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Sample records for mineralocorticoid receptor testicular

  1. The Multifaceted Mineralocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.

    2015-01-01

    The primary adrenal cortical steroid hormones, aldosterone, and the glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone, act through the structurally similar mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Aldosterone is crucial for fluid, electrolyte, and hemodynamic homeostasis and tissue repair; the significantly more abundant glucocorticoids are indispensable for energy homeostasis, appropriate responses to stress, and limiting inflammation. Steroid receptors initiate gene transcription for proteins that effect their actions as well as rapid non-genomic effects through classical cell signaling pathways. GR and MR are expressed in many tissues types, often in the same cells, where they interact at molecular and functional levels, at times in synergy, others in opposition. Thus the appropriate balance of MR and GR activation is crucial for homeostasis. MR has the same binding affinity for aldosterone, cortisol, and corticosterone. Glucocorticoids activate MR in most tissues at basal levels and GR at stress levels. Inactivation of cortisol and corticosterone by 11β-HSD2 allows aldosterone to activate MR within aldosterone target cells and limits activation of the GR. Under most conditions, 11β-HSD1 acts as a reductase and activates cortisol/corticosterone, amplifying circulating levels. 11β-HSD1 and MR antagonists mitigate inappropriate activation of MR under conditions of oxidative stress that contributes to the pathophysiology of the cardiometabolic syndrome; however, MR antagonists decrease normal MR/GR functional interactions, a particular concern for neurons mediating cognition, memory, and affect. PMID:24944027

  2. Localization of mineralocorticoid receptors at mammalian synapses.

    PubMed

    Prager, Eric M; Brielmaier, Jennifer; Bergstrom, Hadley C; McGuire, Jennifer; Johnson, Luke R

    2010-12-15

    In the brain, membrane associated nongenomic steroid receptors can induce fast-acting responses to ion conductance and second messenger systems of neurons. Emerging data suggest that membrane associated glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors may directly regulate synaptic excitability during times of stress when adrenal hormones are elevated. As the key neuron signaling interface, the synapse is involved in learning and memory, including traumatic memories during times of stress. The lateral amygdala is a key site for synaptic plasticity underlying conditioned fear, which can both trigger and be coincident with the stress response. A large body of electrophysiological data shows rapid regulation of neuronal excitability by steroid hormone receptors. Despite the importance of these receptors, to date, only the glucocorticoid receptor has been anatomically localized to the membrane. We investigated the subcellular sites of mineralocorticoid receptors in the lateral amygdala of the Sprague-Dawley rat. Immunoblot analysis revealed the presence of mineralocorticoid receptors in the amygdala. Using electron microscopy, we found mineralocorticoid receptors expressed at both nuclear including: glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and extra nuclear sites including: presynaptic terminals, neuronal dendrites, and dendritic spines. Importantly we also observed mineralocorticoid receptors at postsynaptic membrane densities of excitatory synapses. These data provide direct anatomical evidence supporting the concept that, at some synapses, synaptic transmission is regulated by mineralocorticoid receptors. Thus part of the stress signaling response in the brain is a direct modulation of the synapse itself by adrenal steroids.

  3. Aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptors in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Funder, John W

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone is currently thought to exert its physiologic effects by activating epithelial mineralocorticoid receptors, and its pathologic effects on the cardiovascular system via mineralocorticoid receptors in the heart and blood vessels. Recent studies have extended this understanding to include a reevaluation of the roles of aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptor activation in blood pressure control; the rapid, nongenomic effects of aldosterone; the role of cortisol as a mineralocorticoid receptor agonist under conditions of redox change/tissue damage/reactive oxygen species generation; the growing consensus that primary aldosteronism accounts for approximately 10% of all essential hypertension; recent new insights into the cardioprotective role of spironolactone; and the development of third- and fourth-generation mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists for use in cardiovascular and other inflammatory disease. These findings on aldosterone action and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade are analyzed in the context of the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  4. Mineralocorticoid receptors in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zennaro, Maria-Christina; Caprio, Massimiliano; Fève, Bruno

    2009-11-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates aldosterone effects on salt homeostasis and blood pressure regulation. MR activation also promotes inflammation, cardiovascular remodelling and endothelial dysfunction, and affects adipose tissue differentiation and function. Some of these effects derive from MR activation by glucocorticoids. Recent epidemiological studies show that the incidence of metabolic syndrome increases across quartiles of aldosterone, implicating the MR as a central player in metabolic homeostasis, involving electrolyte, water and energy balance. This review summarizes the current understanding of MR-mediated effects in diverse tissues and the role of aldosterone as a cardiometabolic risk factor, and discusses the possible relationship between inappropriate MR activation (by both mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids) and the development of metabolic syndrome.

  5. Renal mineralocorticoid receptor and electrolyte homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Terker, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    The renal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a steroid hormone receptor essential for maintaining electrolyte homeostasis. Its role in mediating effects of aldosterone was likely vital in enabling the evolution of terrestrial life. Dysregulated aldosterone-MR signaling has been identified as the cause of multiple clinical diseases, suggesting the physiological importance of the MR. While the physiology of this pathway has been studied for over 60 years, only more recently have genetic mouse models been available to dissect its function in vivo. This review will focus on recent advances in our knowledge of MR function with an emphasis on these models. PMID:26136532

  6. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  7. Emerging cardiovascular indications of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Parviz, Yasir; Iqbal, Javaid; Pitt, Bertram; Adlam, David; Al-Mohammad, Abdallah; Zannad, Faiez

    2015-04-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism is a well-established treatment modality for patients with hypertension, heart failure, and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) post-myocardial infarction (MI). There are emerging data showing potential benefits of MR antagonists in other cardiovascular conditions. Studies have shown association between MR activation and the development of myocardial fibrosis, coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome, and cerebrovascular diseases. This review examines the preclinical and clinical data of MR antagonists for novel indications including heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, valvular heart disease, metabolic syndrome, renal disease, and stroke. MR antagonists are not licensed for these conditions yet; however, emerging data suggest that indication for MR antagonists are likely to broaden; further studies are warranted.

  8. Principal function of mineralocorticoid signaling suggested by constitutive knockout of the mineralocorticoid receptor in medaka fish

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Yoshiki, Madoka; Takahashi, Hideya; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ogino, Yukiko; Ikeuchi, Toshitaka; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Konno, Norifumi; Matsuda, Kouhei; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    As in osmoregulation, mineralocorticoid signaling is implicated in the control of brain-behavior actions. Nevertheless, the understanding of this role is limited, partly due to the mortality of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)-knockout (KO) mice due to impaired Na+ reabsorption. In teleost fish, a distinct mineralocorticoid system has only been identified recently. Here, we generated a constitutive MR-KO medaka as the first adult-viable MR-KO animal, since MR expression is modest in osmoregulatory organs but high in the brain of adult medaka as for most teleosts. Hyper- and hypo-osmoregulation were normal in MR-KO medaka. When we studied the behavioral phenotypes based on the central MR localization, however, MR-KO medaka failed to track moving dots despite having an increase in acceleration of swimming. These findings reinforce previous results showing a minor role for mineralocorticoid signaling in fish osmoregulation, and provide the first convincing evidence that MR is required for normal locomotor activity in response to visual motion stimuli, but not for the recognition of these stimuli per se. We suggest that MR potentially integrates brain-behavioral and visual responses, which might be a conserved function of mineralocorticoid signaling through vertebrates. Importantly, this fish model allows for the possible identification of novel aspects of mineralocorticoid signaling. PMID:27897263

  9. Novel interactions of the mineralocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Peter J

    2015-06-15

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) differs from the other steroid receptors in that it responds to two physiological ligands, aldosterone and cortisol. In epithelial tissues, aldosterone selectivity is determined by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II. In other tissues cortisol is the primary ligand; in some tissues cortisol may act as an antagonist. To better target MR, an understanding of the structural determinants of tissue and ligand-specific MR activation is required. Our focus is on interactions of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) with ligand, the N-terminal domain and putative co-regulatory molecules. Molecular modelling has identified a region in the LBD of the MR and indeed other steroid receptors that critically defines ligand-specificity for aldosterone and cortisol, yet is not part of the ligand-binding pocket. An interaction between the N-terminus and LBD observed in the MR is aldosterone-dependent but is unexpectedly antagonised by cortisol. The structural basis of this interaction has been defined. We have identified proteins which interact in the presence of either aldosterone or cortisol but not both. These have been confirmed as coactivators of the full-length hMR. The structural basis of this interaction has been determined for tesmin, a ligand-discriminant coactivator of the MR. The successful identification of the structural basis of antagonism and of ligand-specific interactions of the MR may provide the basis for the development of novel MR ligands with tissue specificity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mineralocorticoid Receptors, Inflammation and Sympathetic Drive in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Appreciation for the role of aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptors in cardiovascular disease is accelerating rapidly. Recent experimental work has unveiled a strong relationship between brain mineralocorticoid receptors and sympathetic drive, an important determinant of outcome in heart failure and hypertension. Two putative mechanisms are explored in this manuscript. First, brain mineralocorticoid receptors may influence sympathetic discharge by regulating the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into the circulation. Blood-borne pro-inflammatory cytokines act upon receptors in the microvasculature of the brain to induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity and the production of prostaglandin E2, which penetrates the blood-brain barrier to activate the sympathetic nervous system. Second, brain mineralocorticoid receptors may influence sympathetic drive by upregulating the activity of the brain renin-angiotensin system, resulting in NAD(P)H oxidase dependent superoxide production. A potential role for superoxide dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in the regulation of sympathetic nerve activity is also considered. Other potential downstream signaling mechanisms contributing to mineralocorticoid receptor mediated sympathetic excitation are under investigation. PMID:19648480

  11. Interfering with mineralocorticoid receptor activation: the past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aldosterone is a potent mineralocorticoid produced by the adrenal gland. Aldosterone binds to and activates the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in a plethora of tissues, but the cardiovascular actions of aldosterone are of primary interest clinically. Although MR antagonists were developed as antihypertensive agents, they are now considered to be important therapeutic options for patients with heart failure. Specifically, blocking only the MR has proven to be a difficult task because of its similarity to other steroid receptors, including the androgen and progesterone receptors. This lack of specificity caused the use of the first-generation mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists to be fraught with difficulty because of the side effects produced by drug administration. However, in recent years, several advances have been made that could potentially increase the clinical use of agents that inhibit the actions of aldosterone. These will be discussed here along with some examples of the beneficial effects of these new therapeutic agents. PMID:25165560

  12. Mineralocorticoid receptor activation in obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Miki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2009-08-01

    Obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome have become major public health concerns. Nowadays, aldosterone is recognized as an important mediator of cardiovascular and renal damage. In the kidney, aldosterone injures glomerular visceral epithelial cells (podocytes), the final filtration barrier to plasma macromolecules, leading to proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists effectively ameliorate proteinuria in patients or in animal models of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well as in patients who experience 'aldosterone breakthrough.' Recently, clinical and experimental studies have shown that plasma aldosterone concentration is associated with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome. We showed that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)/cp, an experimental model of obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome, are prone to glomerular podocyte injury, proteinuria and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, especially when the animals are fed a high-salt diet. Inappropriate activation of the aldosterone/MR system underlies the renal and cardiac injuries. Adipocyte-derived aldosterone-releasing factors (ARFs), although still unidentified, may account for aldosterone excess and the resultant target organ complication in SHR/cp. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that MR activation triggers target organ disease even in normal or low aldosterone states. We identified a small GTP (guanosine triphosphate)-binding protein, Rac1, as a novel activator of MR, and showed that this ligand-independent MR activation by Rac1 contributes to the nephropathy of several CKD models. We expect that ARFs and Rac1 can be novel therapeutic targets for metabolic syndrome and CKD. Future large-scale clinical trials are awaited to prove the efficacy of MR blockade in patients with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  13. Evolution of hormone selectivity in glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael E; Funder, John W; Kattoula, Stephanie R

    2013-09-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) are descended from an ancestral corticoid receptor (CR). To date, the earliest CR have been found in lamprey and hagfish, two jawless fish (cyclostomes) that evolved at the base of the vertebrate line. Lamprey CR has both MR and GR activity. Distinct orthologs of the GR and MR first appear in skates and sharks, which are cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes). Aldosterone, the physiological mineralocorticoid in terrestrial vertebrates, first appears in lobe-finned fish, such as lungfish and coelacanth, forerunners of terrestrial vertebrates, but not in sharks, skates or ray-finned fish. Skate MR are transcriptionally activated by glucocorticoids, such as corticosterone and cortisol, as well as by mineralocorticoids such as deoxycorticosterone and (experimentally) aldosterone; skate GR have low affinity for all human corticosteroids and 1α-OH-corticosterone, which has been proposed to be biologically active glucocorticoid. In fish, cortisol is both physiological mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid; in terrestrial vertebrates, cortisol or corticosterone are the physiological glucocorticoids acting through GR, and aldosterone via MR as the physiologic mineralocorticoid. MR have equally high affinity for cortisol, corticosterone and progesterone. We review this evolutionary process through an analysis of changes in sequence and structure of vertebrate GR and MR, identifying changes in these receptors in skates and lobe-fined fish important in allowing aldosterone to act as an agonist at epithelial MR and glucocorticoid specificity for GR. hMR and hGR have lost a key contact between helix 3 and helix 5 that was present in their common ancestor. A serine that is diagnostic for vertebrate MR, and absent in terrestrial and fish GR, is present in lamprey CR, skate MR and GR, but not in coelacanth GR, marking the transition of the GR from MR ancestor. Based on the response of the CR and skate MR and GR to

  14. Localization of Mineralocorticoid Receptors at Mammalian Synapses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-15

    receptor balance in health and disease. Endocr Rev 19: 269–301. 58. Patel PD, Lopez JF, Lyons DM, Burke S, Wallace M, et al. (2000) Glucocorticoid and...Corticosterone alters AMPAR mobility and facilitates bidirectional synaptic plasticity. PLoS One 4: e4714. 75. Roozendaal B, Hernandez A, Cabrera SM, Hagewoud R

  15. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade—a novel approach to fight hyperkalaemia in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, E.; Pitt, B.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia continues to be a major hazard of mineralocorticoid receptor blockade in an effort to retard the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In cardiac patients on mineralocorticoid receptor blockade, RLY-5016 which captures K+ in the colon has been effective in reducing the risk of hyperkalaemia. This compound might be useful in CKD as well. PMID:26120440

  16. Safety profile of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists: Spironolactone and eplerenone.

    PubMed

    Lainscak, Mitja; Pelliccia, Francesco; Rosano, Giuseppe; Vitale, Cristiana; Schiariti, Michele; Greco, Cesare; Speziale, Giuseppe; Gaudio, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Spironolactone was first developed over 50 years ago as a potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist with undesirable side effects; it was followed a decade ago by eplerenone, which is less potent but much more mineralocorticoid receptor-specific. From a marginal role as a potassium-sparing diuretic, spironolactone has been shown to be an extraordinarily effective adjunctive agent in the treatment of progressive heart failure. Also, spironolactone is safe and protective in arterial hypertension, particularly in patients with so-called resistant hypertension. Eplerenone is the second oral aldosterone antagonist available for the treatment of arterial hypertension and heart failure. Treatment with eplerenone has been associated with decreased blood pressure and improved survival for patients with heart failure and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Due to the selectivity of eplerenone for the aldosterone receptor, severe adverse effects such as gynecomastia and vaginal bleeding seem to be less likely in patients who take eplerenone than in those who take spironolactone. The most common and potentially dangerous side effect of spironolactone--hyperkalemia--is also observed with eplerenone but the findings from clinical trials do not indicate more hyperkalemia induced drug withdrawals. Treatment with eplerenone should be initiated at a dosage of 25mg once daily and titrated to a target dosage of 50mg once daily preferably within 4 weeks. Serum potassium levels and renal function should be assessed prior to initiating eplerenone therapy, and periodic monitoring is recommended, especially in patients at high risk of developing hyperkalemia.

  17. Management of hyperkalaemia consequent to mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Roscioni, Sara S; de Zeeuw, Dick; Bakker, Stephan J L; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J

    2012-12-01

    Mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists (MRAs) reduce blood pressure and albuminuria in patients treated with angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II-receptor blockers. The use of MRAs, however, is limited by the occurrence of hyperkalaemia, which frequently occurs in patients older than 65 years with impaired kidney function, and/or diabetes. Patients with these characteristics might still benefit from MRA therapy, however, and should not be excluded from this treatment option. This limitation raises the question of how to optimize the therapeutic use of MRAs in this population of patients. Understanding the individual variability in patients' responses to MRAs, in terms of albuminuria, blood pressure and serum potassium levels, might lead to targeted intervention. MRA use might be restricted to patients with high levels of mineralocorticoid activity, evaluated by circulating renin and aldosterone levels or renal excretion of potassium. In addition, reviewing the patient's diet and concomitant medications might prove useful in reducing the risk of developing subsequent hyperkalaemia. If hyperkalaemia does develop, treatment options exist to decrease potassium levels, including administration of calcium gluconate, insulin, β(2)-agonists, diuretics and cation-exchange resins. In combination with novel aldosterone blockers, these strategies might offer a rationale with which to optimize therapeutic intervention and extend the population of patients who can benefit from use of MRAs.

  18. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Hypertension and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Domenic A.

    2015-01-01

    Spironolactone and eplerenone are both mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists. These compounds block both the epithelial and nonepithelial actions of aldosterone, with the latter assuming increasing clinical relevance. Spironolactone and eplerenone both affect reductions in blood pressure either as mono- or add-on therapy; moreover, they each afford survival benefits in diverse circumstances of heart failure and the probability of renal protection in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. However, as use of mineralocorticoid-blocking agents has expanded, the hazards inherent in taking such drugs have become more apparent. Whereas the endocrine side effects of spironolactone are in most cases little more than a cosmetic annoyance, the potassium-sparing effects of both spironolactone and eplerenone can prove disastrous, even fatal, if sufficient degrees of hyperkalemia emerge. For most patients, however, the risk of developing hyperkalemia in and of itself should not discourage the sensible clinician from bringing these compounds into play. Hyperkalemia should always be considered a possibility in patients receiving either of these medications; therefore, anticipatory steps should be taken to minimize the likelihood of its occurrence if long-term therapy of these agents is being considered. PMID:27057293

  19. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Hypertension and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2015-01-01

    Spironolactone and eplerenone are both mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists. These compounds block both the epithelial and nonepithelial actions of aldosterone, with the latter assuming increasing clinical relevance. Spironolactone and eplerenone both affect reductions in blood pressure either as mono- or add-on therapy; moreover, they each afford survival benefits in diverse circumstances of heart failure and the probability of renal protection in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. However, as use of mineralocorticoid-blocking agents has expanded, the hazards inherent in taking such drugs have become more apparent. Whereas the endocrine side effects of spironolactone are in most cases little more than a cosmetic annoyance, the potassium-sparing effects of both spironolactone and eplerenone can prove disastrous, even fatal, if sufficient degrees of hyperkalemia emerge. For most patients, however, the risk of developing hyperkalemia in and of itself should not discourage the sensible clinician from bringing these compounds into play. Hyperkalemia should always be considered a possibility in patients receiving either of these medications; therefore, anticipatory steps should be taken to minimize the likelihood of its occurrence if long-term therapy of these agents is being considered.

  20. Downregulation of brain mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor by antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment fails to alter spatial navigation in rats.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, M; Landgraf, R; Lörscher, P; Conzelmann, C; Probst, J C; Holsboer, F; Reul, J M

    1998-11-13

    Adult male Brown Norway rats were long-term intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) infused with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (18-mer, double endcapped phosphorothioate protected) targeting either mineralocorticoid or glucocorticoid receptor mRNA, or received the respective mixed bases sequence or vehicle. Mineralocorticoid receptor-mixed bases and glucocorticoid receptor-mixed bases oligodeoxynucleotide infusion (1 microg/0.5 microl/h) over a time period of seven days did not alter hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor binding when compared to vehicle treatment. In contrast, i.c.v. administration of mineralocorticoid receptor, as well as glucocorticoid receptor-antisense over the same time period resulted in a significantly reduced binding of mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor in the hippocampus [mineralocorticoid receptor-antisense group approx. 72% of mineralocorticoid receptor-mixed bases and vehicle groups (100%); glucocorticoid receptor antisense group approx. 77% of glucocorticoid receptor-mixed bases and vehicle]. The specificity of these antisense effects is indicated by the finding that rats treated with mineralocorticoid receptor-antisense did not show any changes in glucocorticoid receptor and vice versa. Animals treated according to this infusion protocol and tested in the Morris water maze for their spatial navigation abilities failed to show significant differences among the groups. These data indicate that a reduction of hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor or glucocorticoid receptor binding capacity by 20-30% does not interfere with spatial navigation.

  1. Interaction between the trout mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kiilerich, Pia; Triqueneaux, Gérard; Christensen, Nynne Meyn; Trayer, Vincent; Terrien, Xavier; Lombès, Marc; Prunet, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    The salmonid corticosteroid receptors (CRs), glucocorticoid receptors 1 and 2 (GR1 and GR2) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) share a high degree of homology with regard to structure, ligand- and DNA response element-binding, and cellular co-localization. Typically, these nuclear hormone receptors homodimerize to confer transcriptional activation of target genes, but a few studies using mammalian receptors suggest some degree of heterodimerization. We observed that the trout MR confers a several fold lower transcriptional activity compared to the trout GRs. This made us question the functional relevance of the MR when this receptor is located in the same cells as the GRs and activated by cortisol. A series of co-transfection experiments using different glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) containing promoter-reporter constructs were carried out to investigate any possible interaction between the piscine CRs. Co-transfection of the GRs with the MR significantly reduced the total transcriptional activity even at low MR levels, suggesting interaction between these receptors. Co-transfection of GR1 or GR2 with the MR did not affect the subcellular localization of the GRs, and the MR-mediated inhibition seemed to be independent of specific activation or inhibition of the MR. Site-directed mutagenesis of the DNA-binding domain and dimerization interface of the MR showed that the inhibition was dependent on DNA binding but not necessarily on dimerization ability. Thus, we suggest that the interaction between MR and the GRs may regulate the cortisol response in cell types where the receptors co-localize and propose a dominant-negative role for the MR in cortisol-mediated transcriptional activity. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. GEMIN4 functions as a coregulator of the mineralocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Fuller, Peter J; Morgan, James; Shibata, Hirotaka; Clyne, Colin D; Young, Morag J

    2015-04-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Pathological activation of the MR causes cardiac fibrosis and heart failure, but clinical use of MR antagonists is limited by the renal side effect of hyperkalemia. Coregulator proteins are known to be critical for nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression. Identification of coregulators, which mediate MR activity in a tissue-specific manner, may allow for the development of novel tissue-selective MR modulators that confer cardiac protection without adverse renal effects. Our earlier studies identified a consensus motif among MR-interacting peptides, MPxLxxLL. Gem (nuclear organelle)-associated protein 4 (GEMIN4) is one of the proteins that contain this motif. Transient transfection experiments in HEK293 and H9c2 cells demonstrated that GEMIN4 repressed agonist-induced MR transactivation in a cell-specific manner. Furthermore, overexpression of GEMIN4 significantly decreased, while knockdown of GEMIN4 increased, the mRNA expression of specific endogenous MR target genes. A physical interaction between GEMIN4 and MR is suggested by their nuclear co-localization upon agonist treatment. These findings indicate that GEMIN4 functions as a novel coregulator of the MR. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR ANTAGONISM CONFERS CARDIOPROTECTION IN HEART FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Seawell, Michael R.; Darazi, Fahed Al; Farah, Victor; Ramanathan, Kodangudi B.; Newman, Kevin P.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2012-01-01

    The symptoms and signs constituting the congestive heart failure (CHF) syndrome have their pathophysiologic origins rooted in a salt-avid renal state mediated by effector hormones of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and adrenergic nervous systems. Controlled clinical trials, conducted over the past decade in patients having minimally to markedly severe symptomatic heart failure, have demonstrated the efficacy of a pharmacologic regimen that interferes with these hormones, including aldosterone receptor binding with either spironolactone or eplerenone. Potential pathophysiologic mechanisms which have not hitherto been considered involved for the salutary responses and cardioprotection provided by these mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are reviewed herein. In particular, we focus on the less well-recognized impact of catecholamines and aldosterone on mono- and divalent cation dyshomeostasis which leads to hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, ionized hypocalcemia with secondary hyperparathyroidism and hypozincemia. Attendant adverse cardiac consequences include a delay in myocardial repolarization with increased propensity for supra- and ventricular arrhythmias and compromised antioxidant defenses with increased susceptibility to nonischemic cardiomyocyte necrosis. PMID:23114591

  4. Mineralocorticoid receptor is involved in rat and human ocular chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Célérier, Isabelle; Bousquet, Elodie; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Jonet, Laurent; Savoldelli, Michèle; Offret, Olivier; Curan, Antoine; Farman, Nicolette; Jaisser, Frédéric; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2012-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) is a vision-threatening eye disease with no validated treatment and unknown pathogeny. In CSCR, dilation and leakage of choroid vessels underneath the retina cause subretinal fluid accumulation and retinal detachment. Because glucocorticoids induce and aggravate CSCR and are known to bind to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), CSCR may be related to inappropriate MR activation. Our aim was to assess the effect of MR activation on rat choroidal vasculature and translate the results to CSCR patients. Intravitreous injection of the glucocorticoid corticosterone in rat eyes induced choroidal enlargement. Aldosterone, a specific MR activator, elicited the same effect, producing choroid vessel dilation -and leakage. We identified an underlying mechanism of this effect: aldosterone upregulated the endothelial vasodilatory K channel KCa2.3. Its blockade prevented aldosterone-induced thickening. To translate these findings, we treated 2 patients with chronic nonresolved CSCR with oral eplerenone, a specific MR antagonist, for 5 weeks, and observed impressive and rapid resolution of retinal detachment and choroidal vasodilation as well as improved visual acuity. The benefit was maintained 5 months after eplerenone withdrawal. Our results identify MR signaling as a pathway controlling choroidal vascular bed relaxation and provide a pathogenic link with human CSCR, which suggests that blockade of MR could be used therapeutically to reverse choroid vasculopathy. PMID:22684104

  5. Third Generation Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists; Why We Need a Fourth

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise

    2015-01-01

    The first mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, spironolactone, was developed almost 60 years ago to treat primary aldosteronism and pathological edema. Its use waned in part due to its lack of selectivity. Subsequently knowledge of the scope of MR function was expanded along with clinical evidence of the therapeutic importance of MR antagonists to prevent the ravages of inappropriate MR activation. Forty-two years elapsed between the first and MR-selective second generation of MR antagonists. Fifteen years later, despite serious shortcomings of the existing antagonists, a third generation antagonist has yet to be marketed. Progress has been slowed by the lack of appreciation of the large variety of cell types that express the MR and its diverse cell-type-specific actions, as well as its uniquely complex interactions actions at the molecular level. New MR antagonists should preferentially target the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of MR and perhaps its excitatory effects on sympathetic nervous system, but not the renal tubular epithelium or neurons of the cortex and hippocampus. This review briefly describes efforts to develop a third generation MR antagonist and why fourth generation antagonists and selective agonists based on structural determinants of tissue and ligand-specific MR activation should be contemplated. PMID:26466326

  6. Mineralocorticoid receptors, inflammation and sympathetic drive in a rat model of systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Felder, Robert B

    2010-01-01

    Appreciation for the role of aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptors in cardiovascular disease is accelerating rapidly. Recent experimental work has unveiled a strong relationship between brain mineralocorticoid receptors and sympathetic drive, an important determinant of outcome in heart failure and hypertension. Two putative mechanisms are explored in this manuscript. First, brain mineralocorticoid receptors may influence sympathetic discharge by regulating the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into the circulation. Blood-borne pro-inflammatory cytokines act upon receptors in the microvasculature of the brain to induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity and the production of prostaglandin E(2), which penetrates the blood-brain barrier to activate the sympathetic nervous system. Second, brain mineralocorticoid receptors may influence sympathetic drive by upregulating the activity of the brain renin-angiotensin system, resulting in NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent superoxide production. A potential role for superoxide-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways in the regulation of sympathetic nerve activity is also considered. Other potential downstream signalling mechanisms contributing to mineralocorticoid receptor-mediated sympathetic excitation are under investigation.

  7. Molecular pharmacology of the mineralocorticoid receptor: prospects for novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kolkhof, Peter; Borden, Steffen A

    2012-03-24

    The blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) has been shown to be an invaluable therapy in heart failure and hypertension. To date, only two steroidal antimineralocorticoids, spironolactone (and its active metabolite canrenone) and eplerenone, have been approved, whereas novel non-steroidal compounds are in preclinical and early development. The careful investigation of the efficacy and tolerance of spironolactone in essential hypertension initially supported the idea that a more selective second generation of MR antagonists is desired for chronic treatment of cardiovascular diseases. More than 40 years went by between the approval of the first MR antagonist spironolactone and the market introduction of its sole successor, eplerenone. The molecular pharmacology of MR antagonists may be addressed at different levels. Available preclinical and clinical data of the two approved steroidal antimineralocorticoids allow a good comparison of potency and selectivity of MR antagonists and their pharmacokinetic properties. The search for novel generations of MR antagonists with the ultimate goal of a more tissue selective mode of action may require novel compounds that are differentiated with respect to the binding mode to the MR. Other factors that may contribute to tissue selectivity as e.g. the physicochemical properties of a drug and how they influence the resulting pharmacology in the context of tissue selective co-factor expression are even less well understood. In the following we will review these aspects and demonstrate that the molecular pharmacology of current MR antagonists is on the one hand far from well understood and, on the other hand, still offers room for improvements.

  8. The necessity and effectiveness of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetic nephropathy is the most common primary disease necessitating dialysis treatment in the world including Japan. Major guidelines for treatment of hypertension in Japan, the United States and Europe recommend the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, which suppress the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), as the antihypertensive drugs of first choice in patients with coexisting diabetes. However, even with the administration of RAS inhibitors, failure to achieve adequate anti-albuminuric, renoprotective effects and a reduction in cardiovascular events has also been reported. Inadequate blockade of aldosterone may be one of the reasons why long-term administration of RAS inhibitors may not be sufficiently effective in patients with diabetic nephropathy. This review focuses on treatment in diabetic nephropathy and discusses the significance of aldosterone blockade. In pre-nephropathy without overt nephropathy, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist can be used to enhance the blood pressure-lowering effects of RAS inhibitors, improve insulin resistance and prevent clinical progression of nephropathy. In CKD categories A2 and A3, the addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to an RAS inhibitor can help to maintain 'long-term' antiproteinuric and anti-albuminuric effects. However, in category G3a and higher, sufficient attention must be paid to hyperkalemia. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are not currently recommended as standard treatment in diabetic nephropathy. However, many studies have shown promise of better renoprotective effects if mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are appropriately used.

  9. The Effect of Mineralocorticoid and Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonism on Autobiographical Memory Recall and Amygdala Response to Implicit Emotional Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Preskorn, Sheldon H.; Victor, Teresa; Misaki, Masaya; Bodurka, Jerzy; Drevets, Wayne C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acutely elevated cortisol levels in healthy humans impair autobiographical memory recall and alter hemodynamic responses of the amygdala to emotionally valenced stimuli. It is hypothesized that the effects of the cortisol on cognition are influenced by the ratio of mineralocorticoid receptor to glucocorticoid receptor occupation. The current study examined the effects of acutely blocking mineralocorticoid receptors and glucocorticoid receptors separately on 2 processes known to be affected by altering levels of cortisol: the specificity of autobiographical memory recall, and the amygdala hemodynamic response to sad and happy faces. Methods: We employed a within-subjects design in which 10 healthy male participants received placebo, the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone (600mg) alone, and the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone (600mg) alone in a randomized, counter-balanced order separated by 1-week drug-free periods. Results: On autobiographical memory testing, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism impaired, while glucocorticoid receptor antagonism improved, recall relative to placebo, as evinced by changes in the percent of specific memories recalled. During fMRI, the amygdala hemodynamic response to masked sad faces was greater under both mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor antagonism relative to placebo, while the response to masked happy faces was attenuated only during mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism relative to placebo. Conclusions: These data suggest both mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor antagonism (and potentially any deviation from the normal physiological mineralocorticoid receptor/glucocorticoid receptor ratio achieved under the circadian pattern) enhances amygdala-based processing of sad stimuli and may shift the emotional processing bias away from the normative processing bias and towards the negative valence. In contrast, autobiographical memory was enhanced by

  10. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptor Deletion Prevents Diet-Induced Cardiac Diastolic Dysfunction in Females.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guanghong; Habibi, Javad; DeMarco, Vincent G; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Ma, Lixin; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Aroor, Annayya R; Domeier, Timothy L; Zhu, Yi; Meininger, Gerald A; Barrett Mueller, Katelee; Jaffe, Iris Z; Sowers, James R

    2015-12-01

    Overnutrition and insulin resistance are especially prominent risk factors for the development of cardiac diastolic dysfunction in females. We recently reported that consumption of a Western diet (WD) containing excess fat (46%), sucrose (17.5%), and high fructose corn syrup (17.5%) for 16 weeks resulted in cardiac diastolic dysfunction and aortic stiffening in young female mice and that these abnormalities were prevented by mineralocorticoid receptor blockade. Herein, we extend those studies by testing whether WD-induced diastolic dysfunction and factors contributing to diastolic impairment, such as cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, inflammation, and impaired insulin signaling, are modulated by excess endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor signaling. Four-week-old female endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor knockout and wild-type mice were fed mouse chow or WD for 4 months. WD feeding resulted in prolonged relaxation time, impaired diastolic septal wall motion, and increased left ventricular filling pressure indicative of diastolic dysfunction. This occurred in concert with myocardial interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy that were associated with enhanced profibrotic (transforming growth factor β1/Smad) and progrowth (S6 kinase-1) signaling, as well as myocardial oxidative stress and a proinflammatory immune response. WD also induced cardiomyocyte stiffening, assessed ex vivo using atomic force microscopy. Conversely, endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor deficiency prevented WD-induced diastolic dysfunction, profibrotic, and progrowth signaling, in conjunction with reductions in macrophage proinflammatory polarization and improvements in insulin metabolic signaling. Therefore, our findings indicate that increased endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor signaling associated with consumption of a WD plays a key role in the activation of cardiac profibrotic, inflammatory, and growth pathways that lead to diastolic dysfunction in

  11. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Activation Contributes to the Supine Hypertension of Autonomic Failure.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Okamoto, Luis E; Gamboa, Alfredo; Black, Bonnie K; Raj, Satish R; Elijovich, Fernando; Robertson, David; Shibao, Cyndya A; Biaggioni, Italo

    2016-02-01

    Primary autonomic failure is characterized by disabling orthostatic hypotension, but at least half of these patients have paradoxical supine hypertension. Renin-angiotensin mechanisms were not initially thought to contribute to this hypertension because plasma renin activity is often undetectable in autonomic failure. Plasma aldosterone levels are normal, however, and we recently showed that plasma angiotensin II is elevated and acts at AT1 (angiotensin type 1) receptors to contribute to hypertension in these patients. Because aldosterone and angiotensin II can also bind mineralocorticoid receptors to elevate blood pressure, we hypothesized that mineralocorticoid receptor activation plays a role in the hypertension of autonomic failure. To test this hypothesis, we determined the acute effects of the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist eplerenone (50 mg, oral) versus placebo on supine blood pressure in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Medications were given at 8:00 pm with blood pressure recorded every 2 hours for 12 hours. Ten primary autonomic failure patients with supine hypertension completed this study (7 pure autonomic failure, 2 multiple system atrophy, 1 parkinson's disease; 7 male; 70±2 years of age). Eplerenone maximally reduced supine systolic blood pressure by 32±6 mm Hg at 8 hours after administration (versus 8±10 mm Hg placebo, P=0.016), with no effect on nocturia (12-hour urine volume: 985±134 mL placebo versus 931±94 mL eplerenone, P=0.492; nocturnal weight loss: -1.19±0.15 kg placebo versus -1.18±0.15 kg eplerenone, P=0.766). These findings suggest that inappropriate mineralocorticoid receptor activation contributes to the hypertension of autonomic failure, likely independent of canonical mineralocorticoid effects, and provides rationale for use of eplerenone in these patients. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. 617-R2 Mineralocorticoid Receptor Activation Contributes to the Supine Hypertension of Autonomic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Amy C.; Okamoto, Luis E.; Gamboa, Alfredo; Black, Bonnie K.; Raj, Satish R.; Elijovich, Fernando; Robertson, David; Shibao, Cyndya A.; Biaggioni, Italo

    2016-01-01

    Primary autonomic failure is characterized by disabling orthostatic hypotension; but at least half of these patients have paradoxical supine hypertension. Renin-angiotensin mechanisms were not initially thought to contribute to this hypertension, as plasma renin activity is often undetectable in autonomic failure. Plasma aldosterone levels are normal, however, and we recently showed that plasma angiotensin II is elevated and acts at AT1 receptors to contribute to hypertension in these patients. Since aldosterone and angiotensin II can also bind mineralocorticoid receptors to elevate blood pressure, we hypothesized that mineralocorticoid receptor activation plays a role in the hypertension of autonomic failure. To test this hypothesis, we determined the acute effects of the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist eplerenone (50 mg, oral) versus placebo on supine blood pressure in a randomized, double blind, crossover study. Medications were given at 8:00 PM with blood pressure recorded every 2 hours for 12 hours. Ten primary autonomic failure patients with supine hypertension completed this study (7 Pure Autonomic Failure, 2 Multiple System Atrophy, 1 Parkinson’s disease; 7 male; 70±2 years of age). Eplerenone maximally reduced supine systolic blood pressure by 32±6 mmHg at 8 hours after administration (vs. 8±10 mmHg placebo, p=0.016), with no effect on nocturia (12-hour urine volume: 985±134 placebo vs. 931±94 ml eplerenone, p=0.492; nocturnal weight loss: −1.19±0.15 placebo vs. −1.18±0.15 kg eplerenone, p=0.766). These findings suggest that inappropriate mineralocorticoid receptor activation contributes to the hypertension of autonomic failure, likely independent of canonical mineralocorticoid effects, and provides rationale for use of eplerenone in these patients. PMID:26644241

  13. Translational Success Stories: Role of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Carlos M; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2014-01-01

    Aldosterone exerts its best known sodium homeostasis actions by controlling sodium excretion at the level of the distal tubules via activation of the apical epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the basolateral Na+/K+ ATPase pump. Recently, this mineralocorticoid hormone has been demonstrated to act on the heart and blood vessels. Excess release of aldosterone in relation to the salt status induces both genomic and non-genomic effects that by promoting endothelial dysfunction, and vascular and cardio-renal adverse remodeling, contribute to the target organ damage found in hypertension, heart failure, myocardial infarction and chronic renal failure. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockers have been shown to be highly effective in resistant hypertension and to slow down heart failure progression, and in experimental animals, the development of atherosclerosis. Blockade of the action of aldosterone and potentially other mineralocorticoid steroids has been increasingly demonstrated to be an extremely beneficial therapy in different forms of cardiovascular disease. This review provides a summary of the knowledge that exists regarding aldosterone actions in the cardiovascular system and, in providing the translational impact of this knowledge to the clinical arena, illustrates how much more needs to be achieved in exploring the use of mineralocorticoid receptor blockers in less advanced stages of heart, renal, and vascular disease. PMID:25552697

  14. Mineralocorticoid receptors along the nephron: (/sup 3/H)aldosterone binding in rabbit tubules

    SciTech Connect

    Doucet, A.; Katz, A.I.

    1981-12-01

    To identify the site of mineralocorticoid action along the nephron, we measured the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)aldosterone to nephron segments microdissected from aldosterone-deficient rabbits. Specific binding was defined as the difference between binding measured in the absence or in the presence of 2,000-fold excess of unlabeled hormone (in 10/sup -18/ mol.cm tubule length/sup -1/ +/- SE). High specific binding capacity was found in the branched collecting tubule (108 +/- 4), the cortical collecting tubule (119 +/- 9), and the outer medullary collecting tubule (115 +/- 16), whereas specific binding was negligible in the proximal convoluted tubule (8 +/- 9), pars recta (2 +/- 6), medullary thick ascending limb (4 +/- 6), cortical thick ascending limb (6 +/- 2), and distal convoluted tubule (6 +/- 6). In cortical collecting tubules, Scatchard analysis of the specific (/sup 3/H)aldosterone binding indicated a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 2.2 X 10/sup -9/ and a maximum number of binding sites of 157 X 10/sup -18/ mol.cm tubule length/sup -1/. The steroid specificity was assessed from the competition of various steroids for (/sup 3/H)aldosterone binding sites. Receptors from the cortical collecting tubule revealed the following sequence of affinities: aldosterone > DOCA > spironolactone > dexamethasone > 5..cap alpha..-dihydrotestosterone = progesterone = 17..beta..-estradiol, indicating that the binding sites in the collecting tubule are mineralocorticoid receptors. These results demonstrate significant (/sup 3/H)aldosterone binding to receptors of high affinity and mineralocorticoid specificity only in the collecting tubule and suggest that this nephron segment is the target site of mineralocorticoid action in the rabbit kidney.

  15. The L-, N-, and T-type triple calcium channel blocker benidipine acts as an antagonist of mineralocorticoid receptor, a member of nuclear receptor family.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Hiromichi; Hirayama, Kazunori; Yoda, Nobuyuki; Sasaki, Katsutoshi; Kitayama, Tetsuya; Kusaka, Hideaki; Matsubara, Masahiro

    2010-06-10

    Aldosterone-induced activation of mineralocorticoid receptor, a member of the nuclear receptor family, results in increased tissue damage such as vascular inflammation and cardiac and perivascular fibrosis. Benidipine, a long-lasting dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, is used for hypertension and angina. Benidipine exhibits pleiotropic pharmacological features such as renoprotective and cardioprotective effects through triple blockade of L-, N-, and T-type calcium channels. However, the mechanism of additional beneficial effects on end-organ damage is poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of benidipine and other calcium channel blockers on aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation using luciferase reporter assay system. Benidipine showed more potent activity than efonidipine, amlodipine, or azelnidipine. Benidipine depressed the response to higher concentrations of aldosterone, whereas pretreatment of eplerenone, a steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, did not. Binding studies using [(3)H] aldosterone indicated that benidipine and other calcium channel blockers competed for binding to mineralocorticoid receptor. Benidipine and other calcium channel blockers showed antagonistic activity on Ser810 to Leu mutant mineralocorticoid receptor, which is identified in patients with early-onset hypertension. On the other hand, eplerenone partially activated the mutant. Results of analysis using optical isomers of benidipine indicated that inhibitory effect of aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation was independent of its primary blockade of calcium channels. These results suggested that benidipine directly inhibits aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation, and the antagonistic activity might contribute to the drug's pleiotropic pharmacological features.

  16. Blocking Mineralocorticoid Receptors Impairs, Blocking Glucocorticoid Receptors Enhances Memory Retrieval in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rimmele, Ulrike; Besedovsky, Luciana; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Memory retrieval is impaired at very low as well as very high cortisol levels, but not at intermediate levels. This inverted-U-shaped relationship between cortisol levels and memory retrieval may originate from different roles of the mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) that bind cortisol with distinctly different affinity. Here, we examined the role of MRs and GRs in human memory retrieval using specific receptor antagonists. In two double-blind within-subject, cross-over designed studies, young healthy men were asked to retrieve emotional and neutral texts and pictures (learnt 3 days earlier) between 0745 and 0915 hours in the morning, either after administration of 400 mg of the MR blocker spironolactone vs placebo (200 mg at 2300 hours and 200 mg at 0400 hours, Study I) or after administration of the GR blocker mifepristone vs placebo (200 mg at 2300 hours, Study II). Blockade of MRs impaired free recall of both texts and pictures particularly for emotional material. In contrast, blockade of GRs resulted in better memory retrieval for pictures, with the effect being more pronounced for neutral than emotional materials. These findings indicate indeed opposing roles of MRs and GRs in memory retrieval, with optimal retrieval at intermediate cortisol levels likely mediated by high MR but concurrently low GR activation. PMID:23303058

  17. Corticosteroids stimulate the amphibious behavior in mudskipper: potential role of mineralocorticoid receptors in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Mori, Chie; Minami, Shogo; Takahashi, Hideya; Abe, Tsukasa; Ojima, Daisuke; Ogoshi, Maho; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2011-10-24

    It has long been held that cortisol, a glucocorticoid in many vertebrates, carries out both glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid actions in teleost fish. However, 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) has been identified as a specific endogenous ligand for the teleostean mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Furthermore, the expressions of MR mRNA are modest in the osmoregulatory organs, but considerably higher in the brain of most teleosts. These recent findings suggest that the mineralocorticoid system (DOC/MR) may carry out some behavioral functions in fish. To test this possibility, we examined the effects of cortisol and DOC administration in the amphibious behavior in mudskipper (Periophthalmus modestus) in vivo. It was found that mudskippers remained in the water for an increased period of time when they were immersed into 5 μM DOC or cortisol for 8h. Additionally, an exposure to 25 μM DOC for 4 to 8 h caused a decreased migratory frequency of mudskippers to the water, reflected a tendency to remain in the water. It was further observed that after 8 h of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection with 0.3 pmol DOC or cortisol the staying period in the water increased in fish. The migratory frequency was decreased after ICV DOC injection which indicated that fishes stayed in the water. Concurrent ICV injections of cortisol with RU486 [a specific glucocorticoid-receptor (GR) antagonist] inhibited only the partial effects of cortisol. Together with no changes in the plasma DOC concentrations under terrestrial conditions, these results indicate the involvement of brain MRs as cortisol receptors in the preference for an aquatic habitat of mudskippers. Although the role of GR signaling cannot be excluded in the aquatic preference, our data further suggest that the MR may play an important role in the brain dependent behaviors of teleost fish. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Combination decongestion therapy in hospitalized heart failure: loop diuretics, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Mentz, Robert J; Greene, Stephen J; Senni, Michele; Sato, Naoki; Nodari, Savina; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Congestion is the most common reason for admissions and readmissions for heart failure (HF). The vast majority of hospitalized HF patients appear to respond readily to loop diuretics, but available data suggest that a significant proportion are being discharged with persistent evidence of congestion. Although novel therapies targeting congestion should continue to be developed, currently available agents may be utilized more optimally to facilitate complete decongestion. The combination of loop diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists represents a regimen of currently available therapies that affects early and persistent decongestion, while limiting the associated risks of electrolyte disturbances, hemodynamic fluctuations, renal dysfunction and mortality.

