. No delay in bone age was noted among children receiving long-term administration of multiple drugs, suggesting that these anticonvulsants do not influence bone maturity. These

  11. Comparative evaluation of short-term leach tests for heavy metal release from mineral processing waste

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Al-Abed, S. R.; Hageman, P.L.; Jegadeesan, G.; Madhavan, N.; Allen, D.

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of metal leaching using a single leach test such as the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) is often questionable. The pH, redox potential (Eh), particle size and contact time are critical variables in controlling metal stability, not accounted for in the TCLP. This paper compares the leaching behavior of metals in mineral processing waste via short-term extraction tests such as TCLP, Field Leach Test (FLT) used by USGS and deionized water extraction tests. Variation in the extracted amounts was attributed to the use of different particle sizes, extraction fluid and contact time. In the controlled pH experiments, maximum metal extraction was obtained at acidic pH for cationic heavy metals such as Cu, Pb and Zn, while desorption of Se from the waste resulted in high extract concentrations in the alkaline region. Precipitation of iron, caused by a pH increase, probably resulted in co-precipitation and immobilization of Cu, Pb and Zn in the alkaline pH region. A sequential extraction procedure was performed on the original waste and the solid residue from the Eh-pH experiments to determine the chemical speciation and distribution of the heavy metals. In the as-received waste, Cu existed predominantly in water soluble or sulfidic phases, with no binding to carbonates or iron oxides. Similar characteristics were observed for Pb and Zn, while Se existed mostly associated with iron oxides or sulfides. Adsorption/co-precipitation of Cu, Se and Pb on precipitated iron hydroxides was observed in the experimental solid residues, resulting in metal immobilization above pH 7.

  12. Natural language processing to ascertain two key variables from operative reports in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liyan; Shorstein, Neal H; Amsden, Laura B; Herrinton, Lisa J

    2017-04-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is critical to ophthalmology and other surgical specialties. We performed natural language processing (NLP) of 743 838 operative notes recorded for 315 246 surgeries to ascertain two variables needed to study the comparative effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in cataract surgery. The first key variable was an exposure variable, intracameral antibiotic injection. The second was an intraoperative complication, posterior capsular rupture (PCR), which functioned as a potential confounder. To help other researchers use NLP in their settings, we describe our NLP protocol and lessons learned. For each of the two variables, we used SAS Text Miner and other SAS text-processing modules with a training set of 10 000 (1.3%) operative notes to develop a lexicon. The lexica identified misspellings, abbreviations, and negations, and linked words into concepts (e.g. "antibiotic" linked with "injection"). We confirmed the NLP tools by iteratively obtaining random samples of 2000 (0.3%) notes, with replacement. The NLP tools identified approximately 60 000 intracameral antibiotic injections and 3500 cases of PCR. The positive and negative predictive values for intracameral antibiotic injection exceeded 99%. For the intraoperative complication, they exceeded 94%. NLP was a valid and feasible method for obtaining critical variables needed for a research study of surgical safety. These NLP tools were intended for use in the study sample. Use with external datasets or future datasets in our own setting would require further testing. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Optimization of the mineralization of a mixture of phenolic pollutants under a ferrioxalate-induced solar photo-Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, J M; Durán, A; Aguirre, M; San Martín, I

    2011-01-15

    The mineralization of solutions containing a mixture of three phenolic compounds, gallic, p-coumaric and protocatechuic acids, in a ferrioxalate-induced solar photo-Fenton process was investigated. The reactions were carried out in a pilot plant consisting of a compound parabolic collector (CPC) solar reactor. An optimization study was performed combining a multivariate experimental design and neuronal networks that included the following variables: pH, temperature, solar power, air flow and initial concentrations of H(2)O(2), Fe(II) and oxalic acid. Under optimal conditions, total elimination of the original compounds and 94% TOC removal of the mixture were achieved in 5 and 194 min, respectively. pH and initial concentrations of H(2)O(2) and Fe(II) were the most significant factors affecting the mixture mineralization. The molar correlation between consumed hydrogen peroxide and removed TOC was always between 1 and 3. A detailed analysis of the reaction was presented. The values of the pseudo-first-order mineralization kinetic rate constant, k(TOC), increased as initial Fe(II) and H(2)O(2) concentrations and temperature increased. The optimum pH value also slightly increased with greater Fe(II) and hydrogen peroxide concentrations but decreased when temperature increased. OH and O(2)(-) radicals were the main oxidative intermediate species in the process, although singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) also played a role in the mineralization reaction.

  14. Organic matter characteristics of food processing industry wastewaters affecting their C and N mineralization in soil incubation.

    PubMed

    Parnaudeau, Virginie; Nicolardot, Bernard; Robert, Philippe; Alavoine, Gonzague; Pagès, Jérôme; Duchiron, Francis

    2006-07-01

    This study aimed at determining food processing wastewater composition factors that regulate their carbon and nitrogen mineralization when added to soil. Twenty three different wastewaters from various food processing industries were characterized by C and N concentrations, liquid and solid physical separation and acid solubility. They were also incubated in a calcareous soil during six months at 28 degrees C. The C and N concentrations were low but covered a wide range. Carbon and nitrogen were variously distributed in the liquid and solid fractions and much C was present in the acid-soluble fraction in which C to N ratios were low. The C and N mineralization measured during soil incubation covered a wide range of decomposition pathways. Carbon mineralization was linked significantly (p=0.05) with the C to N ratio of the acid soluble fraction and C present in the liquid fraction. N mineralization was significantly correlated (p=0.05) with the organic C to organic N ratio and the C to N ratio of the acid soluble fraction. Multiple factor analysis and clustering also enabled defining clusters which partially overlap the various origins of the wastewaters.

  15. Mineralization of herbicides imazapyr and imazaquin in aqueous medium by, fenton, photo-fenton and electro-fenton processes.