  19. Structural analysis of the evolution of steroid specificity in the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael E; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Ollikainen, Noah

    2007-02-16

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) evolved from a common ancestor. Still not completely understood is how specificity for glucocorticoids (e.g. cortisol) and mineralocorticoids (e.g. aldosterone) evolved in these receptors. Our analysis of several vertebrate GRs and MRs in the context of 3D structures of human GR and MR indicates that with the exception of skate GR, a cartilaginous fish, there is a deletion in all GRs, at the position corresponding to Ser-949 in human MR. This deletion occurs in a loop before helix 12, which contains the activation function 2 (AF2) domain, which binds coactivator proteins and influences transcriptional activity of steroids. Unexpectedly, we find that His-950 in human MR, which is conserved in the MR in chimpanzee, orangutan and macaque, is glutamine in all teleost and land vertebrate MRs, including New World monkeys and prosimians. Evolution of differences in the responses of the GR and MR to corticosteroids involved deletion in the GR of a residue corresponding to Ser-949 in human MR. A mutation corresponding to His-950 in human MR may have been important in physiological changes associated with emergence of Old World monkeys from prosimians.

  20. Pivotal role of the mineralocorticoid receptor in corticosteroid-induced adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Caprio, Massimiliano; Fève, Bruno; Claës, Aurélie; Viengchareun, Say; Lombès, Marc; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2007-07-01

    In addition to their role in controlling water and salt homeostasis, recent work suggests that aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) may be involved in adipocyte biology. This is of particular relevance given the role of MR as a high-affinity receptor for both mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids. We have thus examined the effect of aldosterone and MR on white adipose cell differentiation. When cells are cultured in a steroid-free medium, aldosterone promotes acquisition of the adipose phenotype of 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F442A cells in a time-, dose-, and MR-dependent manner. In contrast, late and long-term exposure to dexamethasone inhibits adipocyte terminal maturation. The aldosterone effect on adipose maturation was accompanied by induction of PPARgamma mRNA expression, which was blocked by the MR antagonist spironolactone. Under permissive culture conditions, specific MR down-regulation by siRNAs markedly inhibited 3T3-L1 differentiation by interfering with the transcriptional control of adipogenesis, an effect not mimicked by specific inactivation of the glucocorticoid receptor. These results demonstrate that MR represents an important proadipogenic transcription factor that may mediate both aldosterone and glucocorticoid effects on adipose tissue development. MR thus may be of pathophysiological relevance to the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  1. Does mineralocorticoid receptor play a vital role in the development of depressive disorder?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiao; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Shuai; Zuo, Wei; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide. However, the biological and molecular mechanisms underlying this disease remain unclear. Stress, a disposing factor in the development of depression, leads to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation and glucocorticoids release. Glucocorticoids at physiological concentrations activate two types of steroid receptors including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). During the past decades, lots of studies have confirmed the role of GR in depression. An increasing number of studies, in recent years, indicate that abnormal function of MR is also a crucial component of the pathophysiology of depression. Thus, this review summarizes the role of MR in the HPA axis dysregulation, inflammation, decreased neurogenesis and stress-related behaviors in depression. All of which will provide more information about MR in depression.

  2. Molecular Signature of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Signaling in Cardiomyocytes: From Cultured Cells to Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Latouche, Celine; Sainte-Marie, Yannis; Steenman, Marja; Castro Chaves, Paulo; Naray-Fejes-Toth, Aniko; Fejes-Toth, Geza; Farman, Nicolette; Jaisser, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Excess mineralocorticoid signaling is deleterious for cardiovascular functions, as demonstrated by the beneficial effects of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism on morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure. However, the understanding of signaling pathways after MR activation in the heart remains limited. We performed transcriptomic analyses in the heart of double-transgenic mice with conditional, cardiomyocyte-specific, overexpression of the MR (MRcardio mice) or the glucocorticoid receptor (GR; GRcardio mice). Some of the genes induced in MRcardio mice were selected for comparative evaluation (real time PCR) in vivo in the heart of mice and ex vivo in the MR-expressing cardiomyocyte H9C2 cell line after aldosterone or corticosterone treatment. We demonstrate that chronic MR overexpression in the heart results in a limited number of induced (n = 24) and repressed (n = 22) genes compared with their control littermates. These genes are specifically modulated by MR because there is limited overlap (three induced, four repressed) with the genes that are regulated in the heart of GRcardio mice (compared with control mice: 70 induced, 73 repressed). Interestingly, some MR-induced genes that are up-regulated in vivo in mice are also induced by 24-h aldosterone treatment in H9C2 cells, such as plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and Serpina-3 (α1-antichymotrypsin). The signaling pathways that are affected by long-term activation of MR may be of particular interest to design novel therapeutic targets in cardiac diseases. PMID:20591974

  3. The aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor pathway exerts anti-inflammatory effects in endotoxin-induced uveitis.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Elodie; Zhao, Min; Ly, André; Leroux Les Jardins, Guillaume; Goldenberg, Brigitte; Naud, Marie-Christine; Jonet, Laurent; Besson-Lescure, Bernadette; Jaisser, Frederic; Farman, Nicolette; De Kozak, Yvonne; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that the eye is a mineralocorticoid-sensitive organ and we now question the role of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in ocular inflammation. The endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU), a rat model of human intraocular inflammation, was induced by systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Evaluations were made 6 and 24 hours after intraocular injection of aldosterone (simultaneous to LPS injection). Three hours after onset of EIU, the MR and the glucocorticoid metabolizing enzyme 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) expression were down-regulated in iris/ciliary body and the corticosterone concentration was increased in aqueous humor, altering the normal MR/glucocorticoid receptor (GR) balance. At 24 hours, the GR expression was also decreased. In EIU, aldosterone reduced the intensity of clinical inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. The clinical benefit of aldosterone was abrogated in the presence of the MR antagonist (RU26752) and only partially with the GR antagonist (RU38486). Aldosterone reduced the release of inflammatory mediators (6 and 24 hours: TNF-α, IFN-γ, MIP-1α) in aqueous humor and the number of activated microglia/macrophages. Aldosterone partly prevented the uveitis-induced MR down-regulation. These results suggest that MR expression and activation in iris/ciliary body could protect the ocular structures against damages induced by EIU.

  4. Mineralocorticoid hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 10 – 25% of the population and is an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. The renin-angiotensin system is frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension, be it primary or secondary. The prevalence of primary aldosteronism increases with the severity of hypertension, from 2% in patients with grade 1 hypertension to 20% among resistant hypertensives. Mineralcorticoid hypertension includes a spectrum of disorders ranging from renin-producing pathologies (renin-secreting tumors, malignant hypertension, coarctation of aorta), aldosterone-producing pathologies (primary aldosteronism – Conns syndrome, familial hyperaldosteronism 1, 2, and 3), non-aldosterone mineralocorticoid producing pathologies (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Liddle syndrome, deoxycorticosterone-secreting tumors, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormones (ACTH) syndrome, congenitalvadrenal hyperplasia), and drugs with mineraocorticoid activity (locorice, carbenoxole therapy) to glucocorticoid receptor resistance syndromes. Clinical presentation includes hypertension with varying severity, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. Ratio of plasma aldosterone concentraion to plasma renin activity remains the best screening tool. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling is the best diagnostic test coupled with a CT scan. Treatment is either surgical (adrenelectomy) for unilateral adrenal disease versus medical therapy for idiopathic, ambiguous, or bilateral disease. Medical therapy focuses on blood pressure control and correction of hypokalemia using a combination of anti-hypertensives (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers) and potassium-raising therapies (mineralcorticoid receptor antagonist or potassium sparing diuretics). Direct aldosterone synthetase antagonists represent a promising future therapy. PMID:22145132

  5. Emerging Roles of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor in Pathology: Toward New Paradigms in Clinical Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Jaisser, F; Farman, N

    2016-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and its ligand aldosterone are the principal modulators of hormone-regulated renal sodium reabsorption. In addition to the kidney, there are several other cells and organs expressing MR, in which its activation mediates pathologic changes, indicating potential therapeutic applications of pharmacological MR antagonism. Steroidal MR antagonists have been used for decades to fight hypertension and more recently heart failure. New therapeutic indications are now arising, and nonsteroidal MR antagonists are currently under development. This review is focused on nonclassic MR targets in cardiac, vascular, renal, metabolic, ocular, and cutaneous diseases. The MR, associated with other risk factors, is involved in organ fibrosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and aging; for example, in the kidney and heart MR mediates hormonal tissue-specific ion channel regulation. Genetic and epigenetic modifications of MR expression/activity that have been documented in hypertension may also present significant risk factors in other diseases and be susceptible to MR antagonism. Excess mineralocorticoid signaling, mediated by aldosterone or glucocorticoids binding, now appears deleterious in the progression of pathologies that may lead to end-stage organ failure and could therefore benefit from the repositioning of pharmacological MR antagonists.

  6. Different inactivating mutations of the mineralocorticoid receptor in fourteen families affected by type I pseudohypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Sartorato, Paola; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Armanini, Decio; Kuhnle, Ursula; Khaldi, Yasmina; Salomon, Rémi; Abadie, Véronique; Di Battista, Eliana; Naselli, Arturo; Racine, Alain; Bosio, Maurizio; Caprio, Massimiliano; Poulet-Young, Véronique; Chabrolle, Jean-Pierre; Niaudet, Patrick; De Gennes, Christiane; Lecornec, Marie-Hélène; Poisson, Elodie; Fusco, Anna Maria; Loli, Paola; Lombès, Marc; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2003-06-01

    We have analyzed the human mineralocorticoid receptor (hMR) gene in 14 families with autosomal dominant or sporadic pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA1), a rare form of mineralocorticoid resistance characterized by neonatal renal salt wasting and failure to thrive. Six heterozygous mutations were detected. Two frameshift mutations in exon 2 (insT1354, del8bp537) and one nonsense mutation in exon 4 (C2157A, Cys645stop) generate truncated proteins due to premature stop codons. Three missense mutations (G633R, Q776R, L979P) differently affect hMR function. The DNA binding domain mutant R633 exhibits reduced maximal transactivation, although its binding characteristics and ED(50) of transactivation are comparable with wild-type hMR. Ligand binding domain mutants R776 and P979 present reduced or absent aldosterone binding, respectively, which is associated with reduced or absent ligand-dependent transactivation capacity. Finally, P979 possesses a transdominant negative effect on wild-type hMR activity, whereas mutations G633R and Q776R probably result in haploinsufficiency in PHA1 patients. We conclude that hMR mutations are a common feature of autosomal dominant PHA1, being found in 70% of our familial cases. Their absence in some families underscores the importance of an extensive investigation of the hMR gene and the role of precise diagnostic procedures to allow for identification of other genes potentially involved in the disease.

  7. The Diuretic Torasemide Does Not Prevent Aldosterone-Mediated Mineralocorticoid Receptor Activation in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gravez, Basile; Tarjus, Antoine; Jimenez-Canino, Ruben; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Messaoudi, Smail; de la Rosa, Diego Alvarez; Jaisser, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Aldosterone binds to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and exerts pleiotropic effects beyond enhancing renal sodium reabsorption. Excessive mineralocorticoid signaling is deleterious during the evolution of cardiac failure, as evidenced by the benefits provided by adding MR antagonists (MRA) to standard care in humans. In animal models of cardiovascular diseases, MRA reduce cardiac fibrosis. Interestingly diuretics such as torasemide also appear efficient to improve cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, through several mechanisms. Among them, it has been suggested that torasemide could block aldosterone binding to the MR. To evaluate whether torasemide acts as a MRA in cardiomyocytes, we compared its effects with a classic MRA such as spironolactone. We monitored ligand-induced nuclear translocation of MR-GFP and MR transactivation activity in the cardiac-like cell line H9C2 using a reporter gene assay and known endogenous aldosterone-regulated cardiac genes. Torasemide did not modify MR nuclear translocation. Aldosterone-induced MR transactivation activity was reduced by the MRA spironolactone, not by torasemide. Spironolactone blocked the induction by aldosterone of endogenous MR-responsive genes (Sgk-1, PAI-1, Orosomucoid-1, Rgs-2, Serpina-3, Tenascin-X), while torasemide was ineffective. These results show that torasemide is not an MR antagonist; its association with MRA in heart failure may however be beneficial, through actions on complementary pathways. PMID:24040049

  8. Myeloid mineralocorticoid receptor deficiency inhibits aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Yu Yao; Frieler, Ryan A; Zheng, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Wu Chang; Sun, Xue Nan; Yang, Qing Zhen; Ma, Shu Min; Huang, Baozhuan; Berger, Stefan; Wang, Wang; Wu, Yong; Yu, Ying; Duan, Sheng Zhong; Mortensen, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blockade has been shown to suppress cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling in animal models of pressure overload (POL). This study aims to determine whether MR deficiency in myeloid cells modulates aortic constriction-induced cardiovascular injuries. Myeloid MR knockout (MMRKO) mice and littermate control mice were subjected to abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) or sham operation. We found that AAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were significantly attenuated in MMRKO mice. Expression of genes important in generating reactive oxygen species was decreased in MMRKO mice, while that of manganese superoxide dismutase increased. Furthermore, expression of genes important in cardiac metabolism was increased in MMRKO hearts. Macrophage infiltration in the heart was inhibited and expression of inflammatory genes was decreased in MMRKO mice. In addition, aortic fibrosis and inflammation were attenuated in MMRKO mice. Taken together, our data indicated that MR deficiency in myeloid cells effectively attenuated aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, as well as aortic fibrosis and inflammation.

  9. Effects of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Overexpression on Anxiety and Memory after Early Life Stress in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Ter Horst, Judith P.; Harris, Anjanette P.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Krugers, Harmen J.; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Early-life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for the development of psychopathology, particularly in women. Human studies have shown that certain haplotypes of NR3C2, encoding the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), that result in gain of function, may protect against the consequences of stress exposure, including childhood trauma. Here, we tested the hypothesis that forebrain-specific overexpression of MR in female mice would ameliorate the effects of ELS on anxiety and memory in adulthood. We found that ELS increased anxiety, did not alter spatial discrimination and reduced contextual fear memory in adult female mice. Transgenic overexpression of MR did not alter anxiety but affected spatial memory performance and enhanced contextual fear memory formation. The effects of ELS on anxiety and contextual fear were not affected by transgenic overexpression of MR. Thus, MR overexpression in the forebrain does not represent a major resilience factor to early life adversity in female mice. PMID:26858618

  10. Cardiac Hypertrophy and Fibrosis in the Metabolic Syndrome: A Role for Aldosterone and the Mineralocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Essick, Eric E.; Sam, Flora

    2011-01-01

    Obesity and hypertension, major risk factors for the metabolic syndrome, render individuals susceptible to an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, such as adverse cardiac remodeling and heart failure. There has been much investigation into the role that an increase in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and in particular, how aldosterone mediates left ventricular hypertrophy and increased cardiac fibrosis via its interaction with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Here, we review the pertinent findings that link obesity with elevated aldosterone and the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis associated with the metabolic syndrome. These studies illustrate a complex cross-talk between adipose tissue, the heart, and the adrenal cortex. Furthermore, we discuss findings from our laboratory that suggest that cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in the metabolic syndrome may involve cross-talk between aldosterone and adipokines (such as adiponectin). PMID:21747976

  11. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevents stress-induced modulation of multiple memory systems in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Lars; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver; Wolf, Oliver T

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that stress may orchestrate the engagement of multiple memory systems in the brain. In particular, stress is thought to favor dorsal striatum-dependent procedural over hippocampus-dependent declarative memory. However, the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying these modulatory effects of stress remain elusive, especially in humans. Here, we targeted the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the stress-induced modulation of dorsal striatal and hippocampal memory systems in the human brain using a combination of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacologic blockade of the MR. Eighty healthy participants received the MR antagonist spironolactone (300 mg) or a placebo and underwent a stressor or control manipulation before they performed, in the scanner, a classification task that can be supported by the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. Stress after placebo did not affect learning performance but reduced explicit task knowledge and led to a relative increase in the use of more procedural learning strategies. At the neural level, stress promoted striatum-based learning at the expense of hippocampus-based learning. Functional connectivity analyses showed that this shift was associated with altered coupling of the amygdala with the hippocampus and dorsal striatum. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade before stress prevented the stress-induced shift toward dorsal striatal procedural learning, same as the stress-induced alterations of amygdala connectivity with hippocampus and dorsal striatum, but resulted in significantly impaired performance. Our findings indicate that the stress-induced shift from hippocampal to dorsal striatal memory systems is mediated by the amygdala, required to preserve performance after stress, and dependent on the MR. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  12. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF).

    PubMed

    Capuano, Annalisa; Scavone, Cristina; Vitale, Cristiana; Sportiello, Liberata; Rossi, Francesco; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Coats, Andrew J Stewart

    2015-12-01

    The role of spironolactone and eplerenone in patients with Heart Failure with preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF) is not well defined. Since a growing medical literature has suggested that mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may be beneficial for patients with HFpEF, this review gives an in-depth update on the role of spironolactone and eplerenone and their implications for therapy in the setting of HFpEF. Eleven clinical studies, including seven randomized trials, were reviewed. Two randomized controlled trials evaluated the effect of eplerenone on different end-points, including 6 minute walk distance (6 MWD), cardiovascular mortality, non-fatal reinfarction, hospitalization for unstable angina and congestive heart failure. Eplerenone did not affect either 6 MWD or event-free survival rates in the overall study population in these two reports. The effects of spironolactone on similar composite endpoints were evaluated in 7 studies in patients with HFpEF. Compared to placebo, hospitalization for heart failure was significantly lower in the spironolactone group and spironolactone was also shown to improve diastolic function and induced beneficial remodeling through a reduction in myocardial fibrosis. The safety profile of spironolactone and eplerenone has been assessed in two recent studies. Data showed that eplerenone and spironolactone are both associated with the occurrence of gynecomastia, mastodynia, and abnormal vaginal bleeding and in addition, they can increase natriuresis and cause renal retention of potassium; furthermore, eplerenone may cause hyperkalemia and promote the onset of metabolic acidosis or hyponatremia. In conclusion although the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists eplerenone and spironolactone improve clinical outcomes in patients with HFrEF, additional data will be necessary to better define their risk-benefit profile, especially for eplerenone, in the treatment of HFpEF.

  13. Mineralocorticoid receptors are present in skeletal muscle and represent a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Jessica A.; Hauck, J. Spencer; Lowe, Jeovanna; Shaw, Jeremiah J.; Guttridge, Denis C.; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P.; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Early treatment with heart failure drugs lisinopril and spironolactone improves skeletal muscle pathology in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mouse models. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor lisinopril and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist spironolactone indirectly and directly target MR. The presence and function of MR in skeletal muscle have not been explored. MR mRNA and protein are present in all tested skeletal muscles from both wild-type mice and DMD mouse models. MR expression is cell autonomous in both undifferentiated myoblasts and differentiated myotubes from mouse and human skeletal muscle cultures. To test for MR function in skeletal muscle, global gene expression analysis was conducted on human myotubes treated with MR agonist (aldosterone; EC50 1.3 nM) or antagonist (spironolactone; IC50 1.6 nM), and 53 gene expression differences were identified. Five differences were conserved in quadriceps muscles from dystrophic mice treated with spironolactone plus lisinopril (IC50 0.1 nM) compared with untreated controls. Genes down-regulated more than 2-fold by MR antagonism included FOS, ANKRD1, and GADD45B, with known roles in skeletal muscle, in addition to NPR3 and SERPINA3, bona fide targets of MR in other tissues. MR is a novel drug target in skeletal muscle and use of clinically safe antagonists may be beneficial for muscle diseases.—Chadwick, J. A., Hauck, J. S., Lowe, J. , Shaw, J. J., Guttridge, D. C., Gomez-Sanchez, C. E., Gomez-Sanchez, E. P., Rafael-Fortney, J. A. Mineralocorticoid receptors are present in skeletal muscle and represent a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26178166

  14. Activated mineralocorticoid receptor regulates micro-RNA-29b in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Maria; Busch, Bianca; Mueller, Daniel; Nolze, Alexander; Schreier, Barbara; Gekle, Michael; Grossmann, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Inappropriately activated mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a risk factor for vascular remodeling with unclear molecular mechanism. Recent findings suggest that post-transcriptional regulation by micro-RNAs (miRs) may be involved. Our aim was to search for MR-dependent miRs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism and the pathologic relevance. We detected that aldosteroneviathe MR reduces miR-29bin vivoin murine aorta and in human primary and cultured VSMCs (ED50= 0.07 nM) but not in endothelial cells [quantitative PCR (qPCR), luciferase assays]. This effect was mediated by an increased decay of miR-29b in the cytoplasm with unchanged miR-29 family member or primary-miR levels. Decreased miR-29b led to an increase in extracellular matrix measured by ELISA and qPCR and enhanced VSMC migration in single cell-tracking experiments. Additionally, cell proliferation and the apoptosis/necrosis ratio (caspase/lactate dehydrogenase assay) was modulated by miR-29b. Enhanced VSMC migration by aldosterone required miR-29b regulation. Control experiments were performed with scrambled RNA and empty plasmids, by comparing aldosterone-stimulated with vehicle-incubated cells. Overall, our findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism of aldosterone-mediated vascular pathogenesis by identifying miR-29b as a pathophysiologic relevant target of activated MR in VSMCs and by highlighting the importance of miR processing for miR regulation.-Bretschneider, M., Busch, B., Mueller, D., Nolze, A., Schreier, B., Gekle, M., Grossmann, C. Activated mineralocorticoid receptor regulates micro-RNA-29b in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  15. Mineralocorticoid receptor phosphorylation regulates ligand binding and renal response to volume depletion and hyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Shigeru; Rinehart, Jesse; Zhang, Junhui; Moeckel, Gilbert; Castañeda-Bueno, María; Stiegler, Amy L.; Boggon, Titus J.; Gamba, Gerardo; Lifton, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that regulate diverse cellular processes. In canonical activation, ligand availability is sufficient to produce receptor binding, entraining downstream signaling. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is normally activated by aldosterone, which is produced in both volume depletion and hyperkalemia, states that require different homeostatic responses. We report phosphorylation at S843 in the MR ligand-binding domain that prevents ligand binding and activation. In kidney, MRS843-P is found exclusively in intercalated cells of the distal nephron. In volume depletion, angiotensin II and WNK4 signaling decrease MRS843-P levels whereas hyperkalemia increases MRS843-P. Dephosphorylation of MRS843-P results in aldosterone-dependent increases of the intercalated cell apical proton pump and Cl−/HCO3− exchangers, increasing Cl− reabsorption and promoting increased plasma volume while inhibiting K+ secretion. These findings reveal a mechanism regulating nuclear hormone receptor activity and implicate selective MR activation in intercalated cells in the distinct adaptive responses to volume depletion and hyperkalemia. PMID:24206662

  16. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevents Western diet-induced diastolic dysfunction in female mice.

    PubMed

    Bostick, Brian; Habibi, Javad; DeMarco, Vincent G; Jia, Guanghong; Domeier, Timothy L; Lambert, Michelle D; Aroor, Annayya R; Nistala, Ravi; Bender, Shawn B; Garro, Mona; Hayden, Melvin R; Ma, Lixin; Manrique, Camila; Sowers, James R

    2015-05-01

    Overnutrition/obesity predisposes individuals, particularly women, to diastolic dysfunction (DD), an independent predictor of future cardiovascular disease. We examined whether low-dose spironolactone (Sp) prevents DD associated with consumption of a Western Diet (WD) high in fat, fructose, and sucrose. Female C57BL6J mice were fed a WD with or without Sp (1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)). After 4 mo on the WD, mice exhibited increased body weight and visceral fat, but similar blood pressures, compared with control diet-fed mice. Sp prevented the development of WD-induced DD, as indicated by decreased isovolumic relaxation time and an improvement in myocardial performance (Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism enhanced M2 macrophage polarization and ameliorated oxidant stress and fibrosis. This work supports a novel blood pressure-independent effect of MR antagonism as a strategy to prevent diet-induced DD in women. Mineralocorticoid antagonism; low-dose spironolactone; aldosterone;high-fat diet; high-fructose diet; oxidative stress

  17. Overexpression of mineralocorticoid and transdominant glucocorticoid receptor blocks the impairing effects of glucocorticoids on memory.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Deveroux; Sapolsky, Robert

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) influence hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. MRs are saturated in the presence of low corticosterone (CORT) levels; consequently receptor protein levels play a rate-limiting role in regulating the positive effects of MR-mediated gene transcription. In this study, viral vector-mediated transgene expression was used to simultaneously manipulate both MR and GR signaling. This approach allowed us to investigate the effects of spatially restricted overexpression of MR and a negative transdominant GR (TD) in the dentate gyrus (DG) subfield of the hippocampus, on short term and long term spatial memory in animals overexpressing one copy of MR or TD, two copies of MR ("MR/MR"), or one copy of each ("MR/TD"). Expression of transgenes did not influence the acquisition (learning) phase of the Morris water maze task. However, we found an overall enhancing effect of MR/MR expression on short term memory performance. In addition, rats expressing TD and MR/TD blocked the high CORT-induced impairments on long term spatial memory retrieval. These findings illustrate the potential beneficial effects of increasing MR signaling or decreasing GR signaling to enhance specific aspects of cognitive function.

  18. Myeloid mineralocorticoid receptor controls macrophage polarization and cardiovascular hypertrophy and remodeling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Usher, Michael G.; Duan, Sheng Zhong; Ivaschenko, Christine Y.; Frieler, Ryan A.; Berger, Stefan; Schütz, Günther; Lumeng, Carey N.; Mortensen, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Inappropriate excess of the steroid hormone aldosterone, which is a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) agonist, is associated with increased inflammation and risk of cardiovascular disease. MR antagonists are cardioprotective and antiinflammatory in vivo, and evidence suggests that they mediate these effects in part by aldosterone-independent mechanisms. Here we have shown that MR on myeloid cells is necessary for efficient classical macrophage activation by proinflammatory cytokines. Macrophages from mice lacking MR in myeloid cells (referred to herein as MyMRKO mice) exhibited a transcription profile of alternative activation. In vitro, MR deficiency synergized with inducers of alternatively activated macrophages (for example, IL-4 and agonists of PPARγ and the glucocorticoid receptor) to enhance alternative activation. In vivo, MR deficiency in macrophages mimicked the effects of MR antagonists and protected against cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and vascular damage caused by L-NAME/Ang II. Increased blood pressure and heart rates and decreased circadian variation were observed during treatment of MyMRKO mice with L-NAME/Ang II. We conclude that myeloid MR is an important control point in macrophage polarization and that the function of MR on myeloid cells likely represents a conserved ancestral MR function that is integrated in a transcriptional network with PPARγ and glucocorticoid receptor. Furthermore, myeloid MR is critical for blood pressure control and for hypertrophic and fibrotic responses in the mouse heart and aorta. PMID:20697155

  19. Re-Epithelialization of Pathological Cutaneous Wounds Is Improved by Local Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Tuan; Farman, Nicolette; Maubec, Eve; Nassar, Dany; Desposito, Dorinne; Waeckel, Ludovic; Aractingi, Sélim; Jaisser, Frederic

    2016-10-01

    Impaired cutaneous wound healing is a social burden. It occurs as a consequence of glucocorticoid treatment in several pathologies. Glucocorticoids (GC) bind not only to the glucocorticoid receptor but also to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), both expressed by keratinocytes. In addition to its beneficial effects through the glucocorticoid receptor, GC exposure may lead to inappropriate MR occupancy. We hypothesized that dermatological use of MR antagonists (MRA) might be beneficial by overcoming the negative impact of GC treatment on pathological wounds. The potent GC clobetasol, applied as an ointment to mouse skin, or added to cultured human skin explants, induced delayed wound closure and outgrowth of epidermis with reduced proliferation of keratinocytes. Delayed wound re-epithelialization was rescued by local MRA application. Normal skin was unaffected by MRA. The benefit of MR blockade is explained by the increased expression of MR in clobetasol-treated mouse skin. Blockade of the epithelial sodium channel by phenamil also rescued cultured human skin explants from GC-impaired growth of the epidermis. MRA application over post-biopsy wounds of clobetasol-treated skin zones of healthy volunteers (from the Interest of Topical Spironolactone's Administration to Prevent Corticoid-induced Epidermal Atrophy clinical trial) also accelerated wound closure. In conclusion, we propose repositioning MRA for cutaneous application to improve delayed wound closure occurring in pathology.

  20. Synthesis of new 11 beta-substituted spirolactone derivatives. Relationship with affinity for mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Claire, M; Faraj, H; Grassy, G; Aumelas, A; Rondot, A; Auzou, G

    1993-08-06

    Various steroidal 17-spirolactones substituted in the 11 beta-position were synthesized to study the relationship between the nature of the 11 beta-arm and their affinity for cytosolic mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors prepared from adrenalectomized rabbit kidney or liver. One of them, the 11 beta-allenyl-3-oxo-19-nor-17-pregna-4,9-diene-21,17- carbolactone derivative, exhibited the same affinity for MR as aldosterone and a 5-fold higher affinity than mespirenone. Its affinity for GR was found to be relatively low. As suggested by molecular modeling, the marked differences in mineralocorticoid receptor binding affinity could be related to the structural features induced by this 11 beta-allenic substituent.

  1. Glucocorticoid-induced hypertension and cardiac injury: effects of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Takuya; Murase, Tamayo; Iwase, Erika; Takahashi, Keiji; Ohtake, Masafumi; Tsuboi, Koji; Ohtake, Mayuko; Miyachi, Masaaki; Murohara, Toyoaki; Nagata, Kohzo

    2013-02-01

    Glucocorticoids are widely administered for the treatment of various disorders, although their long-term use results in adverse effects associated with glucocorticoid excess. We investigated the pathophysiological roles of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) in the cardiac changes induced by exogenous corticosterone in rats. Corticosterone or vehicle was injected twice daily in rats from 8 to 12 weeks of age. The effects of the GR antagonist RU486, the MR antagonist spironolactone, or both agents on corticosterone action were also determined. Corticosterone induced hypertension, left ventricular (LV) fibrosis, and LV diastolic dysfunction. Neither RU486 nor spironolactone affected corticosterone-induced hypertension, whereas spironolactone, but not RU486, attenuated the effects of corticosterone on LV fibrosis and diastolic function. Corticosterone also increased cardiac oxidative stress and inflammation in a manner sensitive to spironolactone but not to RU486. The corticosterone-induced LV atrophy was not affected by either RU486 or spironolactone. Our results implicate MRs in the cardiac fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction, but not MRs or GRs in the cardiac atrophy, induced by corticosterone. Neither MRs nor GRs appear to contribute to corticosterone-induced hypertension.

  2. Mineralocorticoid specificity of renal type I receptors: in vivo binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, K.; Funder, J.W.

    1987-02-01

    The authors have injected rats with (TH)aldosterone or (TH) corticosterone, plus 100-fold excess of the highly specific glucocorticoid RU 28362, with or without excess unlabeled aldosterone or corticosterone and compared type I receptor occupancy in kidney and hippocampus. Thirty minutes after subcutaneous injection (TH)aldosterone was well retained in renal papilla-inner medulla, renal cortex-outer medulla, and hippocampus; in contrast, (TH)corticosterone was well retained only in hippocampus. Competition studies for (TH)aldosterone binding sites showed corticosterone to be a poor competitor in the kidney compared with hippocampus. Time-course studies, with rats killed 10-180 min after tracer administration, showed very low uptake/retention of (TH)corticosterone by kidney; in hippocampus (TH)corticosterone retention was similar to that of (TH)aldosterone in kidney, and retention of (TH)aldosterone by hippocampus was much more prolonged than of either tracer in any other tissue. Studies in 10-day-old rats, with very low levels of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), showed a high degree of aldosterone selectivity in both zones of the kidney, whereas 9TH)aldosterone and (TH)corticosterone were equivalently bound in hippocampus. They interpret these data as evidenced for a mechanism unrelated to extravascular CBG conferring mineralocorticoid specificity on renal type I receptors and propose two models derived from their findings consistent with such differential selectivity.

  3. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists in End-Stage Renal Disease: Efficacy and Safety.

    PubMed

    Bomback, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) that block aldosterone's effects on both epithelial and non-epithelial receptors have become a mainstay of therapy for chronic heart failure. Given that cardiovascular events remain the leading cause of death for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the question of whether these MRAs can be employed in dialysis patients arises. This review summarizes the rationale for blocking aldosterone in patients with chronic and end-stage kidney disease and surveys the data on both the efficacy and safety of using MRAs in the ESRD population. A small but growing body of literature suggests that use of MRAs by ESRD patients is associated with lower blood pressure, reduced left ventricular (LV) mass, and improved LV ejection fraction. Recently, a large randomized trial found an overall 3-year mortality rate of 6.4% in ESRD patients on spironolactone 25 mg daily vs. 19.7% in ESRD patients on no MRA therapy (p = 0.002), without a significantly increased risk of hyperkalemia.

  4. Aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists modulate elastin and collagen deposition in human skin.

    PubMed

    Mitts, Thomas F; Bunda, Severa; Wang, Yanting; Hinek, Aleksander

    2010-10-01

    We have shown that the steroid hormone aldosterone, recognized for its action on the kidney and the cardiovascular system, also modulates deposition of extracellular matrix in human skin. We have shown that treatment of primary cultures of normal skin fibroblasts with aldosterone (10 n-1 μM), in addition to stimulation of collagen type I expression, induces elastin gene expression and elastic fiber deposition. We have further shown that the elastogenic effect of aldosterone, which can be enhanced in the presence of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone, is executed in a MR-independent manner via amplification of IGF-I receptor-mediated signaling. Because aldosterone applied alone stimulates both collagen and elastin deposition in cultures of fibroblasts and in cultures of skin explants derived from dermal stretch marks, we postulate that this steroid should be used in the treatment of damaged skin that loses its volume and elasticity. Moreover, aldosterone applied in conjunction with spironolactone or eplerenone induces matrix remodeling and exclusively enhances elastogenesis in cultures of fibroblasts and explants derived from dermal scars and keloids. We therefore propose that intra-lesional injection of these factors should be considered in therapy for disfiguring dermal lesions and especially in prevention of their recurrence after surgical excision.

  5. Corticosterone targets distinct steps of synaptic transmission via concentration specific activation of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sreejata; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2014-02-01

    Hippocampal neurons are affected by chronic stress and have a high density of cytoplasmic mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors (MR and GR). Detailed studies on the genomic effects of the stress hormone corticosterone at physiologically relevant concentrations on different steps in synaptic transmission are limited. In this study, we tried to delineate how activation of MR and GR by different concentrations of corticosterone affects synaptic transmission at various levels. The effect of 3-h corticosterone (25, 50, and 100 nM) treatment on depolarization-mediated calcium influx, vesicular release and properties of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) were studied in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of MR with 25 nM corticosterone treatment resulted in enhanced depolarization-mediated calcium influx via a transcription-dependent process and increased frequency of mEPSCs with larger amplitude. On the other hand, activation of GR upon 100 nM corticosterone treatment resulted in increase in the rate of vesicular release via the genomic actions of GR. Furthermore, GR activation led to significant increase in the frequency of mEPSCs with larger amplitude and faster decay. Our studies indicate that differential activation of the dual receptor system of MR and GR by corticosterone targets the steps in synaptic transmission differently.

  6. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: integrating evidence into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Zannad, Faiez; Gattis Stough, Wendy; Rossignol, Patrick; Bauersachs, Johann; McMurray, John J V; Swedberg, Karl; Struthers, Allan D; Voors, Adriaan A; Ruilope, Luis M; Bakris, George L; O'Connor, Christopher M; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Mentz, Robert J; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Maggioni, Aldo P; Beygui, Farzin; Filippatos, Gerasimos S; Massy, Ziad A; Pathak, Atul; Piña, Ileana L; Sabbah, Hani N; Sica, Domenic A; Tavazzi, Luigi; Pitt, Bertram

    2012-11-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) improve survival and reduce morbidity in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF), and mild-to-severe symptoms, and in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction and heart failure after acute myocardial infarction. These clinical benefits are observed in addition to those of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers and beta-blockers. The morbidity and mortality benefits of MRAs may be mediated by several proposed actions, including antifibrotic mechanisms that slow heart failure progression, prevent or reverse cardiac remodelling, or reduce arrhythmogenesis. Both eplerenone and spironolactone have demonstrated survival benefits in individual clinical trials. Pharmacologic differences exist between the drugs, which may be relevant for therapeutic decision making in individual patients. Although serious hyperkalaemia events were reported in the major MRA clinical trials, these risks can be mitigated through appropriate patient selection, dose selection, patient education, monitoring, and follow-up. When used appropriately, MRAs significantly improve outcomes across the spectrum of patients with HF-REF.

  7. Antiadipogenic effects of the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist drospirenone: potential implications for the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caprio, Massimiliano; Antelmi, Antonella; Chetrite, Gérard; Muscat, Adeline; Mammi, Caterina; Marzolla, Vincenzo; Fabbri, Andrea; Zennaro, Maria-Christina; Fève, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates aldosterone- and glucocorticoid-induced adipocyte differentiation. Drospirenone (DRSP) is a potent synthetic antimineralocorticoid with progestogenic and antiandrogenic properties, which is widely used for contraception and hormone replacement therapy. We investigated its potential role on adipocyte differentiation. The effects of DRSP were studied in murine preadipocyte cell lines and primary cultures of human preadipocytes. Differentiation markers and mechanisms underlying phenotypic variations in response to DRSP were explored. Early exposure to DRSP during differentiation led to a marked dose-dependent inhibition of adipose differentiation and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F442A cells. DRSP also markedly inhibited adipose conversion of human primary preadipocytes derived from visceral (mesenteric and epicardial) and subcutaneous fat. This effect was MR-dependent and did not involve the glucocorticoid, androgen, or progesterone receptors. DRSP inhibited clonal expansion of preadipocytes and decreased expression of PPARγ, a key transcriptional mediator of adipogenesis, but had no effect on lipolysis, glucose uptake, and PPARγ binding to its ligands. DRSP exerts a potent antiadipogenic effect that is related to an alteration of the transcriptional control of adipogenesis via an antagonistic effect on the MR. Selective MR blockade therefore has promise as a novel therapeutic option for the control of excessive adipose tissue deposition and its related metabolic complications.

  8. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone prevents chronic corticosterone induced depression-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting-Ching; Chen, Han-Ting; Chang, Han-Ying; Yang, Ching-Yao; Hsiao, Mei-Chun; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Chen, Jin-Chung

    2013-06-01

    High level of serum corticosteroid is frequently associated with depression, in which a notable HPA (hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal) axis hyperactivity is often observed. There are two types of corticosteroid receptors expressed in the hippocampus that provide potent negative feedback regulation on the HPA axis but dysfunction during depression, i.e. the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). The balance between hippocampal MR and GR during chronic stress plays an important role in the occurrence of depression. The aim of this study is to explore if chronic corticosterone administration would induce depression-like behavior and affect the expression and function of hippocampal MR and GR, in addition to assess whether manipulation of corticosteroid receptors would modulate depressive behaviors. Hence, mice were treated with corticosterone (40 mg/kg) for 21 days followed by assessment in a battery of depression-like behaviors. The results show that chronic corticosterone-treated animals displayed an increased immobility time in a forced-swimming test, decreased preference to sucrose solution and novel object recognition performance, and enhanced hippocampal serotonin but decreased MR expression in both hippocampus and hypothalamus. On the other hand, co-administration of MR antagonist, spironolactone (25mg/kg, i.p. × 7 days) in corticosteroid-treated animals reduced immobility time in a forced-swimming test and improved performance in a novel object recognition test. In conclusion, we demonstrate that chronic corticosterone treatment triggers several depression-like behaviors, and in parallel, down-regulates MR expression in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Administration of an MR antagonist confers an anti-depressant effect in chronic corticosterone-treated animals.

  9. In Utero Exposure to Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate Decreases Mineralocorticoid Receptor Expression in the Adult Testis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Arguelles, D. B.; Culty, M.; Zirkin, B. R.; Papadopoulos, V.

    2009-01-01

    In utero exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has been shown to result in decreased androgen formation by fetal and adult rat testes. In the fetus, decreased androgen is accompanied by the reduced expression of steroidogenic enzymes. The mechanism by which in utero exposure results in reduced androgen formation in the adult, however, is unknown. We hypothesized that deregulation of the nuclear steroid receptors might explain the effects of in utero DEHP exposure on adult testosterone production. To test this hypothesis, pregnant Sprague Dawley dams were gavaged with 100–950 mg DEHP per kilogram per day from gestational d 14–19, and testes were collected at gestational d 20 and postnatal days (PND) 3, 21, and 60. Among the nuclear receptors studied, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mRNA and protein levels were reduced in PND60 interstitial Leydig cells, accompanied by reduced mRNA expression of MR-regulated genes. Methylation-sensitive PCR showed effects on the nuclear receptor subfamilies NR3A and -3C, but only MR was affected at PND60. Pyrosequencing of two CpG islands within the MR gene promoter revealed a loss of methylation in DEHP-treated animals that was correlated with reduced MR. Because MR activation is known to stimulate Leydig cell testosterone formation, and MR inhibition to be repressive, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that in utero exposure to DEHP leads to MR dysfunction and thus to depressed testosterone production in the adult. We suggest that decreased MR, possibly epigenetically mediated, is a novel mechanism by which phthalates may affect diverse functions later in life. PMID:19819939

  10. Aldosterone/Mineralocorticoid receptor stimulation induces cellular senescence in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Yan; Kohno, Masakazu; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kitada, Kento; Fujisawa, Yoshihide; Yatabe, Junichi; Yatabe, Midori; Felder, Robin A; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Rafiq, Kazi; Sherajee, Shamshad J; Noma, Takahisa; Nishiyama, Akira; Nakano, Daisuke

    2011-02-01

    Recent studies demonstrated a possible role of aldosterone in mediating cell senescence. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether aldosterone induces cell senescence in the kidney and whether aldosterone-induced renal senescence affects the development of renal injury. Aldosterone infusion (0.75 μg/h) into rats for 5 weeks caused hypertension and increased urinary excretion rates of proteins and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase. Aldosterone induced senescence-like changes in the kidney, exhibited by increased expression of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase, overexpression of p53 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (p21), and decreased expression of SIRT1. These changes were abolished by eplerenone (100 mg/kg/d), a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, but unaffected by hydralazine (80 mg/liter in drinking water). Furthermore, aldosterone induced similar changes in senescence-associated β-galactosidase, p21, and SIRT1 expression in cultured human proximal tubular cells, which were normalized by an antioxidant, N-acetyl L-cysteine, or gene silencing of MR. Aldosterone significantly delayed wound healing and reduced the number of proliferating human proximal tubular cells, while gene silencing of p21 diminished the effects, suggesting impaired recovery from tubular damage. These findings indicate that aldosterone induces renal senescence in proximal tubular cells via the MR and p21-dependent pathway, which may be involved in aldosterone-induced renal injury.

  11. Modulation of Immunity and Inflammation by the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Durango, N.; Vecchiola, A.; Gonzalez-Gomez, L. M.; Simon, F.; Riedel, C. A.; Fardella, C. E.; Kalergis, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand dependent transcription factor. MR has been traditionally associated with the control of water and electrolyte homeostasis in order to keep blood pressure through aldosterone activation. However, there is growing evidence indicating that MR expression is not restricted to vascular and renal tissues, as it can be also expressed by cells of the immune system, where it responds to stimulation or antagonism, controlling immune cell function. On the other hand, aldosterone also has been associated with proinflammatory immune effects, such as the release of proinflammatory cytokines, generating oxidative stress and inducing fibrosis. The inflammatory participation of MR and aldosterone in the cardiovascular disease suggests an association with alterations in the immune system. Hypertensive patients show higher levels of proinflammatory mediators that can be modulated by MR antagonism. Although these proinflammatory properties have been observed in other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects remain unknown. Here we review and discuss the scientific work aimed at determining the immunological role of MR and aldosterone in humans, as well as animal models. PMID:26448944

  12. Modulation of Immunity and Inflammation by the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Durango, N; Vecchiola, A; Gonzalez-Gomez, L M; Simon, F; Riedel, C A; Fardella, C E; Kalergis, A M

    2015-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand dependent transcription factor. MR has been traditionally associated with the control of water and electrolyte homeostasis in order to keep blood pressure through aldosterone activation. However, there is growing evidence indicating that MR expression is not restricted to vascular and renal tissues, as it can be also expressed by cells of the immune system, where it responds to stimulation or antagonism, controlling immune cell function. On the other hand, aldosterone also has been associated with proinflammatory immune effects, such as the release of proinflammatory cytokines, generating oxidative stress and inducing fibrosis. The inflammatory participation of MR and aldosterone in the cardiovascular disease suggests an association with alterations in the immune system. Hypertensive patients show higher levels of proinflammatory mediators that can be modulated by MR antagonism. Although these proinflammatory properties have been observed in other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects remain unknown. Here we review and discuss the scientific work aimed at determining the immunological role of MR and aldosterone in humans, as well as animal models.

  13. Adult-Onset Hypothyroidism Enhances Fear Memory and Upregulates Mineralocorticoid and Glucocorticoid Receptors in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Pedrazuela, Ana; Fernández-Lamo, Iván; Alieva, María; Pereda-Pérez, Inmaculada; Venero, César; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is the most common hormonal disease in adults, which is frequently accompanied by learning and memory impairments and emotional disorders. However, the deleterious effects of thyroid hormones deficiency on emotional memory are poorly understood and often underestimated. To evaluate the consequences of hypothyroidism on emotional learning and memory, we have performed a classical Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm in euthyroid and adult-thyroidectomized Wistar rats. In this experimental model, learning acquisition was not impaired, fear memory was enhanced, memory extinction was delayed and spontaneous recovery of fear memory was exacerbated in hypothyroid rats. The potentiation of emotional memory under hypothyroidism was associated with an increase of corticosterone release after fear conditioning and with higher expression of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors in the lateral and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala, nuclei that are critically involved in the circuitry of fear memory. Our results demonstrate for the first time that adult-onset hypothyroidism potentiates fear memory and also increases vulnerability to develop emotional memories. Furthermore, our findings suggest that enhanced corticosterone signaling in the amygdala is involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of fear memory potentiation. Therefore, we recommend evaluating whether inappropriate regulation of fear in patients with post-traumatic stress and other mental disorders is associated with abnormal levels of thyroid hormones, especially those patients refractory to treatment. PMID:22039511

  14. Progress in primary aldosteronism: mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and management of primary aldosteronism in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Riester, Anna; Reincke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of secondary hypertension. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis and management of PA during pregnancy based on the literature. As aldosterone and renin are physiologically increased during pregnancy and confirmation tests are not recommended, the diagnosis of PA during pregnancy relies on a repeatedly suppressed plasma renin level. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) are the most effective drugs to treat hypertension and hypokalemia in patients with PA. However, spironolactone (FDA pregnancy category C) might lead to undervirilization of male infants due to the anti-androgenic effects. Although data in the literature are very limited, treatment with spironolactone is not recommended. Eplerenone (FDA pregnancy category B) is a selective MRA without anti-androgenic potential. If MRA treatment is required in pregnancy, eplerenone appears to be a safe and effective alternative, although symptomatic treatment with approved antihypertensive drugs and supplementation with potassium is the first choice. In case of aldosterone-producing adenoma, laparoscopic adrenalectomy is a therapeutic option in the second trimester of pregnancy. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  15. Mineralocorticoid receptor degradation is promoted by Hsp90 inhibition and the ubiquitin-protein ligase CHIP.

    PubMed

    Faresse, Nourdine; Ruffieux-Daidie, Dorothée; Salamin, Mélanie; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Staub, Olivier

    2010-12-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) plays a crucial role in the regulation of Na(+) balance and blood pressure, as evidenced by gain of function mutations in the MR of hypertensive families. In the kidney, aldosterone binds to the MR, induces its nuclear translocation, and promotes a transcriptional program leading to increased transepithelial Na(+) transport via the epithelial Na(+) channel. In the unliganded state, MR is localized in the cytosol and part of a multiprotein complex, including heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which keeps it ligand-binding competent. 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic that binds to Hsp90 and alters its function. We investigated whether 17-AAG affects the stability and transcriptional activity of MR and consequently Na(+) reabsorption by renal cells. 17-AAG treatment lead to reduction of MR protein level in epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo, thereby interfering with aldosterone-dependent transcription. Moreover, 17-AAG inhibited aldosterone-induced Na(+) transport, possibly by interfering with MR availability for the ligand. Finally, we identified the ubiquitin-protein ligase, COOH terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein, as a novel partner of the cytosolic MR, which is responsible for its polyubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation in presence of 17-AAG. In conclusion, 17-AAG may represent a novel pharmacological tool to interfere with Na(+) reabsorption and hypertension.

  16. Tailoring mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist therapy in heart failure patients: are we moving towards a personalized approach?

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Mentz, Robert J; Pizard, Anne; Pitt, Bertram; Zannad, Faiez

    2017-04-12

    The aim of personalized medicine is to offer a tailored approach to each patient in order to provide the most effective therapy, while reducing risks and side effects. The use of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) has demonstrated major benefits in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), results with challenging inconsistencies in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and 'neutral' preliminary results in acute heart failure. Data derived from landmark trials are generally applied in a 'one size fits all' manner and the development and implementation of more personalized MRA management would offer the potential to improve outcomes and reduce side effects. However, the personalization of pharmacotherapy regimens remains poorly defined in the cardiovascular field (in light of current knowledge) and until further trials targeting specific subpopulations have been conducted, MRAs should be provided to the great majority of HFrEF patients in the absence of contraindication. Spironolactone should be considered for symptomatic HFpEF patients with elevated natriuretic peptides. In the near future, trials should target HFrEF patients using exclusion criteria sourced from landmark trials (e.g. severe renal impairment), select more homogeneous HFpEF populations (e.g. with elevated BNP and structural abnormalities on echocardiography), and determine which patients are likely to benefit from MRAs (e.g. according to prespecified biomarkers).

  17. Effects of mineralocorticoid receptor blockade on empathy in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Kuehl, Linn K; Dziobek, Isabel; Roepke, Stefan; Otte, Christian; Hinkelmann, Kim

    2016-10-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is highly expressed in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and is involved in social cognition. We recently found that pharmacological stimulation of the MR enhances emotional empathy but does not affect cognitive empathy. In the current study, we examined whether blockade of the MR impairs empathy in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and healthy individuals. In a placebo-controlled study, we randomized 28 patients with MDD without psychotropic medication and 43 healthy individuals to either placebo or 300 mg spironolactone, a MR antagonist. Subsequently, all participants underwent two tests of social cognition, the Multifaceted Empathy Test (MET) and the Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition (MASC), measuring cognitive and emotional facets of empathy. In the MET, we found no significant main effect of treatment or main effect of group for cognitive empathy but a highly significant treatment by group interaction (p < 0.01). Patients had higher cognitive empathy scores compared to controls in the placebo condition but not after spironolactone. Furthermore, in the spironolactone condition reduced cognitive empathy was seen in MDD patients but not in controls. Emotional empathy was not affected by MR blockade. In the MASC, no effect of spironolactone could be revealed. Depressed patients appear to exhibit greater cognitive empathy compared to healthy individuals. Blockade of MR reduced cognitive empathy in MDD patients to the level of healthy individuals. Future studies should further clarify the impact of MR functioning on different domains of social cognition in psychiatric patients.

  18. Mineralocorticoid receptor is involved in the aldosterone pathway in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Bordin, Luciana; Saccardi, Carlo; Donà, Gabriella; Sabbadin, Chiara; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Plebani, Mario; Brunati, Anna Maria; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Gizzo, Salvatore; Armanini, Decio

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that excessive aldosterone (Aldo) secretion in primary aldosteronism (PA) is associated with red blood cells (RBC) senescence. These alterations were prevented/inhibited by cortisol (Cort) or canrenone (Can) raising the hypothesis that Aldo effects in RBC may be mediated by mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), though to date MR has never been demonstrated in human RBC. The aim of this multicenter comparative study was to investigate whether Aldo effects were mediated by MR in these a-nucleated cells. We included 12 healthy controls (HC) and 22 patients with PA. MR presence and activation were evaluated in RBC cytosol by glycerol gradient sedimentation, Western blotting, immuno-precipitation and radioimmunoassay. We demonstrated that RBC contained cytosolic MR, aggregated with HSP90 and other proteins to form multiprotein complex. Aldo induced MR to release from the complex and to form MR dimers which were quickly proteolyzed. Cort induced MR release but not dimers formation while Can was not able to induce MR release. In addition, RBC cytosol from PA patients contained significantly higher amounts of both MR fragments (p<0.0001) and Aldo (p<0.0001) concentrations. In conclusion, in RBC a genomic-like Aldo pathway is proposed involving MR activation, dimerization and proteolysis, but lacking nuclear transcription. In addition, dimers proteolysis may ensure a sort of Aldo scavenging from circulation by entrapping Aldo in MR fragments. PMID:27158328

  19. Effect of mineralocorticoid receptor blockade on hippocampal-dependent memory in adults with obesity.

    PubMed

    Rotenstein, Lisa S; Sheridan, Margaret; Garg, Rajesh; Adler, Gail K

    2015-06-01

    The hippocampus is crucial for paired-associate learning. Obesity is associated with increased mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activity in peripheral and possibly central tissues, decreased hippocampal size in humans, and impaired hippocampal learning in rodents. The MR is expressed in hippocampal neurons, and MR blockade improves hippocampal learning in obese animals. The goal of the study was to determine whether MR blockade would modulate paired-associate learning in men and women with obesity. Men and women ages 20-61 years with BMI between 30-45 kg/m(2) were randomly assigned to placebo (n = 11; 7 women) or 50 mg spironolactone daily (n = 12; 7 women) for six weeks. At baseline and post-treatment, subjects underwent a clinical and hormonal evaluation. They also underwent a computerized task that assesses paired-associate learning and has been shown by functional magnetic resonance imaging to activate the hippocampus. In an ANCOVA model that adjusted for baseline paired-associate learning, age, and race, spironolactone treatment was associated with a significant (P = 0.043) improvement in hippocampal memory as compared to placebo treatment. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that blocking MR with chronic, low-dose spironolactone treatment improves paired-associate learning in individuals with obesity, suggesting that MR activation contributes to hippocampal memory modulation in humans. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  20. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade but not steroid withdrawal reverses renal fibrosis in deoxycorticosterone/salt rats.

    PubMed

    Lam, Emily Y M; Funder, John W; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Fuller, Peter J; Young, Morag J

    2006-07-01

    The pathophysiologic effects of nonepithelial mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation include vascular inflammation followed by renal and cardiac remodeling in experimental animals. We have recently shown that MR blockade can reverse established cardiac fibrosis and vascular inflammation; the present study explores whether a similar protection is seen in renal tissue. Rats were uninephrectomized and maintained on 0.9% NaCl solution to drink and treated as follows: control, vehicle; deoxycorticosterone (DOC), 20 mg/wk sc for 4 wk and then killed; DOC for 8 wk; DOC for 4 wk and no steroid for wk 5-8; DOC for 8 wk and eplerenone 100 mg/kg.d in the food for wk 5-8. DOC increased renal collagen at 4 and 8 wk; rats given DOC for 4 wk and killed at 8 wk showed levels of fibrosis identical with those killed at 4 wk, whereas rats given DOC for 8 wk plus eplerenone for wk 5-8 were indistinguishable from control. The inflammatory markers ED-1, osteopontin, and cyclooxygenase-2 remained significantly elevated despite the withdrawal of DOC (DOC404), whereas eplerenone restored cyclooxygenase-2 expression (but not that of ED-1 or osteopontin) to control levels. In addition, markers of oxidative stress and TGFbeta were determined. We hypothesize that continuing tubular inflammation and fibrosis despite DOC withdrawal indicates that the renal tissue may reflect MR activation in the context of tissue damage.

  1. Aldosterone Induces Renal Fibrosis and Inflammatory M1-Macrophage Subtype via Mineralocorticoid Receptor in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Cortegano, Isabel; Ballesteros, Sandra; Alía, Mario; Cannata-Ortiz, Pablo; Olivares-Álvaro, Elena; Egido, Jesús; de Andrés, Belén; Gaspar, María Luisa; de las Heras, Natalia; Lahera, Vicente; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate macrophages heterogeneity and structural, functional and inflammatory alterations in rat kidney by aldosterone + salt administration. The effects of treatment with spironolactone on above parameters were also analyzed. Male Wistar rats received aldosterone (1 mgkg-1d-1) + 1% NaCl for 3 weeks. Half of the animals were treated with spironolactone (200 mg kg-1d-1). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were elevated (p<0.05) in aldosterone + salt–treated rats. Relative kidney weight, collagen content, fibronectin, macrophage infiltrate, CTGF, Col I, MMP2, TNF-α, CD68, Arg2, and SGK-1 were increased (p<0.05) in aldosterone + salt–treated rats, being reduced by spironolactone (p<0.05). Increased iNOS and IFN-γ mRNA gene expression (M1 macrophage markers) was observed in aldosterone + salt rats, whereas no significant differences were observed in IL-10 and gene ArgI mRNA expression or ED2 protein content (M2 macrophage markers). All the observed changes were blocked with spironolactone treatment. Macrophage depletion with liposomal clodronate reduced macrophage influx and inflammatory M1 markers (INF-γ or iNOS), whereas interstitial fibrosis was only partially reduced after this intervention, in aldosterone plus salt-treated rats. In conclusion, aldosterone + salt administration mediates inflammatory M1 macrophage phenotype and increased fibrosis throughout mineralocorticoid receptors activation. PMID:26730742

  2. A common and functional mineralocorticoid receptor haplotype enhances optimism and protects against depression in females.

    PubMed

    Klok, M D; Giltay, E J; Van der Does, A J W; Geleijnse, J M; Antypa, N; Penninx, B W J H; de Geus, E J C; Willemsen, G; Boomsma, D I; van Leeuwen, N; Zitman, F G; de Kloet, E R; DeRijk, R H

    2011-12-13

    Mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) are abundantly expressed in the limbic brain and mediate cortisol effects on the stress-response and behavioral adaptation. Dysregulation of the stress response impairs adaptation and is a risk factor for depression, which is twice as abundant in women than in men. Because of the importance of MR for appraisal processes underlying the initial phase of the stress response we investigated whether specific MR haplotypes were associated with personality traits that predict the risk of depression. We discovered a common gene variant (haplotype 2, frequency ∼0.38) resulting in enhanced MR activity. Haplotype 2 was associated with heightened dispositional optimism in study 1 and with less hopelessness and rumination in study 2. Using data from a large genome-wide association study we then established that haplotype 2 was associated with a lower risk of depression. Interestingly, all effects were restricted to women. We propose that common functional MR haplotypes are important determinants of inter-individual variability in resilience to depression in women by differentially mediating cortisol effects on the stress system.

  3. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Stimulation Improves Cognitive Function and Decreases Cortisol Secretion in Depressed Patients and Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Otte, Christian; Wingenfeld, Katja; Kuehl, Linn K; Kaczmarczyk, Michael; Richter, Steffen; Quante, Arnim; Regen, Francesca; Bajbouj, Malek; Zimmermann-Viehoff, Frank; Wiedemann, Klaus; Hinkelmann, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Memory and executive function are often impaired in patients with major depression, while cortisol secretion is increased. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) are abundantly expressed in the hippocampus and in the prefrontal cortex, brain areas critical for memory, executive function, and cortisol inhibition. Here, we investigated whether MR stimulation with fludrocortisone (1) improves memory and executive function and (2) decreases cortisol secretion in depressed patients and healthy individuals. Twenty-four depressed patients without medication and 24 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy participants received fludrocortisone (0.4 mg) or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, within-subject cross-over design. We measured verbal memory, visuospatial memory, executive function, psychomotor speed, and salivary cortisol secretion during cognitive testing between 1400 and 1700 hours. For verbal memory and executive function, we found better performance after fludrocortisone compared with placebo across groups. No treatment effect on other cognitive domains emerged. Depressed patients performed worse than healthy individuals in psychomotor speed and executive function. No group effect or group × treatment interaction emerged on other cognitive domains. Fludrocortisone decreased cortisol secretion across groups and there was a significant correlation between cortisol inhibition and verbal memory performance. Our data suggest a crucial role of MR in verbal memory and executive function and demonstrate the possibility to improve cognition in depressed patients and healthy individuals through MR stimulation. PMID:25035081

  4. Stress Induces a Shift Towards Striatum-Dependent Stimulus-Response Learning via the Mineralocorticoid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Susanne; Klumpers, Floris; Schröder, Tobias Navarro; Oplaat, Krista T; Krugers, Harm J; Oitzl, Melly S; Joëls, Marian; Doeller, Christian F; Fernández, Guillén

    2016-12-21

    Stress is assumed to cause a shift from flexible 'cognitive' memory to more rigid 'habit' memory. In the spatial memory domain, stress impairs place learning depending on the hippocampus whereas stimulus-response learning based on the striatum appears to be improved. While the neural basis of this shift is still unclear, previous evidence in rodents points towards cortisol interacting with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) to affect amygdala functioning. The amygdala is in turn assumed to orchestrate the stress-induced shift in memory processing. However, an integrative study testing these mechanisms in humans is lacking. Therefore, we combined functional neuroimaging of a spatial memory task, stress-induction, and administration of an MR-antagonist in a full-factorial, randomized, placebo-controlled between-subjects design in 101 healthy males. We demonstrate that stress-induced increases in cortisol lead to enhanced stimulus-response learning, accompanied by increased amygdala activity and connectivity to the striatum. Importantly, this shift was prevented by an acute administration of the MR-antagonist spironolactone. Our findings support a model in which the MR and the amygdala play an important role in the stress-induced shift towards habit memory systems, revealing a fundamental mechanism of adaptively allocating neural resources that may have implications for stress-related mental disorders.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 21 December 2016; doi:10.1038/npp.2016.262.

  5. Selection of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist for patients with hypertension or heart failure.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javaid; Parviz, Yasir; Pitt, Bertram; Newell-Price, John; Al-Mohammad, Abdallah; Zannad, Faiez

    2014-02-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated morbidity and mortality benefits of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) in patients with heart failure. These studies have used either spironolactone or eplerenone as the MRA. It is generally believed that these two agents have the same effects, and the data from studies using one drug could be extrapolated for the other. National and international guidelines do not generally discriminate between spironolactone and eplerenone, but strongly recommend using an MRA for patients with heart failure due to LV systolic dysfunction and post-infarct LV systolic dysfunction. There are no major clinical trials directly comparing the efficacy of these two drugs. This article aims to compare the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of spironolactone and eplerenone, and to analyse the available data for their cardiovascular indications and adverse effects. We have also addressed the role of special circumstances including co-morbidities, concomitant drug therapy, cost, and licensing restrictions in choosing an appropriate MRA for a particular patient, thus combining an evidence-based approach with personalized medicine.

  6. Deletion of mineralocorticoid receptors in smooth muscle cells blunts renal vascular resistance following acute cyclosporine administration

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Cristian A.; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Andre-Gregoire, Gwennan; Placier, Sandrine; Van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Berger, Stefan; Warnock, David G.; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Rieu, Philippe; Jaisser, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors such as cyclosporine A (CsA) are still commonly used after renal transplantation, despite CsA–induced nephrotoxicity (CIN), which is partly related to vasoactive mechanisms. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is now recognized as a key player in the control of vascular tone, and both endothelial cell- and vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC)-MR modulate the vasoactive responses to vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. Here we tested whether vascular MR is involved in renal hemodynamic changes induced by CsA. The relative contribution of vascular MR in acute CsA treatment was evaluated using mouse models with targeted deletion of MR in endothelial cell or SMC. Results indicate that MR expressed in SMC, but not in endothelium, contributes to the increase of plasma urea and creatinine, the appearance of isometric tubular vacuolization, and overexpression of a kidney injury biomarker (neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin) after CsA treatment. Inactivation of MR in SMC blunted CsA–induced phosphorylation of contractile proteins. Finally, the in vivo increase of renal vascular resistance induced by CsA was blunted when MR was deleted from SMC cells, and this was associated with decreased L-type Ca2+ channel activity. Thus, our study provides new insights into the role of vascular MR in renal hemodynamics during acute CIN, and provides rationale for clinical studies of MR antagonism to manage the side effects of calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:26422501

  7. Arctigenin antagonizes mineralocorticoid receptor to inhibit the transcription of Na/K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ye; Zhou, Meili; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors in cardiovascular disease and is the most common chronic disease. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists have been successfully used in clinic for the treatment of hypertension. Our study aims to investigate whether Arctigenin can antagonize MR and inhibit the transcription of Na/K-ATPase. The yeast two-hybrid assay was used to screen natural products and Arctigenin was identified as an MR antagonist. The direct binding of Arctigenin to MR was determined using assays based on surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence quenching. Furthermore, results from mammalian one-hybrid and transcriptional activation experiments also confirmed that Arctigenin can potently antagonize MR in cells. We demonstrated that Arctigenin can decrease the level of Na/K-ATPase mRNA by antagonizing MR in HK-2 cells. Our findings show that Arctigenin can effectively decrease Na/K-ATPase transcription; thus highlight its potential as an anti-hypertensive drug lead compound. Our current findings demonstrate that Arctigenin is an antagonist of MR and effectively decreases the Na/K-ATPase 1 gene expression. Our work provides a hint for the drug discovery against cardiovascular disease.

  8. Mineralocorticoid receptor stimulation improves cognitive function and decreases cortisol secretion in depressed patients and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Otte, Christian; Wingenfeld, Katja; Kuehl, Linn K; Kaczmarczyk, Michael; Richter, Steffen; Quante, Arnim; Regen, Francesca; Bajbouj, Malek; Zimmermann-Viehoff, Frank; Wiedemann, Klaus; Hinkelmann, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Memory and executive function are often impaired in patients with major depression, while cortisol secretion is increased. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) are abundantly expressed in the hippocampus and in the prefrontal cortex, brain areas critical for memory, executive function, and cortisol inhibition. Here, we investigated whether MR stimulation with fludrocortisone (1) improves memory and executive function and (2) decreases cortisol secretion in depressed patients and healthy individuals. Twenty-four depressed patients without medication and 24 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy participants received fludrocortisone (0.4 mg) or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, within-subject cross-over design. We measured verbal memory, visuospatial memory, executive function, psychomotor speed, and salivary cortisol secretion during cognitive testing between 1400 and 1700 hours. For verbal memory and executive function, we found better performance after fludrocortisone compared with placebo across groups. No treatment effect on other cognitive domains emerged. Depressed patients performed worse than healthy individuals in psychomotor speed and executive function. No group effect or group × treatment interaction emerged on other cognitive domains. Fludrocortisone decreased cortisol secretion across groups and there was a significant correlation between cortisol inhibition and verbal memory performance. Our data suggest a crucial role of MR in verbal memory and executive function and demonstrate the possibility to improve cognition in depressed patients and healthy individuals through MR stimulation.

  9. Benefit of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonism in AKI: Role of Vascular Smooth Muscle Rac1.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan; André-Grégoire, Gwennan; Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Lechner, Sebastian M; Cau, Jérôme; Prince, Sonia; Kolkhof, Peter; Loirand, Gervaise; Sauzeau, Vincent; Hauet, Thierry; Jaisser, Frédéric

    2017-01-13

    AKI is a frequent complication in hospitalized patients. Unfortunately, there is no effective pharmacologic approach for treating or preventing AKI. In rodents, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism prevents AKI induced by ischemia-reperfusion (IR). We investigated the specific role of vascular MR in mediating AKI induced by IR. We also assessed the protective effect of MR antagonism in IR-induced AKI in the Large White pig, a model of human AKI. In mice, MR deficiency in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) protected against kidney IR injury. MR blockade by the novel nonsteroidal MR antagonist, finerenone, or genetic deletion of MR in SMCs associated with weaker oxidative stress production. Moreover, ischemic kidneys had higher levels of Rac1-GTP, required for NADPH oxidase activation, than sham control kidneys, and genetic deletion of Rac1 in SMCs protected against AKI. Furthermore, genetic deletion of MR in SMCs blunted the production of Rac1-GTP after IR. Pharmacologic inhibition of MR also prevented AKI induced by IR in the Large White pig. Altogether, we show that MR antagonism, or deletion of the MR gene in SMCs, limited the renal injury induced by IR through effects on Rac1-mediated MR signaling. The benefits of MR antagonism in the pig provide a rational basis for future clinical trials assessing the benefits of this approach in patients with IR-mediated AKI.

  10. Contribution of glucocorticoid-mineralocorticoid receptor pathway on the obesity-related adipocyte dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Ayumu; Maeda, Norikazu; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Hiuge-Shimizu, Aki; Okada, Takuya; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2012-03-09

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blockade ameliorated insulin resistance with improvements in adipocytokine dysregulation, inflammation, and excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in obese adipose tissue and adipocytes, but its mechanism has not been clarified. The 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), producing active glucocorticoids, is highly expressed in adipocytes and glucocorticoids bind to MR with higher affinity than to glucocorticoid receptor (GR). We investigated whether glucocorticoids effect on adipocytokines and ROS through MR in adipocytes. In addition, fat distributions of MR and GR were investigated in human subjects. Corticoid receptors and their target genes were examined in adipose tissue of obese db/db mice. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with glucocorticoids, H(2)O(2), MR antagonist eplerenone (EP), GR antagonist RU486 (RU), MR-siRNA, and/or N-acetylcysteine. Human adipose tissues were obtained from seven patients who underwent abdominal surgery. The mRNA levels of MR and its target gene were higher in db/db mice than in control db/m+mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, glucocorticoids, similar to H(2)O(2), caused the dysregulation of mRNA levels of various genes related to adipocytokines and the increase of intracellular ROS. Such changes were rectified by MR blockade, not by GR antagonist. In human fat, MR mRNA level was increased in parallel with the increase of body mass index (BMI) and its increase was more significant in visceral fat, while there were no apparent correlations of GR mRNA level to BMI or fat distribution. Glucocorticoid-MR pathway may contribute to the obesity-related adipocytokine dysregulation and adipose ROS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential contribution of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors to memory formation during sleep.

    PubMed

    Groch, Sabine; Wilhelm, Ines; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Corticosteroids are known to modulate the consolidation of memories during sleep, specifically in the hippocampus-dependent declarative memory system. However, effects of the major human corticosteroid cortisol are conveyed via two different receptors, i.e., mineralocorticoid (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) whose specific contributions to memory consolidation are unclear. Whereas a shift in the balance between MR and GR activation toward predominant GR activation has been found to impair sleep-dependent consolidation of declarative memories, the effect of predominant MR activation is not well characterized. Here, we examined differential corticosteroid receptor contributions to memory consolidation during post-learning sleep in two placebo-controlled double-blind studies in humans, by comparing the effects of the selective MR agonist fludrocortisone (0.2 mg, orally, Study 1) and of hydrocortisone (22 mg, intravenously, Study 2) with strong binding affinity to both MR and GR. We hypothesized increased activation of MRs during sleep to enhance declarative memory consolidation, but the joint MR/GR activation to impair it. Participants (16 men in each study) learned a declarative (word pair associates) and a procedural task (mirror tracing) before a 7-h period of nocturnal retention sleep, with the substances administered before sleep (Study 1) and during sleep (Study 2), respectively. As hypothesized, retention of word pairs, but not of mirror tracing skill, was selectively enhanced by the MR agonist fludrocortisone. An impairing effect of hydrocortisone on word pair retention remained non-significant possibly reflecting that hydrocortisone administration failed to establish robust predominance of GR activation. Our results show that predominant MR activation benefits declarative memory consolidation presumably by enhancing the sleep-dependent reactivation of hippocampal memories and resultant synaptic plastic processes. The effect is counteracted by

  12. Stress or no stress: mineralocorticoid receptors in the forebrain regulate behavioral adaptation.

    PubMed

    ter Horst, J P; van der Mark, M H; Arp, M; Berger, S; de Kloet, E R; Oitzl, M S

    2012-07-01

    Corticosteroid effects on cognitive abilities during behavioral adaptation to stress are mediated by two types of receptors. While the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is mainly involved in the consolidation of memory, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates appraisal and initial responses to novelty. Recent findings in humans and mice suggest that under stress, the MR might be involved in the use of different learning strategies. Here, we used male mice lacking the MR in the forebrain (MR(CaMKCre)), which were subjected to 5-10 min acute restraint stress, followed 30 min later by training trials on the circular hole board. Mice had to locate an exit hole using extra- and intra-maze cues. We assessed performance and the use of spatial and stimulus-response strategies. Non-stressed MR(CaMKCre) mice showed delayed learning as compared to control littermates. Prior stress impaired performance in controls, but did not further deteriorate learning in MR(CaMKCre) mice. When stressed, 20-30% of both MR(CaMKCre) and control mice switched from a spatial to a stimulus-response strategy, which rescued performance in MR(CaMKCre) mice. Furthermore, MR(CaMKCre) mice showed increased GR mRNA expression in all CA areas of the hippocampus and an altered basal and stress-induced corticosterone secretion, which supports their role in the modulation of neuroendocrine activity. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for the critical role of MR in the fast formation of spatial memory. In the absence of forebrain MR spatial learning performance was under basal circumstances impaired, while after stress further deterioration of performance was rescued by switching behavior increasingly to a stimulus-response strategy.

  13. Mineralocorticoid receptor as a therapeutic target in chronic kidney disease and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Shigeru; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Uchida, Shunya

    2017-03-01

    The kidney has a central role in long-term control of blood pressure, and decreased kidney function is a common but difficult-to-treat cause of hypertension. Conversely, elevated blood pressure contributes to the progression of chronic kidney disease. Steroid hormone aldosterone and its receptor mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) contribute to hypertension by increasing renal salt reabsorption and promote kidney dysfunction through direct effects on renal parenchymal cells. Accumulating data indicate that various mechanisms affect aldosterone-MR signaling. Using a genetically engineered mouse model, we identified crosstalk between small GTPase Rac1 and MR. This crosstalk pathway promotes glomerular podocyte injury, and is also involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Notably, salt loading increases renal Rac1 activity in several models of salt-sensitive hypertension, which, in the presence of aldosterone, synergistically activates MR signaling, causing hypertension and kidney injury. There is also a mechanism regulating MR in a cell-selective manner. In the principal cells of the collecting duct, aldosterone directly binds and activate MR. In neighboring intercalated cells, however, binding of aldosterone to MR is regulated by phosphorylation at the ligand-binding domain. This mechanism serves as a switch to turn on electrolyte flux pathways in intercalated cells, allowing aldosterone to exert distinct effects in different physiological contexts. Given the potential benefit of MR blockade in hypertensive kidney disease, the delineation of these pathways may lead to the identification of alternative therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the roles of MR in mediating kidney disease and hypertension, with a focus on the crosstalk among related signaling pathways.

  14. Displacement of Cortisol From Human Heart by Acute Administration of a Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Javaid; Andrew, Ruth; Cruden, Nicholas L.; Kenyon, Christopher J.; Hughes, Katherine A.; Newby, David E.; Hadoke, Patrick W. F.; Walker, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Context Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists have beneficial effects in patients with heart failure and myocardial infarction, often attributed to blocking aldosterone action in the myocardium. However, binding of aldosterone to MR requires local activity of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2), which inactivates cortisol to cortisone and thereby prevents receptor occupancy by cortisol. In vivo activity of 11β-HSD2 and potential occupancy of MR by cortisol in human heart have not been quantified. Objective This study aimed to measure in vivo activity of 11β-HSD2 and to establish whether cortisol binds MR in human heart. Participants and Interventions Nine patients without heart failure undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography were infused to steady state with the stable isotope tracers 9,11,12,12-[2H]4-cortisol and 1,2-[2H]2-cortisone to quantify cortisol and cortisone production. Samples were obtained from the femoral artery and coronary sinus before and for 40 minutes after bolus iv administration of an MR antagonist, potassium canrenoate. Coronary sinus blood flow was measured by venography and Doppler flow wire. Results There was no detectable production of cortisol or cortisone across the myocardium. After potassium canrenoate administration, plasma aldosterone concentrations increased substantially but aldosterone was not detectably released from the myocardium. In contrast, plasma cortisol concentrations did not change in the systemic circulation but tissue-bound cortisol was released transiently from the myocardium after potassium canrenoate administration. Conclusions Human cardiac 11β-HSD2 activity appears too low to inactivate cortisol to cortisone. Cortisol is displaced acutely from the myocardium by MR antagonists and may contribute to adverse MR activation in human heart. PMID:24423282

  15. Dietary sodium intake regulates angiotensin II type 1, mineralocorticoid receptor, and associated signaling proteins in heart.

    PubMed

    Ricchiuti, Vincent; Lapointe, Nathalie; Pojoga, Luminita; Yao, Tham; Tran, Loc; Williams, Gordon H; Adler, Gail K

    2011-10-01

    Liberal or high-sodium (HS) intake, in conjunction with an activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, increases cardiovascular (CV) damage. We tested the hypothesis that sodium intake regulates the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT(1)R), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and associated signaling pathways in heart tissue from healthy rodents. HS (1.6% Na(+)) and low-sodium (LS; 0.02% Na(+)) rat chow was fed to male healthy Wistar rats (n=7 animals per group). Protein levels were assessed by western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis. Fractionation studies showed that MR, AT(1)R, caveolin-3 (CAV-3), and CAV-1 were located in both cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. In healthy rats, consumption of an LS versus a HS diet led to decreased cardiac levels of AT(1)R and MR. Decreased sodium intake was also associated with decreased cardiac levels of CAV-1 and CAV-3, decreased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R-CAV-3 and MR-CAV-3 complexes, but increased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R/MR complexes. Furthermore, decreased sodium intake was associated with decreased cardiac extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphorylated ERK (pERK), and pERK/ERK ratio; increased cardiac striatin; decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (peNOS), but increased peNOS/eNOS ratio; and decreased cardiac plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Dietary sodium restriction has beneficial effects on the cardiac expression of factors associated with CV injury. These changes may play a role in the cardioprotective effects of dietary sodium restriction.

  16. A mixed glucocorticoid/mineralocorticoid receptor modulator dampens endocrine and hippocampal stress responsivity in male rats.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth T; Streicher, Joshua; Berman, Sarah; Caldwell, Jody L; Ghisays, Valentina; Estrada, Christina M; Wulsin, Aynara C; Solomon, Matia B

    2017-09-01

    Aberrant glucocorticoid secretion is implicated in the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders (i.e., depression, anxiety). Glucocorticoids exert biological effects via mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors. Previous data from our laboratory indicate that GR antagonism/modulation (i.e., mifepristone, CORT 108297) regulate endocrine, behavioral, and central stress responses. Because of the dynamic interplay between MR and GR on HPA axis regulation and emotionality, compounds targeting both receptors are of interest for stress-related pathology. We investigated the effects of CORT 118335 (a dual selective GR modulator/MR antagonist) on endocrine, behavioral, and central (c-Fos) stress responses in male rats. Rats were treated for five days with CORT 118335, imipramine (positive control), or vehicle and exposed to restraint or forced swim stress (FST). CORT 118335 dampened corticosterone responses to both stressors, without a concomitant antidepressant-like effect in the FST. Imipramine decreased corticosterone responses to restraint stress; however, the antidepressant-like effect of imipramine in the FST was independent of circulating glucocorticoids. These findings indicate dissociation between endocrine and behavioral stress responses in the FST. CORT 118335 decreased c-Fos expression only in the CA1 division of the hippocampus. Imipramine decreased c-Fos expression in the basolateral amygdala and CA1 and CA3 divisions of the hippocampus. Overall, the data indicate differential effects of CORT 118335 and imipramine on stress-induced neuronal activity in various brain regions. The data also highlight a complex relationship between neuronal activation in stress and mood regulatory brain regions and the ensuing impact on endocrine and behavioral stress responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Combination of chewing and stress up-regulates hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor in contrast to the increase of mineralocorticoid receptor under stress only.

    PubMed

    Sasaguri, Ken-Ichi; Yoshikawa, Gota; Yamada, Kentaro; Miyake, Shinjiro; Kubo, Kin-Ya; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2012-06-21

    In general, acute immobilization stress increases plasma corticosterone levels that signal the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Mineralocorticoid receptors and glucocorticoid receptors in the hippocampus perform crucial roles in this feedback mechanism. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chewing under stress on the rat hippocampal mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors by immunohistochemistry. We separated rats into a control group, a 2-h immobilization stress group (stress only group), and a 2-h immobilization stress group that was allowed to chew on a wooden stick for the latter 1h (stress with chewing group). Mineralocorticoid receptor immunoreactive cells with nucleus staining in the hippocampal CA1 area were scattered in the pyramidal cell layer. The stress only group showed the densest distribution of immunoreactive cells; however, the density of the immunoreactive cells in the stress with chewing group was similar to that of the control group. Changes in immunoreactive cell density were not visible in other areas of the hippocampus, namely, the CA3 area and dentate gyrus. Image analysis indicated that the increase in the mineralocorticoid receptor immunoreactive area within a fixed area in the stress only group was statistically significant compared with those in the control group and the stress with chewing group. On the other hand, glucocorticoid receptor immunoreactive cells in the CA1 area seemed to be increased in the stress with chewing group, but not in the stress only group. Image analysis indicated that this increase was statistically significant. These results suggest that immobilization and immobilization with chewing differentially affect these two types of glucocorticoid receptors in the rat hippocampus. Considering that chewing has alleviative effects against stress, glucocorticoid receptor elevation in the hippocampal CA1 area is one of the neuronal mechanisms of coping with stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  18. BENEFICIAL EFFECTS OF MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR BLOCKADE IN EXPERIMENTAL NON-ALCOHOLIC STEATOHEPATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Margarita; Solís, Nancy; Quintero, Pablo; Barrera, Francisco; Cabrera, Daniel; Santiago, Pamela Rojasde; Arab, Juan Pablo; Padilla, Oslando; Roa, Juan Carlos; Moshage, Han; Wree, Alexander; Inzaugarat, Eugenia; Feldstein, Ariel E.; Fardella, Carlos E.; Baudrand, Rene; Riquelme, Arnoldo; Arrese, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic options to treat Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are limited. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation could play a role in hepatic fibrogenesis and its modulation could be beneficial for NASH. Aim To investigate whether eplerenone, a specific MR antagonist, ameliorates liver damage in experimental NASH. Methods C57bl6 mice were fed a choline-deficient-amino-acid–defined (CDAA) diet for 22 weeks with or without eplerenone supplementation. Serum levels of aminotransferases and aldosterone were measured and hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis scored histologically. Hepatic triglyceride content (HTC) and hepatic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory pro-fibrotic, oxidative stress-associated genes and of MR were also assessed. Results CDAA diet effectively induced fibrotic NASH, and increased the hepatic expression of pro-inflammatory, pro-fibrotic and oxidative stress-associated genes. Hepatic MR mRNA levels significantly correlated with the expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic genes and were significantly increased in hepatic stellate cells obtained from CDAA-fed animals. Eplerenone administration was associated to a reduction in histological steatosis and attenuation of liver fibrosis development, which was associated to a significant decrease in the expression of collagen-α1, collagen type III, alpha 1 and Matrix metalloproteinase-2. Conclusion The expression of MR correlates with inflammation and fibrosis development in experimental NASH. Specific MR blockade with eplerenone has hepatic anti-steatotic and anti-fibrotic effects. These data identifies eplerenone as a potential novel therapy for NASH. Considering its safety and FDA-approved status, human studies are warranted PMID:25646700

  19. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptors Differentially Contribute to Coronary and Mesenteric Vascular Function Without Modulating Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Katelee Barrett; Bender, Shawn B; Hong, Kwangseok; Yang, Yan; Aronovitz, Mark; Jaisser, Frederic; Hill, Michael A; Jaffe, Iris Z

    2015-11-01

    Arteriolar vasoreactivity tightly regulates tissue-specific blood flow and contributes to systemic blood pressure (BP) but becomes dysfunctional in the setting of cardiovascular disease. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is known to regulate BP via the kidney and by vasoconstriction in smooth muscle cells. Although endothelial cells (EC) express MR, the contribution of EC-MR to BP and resistance vessel function remains unclear. To address this, we created a mouse with MR specifically deleted from EC (EC-MR knockout [EC-MR-KO]) but with intact leukocyte MR expression and normal renal MR function. Telemetric BP studies reveal no difference between male EC-MR-KO mice and MR-intact littermates in systolic, diastolic, circadian, or salt-sensitive BP or in the hypertensive responses to aldosterone±salt or angiotensin II±l-nitroarginine methyl ester. Vessel myography demonstrated normal vasorelaxation in mesenteric and coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice. After exposure to angiotensin II-induced hypertension, impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation was prevented in EC-MR-KO mice in mesenteric vessels but not in coronary vessels. Mesenteric vessels from angiotensin II-exposed EC-MR-KO mice showed increased maximum responsiveness to acetylcholine when compared with MR-intact vessels, a difference that is lost with indomethacin+l-nitroarginine methyl ester pretreatment. These data support that EC-MR plays a role in regulating endothelial function in hypertension. Although there was no effect of EC-MR deletion on mesenteric vasoconstriction, coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice showed decreased constriction to endothelin-1 and thromboxane agonist at baseline and also after exposure to hypertension. These data support that EC-MR participates in regulation of vasomotor function in a vascular bed-specific manner that is also modulated by risk factors, such as hypertension.

  20. Combined oral contraceptive synergistically activates mineralocorticoid receptor through histone code modifications.

    PubMed

    Igunnu, Adedoyin; Seok, Young-Mi; Olatunji, Lawrence A; Kang, Seol-Hee; Kim, Inkyeom

    2015-12-15

    Clinical studies have shown that the use of combined oral contraceptive in pre-menopausal women is associated with fluid retention. However, the molecular mechanism is still elusive. We hypothesized that combined oral contraceptive (COC) ethinyl estradiol (EE) and norgestrel (N) synergistically activates mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) through histone code modifications. Twelve-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with olive oil (control), a combination of 0.1µg EE and 1.0µg N (low COC) or 1.0µg EE and 10.0µg N (high COC) as well as 0.1 or 1.0µg EE and 1.0 or 10.0µg N daily for 6 weeks. Expression of MR target genes in kidney cortex was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. MR was quantified by western blot. Recruitment of MR and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) on promoters of target genes as well as histone code modifications was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Treatment with COC increased renal cortical expression of MR target genes such as serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (Sgk-1), glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (Gilz), epithelial Na(+)channel (Enac) and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase subunit α1 (Atp1a1). Although COC increased neither serum aldosterone nor MR expression in kidney cortex, it increased recruitment of MR and Pol II in parallel with increased H3Ac and H3K4me3 on the promoter regions of MR target genes. However, treatment with EE or N alone did not affect renal cortical expression of Sgk-1, Gilz, Enac or Atp1a1. These results indicate that COC synergistically activates MR through histone code modifications.

  1. Preventive and chronic mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism is highly beneficial in obese SHHF rats

    PubMed Central

    Youcef, G; Olivier, A; Nicot, N; Muller, A; Deng, C; Labat, C; Fay, R; Rodriguez‐Guéant, R‐M; Leroy, C; Jaisser, F; Zannad, F; Lacolley, P; Vallar, L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation contributes to heart failure (HF) progression. Its overactivity in obesity is thought to accelerate cardiac remodelling and HF development. Given that MR antagonists (MRA) are beneficial in chronic HF patients, we hypothesized that early MRA treatment may target obesity‐related disorders and consequently delay the development of HF. Experimental Approach Twenty spontaneously hypertensive HF dyslipidaemic obese SHHFcp/cp rats and 18 non‐dyslipidaemic lean SHHF+/+ controls underwent regular monitoring for their metabolic and cardiovascular phenotypes with or without MRA treatment [eplerenone (eple), 100 mg∙kg−1∙day−1] from 1.5 to 12.5 months of age. Key Results Eleven months of eple treatment in obese rats (SHHFcp/cpeple) reduced the obesity‐related metabolic disorders observed in untreated SHHFcp/cp rats by reducing weight gain, triglycerides and total cholesterol levels and by preserving adiponectinaemia. The MRA treatment predominantly preserved diastolic and systolic functions in obese rats by alleviating the eccentric cardiac hypertrophy observed in untreated SHHFcp/cp animals and preserving ejection fraction (70 ± 1 vs. 59 ± 1%). The MRA also improved survival independently of these pressure effects. Conclusion and Implications Early chronic eple treatment resulted in a delay in cardiac remodelling and HF onset in both SHHF+/+ and SHHFcp/cp rats, whereas SHHFcp/cp rats further benefited from the MRA treatment through a reduction in their obesity and dyslipidaemia. These findings suggest that preventive MRA therapy may provide greater benefits in obese patients with additional risk factors of developing cardiovascular complications. PMID:26990406

  2. Functional Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Regulate ICAM-1 Expression and Promote Leukocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Caprio, Massimiliano; Newfell, Brenna G.; la Sala, Andrea; Baur, Wendy; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe; Mendelsohn, Michael E.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2008-01-01

    In clinical trials, aldosterone antagonists decrease cardiovascular mortality and ischemia by unknown mechanisms. The steroid hormone aldosterone acts by binding to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. In humans, aldosterone causes MR-dependent endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and in animal models, aldosterone increases vascular macrophage infiltration and atherosclerosis. MR antagonists inhibit these effects without changing blood pressure, suggesting a direct role for vascular MR in EC function and atherosclerosis. Whether human vascular EC express functional MR is not known. Here we show that human coronary artery and aortic EC express MR mRNA and protein and that EC MR mediates aldosterone-dependent gene transcription. Human EC also express the enzyme 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2(11βHSD2) and inhibition of 11βHSD2 in aortic EC enhances gene transactivation by cortisol, supporting that EC 11βHSD2 is functional. Furthermore, aldosterone stimulates transcription of the proatherogenic leukocyte-EC adhesion molecule Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1(ICAM1) gene and protein expression on human coronary artery EC, an effect inhibited by the MR antagonist spironolactone and by MR knock-down with siRNA. Cell adhesion assays demonstrate that aldosterone promotes leukocyte-EC adhesion, an effect that is inhibited by spironolactone and ICAM1 blocking antibody, supporting that aldosterone induction of EC ICAM1 surface expression via MR mediates leukocyte-EC adhesion. These data show that aldosterone activates endogenous EC MR and proatherogenic gene expression in clinically important human EC. These studies describe a novel mechanism by which aldosterone may influence ischemic cardiovascular events and support a new explanation for the decrease in ischemic events in patients treated with aldosterone antagonists. PMID:18467630

  3. Aging-like skin changes in metabolic syndrome model mice are mediated by mineralocorticoid receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Takashi; Akase, Tomoko; Sanada, Hiromi; Minematsu, Takeo; Ibuki, Ai; Huang, Lijuan; Asada, Mayumi; Yoshimura, Kotaro; Nagase, Miki; Shimada, Tsutomu; Aburada, Masaki; Nakagami, Gojiro; Sugama, Junko

    2013-02-01

    Aging is accelerated, at least in part, by pathological condition such as metabolic syndrome (MetS), and various molecular pathways such as oxidative stress are common mediators of aging and MetS. We previously developed the aging-like skin model by single ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the MetS model mice. Recent studies revealed that mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) signaling plays a pivotal role for various tissue inflammation and damages in MetS. Although previous studies reported that MR is expressed in the skin and that overexpression of MR in the skin resulted in the skin atrophy, the physiological or pathological functions of MR in the skin are not fully elucidated. Here, we show the involvement of MR signaling in the aging-like skin changes in our own model. Elevations of oxidative stress and inflammation markers were observed in the MetS mice, and the UV-evoked aging-like skin damages were attenuated by topical antioxidant. MR expression was higher in the MetS mouse skin, and notably, expression of its effecter gene Sgk1 was significantly upregulated in the aging-like skin in the UV-irradiated MetS mice. Furthermore, topical application of MR antagonist spironolactone suppressed Sgk1 expression, oxidative stress, inflammation, and the aging-like changes in the skin. The 2-week UV onto the non-MetS mice, the more usual photoaging model, resulted in the skin damages mostly equivalent to the MetS mice with single UV, but they were not associated with upregulation of MR signaling. Our studies suggested an unexpected role of MR signaling in the skin aging in MetS status.