    PubMed

    Kaichouh, G; Oturan, N; Oturan, M A; El Hourch, A; El Kacemi, K

    2008-05-01

    Oxidative degradation of aqueous solutions of imazapyr and imazaquin herbicides at room temperature and pH 3.0 has been investigated by Fenton, photo-Fenton and electro-Fenton processes. The high degradation power of these advanced oxidation processes is due to the large production of hydroxyl radicals (*OH), a strong oxidizing agent, by reaction between H2O2 and Fe2+ in the solution to be treated. These radicals are used to oxidize organic pollutants to aromatic and aliphatic intermediates through subsequent oxidation until complete mineralization. Degradation kinetics and evolution of the chemical composition of treated solutions in each process was followed by high performance liquid chromatography. The mineralization efficiency was determined by chemical oxygen demand analysis. The effect of experimental parameters such as initial herbicide concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, ferrous ion concentration and applied current on the degradation kinetics was examined. Better degradation and mineralization efficiency were observed in photo-Fenton and electro-Fenton processes compared with conventional Fenton process. A pseudo-first order kinetic model was employed to describe the result and determine the apparent and absolute rate constants of the reaction between hydroxyl radicals and herbicides.

  16. Clues for regulatory processes in fungal uptake and transfer of minerals to the basidiospore.

    PubMed

    Gramss, Gerhard; Voigt, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-07-01

    Several fungal species are notorious for the preferential acquisition of toxicants such as AsCdHgPbU in their wild-grown basidiomes, but it is not known how, or whether at all, mineral uptake is regulated. In this study, basidiomes of Kuehneromyces mutabilis, Pleurotus ostreatus, and Hypholoma fasciculare were grown on Fagus sylvatica logs embedded in sand, uranium-overburden soil, and garden soil (SIO) at a lab scale to raise the accessible mineral resources 30 to >1,000 times over those available in the timber alone. Non-embedded logs and a field culture established on SIO served as controls. Concentrations of 22 minerals were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry from microwave-digested samples of timber, soils, whole and dissected mushrooms, and basidiospores. It was the goal to determine whether mineral uptake rates vary simply with their concentration in the substrate or undergo selections which indicate the ability of metal sensing and optimizing/delimiting the quantity of (essential) elements on their passage from a substrate via basidiome to the basidiospores. It is shown that an underrepresented substrate mineral is up-concentrated to a more or less regulated and physiologically compatible mean, whereas a rising external mineral supply leads to uptake blockage by downregulation of the bioconcentration rate in the vicinity of an apparent mycelial saturation point. The resulting concentrations in whole K. mutabilis basidiomes of the essential metals, CaCoCuFeMgMn(Sr)Zn corresponded surprisingly with those in wheat grains which share the main metabolic pathways with fungi and whose metallome is believed to be out-regulated for an optimum and stress-free development. Concentrations of nonessential metals, too, fitted the range of those common crops, whereas KP reached the higher typical level of fungi. Minerals entering the lower stipe of the K. mutabilis basidiome were specifically enriched/diluted on a passage to the gills and once more

  17. Improving operating room productivity via parallel anesthesia processing.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael J; Subramanian, Arun; Curry, Timothy B; Kor, Daryl J; Moran, Steven L; Rohleder, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Parallel processing of regional anesthesia may improve operating room (OR) efficiency in patients undergoes upper extremity surgical procedures. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate whether performing regional anesthesia outside the OR in parallel increases total cases per day, improve efficiency and productivity. Data from all adult patients who underwent regional anesthesia as their primary anesthetic for upper extremity surgery over a one-year period were used to develop a simulation model. The model evaluated pure operating modes of regional anesthesia performed within and outside the OR in a parallel manner. The scenarios were used to evaluate how many surgeries could be completed in a standard work day (555 minutes) and assuming a standard three cases per day, what was the predicted end-of-day time overtime. Modeling results show that parallel processing of regional anesthesia increases the average cases per day for all surgeons included in the study. The average increase was 0.42 surgeries per day. Where it was assumed that three cases per day would be performed by all surgeons, the days going to overtime was reduced by 43 percent with parallel block. The overtime with parallel anesthesia was also projected to be 40 minutes less per day per surgeon. Key limitations include the assumption that all cases used regional anesthesia in the comparisons. Many days may have both regional and general anesthesia. Also, as a case study, single-center research may limit generalizability. Perioperative care providers should consider parallel administration of regional anesthesia where there is a desire to increase daily upper extremity surgical case capacity. Where there are sufficient resources to do parallel anesthesia processing, efficiency and productivity can be significantly improved. Simulation modeling can be an effective tool to show practice change effects at a system-wide level.

  18. The NASA Robotic Conjunction Assessment Process: Overview and Operational Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Lauri Kraft

    2008-01-01

    Orbital debris poses a significant threat to spacecraft health and safety. Recent events such as China's anti-satellite test and the Breeze-M rocket explosion have led to an even greater awareness and concern in the satellite community. Therefore, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established requirements that routine conjunction assessment screening shall be performed for all maneuverable spacecraft having perigees less than 2000 km or within 200 km of geosynchronous altitude. NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed an operational collision risk assessment process to protect NASA s high-value unmanned (robotic) assets that has been in use since January 2005. This paper provides an overview of the NASA robotic conjunction assessment process, including descriptions of the new tools developed to analyze close approach data and of the risk mitigation strategies employed. In addition, statistical data describing the number of conjunctions experienced are presented. A debris avoidance maneuver performed by Aura in June of 2008 is described in detail to illustrate the process.

  19. The NASA robotic conjunction assessment process: Overview and operational experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Lauri Kraft

    2010-04-01

    Orbital debris poses a significant threat to spacecraft health and safety. Recent events such as China's anti-satellite test and the Breeze-M rocket explosion have led to an even greater awareness and concern in the satellite community. Therefore, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established requirements that routine conjunction assessment screening shall be performed for all maneuverable spacecraft having perigees <2000 km or within 200 km of geosynchronous altitude. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed an operational collision risk assessment process to protect NASA's high-value unmanned (robotic) assets that has been in use since January 2005. This paper provides an overview of the NASA robotic conjunction assessment process, including descriptions of the new tools developed to analyze close approach data and of the risk mitigation strategies employed. In addition, statistical data describing the number of conjunctions experienced are presented. A debris avoidance maneuver performed by Aura in June of 2008 is described in detail to illustrate the process.

  20. Instituting a filtration/pressurization system to reduce dust concentrations in a control room at a mineral processing plant.

    PubMed

    Noll, J; Cecala, A; Hummer, J

    2015-12-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has observed that many control rooms and operator compartments in the U.S. mining industry do not have filtration systems capable of maintaining low dust concentrations in these areas. In this study at a mineral processing plant, to reduce respirable dust concentrations in a control room that had no cleaning system for intake air, a filtration and pressurization system originally designed for enclosed cabs was modified and installed. This system was composed of two filtering units: one to filter outside air and one to filter and recirculate the air inside the control room. Eighty-seven percent of submicrometer particles were reduced by the system under static conditions. This means that greater than 87 percent of respirable dust particles should be reduced as the particle-size distribution of respirable dust particles is greater than that of submicrometer particles, and filtration systems usually are more efficient in capturing the larger particles. A positive pressure near 0.02 inches of water gauge was produced, which is an important component of an effective system and minimizes the entry of particles, such as dust, into the room. The intake airflow was around 118 cfm, greater than the airflow suggested by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) for acceptable indoor air quality. After one year, the loading of the filter caused the airflow to decrease to 80 cfm, which still produces acceptable indoor air quality. Due to the loading of the filters, the reduction efficiency for submicrometer particles under static conditions increased to 94 percent from 87 percent.

  1. Instituting a filtration/pressurization system to reduce dust concentrations in a control room at a mineral processing plant

    PubMed Central

    Noll, J.; Cecala, A.; Hummer, J.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has observed that many control rooms and operator compartments in the U.S. mining industry do not have filtration systems capable of maintaining low dust concentrations in these areas. In this study at a mineral processing plant, to reduce respirable dust concentrations in a control room that had no cleaning system for intake air, a filtration and pressurization system originally designed for enclosed cabs was modified and installed. This system was composed of two filtering units: one to filter outside air and one to filter and recirculate the air inside the control room. Eighty-seven percent of submicrometer particles were reduced by the system under static conditions. This means that greater than 87 percent of respirable dust particles should be reduced as the particle-size distribution of respirable dust particles is greater than that of submicrometer particles, and filtration systems usually are more efficient in capturing the larger particles. A positive pressure near 0.02 inches of water gauge was produced, which is an important component of an effective system and minimizes the entry of particles, such as dust, into the room. The intake airflow was around 118 cfm, greater than the airflow suggested by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) for acceptable indoor air quality. After one year, the loading of the filter caused the airflow to decrease to 80 cfm, which still produces acceptable indoor air quality. Due to the loading of the filters, the reduction efficiency for submicrometer particles under static conditions increased to 94 percent from 87 percent. PMID:26834293

  2. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector.

  3. Automating the training development process for mission flight operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carol J.

    1994-01-01

    Traditional methods of developing training do not effectively support the changing needs of operational users in a multimission environment. The Automated Training Development System (ATDS) provides advantages over conventional methods in quality, quantity, turnaround, database maintenance, and focus on individualized instruction. The Operations System Training Group at the JPL performed a six-month study to assess the potential of ATDS to automate curriculum development and to generate and maintain course materials. To begin the study, the group acquired readily available hardware and participated in a two-week training session to introduce the process. ATDS is a building activity that combines training's traditional information-gathering with a hierarchical method for interleaving the elements. The program can be described fairly simply. A comprehensive list of candidate tasks determines the content of the database; from that database, selected critical tasks dictate which competencies of skill and knowledge to include in course material for the target audience. The training developer adds pertinent planning information about each task to the database, then ATDS generates a tailored set of instructional material, based on the specific set of selection criteria. Course material consistently leads students to a prescribed level of competency.

  4. Evaluation of Meteorology Data for MOPITT Operational Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D.; Deeter, M. N.; Worden, H. M.; Mao, D.; Dean, V.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere[1] (MOPITT) is an instrument flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite[2]. It measures CO using correlated spectroscopy[3]. As part of its processing it uses surface temperature, an atmospheric temperature profile and a water vapor profile from analysis. Since there are many analysis products on the market (e.g. GMAO, NCEP, ECMWF etc.) that meet MOPITT's operational requirements, the question arises as to which product is most apt? There is a collection of "validation data" that MOPITT compares its CO retrievals against[4]. The validation dataset has been acquired by in situ air samples taken by aircraft at a series of altitudes. We can run our processing system in "validation mode" which processes the satellite data for only the days that validation data exists and for a spatial subset that corresponds to the region where the validation data has been collected. We will run the MOPITT retrievals in validation mode separately using each variety of analysis data. We will create a cost function that will provide a scalar estimate of the retrieved CO profile error relative to the validation dataset which is assumed to be "the truth". The retrieval errors of each of the input datasets will be compared to each other to provide insight into the best choice for use in operational MOPITT processing. [1] Drummond, J.R., "Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT)," in The Use of EOS for Studies of Atmospheric Physics, J. C. Gille, G. Visconti, eds. (North Holland, Amsterdam), pp. 77-101, 1992. [2] 1999 EOS Reference Handbook: A Guide to NASA's Earth Science Enterprise and the Earth Observing System; Eds. Michael D. King and Reynold Greenstone; NASA, Greenbelt, MD, 1999. [3] Drummond, J.R., G. P. Brasseur, G. R. Davis, J. C. Gille, J. C. McConnell, G. D. Pesket, H. G. Reichle, N. Roulet, MOPITT Mission Description Document (Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A7), 1993. [4] Deeter, M. N

  5. PETROMAP: MS-DOS software package for quantitative processing of X-ray maps of zoned minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossio, Roberto; Borghi, Alessandro

    1998-10-01

    This paper shows an application of energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) for digital acquisition of multi-element X-ray compositional maps of minerals in polished thin sections. A square matrix of n EDS spectra with known X, Y coordinates is collected, converted and exported to a personal computer. Each spectrum of the matrix is processed and the apparent concentration of each analyzed element is calculated by means of PETROMAP, a program written in Quick-Basic which applies a quantitative ZAF/FLS correction. The results of processing are comparable to the conventional quantitative microprobe analyses, with similar counting statistics. The output is a numerical matrix, compatible with the most popular graphic and spreadsheet programs from which it is possible to produce two-dimensional wt% oxide, mole fractions and mineral end-members pseudocolored or black/white maps. The procedure has been tested using a metamorphic garnet of the medium-grade Stilo unit (Calabrian Arc, Southern Italy).

  6. Molecular orbital (SCF-Xα-SW) theory of metal-metal charge transfer processes in minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Electronic transitions between the Fe-Fe bonding and Fe-Fe antibonding orbitals results in the optically-induced intervalence charge transfer bands observed in the electronic spectra of mixed valence minerals. Such transitions are predicted to be polarized along the metal-metal bond direction, in agreement with experimental observations.