  4. Predicting the relative binding affinity of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists by density functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Katarina; Hogner, Anders; Ogg, Derek; Packer, Martin J.; Hansson, Eva; Granberg, Kenneth L.; Evertsson, Emma; Nordqvist, Anneli

    2015-12-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of binding affinity ahead of synthesis to aid compound prioritization is still hampered by the low throughput of the more accurate methods and the lack of general pertinence of one method that fits all systems. Here we show the applicability of a method based on density functional theory using core fragments and a protein model with only the first shell residues surrounding the core, to predict relative binding affinity of a matched series of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists. Antagonists of MR are used for treatment of chronic heart failure and hypertension. Marketed MR antagonists, spironolactone and eplerenone, are also believed to be highly efficacious in treatment of chronic kidney disease in diabetes patients, but is contra-indicated due to the increased risk for hyperkalemia. These findings and a significant unmet medical need among patients with chronic kidney disease continues to stimulate efforts in the discovery of new MR antagonist with maintained efficacy but low or no risk for hyperkalemia. Applied on a matched series of MR antagonists the quantum mechanical based method gave an R2 = 0.76 for the experimental lipophilic ligand efficiency versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional in gas phase and an R2 = 0.64 for experimental binding affinity versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional including an implicit solvation model. The quantum mechanical approach using core fragments was compared to free energy perturbation calculations using the full sized compound structures.

  5. Endothelial mineralocorticoid receptor activation mediates endothelial dysfunction in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Nicola; Lohmann, Christine; Winnik, Stephan; van Tits, Lambertus J.; Miranda, Melroy X.; Vergopoulos, Athanasios; Ruschitzka, Frank; Nussberger, Jürg; Berger, Stefan; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Verrey, François; Matter, Christian M.

    2013-01-01

    Received 22 July 2012; revised 29 January 2013; accepted 4 March 2013 Aims Aldosterone plays a crucial role in cardiovascular disease. ‘Systemic’ inhibition of its mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) decreases atherosclerosis by reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. Obesity, an important cardiovascular risk factor, is an inflammatory disease associated with increased plasma aldosterone levels. We have investigated the role of the ‘endothelial’ MR in obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction, the earliest stage in atherogenesis. Methods and results C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a normal chow diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD) alone or in combination with the MR antagonist eplerenone (200 mg/kg/day) for 14 weeks. Diet-induced obesity impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in response to acetylcholine, whereas eplerenone treatment of obese mice prevented this. Expression analyses in aortic endothelial cells isolated from these mice revealed that eplerenone attenuated expression of pro-oxidative NADPH oxidase (subunits p22phox, p40phox) and increased expression of antioxidative genes (glutathione peroxidase-1, superoxide dismutase-1 and -3) in obesity. Eplerenone did not affect obesity-induced upregulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 or prostacyclin synthase. Endothelial-specific MR deletion prevented endothelial dysfunction in obese (exhibiting high ‘endogenous’ aldosterone) and in ‘exogenous’ aldosterone-infused lean mice. Pre-incubation of aortic rings from aldosterone-treated animals with the COX-inhibitor indomethacin restored endothelial function. Exogenous aldosterone administration induced endothelial expression of p22phox in the presence, but not in the absence of the endothelial MR. Conclusion Obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction depends on the ‘endothelial’ MR and is mediated by an imbalance of oxidative stress-modulating mechanisms. Therefore, MR antagonists may represent an attractive therapeutic strategy in the increasing population

  6. The impact of mineralocorticoid receptor ISO/VAL genotype (rs5522) and stress on reward learning.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, R; Perlis, R H; Fagerness, J; Pizzagalli, D A

    2010-08-01

    Research suggests that stress disrupts reinforcement learning and induces anhedonia. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) determines the sensitivity of the stress response, and the missense iso/val polymorphism (Ile180Val, rs5522) of the MR gene (NR3C2) has been associated with enhanced physiological stress responses, elevated depressive symptoms and reduced cortisol-induced MR gene expression. The goal of these studies was to evaluate whether rs5522 genotype and stress independently and interactively influence reward learning. In study 1, participants (n = 174) completed a probabilistic reward task under baseline (i.e. no-stress) conditions. In study 2, participants (n = 53) completed the task during a stress (threat-of-shock) and no-stress condition. Reward learning, i.e. the ability to modulate behavior as a function of reinforcement history, was the main variable of interest. In study 1, in which participants were evaluated under no-stress conditions, reward learning was enhanced in val carriers. In study 2, participants developed a weaker response bias toward a more frequently rewarded stimulus under the stress relative to no-stress condition. Critically, stress-induced reward learning deficits were largest in val carriers. Although preliminary and in need of replication due to small sample size, findings indicate that psychiatrically healthy individuals carrying the MR val allele, gene, which has been recently linked to depression, showed a reduced ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward when facing an acute, uncontrollable stressor. Future studies are warranted to evaluate whether rs5522 genotype interacts with naturalistic stressors to increase the risk of depression and whether stress-induced anhedonia might moderate such risk.

  7. Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralocorticoid Receptors Are Mandatory for Aldosterone–Salt to Induce Vascular Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Galmiche, Guillaume; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine; Berger, Stefan; Challande, Pascal; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Labat, Carlos; Lacolley, Patrick; Jaisser, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is recognized as a risk factor for many cardiovascular diseases. Aldosterone via its binding to and activation of the mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) is a main regulator of blood pressure by controlling renal sodium reabsorption. Although both clinical and experimental data indicate that MR activation by aldosterone is involved in arterial stiffening, the molecular mechanism is not known. In addition to the kidney, MR is expressed in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but the specific contribution of the VSMC MR to aldosterone-induced vascular stiffness remains to be explored. To address this question, we generated a mouse model with conditional inactivation of the MR in VSMC (MRSMKO). MRSMKO mice show no alteration in renal sodium handling or vascular structure, but they have decreased blood pressure when compared with control littermate mice. In vivo at baseline, large vessels of mutant mice presented with normal elastic properties, whereas carotids displayed a smaller diameter when compared with those of the control group. As expected after aldosterone/salt challenge, the arterial stiffness increased in control mice; however, it remained unchanged in MRSMKO mice, without significant modification in vascular collagen/elastin ratio. Instead, we found that the fibronectin/α5-subunit integrin ratio is profoundly altered in MRSMKO mice because the induction of α5 expression by aldosterone/salt challenge is prevented in mice lacking VSMC MR. Altogether, our data reveal in the aldosterone/salt hypertension model that MR activation specifically in VSMC leads to the arterial stiffening by modulation of cell-matrix attachment proteins independent of major vascular structural changes. PMID:24296280

  8. Corticosteroid and progesterone transactivation of mineralocorticoid receptors from Amur sturgeon and tropical gar.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Akira; Oka, Kaori; Sato, Rui; Adachi, Shinji; Baker, Michael E; Katsu, Yoshinao

    2016-10-15

    The response to a panel of steroids by the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) from Amur sturgeon and tropical gar, two basal ray-finned fish, expressed in HEK293 cells was investigated. Half-maximal responses (EC50s) for transcriptional activation of sturgeon MR by 11-deoxycorticosterone, corticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol, cortisol and aldosterone, and progesterone (Prog) were between 13 and 150 pM. For gar MR, EC50s were between 8 and 55 pM. Such low EC50s support physiological regulation by these steroids of the MR in sturgeon and gar. Companion studies with human and zebrafish MRs found higher EC50s compared with EC50s for sturgeon and gar MRs, with EC50s for zebrafish MR closer to gar and sturgeon MRs than was human MR. For zebrafish MR, EC50s were between 75 and 740 pM; for human MR, EC50s were between 65 pM and 2 nM. In addition to Prog, spironolactone (spiron) and 19nor-progesterone (19norP) were agonists for all three fish MRs, in contrast with their antagonist activity for human MR, which is hypothesized to involve serine-810 in human MR because all three steroids are agonists for a mutant human Ser810Leu-MR. Paradoxically, sturgeon, gar, and zebrafish MRs contain a serine corresponding to serine-810 in human MR. Our data suggest alternative mechanism(s) for Prog, spiron, and 19norP as MR agonists in these three ray-finned fishes and the need for caution in applying data for Prog signaling in zebrafish to human physiology.

  9. Hypertonicity Compromises Renal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Signaling through Tis11b-Mediated Post-Transcriptional Control

    PubMed Central

    Viengchareun, Say; Lema, Ingrid; Lamribet, Khadija; Keo, Vixra; Blanchard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates the Na+-retaining action of aldosterone. MR is highly expressed in the distal nephron, which is submitted to intense variations in extracellular fluid tonicity generated by the corticopapillary gradient. We previously showed that post-transcriptional events control renal MR abundance. Here, we report that hypertonicity increases expression of the mRNA-destabilizing protein Tis11b, a member of the tristetraprolin/ZFP36 family, and thereby, decreases MR expression in renal KC3AC1 cells. The 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTRs) of human and mouse MR mRNA, containing several highly conserved adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs), were cloned downstream of a reporter gene. Luciferase activities of full-length or truncated MR Luc-3′-UTR mutants decreased drastically when cotransfected with Tis11b plasmid, correlating with an approximately 50% shorter half-life of ARE-containing transcripts. Using site-directed mutagenesis and RNA immunoprecipitation, we identified a crucial ARE motif within the MR 3′-UTR, to which Tis11b must bind for destabilizing activity. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggested that endogenous Tis11b physically interacts with MR mRNA in KC3AC1 cells, and Tis11b knockdown prevented hypertonicity-elicited repression of MR. Moreover, hypertonicity blunted aldosterone-stimulated expression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine-zipper protein and the α-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel, supporting impaired MR signaling. Challenging the renal osmotic gradient by submitting mice to water deprivation, diuretic administration, or high-Na+ diet increased renal Tis11b and decreased MR expression, particularly in the cortex, thus establishing a mechanistic pathway for osmotic regulation of MR expression in vivo. Altogether, we uncovered a mechanism by which renal MR expression is regulated through mRNA turnover, a post-transcriptional control that seems physiologically relevant. PMID:24700863

  10. T Cell Mineralocorticoid Receptor Controls Blood Pressure by Regulating Interferon Gamma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue Nan; Li, Chao; Liu, Yuan; Du, Lin-Juan; Zeng, Meng-Ru; Zheng, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Wu Chang; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Mingjiang; Kong, Deping; Zhou, Li; Lu, Limin; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Yi, Yi; Du, Lili; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Hua, Zichun; Sun, Shuyang; Yin, Huiyong; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2017-03-15

    Rationale: Hypertension remains to be a global public health burden and demands novel intervention strategies such as targeting T cells and T cell-derived cytokines. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists have been clinically used to treat hypertension. However, the function of T cell MR in blood pressure (BP) regulation has not been elucidated. Objective: We aim to determine the role of T cell MR in BP regulation and to explore the mechanism. Methods and Results: Using T cell MR knockout (TMRKO) mouse in combination with angiotensin II (AngII)-induced hypertensive mouse model, we demonstrated that MR deficiency in T cells strikingly decreased both systolic and diastolic BP, and attenuated renal and vascular damage. Flow cytometric analysis showed that TMRKO mitigated AngII-induced accumulation of interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing T cells, particularly CD8(+) population, in both kidneys and aortas. Similarly, eplerenone attenuated AngII-induced elevation of BP and accumulation of IFNγ-producing T cells in wild type mice. In cultured CD8(+) T cells, TMRKO suppressed IFNγ expression whereas T cell MR overexpression and aldosterone both enhanced IFNγ expression. At the molecular level, MR interacted with nuclear factor of activated T-cells 1 (NFAT1) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) in T cells. Finally, T cell MR overexpressing mice manifested more elevated BP compared to control mice after AngII infusion and such difference was abolished by IFNγ-neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions: MR may interact with NFAT1 and AP-1 to control IFNγ in T cells, and to regulate target organ damage and ultimately BP. Targeting MR in T cells specifically may be an effective novel approach for hypertension treatment.

  11. The acute effect of a mineralocorticoid receptor agonist on corticotrope secretion in Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Berardelli, R; Karamouzis, I; D'Angelo, V; Fussotto, B; Minetto, M A; Ghigo, E; Giordano, R; Arvat, E

    2016-05-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the hippocampus display an important role in the control of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, mediating the ''proactive'' feedback of glucocorticoids (GC). Fludrocortisone (FC), a potent MR agonist, has been shown to decrease HPA activity through a hippocampal mechanism. Since it has been demonstrated that FC shows a significant inhibition of the HPA axis response to hCRH stimulus in normal subjects, also at doses usually administered as replacement therapy in patients with Addison's disease, an FC effect at MRs in human pituitary or a GR-pituitary agonism stronger than believed until now has been postulated. Ten patients affected by autoimmune Addison's disease received: (1) placebo p.o. + placebo i.v., (2) hydrocortisone (H) 10 mg p.o. + placebo i.v., (3) FC 0.1 mg p.o. + placebo i.v., (4) FC 0.1 mg and H 10 mg p.o. + placebo i.v. to verify a possible GR FC-mediated effect that might display a repercussion on the GC-replacement therapy. H reduced ACTH (p < 0.01) and increased cortisol levels (p < 0.01) with respect to the placebo session, while FC did not affect either ACTH or cortisol levels compared to placebo, and higher ACTH and lower cortisol levels (p < 0.03 and p < 0.01) were observed compared with the H session; furthermore the co-administration of FC + H showed ACTH and cortisol profiles similar to that observed during H alone. Our study showed a lack of FC effect on corticotrope secretion in Addison's disease, thus making unlikely the hypothesis of its GR pituitary agonism and the risk of glucocorticoid excess in primary adrenal insufficiency.

  12. Suppression of Rapidly Progressive Mouse Glomerulonephritis with the Non-Steroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist BR-4628

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Frank Y.; Han, Yingjie; Nikolic-Paterson, David J.; Kolkhof, Peter; Tesch, Greg H.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim Steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) are effective in the treatment of kidney disease; however, the side effect of hyperkalaemia, particularly in the context of renal impairment, is a major limitation to their clinical use. Recently developed non-steroidal MRAs have distinct characteristics suggesting that they may be superior to steroidal MRAs. Therefore, we explored the benefits of a non-steroidal MRA in a model of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Methods Accelerated anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis was induced in groups of C57BL/6J mice which received no treatment, vehicle or a non-steroidal MRA (BR-4628, 5mg/kg/bid) from day 0 until being killed on day 15 of disease. Mice were examined for renal injury. Results Mice with anti-GBM glomerulonephritis which received no treatment or vehicle developed similar disease with severe albuminuria, impaired renal function, glomerular tuft damage and crescents in 40% of glomeruli. In comparison, mice which received BR-4628 displayed similar albuminuria, but had improved renal function, reduced severity of glomerular tuft lesions and a 50% reduction in crescents. The protection seen in BR-4628 treated mice was associated with a marked reduction in glomerular macrophages and T-cells and reduced kidney gene expression of proinflammatory (CCL2, TNF-α, IFN-γ) and profibrotic molecules (collagen I, fibronectin). In addition, treatment with BR-4626 did not cause hyperkalaemia or increase urine Na+/K+ excretion (a marker of tubular dysfunction). Conclusions The non-steroidal MRA (BR-4628) provided substantial suppression of mouse crescentic glomerulonephritis without causing tubular dysfunction. This finding warrants further investigation of non-steroidal MRAs as a therapy for inflammatory kidney diseases. PMID:26700873

  13. Role of brain aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptors in aldosterone-salt hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-W; Huang, B S; Chen, A; Ahmad, M; White, R A; Leenen, F H H

    2016-02-09

    Central blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) or angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1Rs) attenuates aldosterone (aldo)-salt induced hypertension. We examined the role of the subfornical organ (SFO), aldo synthesized locally in the brain, and MR and AT1R specifically in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in aldo-salt hypertension. Wistar rats were treated with subcutaneous aldo (1 μg/h) plus saline as drinking fluid, and gene expression was assessed by real-time qPCR. Other sets of rats received chronic intra-cerebroventricular (icv) infusion of aldo synthase (AS) inhibitor FAD286, MR blocker eplerenone or vehicle, electrolytic or sham lesions of the SFO, or intra-PVN infusion of AAV-MR-siRNA or AAV-AT1aR-siRNA. Infusion of aldo had no effect on 11βHSD2, MR and AT1R mRNA in different nuclei but increased CYP11B2 mRNA in the SFO, and serum and glucocorticoid-kinase 1 (Sgk1) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) γ subunit mRNA in the SFO and supraoptic nucleus (SON). MR-siRNA decreased both MR and AT1R mRNA in the PVN by ∼ 60%, but AT1aR-siRNA only decreased AT1R mRNA. SFO lesion, blockade of brain AS or MR, or knockdown of MR or AT1R in the PVN similarly attenuated aldosterone-induced saline intake by ∼ 50% and hypertension by ∼ 70%. These results suggest that an increase in circulating aldosterone may via MR and AT1R in the SFO increase local aldosterone production in hypothalamic nuclei such as the SON and PVN, and via MR enhance AT1R signaling in the PVN. This central aldosterone-MR-AT1R neuro-modulatory pathway appears to play a major role in the progressive hypertension. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Familial glucocorticoid receptor haploinsufficiency by non-sense mediated mRNA decay, adrenal hyperplasia and apparent mineralocorticoid excess.

    PubMed

    Bouligand, Jérôme; Delemer, Brigitte; Hecart, Annie-Claude; Meduri, Geri; Viengchareun, Say; Amazit, Larbi; Trabado, Séverine; Fève, Bruno; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Young, Jacques; Lombès, Marc

    2010-10-22

    Primary glucocorticoid resistance (OMIM 138040) is a rare hereditary disease that causes a generalized partial insensitivity to glucocorticoid action, due to genetic alterations of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Investigation of adrenal incidentalomas led to the discovery of a family (eight affected individuals spanning three generations), prone to cortisol resistance, bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, arterial hypertension and hypokalemia. This phenotype exacerbated over time, cosegregates with the first heterozygous nonsense mutation p.R469[R,X] reported to date for the GR, replacing an arginine (CGA) by a stop (TGA) at amino-acid 469 in the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain of the receptor. In vitro, this mutation leads to a truncated 50-kDa GR lacking hormone and DNA binding capacity, devoid of hormone-dependent nuclear translocation and transactivation properties. In the proband's fibroblasts, we provided evidence for the lack of expression of the defective allele in vivo. The absence of detectable mutated GR mRNA was accompanied by a 50% reduction in wild type GR transcript and protein. This reduced GR expression leads to a significantly below-normal induction of glucocorticoid-induced target genes, FKBP5 in fibroblasts. We demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid signaling dysfunction involved GR haploinsufficiency due to the selective degradation of the mutated GR transcript through a nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay that was experimentally validated on emetine-treated propositus' fibroblasts. GR haploinsufficiency leads to hypertension due to illicit occupation of renal mineralocorticoid receptor by elevated cortisol rather than to increased mineralocorticoid production reported in primary glucocorticoid resistance. Indeed, apparent mineralocorticoid excess was demonstrated by a decrease in urinary tetrahydrocortisone-tetrahydrocortisol ratio in affected patients, revealing reduced glucocorticoid degradation by renal activity of

  15. Finerenone Impedes Aldosterone-dependent Nuclear Import of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Prevents Genomic Recruitment of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1*

    PubMed Central

    Amazit, Larbi; Le Billan, Florian; Kolkhof, Peter; Lamribet, Khadija; Viengchareun, Say; Fay, Michel R.; Khan, Junaid A.; Hillisch, Alexander; Lombès, Marc; Rafestin-Oblin, Marie-Edith; Fagart, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone regulates sodium homeostasis by activating the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Hyperaldosteronism leads todeleterious effects on the kidney, blood vessels, and heart. Although steroidal antagonists such as spironolactone and eplerenone are clinically useful for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, they are associated with several side effects. Finerenone, a novel nonsteroidal MR antagonist, is presently being evaluated in two clinical phase IIb trials. Here, we characterized the molecular mechanisms of action of finerenone and spironolactone at several key steps of the MR signaling pathway. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis approaches allowed identification of Ser-810 and Ala-773 as key residues for the high MR selectivity of finerenone. Moreover, we showed that, in contrast to spironolactone, which activates the S810L mutant MR responsible for a severe form of early onset hypertension, finerenone displays strict antagonistic properties. Aldosterone-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of MR are inhibited by both finerenone and spironolactone. However, automated quantification of MR subcellular distribution demonstrated that finerenone delays aldosterone-induced nuclear accumulation of MR more efficiently than spironolactone. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that, as opposed to spironolactone, finerenone inhibits MR, steroid receptor coactivator-1, and RNA polymerase II binding at the regulatory sequence of the SCNN1A gene and also remarkably reduces basal MR and steroid receptor coactivator-1 recruitment, unraveling a specific and unrecognized inactivating mechanism on MR signaling. Overall, our data demonstrate that the highly potent and selective MR antagonist finerenone specifically impairs several critical steps of the MR signaling pathway and therefore represents a promising new generation MR antagonist. PMID:26203193

  16. Finerenone Impedes Aldosterone-dependent Nuclear Import of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Prevents Genomic Recruitment of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1.

    PubMed

    Amazit, Larbi; Le Billan, Florian; Kolkhof, Peter; Lamribet, Khadija; Viengchareun, Say; Fay, Michel R; Khan, Junaid A; Hillisch, Alexander; Lombès, Marc; Rafestin-Oblin, Marie-Edith; Fagart, Jérôme

    2015-09-04

    Aldosterone regulates sodium homeostasis by activating the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Hyperaldosteronism leads todeleterious effects on the kidney, blood vessels, and heart. Although steroidal antagonists such as spironolactone and eplerenone are clinically useful for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, they are associated with several side effects. Finerenone, a novel nonsteroidal MR antagonist, is presently being evaluated in two clinical phase IIb trials. Here, we characterized the molecular mechanisms of action of finerenone and spironolactone at several key steps of the MR signaling pathway. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis approaches allowed identification of Ser-810 and Ala-773 as key residues for the high MR selectivity of finerenone. Moreover, we showed that, in contrast to spironolactone, which activates the S810L mutant MR responsible for a severe form of early onset hypertension, finerenone displays strict antagonistic properties. Aldosterone-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of MR are inhibited by both finerenone and spironolactone. However, automated quantification of MR subcellular distribution demonstrated that finerenone delays aldosterone-induced nuclear accumulation of MR more efficiently than spironolactone. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that, as opposed to spironolactone, finerenone inhibits MR, steroid receptor coactivator-1, and RNA polymerase II binding at the regulatory sequence of the SCNN1A gene and also remarkably reduces basal MR and steroid receptor coactivator-1 recruitment, unraveling a specific and unrecognized inactivating mechanism on MR signaling. Overall, our data demonstrate that the highly potent and selective MR antagonist finerenone specifically impairs several critical steps of the MR signaling pathway and therefore represents a promising new generation MR antagonist. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular

  17. Target-based biomarker selection - Mineralocorticoid receptor-related biomarkers and treatment outcome in major depression.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Matthias; Jezova, Daniela; Greene, Brandon; Konrad, Carsten; Kircher, Tilo; Murck, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)-function have been related to depression. We examined central and peripheral parameters of MR-function in order to characterize their relationship to clinical treatment outcome after six weeks in patients with acute depression. 30 patients with a diagnosis of major depression were examined 3 times over a 6 week period. Aldosterone and cortisol salvia samples were taken at 7.00 a.m. before patients got out of bed. Easy to use e-devices were used to measure markers of central MR function, i.e. slow wave sleep (SWS) and heart-rate variability (HRV). Salt-taste intensity (STI) and salt pleasantness (SP) of a 0.9% salt solution were determined by a newly developed scale. In addition, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and plasma electrolytes were determined as markers for peripheral MR activity. The relationship between the levels of these biomarkers at baseline and the change in clinical outcome parameters (Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS)-21, anxiety, QIDS and BDI) after 6 weeks of treatment was investigated. A higher aldosterone/cortisol ratio (Aldo/Cort) (n = 17 due to missing values; p < 0.05) and lower SBP (n = 24; p < 0.05) at baseline predicted poor outcome, as measured with the HDRS, independent of gender. Only in male patients higher STI, lower SP, lower SWS (all n = 13) and higher HRV (n = 11) at baseline predicted good outcome p < 0.05). Likewise, in male patients low baseline sodium appears to be predictive for a poor outcome (n = 12; p = 0.05; based on HDRS-6). In conclusion, correlates of higher central MR-activation are associated with poorer clinical improvement, particularly in men. This contrasts with the finding of a peripheral MR-desensitization in more refractory patients. As one potential mechanism to consider, sodium loss on the basis of dysfunctional peripheral MR function and additional environmental factors may trigger increased aldosterone secretion and consequently worse outcome. These

  18. Acute Effect of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonism on Vascular Function in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Talcott, Susanne; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation by aldosterone may regulate vascular function in health or contribute to vascular dysfunction in cardiovascular disease. Whether the effects are beneficial or detrimental to vascular function appear to be dependent on the integrity of the vascular endothelium and whether the responses are short-term or chronic. Acute modulation of MR activation has resulted in conflicting outcomes on vascular function in young healthy adults. Little is known about the vascular role of aldosterone and MR activation in healthy human aging. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether acute inhibition of MR by the selective antagonist eplerenone, influences vascular function in healthy older adults. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study in 22 adults (61±1 y; mean ± SE, 53–79 y) who were free from overt clinical cardiovascular disease. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation and endothelium-independent dilation to sublingual nitroglycerin (0.4mg) following eplerenone (100 mg/dose, 2 doses, 24 hours between doses) or placebo. In response to acute MR antagonism, flow-mediated dilation decreased by 19% (from 6.9±0.5 to 5.6±0.6 %, P=0.02; placebo vs. eplerenone). Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity also decreased following MR antagonism based on the ratio of phosphorylated eNOSSer1177 to total eNOS (1.53±0.08 vs. 1.29±0.06, P=0.02). Nitroglycerin-induced dilation and blood pressure were unaffected (nitroglycerin-induced dilation: 21.9±1.9 vs. 21.0±1.5 %, P=0.5 and systolic/diastolic blood pressure: 135/77±4/2 vs. 134/77± 4/2 mmHg, P ≥0.6). In conclusion, acute MR antagonism impairs vascular endothelial function in healthy older adults without influencing vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to exogenous nitric oxide or blood pressure. PMID:26639352

  19. Acute effect of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism on vascular function in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H; English, Mark; Talcott, Susanne; Jaffe, Iris Z; Christou, Demetra D

    2016-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation by aldosterone may regulate vascular function in health or contribute to vascular dysfunction in cardiovascular disease. Whether the effects are beneficial or detrimental to vascular function appear to be dependent on the integrity of the vascular endothelium and whether the responses are short-term or chronic. Acute modulation of MR activation has resulted in conflicting outcomes on vascular function in young healthy adults. Little is known about the vascular role of aldosterone and MR activation in healthy human aging. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether acute inhibition of MR by the selective antagonist eplerenone, influences vascular function in healthy older adults. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study in 22 adults (61±1 years; mean±SE, 53-79 years) who were free from overt clinical cardiovascular disease. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation and endothelium-independent dilation to sublingual nitroglycerin (0.4 mg) following eplerenone (100 mg/dose, 2 doses, 24h between doses) or placebo. In response to acute MR antagonism, flow-mediated dilation decreased by 19% (from 6.9±0.5 to 5.6±0.6%, P=0.02; placebo vs. eplerenone). Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity also decreased following MR antagonism based on the ratio of phosphorylated eNOS(Ser1177) to total eNOS (1.53±0.08 vs. 1.29±0.06, P=0.02). Nitroglycerin-induced dilation and blood pressure were unaffected (nitroglycerin-induced dilation: 21.9±1.9 vs. 21.0±1.5%, P=0.5 and systolic/diastolic blood pressure: 135/77±4/2 vs. 134/77±4/2 mmHg, P≥0.6). In conclusion, acute MR antagonism impairs vascular endothelial function in healthy older adults without influencing vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to exogenous nitric oxide or blood pressure.

  20. Mineralocorticoid receptor in the NTS stimulates saline intake during fourth ventricular infusions of aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Koneru, Bhuvaneswari; Bathina, Chandra Sekhar; Cherry, Brandon H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether neurons within the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) that express the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) play a role in aldosterone stimulation of salt intake. Adult Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats received microinjections into the NTS of a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for the MR, to site specifically reduce levels of the MR by RNA interference (shRNA; n = 9) or scrambled RNA as a control (scRNA; n = 8). After injection of the viral construct, aldosterone-filled osmotic minipumps were implanted subcutaneously and connected to a cannula extending into the fourth ventricle to infuse aldosterone at a rate of 25 ng/h. Before and after surgeries, rats had ad libitum access to normal sodium (0.26%) rat chow and two graduated drinking bottles filled with either distilled water or 0.3 M NaCl. Before the surgeries, basal saline intake was 1.6 ± 0.6 ml in the scRNA group and 1.56 ± 0.6 ml in the shRNA group. Twenty-four days postsurgery, saline intake was elevated to a greater extent in the scRNA group (5.9 ± 1.07 ml) than in the shRNA group (2.41 ± 0.6 ml). Post mortem immunohistochemistry revealed a significant reduction in the number of NTS neurons exhibiting immunoreactivity for MR in shRNA-injected rats (23 ± 1 cells/section) versus scRNA-injected rats (33 ± 2 cells/section; P = 0.008). shRNA did not alter the level of 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II (HSD2) protein in the NTS as judged by the number of HSD2 immunoreactive neurons. These results suggest that fourth ventricular infusions of aldosterone stimulate saline intake, and that this stimulation is at least in part mediated by hindbrain NTS neurons that express MR. PMID:24259463

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha and receptor-gamma activators prevent cardiac fibrosis in mineralocorticoid-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Iglarz, Marc; Touyz, Rhian M; Viel, Emilie C; Paradis, Pierre; Amiri, Farhad; Diep, Quy N; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2003-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activation may prevent cardiac hypertrophy and inhibit production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a hypertrophic agent. The aim of this in vivo study was to investigate the effects of PPAR activators on cardiac remodeling in DOCA-salt rats, a model overexpressing ET-1. Unilaterally nephrectomized 16-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats (Uni-Nx) were randomly divided into 4 groups: control rats, DOCA-salt, DOCA-salt+rosiglitazone (PPAR-gamma activator, 5 mg/kg per day), and DOCA-salt+fenofibrate (PPAR-alpha activator, 100 mg/kg per day). After 3 weeks of treatment, mean arterial blood pressure was significantly increased in DOCA-salt by 36 mm Hg. Mean arterial blood pressure was normalized by coadministration of rosiglitazone but not by fenofibrate. Both PPAR activators prevented cardiac fibrosis and abrogated the increase in prepro-ET-1 mRNA content in the left ventricle of DOCA-salt rats. Coadministration of rosiglitazone or fenofibrate failed to prevent thickening of left ventricle (LV) walls as measured by echocardiography and the increase in atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA levels. However, rosiglitazone and fenofibrate prevented the decrease in LV internal diameter and thus concentric remodeling of the LV found in DOCA-salt rats. Taken together, these data indicate a modulatory role of PPAR activators on cardiac remodeling in mineralocorticoid-induced hypertension, in part associated with decreased ET-1 production.

  2. Finerenone : third-generation mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist for the treatment of heart failure and diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Licette C Y; Schutte, Elise; Gansevoort, Ron T; van der Meer, Peter; Voors, Adriaan A

    2015-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) spironolactone and eplerenone reduce the risk of hospitalizations and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), and attenuate progression of diabetic kidney disease. However, their use is limited by the fear of inducing hyperkalemia, especially in patients with renal dysfunction. Finerenone is a novel nonsteroidal MRA, with higher selectivity toward the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) compared to spironolactone and stronger MR-binding affinity than eplerenone. This paper discusses the chemistry, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and safety of finerenone. The selectivity and greater binding affinity of finerenone to the MR may reduce the risk of hyperkalemia and renal dysfunction and thereby overcome the reluctance to start and uptitrate MRAs in patients with HF and diabetic kidney disease. Studies conducted in patients with HFrEF and moderate chronic kidney disease and diabetic kidney disease, showed promising results. Phase III trials will have to show whether finerenone might become the third-generation MRA for the treatment of HF and diabetic kidney disease.

  3. Perfluorooctane sulfonate-induced testicular toxicity and differential testicular expression of estrogen receptor in male mice.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jian-Hua; Lu, Chun-Cheng; Xu, Cheng; Chen, Gang; Qiu, Liang-Lin; Jiang, Jun-Kang; Ben, Shuai; Wang, Yu-Bang; Gu, Ai-Hua; Wang, Xin-Ru

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, CAS#1763-23-1) causes male reproductive toxicities, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, 0, 0.5 and 10mg/kg/day PFOS were given by oral gavage to adult mice for 5 weeks. In the 10mg/kg group, serum testosterone levels decreased significantly. Sperm counts declined which might be associated with the decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of germ cells. In relation to increased apoptosis, bax, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3 levels elevated significantly, indicating that PFOS induced germ cell apoptosis by activating the mitochondrial pathway. In addition, the increase in levels of testicular estrogen receptor (ER) β was observed in both 0.5 and 10mg/kg group, whereas a decrease in ERα expression was only observed in 10mg/kg group. These results suggested that the alterations in testicular ERs expression, together with decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of germ cells, might be involved in PFOS-induced testicular toxicity.

  4. Nonsteroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Finerenone Protects Against Acute Kidney Injury-Mediated Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Lattenist, Lionel; Lechner, Sebastian M; Messaoudi, Smail; Le Mercier, Alan; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Prince, Sonia; Bobadilla, Norma A; Kolkhof, Peter; Jaisser, Frédéric; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan

    2017-05-01

    Acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion (IR) is a frequent complication in hospitalized patients. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism has shown to be helpful against renal IR consequences; however, the potential benefit of novel nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists such as finerenone has to be further explored. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of finerenone to prevent the acute and chronic consequences of ischemic acute kidney injury. For the acute study (24 hours), 18 rats were divided into sham, bilateral renal ischemia of 25 minutes, and rats that received 3 doses of finerenone at 48, 24, and 1 hour before the ischemia. For the chronic study (4 months), 23 rats were divided into sham, rats that underwent 45 minutes of bilateral ischemia, and rats treated with finerenone at days 2 and 1 and 1 hour before IR. We found that after 24 hours of reperfusion, the untreated IR rats presented kidney dysfunction and tubular injury. Kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin mRNA levels were increased. In contrast, the rats treated with finerenone displayed normal kidney function and significantly lesser tubular injury and kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin levels. After 4 months, the IR rats developed chronic kidney disease, evidenced by kidney dysfunction, increased proteinuria and renal vascular resistance, tubular dilation, extensive tubule-interstitial fibrosis, and an increase in kidney transforming growth factor-β and collagen-I mRNA. The transition from acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease was fully prevented by finerenone. Altogether, our data show that in the rat, finerenone is able to prevent acute kidney injury induced by IR and the chronic and progressive deterioration of kidney function and structure.

  5. Central mineralocorticoid receptors and the role of angiotensin II and glutamate in the paraventricular nucleus of rats with angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gabor, Alexander; Leenen, Frans H H

    2013-05-01

    A chronic increase in circulating angiotensin II (Ang II) activates an aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor-ouabain neuromodulatory pathway in the brain that increases neuronal activation in hypothalamic nuclei, such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and causes progressive hypertension. Several models of chronic sympathetic hyperactivity are associated with an increase in AT1 and glutamate receptor activation in the PVN. The current study evaluated whether increased angiotensin type 1 (AT1) and glutamate receptor-dependent signaling in the PVN contributes to the maintenance of blood pressure (BP) in Ang II-hypertensive Wistar rats, and the role of aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor pathway in this enhanced signaling. After subcutaneous infusion of Ang II for 2 weeks, in conscious rats BP and heart rate were recorded after (1) 10-minute bilateral infusions of candesartan and kynurenate in the PVN; (2) 1 hour intracerebroventricular infusion of eplerenone, and (3) candesartan and kynurenate after eplerenone. Candesartan or kynurenate in the PVN fully reversed the increase in BP from circulating Ang II. Kynurenate after candesartan or candesartan after kynurenate did not further lower BP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of eplerenone at 16 hours after its infusion fully reversed the increase in BP from circulating Ang II. After eplerenone, candesartan and kynurenate in the PVN did not further decrease BP. These findings suggest that increased mineralocorticoid receptor activation in the brain activates a slow neuromodulatory pathway that maintains enhanced AT1 and glutamate receptor-dependent signaling in the PVN, and thereby the hypertension from a chronic increase in circulating Ang II.

  6. Osmotic Stress Regulates Mineralocorticoid Receptor Expression in a Novel Aldosterone-Sensitive Cortical Collecting Duct Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Viengchareun, Say; Kamenicky, Peter; Teixeira, Marie; Butlen, Daniel; Meduri, Geri; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Kurschat, Christine; Lanel, Aurélie; Martinerie, Laetitia; Sztal-Mazer, Shoshana; Blot-Chabaud, Marcel; Ferrary, Evelyne; Cherradi, Nadia; Lombès, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Aldosterone effects are mediated by the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a transcription factor highly expressed in the distal nephron. Given that MR expression level constitutes a key element controlling hormone responsiveness, there is much interest in elucidating the molecular mechanisms governing MR expression. To investigate whether hyper- or hypotonicity could affect MR abundance, we established by targeted oncogenesis a novel immortalized cortical collecting duct (CCD) cell line and examined the impact of osmotic stress on MR expression. KC3AC1 cells form domes, exhibit a high transepithelial resistance, express 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 and functional endogenous MR, which mediates aldosterone-stimulated Na+ reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel activation. MR expression is tightly regulated by osmotic stress. Hypertonic conditions induce expression of tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein, an osmoregulatory transcription factor capable of binding tonicity-responsive enhancer response elements located in MR regulatory sequences. Surprisingly, hypertonicity leads to a severe reduction in MR transcript and protein levels. This is accompanied by a concomitant tonicity-induced expression of Tis11b, a mRNA-destabilizing protein that, by binding to the AU-rich sequences of the 3′-untranslated region of MR mRNA, may favor hypertonicity-dependent degradation of labile MR transcripts. In sharp contrast, hypotonicity causes a strong increase in MR transcript and protein levels. Collectively, we demonstrate for the first time that optimal adaptation of CCD cells to changes in extracellular fluid composition is accompanied by drastic modification in MR abundance via transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Osmotic stress-regulated MR expression may represent an important molecular determinant for cell-specific MR action, most notably in renal failure, hypertension, or mineralocorticoid resistance. PMID:19846540

  7. Osmotic stress regulates mineralocorticoid receptor expression in a novel aldosterone-sensitive cortical collecting duct cell line.

    PubMed

    Viengchareun, Say; Kamenicky, Peter; Teixeira, Marie; Butlen, Daniel; Meduri, Geri; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Kurschat, Christine; Lanel, Aurélie; Martinerie, Laetitia; Sztal-Mazer, Shoshana; Blot-Chabaud, Marcel; Ferrary, Evelyne; Cherradi, Nadia; Lombès, Marc

    2009-12-01

    Aldosterone effects are mediated by the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a transcription factor highly expressed in the distal nephron. Given that MR expression level constitutes a key element controlling hormone responsiveness, there is much interest in elucidating the molecular mechanisms governing MR expression. To investigate whether hyper- or hypotonicity could affect MR abundance, we established by targeted oncogenesis a novel immortalized cortical collecting duct (CCD) cell line and examined the impact of osmotic stress on MR expression. KC3AC1 cells form domes, exhibit a high transepithelial resistance, express 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 and functional endogenous MR, which mediates aldosterone-stimulated Na(+) reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel activation. MR expression is tightly regulated by osmotic stress. Hypertonic conditions induce expression of tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein, an osmoregulatory transcription factor capable of binding tonicity-responsive enhancer response elements located in MR regulatory sequences. Surprisingly, hypertonicity leads to a severe reduction in MR transcript and protein levels. This is accompanied by a concomitant tonicity-induced expression of Tis11b, a mRNA-destabilizing protein that, by binding to the AU-rich sequences of the 3'-untranslated region of MR mRNA, may favor hypertonicity-dependent degradation of labile MR transcripts. In sharp contrast, hypotonicity causes a strong increase in MR transcript and protein levels. Collectively, we demonstrate for the first time that optimal adaptation of CCD cells to changes in extracellular fluid composition is accompanied by drastic modification in MR abundance via transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Osmotic stress-regulated MR expression may represent an important molecular determinant for cell-specific MR action, most notably in renal failure, hypertension, or mineralocorticoid resistance.

  8. The K+ channel TASK1 modulates β-adrenergic response in brown adipose tissue through the mineralocorticoid receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Didier F; Beranger, Guillaume E; Corinus, Alain; Giroud, Maude; Ghandour, Rayane A; Altirriba, Jordi; Chambard, Jean-Claude; Mazure, Nathalie M; Bendahhou, Saïd; Duranton, Christophe; Michiels, Jean-François; Frontini, Andrea; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Cinti, Saverio; Christian, Mark; Barhanin, Jacques; Amri, Ez-Zoubir

    2016-02-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is essential for adaptive thermogenesis and dissipation of caloric excess through the activity of uncoupling protein (UCP)-1. BAT in humans is of great interest for the treatment of obesity and related diseases. In this study, the expression of Twik-related acid-sensitive K(+) channel (TASK)-1 [a pH-sensitive potassium channel encoded by the potassium channel, 2-pore domain, subfamily K, member 3 (Kcnk3) gene] correlated highly with Ucp1 expression in obese and cold-exposed mice. In addition, Task1-null mice, compared with their controls, became overweight, mainly because of an increase in white adipose tissue mass and BAT whitening. Task1(-/-)-mouse-derived brown adipocytes, compared with wild-type mouse-derived brown adipocytes, displayed an impaired β3-adrenergic receptor response that was characterized by a decrease in oxygen consumption, Ucp1 expression, and lipolysis. This phenotype was thought to be caused by an exacerbation of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) signaling, given that it was mimicked by corticoids and reversed by an MR inhibitor. We concluded that the K(+) channel TASK1 controls the thermogenic activity in brown adipocytes through modulation of β-adrenergic receptor signaling.

  9. Chronic Antagonism of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor Ameliorates Hypertension and End Organ Damage in a Rodent Model of Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Crook, Martin F; Sharif-Rodriguez, Wanda; Zhu, Yonghua; Ruben, Zadok; Pan, Yi; Urosevic-Price, Olga; Wang, Li; Flattery, Amy M; Forrest, Gail; Szeto, Daphne; Zhao, Huawei; Roy, Sophie; Forrest, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of chronic mineralocorticoid receptor blockade with eplerenone on the development and progression of hypertension and end organ damage in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Eplerenone significantly attenuated the progressive rise in systolic blood pressure (SBP) (204 ± 3 vs. 179±3 mmHg, p < 0.05), reduced proteinuria (605.5 ± 29.6 vs. 479.7 ± 26.1 mg/24h, p < 0.05), improved injury scores of glomeruli, tubules, renal interstitium, and vasculature in Dahl salt-sensitive rats fed a high-salt diet. These results demonstrate that mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism provides target organ protection and attenuates the development of elevated blood pressure (BP) in a model of salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:21950654

  10. Deletion of Macrophage Mineralocorticoid Receptor Protects Hepatic Steatosis and Insulin Resistance through ERα/HGF/MET Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Yao; Li, Chao; Yao, Gao-Feng; Du, Lin-Juan; Liu, Yuan; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Yan, Shuai; Sun, Jian-Yong; Liu, Yan; Liu, Ming-Zhu; Zhang, Xiaoran; Wei, Gang; Tong, Wenxin; Chen, Xiaobei; Wu, Yong; Sun, Shuyang; Liu, Suling; Ding, Qiurong; Yu, Ying; Yin, Huiyong; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2017-03-21

    Although the importance of macrophages in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been recognized, it remains elusive how macrophages impact hepatocytes. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) has been implied to play important roles in NAFLD and T2DM. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we report that myeloid MR knockout (MRKO) improves glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis in obese mice. Estrogen signaling is sufficient and necessary for such improvements. Hepatic gene and protein expression suggests that MRKO reduces hepatic lipogenesis and lipid storage. In the presence of estrogen, MRKO in macrophages decreases lipid accumulation and increases insulin sensitivity of hepatocytes through hepatic-growth-factor (HGF)/Met signaling. MR directly regulates estrogen receptor 1 (Esr1, encoding ERα) in macrophages. Knockdown of hepatic Met eliminates the beneficial effects of MRKO in female obese mice. These findings identify a novel MR/ERα/HGF/Met pathway that conveys metabolic signaling from macrophages to hepatocytes in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, and provide potential new therapeutic strategies for NAFLD and T2DM.

  11. Cortisol stimulates proliferation and apoptosis in the late gestation fetal heart: differential effects of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaodi; Reini, Seth A; Richards, Elaine; Wood, Charles E; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2013-08-15

    We have previously found that modest chronic increases in maternal cortisol result in an enlarged fetal heart. To explore the mechanisms of this effect, we used intrapericardial infusions of a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist (canrenoate) or of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist (mifepristone) in the fetus during maternal infusion of cortisol (1 mg·kg⁻¹·day⁻¹). We have shown that the MR antagonist blocked the increase in fetal heart weight and in wall thickness resulting from maternal cortisol infusion. In the current study we extended those studies and found that cortisol increased Ki67 staining in both ventricles, indicating cell proliferation, but also increased active caspase-3 staining in cells of the conduction pathway in the septum and subendocardial layers of the left ventricle, suggesting increased apoptosis in Purkinje fibers. The MR antagonist blocked the increase in cell proliferation, whereas the GR antagonist blocked the increased apoptosis in Purkinje fibers. We also found evidence of activation of caspase-3 in c-kit-positive cells, suggesting apoptosis in stem cell populations in the ventricle. These studies suggest a potentially important role of corticosteroids in the terminal remodeling of the late gestation fetal heart and suggest a mechanism for the cardiac enlargement with excess corticosteroid exposure.

  12. Expression and dexamethasone-induced nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors in guinea pig cochlear cells.