  7. Proximate, Antinutrients and Mineral Composition of Raw and Processed (Boiled and Roasted) Sphenostylis stenocarpa Seeds from Southern Kaduna, Northwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ndidi, Uche Samuel; Ndidi, Charity Unekwuojo; Olagunju, Abbas; Muhammad, Aliyu; Billy, Francis Graham; Okpe, Oche

    2014-01-01

    This research was aimed at evaluating the proximate composition, level of anti-nutrients, and the mineral composition of raw and processed Sphenostylis stenocarpa seeds and at examining the effect of processing on the parameters. From the proximate composition analysis, the ash content showed no significant difference (P > 0.05) between the processed and unprocessed (raw) samples. However, there was significant difference (P < 0.05) in the levels of moisture, crude lipid, nitrogen-free extract, gross energy, true protein, and crude fiber between the processed and unprocessed S. stenocarpa. Analyses of the antinutrient composition show that the processed S. stenocarpa registered significant reduction in levels of hydrogen cyanide, trypsin inhibitor, phytate, oxalate, and tannins compared to the unprocessed. Evaluation of the mineral composition showed that the level of sodium, calcium, and potassium was high in both the processed and unprocessed sample (150–400 mg/100 g). However, the level of iron, copper, zinc, and magnesium was low in both processed and unprocessed samples (2–45 mg/100 g). The correlation analysis showed that tannins and oxalate affected the levels of ash and nitrogen-free extract of processed and unprocessed seeds. These results suggest that the consumption of S. stenocarpa will go a long way in reducing the level of malnutrition in northern Nigeria. PMID:24967265

  8. Process-based modeling of silicate mineral weathering responses to increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banwart, Steven A.; Berg, Astrid; Beerling, David J.

    2009-12-01

    A mathematical model describes silicate mineral weathering processes in modern soils located in the boreal coniferous region of northern Europe. The process model results demonstrate a stabilizing biological feedback mechanism between atmospheric CO2 levels and silicate weathering rates as is generally postulated for atmospheric evolution. The process model feedback response agrees within a factor of 2 of that calculated by a weathering feedback function of the type generally employed in global geochemical carbon cycle models of the Earth's Phanerozoic CO2 history. Sensitivity analysis of parameter values in the process model provides insight into the key mechanisms that influence the strength of the biological feedback to weathering. First, the process model accounts for the alkalinity released by weathering, whereby its acceleration stabilizes pH at values that are higher than expected. Although the process model yields faster weathering with increasing temperature, because of activation energy effects on mineral dissolution kinetics at warmer temperature, the mineral dissolution rate laws utilized in the process model also result in lower dissolution rates at higher pH values. Hence, as dissolution rates increase under warmer conditions, more alkalinity is released by the weathering reaction, helping maintain higher pH values thus stabilizing the weathering rate. Second, the process model yields a relatively low sensitivity of soil pH to increasing plant productivity. This is due to more rapid decomposition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) under warmer conditions. Because DOC fluxes strongly influence the soil water proton balance and pH, this increased decomposition rate dampens the feedback between productivity and weathering. The process model is most sensitive to parameters reflecting soil structure; depth, porosity, and water content. This suggests that the role of biota to influence these characteristics of the weathering profile is as important, if not

  9. Batch Preheat for glass and related furnace processing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Energy & Environmental Resources, Inc

    2002-08-12

    The objectives that our development work addressed are: (1) Establish through lab tests a salt eutectic with a melting point of about 250 F and a working range of 250 to 1800 F. (2) Establish the most economical material of construction for the screened salt eutectics identified in the first objective. (3) Establish the material of construction for the salt heater liner. Objectives 2 and 3 were determined through corrosion tests using selected metallurgical samples. Successful completion of the above-stated goals will be incorporated in a heat recovery design that can be used in high temperature processes and furnaces, typical of which is the glass melting process. The process design incorporates the following unit operations: a vertical batch heater (whereby the batch flows down through tubes in a shell and tube exchanger; a molten salt eutectic is circulated on the shell side); a molten salt heater utilizing furnace flue gas in a radiation type heater (molten salt is circulated in the annular space between the inner and outer shells of the vertical heater, and flue gas passes from the furnace exhaust through the inner shell of the heater); a cantilever type molten salt circulating pump; and a jacketed mixer/conveyor to drive off moisture from the batch prior to feeding the batch to the vertical batch heater. Historically, radiation heaters, when applied to glass or fiberglass furnace recuperation, have experienced failures due to uneven heat flux rates, which increases internal stresses and spot overheating conditions. Low heat transfer coefficients result in requirements for large heat transfer surface areas in gas to gas or gas to air exchangers. Fouling is another factor that results in lower unit availability and reduced performance. These factors are accommodated in this process by the incorporation of several design features. The salt heater will be a vertical double wall radiation design, similar to radiation air heaters used in high temperature heat

  10. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  11. An operational approach for infrasound multi-array processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergoz, J.; Le Pichon, A.; Herry, P.; Blanc, E.

    2009-04-01

    The infrasound network of the International Monitoring Network (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is currently not fully established. However, it has demonstrated its capability for detecting and locating infrasonic sources like meteorites as well as volcanic eruptions on a global scale. Unfortunately, such ground truth events are rare. Therefore, regions with dense infrasound networks have to be considered in order to test and calibrate detection and location procedures (Le Pichon. et al. 2008, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D12115, doi:10.1029/2007JD009509). In Central Europe, several years of continuous infrasound recordings are available for many infrasound arrays, where not all of them are part of the IMS. Infrasound waveforms are routinely processed in the 0.1 to 4 Hz frequency band using PMCC as a real-time detector. After applying a categorization procedure to remove detections associated with environmental noise, a blind fusion provides a list of events to be reviewed by the analyst. In order to check the geophysical consistency of the located events, an interactive tool has been developed. All results of the automatic processing are presented along with a realistic estimate of the network detection capability which incorporates near-real time atmospheric updates. Among the dominant acoustic sources of human origin, peaks in the geographical distribution of infrasound events correspond well with seismically active regions where operational mines have been identified. With the increasing number of IMS and regional cluster infrasound arrays deployed around the globe, conducting consistent analyses on a routine-basis provides an extensive database for discriminating between natural and artificial acoustic sources. Continuing such studies may also help quantifying relationships between infrasonic observables and atmospheric specification problems, thus opening new fields for investigations into inverse problems.

  12. Design and operation of a mini-pilot plant for the removal of sulfur from coal using the perchloroethylene process

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, T.L.; Fullerton, K.L.; Lee, S.

    1994-12-31

    A mini-pilot plant has been designed and fabricated to study the removal of sulfur from coal using perchloroethylene in a continuous process. Perchloroethylene solvent is used in a recycle process stream to perform both physical and chemical cleaning of finely crushed coal. Organic sulfur is removed in an extraction stage using perchloroethylene at atmospheric pressure. Physical removal of pyrites and minerals takes place in a float/sink apparatus in which perchloroethylene is used as a heavy medium. The plant is used to study process efficiency, control, and to provide scale-up data. The process variables studied will include type of coal, solvent-to-coal ratio, and extraction time among others. Design of the plant using bench-scale data will be discussed. Unit operations will be discussed, including extraction, heavy medium separation, screen separation, and drying.

  13. Residence time, mineralization processes and groundwater origin within a carbonate coastal aquifer with a thick unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, S.; Huneau, F.; Garel, E.; Vergnaud-Ayraud, V.; Labasque, T.; Aquilina, L.; Jaunat, J.; Celle-Jeanton, H.

    2016-09-01

    This study aims at establishing groundwater residence times, identifying mineralization processes and determining groundwater origins within a carbonate coastal aquifer with thick unsaturated zone and lying on a granitic depression. A multi-tracer approach (major ions, SiO2, Br-, Ba+, Sr2+, 18O, 2H, 13C, 3H, Ne, Ar) combined with a groundwater residence time determination using CFCs and SF6 allows defining the global setting of the study site. A typical mineralization conditioned by the sea sprays and the carbonate matrix helped to validate the groundwater weighted residence times from using a binary mixing model. Terrigenic SF6 excesses have been detected and quantified, which permits to identify a groundwater flow from the surrounding fractured granites towards the lower aquifer principally. The use of CFCs and SF6 as a first hydrogeological investigation tool is possible and very relevant despite the thick unsaturated zone and the hydraulic connexion with a granitic environment.

  14. Materials measurement and accounting in an operating plutonium conversion and purification process. Phase I. Process modeling and simulation. [PUCSF code

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.C. Jr.; Ostenak, C.A.; Gutmacher, R.G.; Dayem, H.A.; Kern, E.A.

    1981-04-01

    A model of an operating conversion and purification process for the production of reactor-grade plutonium dioxide was developed as the first component in the design and evaluation of a nuclear materials measurement and accountability system. The model accurately simulates process operation and can be used to identify process problems and to predict the effect of process modifications.

  15. Processes of mineralization in the Hauran Basin (Syria and Jordan) and in adjoining areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raggad, Marwan Al; Elias, Salameh; Inbar, Nimrod; Rosenthal, Eliahu; Möller, Peter; Siebert, Christian; Magri, Fabien

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic rocks covering vast areas in central north Jordan and in central and southern Syria erupted during 6 different phases starting in Miocene and continuing - with major interruptions - into the Holocene. The petrological composition of the different flows of the Harrat ash Shaam Basalt complex is quite homogeneous with the major minerals: Plagioclase, K-feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, olivine, magnetite, limonite, goethite, pyrite and chalcopyrite. The oldest basalts cover Cretaceous and Paleogene sediments, which at that time formed the land surface of drainage basins. The basaltic aquifer contains groundwater with a wide range of salinities. They represent a continuous sequence of increasingly mineralized groundwater originating from precipitation over Jebel Druz flowing radially into all directions, in coincidence with the topographic slopes. Along the flow-paths halite and gypsum are dissolved. Ca2+ not only depends on gypsum dissolution but also increases proportionally to Mg. This may suggest that the combination of Ca2+, Mg2+ and sulfate is a saline endmember fluid originating from the underlying carbonate formations of the basalt. Mixing with recharge water could explain the chemical composition of the various types of water. The signature of dissolved gypsum and halite indicates dissolution of evaporites that might have formed by evaporation either before the basalt covered the area or due to the hot basalts heating up the underlying carbonates and their enclosed fluids. Evaporation of water precipitated evaporites. Ca and Mg halides are hygroscopic, thus they are only present in solution. Such saline water, however, has not affected the low saline groundwater because their increase in Ca depends neither on the increase of Mg2+ nor of SO42-. This leaves the formation of clay minerals as the probably sink for Na. Inverse modelling applying PHREEQC with phreeq.dat database reveals that the mineralization of groundwater increases due to

  16. Investigation of mineral filler effects on the aging process of asphalt mastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, Raquel

    Aging of asphalt binders is induced by chemical and/or physicochemical changes during production of pavement and throughout its service life. Although binder aging in pavement always occurs while binder is in contact with aggregates and mineral filler, in most laboratory aging studies, and in current specifications, asphalt binders are individually aged without accounting for aggregate induced interactions. Past research has had conflicting findings, attributing both mitigating and/or catalytic effects to the presence of mineral filler in asphalt binder with regards to oxidative aging. Thus, in the present study it was hypothesized that evaluation of asphalt oxidative aging without regard to interactive effect of the presence of mineral filler is inadequate as a specification tool. Effects of mineral fillers on oxidative aging of asphalt is investigated by means of accelerated aging of mastics (asphalt and fillers) in Pressure Aging Vessel (PAV). Testing matrix included aging evaluation of mastics containing different fillers content, mineralogy, and surface area. Results showed that low-temperature behavior of aged mastic can be modified by controlling filler concentration and type. Fillers acts as an agent adsorbing heavy fractions of asphalt binder, therefore reducing stiffness and changing glass-transition temperature. Also, during oxidative aging of asphalt binders and mastics, both diffusion and adsorption mechanisms play a role in the rate of aging of asphaltic material. A method to characterize the behavior of mastics with aging was also developed by monitoring the mastics |G*| aging index (ratio of complex modulus before and after aging). Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) testing results supported mentioned findings regarding |G*| changes, as the presence of mineral filler appears to decelerate the rate of production of larger molecular size oxidation products in the binder phase of mastics. Implication of the findings is that change in molecular size

  17. Atmospheric transport of mineral dust from the Indo-Gangetic Plain: Temporal variability, acid processing, and iron solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Bikkina; Sarin, M. M.; Rengarajan, R.