    PubMed

    Kil, Sung-Hee; Kalinec, Federico

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are powerful anti-inflammatory agents frequently used to protect the auditory organ against damage associated with a variety of conditions, including noise exposure and ototoxic drugs as well as bacterial and viral infections. In addition to glucocorticoid receptors (GC-R), natural and synthetic GC are known to bind mineralocorticoid receptors (MC-R) with great affinity. We used light and laser scanning confocal microscopy to investigate the expression of GC-R and MC-R in different cell populations of the guinea pig cochlea, and their translocation to different cell compartments after treatment with the synthetic GC dexamethasone. We found expression of both types of receptors in the cytoplasm and nucleus of sensory inner and outer hair cells as well as pillar, Hensen and Deiters cells in the organ of Corti, inner and outer sulcus cells, spiral ganglion neurons and several types of spiral ligament and spiral limbus cells; stria vascularis cells expressed mostly MC-R whereas fibrocytes type IV were positive for GC-R only. GC-R and MC-R were also localized at or near the plasma membrane of pillar cells and outer hair cells, whereas GC-R were found at or near the plasma membrane of Hensen cells only. We investigated the relative levels of receptor expression in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of Hensen cells treated with dexamethasone, and found they varied in a way suggestive of dose-induced translocation. These results suggest that the oto-protective effects of GC could be associated with the concerted activation of genomic and non-genomic, GC-R and MC-R mediated signaling pathways in different regions of the cochlea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists attenuate pulmonary inflammation and bleomycin-evoked fibrosis in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Gissela B; Fernandez, Xiomara; Mingo, Garfield G; Jia, Yanlin; Caniga, Michael; Gil, Malgorzata A; Keshwani, Shanil; Woodhouse, Janice D; Cicmil, Milenko; Moy, Lily Y; Kelly, Nancy; Jimenez, Johanna; Crawley, Yvette; Anthes, John C; Klappenbach, Joel; Ma, Yu-Lu; McLeod, Robbie L

    2013-10-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates protective actions of mineralocorticoid antagonists (MR antagonists) on cardiovascular pathology, which includes blunting vascular inflammation and myocardial fibrosis. We examined the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic potential of MR antagonists in rodent respiratory models. In an ovalbumin allergic and challenged Brown Norway rat model, the total cell count in nasal lavage was 29,348 ± 5451, which was blocked by spironolactone (0.3-60 mg/kg, p.o.) and eplerenone (0.3-30 mg/kg, p.o.). We also found that MR antagonists attenuated pulmonary inflammation in the Brown Norway rat. A series of experiments were conducted to determine the actions of MR blockade in acute/chronic lung injury models. (1) Ex vivo lung slice rat experiments found that eplerenone (0.01 and 10 µM) and spironolactone (10 µM) diminished lung hydroxyproline concentrations by 55 ± 5, 122 ± 9, and 83 ± 8%. (2) In in vivo studies, MR antagonists attenuated the increases in bronchioalveolar lavage (BAL) neutrophils and macrophages caused by lung bleomycin exposure. In separate studies, bleomycin (4.0 U/kg, i.t.) increased lung levels of hydroxyproline by approximately 155%, which was blocked by spironolactone (10-60 mg/kg, p.o.). In a rat Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model, spironolactone inhibited acute increases in BAL cytokines with moderate effects on neutrophils. Finally, we found that chronic LPS exposure significantly increased end expiratory lung and decreased lung elastance in the mouse. These functional effects of chronic LPS were improved by MR antagonists. Our results demonstrate that MR antagonists have significant pharmacological actions in the respiratory system.

  14. The functional c.-2G>C variant of the mineralocorticoid receptor modulates blood pressure, renin, and aldosterone levels.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Nienke; Caprio, Massimiliano; Blaya, Carolina; Fumeron, Frédéric; Sartorato, Paola; Ronconi, Vanessa; Giacchetti, Gilberta; Mantero, Franco; Fernandes-Rosa, Fabio L; Simian, Christophe; Peyrard, Sévrine; Zitman, Frans G; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Kloet, E Ron; Azizi, Michel; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Derijk, Roel H; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2010-11-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is essential in the regulation of volemia and blood pressure. Rare mutations in the MR gene cause type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism and hypertension. In this study we characterized the common MR polymorphism c.-2G>C (rs2070951) in vitro and tested its influence on parameters related to blood pressure regulation and the renin-angiotensin system. In vitro studies showed that the G allele was associated with decreased MR protein levels and reduced transcriptional activation compared with the C allele. Association studies were performed with several outcome variables in 3 independent cohorts: a mild hypertensive group subjected to a salt-sensitivity test, a healthy normotensive group included in a crossover study to receive both a high and low Na/K diet, and a large cohort (The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety), in which blood pressure was measured. Subjects with the GG genotype had significantly higher plasma renin levels both in the mild hypertensive group and in normal volunteers compared with homozygous C carriers. The GG genotype was also correlated with higher plasma aldosterone levels in healthy subjects. In both the mild hypertensive group and The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety cohort the genotype GG was associated with higher systolic blood pressure in males. In conclusion, the G allele of the common functional genetic polymorphism c.-2G>C in the MR gene associates with increased activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis and with increased blood pressure, probably related to decreased MR expression.

  15. Mineralocorticoid receptor stimulation induces urinary storage dysfunction via upregulation of epithelial sodium channel expression in the rat urinary bladder epithelium.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiji; Hotta, Yuji; Maeda, Kotomi; Kataoka, Tomoya; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Hamakawa, Takashi; Sasaki, Shoichi; Yasui, Takahiro; Asai, Kiyofumi; Kimura, Kazunori

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) expression in rat bladder and the physiological role of the MR-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) pathway in controlling bladder function in 10-12-week-old, male Sprague-Dawley rats. First, we examined the mRNA expression of MR and localization of MR and ENaC-α proteins in the urinary bladder. MR mRNA expression was observed in untreated-rat urinary bladders, and MR and ENaC-α proteins were localized in the epithelium. Next, rats were treated with vehicle (controls) or fludrocortisone (an MR agonist) for 3 days, and ENaC-α protein expression levels and bladder function were evaluated on day 4. ENaC-α protein expression was significantly higher in fludrocortisone-treated rats than in controls. In addition, cystometry was performed during intravesical infusion of saline and amiloride (an ENaC inhibitor). While intercontraction intervals (ICIs) during saline infusion were significantly shorter in the fludrocortisone group than in the controls, infusion of amiloride normalized the ICIs in the fludrocortisone group. However, no intra- or inter-group differences in maximum intravesical pressure were observed. Taken together, MR protein is localized in the rat urinary bladder epithelium, and may regulate ENaC expression and bladder afferent input. The MR-ENaC pathway may be a therapeutic target for ameliorating storage symptoms.

  16. In vivo tissue specific modulation of rat insulin receptor gene expression in an experimental model of mineralocorticoid excess.

    PubMed

    Campión, J; Lahera, V; Cachofeiro, V; Maestro, B; Dávila, N; Carranza, M C; Calle, C

    1998-08-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) gene expression at the mRNA level was investigated in hindlimb skeletal muscle, epididymal adipose tissue and in the liver of rats exposed to prolonged in vivo administration of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA). Following treatment, plasma insulin levels were reduced while glucose levels increased compared to values in control rats. DOCA-treated animals showed an increase in blood pressure and a reduction in body weight. This treatment also induced hypokalemia and decreased plasma protein levels. Sodium levels were unaffected. Moreover, no differences in DNA and protein content or in the indicator of cell size (protein/DNA) were observed in the skeletal muscle or adipose tissue of animals. In contrast, there was a clear increase in the protein and DNA contents of the liver with no change in the indicator of cell size. Northern blot assays revealed 2 major IR mRNA species of approximately 9.5 and 7.5 Kb in the 3 tissues from control animals. DOCA treatment induced no change in the levels of either RNA species in skeletal muscle. However, a decrease of approximately 22% was detected in the levels of both species in adipose tissue whereas the liver showed an increase of 64%. These results provide the first evidence for an in vivo tissue-specific modulation of IR mRNA levels under experimental conditions of mineralocorticoid excess.

  17. Overexpression of Mineralocorticoid Receptors Partially Prevents Chronic Stress-Induced Reductions in Hippocampal Memory and Structural Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Fearey, Brenna C; Kuil, Laura E; Lucassen, Paul J; Harris, Anjanette P; Seckl, Jonathan R; Krugers, Harm; Joels, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is a risk factor for cognitive decline and psychopathology in genetically predisposed individuals. Preliminary evidence in humans suggests that mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) may confer resilience to these stress-related changes. We specifically tested this idea using a well-controlled mouse model for chronic stress in combination with transgenic MR overexpression in the forebrain. Exposure to unpredictable stressors for 21 days in adulthood reduced learning and memory formation in a low arousing hippocampus-dependent contextual learning task, but enhanced stressful contextual fear learning. We found support for a moderating effect of MR background on chronic stress only for contextual memory formation under low arousing conditions. In an attempt to understand potentially contributing factors, we studied structural plasticity. Chronic stress altered dendritic morphology in the hippocampal CA3 area and reduced the total number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in the infrapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus. The latter reduction was absent in MR overexpressing mice. We therefore provide partial support for the idea that overexpression of MRs may confer resilience to the effects of chronic stress on hippocampus-dependent function and structural plasticity.

  18. Overexpression of Mineralocorticoid Receptors Partially Prevents Chronic Stress-Induced Reductions in Hippocampal Memory and Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Fearey, Brenna C.; Kuil, Laura E.; Lucassen, Paul J.; Harris, Anjanette P.; Seckl, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is a risk factor for cognitive decline and psychopathology in genetically predisposed individuals. Preliminary evidence in humans suggests that mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) may confer resilience to these stress-related changes. We specifically tested this idea using a well-controlled mouse model for chronic stress in combination with transgenic MR overexpression in the forebrain. Exposure to unpredictable stressors for 21 days in adulthood reduced learning and memory formation in a low arousing hippocampus-dependent contextual learning task, but enhanced stressful contextual fear learning. We found support for a moderating effect of MR background on chronic stress only for contextual memory formation under low arousing conditions. In an attempt to understand potentially contributing factors, we studied structural plasticity. Chronic stress altered dendritic morphology in the hippocampal CA3 area and reduced the total number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in the infrapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus. The latter reduction was absent in MR overexpressing mice. We therefore provide partial support for the idea that overexpression of MRs may confer resilience to the effects of chronic stress on hippocampus-dependent function and structural plasticity. PMID:26600250

  19. Immunohistochemical characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in canine normal testis and testicular tumours.

    PubMed

    Sozmen, M; Kabak, Y B; Gulbahar, M Y; Gacar, A; Karayigit, M O; Guvenc, T; Yarim, M

    2013-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Recent studies have demonstrated that PPARs regulate lipid metabolism and are expressed in various cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of PPAR-α, -β and -γ in normal canine testicular tissue and canine testicular tumours (CTTs). Expression of PPAR-α, -β and -γ was greater (P <0.05) than in normal testicular tissue. PPARs were therefore induced in CTTs and they may play a role in the biology of these tumours. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of murine renal distal convoluted tubular cells for the target genes of mineralocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kohei; Fujiki, Katsunori; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Fujita, Toshiro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Nagase, Miki

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a member of nuclear receptor family proteins and contributes to fluid homeostasis in the kidney. Although aldosterone-MR pathway induces several gene expressions in the kidney, it is often unclear whether the gene expressions are accompanied by direct regulations of MR through its binding to the regulatory region of each gene. The purpose of this study is to identify the direct target genes of MR in a murine distal convoluted tubular epithelial cell-line (mDCT). Methods We analyzed the DNA samples of mDCT cells overexpressing 3xFLAG-hMR after treatment with 10−7 M aldosterone for 1 h by chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep-sequence (ChIP-seq) and mRNA of the cell-line with treatment of 10−7 M aldosterone for 3 h by microarray. Results 3xFLAG-hMR overexpressed in mDCT cells accumulated in the nucleus in response to 10−9 M aldosterone. Twenty-five genes were indicated as the candidate target genes of MR by ChIP-seq and microarray analyses. Five genes, Sgk1, Fkbp5, Rasl12, Tns1 and Tsc22d3 (Gilz), were validated as the direct target genes of MR by quantitative RT-qPCR and ChIP-qPCR. MR binding regions adjacent to Ctgf and Serpine1 were also validated. Conclusions We, for the first time, captured the genome-wide distribution of MR in mDCT cells and, furthermore, identified five MR target genes in the cell-line. These results will contribute to further studies on the mechanisms of kidney diseases. PMID:24491541

  1. Deletion of the forebrain mineralocorticoid receptor impairs social discrimination and decision-making in male, but not in female mice

    PubMed Central

    ter Horst, Judith P.; van der Mark, Maaike; Kentrop, Jiska; Arp, Marit; van der Veen, Rixt; de Kloet, E. Ronald; Oitzl, Melly S.

    2014-01-01

    Social interaction with unknown individuals requires fast processing of information to decide whether it is friend or foe. This process of discrimination and decision-making is stressful and triggers secretion of corticosterone activating mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The MR is involved in appraisal of novel experiences and risk assessment. Recently, we have demonstrated in a dual-solution memory task that MR plays a role in the early stage of information processing and decision-making. Here we examined social approach and social discrimination in male and female mice lacking MR from hippocampal-amygdala-prefrontal circuitry and controls. The social approach task allows the assessment of time spent with an unfamiliar mouse and the ability to discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics. The male and female test mice were both more interested in the social than the non-social experience and deletion of their limbic MR increased the time spent with an unfamiliar mouse. Unlike controls, the male MRCaMKCre mice were not able to discriminate between an unfamiliar and the familiar mouse. However, the female MR mutant had retained the discriminative ability between unfamiliar and familiar mice. Administration of the MR antagonist RU28318 to male mice supported the role of the MR in the discrimination between an unfamiliar mouse and a non-social stimulus. No effect was found with a GR antagonist. Our findings suggest that MR is involved in sociability and social discrimination in a sex-specific manner through inhibitory control exerted putatively via limbic-hippocampal efferents. The ability to discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics is of uttermost importance for territorial defense and depends on a role of MR in decision-making. PMID:24567706

  2. Paradoxical resistance to high-fat diet-induced obesity and altered macrophage polarization in mineralocorticoid receptor-overexpressing mice.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Emmanuelle; Bourgeois, Christine; Keo, Vixra; Viengchareun, Say; Muscat, Adeline; Meduri, Geri; Le Menuet, Damien; Fève, Bruno; Lombès, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) exerts proadipogenic and antithermogenic effects in vitro, yet its in vivo metabolic impact remains elusive. Wild type (WT) and transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing human MR were subjected to standard chow (SC) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk. Tg mice had a lower body weight gain than WT animals and exhibited a relative resistance to HFD-induced obesity. This was associated with a decrease in fat mass, an increased population of smaller adipocytes, and an improved glucose tolerance compared with WT animals. Quantitative RT-PCR studies revealed decreased expression of PPARγ2, a master adipogenic gene, and of glucocorticoid receptor and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, consistent with an impaired local glucocorticoid signaling in adipose tissues (AT). This paradoxical resistance to HFD-induced obesity was not related to an adipogenesis defect since differentiation capacity of Tg preadipocytes isolated from stroma-vascular fractions was unaltered, suggesting that other nonadipocyte factors might compromise AT development. Although AT macrophage infiltration was not different between genotypes, Tg mice exhibited a distinct macrophage polarization, as revealed by FACS analysis and CD11c/CD206 expression studies. We further demonstrated that Tg macrophage-conditioned medium partially impaired preadipocyte differentiation. Therefore, we propose that modification of M1/M2 polarization of hMR-overexpressing macrophages could account in part for the metabolic phenotype of Tg mice. Collectively, our results provide evidence that MR exerts a pivotal immunometabolic role by controlling adipocyte differentiation processes directly but also indirectly through macrophage polarization regulation. Our findings should be taken into account for the pharmacological treatment of metabolic disorders.

  3. Deletion of the forebrain mineralocorticoid receptor impairs social discrimination and decision-making in male, but not in female mice.

    PubMed

    Ter Horst, Judith P; van der Mark, Maaike; Kentrop, Jiska; Arp, Marit; van der Veen, Rixt; de Kloet, E Ronald; Oitzl, Melly S

    2014-01-01

    Social interaction with unknown individuals requires fast processing of information to decide whether it is friend or foe. This process of discrimination and decision-making is stressful and triggers secretion of corticosterone activating mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The MR is involved in appraisal of novel experiences and risk assessment. Recently, we have demonstrated in a dual-solution memory task that MR plays a role in the early stage of information processing and decision-making. Here we examined social approach and social discrimination in male and female mice lacking MR from hippocampal-amygdala-prefrontal circuitry and controls. The social approach task allows the assessment of time spent with an unfamiliar mouse and the ability to discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics. The male and female test mice were both more interested in the social than the non-social experience and deletion of their limbic MR increased the time spent with an unfamiliar mouse. Unlike controls, the male MR(CaMKCre) mice were not able to discriminate between an unfamiliar and the familiar mouse. However, the female MR mutant had retained the discriminative ability between unfamiliar and familiar mice. Administration of the MR antagonist RU28318 to male mice supported the role of the MR in the discrimination between an unfamiliar mouse and a non-social stimulus. No effect was found with a GR antagonist. Our findings suggest that MR is involved in sociability and social discrimination in a sex-specific manner through inhibitory control exerted putatively via limbic-hippocampal efferents. The ability to discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics is of uttermost importance for territorial defense and depends on a role of MR in decision-making.

  4. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates the transcriptional activity of the mineralocorticoid receptor and regulates expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Kino, Tomoshige; Jaffe, Howard; Amin, Niranjana D; Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Zheng, Ya-Li; Chrousos, George P; Pant, Harish C

    2010-05-01

    Glucocorticoids, major end effectors of the stress response, play an essential role in the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and contribute to memory consolidation and emotional control through their intracellular receptors, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), on the other hand, plays important roles in the morphogenesis and functions of the central nervous system, and its aberrant activation has been associated with development of neurodegenerative disorders. We previously reported that CDK5 phosphorylated the glucocorticoid receptor and modulated its transcriptional activity. Here we found that CDK5 also regulated mineralocorticoid receptor-induced transcriptional activity by phosphorylating multiple serine and threonine residues located in its N-terminal domain through physical interaction. Aldosterone and dexamethasone, respectively, increased and suppressed mRNA/protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat cortical neuronal cells, whereas the endogenous glucocorticoid corticosterone showed a biphasic effect. CDK5 enhanced the effect of aldosterone and dexamethasone on BDNF expression. Because this neurotrophic factor plays critical roles in neuronal viability, synaptic plasticity, consolidation of memory, and emotional changes, we suggest that aberrant activation of CDK5 might influence these functions through corticosteroid receptors/BDNF.

  5. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) regulates ENaC but not NCC in mice with random MR deletion.

    PubMed

    Czogalla, Jan; Vohra, Twinkle; Penton, David; Kirschmann, Moritz; Craigie, Eilidh; Loffing, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Aldosterone binds to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and increases renal Na(+) reabsorption via up-regulation of the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in the collecting system (CS) and possibly also via the NaCl cotransporter (NCC) in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). However, whether aldosterone directly regulates NCC via MR or indirectly through systemic alterations remains controversial. We used mice with deletion of MR in ∼20 % of renal tubule cells (MR/X mice), in which MR-positive (MR(wt)) and -negative (MR(ko)) cells can be studied side-by-side in the same physiological context. Adult MR/X mice showed similar mRNA and protein levels of renal ion transport proteins to control mice. In MR/X mice, no differences in NCC abundance and phosphorylation was seen between MR(wt) and MR(ko) cells and dietary Na(+) restriction up-regulated NCC to similar extent in both groups of cells. In contrast, MR(ko) cells in the CS did not show any detectable alpha-ENaC abundance or apical targeting of ENaC neither on control diet nor in response to dietary Na(+) restriction. Furthermore, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase expression was unaffected in MR(ko) cells of the DCT, while it was lost in MR(ko) cells of the CS. In conclusion, MR is crucial for ENaC and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase regulation in the CS, but is dispensable for NCC and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase regulation in the DCT.

  6. Effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, S; Katada, J; Daida, H; Kitamura, F; Yokoyama, K

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control is important to ameliorate cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, achieving the target BP with a single drug is often difficult. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antihypertensive effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) as add-on therapy to renin–angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitor(s) in patients with hypertension and DM. Studies were searched through October 2014 in MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Randomized, controlled trials or prospective, observational studies regarding concomitant administration of MRA and RAS inhibitor(s) in patients with DM were included. Articles were excluded if the mean systolic BP (SBP) was <130 mm Hg before randomization for interventional studies or at baseline for prospective cohort studies. We identified nine eligible studies (486 patients): five randomized placebo-controlled trials; three randomized active drug-controlled trials; and one single-arm observational study. The mean differences in office SBP and diastolic BP (DBP) between the MRA and placebo groups were −9.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) −12.9 to −5.9) and −3.8 (95% CI, −5.5 to −2.2) mm Hg, respectively. Subgroup analysis results for study type, age, baseline office SBP and follow-up duration were similar to those of the main analysis. MRA mildly increased serum potassium (0.4 mEq l−1; 95% CI, 0.3–0.5 mEq l−1). A consistent reduction of albuminuria across these studies was also demonstrated. MRA further reduced SBP and DBP in patients with hypertension and DM already taking RAS inhibitors. Serum potassium levels should be monitored to prevent hyperkalemia. PMID:26674759

  7. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Is Associated with Altered Subcellular Distribution of Glucocorticoid and Mineralocorticoid Receptors in the Adolescent Mouse Hippocampal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Kevin K; Goggin, Samantha L; Tyler, Christina R; Allan, Andrea M

    2014-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence indicates that several of the long-term consequences of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) are the result of changes in the development and function of cortico-limbic structures, including the hippocampal formation. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) are key regulators of hippocampal formation development, structure, and functioning and, thus, are potential mediators of PAE’s effects on this brain region. In the present studies, we assessed the impact of PAE on components of corticosteroid signaling pathways in the mouse hippocampal formation. Methods Throughout pregnancy, mouse dams were offered either 10% (w/v) ethanol sweetened with 0.066% (w/v) saccharin (SAC) or 0.066% (w/v) SAC alone using a limited (4-hour) access, drinking-in-the-dark paradigm. The hippocampal formation was isolated from naïve postnatal day 40 to 50 offspring, and subcellular fractions were prepared. Using immunoblotting techniques, we measured the levels of GR, MR, 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1), and the FK506-binding proteins 51 (FKBP51, FKBP5) and 52 (FKBP52, FKBP4). Finally, we determined the effect of PAE on context discrimination, a hippocampal-dependent learning/memory task. Results PAE was associated with reduced MR and elevated GR nuclear localization in the hippocampal formation, whereas cytosolic levels of both receptors were not significantly altered. FKBP51 levels were reduced, while FKBP52 levels were unaltered, and 11β-HSD1 levels were increased in postnuclear fractions isolated from PAE mouse hippocampal formation. These neurochemical alterations were associated with reduced context discrimination. Conclusions The data support a model in which PAE leads to increased nuclear localization of GRs secondary to reductions in FKBP51 and increases in 11β-HSD1 levels in the adolescent mouse hippocampal formation. Persistent dysregulation of GR subcellular distribution is predicted to damage the

  8. The use of plasma aldosterone and urinary sodium to potassium ratio as translatable quantitative biomarkers of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence supports the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. These findings have generated renewed interest in novel MR antagonists with improved selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors and a potentially reduced risk of hyperkalemia. Characterization of novel MR antagonists warrants establishing translatable biomarkers of activity at the MR receptor. We assessed the translatability of urinary sodium to potassium ratio (Na+/K+) and plasma aldosterone as biomarkers of MR antagonism using eplerenone (Inspra®), a commercially available MR antagonist. Further we utilized these biomarkers to demonstrate antagonism of MR by PF-03882845, a novel compound. Methods The effect of eplerenone and PF-03882845 on urinary Na+/K+ and plasma aldosterone were characterized in Sprague-Dawley rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Additionally, the effect of eplerenone on these biomarkers was determined in healthy volunteers. Drug exposure-response data were modeled to evaluate the translatability of these biomarkers from rats to humans. Results In Sprague-Dawley rats, eplerenone elicited a rapid effect on urinary Na+/K+ yielding an EC50 that was within 5-fold of the functional in vitro IC50. More importantly, the effect of eplerenone on urinary Na+/K+ in healthy volunteers yielded an EC50 that was within 2-fold of the EC50 generated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Similarly, the potency of PF-03882845 in elevating urinary Na+/K+ in Sprague-Dawley rats was within 3-fold of its in vitro functional potency. The effect of MR antagonism on urinary Na+/K+ was not sustained chronically; thus we studied the effect of the compounds on plasma aldosterone following chronic dosing in SHR. Modeling of drug exposure-response data for both eplerenone and PF-03882845 yielded EC50 values that were within 2-fold of that estimated from modeling of drug exposure with changes in urinary sodium and potassium excretion

  9. Sulfenic Acid Modification of Endothelin B Receptor is Responsible for the Benefit of a Nonsteroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist in Renal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan; Prince, Sonia; Fadel, Fouad; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Warnock, David G.; Kolkhof, Peter; Jaisser, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    AKI is associated with high mortality rates and the development of CKD. Ischemia/reperfusion (IR) is an important cause of AKI. Unfortunately, there is no available pharmacologic approach to prevent or limit renal IR injury in common clinical practice. Renal IR is characterized by diminished nitric oxide bioavailability and reduced renal blood flow; however, the mechanisms leading to these alterations are poorly understood. In a rat model of renal IR, we investigated whether the administration of the novel nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist BR-4628 can prevent or treat the renal dysfunction and tubular injury induced by IR. Renal injury induced by ischemia was associated with increased oxidant damage, which led to a cysteine sulfenic acid modification in endothelin B receptor and consequently decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation. These modifications were efficiently prevented by nonsteroidal MR antagonism. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the protective effect of BR-4628 against IR was lost when a selective endothelin B receptor antagonist was coadministered. These data describe a new mechanism for reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation during renal IR that can be blocked by MR antagonism with BR-4628. PMID:26361797

  10. Genome-wide analysis of murine renal distal convoluted tubular cells for the target genes of mineralocorticoid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Kohei; Fujiki, Katsunori; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Fujita, Toshiro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Nagase, Miki

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • We define a target gene of MR as that with MR-binding to the adjacent region of DNA. • We use ChIP-seq analysis in combination with microarray. • We, for the first time, explore the genome-wide binding profile of MR. • We reveal 5 genes as the direct target genes of MR in the renal epithelial cell-line. - Abstract: Background and objective: Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a member of nuclear receptor family proteins and contributes to fluid homeostasis in the kidney. Although aldosterone-MR pathway induces several gene expressions in the kidney, it is often unclear whether the gene expressions are accompanied by direct regulations of MR through its binding to the regulatory region of each gene. The purpose of this study is to identify the direct target genes of MR in a murine distal convoluted tubular epithelial cell-line (mDCT). Methods: We analyzed the DNA samples of mDCT cells overexpressing 3xFLAG-hMR after treatment with 10{sup −7} M aldosterone for 1 h by chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep-sequence (ChIP-seq) and mRNA of the cell-line with treatment of 10{sup −7} M aldosterone for 3 h by microarray. Results: 3xFLAG-hMR overexpressed in mDCT cells accumulated in the nucleus in response to 10{sup −9} M aldosterone. Twenty-five genes were indicated as the candidate target genes of MR by ChIP-seq and microarray analyses. Five genes, Sgk1, Fkbp5, Rasl12, Tns1 and Tsc22d3 (Gilz), were validated as the direct target genes of MR by quantitative RT-qPCR and ChIP-qPCR. MR binding regions adjacent to Ctgf and Serpine1 were also validated. Conclusions: We, for the first time, captured the genome-wide distribution of MR in mDCT cells and, furthermore, identified five MR target genes in the cell-line. These results will contribute to further studies on the mechanisms of kidney diseases.

  11. Vascular mineralocorticoid receptor regulates microRNA-155 to promote vasoconstriction and rising blood pressure with aging

    PubMed Central

    DuPont, Jennifer J.; McCurley, Amy; Davel, Ana P.; McCarthy, Joseph; Bender, Shawn B.; Hong, Kwangseok; Yang, Yan; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Aronovitz, Mark; Baur, Wendy E.; Christou, Demetra D.; Hill, Michael A.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is nearly universal yet poorly controlled in the elderly despite proven benefits of intensive treatment. Mice lacking mineralocorticoid receptors in smooth muscle cells (SMC-MR-KO) are protected from rising blood pressure (BP) with aging, despite normal renal function. Vasoconstriction is attenuated in aged SMC-MR-KO mice, thus they were used to explore vascular mechanisms that may contribute to hypertension with aging. MicroRNA (miR) profiling identified miR-155 as the most down-regulated miR with vascular aging in MR-intact but not SMC-MR-KO mice. The aging-associated decrease in miR-155 in mesenteric resistance vessels was associated with increased mRNA abundance of MR and of predicted miR-155 targets Cav1.2 (L-type calcium channel (LTCC) subunit) and angiotensin type-1 receptor (AgtR1). SMC-MR-KO mice lacked these aging-associated vascular gene expression changes. In HEK293 cells, MR repressed miR-155 promoter activity. In cultured SMCs, miR-155 decreased Cav1.2 and AgtR1 mRNA. Compared to MR-intact littermates, aged SMC-MR-KO mice had decreased systolic BP, myogenic tone, SMC LTCC current, mesenteric vessel calcium influx, LTCC-induced vasoconstriction and angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction and oxidative stress. Restoration of miR-155 specifically in SMCs of aged MR-intact mice decreased Cav1.2 and AgtR1 mRNA and attenuated LTCC-mediated and angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction and oxidative stress. Finally, in a trial of MR blockade in elderly humans, changes in serum miR-155 predicted the BP treatment response. Thus, SMC-MR regulation of miR-155, Cav1.2 and AgtR1 impacts vasoconstriction with aging. This novel mechanism identifies potential new treatment strategies and biomarkers to improve and individualize antihypertensive therapy in the elderly. PMID:27683672

  12. The Prognostic Value of Plasma Galectin-3 in Chronic Heart Failure Patients Is Maintained when Treated with Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Koukoui, François; Desmoulin, Franck; Galinier, Michel; Barutaut, Manon; Caubère, Celine; Evaristi, Maria Francesca; Murat, Gurbuz; De Boer, Rudolf; Berry, Matthieu; Smih, Fatima; Rouet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objective Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is considered as a myocardial fibrosis biomarker with prognostic value in heart failure (HF). Since aldosterone is a neurohormone with established fibrotic properties, we aimed to investigate if mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) would modulate the prognostic value of Gal-3. Methods The IBLOMAVED cohort comprised 427 eligible chronic HF patients (CHF) with echocardiography and heart failure biomarkers assessments (BNP). After propensity score matching CHF patients for cardiovascular risk factors, to form balanced groups, Gal-3 levels were measured at baseline in plasma from patients treated with MRAs (MRA-Plus, n=101) or not (MRA-Neg, n=101). The primary end point was all-cause mortality with a follow-up of 3 years. Results Gal-3 in plasma from these patients were similar with median values of 14.0 ng/mL [IQR, 9.9–19.3] and 14.4 ng/mL [IQR, 12.3–19.8] (P = 0.132) in MRA-Neg and MRA-Plus, respectively. Patients with Gal-3 ≤17.8 ng/mL had an HR of 1 (reference group) and 1.5 [0.4–5.7] in MRA-Neg and MRA-Plus, respectively (p=0.509). Patients with Gal-3 ≥ 17.8 ng/mL had an HR of 7.4 [2.2–24.6] and 9.0 [2.9–27.8] in MRA-Plus and MRA-Neg, respectively (p=0.539) and a median survival time of 2.4 years [95%CI,1.8–2.4]. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis confirmed that MRA and the interaction term between MRA treatment and Gal-3 >17.8 ng/mL were not factors associated with survival. Conclusions MRA treatment did not impair the prognostic value of Gal-3 assessed with a 17.8 ng/mL cut off. Gal-3 levels maintained its strong prognostic value in CHF also in patients treated with MRAs. The significance of the observed lack of an interaction between Gal-3 and treatment effect of MRAs remains to be elucidated. PMID:25786035

  13. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist use in hospitalized patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction, and diabetes mellitus (from the EVEREST Trial).

    PubMed

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Dei Cas, Alessandra; Mentz, Robert J; Greene, Stephen J; Khan, Sadiya; Subacius, Haris P; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Maggioni, Aldo P; Konstam, Marvin A; Senni, Michele; Fonarow, Gregg C; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2014-09-01

    Despite the well-established benefits of mineralocorticoid receptor agonists (MRAs) in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, safety concerns remain in patients with concomitant diabetes mellitus (DM) because of common renal and electrolyte abnormalities in this population. We analyzed all-cause mortality and composite cardiovascular mortality and HF hospitalization over a median 9.9 months among 1,998 patients in the placebo arm of the Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in Heart Failure Outcome Study With Tolvaptan (EVEREST) trial by DM status and discharge MRA use. Of the 750 patients with DM, 59.2% were receiving MRAs compared with 62.5% in the non-DM patients. DM patients not receiving MRAs were older, more likely to be men, with an ischemic heart failure etiology and slightly worse renal function compared with those receiving MRAs. After adjustment for baseline risk factors, among DM patients, MRA use was not associated with either mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75 to 1.15) or the composite end point (HR 0.94; 95% CI 0.80 to 1.10). Similar findings were seen in non-DM patients (mortality [HR 1.01; 95% CI 0.84 to 1.22] or the composite end point [HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.13] [p >0.43 for DM interaction]). In conclusion, in-hospital initiation of MRA therapy was low (15% to 20%), and overall discharge MRA use was only 60% (with regional variation), regardless of DM status. There does not appear to be clear, clinically significant in-hospital hemodynamic or even renal differences between those on and off MRA. Discharge MRA use was not associated with postdischarge end points in patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and co-morbid DM. DM does not appear to influence the effectiveness of MRA therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Selective Mineralocorticoid Receptor Blockade on Flow-Mediated Dilation and Insulin Resistance in Older Adults with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Meade, Thomas H; English, Mark; Christou, Demetra D

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is especially high in older adults. Metabolic syndrome is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function, insulin resistance, and increased risk for cardiovascular disease but the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Plasma aldosterone is independently associated with metabolic syndrome and is linked to endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Thus, we hypothesized that mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blockade would improve flow-mediated dilation and insulin resistance in older adults with metabolic syndrome. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a balanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study using selective MR blockade (eplerenone; 100 mg/day) for 1 month with 1 month washout in older adults with metabolic syndrome (62.6 ± 3.2 yrs; mean ± standard error). We evaluated brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (ultrasonography), oxidative stress (oxidized low-density lipoproteins and F2-isoprostanes) and insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment). In response to MR blockade, flow-mediated dilation (5.37 ± 0.85 vs. 5.98 ± 1.29%; placebo vs. eplerenone; P = 0.4), oxidized low-density lipoproteins (51.6 ± 11.5 vs. 56.1 ± 10.9 U/L; P = 0.6), and F2-isoprostanes (0.07 ± 0.02 vs. 0.06 ± 0.01 pg/mL; P = 0.3) did not improve. Insulin resistance also did not change following MR blockade (1.04 ± 0.26 vs. 1.38 ± 0.50; P = 0.6). However, MR blockade resulted in a large reduction (10 mmHg) in systolic blood pressure (140 ± 6 vs. 130 ± 6 mmHg; P = 0.02), with no significant change in diastolic blood pressure (81 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 2 mmHg; P = 0.2). Our data do not support a contributing role for MRs in endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in older adults with metabolic syndrome. However, our findings suggest MR activation is an important contributor to systolic hypertension in

  15. The mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist eplerenone reduces renal interstitial fibrosis after long-term cyclosporine treatment in rat: antagonizing cyclosporine nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic cyclosporine-(CsA)-mediated loss of kidney function is a major clinical problem in organ transplantation. We hypothesized that the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist eplerenone (EPL) prevents chronic CsA-induced renal interstitial volume increase, tubule loss, and functional impairment in a rat model. Methods Sprague–Dawley rats received CsA alone (15 mg/kg/d p.o.), CsA and EPL (approximately 100 mg/kg/day p.o.) or vehicle (control) for 12 weeks. At 11 weeks, chronic indwelling arterial and venous catheters were implanted for continuous measurements of arterial blood pressure (BP) and GFR (inulin clearance) in conscious, freely moving animals. Plasma was sampled for analysis and kidney tissue was fixed for quantitative stereological analyses. Results Compared to controls, CsA-treatment reduced relative tubular volume (0.73±0.03 vs. 0.85±0.01, p<0.05) and increased relative interstitial volume (0.080±0.004 vs. 0.045±0.003, p<0.05); EPL attenuated these changes (0.82±0.02, p<0.05, and 0.060±0.006, p<0.05, respectively). CsA-treated rats had more sclerotic glomeruli and a higher degree of vascular depositions in arterioles; both were significantly reduced in CsA+EPL-treated animals. CsA increased BP and reduced body weight gain and GFR. In CsA+EPL rats, weight gain, GFR and BP at rest (daytime) were normalized; however, BP during activity (night) remained elevated. Plasma sodium and potassium concentrations, kidney-to-body weight ratios and CsA whole blood concentration were similar in CsA and CsA+EPL rats. Conclusions It is concluded that in the chronic cyclosporine rat nephropathy model, EPL reduces renal tissue injury, hypofiltration, hypertension, and growth impairment. MR antagonists should be tested for their renoprotective potential in patients treated with calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:23425330

  16. Exclusion of the locus for autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 from the mineralocorticoid receptor gene region on human chromosome 4q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.; Hanukoglu, A.; Rees, M.; Thompson, R.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by salt-wasting in infancy arising from target organ unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Clinical expression of the disease varies from severely affected infants who may die to apparently asymptomatic individuals. Inheritance is Mendelian and may be either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive. A defect in the mineralocortiocoid receptor has been implicated as a likely cause of PHA1. The gene for human mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) has been cloned and physically mapped to human chromosome 4q31.1-31.2. The etiological role of MLR in autosomal recessive PHA1 was investigated by performing linkage analysis between PHA1 and three simple sequence length polymorphisms (D4S192, D4S1548, and D4S413) on chromosome 4q in 10 consanguineous families. Linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal recessive inheritance with full penetrance and zero phenocopy rate using the MLINK program for two-point analysis and the HOMOZ program for multipoint analysis. Lod scores of less than -2 were obtained over the whole region from D4S192 to D4S413 encompassing MLR. This provides evidence against MLR as the site of mutations causing PHA1 in the majority of autosomal recessive families. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. The hsp90-FKBP52 Complex Links the Mineralocorticoid Receptor to Motor Proteins and Persists Bound to the Receptor in Early Nuclear Events▿

    PubMed Central

    Galigniana, Mario D.; Erlejman, Alejandra G.; Monte, Martín; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the subcellular localization of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is regulated by tetratricopeptide domain (TPR) proteins. The high-molecular-weight immunophilin (IMM) FKBP52 links the MR-hsp90 complex to dynein/dynactin motors favoring the cytoplasmic transport of MR to the nucleus. Replacement of this hsp90-binding IMM by FKBP51 or the TPR peptide favored the cytoplasmic localization of MR. The complete movement machinery, including dynein and tubulin, could be recovered from paclitaxel/GTP-stabilized cytosol and was fully reassembled on stripped MR immune pellets. The whole MR-hsp90-based heterocomplex was transiently recovered in the soluble fraction of the nucleus after 10 min of incubation with aldosterone. Moreover, cross-linked MR-hsp90 heterocomplexes accumulated in the nucleus in a hormone-dependent manner, demonstrating that the heterocomplex can pass undissociated through the nuclear pore. On the other hand, a peptide that comprises the DNA-binding domain of MR impaired the nuclear export of MR, suggesting the involvement of this domain in the process. This study represents the first report describing the entire molecular system that commands MR nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and proposes that the MR-hsp90-TPR protein heterocomplex is dissociated in the nucleus rather than in the cytoplasm. PMID:20038533

  18. The calcium-sensing receptor participates in testicular damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wei-Yuan; Tong, Li-Quan; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Cao, Yong-Gang; Wang, Gong-Chen; Zhu, Jin-Zhi; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Xue-Ying; Zhang, Tie-Hui; Zhang, Lin-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Male infertility caused by testicular damage is one of the complications of diabetes mellitus. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in testicular tissues and plays a pivotal role in calcium homeostasis by activating cellular signaling pathways, but its role in testicular damage induced by diabetes remains unclear. A diabetic model was established by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 40 mg kg−1) in Wistar rats. Animals then received GdCl3 (an agonist of CaSR, 8.67 mg kg−1), NPS-2390 (an antagonist of CaSR, 0.20 g kg−1), or a combination of both 2 months after STZ injection. Diabetic rats had significantly lower testes weights and serum levels of testosterone compared to healthy rats, indicating testicular damage and dysfunction in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Compared with healthy controls, the testicular tissues of diabetic rats overexpressed the CaSR protein and had higher levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), lower superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, and higher numbers of apoptotic germ cells. The testicular tissues from diabetic rats also expressed lower levels of Bcl-2 and higher levels of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 in addition to higher phosphorylation rates of c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. The above parameters could be further increased or aggravated by the administration of GdCl3, but could be attenuated by injection of NPS-2390. In conclusion, the present results indicate that CaSR activation participates in diabetes-induced testicular damage, implying CaSR may be a potential target for protective strategies against diabetes-induced testicular damage and could help to prevent infertility in diabetic men. PMID:26387585

  19. Angiotensin –Converting Enzyme Inhibition or Mineralocorticoid Receptor Blockade Do Not Affect Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pretorius, Mias; Murray, Katherine T.; Yu, Chang; Byrne, John G.; Billings, Frederic T.; Petracek, Michael R.; Greelish, James P.; Hoff, Steven J.; Ball, Stephen K.; Mishra, Vineet; Body, Simon C.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study tested the hypothesis that interruption of the renin-angiotensin system with either an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist will decrease the incidence of atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery. Design Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. Setting University affiliated hospitals. Patients Four-hundred and forty-five adult patients in normal sinus rhythm undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Interventions One week to four days prior to surgery, patients were randomized to treatment with placebo, ramipril (2.5 mg the first three days followed by 5mg/day, with the dose reduced to 2.5mg/d on the first postoperative day only), or spironolactone (25 mg/day). Measurements The primary endpoint was the occurrence of electrocardiographically confirmed postoperative atrial fibrillation. Secondary endpoints included acute renal failure, hyperkalemia, the incidence of hypotension, length of hospital stay, stroke, and death. Main Results The incidence of atrial fibrillation was 27.2% in the placebo group, 27.8% in the ramipril group, and 25.9% in the spironolactone group (P=0.95). Patients in the ramipril (0.7%) or spironolactone (0.7%) group were less likely to develop acute renal failure than those randomized to placebo (5.4%, P=0.006). Patients in the placebo group tended to be hospitalized longer than those in the ramipril or spironolactone group (6.8±8.2 days versus 5.7±3.2 and 5.8±3.4 days, respectively, P=0.08 for the comparison of placebo versus the active treatment groups using log-rank test). Compared to patients in the placebo group, patients in the spironolactone group were extubated sooner after surgery (576.4±761.5 minutes versus 1091.3±3067.3 minutes, P=0.04). Conclusions Neither angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition nor mineralocorticoid receptor blockade decreased the primary outcome of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme

  20. Enantiomeric separation of mineralocorticoid receptor (hMR) antagonists using the Chiralcel OJ-H HPLC column with novel polar cosolvent eluent systems.

    PubMed

    Sharp, V Scott; Kennedy, Joseph H; Belvo, Matthew D; Williams, Jeffrey D; Risley, Donald S; Seest, Eric P

    2006-06-01

    This study demonstrates the increased versatility of the Chiralcel OJ-H stationary phase when using various alcohol/acetonitrile mobile phases. This chiral stationary phase has traditionally been employed in the normal phase mode and more recently with neat alcohols as eluents. Selected isomeric human mineralocorticoid receptor (hMR) antagonist pharmaceutical candidates and synthetic intermediates were separated using the Chiralcel OJ-H HPLC column with novel polar cosolvent eluent systems. The capacity factors, resolution, and selectivity of the chiral separations were assessed while varying the alcohol/acetonitrile composition and alcohol identity. The mixed polar eluents provide separations that are nearly always superior to both the traditional hexane-rich and single-alcohol "polar organic" eluents for the compounds tested in this article.

  1. Reversible cardiac fibrosis and heart failure induced by conditional expression of an antisense mRNA of the mineralocorticoid receptor in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Beggah, Ahmed T.; Escoubet, Brigitte; Puttini, Stefania; Cailmail, Stephane; Delage, Vanessa; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine; Bocchi, Brigitte; Peuchmaur, Michel; Delcayre, Claude; Farman, Nicolette; Jaisser, Frederic

    2002-01-01

    Cardiac failure is a common feature in the evolution of cardiac disease. Among the determinants of cardiac failure, the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system has a central role, and antagonism of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy. In this study, we questioned the role of the MR, not of aldosterone, on heart function, using an inducible and cardiac-specific transgenic mouse model. We have generated a conditional knock-down model by expressing solely in the heart an antisense mRNA directed against the murine MR, a transcription factor with unknown targets in cardiomyocytes. Within 2–3 mo, mice developed severe heart failure and cardiac fibrosis in the absence of hypertension or chronic hyperaldosteronism. Moreover, cardiac failure and fibrosis were fully reversible when MR antisense mRNA expression was subsequently suppressed. PMID:11997477

  2. Synthesis of sterically encumbered 11β-aminoprogesterone derivatives and evaluation as 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitors and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Keyur; Dietrich, David; Seibert, Julia; Vederas, John C; Odermatt, Alex

    2013-11-01

    11β-Hydroxyprogesterone is a well-known nonselective inhibitor of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11βHSD) types 1 and 2. It also activates the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Modulation of corticosteroid action by inhibition of 11βHSDs or blocking MR is currently under consideration for treatment of electrolyte disturbances, metabolic diseases and chronic inflammatory disorders. We established conditions to synthesize sterically demanding 11β-aminoprogesterone, which following subsequent nucleophilic or reductive amination, allowed extension of the amino group to prepare amino acid derivatives. Biological testing revealed that some of the 11β-aminoprogesterone derivatives selectively inhibit 11βHSD2. Moreover, two compounds that did not significantly inhibit 11βHSDs had antagonist properties on MR. The 11β-aminoprogesterone derivatives form a basis for the further development of improved modulators of corticosteroid action.