    2014-08-01

    transport of chemical constituents from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) to the Bay of Bengal is a conspicuous seasonal feature that occurs during the late NE-monsoon (December-March). With this perspective, aerosol composition and abundance of mineral dust have been studied during November 2009 to March 2010 from a sampling site (Kharagpur: 22.3°N, 87.3°E) in the IGP, representing the atmospheric outflow to the Bay of Bengal. The chemical composition of PM2.5 suggests the dominance of nss-SO42- (6.9-24.3 µg m-3); whereas the abundance of mineral dust varied from 3 to 18 µg m-3. The concentration of aerosol iron (FeTot) and its fractional solubility (Fews % = Fews/FeTot *100, where Fews is the water-soluble fraction of FeTot) varied from 60 to 1144 ng m-3 and from 6.7 to 26.5%, respectively. A striking similarity in the temporal variability of total inorganic acidity (TIA = NO3- + nss-SO42-) and Fews (%) provides evidence for acid processing of mineral dust (alluvium) during atmospheric transport from the IGP. The contribution of TIA to water-soluble inorganic species [(nss-SO42- + NO3-)/ΣWSIS], mass ratios of Ca/Al and Fe/Al, and abundance of dust (%) and Fews (%) in the IGP-outflow are similar to the aerosol composition over the Bay of Bengal. With the rapid increase in anthropogenic activities over south and south-east Asia, the enhanced fractional solubility of aerosol iron (attributed to acid processing of mineral dust) has implications to further increase in the air-sea deposition of Fe to the Ocean surface.

  18. Conflict minerals from the Democratic Republic of the Congo: global tungsten processing plants, a critical part of the tungsten supply chain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bermúdez-Lugo, Omayra

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) analyzes supply chains to identify and define major components of mineral and material flows from ore extraction, through intermediate forms, to a final product. Two major reasons necessitate these analyses: (1) to identify risks associated with the supply of critical and strategic minerals to the United States and (2) to provide greater supply chain transparency so that policymakers have the information necessary to ensure domestic legislation compliance. This fact sheet focuses on the latter. The USGS National Minerals Information Center has been asked by governmental and non-governmental organizations to provide information on tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold (collectively known as “3TG minerals”) processing facilities worldwide in response to U.S. legislation aimed at removing the link between the trade in these minerals and civil unrest in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Post beneficiation processing plants (smelters and refineries) of 3TG mineral ores and concentrates were identified by company and industry association representatives as being the link in the 3TG mineral supply chain through which these minerals can be traced to their source of origin (mine); determining the point of origin is critical to establishing a transparent conflict mineral supply chain. This fact sheet, the first in a series of 3TG mineral fact sheets, focuses on the tungsten supply chain by listing plants that consume tungsten concentrates to produce ammonium paratungstate and ferrotungsten worldwide.

  19. OPERATIONS ANVIL, CRESSET, TINDERBOX and GUARDIAN Events Husky Pup, Mighty Epic, Hybla Gold, Diablo Hawk, Huron King, and Miners Iron, 24 October 1975 - 31 October 1980

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-30

    dtd 19 Jun 2013 HAROLD I_. BRODE DNA 6325F OPERATIONS ANVIL, CRESSET, TINDERBOX, AND GUARDIAN EVENTS HUSKY PUP, MIGHTY EPIC, HYBLA GOLD, DIABLO ...ELEMENT NO WO NO ACCESSION ‘~0 1 1 TITLE (/nc/ude Securrfy c~aSSlf!cJrlOn) OPk3ATIONS ANVIL, CRESSET, TINDERBOX, AND GUARDIAN : Events Ilusky Pup, Mighty...OPERATIONS ANVIL,, CRESSl:T, TINDERBOX, <ind GUARDIAN : Events llusky PUP, Mighty Epic, Ifybla Cold, Di,iblo Il;lwk, lluron King, and Miners Iron, 24 October

  20. [Evaluating exposure of population to dust, with consideration of components and dispersion contents of industrial discharges from enterprise extracting and processing mineral raw materials (discussion)].

    PubMed

    Mai, I V; Zagorodnov, S Iu; Popova, E V

    2014-01-01

    The article covers results of study concerning disperse content of solid components of discharges from main dust- generating technologic operations in extraction and processing of mineral raw materials (pouring ore to conveyor, drying with combustion gas in fluid-bed, pouring of end product, sorting ore on riddle, drying on vibration dry and cool device, etc). Findings are that fractions under 10 and 2.5 micrometers approach 50% in general structure of dust discharges. Maximal share of low-disperse dust enters ambient air from vibraion dry and cool devices, riddles and pouring places. Exceeded reference values for acute and chronic exposure are registered on TSP and PM10 at a sanitary protection zone border and in the nearest living area points--that can forecast intolerable risks for health of population exposed and necessitate instrumental confirmation of the detected jeopardy level.

  1. Mimicking natural bio-mineralization processes: a new tool for osteochondral scaffold development.

    PubMed

    Tampieri, Anna; Sprio, Simone; Sandri, Monica; Valentini, Federica

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, the concept of regenerative medicine has gained great importance, particularly in the field of orthopaedics, in which current solutions are based mainly on the replacement of damaged tissues with devices that function only as structural replacements with limited regenerative capacity. New regenerative solutions can be obtained by taking inspiration from nature, which surrounds us with a multitude of organisms endowed with extraordinary performance. In particular, bio-mineralization, which is the basis of the formation of load-bearing structures in vertebrate and invertebrate organisms, can be exploited to achieve innovative devices for the repair and reconstruction of bone and osteo-cartilaginous tissues.

  2. DORIS processing at the European Space Operations Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Michiel; Flohrer, Claudia; Springer, Tim; Dow, John

    2010-12-01

    This paper gives an overview of the DORIS related activities at the Navigation Support Office of the European Space Operations Centre. The DORIS activities were started in 2002 because of the launch of the Envisat satellite where ESOC is responsible for the validation of the Envisat Precise Orbits and a brief overview of the key Envisat activities at ESOC is given. Typical orbit comparison RMS values between the CNES POE (GDR-C) and the ESOC POD solution is 6.5, 18.8 and 23.1 mm in radial-, along- and cross-track direction. In the framework of the generation of the ITRF2008 ESOC participated in the reprocessing of all three space geodetic techniques; DORIS, SLR, and GPS. Here the main results of our DORIS reprocessing, in the framework of the International DORIS Service (IDS), are given. The WRMS of the weekly ESOC solution (esawd03) for the 2004-2009 period compared to the IDS-1 combined solution is of the order of 12 mm. Based on the long time series of homogeneously processed data a closer look is taken at the estimated solar radiation pressure parameters of the different satellites used in this DORIS analysis. The main aim being the stabilization of the Z-component of the geocentre estimates. We conclude that the ESOC participation to the IDS ITRF2008 contribution has been beneficial for both ESOC and the IDS. ESOC has profited significantly from the very open and direct communications and comparisons that took place within the IDS during the reprocessing campaign.

  3. Offline modeling for product quality prediction of mineral processing using modeling error PDF shaping and entropy minimization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jinliang; Chai, Tianyou; Wang, Hong

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a novel offline modeling for product quality prediction of mineral processing which consists of a number of unit processes in series. The prediction of the product quality of the whole mineral process (i.e., the mixed concentrate grade) plays an important role and the establishment of its predictive model is a key issue for the plantwide optimization. For this purpose, a hybrid modeling approach of the mixed concentrate grade prediction is proposed, which consists of a linear model and a nonlinear model. The least-squares support vector machine is adopted to establish the nonlinear model. The inputs of the predictive model are the performance indices of each unit process, while the output is the mixed concentrate grade. In this paper, the model parameter selection is transformed into the shape control of the probability density function (PDF) of the modeling error. In this context, both the PDF-control-based and minimum-entropy-based model parameter selection approaches are proposed. Indeed, this is the first time that the PDF shape control idea is used to deal with system modeling, where the key idea is to turn model parameters so that either the modeling error PDF is controlled to follow a target PDF or the modeling error entropy is minimized. The experimental results using the real plant data and the comparison of the two approaches are discussed. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  4. 26 CFR 1.614-4 - Treatment under the Internal Revenue Code of 1939 with respect to separate operating mineral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., 1964, in the case of oil and gas wells. 1.614-4 Section 1.614-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... mineral interests for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1964, in the case of oil and gas wells. (a... amendment by section 226(a) of the Revenue Act of 1964. All references in this section to section 614(d) are...

  5. 26 CFR 1.614-4 - Treatment under the Internal Revenue Code of 1939 with respect to separate operating mineral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., 1964, in the case of oil and gas wells. 1.614-4 Section 1.614-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... mineral interests for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1964, in the case of oil and gas wells. (a... amendment by section 226(a) of the Revenue Act of 1964. All references in this section to section 614(d) are...

  6. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-10-05

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF).

  7. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-10-05

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF).

  8. 9 CFR 381.304 - Operations in the thermal processing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... before process timing begins shall be operated to assure that such water will not lower the temperature... (or operating process schedules) for daily production, including minimum initial temperatures and... from bypassing the thermal processing operation. (c) Initial temperature. The initial temperature of...

  9. 21 CFR 113.87 - Operations in the thermal processing room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Operations in the thermal processing room. 113.87... CONTAINERS Production and Process Controls § 113.87 Operations in the thermal processing room. (a) Operating... Food and Drug Administration. (b) A system for product traffic control in the retort room shall...

  10. In situ Raman characterization of minerals and degradation processes in a variety of cultural and geological heritage sites.

    PubMed

    Gázquez, F; Rull, F; Sanz-Arranz, A; Medina, J; Calaforra, J M; de Las Heras, C; Lasheras, J A

    2017-02-05

    We test the capabilities of in situ Raman spectroscopy for non-destructive analysis of degradation processes in invaluable masterpieces, as well as for the characterization of minerals and prehistoric rock-art in caves. To this end, we have studied the mechanism of decay suffered by the 15th-century limestone sculptures that decorate the retro-choir of Burgos Cathedral (N Spain). In situ Raman probe detected hydrated sulfate and nitrate minerals on the sculptures, which are responsible for the decay of the original limestone. In addition, in situ Raman analyses were performed on unique speleothems in El Soplao Cave (Cantabria, N Spain) and in the Gruta de las Maravillas (Aracena, SW Spain). Unusual cave minerals were detected in El Soplao Cave, such as hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O), as well as ferromanganese oxides in the black biogenic speleothems recently discovered in this cavern. In the Gruta de las Maravillas, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) was identified for the first time, as part of the oldest cave materials, so providing additional evidence of hypogenic mechanisms that occurred in this cave during earlier stages of its formation. Finally, we present preliminary analyses of several cave paintings in the renowned "Polychrome Hall" of Altamira Cave (Cantabria, N. Spain). Hematite (Fe2O3) is the most abundant mineral phase, which provides the characteristic ochre-reddish color to the Altamira bison and deer paintings. Thus, portable Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated to be an analytical technique compatible with preserving our cultural and natural heritage, since the analysis does not require physical contact between the Raman head and the analyzed items.

  11. In situ Raman characterization of minerals and degradation processes in a variety of cultural and geological heritage sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gázquez, F.; Rull, F.; Sanz-Arranz, A.; Medina, J.; Calaforra, J. M.; de las Heras, C.; Lasheras, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    We test the capabilities of in situ Raman spectroscopy for non-destructive analysis of degradation processes in invaluable masterpieces, as well as for the characterization of minerals and prehistoric rock-art in caves. To this end, we have studied the mechanism of decay suffered by the 15th-century limestone sculptures that decorate the retro-choir of Burgos Cathedral (N Spain). In situ Raman probe detected hydrated sulfate and nitrate minerals on the sculptures, which are responsible for the decay of the original limestone. In addition, in situ Raman analyses were performed on unique speleothems in El Soplao Cave (Cantabria, N Spain) and in the Gruta de las Maravillas (Aracena, SW Spain). Unusual cave minerals were detected in El Soplao Cave, such as hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O), as well as ferromanganese oxides in the black biogenic speleothems recently discovered in this cavern. In the Gruta de las Maravillas, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) was identified for the first time, as part of the oldest cave materials, so providing additional evidence of hypogenic mechanisms that occurred in this cave during earlier stages of its formation. Finally, we present preliminary analyses of several cave paintings in the renowned "Polychrome Hall" of Altamira Cave (Cantabria, N. Spain). Hematite (Fe2O3) is the most abundant mineral phase, which provides the characteristic ochre-reddish color to the Altamira bison and deer paintings. Thus, portable Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated to be an analytical technique compatible with preserving our cultural and natural heritage, since the analysis does not require physical contact between the Raman head and the analyzed items.