  3. Differential effects of imipramine and CORT118335 (Glucocorticoid receptor modulator/mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist) on brain-endocrine stress responses and depression-like behavior in female rats.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth T; Caldwell, Jody L; Streicher, Joshua; Ghisays, Valentina; Balmer, Nikolaus J; Estrada, Christina M; Solomon, Matia B

    2017-09-01

    Depression is commonly associated with hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction that primarily manifests as aberrant glucocorticoid secretion. Glucocorticoids act on Type I mineralocorticoid (MR) and Type II glucocorticoid receptors (GR) to modulate mood and endocrine responses. Successful antidepressant treatment normalizes HPA axis function, in part due to modulatory effects on MR and GR in cortico-limbic structures. Although women are twice as likely to suffer from depression, little is known about how antidepressants modulate brain, endocrine, and behavioral stress responses in females. Here, we assessed the impact of CORT118335 (GR modulator/MR antagonist) and imipramine (tricyclic antidepressant) on neuroendocrine and behavioral responses to restraint or forced swim stress (FST) in female rats (n=10-12/group). Increased immobility CORT118335 in the FST is purported to reflect passive coping or depression-like behavior. CORT118335 dampened adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to the FST, but did not affect immobility. Imipramine suppressed ACTH, but had minimal effects on corticosterone responses to FST. Despite these marginal effects, imipramine decreased immobility, suggesting antidepressant efficacy. In an effort to link brain-endocrine responses with behavior, c-Fos was assessed in HPA axis and mood modulatory regions in response to the FST. CORT118335 upregulated c-Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Imipramine decreased c-Fos in the basolateral amygdala and hippocampus (CA1 and CA3), but increased c-Fos in the central amygdala. These data suggest the antidepressant-like (e.g., active coping) properties of imipramine may be due to widespread effects on cortico-limbic circuits that regulate emotional and cognitive processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mineralocorticoid receptor and heat shock protein expression levels in peripheral lymphocytes from war trauma-exposed men with and without PTSD.

    PubMed

    Matić, Gordana; Vojnović Milutinović, Danijela; Nestorov, Jelena; Elaković, Ivana; Manitašević Jovanović, Sanja; Elzaedi, Younis Mouftah; Perišić, Tatjana; Dunđerski, Jadranka; Damjanović, Svetozar; Knežević, Goran; Špirić, Željko; Vermetten, Eric; Savić, Danka

    2014-02-28

    Alterations in the number and functional status of mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) may contribute to vulnerability to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Corticosteroid receptors are chaperoned by heat shock proteins Hsp90 and Hsp70. We examined relations between corticosteroid receptor and heat shock protein expression levels, and related them with war trauma exposure, PTSD and resilience to PTSD. Relative levels of MR, Hsp90 and Hsp70 were determined by immunoblotting in lymphocytes from war trauma-exposed men with current PTSD (current PTSD group, n=113), with life-time PTSD (life-time PTSD group, n=61) and without PTSD (trauma control group, n=88), and from non-traumatized healthy controls (healthy control group, n=85). Between-group differences in MR, Hsp90 and Hsp70 levels and in MR/GR ratio were not observed. The level of MR was correlated with both Hsp90 and Hsp70 levels in trauma control and healthy control groups. On the other hand, GR level was correlated only with Hsp90 level, and this correlation was evident in current PTSD and trauma control groups. In conclusion, PTSD and exposure to trauma are not related to changes in lymphocyte MR, Hsp90 or Hsp70 levels, but may be associated with disturbances in corticosteroid receptors interaction with heat shock proteins. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Neuroregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in humans: effects of GABA-, mineralocorticoid-, and GH-Secretagogue-receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Roberta; Pellegrino, Micaela; Picu, Andreea; Bonelli, Lorenza; Balbo, Marcella; Berardelli, Rita; Lanfranco, Fabio; Ghigo, Ezio; Arvat, Emanuela

    2006-01-17

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis exerts a variety of effects at both the central and peripheral level. Its activity is mainly regulated by CRH, AVP, and the glucocorticoid-mediated feedback action. Moreover, many neurotransmitters and neuropeptides influence HPA axis activity by acting at the hypothalamic and/or suprahypothalamic level. Among them, GABA and Growth Hormone Secretagogues (GHS)/GHS-receptor systems have been shown to exert a clear inhibitory and stimulatory effect, respectively, on corticotroph secretion. Alprazolam (ALP), a GABA-A receptor agonist, shows the most marked inhibitory effect on both spontaneous and stimulated HPA axis activity, in agreement with its peculiar efficacy in panic disorders and depression where an HPA axis hyperactivation is generally present. Ghrelin and synthetic GHS possess a marked ACTH/cortisol-releasing effect in humans and the ghrelin/GHS-R system is probably involved in the modulation of the HPA response to stress and nutritional/metabolic variations. The glucocorticoid-mediated negative feedback action is mediated by both glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors activation at the central level, mainly in the hippocampus. In agreement with animal studies, MRs seem to play a crucial role in the maintenance of the circadian ACTH and cortisol rhythm, through the modulation of CRH and AVP release. GABA agonists (mainly ALP), ghrelin, as well as MR agonists/antagonists, may represent good tools to explore the activity of the HPA axis in both physiological conditions and pathological states characterized by an impaired control of the corticotroph function.

  6. Expression of a mutant androgen receptor in cloned fibroblasts derived from a heterozygous carrier for the syndrome of testicular feminization.

    PubMed Central

    Elawady, M K; Allman, D R; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J D

    1983-01-01

    Thermolability of androgen binding was compared in fibroblasts cloned from normal female skin, skin from a subject with testicular feminization whose mutation is known to be associated with a thermolabile androgen receptor, and from the mother of the subject with testicular feminization. Seven of 28 clones studied from the mother exhibited thermolability of binding, indicating that the mutant gene that causes thermolability of binding, like the gene responsible for the normal androgen receptor, is X-linked. PMID:6602545

  7. Testicular adrenal rests: evidence for luteinizing hormone receptors and for distinct types of testicular nodules differing for their autonomization.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, S; Smedile, G; Lo Giudice, F; Trimarchi, F

    1999-09-01

    We report one patient with 21-hydroxylase deficiency and associated bilateral macro-orchidism caused by nodular hyperplasia of testicular adrenal rests (TAR). The boy, referred to us when 10 years old, was born with bilateral cryptorchidism that was treated unsuccessfully with i.m. injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and later on with orchidopexy. He was treated with oral dexamethasone (0.625 mg per day) for the following 13 years. After one year, there was a marked reduction in steroid hormone levels (17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OH P) from 27.2 to 1.2 nmol/l, testosterone from >104 to 4.8 nmol/l, estradiol (E(2)) from 481 to 33 pmol/l). After the same period of time, both testicular volume and nodularity decreased: from 45 to 18 ml and from numerous to four nodules in the right testis, and from 40 to 13 ml and from numerous to three nodules in the left testis. At the third year, there were transient increases in serum gonadotropins, testicular volume (right testis = 25 ml, left testis = 20 ml) and steroid hormones, including cortisol (serum ACTH and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate remained suppressed). At the fourth year of follow-up, there were still four nodules in the right testis and three in the left testis. The LH-dependency (which implies possession of LH/hCG receptors) of these nodules was also substantiated by their steroidogenic response to an acute i.m. hCG test. An exogenous ACTH stimulation test increased serum 17-OH P and cortisol. Since these nodules, unlike the majority of those present initially, were not suppressed by the corticosteroid therapy and since they were not detected when the patient returned for control at 23 years of age, they had partial autonomy from ACTH. At 23 years of age, the patient had a single nodule in the right testis (right testis volume = 13 ml, left testis volume = 10 ml), which should have accounted for the consistent difference in size between the two gonads. Serum LH was about 7 mU/l and FSH about 23 m

  8. A common mineralocorticoid receptor polymorphism (I180V) interacts with life events in relation to perfectionism in eating disorders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Slof-Op't Landt, Margarita C T; DeRijk, Roel H; van Son, Gabrielle E; Suchiman, H Eka D; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Van Furth, Eric F

    2014-11-01

    The stress response is regulated by the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). When the balance between GR and MR signalling is disturbed, one's capacity to cope with a stressful event is diminished. In this pilot study, we tested the hypothesis that an interaction between common variants in the MR (rs5522) or GR gene (rs41423247) and stressful life events influences perfectionism levels in a group of patients with an eating disorder (ED; n = 113). Patients carrying the minor G allele of rs5522 had a higher perfectionism score if more stressful life events were experienced [β = 0.95, t(109) = 3.75, p < 0.01]. This effect was not found for patients carrying the AA genotype. These results suggest that rs5522 G allele carriers might be vulnerable to stressful life events. When patients with an ED are carriers and experience multiple life events, this might fuel their insecurity, which in turn may engender higher levels of perfectionism. Further studies are necessary to replicate and expand our findings.

  9. Mineralocorticoid Receptor (MR) trans-Activation of Inflammatory AP-1 Signaling: DEPENDENCE ON DNA SEQUENCE, MR CONFORMATION, AND AP-1 FAMILY MEMBER EXPRESSION.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Edward J; Elinoff, Jason M; Ferreyra, Gabriela A; Hou, Angela; Cai, Rongman; Sun, Junfeng; Blaine, Kevin P; Wang, Shuibang; Danner, Robert L

    2016-11-04

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used to treat inflammatory disorders. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can tether to inflammatory transcription factor complexes, such as NFκB and AP-1, and trans-repress the transcription of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. In contrast, aldosterone and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) primarily promote cardiovascular inflammation by incompletely understood mechanisms. Although MR has been shown to weakly repress NFκB, its role in modulating AP-1 has not been established. Here, the effects of GR and MR on NFκB and AP-1 signaling were directly compared using a variety of ligands, two different AP-1 consensus sequences, GR and MR DNA-binding domain mutants, and siRNA knockdown or overexpression of core AP-1 family members. Both GR and MR repressed an NFκB reporter without influencing p65 or p50 binding to DNA. Likewise, neither GR nor MR affected AP-1 binding, but repression or activation of AP-1 reporters occurred in a ligand-, AP-1 consensus sequence-, and AP-1 family member-specific manner. Notably, aldosterone interactions with both GR and MR demonstrated a potential to activate AP-1. DNA-binding domain mutations that eliminated the ability of GR and MR to cis-activate a hormone response element-driven reporter variably affected the strength and polarity of these responses. Importantly, MR modulation of NFκB and AP-1 signaling was consistent with a trans-mechanism, and AP-1 effects were confirmed for specific gene targets in primary human cells. Steroid nuclear receptor trans-effects on inflammatory signaling are context-dependent and influenced by nuclear receptor conformation, DNA sequence, and the expression of heterologous binding partners. Aldosterone activation of AP-1 may contribute to its proinflammatory effects in the vasculature.

  10. Strategies for managing ACTH dependent mineralocorticoid excess induced by abiraterone.

    PubMed

    Pia, Anna; Vignani, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt; Tucci, Marcello; Bironzo, Paolo; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Arlt, Wiebke; Terzolo, Massimo; Berruti, Alfredo

    2013-12-01

    Abiraterone strongly inhibits androgen synthesis but may lead to an increase in mineralocorticoid hormones that may impair its long term tolerability in patients with prostate cancer. How to implement available therapies in the management and prevention of these potential side effects is a matter of current clinical research. The acute and long term consequences of mineralocorticoid excess and the effects of available treatments have been reviewed. Prospective studies in which abiraterone was employed were identified to assess the frequency and severity of the mineralocorticoid excess syndrome and the efficacy of ameliorating therapeutic approaches. Glucocorticoids to inhibit the ACTH increase that drives mineralocorticoid synthesis and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists can be used in the management of the abiraterone-induced mineralocorticoid excess syndrome. Phase I and II trials of abiraterone without additional therapies revealed that mineralocorticoid excess symptoms occur in the majority of patients. Eplerenone, a specific MR antagonist, seems to be effective but it does not control the mineralocorticoid excess. Glucorticoid supplementation to control ACTH drive is therefore needed. In several randomized trials the addition of prednisone (10mg daily) to abiraterone was not able to prevent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome in many cases and thus cannot be considered the gold standard. At present, the best conceivable treatment for managing the abiraterone-induced mineralocorticoid excess consists of the administration of glucocorticoid replacement at the lowest effective dose ± MR antagonists and salt deprivation. The drug doses should be modulated by monitoring blood pressure, fluid retention and potassium levels during therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of Per1 and the mineralocorticoid receptor in the coordinate regulation of αENaC in renal cortical collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jacob; Jeffers, Lauren A.; All, Sean C.; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Gumz, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Renal function and blood pressure (BP) exhibit a circadian pattern of variation, but the molecular mechanism underlying this circadian regulation is not fully understood. We have previously shown that the circadian clock protein Per1 positively regulates the basal and aldosterone-mediated expression of the alpha subunit of the renal epithelial sodium channel (αENaC). The mechanism of this regulation has not been determined however. To further elucidate the mechanism of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and Per1 action, site-directed mutagenesis, DNA pull-down assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) methods were used to investigate the coordinate regulation of αENaC by Per1 and MR. Mutation of two circadian response E-boxes in the human αENaC promoter abolished both basal and aldosterone-mediated promoter activity. DNA pull down assays demonstrated the interaction of both MR and Per1 with the E-boxes from the αENaC promoter. These observations were corroborated by ChIP experiments showing increased occupancy of MR and Per1 on an E-box of the αENaC promoter in the presence of aldosterone. This is the first report of an aldosterone-mediated increase in Per1 on a target gene promoter. Taken together, these results demonstrate the novel finding that Per1 and MR mediate the aldosterone response of αENaC through DNA/protein interaction in renal collecting duct cells. PMID:24062694

  12. Effect of aldosterone breakthrough on albuminuria during treatment with a direct renin inhibitor and combined effect with a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuhisa; Fukuda, Seiichi

    2013-10-01

    We have reported observing aldosterone breakthrough in the course of relatively long-term treatment with renin-angiotensin (RA) system inhibitors, where the plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) increased following an initial decrease. Aldosterone breakthrough has the potential to eliminate the organ-protective effects of RA system inhibitors. We therefore conducted a study in essential hypertensive patients to determine whether aldosterone breakthrough occurred during treatment with the direct renin inhibitor (DRI) aliskiren and to ascertain its clinical significance. The study included 40 essential hypertensive patients (18 men and 22 women) who had been treated for 12 months with aliskiren. Aliskiren significantly decreased blood pressure and plasma renin activity (PRA). The PAC was also decreased significantly at 3 and 6 months; however, the significant difference disappeared after 12 months. Aldosterone breakthrough was observed in 22 of the subjects (55%). Urinary albumin excretion differed depending on whether breakthrough occurred. For the subjects in whom aldosterone breakthrough was observed, eplerenone was added. A significant decrease in urinary albumin excretion was observed after 1 month, independent of changes in blood pressure. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that aldosterone breakthrough occurs in some patients undergoing DRI therapy. Aldosterone breakthrough affects the drug's ability to improve urinary albumin excretion, and combining a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist with the DRI may be useful for decreasing urinary albumin excretion. When the objective is organ protection in hypertensive patients, a two-pronged approach using combination therapy to inhibit both the RA system and aldosterone may be highly effective.

  13. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Deficiency in T Cells Attenuates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy and Dysfunction Through Modulating T-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Sun, Xue-Nan; Zeng, Meng-Ru; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Yu-Yao; Wan, Qiangyou; Zhang, Wu-Chang; Shi, Chaoji; Du, Lin-Juan; Ai, Tang-Jun; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yan; Du, Li-Li; Yi, Yi; Yu, Ying; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2017-07-01

    Although antagonists of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) have been widely used to treat heart failure, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Recent reports show that T cells play important roles in pathologic cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, it is unclear whether and how MR functions in T cells under these pathologic conditions. We found that MR antagonist suppressed abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy and decreased the accumulation and activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in mouse heart. T-cell MR knockout mice manifested suppressed cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction compared with littermate control mice after abdominal aortic constriction. T-cell MR knockout mice had less cardiac inflammatory response, which was illustrated by decreased accumulation of myeloid cells and reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines. Less amounts and activation of T cells were observed in the heart of T-cell MR knockout mice after abdominal aortic constriction. In vitro studies showed that both MR antagonism and deficiency repressed activation of T cells, whereas MR overexpression elevated activation of T cells. These results demonstrated that MR blockade in T cells protected against abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. Mechanistically, MR directly regulated T-cell activation and modulated cardiac inflammation. Targeting MR in T cells specifically may be a feasible strategy for more effective treatment of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibition, but not a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone, attenuates atypical transcription by an activating mutant MR (MRS 810L ).

    PubMed

    Kang, Seol-Hee; Lee, Hae-Ahm; Lee, Eunjo; Kim, Mina; Kim, Inkyeom

    2016-10-01

    A mutation in the mineralocorticoid receptor (MRS 810L ) leads to early-onset hypertension, which is markedly exacerbated during pregnancy. The mutation causes progesterone and even the MR antagonist spironolactone to become potent agonists. Thus, it is hard to control hypertension in patients harbouring this mutation. We hypothesized that histone deacetylase inhibition (HDACi), but not the MR antagonist spironolactone, attenuates atypical transcriptional activity of activating mutant MR (MRS 810L ). We established HEK293T cells overexpressing wild-type MR (MRWT ) or MRS 810L and determined their transcriptional activities by luciferase assay. Expression of MR target genes was measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Treatment with aldosterone increased the expression of MR target genes as well as the transcriptional activities in HEK293T cells transfected either with MRWT or MRS 810L . Treatment with either spironolactone or progesterone also increased the expression of MR target genes as well as transcriptional activity, but only in HEK293T cells transfected with MRS 810L . Spironolactone abolished the promoter activity stimulated by aldosterone in HEK293T cells transfected with MRWT . Treatment with HDAC inhibitors attenuated the transcriptional activity as well as the expression of MR target genes induced by aldosterone, spironolactone, or progesterone whether HEK293T cells were transfected with either MRWT or MRS 810L . These results indicate that HDACi, but not an MR antagonist spironolactone, attenuates atypical transcriptional activity of an activating mutant MR (MRS 810L ).

  15. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism induces browning of white adipose tissue through impairment of autophagy and prevents adipocyte dysfunction in high-fat-diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Armani, Andrea; Cinti, Francesca; Marzolla, Vincenzo; Morgan, James; Cranston, Greg A; Antelmi, Antonella; Carpinelli, Giulia; Canese, Rossella; Pagotto, Uberto; Quarta, Carmelo; Malorni, Walter; Matarrese, Paola; Marconi, Matteo; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe; Cinti, Saverio; Young, Morag J; Caprio, Massimiliano

    2014-08-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) controls adipocyte function, but its role in the conversion of white adipose tissue (WAT) into thermogenic fat has not been elucidated. We investigated responses to the MR antagonists spironolactone (spiro; 20 mg/kg/d) and drospirenone (DRSP; 6 mg/kg/d) in C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet for 90 d. DRSP and spiro curbed HF diet-induced impairment in glucose tolerance, and prevented body weight gain and white fat expansion. Notably, either MR antagonist induced up-regulation of brown adipocyte-specific transcripts and markedly increased protein levels of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in visceral and inguinal fat depots when compared with the HF diet group. Positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed acquisition of brown fat features in WAT. Interestingly, MR antagonists markedly reduced the autophagic rate both in murine preadipocytes in vitro (10(-5) M) and in WAT depots in vivo, with a concomitant increase in UCP1 protein expression. Moreover, the autophagy repressor bafilomycin A1 (10(-8) M) mimicked the effect of MR antagonists, increasing UCP1 protein expression in primary preadipocytes. Hence, we showed that adipocyte MR regulates brown remodeling of WAT through a modulation of autophagy. These results provide a rationale for the use of MR antagonists to prevent the adverse metabolic consequences of adipocyte dysfunction. © FASEB.

  16. CHBPR-Angiotensin II stimulates renin in inner medullary collecting duct cells via PKC and independent of ENaC and mineralocorticoid receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Alexis A.; Liu, Liu; Lara, Lucienne S.; Seth, Dale M; Navar, L. Gabriel; Prieto, Minolfa C

    2011-01-01

    Collecting duct (CD) renin is stimulated by angiotensin (Ang) II providing a pathway for Ang I generation and further conversion to Ang II. Ang II stimulates epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) via Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and increases mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activity due to increased aldosterone release. Our objective was to determine if CD renin augmentation is mediated directly by AT1R or via ENaC and MR. In vivo studies examined the effects of ENaC blockade (amiloride; 5 mg/kg/day) on CD renin expression and urinary renin content (URC) in Ang II-infused rats (80 ng/min, 2 weeks). Ang II infusion increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), medullary renin mRNA, URC and intrarenal Ang II levels. Amiloride co-treatment did not alter these responses despite reduction in the rate of progression of SBP. In primary cultures of inner medullary CD (IMCD) cells, renin mRNA and (pro)renin protein levels increased with Ang II (100 nmol/L), and candesartan (AT1R antagonist) prevented this effect. Aldosterone (10−10 to 10−7 mol/L) with or without amiloride did not modify the upregulation of renin mRNA in Ang II treated cells. However, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with calphostin C prevented the Ang II-mediated increases in renin mRNA and (pro)renin protein levels. Furthermore, PKC activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increased renin expression to the same extent as Ang II. These data indicate that AT1R-mediated increase in CD renin is induced directly by Ang II via PKC pathway and that this regulation is independent of MR activation or ENaC activity. PMID:21282553

  17. Mineralocorticoid and angiotensin II type 1 receptors in the subfornical organ mediate angiotensin II - induced hypothalamic reactive oxygen species and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Huang, Bing S; White, Roselyn A; Chen, Aidong; Ahmad, Monir; Leenen, Frans H H

    2016-08-04

    Activation of angiotensinergic pathways by central aldosterone (Aldo)-mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway plays a critical role in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension. The subfornical organ (SFO) contains both MR and angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R) and can relay the signals of circulating Ang II to downstream nuclei such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). In Wistar rats, subcutaneous (sc) infusion of Ang II at 500ng/min/kg for 1 or 2weeks increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) as measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining in a nucleus - specific pattern. Intra-SFO infusion of AAV-MR- or AT1aR-siRNA prevented the Ang II-induced increase in AT1R mRNA expression in the SFO and decreased MR mRNA. Both MR- and AT1aR-siRNA prevented increases in ROS in the PVN and RVLM. MR- but not AT1aR-siRNA in the SFO prevented the Ang II-induced ROS in the SON. Both MR- and AT1aR-siRNA in the SFO prevented most of the Ang II-induced hypertension as assessed by telemetry. These results indicate that Aldo-MR signaling in the SFO is needed for the activation of Ang II-AT1R-ROS signaling from the SFO to the PVN and RVLM. Activation of Aldo-MR signaling from the SFO to the SON may enhance AT1R dependent activation of pre-sympathetic neurons in the PVN. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Knockdown of mineralocorticoid or angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene expression in the paraventricular nucleus prevents angiotensin II hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aidong; Huang, Bing S; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ahmad, Monir; Leenen, Frans H H

    2014-01-01

    Circulating Ang II activates an aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) – angiotensin II (Ang II) – angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) pathway in the hypothalamus. To obtain insights into the actual neuronal projections involved, adeno-associated virus carrying small interfering RNA against either AT1aR (AAV-AT1aR-siRNA) or MR (AAV-MR-siRNA) were infused into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in Wistar rats. Intra-PVN infusion of AAV-AT1aR-siRNA or AAV-MR-siRNA decreased AT1R or MR expression in the PVN but not in the subfornical organ (SFO) or supraoptic nucleus (SON). Subcutaneous infusion of Ang II at 500 ng kg−1 min−1 for 2 weeks increased mean arterial pressure by 60–70 mmHg, and increased AT1R and MR expression in the SFO, SON and PVN. Intra-PVN AT1aR-siRNA prevented the Ang II-induced increase in AT1R but not MR expression in the PVN, and MR-siRNA prevented MR but not AT1R expression in the PVN. The increases in AT1R and MR expression in both the SFO and the SON were not changed by the two AAV-siRNAs. Specific knockdown of AT1R or MR in the PVN by AAV-siRNA each prevented most of the Ang II-induced hypertension. Prevention of the subcutaneous Ang II-induced increase in MR but not the increase in AT1R by knockdown of MR and vice versa suggests an independent regulation of MR and AT1R expression in the PVN. Both AT1R and MR activation in the PVN play a critical role in Ang II-induced hypertension in rats. PMID:24973408

  19. Comparative inhibition by hard and soft metal ions of steroid-binding capacity of renal mineralocorticoid receptor cross-linked to the 90-kDa heat-shock protein heterocomplex.

    PubMed Central

    Galigniana, M D; Piwien-Pilipuk, G

    1999-01-01

    We analysed the inhibitory effects in vitro and in vivo of several metal ions on aldosterone binding to the rat kidney mineralocorticoid receptor with the purpose of assessing possible toxic effects of those ions on sodium retention, as well as to obtain information on receptor structural requirements for ligand binding. For the assays in vitro, the inhibitory effects of 20 metal ions were analysed on steroid-binding capacity for renal receptor cross-linked to 90-kDa heat-shock protein (hsp90) by pretreatment with dimethyl pimelimidate. Cross-linking prevented the artifactual dissociation of hsp90 (and, consequently, the loss of steroid binding) from the mineralocorticoid receptor due to the presence of high concentrations of salt in the incubation medium. Cross-linked heterocomplex showed no difference in ligand specificity and affinity with respect to native receptor, but increased stability upon thermal- or ionic-strength-induced destabilization was observed. Treatments in vitro with metal ions in the range 10(-8)-10(-1) M resulted in a differential inhibitory effect for each particular ion on aldosterone binding. Using the negative logarithm of metal concentration for 50% inhibition, the ions could be correlated with their Klopman hardness constants. The analysis of this relationship led us to postulate three types of reaction: with thiol, imidazole and carboxyl groups. The essential role played by these residues in steroid binding was confirmed by chemical modification of cysteines with dithionitrobenzoic acid, histidines with diethyl pyrocarbonate and acidic amino acids with Woodward's reagent (N-ethyl-5-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulphonate). Importantly, the toxic effects of some metal ions were also observed by treatments in vivo of adrenalectomized rats on both steroid-binding capacity and aldosterone-dependent sodium-retaining properties. We suggest that those amino acid residues are involved in the activation process of the mineralocorticoid receptor upon

  20. Adipocyte-Specific Mineralocorticoid Receptor Overexpression in Mice Is Associated With Metabolic Syndrome and Vascular Dysfunction: Role of Redox-Sensitive PKG-1 and Rho Kinase.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; Sanchez, Ana; Tsiropoulou, Sofia; Dulak-Lis, Maria G; Anagnostopoulou, Aikaterini; He, Ying; Montezano, Augusto C; Jaisser, Frederic; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-08-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) expression is increased in adipose tissue from obese individuals and animals. We previously demonstrated that adipocyte-MR overexpression (Adipo-MROE) in mice is associated with metabolic changes. Whether adipocyte MR directly influences vascular function in these mice is unknown. We tested this hypothesis in resistant mesenteric arteries from Adipo-MROE mice using myography and in cultured adipocytes. Molecular mechanisms were probed in vessels/vascular smooth muscle cells and adipose tissue/adipocytes and focused on redox-sensitive pathways, Rho kinase activity, and protein kinase G type-1 (PKG-1) signaling. Adipo-MROE versus control-MR mice exhibited reduced vascular contractility, associated with increased generation of adipocyte-derived hydrogen peroxide, activation of vascular redox-sensitive PKG-1, and downregulation of Rho kinase activity. Associated with these vascular changes was increased elastin content in Adipo-MROE. Inhibition of PKG-1 with Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS normalized vascular contractility in Adipo-MROE. In the presence of adipocyte-conditioned culture medium, anticontractile effects of the adipose tissue were lost in Adipo-MROE mice but not in control-MR mice. In conclusion, adipocyte-MR upregulation leads to impaired contractility with preserved endothelial function and normal blood pressure. Increased elasticity may contribute to hypocontractility. We also identify functional cross talk between adipocyte MR and arteries and describe novel mechanisms involving redox-sensitive PKG-1 and Rho kinase. Our results suggest that adipose tissue from Adipo-MROE secrete vasoactive factors that preferentially influence vascular smooth muscle cells rather than endothelial cells. Our findings may be important in obesity/adiposity where adipocyte-MR expression/signaling is amplified and vascular risk increased.

  1. CS-3150, a Novel Nonsteroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist, Shows Preventive and Therapeutic Effects On Renal Injury in Deoxycorticosterone Acetate/Salt-Induced Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kiyoshi; Morikawa, Yuka; Ubukata, Naoko; Tsuruoka, Hiroyuki; Homma, Tsuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    The present study was designed to assess both preventive and therapeutic effects of (S)-1-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-4-methyl-N-[4-(methylsulfonyl) phenyl]-5-[2-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl]-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxamide (CS-3150), a novel nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, on renal injury in deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/salt-induced hypertensive rats (DOCA rats). From 7 weeks of age, DOCA was subcutaneously administered once a week for 4 weeks to uninephrectomized rats fed a high-salt diet. In experiment 1, CS-3150 (0.3-3 mg/kg) was orally administered once a day for 4 weeks coincident with DOCA administration. In experiment 2, after establishment of renal injury by 4 weeks of DOCA/salt loading, CS-3150 (3 mg/kg) was orally administered once a day for 4 weeks with or without continuous DOCA administration. In experiment 1, DOCA/salt loading significantly increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), which was prevented by CS-3150 in a dose-dependent manner. Development of renal injury (proteinuria, renal hypertrophy, and histopathological changes in glomeruli and tubule) was also suppressed by CS-3150 with inhibition of mRNA expression of fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress markers. In experiment 2, under continuous DOCA treatment, CS-3150 clearly ameliorated existing renal injury without lowering SBP, indicating that CS-3150 regressed renal injury independent of its antihypertensive action. Moreover, CS-3150 treatment in combination with withdrawal of DOCA showed further therapeutic effect on renal injury accompanied by reduction in SBP. These results demonstrate that CS-3150 not only prevents but also ameliorates hypertension and renal injury in DOCA rats. Therefore, CS-3150 could be a promising agent for the treatment of hypertension and renal disorders, and may have potential to promote regression of renal injury. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Paradoxical mineralocorticoid receptor-mediated effect in fear memory encoding and expression of rats submitted to an olfactory fear conditioning task.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rimenez R; Dal Bó, Silvia; de Kloet, E Ronald; Oitzl, Melly S; Carobrez, Antonio P

    2014-04-01

    There is general agreement that the substantial modification in memory and motivational states exerted by corticosteroids after a traumatic experience is mediated in complementary manner by the mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors. Here we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological manipulation of MR activity would affect behavioral strategy and information storage in an olfactory fear conditioning (OFC) task. Male Wistar rats were submitted to the OFC with different training intensities. We observed that following high intensity OFC acquisition, a set of defensive coping strategies, which includes avoidance and risk assessment behaviors, was elicited when subjects were exposed to the conditioned stimulus (CS) 48 h later. In addition, following either OFC acquisition or retrieval (CS-I test) a profound corticosterone secretion was also detected. Systemic administration of the MR antagonist spironolactone altered the behavioral coping style irrespective the antagonist was administered 60 min prior to the acquisition or before the retrieval session. Surprisingly, the MR agonist fludrocortisone given 60 min prior to acquisition or retrieval of OFC had similar effects as the antagonist. In addition, post-training administration of fludrocortisone, following a weak training procedure, facilitated the consolidation of OFC. Fludrocortisone rather than spironolactone reduced serum corticosterone levels, suggesting that, at least in part, the effects of the MR agonist may derive from additional GR-mediated HPA-axis suppression. In conclusion, the present study suggests the involvement of the MR in the fine-tuning of behavioral adaptation necessary for optimal information storage and expression, as revealed by the marked alterations in the risk assessment behavior.

  3. Activation of mineralocorticoid receptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla is involved in hypertensive mechanisms in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagaki, Toshiaki; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Matsukawa, Ryuichi; Nishihara, Masaaki; Nakano, Masatsugu; Ito, Koji; Hoka, Sumio; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2012-04-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is recognized as a target for therapeutic intervention in hypertension and heart failure. MRs in the central nervous system are thought to have an important role in blood pressure regulation. Thus, we examined whether activation of the MR pathway in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) of the brainstem contributes to the neural mechanism of hypertension in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSPs). We microinjected eplerenone, aldosterone or Na(+)-rich artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) into the RVLM of anesthetized Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and SHRSPs. Arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) were recorded. The expressions of the MR protein and the serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase protein (Sgk1), which is a marker of MR activity, in the RVLM were measured by western blot analysis. Bilateral microinjection of eplerenone into the RVLM decreased AP and RSNA in WKY rats and SHRSPs, and the decreases in those variables were significantly greater in SHRSPs than WKY rats. Microinjection of aldosterone or Na(+)-rich aCSF into the RVLM increased AP and RSNA dose-dependently. The increases in those variables were significantly greater in SHRSPs than in WKY rats. The pressor responses of aldosterone or Na(+)-rich aCSF were attenuated by the prior injection of eplerenone in SHRSPs. Sgk1 expression levels in the RVLM were significantly greater in SHRSPs than in WKY rats. These findings suggest that activation of MRs in the RVLM enhances sympathetic activity, thereby contributing to the neural mechanism of hypertension in the SHRSP.

  4. Expression of testicular androgen receptor in non-obstructive azoospermia and its change after hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kato, Y; Shiraishi, K; Matsuyama, H

    2014-09-01

    Several trials aimed at improving the sperm retrieval from men with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) by optimizing intratesticular testosterone (ITT) have reported partial responses, however, an appropriate level of ITT has not been identified. In this study, we examined the expression of the testicular androgen receptor (AR) in NOA and investigated its correlation with clinical and pathological parameters. Expression of the testicular AR was investigated in 52 men with NOA and 22 men with obstructive azoospermia (OA). Twenty-two patients for whom sperm retrieval failed during microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) were enrolled in hormonal therapy using hCG with or without recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone (rhFSH) prior to a second micro-TESE. Sertoli cells were identified by vimentin immunostaining, and positivity in Sertoli cells was used as the AR index. AR immunostaining was robust in the nuclei of Sertoli cells [Sertoli cell androgen receptor (SCAR)] in both OA and NOA. The mean AR index in NOA was significantly higher than that in OA (p < 0.05). In NOA patients, there was no correlation between the AR index and the clinical parameters, whereas the AR index of early maturation arrest (MA) was significantly lower than that of Sertoli cell only, late MA and hypospermatogenesis (p < 0.05). A significant increase in the AR index after salvage hormonal therapy was shown, particularly when using rhFSH. The AR index in patients from whom spermatozoa could be retrieved at the second micro-TESE increased significantly after hormonal therapy. In human testes, the expression of AR is dominant in Sertoli cells, and the expression of SCAR is upregulated by FSH. Germ cell maturation, especially during spermatogonia to spermatocyte stage, has been shown to be SCAR-dependent. Taken together, the results indicate that SCAR elevation is closely associated with sperm retrieval after hormonal therapy and that FSH-based hormonal therapy is

  5. Renal Aldosterone Receptors: Studies with [3H]Aldosterone and the Anti-Mineralocorticoid [3H]Spirolactone (SC-26304)

    PubMed Central

    Marver, Diana; Stewart, John; Funder, John W.; Feldman, David; Edelman, Isidore S.

    1974-01-01

    In vivo, a spirolactone (SC-26304) inhibited the effects of aldosterone on urinary K+:Na+ ratios and the binding of [3H]aldosterone to renal cytoplasmic and nuclear receptors. Cytoplasmic binding of [3H]aldosterone and [3H]spirolactone (SC-26304) was similar in magnitude and involved the same set of sites. Under three sets of conditions—(i) in the intact rat, (ii) in kidney slices, and (iii) in reconstitution studies (mixing prelabeled cytoplasm with either purified renal nuclei or chromatin), [3H]spirolactone (SC-26304) did not yield specific nuclear complexes in contrast to the reproducible generation of these complexes with [3H]aldosterone. In glycerol density gradients, cytoplasmic [3H]aldosterone receptor complexes sedimented at 8.5 S and 4 S in low concentrations of salt and at 4.5 S in high concentrations of salt. Cytoplasmic [3H]spirolactone (SC-26304) receptor complexes sedimented at 3 S in low concentrations of salt and 4 S in high concentrations of salt. These results are discussed in terms of an allosteric model of the receptor system. Images PMID:4364539

  6. Early life stress in depressive patients: role of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors and of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity.

    PubMed

    Juruena, Mario Francisco; Werne Baes, Cristiane Von; Menezes, Itiana Castro; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a chronic, recurrent and long-term disorder characterized by high rates of impairment and several comorbidities. Early life stress (ELS) is associated with the increased risk for developing depression in adulthood, influences its clinical course and predicts a poorer treatment outcome. Stressful life events play an important role in the pathogenesis of depression, being well established as acute triggers of psychiatric illness. The vulnerability for developing depression is associated to changes in neurobiological systems related to stress regulation. The hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenal (HPA) axis responds to external and internal stimuli. Reported results indicate that stress in early phases of development can induce persistent changes in the response of the HPA axis to stress in adulthood, leading to a raised susceptibility to depression. These abnormalities appear to be related to the HPA axis deregulation in depression, partially due to an imbalance between glucocorticoid receptors (GR) and mineral ocorticoid receptors (MR). While most studies have consistently demonstrated that GR function is impaired in major depression (reduced GR-mediated feedback in HPA axis), data about the MR role in depression are still limited and contr oversial. Thus, in this review article we summarize the main reported findings about the consequences of ELS in HPA axis functioning and in the responsivity of MR/GR receptors in depression.

  7. Detection of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor in various adipose tissue depots of dairy cows supplemented with conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Friedauer, K; Dänicke, S; Schulz, K; Sauerwein, H; Häussler, S

    2015-10-01

    Early lactating cows mobilize adipose tissue (AT) to provide energy for milk yield and maintenance and are susceptible to metabolic disorders and impaired immune response. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), mainly the trans-10, cis-12 isomer, reduce milk fat synthesis and may attenuate negative energy balance. Circulating glucocorticoids (GC) are increased during parturition in dairy cows and mediate differentiating and anti-inflammatory effects via glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the presence of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1). Activated GC are the main ligands for both receptors in AT; therefore, we hypothesized that tissue-specific GC metabolism is effected by varying amounts of GR, MR and 11βHSD1 and/or their localization within AT depots. Furthermore, the lipolytic and antilipogenic effects of CLA might influence the GC/GR/MR system in AT. Therefore, we aimed to localize GR and MR as well as the expression pattern and activity of 11βHSD1 in different AT depots during early lactation in dairy cows and to identify potential effects of CLA. Primiparous German Holstein cows were divided into a control (CON) and a CLA group. From day 1 post-partum (p.p.) until sample collection, the CLA group was fed with 100 g/d CLA (contains 10 g each of the cis-9, trans-11 and the trans-10, cis-12-CLA isomers). CON cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 1, 42 and 105 p.p., while CLA cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 42 and 105 p.p. Subcutaneous fat from tailhead, withers and sternum, and visceral fat from omental, mesenteric and retroperitoneal depots were sampled. The localization of GR and 11βHSD1 in mature adipocytes - being already differentiated - indicates that GC promote other effects via GR than differentiation. Moreover, MR were observed in the stromal vascular cell fraction and positively related to the pre-adipocyte marker Pref-1. However, only marginal CLA effects were observed in this study

  8. Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and polymorphisms of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors are associated with IQ and behavior in young adults born very preterm.

    PubMed

    van der Voorn, Bibian; Wit, Jan M; van der Pal, Sylvia M; Rotteveel, Joost; Finken, Martijn J J

    2015-02-01

    Preterm survivors exhibit neurodevelopmental impairments. Whether this association is influenced by antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and glucocorticoid sensitivity is unknown. This study aimed to study the effects of antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) polymorphisms on behavior and intelligence quotient (IQ). This study was part of the 19-year follow-up of the Project On Preterm and Small-for-gestational-age birth cohort. Multicenter study. Three hundred forty-four 19-year-olds born very preterm (gestational age < 32 wk), of whom 71 had received betamethasone antenatally. Single antenatal treatment course of betamethasone. Behavior (Young Adult Self Report and Young Adult Behavior Checklist for parents) and IQ (digital Multicultural Capacity Test-intermediate level). Data were analyzed by linear regression and presented as regression coefficient (95% confidence interval [CI]). Sex ratio, GR (R23K; N363S) and MR (-2G/C; I180V) genotypes were equally distributed between treated and nontreated subjects. Independent of treatment, R23K carriers had improved IQ scores (β 9.3; 95% CI, 3.4 to 15.1) and a tendency toward more favorable total problem behavior scores (β -8.5; 95% CI, -17.3 to 0.2) ; -2G/C CC carriers had poorer IQ scores (β -6.2; 95% CI, -10.5 to -1.9); I180V carriers had more favorable internalizing behavior scores (β -2.0; 95% CI, -3.9 to -0.1). Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment was associated with more unfavorable behavior scores, especially internalizing behavior (β 2.4; 95% CI, 0.3 to 4.5). Interaction between GR and MR polymorphisms and antenatal glucocorticoid treatment was observed, with poorer IQ scores for exposed N363S carriers; poorer intellectual subdomain scores for exposed I180V-carriers; more favorable total problem behavior scores for exposed R23K carriers. Genetic variations in glucocorticoid sensitivity and antenatal glucocorticoid treatment are associated with IQ

  9. Effect of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark oil on heat stress-induced changes in sperm production, testicular lipid peroxidation, testicular apoptosis, and androgenic receptor density in developing Japanese quails.

    PubMed

    Türk, Gaffari; Şimşek, Ülkü G; Çeribaşı, Ali O; Çeribaşı, Songül; Özer Kaya, Şeyma; Güvenç, Mehmet; Çiftçi, Mehmet; Sönmez, Mustafa; Yüce, Abdurrauf; Bayrakdar, Ali; Yaman, Mine; Tonbak, Fadime

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cinnamon bark oil (CBO) on heat stress (HS)-induced changes in sperm production, testicular lipid peroxidation, testicular apoptosis, and androgenic receptor (AR) density in developing Japanese quails. Fifteen-day-old 90 male chicks were assigned to two main groups. The first group (45 chicks) was kept in a thermoneutral room at 22 °C for 24 h/day. The second group (45 chicks) was kept in a room with high ambient temperature at 34 °C for 8 h/day (from 9 AM-5 PM) and at 22 °C for 16 h/day. Each of these two main groups was then divided into three subgroups (CBO groups 0, 250, 500 ppm) consisting of 15 chicks (six treatment groups in 2 × 3 factorial order). Each of subgroups was replicated for three times and each replicate included five chicks. Heat stress caused significant decreases in body weight, spermatid and testicular sperm numbers, the density of testicular Bcl-2 (antiapoptotic marker) and AR immunopositivity, and significant increases in testicular lipid peroxidation level, the density of testicular Bax (apoptotic marker) immunopositivity, and a Bax/Bcl-2 ratio along with some histopathologic damages. However, 250 and 500 ppm CBO supplementation provided significant improvements in HS-induced increased level of testicular lipid peroxidation, decreased number of spermatid and testicular sperm, decreased densities of Bcl-2 and AR immunopositivity, and some deteriorated testicular histopathologic lesions. In addition, although HS did not significantly affect the testicular glutathione level, addition of both 250 and 500 ppm CBO to diet of quails reared in both HS and thermoneutral conditions caused a significant increase when compared with quails without any consumption of CBO. In conclusion, HS-induced lipid peroxidation causes testicular damage in developing male Japanese quails and, consumption of CBO, which has antiperoxidative effect, protects their testes against HS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  10. Neonatal exposure to low dose corticosterone persistently modulates hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor expression and improves locomotor/exploratory behaviour in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Ricceri, Laura; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder, primarily affecting girls. RTT causes a wide variety of debilitating symptoms and no cure currently exists. Mouse models bearing mutations in the Mecp2 gene recapitulate most physiological and behavioural RTT-related abnormalities. Stimulating neonatal environments (e.g. brief maternal separations or maternal low-dose corticosterone supplementation) reduce stress and fear responses at adulthood. The present study investigated whether impacting early in development the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, by exposing Mecp2-308 mutant pups to a low dose of corticosterone (50 µg/ml, during the 1st week of life) may contrast RTT-related abnormalities in neuroendocrine regulation and behavioural adaptation at adulthood. In line with previous reports, when fully symptomatic, MeCP2-308 mice showed a reduction in the regular nocturnal hyperactivity in the home-cage and increased anxiety-like behaviours and plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels in response to restraint stress. An abnormal elevation in mRNA levels of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and BDNF gene was also evident in the hippocampus of fully symptomatic mutant mice. Neonatal CORT modulated MR gene expression and behavioural reactivity towards a novel object, also restoring wt-like levels of locomotor/exploratory behaviour in mutant mice. Enhanced sensitivity to the neonatal treatment (in terms of increase in GR and MR mRNA levels), was also evident in the hippocampus of MeCP2-308 mice compared to wt littermates. Present results corroborate the hypothesis that targeting the glucocorticoid system may prove valid in contrasting at least some of the RTT-related symptoms and provide evidence that pharmacological interventions during critical early time windows can persistently improve the behavioural phenotype of RTT mice. Current data also support the emerging role played by Mecp2 in mediating the epigenetic programming induced by early life events

  11. Identification and regulation of receptor tyrosine kinases Rse and Mer and their ligand Gas6 in testicular somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, M C; Mather, J P; McCray, G; Lee, W M

    2000-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases act to convey extracellular signals to intracellular signaling pathways and ultimately control cell proliferation and differentiation. Rse, Axl, and Mer belong to a newly identified family of cell adhesion molecule-related receptor tyrosine kinase. They bind the vitamin K-dependent protein growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), which is also structurally related to the anticoagulation factor Protein S. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible role of Rse/Axl/Mer tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligand in regulating testicular functions. Gene expression of Rse, Axl, Mer, and Gas6 in the testis was studied by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blot analysis. The results indicated that receptors Rse and Mer and the ligand Gas6 were expressed in the rat endothelial cell line (TR1), mouse Leydig cell line (TM3), rat peritubular myoid cell line (TRM), mouse Sertoli cell line (TM4), and primary rat Sertoli cells. Axl was not expressed in the testicular somatic cells by RT-PCR or Northern blot analysis. The highest level of expression of Gas6 messenger RNA (mRNA) was observed in the Sertoli cells, and its expression was responsive to the addition of forskolin in vitro. The effects of serum, insulin, and transferrin on Gas6 expression by TM4 cells were examined. It was shown that they all exhibited an up-regulating effect on Gas6 expression. The forskolin-stimulated Gas6 expression was accompanied by an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of the Rse receptor in vitro, suggesting that Gas6 may exhibit an autocrine effect in the Sertoli cells through multiple tyrosine kinase receptors. Our studies so far have demonstrated that tyrosine kinase receptors Rse and Mer and their ligand Gas6 are widely expressed in the testicular somatic cell lines and may play a marked role in promoting testicular cell survival.