  12. Characterization of surface processes on mineral surfaces in aqueous solutions. Annual report for fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Leckie, J.O.

    1993-11-01

    Performance assessments by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the DOE`s Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) are being done investigating the environmental risk related to long-term disposal of hazardous wastes resulting from the use of radioactive materials that must subsequently be isolated from the environment. The YMP site, located in southwestern Nevada, is intended for the storage of high-level wastes generated by nuclear energy-related activities, including spent fuel and waste from reprocessed fuel rods. The work covered by this contract is necessary for producing a defensible model and dataset, and may be critical for evaluation of repository compliance. This work, performed by the Environmental Engineering and Science research group at Stanford University, will quantify the adsorption of uranyl on various minerals. The project`s principle objective is to provide sorption coefficients for uranyl and other ions of interest to predict radionuclide movements form the repository to accessible environments. This adsorption data is essential for the unambiguous interpretation of field experiments and observations. In this report, details of the activity and progress made with respect to the study of uranyl adsorption on mineral surfaces is presented and discussed.

  13. The Grafting of Industrial Chemicals Operations onto the Bayer Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Lester A. D.

    Concepts are presented for the grafting of industrial chemicals manufacturing processes onto a Bayer Process, and the implications of these chemical processes on the host process are identified. The application of these concepts as guidelines for the downstream manufacture of chemicals at alumina chemicals complexes located away from Bayer refineries, is also considered. A full line of industrial alumina chemicals is covered.

  14. Enforcement Alert: Hazardous Waste Management Practices at Mineral Processing Facilities Under Scrutiny by U.S. EPA; EPA Clarifies 'Bevill Exclusion' Wastes and Establishes Disposal Standards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is the enforcement alert for Hazardous Waste Management Practices at Mineral Processing Facilities Under Scrutiny by U.S. EPA; EPA Clarifies 'Bevill Exclusion' Wastes and Establishes Disposal Standards

  15. Sulfates on Mars as Markers of Aqueous Processes: An Integrated Multidisciplinary Study of Minerals, Mars Analog sites and Recent Mission Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.; Dyar, M. D.; Brown, A. J.; Parente, M.

    2006-01-01

    Our analyses of sulfate minerals, analog sites, and Martian spectra and spectral images is focused on characterization of the Martian surface and in particular identification of aqueous processes there.

  16. Aqueous mineralization process to synthesize uniform shuttle-like BaMoO{sub 4} microcrystals at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xueying; Du Jin; Li Haibo; Zhang Maofeng; Xi Baojuan; Fan Hai; Zhu Yongchun; Qian Yitai

    2007-11-15

    Single-crystalline BaMoO{sub 4} microcrystals with uniform shuttle-like morphology have been successfully prepared via a facile aqueous solution mineralization process at room temperature. It was found that the pH value and the reaction temperature had important influences on the formation of the BaMoO{sub 4} microcrystals. The shuttle-like microcrystals can be obtained in alkaline aqueous solution (pH=9-14), and when the pH value was adjusted to 6-7, cocoon-like microcrystals appeared. A possible two-stage growth process has been proposed, and the Ostwald ripening was responsible for the formation of the shuttle-like BaMoO{sub 4} microcrystals. The products were characterized by XRD, XPS, FESEM, HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy. Room-temperature photoluminescence indicated that the as-prepared BaMoO{sub 4} microcrystals had a strong blue emission peak centered at 438 nm. - Graphical abstract: A facile aqueous mineralization process has been used to synthesize uniform shuttle-like BaMoO{sub 4} microcrystals at room temperature. High quality, large scale, and uniform microcrystals with a mean length size of 50 {mu}m can be easily obtained. These microcrystals exhibit single-crystal nature and perfect symmetry.

  17. Mineralization of metoprolol by electro-Fenton and photoelectro-Fenton processes.

    PubMed

    Isarain-Chávez, Eloy; Garrido, José Antonio; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Centellas, Francesc; Arias, Conchita; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Brillas, Enric

    2011-02-24

    Solutions of about 0.25 mM of the β-blocker metoprolol tartrate (100 mg L(-1) total organic carbon) with 0.5 mM Fe(2+) in the presence and absence of 0.1 mM Cu(2+) of pH 3.0 have been comparatively degraded under electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) conditions. The electrolyses were carried out with two systems: (i) a single cell with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and an air-diffusion cathode (ADE) for H(2)O(2) electrogeneration and (ii) a combined cell with a BDD/ADE pair coupled with a Pt/carbon felt (CF) cell. Overall mineralization was reached in all PEF treatments using both systems due to the efficient production of hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) from Fenton's reaction induced by UVA light and the quick photolysis of Fe(III) carboxylate complexes formed. In EF, the combined cell was much more potent than the single one by the larger (•)OH generation from the continuous Fe(2+) regeneration at the CF cathode, accelerating the oxidation of organics. However, almost total mineralization in EF was feasible using the combined cell in the presence of 0.1 mM Cu(2+), because of the parallel quick oxidation of Cu(II) carboxylate complexes by (•)OH. Metoprolol decay always followed a pseudo-first-order reaction. Aromatic products related to consecutive hydroxylation/oxidation reactions of metoprolol were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The evolution of the aromatic 4-(2-methoxyethyl)phenol and generated carboxylic acids was followed by HPLC. The degradation rate and mineralization degree of metoprolol tartrate were limited by the removal of Fe(III) and Cu(II) complexes of ultimate carboxylic acids such as formic, oxalic, and oxamic. NH(4)(+) ion and to a lesser extent NO(3)(-) ion were released in all treatments, being quantified by ionic chromatography.

  18. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Lambert, D.P.

    1992-11-09

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for tetraphenylborate precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92-737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The program was in conjunction with reducing the nitrite ion level in DWPF feed.

  19. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Lambert, D.P.

    1992-11-09

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for tetraphenylborate precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92-737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The program was in conjunction with reducing the nitrite ion level in DWPF feed.

  20. Operation Just Cause and the U.S. Policy Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    President Bush to give the order for Operation Just Cause. The success of Operation Just Cause reversed the years of neglect and the recent blunders in U.S...morning, U.S. officials saw members of the elite Battalion " Machos del Monte" drive past the American Embassy on their way to assist Noriega. Twenty-six...threatened the woman with sexual violence. Eventually the pair were released and they returned to base to report the incident. These two incidents eliminated