  12. Cooperative Role of Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Caveolin-1 in Regulating the Vascular Response to Low Nitric Oxide-High Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiovascular Injury.

    PubMed

    Pojoga, Luminita H; Yao, Tham M; Opsasnick, Lauren A; Siddiqui, Waleed T; Reslan, Ossama M; Adler, Gail K; Williams, Gordon H; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-10-01

    Aldosterone interacts with mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) to stimulate sodium reabsorption in renal tubules and may also affect the vasculature. Caveolin-1 (cav-1), an anchoring protein in plasmalemmal caveolae, binds steroid receptors and also endothelial nitric oxide synthase, thus limiting its translocation and activation. To test for potential MR/cav-1 interaction in the vasculature, we investigated if MR blockade in cav-1-replete or -deficient states would alter vascular function in a mouse model of low nitric oxide (NO)-high angiotensin II (AngII)-induced cardiovascular injury. Wild-type (WT) and cav-1 knockout mice (cav-1(-/-)) consuming a high salt diet (4% NaCl) received Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (0.1-0.2 mg/ml in drinking water at days 1-11) plus AngII (0.7-2.8 mg/kg per day via an osmotic minipump at days 8-11) ± MR antagonist eplerenone (EPL) 100 mg/kg per day in food. In both genotypes, blood pressure increased with L-NAME + AngII. EPL minimally changed blood pressure, although its dose was sufficient to block MR and reverse cardiac expression of the injury markers cluster of differentiation 68 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in L-NAME+AngII treated mice. In aortic rings, phenylephrine and KCl contraction was enhanced with EPL in L-NAME+AngII treated WT mice, but not cav-1(-/-) mice. AngII-induced contraction was not different, and angiotensin type 1 receptor expression was reduced in L-NAME + AngII treated WT and cav-1(-/-) mice. In WT mice, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was enhanced with L-NAME + AngII treatment and reversed with EPL. Acetylcholine relaxation in cav-1(-/-) mice was greater than in WT mice, not modified by L-NAME + AngII or EPL, and blocked by ex vivo L-NAME, 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), or endothelium removal, suggesting the role of NO-cGMP. Cardiac endothelial NO synthase was increased in cav-1(-/-) versus WT mice, further increased with L-NAME + AngII, and not affected by EPL

  13. Cooperative Role of Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Caveolin-1 in Regulating the Vascular Response to Low Nitric Oxide–High Angiotensin II–Induced Cardiovascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pojoga, Luminita H.; Yao, Tham M.; Opsasnick, Lauren A.; Siddiqui, Waleed T.; Reslan, Ossama M.; Adler, Gail K.; Williams, Gordon H.

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone interacts with mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) to stimulate sodium reabsorption in renal tubules and may also affect the vasculature. Caveolin-1 (cav-1), an anchoring protein in plasmalemmal caveolae, binds steroid receptors and also endothelial nitric oxide synthase, thus limiting its translocation and activation. To test for potential MR/cav-1 interaction in the vasculature, we investigated if MR blockade in cav-1–replete or –deficient states would alter vascular function in a mouse model of low nitric oxide (NO)–high angiotensin II (AngII)–induced cardiovascular injury. Wild-type (WT) and cav-1 knockout mice (cav-1−/−) consuming a high salt diet (4% NaCl) received Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (0.1–0.2 mg/ml in drinking water at days 1–11) plus AngII (0.7–2.8 mg/kg per day via an osmotic minipump at days 8–11) ± MR antagonist eplerenone (EPL) 100 mg/kg per day in food. In both genotypes, blood pressure increased with L-NAME + AngII. EPL minimally changed blood pressure, although its dose was sufficient to block MR and reverse cardiac expression of the injury markers cluster of differentiation 68 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in L-NAME+AngII treated mice. In aortic rings, phenylephrine and KCl contraction was enhanced with EPL in L-NAME+AngII treated WT mice, but not cav-1−/− mice. AngII-induced contraction was not different, and angiotensin type 1 receptor expression was reduced in L-NAME + AngII treated WT and cav-1−/− mice. In WT mice, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was enhanced with L-NAME + AngII treatment and reversed with EPL. Acetylcholine relaxation in cav-1−/− mice was greater than in WT mice, not modified by L-NAME + AngII or EPL, and blocked by ex vivo L-NAME, 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), or endothelium removal, suggesting the role of NO-cGMP. Cardiac endothelial NO synthase was increased in cav-1−/− versus WT mice, further increased with L-NAME + AngII, and

  14. Aldosterone Stimulates Elastogenesis in Cardiac Fibroblasts via Mineralocorticoid Receptor-independent Action Involving the Consecutive Activation of Gα13, c-Src, the Insulin-like Growth Factor-I Receptor, and Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Akt*

    PubMed Central

    Bunda, Severa; Wang, Yanting; Mitts, Thomas F.; Liu, Peter; Arab, Sara; Arabkhari, Majid; Hinek, Aleksander

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that aldosterone, which stimulates collagen production through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)-dependent pathway, also induces elastogenesis via a parallel MR-independent mechanism involving insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) signaling. The present study provides a more detailed explanation of this signaling pathway. Our data demonstrate that small interfering RNA-driven elimination of MR in cardiac fibroblasts does not inhibit aldosterone-induced IGF-IR phosphorylation and subsequent increase in elastin production. These results exclude the involvement of the MR in aldosterone-induced increases in elastin production. Results of further experiments aimed at identifying the upstream signaling component(s) that might be activated by aldosterone also eliminate the putative involvement of pertussis toxin-sensitive Gαi proteins, which have previously been shown to be responsible for some MR-independent effects of aldosterone. Instead, we found that small interfering RNA-dependent elimination of another heterotrimeric G protein, Gα13, eliminates aldosterone-induced elastogenesis. We further demonstrate that aldosterone first engages Gα13 and then promotes its transient interaction with c-Src, which constitutes a prerequisite step for aldosterone-dependent activation of the IGF-IR and propagation of consecutive downstream elastogenic signaling involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt. In summary, the data we present reveal new details of an MR-independent cellular signaling pathway through which aldosterone stimulates elastogenesis in human cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:19372600

  15. Changes in plasma gonadotropins, inhibin and testosterone concentrations and testicular gonadotropin receptor mRNA expression during testicular active, regressive and recrudescent phase in the captive Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus).

    PubMed

    Iibuchi, Ruriko; Kamine, Akari; Shimozuru, Michito; Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Tsubota, Toshio

    2010-02-01

    Male Japanese black bears (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) have an explicit reproductive cycle. The objective of this study was to clarify the variation of plasma testosterone, FSH, inhibin, LH levels and testicular gonadotropin receptor mRNA expression of male bears associated with their testicular activity. Notably, this study investigated peripheral FSH concentration and localization of gonadotropin receptor mRNAs for the first time in male bears. Blood and testicular tissue samples were taken from captive, mature, male Japanese black bears during testicular active, regressive and recrudescent phases. Plasma hormone concentrations were measured by immunoassays, and gonadotropin receptor mRNA expression in the testis was investigated by in situ hybridization technique and also by real-time PCR. There were significant variations in plasma testosterone and inhibin concentrations. Changes in FSH concentration preceded these hormones with a similar tendency. Hormones started to increase during denning, and achieved the highest values at the end of the recrudescent phase for FSH and in the active phase for testosterone and inhibin. These changes in hormone concentrations were accompanied by testicular growth. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that FSH and LH receptor mRNA was possibly expressed in Sertoli cells and Leydig cells, respectively, as they are in other mammals. However, neither plasma LH concentration nor testicular gonadotropin receptor mRNA expression level varied significantly among the sampling months. These results suggest that FSH, inhibin and testosterone have roles in testicular activity in male bears. This study provides important endocrine information for comprehending seasonal reproductivity in male Japanese black bears.

  16. Testicular cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - testes; Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer; Testicular neoplasm ... The exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. Factors that may ... Abnormal testicle development Exposure to certain chemicals ...

  17. Growth retardation and abnormal maternal behavior in mice lacking testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Loretta L.; Lee, Yi-Fen; Heinlein, Cynthia A.; Liu, Ning-Chun; Chen, Yei-Tsung; Shyr, Chih-Rong; Meshul, Charles K.; Uno, Hideo; Platt, Kenneth A.; Chang, Chawnshang

    2004-01-01

    Testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily for which a ligand has not yet been found. In vitro data obtained from various cell lines suggest that TR4 functions as a master regulator to modulate many signaling pathways, yet the in vivo physiological roles of TR4 remain unclear. Here, we report the generation of mice lacking TR4 by means of targeted gene disruption (TR4–/–). The number of TR4–/– pups generated by the mating of TR4+/– mice is well under that predicted by the normal Mendelian ratio, and TR4–/– mice demonstrate high rates of early postnatal mortality, as well as significant growth retardation. Additionally, TR4–/– females show defects in reproduction and maternal behavior, with pups of TR4–/– dams dying soon after birth with no indication of milk intake. These results provide in vivo evidence that TR4 plays important roles in growth, embryonic and early postnatal pup survival, female reproductive function, and maternal behavior. PMID:15477591

  18. Testicular development involves the spatiotemporal control of PDGFs and PDGF receptors gene expression and action

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) are growth-regulatory molecules that stimulate chemotaxis, proliferation and metabolism primarily of cells of mesenchymal origin. In this study, we found high levels of PDGFs and PDGFs receptors (PDGFRs) mRNAs, and specific immunostaining for the corresponding proteins in the rat testis. PDGFs and PDGFRs expression was shown to be developmentally regulated and tissue specific. Expression of PDGFs and PDGFRs genes was observed in whole testis RNA 2 d before birth, increased through postnatal day 5 and fell to low levels in adult. The predominant cell population expressing transcripts of the PDGFs and PDGFRs genes during prenatal and early postnatal periods were Sertoli cells and peritubular myoid cells (PMC) or their precursors, respectively, while in adult animals PDGFs and PDGFRs were confined in Leydig cells. We also found that early postnatal Sertoli cells produce PDGF-like substances and that this production is inhibited dose dependently by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). The expression of PDGFRs by PMC and of PDGFs by Sertoli cells corresponds in temporal sequence to the developmental period of PMC proliferation and migration from the interstitium to the peritubulum. Moreover, we observed that all the PDGF isoforms and the medium conditioned by early postnatal Sertoli cells show a strong chemotactic activity for PMC which is inhibited by anti-PDGF antibodies. These data indicate that, through the spatiotemporal pattern of PDGF ligands and receptors expression, PDGF may play a role in testicular development and homeostasis. PMID:7490286

  19. Melanocortin 4 Receptor Activation Protects Against Testicular Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Triggering the Cholinergic Antiinflammatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Minutoli, Letteria; Bitto, Alessandra; Irrera, Natasha; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Arena, Salvatore; Magno, Carlo; Marini, Herbert; Spaccapelo, Luca; Ottani, Alessandra; Giuliani, Daniela; Romeo, Carmelo; Guarini, Salvatore; Antonuccio, Pietro; Altavilla, Domenica

    2011-01-01

    Melanocortins (MC) trigger a vagus nerve-mediated cholinergic-antiinflammatory pathway projecting to the testis. We tested whether pharmacological activation of brain MC receptors might protect the testis from the damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion. Adult male rats were subjected to 1-h testicular ischemia, followed by 24-h reperfusion [testicular ischemia-reperfusion (TI/R)]. Before TI/R, groups of animals were subjected to bilateral cervical vagotomy, or pretreated with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist chlorisondamine or the selective MC4 receptor antagonist HS024. Immediately after reperfusion, rats were ip treated with saline or the MC analog [Nle4,D-Phe7]α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (NDP-α-MSH) (340 μg/kg). We evaluated testicular IL-6 and TNF-α by Western blot analysis and organ damage by light microscopy. Some experimental groups were prepared for neural efferent activity recording along the vagus nerve starting 30 min after treatment with NDP-α-MSH or saline, and for a 30-min period. Additional groups of TI/R rats were treated for 30 d with saline, NDP-α-MSH, chlorisondamine plus NDP-α-MSH, or HS024 plus NDP-α-MSH to evaluate spermatogenesis, organ damage, and the apoptosis machinery. After a 24-h reperfusion, in TI/R saline-treated rats, there was an increase in IL-6 and TNF-α expression and a marked damage in both testes. NDP-α-MSH inhibited IL-6 and TNF-α expression, decreased histological damage, and increased neural efferent activity. Furthermore, NDP-α-MSH administration for 30 d greatly improved spermatogenesis, reduced organ damage, and inhibited apoptosis. All positive NDP-α-MSH effects were abrogated by vagotomy, chlorisondamine, or HS024. Our data suggest that selective MC4 receptor agonists might be therapeutic candidates for the management of testicular torsion. PMID:21828180

  20. Melanocortin 4 receptor activation protects against testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury by triggering the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Bitto, Alessandra; Squadrito, Francesco; Irrera, Natasha; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Arena, Salvatore; Magno, Carlo; Marini, Herbert; Spaccapelo, Luca; Ottani, Alessandra; Giuliani, Daniela; Romeo, Carmelo; Guarini, Salvatore; Antonuccio, Pietro; Altavilla, Domenica

    2011-10-01

    Melanocortins (MC) trigger a vagus nerve-mediated cholinergic-antiinflammatory pathway projecting to the testis. We tested whether pharmacological activation of brain MC receptors might protect the testis from the damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion. Adult male rats were subjected to 1-h testicular ischemia, followed by 24-h reperfusion [testicular ischemia-reperfusion (TI/R)]. Before TI/R, groups of animals were subjected to bilateral cervical vagotomy, or pretreated with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist chlorisondamine or the selective MC(4) receptor antagonist HS024. Immediately after reperfusion, rats were ip treated with saline or the MC analog [Nle(4),D-Phe(7)]α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (NDP-α-MSH) (340 μg/kg). We evaluated testicular IL-6 and TNF-α by Western blot analysis and organ damage by light microscopy. Some experimental groups were prepared for neural efferent activity recording along the vagus nerve starting 30 min after treatment with NDP-α-MSH or saline, and for a 30-min period. Additional groups of TI/R rats were treated for 30 d with saline, NDP-α-MSH, chlorisondamine plus NDP-α-MSH, or HS024 plus NDP-α-MSH to evaluate spermatogenesis, organ damage, and the apoptosis machinery. After a 24-h reperfusion, in TI/R saline-treated rats, there was an increase in IL-6 and TNF-α expression and a marked damage in both testes. NDP-α-MSH inhibited IL-6 and TNF-α expression, decreased histological damage, and increased neural efferent activity. Furthermore, NDP-α-MSH administration for 30 d greatly improved spermatogenesis, reduced organ damage, and inhibited apoptosis. All positive NDP-α-MSH effects were abrogated by vagotomy, chlorisondamine, or HS024. Our data suggest that selective MC(4) receptor agonists might be therapeutic candidates for the management of testicular torsion.

  1. Liver X receptors interfere with the deleterious effect of diethylstilbestrol on testicular physiology.

    PubMed

    Oumeddour, Abdelkader; Viennois, Emilie; Caira, Françoise; Decourbey, Clélia; Maqdasy, Salwan; Tahraoui, Abdelkrim; Baron, Silvère; Volle, David H; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A

    2014-04-11

    Liver X receptors LXRα (NR1H3) and LXRβ (NR1H2) are transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, activated by specific oxysterols, oxidized derivatives of cholesterol. These receptors are involved in the regulation of testis physiology. Lxr-deficient mice pointed to the physiological roles of these nuclear receptors in steroid synthesis, lipid homeostasis and germ cell apoptosis and proliferation. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen considered as an endocrine disruptor that affects the functions of the testis. Various lines of evidences have made a clear link between estrogens, their nuclear receptors ERα (NR3A1) and ERβ (NR3A2), and Lxrα/β. As LXR activity could also be regulated by the nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP, NR0A2) and DES could act through SHP, we wondered whether LXR could be targeted by estrogen-like endocrine disruptors such as DES. For that purpose, wild-type and Lxr-deficient mice were daily treated with 0.75 μg DES from days 1 to 5 after birth. The effects of DES were investigated at 10 or 45 days of age. We demonstrated that DES induced a decrease of the body mass at 10 days only in the Lxr-deficient mice suggesting a protective effect of Lxr. We defined three categories of DES-target genes in testis: those whose accumulation is independent of Lxr; those whose accumulation is enhanced by the lack of both Lxrα/β; those whose accumulation is repressed by the absence of Lxrα/β. Lipid accumulation is also modified by neonatal DES injection. Lxr-deficient mice present different lipid profiles, demonstrating that DES could have its effects in part due to Lxrα/β. Altogether, our study shows that both nuclear receptors Lxrα and Lxrβ are not only basally important for testicular physiology but could also have a preventive effect against estrogen-like endocrine disruptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Liver X receptors interfere with the deleterious effect of diethylstilbestrol on testicular physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Oumeddour, Abdelkader; Viennois, Emilie; Caira, Françoise; Decourbey, Clélia; Maqdasy, Salwan; and others

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • Part of the neonatal effect of DES on testis needs the presence of Lxrα/β. • Some DES-induced pathways are blocked in Lxr-deficient mice. • Lxr-deficient mice analysis defines DES-target genes protected by Lxr. - Abstract: Liver X receptors LXRα (NR1H3) and LXRβ (NR1H2) are transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, activated by specific oxysterols, oxidized derivatives of cholesterol. These receptors are involved in the regulation of testis physiology. Lxr-deficient mice pointed to the physiological roles of these nuclear receptors in steroid synthesis, lipid homeostasis and germ cell apoptosis and proliferation. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen considered as an endocrine disruptor that affects the functions of the testis. Various lines of evidences have made a clear link between estrogens, their nuclear receptors ERα (NR3A1) and ERβ (NR3A2), and Lxrα/β. As LXR activity could also be regulated by the nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP, NR0A2) and DES could act through SHP, we wondered whether LXR could be targeted by estrogen-like endocrine disruptors such as DES. For that purpose, wild-type and Lxr-deficient mice were daily treated with 0.75 μg DES from days 1 to 5 after birth. The effects of DES were investigated at 10 or 45 days of age. We demonstrated that DES induced a decrease of the body mass at 10 days only in the Lxr-deficient mice suggesting a protective effect of Lxr. We defined three categories of DES-target genes in testis: those whose accumulation is independent of Lxr; those whose accumulation is enhanced by the lack of both Lxrα/β; those whose accumulation is repressed by the absence of Lxrα/β. Lipid accumulation is also modified by neonatal DES injection. Lxr-deficient mice present different lipid profiles, demonstrating that DES could have its effects in part due to Lxrα/β. Altogether, our study shows that both nuclear receptors Lxrα and Lxrβ are not only

  3. Altered mRNA Levels of Glucocorticoid Receptor, Mineralocorticoid Receptor, and Co-Chaperones (FKBP5 and PTGES3) in the Middle Frontal Gyrus of Autism Spectrum Disorder Subjects.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neil; Crider, Amanda; Pandya, Chirayu D; Ahmed, Anthony O; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2016-05-01

    Although stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), it is not known whether glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels are altered in the brain of subjects with ASD. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of GR isoforms (GRα, GRβ, GRγ, and GRP), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), GR co-chaperones (FKBP5, PTGES3, and BAG1), and inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) were examined in the postmortem middle frontal gyrus tissues of 13 ASD and 13 age-matched controls by qRT-PCR. The protein levels were examined by Western blotting. We found significant decreases in GRα (64%), GRγ (48%), GRP (20%) and MR (46%) mRNA levels in ASD subjects as compared to controls. However, significant increases in FKBP5 (42%) and PTGES3 (35%) mRNA levels were observed in ASD subjects. There were no differences in the mRNA levels of GRβ and BAG1 in ASD subjects as compared to controls. MR mRNA was found to be negatively correlated with the diagnostic score for abnormality of development. On the protein level, significant reductions in GR and MR, but no change in FKBP5 and PTGES3 were found in ASD subjects as compared to controls. Moreover, we observed significant increases in IL-1β and IFN-γ mRNA levels in ASD subjects, and these cytokines were negatively associated with GR levels. Our data, for the first time, reports dysregulation of GR, MR, FKBP5, and PTGES3 in ASD and suggest a possible role of inflammation in altered GR function in ASD.

  4. Human adipocytes secrete mineralocorticoid-releasing factors.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Lamounier-Zepter, V; Schraven, A; Langenbach, J; Willenberg, H S; Barthel, A; Hauner, H; McCann, S M; Scherbaum, W A; Bornstein, S R

    2003-11-25

    Obesity has become an epidemic problem in western societies, contributing to metabolic diseases, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Overweight and obesity are frequently associated with increased plasma levels of aldosterone. Recent evidence suggests that human fat is a highly active endocrine tissue. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that adipocyte secretory products directly stimulate adrenocortical aldosterone secretion. Secretory products from isolated human adipocytes strongly stimulated steroidogenesis in human adrenocortical cells (NCI-H295R) with a predominant effect on mineralocorticoid secretion. Aldosterone secretion increased 7-fold during 24 h of incubation. This stimulation was comparable to maximal stimulation of these cells with forskolin (2 x 10(-5) M). On the molecular level, there was a 10-fold increase in the expression of steroid acute regulatory peptide mRNA. This effect was independent of adipose angiotensin II as revealed by the stimulatory effect of fat cell-conditioned medium even in the presence of the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist, valsartan. None of the recently defined adipocytokines accounted for the effect. Mineralocorticoid-stimulating activity was heat sensitive and could be blunted by heating fat cell-conditioned medium to 99 degrees C. Centrifugal filtration based on molecular mass revealed at least two releasing factors: a heat sensitive fraction (molecular mass >50 kDa) representing 60% of total activity, and an inactive fraction (molecular mass <50 kDa). However, the recovery rate increased to 92% when combining these two fractions, indicating the interaction of at least two factors. In conclusion, human adipocytes secrete potent mineralocorticoid-releasing factors, suggesting a direct link between obesity and hypertension.

  5. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors in dispersed rat testicular interstitial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Poyet, P.; Labrie, F.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that beta-adrenergic agents stimulate steroidogenesis and cyclic AMP formation in mouse Leydig cells in culture. To obtain information about the possible presence and the characteristics of a beta-adrenergic receptor in rat testicular interstitial cells, the potent beta-adrenergic antagonist (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol (CYP) was used as ligand. Interstitial cells prepared by collagenase dispersion from rat testis were incubated with the ligand for 2 h at room temperature. (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol binds to a single class of high affinity sites at an apparent KD value of 15 pM. A number of sites of 6,600 sites/cell is measured when 0.1 microM (-) propranolol is used to determine non-specific binding. The order of potency of a series of agonists competing for (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol binding is consistent with the interaction of a beta 2-subtype receptor: zinterol greater than (-) isoproterenol greater than (-) epinephrine = salbutamol much greater than (-) norepinephrine. In addition, it was observed that the potency of a large series of specific beta 1 and beta 2 synthetic compounds for displacing (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol in rat interstitial cells is similar to the potency observed for these compounds in a typical beta 2-adrenergic tissue, the rat lung. For example, the potency of zinterol, a specific beta 2-adrenergic agonist, is 10 times higher in interstitial cells and lung than in rat heart, a typical beta 1-adrenergic tissue. Inversely, practolol, a typical beta 1-antagonist, is about 50 times more potent in rat heart than in interstitial cells and lung.

  6. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition: overview of the therapeutic use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and direct renin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Kelly; Smith, Holly; Biederman, Jason

    2014-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy in hypertensive diabetic patients with macroalbuminuria, microalbuminuria, or normoalbuminuria has been repeatedly shown to improve cardiovascular mortality and reduce the decline in glomerular filtration rate. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade in normotensive diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria or microalbuminuria cannot be advocated at present. Dual RAAS inhibition with ACE inhibitors plus ARBs or ACE inhibitors plus direct renin inhibitors has failed to improve cardiovascular or renal outcomes but has predisposed patients to serious adverse events.

  7. Testicular Exams

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens, surgery almost always repairs the hernia completely. Testicular Cancer Testicular cancer is unusual in teen guys, but it can happen. Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in guys aged ...

  8. Abnormal Cerebellar Cytoarchitecture and Impaired Inhibitory Signaling in Adult Mice Lacking Testicular Orphan Nuclear Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yei-Tsung; Collins, Loretta L.; Uno, Hideo; Chou, Samuel M.; Meshul, Charles K.; Chang, Shu-Shi; Chang, Chawnshang

    2007-01-01

    Since Testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) was cloned, its physiological functions remain largely unknown. In this study, the TR4 knockout (TR4−/−) mouse model was used to investigate the role of TR4 in the adult cerebellum. Behaviorally, these null mice exhibit unsteady gait, as well as involuntary postural and kinetic movements, indicating a disturbance of cerebellar function. In the TR4−/− brain, cerebellar restricted hypoplasia is severe and cerebellar vermal lobules VI and VII are underdeveloped, while no structural alterations in the cerebral cortex are observed. Histological analysis of the TR4−/− cerebellar cortex reveals reductions in granule cell density, as well as a decreased number of parallel fiber boutons that are enlarged in size. Further analyses reveal that the levels of GABA and GAD are decreased in both Purkinje cells and interneurons of the TR4−/− cerebellum, suggesting that the inhibitory circuits signaling within and from the cerebellum may be perturbed. In addition, in the TR4−/− cerebellum, immunoreactivity of GluR2/3 was reduced in Purkinje cells, but increased in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Together, these results suggest that the behavioral phenotype of TR4−/− mice may result from disrupted inhibitory pathways in the cerebellum. No progressive atrophy was observed at various adult stages in the TR4−/− brain, therefore the disturbances most likely originate from a failure to establish proper connections between principal neurons in the cerebellum during development. PMID:17706948

  9. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin is a novel mineralocorticoid target in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Latouche, Celine; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Messaoudi, Smail; Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurélie; Hernandez-Diaz, Ivan; Alvarez de la Rosa, Diego; Perret, Claudine; López Andrés, Natalia; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Farman, Nicolette; Jaisser, Frederic

    2012-05-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation may be deleterious to the cardiovascular system, and MR antagonists improve morbidity and mortality of patients with heart failure. However, mineralocorticoid signaling in the heart remains largely unknown. Using a pan-genomic transcriptomic analysis, we identified neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL or lipocalin 2) as a strongly induced gene in the heart of mice with conditional and targeted MR overexpression in cardiomyocytes (whereas induction was low in glucocorticoid receptor-overexpressing mice). NGAL mRNA levels were enhanced after hormonal stimulation by the MR ligand aldosterone in cultured cardiac cells and in the heart of wild-type mice. Mineralocorticoid pathological challenge induced by nephrectomy/aldosterone/salt treatment upregulated NGAL expression in the heart and aorta and its plasma levels. We show evidence for MR binding to an NGAL promoter, providing a mechanism for NGAL regulation. We propose that NGAL may be a marker of mineralocorticoid-dependent injury in the cardiovascular system in mice.

  10. Involvement of Fibroblast Growth Factors and Their Receptors in Epididymo-Testicular Descent and Maldescent

    PubMed Central

    Hadziselimovic, Faruk

    2016-01-01

    Maldescent of the epididymo-testicular unit can occur as an isolated event or as a component of various syndromes. When part of a syndrome, crypto-epididymis is usually accompanied by other genital and/or extragenital features. Epididymis development is primarily regulated by androgens, and successful epididymo-testicular unit development and descent requires an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The developing gonadotropin-releasing hormone system is essential for epididymo-testicular descent and is highly sensitive to reduced fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Our understanding of the impact of FGFR1 in the process of epididymo-testicular descent has recently improved. At later stages of embryonic development, the undifferentiated epididymal mesenchyme is a specific domain for FGFR1 expression. The majority of individuals with syndromic crypto-epididymis, as well as individuals with isolated maldescent of the epididymo-testicular unit, exhibit some disturbance of FGF, FGFR1 and/or genes involved in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis regulation. However, the mechanisms underlying FGF dysregulation may differ between various syndromes. PMID:27022326

  11. Cloning of partial cDNAs for the chicken glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors and characterization of mRNA levels in the anterior pituitary gland during chick embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Porter, Tom E; Ghavam, Sarvin; Muchow, Michael; Bossis, Ioannis; Ellestad, Laura

    2007-08-01

    Virtually nothing is known about glucocorticoid receptor (GR) or mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) gene expression in any avian species. Here we report the cloning of partial cDNAs for chicken GR and MR. These partial cDNAs were used as probes to characterize expression of GR and MR mRNA and to identify the full-length transcripts within the chicken genome. Chicken GR and MR sequences predicted from the genome sequence were compared with those of representatives of other vertebrate classes. GR and MR genes are located on chicken chromosomes 13 and 4, respectively. Northern blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results indicate that GR and MR are widely expressed in many tissues. Characterization of mRNA levels in the anterior pituitary gland during chick embryonic development by quantitative real time RT-PCR demonstrates decreased MR and increased GR gene expression between embryonic days 12 and 17. Plasma levels of corticosteroids increased during this same period. This is the first study of GR and MR gene expression in any avian species and the first analysis of changes in pituitary MR gene expression during embryonic development of any species.

  12. GnRH-agonist implantation of prepubertal male cats affects their reproductive performance and testicular LH receptor and FSH receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Mehl, N S; Khalid, M; Srisuwatanasagul, S; Swangchan-Uthai, T; Sirivaidyapong, S

    2016-03-15

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of GnRH-agonist implantation in prepubertal tomcats on sexual behavior, reproductive performance, and expression of testicular LH receptor (LHR) and FSH receptor (FSHR) and also to compare the testicular characteristics, LHR and FSHR expression between prepubertal and adult tomcats. In experiment 1, 3-month-old tomcats (n = 6/group) were either treated with or left without 4.7 mg deslorelin implants. Semen collection and evaluation were performed just before castration at 48 weeks after treatment; removed testes were analyzed for mRNA and protein expression of LHR and FSHR. We were able to collect semen from six non-treated cats, whereas in treated cats, semen was uncollectable. The results revealed that sexual behavior was absent in the implanted cats throughout the study period. Testicular volume was found to decrease from 30 weeks after treatment onward in the implanted cats compared to the controls (P < 0.05). Semen production was found only in non-implanted cats. Testicular tissue score, seminiferous tubule diameter, and LHR protein expression were found lower in the implanted cats (P < 0.05), but no differences were observed in mRNA expression of LHR and protein expression of FSHR between groups. The mRNA expression of FSHR was higher in the implanted (P < 0.05) compared to control cats. In experiment 2, testes from prepubertal (n = 6) and adult (n = 6) male cats were collected after castration and analyzed for mRNA and protein expression of LHR and FSHR. No differences were observed in the protein expression of LHR and FSHR between the two groups, whereas mRNA expression of FSHR was higher in prepubertal cats (P < 0.05). Testicular and epididymal weight, diameter of seminiferous tubules, and the testicular grade were higher in the adult compared to prepubertal cats (P < 0.05). In conclusion, deslorelin implants suppressed protein expression of LHR and enhanced mRNA expression of FSHR along with suppression

  13. The Organizational Role of Testicular Hormones and the Androgen Receptor in Anxiety-Related Behaviors and Sensorimotor Gating in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Cynthia L.; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to testosterone (T), which can act upon both the androgen receptor (AR) and, via aromatization of T into estrogens, upon estrogen receptors, organizes many adult behaviors in rodents. We compared behaviors in wild-type (WT) male rats and AR-deficient rats with the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm), which on the day of birth were either gonadectomized (Neo-Gdx) or sham operated. In adulthood, all rats were either gonadectomized or sham operated and implanted with T capsules to equilibrate circulating androgens. In each of four tests of behavior related to anxiety (open field, novel object exposure, light/dark box, and elevated plus maze), Neo-Gdx rats showed decreased indices of anxiety and increased activity compared with rats sham operated on the day of birth, with no differences between WT or Tfm males within treatment groups. These results indicate that testicular hormones act in development to increase adult indices of anxiety and decrease activity in males and that functional ARs are not required for this effect. Acoustic startle response was also reduced by Neo-Gdx, suggesting that postnatal testicular secretions potentiate this behavior as well. Adult corticosterone levels and sensorimotor gating, as measured by prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response, were increased by neonatal castration in both WT and Tfm rats. These findings indicate a role of T before adulthood in the organization of anxiety-related behaviors, activity, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and sensorimotor gating in rats, all of which appears to be AR independent. PMID:21325044

  14. Testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4 is associated with the radio-sensitivity of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shicheng; Wang, Mingchao; Ding, Xianfan; Xia, Liqun; Chen, Bide; Chen, Yicheng; Zhang, Zhigen; Niu, Yuanjie; Li, Gonghui; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that a significant number of prostate cancers (PCa) showed different extents of radio-resistance and the tumor may recur after treatment. Recent studies demonstrated that Testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) could play a critical role in anti-oxidative stress responses and might modulate the DNA damage repair. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of TR4 in the radiotherapy for PCa. The TR4 expression in tissue samples from PCa patients treated with brachytherapy was measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Cell survival test and colony formation assay were applied to test the radio-sensitivity of PCa cells with modulated TR4 gene expression upon irradiation. PCa patients with biochemical recurrence (BCR) after brachytherapy tend to have higher TR4 expression (80%, n = 30) as compared to those without BCR (36.67%, n = 30). Survival analysis demonstrated a significant higher BCR occurrence in patients with high level of TR4 expression (HR = 3.474, 95%CI 1.678-7.192, P = 0.0008). Multivariate analysis showed that the TR4 staining score on IHC was the only significant variable for predicting the PCa patients' clinical outcomes after radiotherapy (OR = 9.919, 95% CI 2.516-39.101, P = 0.001). Using cell survival test and colony forming assay, we found that the addition of functional TR4 in PC3 cells lead to elevated radio-resistance. In contrast, knocking-down TR4 in LNCaP cells resulted in increased radio-sensitivity. The γH2AX foci kinetic analysis suggested that knocking down TR4 might delay the PCa cell's DNA damage repair which would enhance the radio-sensitivity. TR4 could mediate the PCa cells' radio-sensitivity and might become a prognostic indicator for PCa patients received radiotherapy. This study provides a novel approach to manipulate radio-sensitivity of PCa cells, and may bring a promoted therapeutic outcome of radiotherapy to battle PCa in future. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Inhibition of testicular embryonal carcinoma cell tumorigenicity by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ- and retinoic acid receptor-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pei-Li; Chen, Li Ping; Dobrzański, Tomasz P; Phillips, Dylan A; Zhu, Bokai; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Gonzalez, Frank J; Peters, Jeffrey M

    2015-11-03

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) has important physiological functions in control of cell growth, lipid and glucose homeostasis, differentiation and inflammation. To investigate the role of PPARβ/δ in cancer, stable human testicular embryonal carcinoma cell lines were developed that constitutively express PPARβ/δ. Expression of PPARβ/δ caused enhanced activation of the receptor, and this significantly decreased proliferation, migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, and also reduced tumor mass and volume of ectopic xenografts derived from NT2/D1 cells compared to controls. The changes observed in xenografts were associated with decreased PPARβ/δ-dependent expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and octamer-binding transcription factor-3/4, suggesting suppressed tumor proliferation and induction of differentiation. Inhibition of migration and invasion was mediated by PPARβ/δ competing with formation of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) complex, resulting in attenuation of RARα-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and activity. These results demonstrate that PPARβ/δ mediates attenuation of human testicular embryonal carcinoma cell progression through a novel RAR-dependent mechanism and suggest that activation of PPARβ/δ inhibits RAR/RXR dimerization and represents a new therapeutic strategy.

  16. Should MRAs be at the front row in heart failure? A plea for the early use of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in medical therapy for heart failure based on clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Heggermont, Ward A; Goethals, Marc; Dierckx, Riet; Verstreken, Sofie; Bartunek, Jozef; Vanderheyden, Marc

    2016-11-01

    The brand new 2016 ESC guidelines for the treatment of acute and chronic heart failure continue to give a prominent place to mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in the treatment of chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). In the prevention of HF hospitalization and death, a class I, level of recommendation A, is given to MRAs for patients with HFrEF, who remain symptomatic despite treatment with an ACE-inhibitor and a beta-blocker and have an LVEF below 35 %. This recommendation is primarily based on two landmark trials, the RALES trial (for spironolactone) and the EMPHASIS-HF trial (for eplerenone). A crucial question is, however, why MRAs are advised only in "third place," i.e., after optimal up-titration of ACE-inhibitors and beta-blockers. We wonder whether MRAs could not or should not be given earlier in the treatment of HFrEF, namely before or together with the up-titration of ACE-inhibitors and beta-blockers. Several arguments to support this plea are described in this short paper.

  17. Syndromes that Mimic an Excess of Mineralocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Sabbadin, Chiara; Armanini, Decio

    2016-09-01

    Pseudohyperaldosteronism is characterized by a clinical picture of hyperaldosteronism with suppression of renin and aldosterone. It can be due to endogenous or exogenous substances that mimic the effector mechanisms of aldosterone, leading not only to alterations of electrolytes and hypertension, but also to an increased inflammatory reaction in several tissues. Enzymatic defects of adrenal steroidogenesis (deficiency of 17α-hydroxylase and 11β-hydroxylase), mutations of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and alterations of expression or saturation of 11-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Cushing's syndrome, excessive intake of licorice, grapefruits or carbenoxolone) are the main causes of pseudohyperaldosteronism. In these cases treatment with dexamethasone and/or MR-blockers is useful not only to normalize blood pressure and electrolytes, but also to prevent the deleterious effects of prolonged over-activation of MR in epithelial and non-epithelial tissues. Genetic alterations of the sodium channel (Liddle's syndrome) or of the sodium-chloride co-transporter (Gordon's syndrome) cause abnormal sodium and water reabsorption in the distal renal tubules and hypertension. Treatment with amiloride and thiazide diuretics can respectively reverse the clinical picture and the renin aldosterone system. Finally, many other more common situations can lead to an acquired pseudohyperaldosteronism, like the expansion of volume due to exaggerated water and/or sodium intake, and the use of drugs, as contraceptives, corticosteroids, β-adrenergic agonists and FANS. In conclusion, syndromes or situations that mimic aldosterone excess are not rare and an accurate personal and pharmacological history is mandatory for a correct diagnosis and avoiding unnecessary tests and mistreatments.

  18. Tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids mimic direct but not receptor-mediated inhibitory effects of estrogens and phytoestrogens on testicular endocrine function. Possible significance for Leydig cell insufficiency in alcohol addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Stammel, W.; Thomas, H. ); Staib, W.; Kuehn-Velten, W.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Possible effects of various tetrahydroisoquinolines (TIQs) on rat testicular endocrine function were tested in vitro in order to prove whether these compounds may be mediators of the development of Leydig cell insufficiency. TIQ effects on different levels of regulation of testis function were compared in vitro with estrogen effects, since both classes of compounds have structural similarities. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production by testicular Leydig cells was inhibited by tetrahydropapaveroline and isosalsoline, the IC{sub 50} values being comparable to those of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol, and the phytoestrogens, coumestrol and genistein; salsolinol and salsoline were less effective, and salsolidine was ineffective. None of these TIQs interacted significantly with testicular estrogen receptor as analyzed by estradiol displacement. However, tetrahydropapaveroline, isosalsoline and salsolinol competitively inhibited substrate binding to cytochrome P45OXVII, with similar efficiency as the estrogens did; salsoline and salsolidine were again much less effective.

  19. Effect of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists on Cardiac Structure and Function in Patients With Diastolic Dysfunction and Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ambarish; Garg, Sushil; Matulevicius, Susan A; Shah, Amil M; Garg, Jalaj; Drazner, Mark H; Amin, Alpesh; Berry, Jarett D; Marwick, Thomas H; Marso, Steven P; de Lemos, James A; Kumbhani, Dharam J

    2015-10-12

    There has been an increasing interest in use of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). However, a comprehensive evaluation of MRA effects on left ventricular (LV) structure and function in these patients is lacking. In this meta-analysis, we evaluated the effects of MRAs on LV structure and function among patients with diastolic dysfunction or HFPEF. Randomized, controlled clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of MRAs in patients with diastolic dysfunction or HFPEF were included. The primary outcome was change in E/e', a specific measure of diastolic function. Secondary outcomes included changes in other measures of diastolic function, LV structure, surrogate markers for myocardial fibrosis (carboxy-terminal peptide of procollagen type I [PICP] and amino-terminal peptide of pro-collagen type-II [PIIINP]), blood pressure, and exercise tolerance. In the pooled analysis, MRA use was associated with significant reduction in E/e' (weighted mean difference [WMD] [95% confidence interval {CI}]: -1.68 [-2.03 to -1.33]; P<0.0001) and deceleration time (WMD [95% CI]: -12.0 ms [-23.3 to -0.7]; P=0.04) as compared with control, suggesting and improvement in diastolic function. Furthermore, blood pressure and levels of PIIINP and PICP were also significantly reduced with MRA therapy with no significant change in LV mass or dimensions. MRA therapy in patients with asymptomatic diastolic dysfunction or HFPEF is associated with significant improvement in diastolic function and markers of cardiac fibrosis without a significant change in LV mass or dimensions. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. A frame-shift mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity in the testicular-feminized mouse.

    PubMed Central

    He, W W; Kumar, M V; Tindall, D J

    1991-01-01

    The testicular feminized (Tfm) mouse lacks completely androgen responsiveness; and therefore, is unique for studying the role of androgenic steroids in different biological processes. In order to understand the molecular basis of this mutation, 2.8 kilobases of cDNA encoding the Tfm mouse androgen receptor (AR) were amplified with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. No large deletion in the coding region of the Tfm mouse AR was detected. However, sequence analysis revealed a single base deletion in the coding region of the Tfm AR mRNA. This mutation, which is located in the amino-terminus domain of the receptor, is predicted to cause a frame-shift in translation resulting in a premature termination of AR synthesis at amino acid 412. In vitro translation studies of the recombinant wild type and Tfm AR's demonstrated that the Tfm AR cDNA failed to produce a full-length receptor. Furthermore, the Tfm AR was demonstrated to lack transcriptional activation capability by cotransfection experiments using the Tfm AR with a reporter plasmid of mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. These studies provide evidence of the molecular defect which causes androgen insensitivity in the Tfm mouse. Images PMID:2041777

  1. Bleomycin induced sensitivity to TRAIL/Apo-2L-mediated apoptosis in human seminomatous testicular cancer cells is correlated with upregulation of death receptors.

    PubMed

    Timur, Mujgan; Cort, Aysegul; Ozdemir, Evrim; Sarikcioglu, Sureyya Bilmen; Sanlioglu, Salih; Sanlioglu, Ahter Dilsad; Ozben, Tomris

    2015-01-01

    The most common solid tumor is testicular cancer among young men. Bleomycin is an antitumor antibiotic used for the therapy of testicular cancer. TRAIL is a proapoptotic cytokine that qualified as an apoptosis inducer in cancer cells. Killing cancer cells selectively via apoptosis induction is an encouraging therapeutic strategy in clinical settings. Combination of TRAIL with chemotherapeutics has been reported to enhance TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of different kinds of cancer cell lines. The molecular ground for sensitization of tumour cells to TRAIL by chemotherapeutics might involve upregulation of TRAIL-R1 (TR/1, DR4) and/or TRAIL-R2 (TR/2, DR5) receptors or activation of proapoptotic proteins including caspases. The curative potential of TRAIL to eradicate cancer cells selectively in testicular cancer has not been studied before. In this study, we investigated apoptotic effects of bleomycin, TRAIL, and their combined application in NTera-2 and NCCIT testicular cancer cell lines. We measured caspase 3 levels as an apoptosis indicator, and TRAIL receptor expressions using flow cytometry. Both NTera-2 and NCCIT cells were fairly resistant to TRAIL's apoptotic effect. Incubation of bleomycin alone caused a significant increase in caspase 3 activity in NCCIT. Combined incubation with bleomycin and TRAIL lead to elevated caspase 3 activity in Ntera-2. Exposure to 72 h of bleomycin increased TR/1, TR/2, and TR/3 cell-surface expressions in NTera-2. Elevation in TR/1 cell-surface expression was evident only at 24 h of bleomycin application in NCCIT. It can be concluded that TRAIL death receptor expressions in particular are increased in testicular cancer cells via bleomycin treatment, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis is initiated.

  2. Decreased expression of orexin 1 receptor in adult mice testes during alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus perturbs testicular steroidogenesis and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deepanshu; Sarkar, Debarshi; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2017-09-02

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) affects male reproductive system and causes infertility. The male reproductive health is largely dependent upon uptake and proper utilization of glucose by testicular cells. Results show involvement of orexin A (OXA) and its receptor (OX1R) in regulation of steroidogenesis and glucose homeostasis in adult mice testis. However, the role of OX1R in regulation of testicular functions during hyperglycemia has not been investigated so far. The present study, therefore, examined the role of OX1R in regulation of steroidogenesis and glucose homeostasis in testis of adult mice during alloxan-induced type 1 DM. A significant decrease was noted in body weight and testis weight in alloxan-treated mice compared to controls. The blood glucose level, however, was markedly increased in treated animals than in controls. Further, serum and intratesticular level of testosterone, activities of testicular steroidogenic enzymes, and expressions of various steroidogenic markers, OX1R, glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) and Wilms' tumor gene (WT1) were downregulated in treated mice. The level of glucose, activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and lactate concentration in the testes of diabetic mice were also decreased; a significant increase in the number of testicular apoptotic cells with concomitant increase in the expression of caspase-3 was noted in these mice. Furthermore, DM affected germ cell proliferation with decreased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Results thus suggest that type 1 DM impairs testicular steroidogenesis and glucose homeostasis through inhibition of OXA/OX1R signaling cascade due to decreased OX1R expression in adult mice, thereby affecting germ cell survival and their proliferation in the testis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Deficits in Motor Coordination with Aberrant Cerebellar Development in Mice Lacking Testicular Orphan Nuclear Receptor 4†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yei-Tsung; Collins, Loretta L.; Uno, Hideo; Chang, Chawnshang

    2005-01-01

    Since testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) was cloned, its physiological function has remained largely unknown. Throughout postnatal development, TR4-knockout (TR4−/−) mice exhibited behavioral deficits in motor coordination, suggesting impaired cerebellar function. Histological examination of the postnatal TR4−/− cerebellum revealed gross abnormalities in foliation; specifically, lobule VII in the anterior vermis was missing. Further analyses demonstrated that the laminations of the TR4−/− cerebellar cortex were changed, including reductions in the thickness of the molecular layer and the internal granule layer, as well as delayed disappearance of the external granule cell layer (EGL). These lamination irregularities may result from interference with granule cell proliferation within the EGL, delayed inward migration of postmitotic granule cells, and a higher incidence of apoptotis. In addition, abnormal development of Purkinje cells was observed in the postnatal TR4−/− cerebellum, as evidenced by aberrant dendritic arborization and reduced calbindin staining intensity. Expression of Pax-6, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), astrotactin (Astn), reelin, and Cdk-5, genes correlated with the morphological development of the cerebellum, is reduced in the developing TR4−/− cerebellum. Together, our findings suggest that TR4 is required for normal cerebellar development. PMID:15767677

  4. Estrogen related receptor is required for the testicular development and for the normal sperm axoneme/mitochondrial derivatives in Drosophila males

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Snigdha; Pandey, Anuj Kumar; Gupta, Snigdha; Kumar, Ajay; Khanna, Priyanka; shankar, Jai; Ravi Ram, Kristipati

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen related receptors (ERRs), categorized as orphan nuclear receptors, are critical for energy homeostasis and somatic development. However, significance of ERRs in the development of reproductive organs/organelles/cells remain poorly understood, albeit their homology to estrogen receptors. In this context, here, we show that knockdown of ERR in the testes leads to improperly developed testes with mis-regulation of genes (aly, mia, bruce, bam, bgcn, fzo and eya) involved in spermatogenesis, resulting in reduced male fertility. The observed testicular deformity is consistent with the down-regulation of SOX-E group of gene (SOX100B) in Drosophila. We also show dispersion/disintegration of fusomes (microtubule based structures associated with endoplasmic reticulum derived vesicle, interconnecting spermatocytes) in ERR knockdown testes. A few ERR knockdown testes go through spermatogenesis but have significantly fewer sperm. Moreover, flagella of these sperm are defective with abnormal axoneme and severely reduced mitochondrial derivatives, suggesting a possible role for ERR in mitochondrial biogenesis, analogous to mammalian ERRα. Interestingly, similar knockdown of remaining seventeen nuclear receptors did not yield a detectable reproductive or developmental defect in Drosophila. These findings add newer dimensions to the functions envisaged for ERR and provide the foundation for deciphering the relevance of orphan nuclear receptors in ciliopathies and testicular dysgenesis. PMID:28094344

  5. A switch in the mechanism of hypertension in the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Matthew A; Paterson, Janice M; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Wrobel, Nicola; Bellamy, Christopher O C; Brownstein, David G; Seckl, Jonathan R; Mullins, John J

    2008-01-01

    The syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess arises from nonfunctional mutations in 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11betaHSD2), an enzyme that inactivates cortisol and confers aldosterone specificity on the mineralocorticoid receptor. Loss of 11betaHSD2 permits glucocorticoids to activate the mineralocorticoid receptor, and the hypertension in the syndrome is presumed to arise from volume expansion secondary to renal sodium retention. An 11betaHSD2 null mouse was generated on an inbred C57BL/6J genetic background, allowing survival to adulthood. 11betaHSD2(-/-) mice had BP approximately 20 mmHg higher on average compared with wild-type mice but were volume contracted, not volume expanded as expected. Initially, impaired sodium excretion associated with increased activity of the epithelial sodium channel was observed. By 80 days of age, however, channel activity was abolished and 11betaHSD2(-/-) mice lost salt. Despite the natriuresis, hypertension remained but was not attributable to intrinsic vascular dysfunction. Instead, urinary catecholamine levels in 11betaHSD2(-/-) mice were double those in wild-type mice, and alpha1-adrenergic receptor blockade rescued the hypertensive phenotype, suggesting that vasoconstriction contributes to the sustained hypertension in this model. In summary, it is proposed that renal sodium retention remains a key event in apparent mineralocorticoid excess but that the accompanying hypertension changes from a renal to a vascular etiology over time.

  6. Mineralocorticoid deficiency in hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Tolstoy, Nikolai S.; Aized, Majid; McMonagle, Morgan P.; Holena, Daniel N.; Pascual, Jose L.; Sonnad, Seema S.; Sims, Carrie A.

    2013-01-01

    Background In the critically ill, mineralocorticoid deficiency (MD) is associated with greater disease severity, the development of acute renal insufficiency, and increased mortality. We hypothesized that severely injured trauma patients presenting with hemorrhagic shock would demonstrate a high degree of MD. We also hypothesized that MD in these patients would be associated with increased length of stay, hypotension, fluid requirements, and acute kidney injury (AKI). Materials and methods Thirty-two trauma patients in hemorrhagic shock on admission to the trauma bay (SBP <90 mm Hg × 2) were enrolled. Blood samples were obtained on ICU admission and 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours later. Plasma aldosterone (PA) and renin (PR) were assayed by radioimmunoassay. MD was defined as a ratio of PA/PR ≤2. Demographic data, injury severity score, ICU and hospital length of stay, fluid requirements, mean arterial pressure, serum sodium, hypotension, and risk for AKI were compared for patients with and without MD. Results At ICU admission, 48% of patients met criteria for MD. Patients with MD were significantly more likely to experience hypotension (MAP ≤60 mm Hg) during the study period. MD patients required significantly more units of blood in 48 h than non-MD patients (13 [7–22] versus 5 [2–7], P = 0.015) and had increased crystalloid requirements (18L [14–23] versus 9L [6–10], P < 0.001). MD patients were at higher risk for AKI according to RIFLE and AKIN criteria. Conclusions MD is a common entity in trauma patients presenting in hemorrhagic shock. Patients with MD required a more aggressive resuscitative effort, were more likely to experience hypotension, and had a higher risk of AKI than non-MD patients. Future studies are needed to fully understand the impact of MD following trauma and the potential role for hormonal replacement therapy. PMID:22683082

  7. Mineralocorticoid deficiency in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, Nikolai S; Aized, Majid; McMonagle, Morgan P; Holena, Daniel N; Pascual, Jose L; Sonnad, Seema S; Sims, Carrie A

    2013-04-01

    In the critically ill, mineralocorticoid deficiency (MD) is associated with greater disease severity, the development of acute renal insufficiency, and increased mortality. We hypothesized that severely injured trauma patients presenting with hemorrhagic shock would demonstrate a high degree of MD. We also hypothesized that MD in these patients would be associated with increased length of stay, hypotension, fluid requirements, and acute kidney injury (AKI). Thirty-two trauma patients in hemorrhagic shock on admission to the trauma bay (SBP <90 mm Hg × 2) were enrolled. Blood samples were obtained on ICU admission and 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours later. Plasma aldosterone (PA) and renin (PR) were assayed by radioimmunoassay. MD was defined as a ratio of PA/PR ≤2. Demographic data, injury severity score, ICU and hospital length of stay, fluid requirements, mean arterial pressure, serum sodium, hypotension, and risk for AKI were compared for patients with and without MD. At ICU admission, 48% of patients met criteria for MD. Patients with MD were significantly more likely to experience hypotension (MAP ≤60 mm Hg) during the study period. MD patients required significantly more units of blood in 48 h than non-MD patients (13 [7-22] versus 5 [2-7], P = 0.015) and had increased crystalloid requirements (18L [14-23] versus 9L [6-10], P < 0.001). MD patients were at higher risk for AKI according to RIFLE and AKIN criteria. MD is a common entity in trauma patients presenting in hemorrhagic shock. Patients with MD required a more aggressive resuscitative effort, were more likely to experience hypotension, and had a higher risk of AKI than non-MD patients. Future studies are needed to fully understand the impact of MD following trauma and the potential role for hormonal replacement therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Testicular failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood tests may show a low level of testosterone and high levels of prolactin, FSH , and LH . ... testes will be ordered. Testicular failure and low testosterone level may be hard to diagnose in older ...

  9. Testicular Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also, the location of the testicles makes them prime targets to be accidentally struck on the playing ... you might also feel nauseated for a short time. If it's a minor testicular injury, the pain ...

  10. Testicular Torsion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal of Urology. 2011;185:2469. Hittelman AB. Neonatal testicular torsion. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed ... 16, 2015. Snyder HM, et al. In utero/neonatal torsion: Observation versus prompt exploration. Journal of Urology. ...

  11. Testicular self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Screening - testicular cancer - self-exam; Testicular cancer - screening - self-exam ... A testicular self-exam is done to check for testicular cancer . Testicles have blood vessels and other structures that can make ...

  12. Covalent affinity labeling, radioautography, and immunocytochemistry localize the glucocorticoid receptor in rat testicular Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1989-12-01

    The presence and distribution of glucocorticoid receptors in the rat testis were examined by using 2 approaches: in vivo quantitative radioautography and immunocytochemistry. Radioautographic localization was made possible through the availability of a glucocorticoid receptor affinity label, dexamethasone 21-mesylate, which binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor, thereby preventing dissociation of the steroid-receptor complex. Adrenalectomized adult rats were injected with a tritiated (3H) form of this steroid into the testis and the tissue was processed for light-microscope radioautography. Silver grains were observed primarily over the Leydig cells of the interstitial space and to a lesser extent, over the cellular layers which make up the seminiferous epithelium, with no one cell type showing preferential labeling. To determine the specificity of the labeling, a 25- or 50-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone was injected simultaneously with the same dose of (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate. In these control experiments, a marked reduction in label intensity was noted over the Leydig as well as tubular cells. Endocytic macrophages of the interstitium were non-specifically labeled, indicating uptake of the ligand possibly by fluid-phase endocytosis. A quantitative analysis of the label confirmed the presence of statistically significant numbers of specific binding sites for glucocorticoids in both Leydig cells and the cellular layers of the seminiferous epithelium; 86% of the label was found over Leydig cells, and only 14% over the cells of the seminiferous epithelium. These binding data were confirmed by light-microscope immunocytochemistry using a monoclonal antibody to the glucocorticoid receptor.

  13. Mineralocorticoid excess, dietary sodium, and myocardial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brilla, C G; Weber, K T

    1992-12-01

    Unlike the non-renin-dependent hypertension associated with infrarenal aorta banding, an abnormal accumulation of fibrillar collagen occurs within the adventitia of intramural coronary arteries and neighboring interstitial space of the left and right ventricles in arterial hypertension associated with primary or secondary hyperaldosteronism. Based on these findings it was suggested that this interstitial and perivascular fibrosis was mediated by mineralocorticoid excess (i.e., elevated plasma aldosterone relative to dietary sodium) and not ventricular loading. To further address the importance of mineralocorticoid excess, we examined the fibrous tissue response after 8 weeks in the following uninephrectomized rat groups receiving a high-sodium diet: D-aldosterone (ALDO) infusion (0.75 micrograms/hr sc, n = 16); deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) administration (100 mg/kg/wk sc, n = 8); and administration of a mineralocorticoid-like substance, glycyrrhizic acid (GA; 1 gm kg/wk sc, n = 8). Compared with ALDO infusion and sodium deprivation (n = 9), untreated controls (n = 14), and uninephrectomized rats with high dietary sodium and no mineralocorticoid administration (n = 15), we found (1) hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy with all forms of mineralocorticoid excess; (2) a rise in collagen volume fraction with ALDO, and an increase in perivascular collagen with DOCA; and (3) no observance of myocardial fibrosis with GA or experimental controls, including ALDO infusion and sodium deprivation. Thus, in the presence of enhanced sodium intake, chronic administration of ALDO or DOCA are associated with collagen accumulation in the myocardium, whereas with the mineralocorticoid-like compound GA, myocardial fibrosis was not seen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Ringdahl, Erika; Teague, Lynn

    2006-11-15

    Each year, testicular torsion affects one in 4,000 males younger than 25 years. Early diagnosis and definitive management are the keys to avoid testicular loss. All prepubertal and young adult males with acute scrotal pain should be considered to have testicular torsion until proven otherwise. The finding of an ipsilateral absent cremasteric reflex is the most accurate sign of testicular torsion. Torsion of the appendix testis is more common in children than testicular torsion and may be diagnosed by the "blue dot sign" (i.e., tender nodule with blue discoloration on the upper pole of the testis). Epididymitis/orchitis is much less common in the prepubertal male, and the diagnosis should be made with caution in this age group. Doppler ultrasonography may be needed for definitive diagnosis; radionuclide scintigraphy is an alternative that may be more accurate but should be ordered only if it can be performed without delay. Diagnosis of testicular torsion is based on the finding of decreased or absent blood flow on the ipsilateral side. Treatment involves rapid restoration of blood flow to the affected testis. The optimal time frame is less than six hours after the onset of symptoms. Manual detorsion by external rotation of the testis can be successful, but restoration of blood flow must be confirmed following the maneuver. Surgical exploration provides definitive treatment for the affected testis by orchiopexy and allows for prophylactic orchiopexy of the contralateral testis. Surgical treatment of torsion of the appendix testis is not mandatory but hastens recovery.

  15. Effect of neonatal or adult heat acclimation on plasma fT3 level, testicular thyroid receptors expression in male rats and testicular steroidogenesis in vitro in response to triiodothyronine treatment.

    PubMed

    Kurowicka, B; Chrusciel, M; Zmijewska, A; Kotwica, G

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of heat acclimation of neonatal and adult rats on their testes response to in vitro treatment with triiodothyronine (T3). Four groups of rats were housed from birth as: 1) control (CR) at 20°C for 90 days, 2) neonatal heat-acclimated (NHA) at 34°C for 90 days, 3) adult heat-acclimated (AHA) at 20°C for 45 days followed by 45 days at 34°C and 4) de-acclimated (DA) at 34°C for 45 days followed by 45 days at 20°C. Blood plasma and both testes were harvested from 90-day old rats. Testicular slices were then submitted to in vitro treatment with T3 (100 ng/ml) for 8 h. Plasma fT3 level was lower in AHA, NHA and DA groups than in CR group. Basal thyroid hormone receptor α1 (Thra1) expression was higher in testes of NHA and DA and β1 receptor (Thrb1) in DA rats vs. other groups. In the in vitro experiment, T3: 1) decreased Thra1 expression in all groups and Thrb1 in DA group, 2) increased Star expression in CR, NHA and DA groups, and Hsd17b3 expression in NHA group, 3) decreased the expression of Cyp11a1 in NHA and DA groups, and Cyp19a1 in all the groups, 4) did not affect the activity of steroidogenic enzymes and steroid secretion (A4, T, E2) in all the groups. These results indicate, that heat acclimation of rats, depending on their age, mainly affects the testicular expression of steroidogenic enzymes in response to short-lasting treatment with T3.

  16. Reduced Risk of Hyperkalemia During Treatment of Heart Failure With Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists by Use of Sacubitril/Valsartan Compared With Enalapril: A Secondary Analysis of the PARADIGM-HF Trial.

    PubMed

    Desai, Akshay S; Vardeny, Orly; Claggett, Brian; McMurray, John J V; Packer, Milton; Swedberg, Karl; Rouleau, Jean L; Zile, Michael R; Lefkowitz, Martin; Shi, Victor; Solomon, Scott D

    2017-01-01

    Consensus guidelines recommend the use of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) for selected patients with symptomatic heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) to reduce morbidity and mortality; however, the use of MRAs in combination with other inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system increases the risk of hyperkalemia. To determine whether the risk of hyperkalemia associated with use of MRAs for patients with HFrEF is reduced by sacubitril/valsartan in comparison with enalapril. The PARADIGM-HF (Prospective Comparison of ARNI With an ACE-Inhibitor to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure) trial randomly assigned 8399 patients with chronic HF, New York Heart Association class II to IV symptoms, and a left ventricular EF of 40% or less to treatment with enalapril 10 mg twice daily or sacubitril/valsartan 97/103 mg twice daily (previously known as LCZ696 [200 mg twice daily]) in addition to guideline-directed medical therapy. Use of MRAs was encouraged but left to the discretion of study investigators. Serum potassium level was measured at every study visit. The incidence of hyperkalemia (potassium level >5.5 mEq/L) and severe hyperkalemia (potassium level >6.0 mEq/L) among patients treated or not treated with an MRA at baseline and the risk of subsequent hyperkalemia for those newly treated with an MRA during study follow-up were defined in time-updated Cox proportional hazards models. Analyses were conducted between August 1 and October 15, 2016. Incident hyperkalemia and severe hyperkalemia. In comparison with the 3728 patients (44.4% of enrolled participants [21.6% female]) not taking an MRA at baseline, the 4671 patients (55.6% [22.0% female]) taking an MRA tended to be younger, with a lower EF, lower systolic blood pressure, and more advanced HF symptoms. Among those taking an MRA at baseline, the overall rates of hyperkalemia were similar between treatment groups, but severe hyperkalemia was more

  17. Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treating Testicular Cancer Surgery for Testicular Cancer Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer High-Dose Chemotherapy and ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  18. Apparent mineralocorticoid excess: time of manifestation and complications despite treatment.

    PubMed

    Knops, Noël B B; Monnens, Leo A; Lenders, Jacques W; Levtchenko, Elena N

    2011-06-01

    Here we describe the case of a patient followed from birth because of a positive family history for apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) in an older brother. The patient, a girl, had normal serum electrolyte and blood pressure measurements in the first months after birth. Not until the age of 11 months did she develop anorexia and failure to thrive in combination with hypertension, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis, which are consistent with the diagnosis of AME. This diagnosis was confirmed by mutation analysis of the HSD11B2 gene (C1228T). Treatment with amiloride and furosemide electrolyte disturbances normalized her blood pressure. At the age of 19 years she unexpectedly suffered a stroke. Additional investigations revealed no accepted risk factor for stroke. We discuss the possible underlying mechanisms for the delayed manifestation of hypertension and electrolyte disturbances in AME, propose an additional explanation for the stroke in this patient, and advise treatment with a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to reduce stroke risk in patients with AME.

  19. Testicular Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... boys should wear athletic supporters when they play sports. You should examine your testicles monthly and seek medical attention for lumps, redness, pain or other changes. Testicles can get inflamed or infected. They can also develop cancer. Testicular cancer is rare and highly treatable. It ...

  20. Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin behind the penis. You can get cancer in one or both testicles. Testicular cancer mainly affects young men between the ages of ... undescended testicle Have a family history of the cancer Symptoms include pain, swelling, or lumps in your ...

  1. Synergistic effect of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor expression: an explanation of cell sloughing during testicular inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Lui, Wing-Yee

    2014-03-01

    Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a junction molecule that expresses on Sertoli and germ cells. It mediates Sertoli-germ cell adhesion and facilitates migration of preleptotene/leptotene spermatocytes across the blood-testis barrier, suggesting that CAR-based cell adhesion and migration are crucial for spermatogenesis. Interferon-gamma (IFNG) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) are two major cytokines that are elevated during testicular inflammation and cause reduced fertility. We investigated the mechanism by which IFNG and TNF exert their disruptive effects on testicular cell adhesion. We have demonstrated that combined treatment with IFNG and TNF (IFNG+TNF) exerts a synergistic effect by downregulating CAR mRNA and protein levels. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that IFNG+TNF treatment effectively removes CAR from the site of cell-cell contact. Using inhibitor and co-immunoprecipitation, we confirmed that IFNG+TNF mediates CAR protein degradation via ubiquitin-proteasome and NFKB pathways. Blockage of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway significantly inhibits CAR degradation, as indicated by the reappearance of CAR at the site of cell-cell contact. Additionally, IFNG+TNF reduces CAR mRNA via transcriptional regulation. Mutational studies have shown that IFNG+TNF-induced CAR repression is achieved by suppression of the basal transcription. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further confirmed that IFNG+TNF treament not only inhibits binding of the basal transcription factors but also promotes binding of NFKB subunits and Sp1 (negative regulators) to the CAR promoter region. Taken together, IFNG+TNF treatment significantly downregulates CAR expression, which provides an explanation of how cell sloughing in the epithelium mediates, by loss of CAR-based cell adhesion, during testicular inflammation.

  2. Recovery effect of pre-germinated brown rice on the alteration of sperm quality, testicular structure and androgen receptor expression in rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Roboon, J; Nudmamud-Thanoi, S; Thanoi, S

    2017-02-01

    Depression and antidepressant drugs induce adverse effects in male reproduction. Therefore, it is important to investigate alternative treatment for depression without adverse effects on the male reproductive system. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR) on sperm quality, testicular structure and androgen receptor (AR) expression in rat model of depression. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into five groups including control (distilled water only), depression induced by forced swimming test (FST), FST + fluoxetine (antidepressant drug), FST + GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) (standard) and FST + PGBR. When compared with the control, sperm motility showed a significant decrease in FST + fluoxetine group. Sperm morphology also decreased significantly in depression and FST + fluoxetine groups. The morphological changes of seminiferous tubules showed significant increases in depression and FST + fluoxetine groups, while AR expression showed significant decreases in depression, FST + fluoxetine and FST + GABA groups. Interestingly, there were no significant differences in all sperm quality parameters, testicular structure and AR expression in FST + PGBR group. These findings reflect the recovery effects of PGBR treatment on sperm quality, morphological changes of seminiferous tubules and AR expression in stress-induced rats. Therefore, PGBR may potentially develop for the treatment for depression without adverse effect on male reproduction.

  3. Discovery of (3S,3aR)-2-(3-chloro-4-cyanophenyl)-3-cyclopentyl-3,3a,4,5-tetrahydro-2H-benzo[g]indazole-7-carboxylic acid (PF-3882845), an orally efficacious mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist for hypertension and nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Marvin J; Arhancet, Graciela B; Hockerman, Susan L; Chen, Xiangyang; Long, Scott A; Mahoney, Matthew W; Rico, Joseph R; Garland, Danny J; Blinn, James R; Collins, Joe T; Yang, Shengtian; Huang, Horng-Chih; McGee, Kevin F; Wendling, Jay M; Dietz, Jessica D; Payne, Maria A; Homer, Bruce L; Heron, Marcia I; Reitz, David B; Hu, Xiao

    2010-08-26

    We have discovered a novel class of nonsteroidal pyrazoline antagonists of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) that show excellent potency and selectivity against other nuclear receptors. Early analogues were poorly soluble and had a propensity to inhibit the hERG channel. Remarkably, both of these challenges were overcome by incorporation of a single carboxylate moiety. Structural modification of carboxylate-containing lead R-4g with a wide range of substituents at each position of the pyrazoline ring resulted in R-12o, which shows excellent activity against MR and reasonable pharmacokinetic profile. Introduction of conformational restriction led to a novel series characterized by exquisite potency and favorable steroid receptor selectivity and pharmacokinetic profile. Oral dosing of 3S,3aR-27d (PF-3882845) in the Dahl salt sensitive preclinical model of salt-induced hypertension and nephropathy showed blood pressure attenuation significantly greater than that with eplerenone, reduction in urinary albumin, and renal protection. As a result of these findings, 3S,3aR-27d was advanced to clinical studies.

  4. Testicular defense systems: immune privilege and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shutao; Zhu, Weiwei; Xue, Shepu; Han, Daishu

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian testis possesses a special immunological environment because of its properties of remarkable immune privilege and effective local innate immunity. Testicular immune privilege protects immunogenic germ cells from systemic immune attack, and local innate immunity is important in preventing testicular microbial infections. The breakdown of local testicular immune homeostasis may lead to orchitis, an etiological factor of male infertility. The mechanisms underlying testicular immune privilege have been investigated for a long time. Increasing evidence shows that both a local immunosuppressive milieu and systemic immune tolerance are involved in maintaining testicular immune privilege status. The mechanisms underlying testicular innate immunity are emerging based on the investigation of the pattern recognition receptor-mediated innate immune response in testicular cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of testicular defense mechanisms and identifies topics that merit further investigation.

  5. Vasopressin potentiates mineralocorticoid selectivity by stimulating 11 beta hydroxysteroid deshydrogenase in rat collecting duct.

    PubMed Central

    Alfaidy, N; Blot-Chabaud, M; Bonvalet, J P; Farman, N

    1997-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and corticosteroid hormones are involved in sodium reabsorption regulation in the renal collecting duct. Synergy between AVP and aldosterone has been well documented, although its mechanism remains unclear. Both aldosterone and glucocorticoid hormones bind to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and mineralocorticoid selectivity depends on the MR-protecting enzyme 11 beta hydroxysteroid deshydrogenase (11-HSD), which metabolizes glucocorticoids into derivatives with low affinity for MR. We have investigated whether the activity of 11-HSD could be influenced by AVP and corticosteroid hormones. This study shows that in isolated rat renal collecting ducts, AVP increases 11-HSD catalytic activity. This effect is maximal at 10(-8) M AVP (a concentration clearly above the normal physiological range of AVP concentrations) and involves the V2 receptor pathway, while activation of protein kinase C or changes in intracellular calcium are ineffective. The stimulatory effect of AVP on 11-HSD is largely reduced after adrenalectomy, and is selectively restored by infusion of aldosterone, not glucocorticoids. We conclude that this synergy between AVP and aldosterone in controlling the activity of 11-HSD is likely to play a pivotal role in resetting mineralocorticoid selectivity, and hence sodium reabsorption capacities of the renal collecting duct. PMID:9366557

  6. Testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Peckham, M

    1988-01-01

    Testicular cancer, which predominantly occurs in young men, has become increasingly common; it is presently the most common malignancy in men aged 20-34. Despite a lack of knowledge of aetiology, empirical advances, particularly in the management of patients with advanced disease, have been dramatic. Prior to the development of effective chemotherapy in the 1970s, less than 10% of men with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours were cured; nowadays approximately 90% of patients are potentially curable. The introduction of effective chemotherapy has led to a reappraisal of surgery and radiotherapy in the management of early stage disease and the introduction of a policy of surveillance in patients without evidence of metastases at the time of removal of the primary tumour. Following chemotherapy, surgery is required in approximately 25% of patients with advanced disease to excise residual masses, which in one-fifth of cases will show evidence of residual malignancy. In a proportion of patients, testicular cancer develops on a background of long-standing infertility, whereas in many men there is temporary oligospermia, despite a previous history of fertility. The majority of patients with prior evidence of spermatogenesis recover this function following chemotherapy and there is no evidence that children fathered by such patients have an increased risk of malformation. Despite physician optimism and excellent prospects for cure, significant psycho-social morbidity is associated with the diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer. Factors contributing to this are being identified and will lead, hopefully, to the minimisation of such problems by appropriate intervention.

  7. Visceral adipose tissue: emerging role of gluco- and mineralocorticoid hormones in the setting of cardiometabolic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Boscaro, Marco; Giacchetti, Gilberta; Ronconi, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical and experimental lines of evidence have highlighted the detrimental effects of visceral adipose tissue excess on cardiometabolic parameters. Besides, recent findings have shown the effects of gluco-and mineralocorticoid hormones on adipose tissue and have also underscored the interplay existing between such adrenal steroids and their respective receptors in the modulation of adipose tissue biology. While the fundamental role played by glucocorticoids on adipocyte differentiation and storage was already well known, the relevance of the mineralocorticoids in the physiology of the adipose organ is of recent acquisition. The local and systemic renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) acting on adipose tissue seems to contribute to the development of the cardiometabolic phenotype so that its modulation can have deep impact on human health. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of the adipose organ is of crucial importance in order to identify possible therapeutic approaches that can avoid the development of such cardiovascular and metabolic sequelae. PMID:22804097

  8. [Segmental testicular infarction].

    PubMed

    Ripa Saldías, L; Guarch Troyas, R; Hualde Alfaro, A; de Pablo Cárdenas, A; Ruiz Ramo, M; Pinós Paul, M

    2006-02-01

    We report the case of a 47 years old man previously diagnosed of left hidrocele. After having a recent mild left testicular pain, an ultrasonografic study revealed a solid hipoecoic testicular lesion rounded by a big hidrocele, suggesting a testicular neoplasm. Radical inguinal orchiectomy was made and pathologic study showed segmental testicular infarction. No malignancy was found. We review the literature of the topic.

  9. Mineralocorticoid-induced sodium appetite and renal salt retention: Evidence for common signaling and effector mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yiling; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    An increase in renal sodium chloride (salt) retention and an increase in sodium appetite is the body's response to salt restriction or depletion in order to restore salt balance. Renal salt retention and increased sodium appetite can also be maladaptive and sustain the pathophysiology in conditions like salt-sensitive hypertension and chronic heart failure. Here we review the central role of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone in both the increase in renal salt reabsorption and sodium appetite. We discuss the working hypothesis that aldosterone activates similar signaling and effector mechanisms in the kidney and brain, including the mineralocorticoid receptor, the serum-and-glucocorticoid-induced kinase SGK1, the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, and the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. The latter also mediates the gustatory salt sensing in the tongue, which is required for the manifestation of increased salt intake. Effects of aldosterone on both brain and kidney synergize with the effects of angiotensin II. Thus, mineralocorticoids appear to induce similar molecular pathways in the kidney, brain, and possibly tongue, which could provide opportunities for more effective therapeutic interventions. Inhibition of renal salt reabsorption is compensated by stimulation of salt appetite and vice versa; targeting both mechanisms should be more effective. Inhibiting the arousal to consume salty food may improve a patient's compliance to reducing salt intake. While a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms is needed and will provide new options, current pharmacological interventions that target both salt retention and sodium appetite include mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and potentially inhibitors of angiotensin II and ENaC. PMID:25376899

  10. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of mineralocorticoid disorders.

    PubMed

    Magill, Steven B

    2014-07-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is a major regulator of blood pressure control, fluid, and electrolyte balance in humans. Chronic activation of mineralocorticoid production leads to dysregulation of the cardiovascular system and to hypertension. The key mineralocorticoid is aldosterone. Hyperaldosteronism causes sodium and fluid retention in the kidney. Combined with the actions of angiotensin II, chronic elevation in aldosterone leads to detrimental effects in the vasculature, heart, and brain. The adverse effects of excess aldosterone are heavily dependent on increased dietary salt intake as has been demonstrated in animal models and in humans. Hypertension develops due to complex genetic influences combined with environmental factors. In the last two decades, primary aldosteronism has been found to occur in 5% to 13% of subjects with hypertension. In addition, patients with hyperaldosteronism have more end organ manifestations such as left ventricular hypertrophy and have significant cardiovascular complications including higher rates of heart failure and atrial fibrillation compared to similarly matched patients with essential hypertension. The pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of primary aldosteronism will be extensively reviewed. There are many pitfalls in the diagnosis and confirmation of the disorder that will be discussed. Other rare forms of hyper- and hypo-aldosteronism and unusual disorders of hypertension will also be reviewed in this article.

  11. Activation of adenosine A2A receptors by polydeoxyribonucleotide increases vascular endothelial growth factor and protects against testicular damage induced by experimental varicocele in rats.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Arena, Salvatore; Bonvissuto, Giulio; Bitto, Alessandra; Polito, Francesca; Irrera, Natasha; Arena, Francesco; Fragalà, Eugenia; Romeo, Carmelo; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Fazzari, Carmine; Marini, Herbert; Implatini, Alessandra; Grimaldi, Silvia; Cantone, Noemi; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Morgia, Giuseppe

    2011-03-15

    In rat experimental varicocele, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production, thereby enhancing testicular function. This may point to a new therapeutic approach in human varicocele.

  12. Control of Middle Ear Inflammatory and Ion Homeostasis Genes by Transtympanic Glucocorticoid and Mineralocorticoid Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Lighthall, Jessyka G.; Kempton, J. Beth; Hausman, Frances; MacArthur, Carol J.; Trune, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Transtympanic steroid treatment will induce changes in ion homeostasis and inflammatory gene expression to decrease middle ear inflammation due to bacterial inoculation. Background Otitis media is common, but treatment options are limited to systemic antibiotic therapy or surgical intervention. Systemic glucocorticoid treatment of mice decreases inflammation and improves fluid clearance. However, transtympanic delivery of glucocorticoids or mineralocorticoid has not been explored to determine if direct steroid application is beneficial. Methods Balb/c mice received transtympanic inoculation of heat-killed Haemophilus influenzae (H flu), followed by transtympanic treatment with either prednisolone or aldosterone. Mice given PBS instead of steroid and untreated mice were used as controls. Four hours after steroid treatment, middle ears were harvested for mRNA extraction and 24 hours after inoculation middle ears were harvested and examined for measures of inflammation. Results H flu inoculation caused the increased expression of nearly all inflammatory cytokine genes and induced changes in expression of several genes related to cellular junctions and transport channels. Both steroids generally reversed the expression of inflammatory genes and caused ion and water regulatory genes to return to normal or near normal levels. Histologic evaluation of middle ears showed improved fluid and inflammatory cell clearance. Conclusion Improvement in middle ear inflammation was noted with both the glucocorticoid prednisolone and the mineralocorticoid aldosterone. This was due to reversal of inflammation-induced changes in middle ear cytokine genes, as well as those involved in ion and water homeostasis. Because glucocorticoids bind to the mineralocorticoid receptor, but not the reverse, it is concluded that much of the reduction of fluid and other inflammation measures was due to these steroids impact on ion and water transport channels. Further research is necessary

  13. Testicular receptor 2, Nr2c1, is associated with stem cells in the developing olfactory epithelium and other cranial sensory and skeletal structures.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jennifer L; Wood, Bernard; Karpinski, Beverly A; LaMantia, Anthony-S; Maynard, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomic analysis of the nuclear receptor family suggests that the testicular receptor 2, Nr2c1, undergoes positive selection in the human-chimpanzee clade based upon a significant increase in nonsynonymous compared to synonymous substitutions. Previous in situ analyses of Nr2c1 lacked the temporal range and spatial resolution necessary to characterize cellular expression of this gene from early to mid gestation, when many nuclear receptors are key regulators of tissue specific stem or progenitor cells. Thus, we asked whether Nr2c1 protein is associated with stem cell populations in the mid-gestation mouse embryo. Nr2c1 is robustly expressed in the developing olfactory epithelium. Its expression in the olfactory epithelium shifts from multiple progenitor classes at early stages to primarily transit amplifying cells later in olfactory epithelium development. In the early developing central nervous system, Nr2c1 is limited to the anterior telencephalon/olfactory bulb anlagen, coincident with Nestin-positive neuroepithelial stem cells. Nr2c1 is also seen in additional cranial sensory specializations including cells surrounding the mystacial vibrissae, the retinal pigment epithelium and Scarpa's ganglion. Nr2c1 was also detected in a subset of mesenchymal cells in developing teeth and cranial bones. The timing and distribution of embryonic expression suggests that Nr2c1 is primarily associated with the early genesis of mammalian cranial sensory neurons and craniofacial skeletal structures. Thus, Nr2c1 may be a candidate for mediating parallel adaptive changes in cranial neural sensory specializations such as the olfactory epithelium, retina and mystacial vibrissae and in non-neural craniofacial features including teeth.

  14. Systemic Mineralocorticoid Antagonists in the Treatment of Central Serous Chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Eliott, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) is a challenging disease characterized by subretinal serous fluid accumulation. The complex pathogenesis is still not fully understood, but is thought to be multifactorial and involves exogenous and endogenous factors affecting the choroid and retinal pigment epithelium. The involvement of corticosteroids is undisputed, while the contribution of mineralocorticoid pathways is under investigation. This review addresses the proposed pathogenesis models and the evidence for systemic treatment of CSCR with mineralocorticoid antagonists.

  15. Testicular Sonogram

    PubMed Central

    Devkota, Jagadishwar; White, Sherry

    1980-01-01

    Precise localization, detection, and recognition of minor changes in testicular lesions are important because teratocarcinoma is notorious for manifesting as secondaries at the time the primary site is obvious to the clinician. In the past, questionable enlargement of the testis due to significant pathology required numerous radiographic invasive special procedures to provide a correct diagnosis. Due to the advent of the sophisticated digital ultrasound imager with high frequency quarter wave transducer, it is possible to detect minor changes in the tissue character of the testis, thus enabling the physician to tackle primary neoplasms prior to distant spread. In our case we were able to detect the abnormality in the testis, but unfortunately a large secondary abnormal mass was present. Even at that stage we were able to map out the extent of the lesion which was beneficial to the surgeon and the patient. Ultrasound studies were utilized in serial follow-up studies. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7401191

  16. Male rats with the testicular feminization mutation of the androgen receptor display elevated anxiety-related behavior and corticosterone response to mild stress

    PubMed Central

    Zuloaga, Damian G.; Poort, Jessica E.; Jordan, Cynthia L.; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone influences the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, anxiety-related behavior, and sensorimotor gating in rodents, but little is known about the role of the androgen receptor (AR) in mediating these influences. We compared levels of the stress hormone corticosterone at baseline and following exposure to a novel object in an open field in wild type (wt) male and female rats, and male rats with the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) of the AR, which disables its function. Basal corticosterone was equivalent in all groups, but exposure to a novel object in an open field elicited a greater increase in corticosterone in Tfm males and wt females than in wt males. Tfm males also showed increased behavioral indices of anxiety compared to wt males and females in the test. Analysis of the immediate early gene c-Fos expression after exposure to a novel object revealed greater activation in Tfm males than wt males in some regions (medial preoptic area) and lesser activation in others (dentate gyrus, posterodorsal medial amygdala). No differences were found in a measure of sensorimotor gating (prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response), although Tfm males had an increased acoustic startle response compared to wt males and females. These findings demonstrate that ARs play a role in regulating anxiety-related behaviors, as well as corticosterone responses and neural activation following exposure to a mild stressor in rats. PMID:21801726

  17. Pediatric Testicular Torsion.

    PubMed

    Bowlin, Paul R; Gatti, John M; Murphy, J Patrick

    2017-02-01

    The pediatric patient presenting with acute scrotal pain requires prompt evaluation and management given the likelihood of testicular torsion as the underlying cause. Although other diagnoses can present with acute testicular pain, it is important to recognize the possibility of testicular torsion because the best chance of testicular preservation occurs with expeditious management. When testicular torsion is suspected, prompt surgical exploration is warranted. A delay in surgical management should not occur in an effort to obtain confirmatory imaging. When torsion is discovered, the contralateral testicle should undergo fixation to reduce the risk of asynchronous torsion.

  18. Pituitary gonadotropin and testicular gonadotropin receptor expression in Atlantic cod (Gadusmorhua L.) during the first reproductive season: Effects of photoperiod modulation.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Fernanda Ferreira Loureiro; Andersson, Eva; Mittelholzer, Christian; Karlsen, Orjan; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Schulz, Rüdiger W

    2011-08-01

    Pituitary mRNA levels of gonadotropin β-subunits and of their cognate receptors in the testis were studied during puberty in Atlantic cod under normal and experimental photoperiod conditions that suppressed, delayed or accelerated testis maturation. Results are discussed in context with changes in testicular histology and plasma androgen levels, considered as end points of gonadotropic regulation. Up-regulation of fshb was closely associated with the onset of puberty, decreased when spermatogenesis was completed and reached minimum levels after spawning. These results demonstrate, for the first time using an experimental approach, that activation of Fsh-dependent signaling is associated with spermatogonial proliferation and formation of spermatogenic cysts. Changes in fshr expression were less prominent and could be explained by changes in the cellular composition and RNA content of cod testis tissue. At more advanced stages of development (spermiogenesis, spermiation and spawning), lhb and, one month later, lhcgr transcript levels increased and reached peak values in spawning fish, in a positive feedback loop involving plasma androgens and Lh/Lhcgr-dependent signaling. This loop was broken by a loss of lhb expression at the end of the spawning season. Continuous light (LL) from summer solstice, ~8 months prior to spawning, suppressed the start of testis maturation and the changes in gonadotropin and receptor mRNA levels, while LL from winter solstice initially up-regulated lhb and lhcgr expression, before resulting in a precocious termination of the spawning season and low expression of all four genes. Our studies provide experimental evidence for a clear functional discrimination of cod gonadotropins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mineralocorticoid effects in the late gestation ovine fetal lung

    PubMed Central

    McCartney, Jarret; Richards, Elaine M.; Wood, Charles E.; Keller‐Wood, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study was designed to determine the effects of corticosteroids at MR in the late‐gestation fetal lung. Since both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are expressed at relatively high levels in the fetal lung, endogenous corticosteroids may act at MR as well as GR in the preterm fetal lung. The GR agonist, betamethasone, the MR agonist, aldosterone, or both were infused intravenously for 48 h in ovine fetuses of approximately 130 days gestation. Effects on airway pressures during stepwise inflation of the in situ lung, expression of ENaC alpha (SCNN1A), ENaC beta (SCNN1B), and Na,K ATPase (ATP1A1), and elastin and collagen content were determined after the infusions. We found that aldosterone significantly reduced the airway pressure measured during the initial step in inflation of the lung, although aldosterone had no overall effect on lung compliance, nor did aldosterone induce expression of ENaCα, ENaCβ or Na,K ATPaseα1. Betamethasone significantly increased expression of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunit mRNAs, and collagen and elastin content in the lungs, although this dose of betamethasone also had no effect on lung compliance. There was no synergy between effects of the MR and GR agonists. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that although aldosterone did not alter genes in pathways related to epithelial sodium transport, aldosterone did alter genes in pathways involved in cell proliferation in the lungs. The results are consistent with corticosteroid‐induced fluid reabsorption at birth through GR rather than MR, but suggest that MR facilitates lung maturation, and may contribute to inflation with the first breaths via mechanisms distinct from known aldosterone effects in other epithelia. PMID:25347852

  20. Localization of orexin B and receptor 2 for orexins in testicular cytotypes of the camelid alpaca (Vicugna pacos).

    PubMed

    Liguori, G; Squillacioti, C; Assisi, L; Mirabella, N; Langella, E; Costagliola, A; Vittoria, A

    2017-02-08

    The orexins A (OxA) and B (OxB) are two hypothalamic peptides involved in many physiological functions of the mammalian body. They act through the binding of two G-coupled receptors named receptor 1 (OX1 ) and receptor 2 (OX2 ) for orexins. The first receptor is specific for OxA, while the second binds both the substances with equal affinity. The orexins and the relative receptors have been traced by means of different techniques also at the periphery of the body and particularly in the adrenals, and in gastrointestinal and genital organs. Aim of this work was to investigate the presence of OxB and OX2 by means of immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis in the testis of the South American camelid alpaca, a species primarily breed in Chile and Ecuador and recently diffused in Europe where the quality of its wool is particularly appreciated. OxB immunoreactivity (IR) was found in the tubular compartment of the testis where spermatogonia (resting), zygotene and pachytene spermatocytes, and spermatids clearly showed differently sized and shaped cytoplasmic positive structures. OX2 -IR was found both in the interstitial and tubular compartments of the testis and particularly in Leydig cells and round and elongated spermatids. Western blotting analysis of testis lysates showed the presence of a protein band whose molecular weight corresponded to that currently assigned to OX2 . Such findings easily translate the hypothesis that OxB and its receptor 2 play a functional role both in the interstitial and tubular compartments of the alpaca testis.

  1. Testicular gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown constitutively impairs diurnal testosterone secretion in the boar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II) and its specific receptor (GnRHR-II) are highly expressed in the testis, suggesting an important role in testis biology. Gene coding errors prevent the production of GnRH-II and GnRHR-II in many species, but both genes are functional in swine. We have demo...

  2. Insulin Directly Regulates Steroidogenesis via Induction of the Orphan Nuclear Receptor DAX-1 in Testicular Leydig Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seung Won; Gang, Gil-Tae; Kim, Yong Deuk; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Harris, Robert A.; Lee, Chul-Ho; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone level is low in insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes. Whether this is due to negative effects of high level of insulin on the testes caused by insulin resistance has not been studied in detail. In this study, we found that insulin directly binds to insulin receptors in Leydig cell membranes and activates phospho-insulin receptor-β (phospho-IR-β), phospho-IRS1, and phospho-AKT, leading to up-regulation of DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1) gene expression in the MA-10 mouse Leydig cell line. Insulin also inhibits cAMP-induced and liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1)-induced steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and steroidogenesis. In contrast, knockdown of DAX-1 reversed insulin-mediated inhibition of steroidogenesis. Whether insulin directly represses steroidogenesis through regulation of steroidogenic enzyme gene expression was assessed in insulin-injected mouse models and high fat diet-induced obesity. In insulin-injected mouse models, insulin receptor signal pathway was activated and subsequently inhibited steroidogenesis via induction of DAX-1 without significant change of luteinizing hormone or FSH levels. Likewise, the levels of steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and steroidogenesis were low, but interestingly, the level of DAX-1 was high in the testes of high fat diet-fed mice. These results represent a novel regulatory mechanism of steroidogenesis in Leydig cells. Insulin-mediated induction of DAX-1 in Leydig cells of testis may be a key regulatory step of serum sex hormone level in insulin-resistant states. PMID:23589295

  3. Insulin directly regulates steroidogenesis via induction of the orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 in testicular Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seung Won; Gang, Gil-Tae; Kim, Yong Deuk; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Harris, Robert A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-05-31

    Testosterone level is low in insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes. Whether this is due to negative effects of high level of insulin on the testes caused by insulin resistance has not been studied in detail. In this study, we found that insulin directly binds to insulin receptors in Leydig cell membranes and activates phospho-insulin receptor-β (phospho-IR-β), phospho-IRS1, and phospho-AKT, leading to up-regulation of DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1) gene expression in the MA-10 mouse Leydig cell line. Insulin also inhibits cAMP-induced and liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1)-induced steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and steroidogenesis. In contrast, knockdown of DAX-1 reversed insulin-mediated inhibition of steroidogenesis. Whether insulin directly represses steroidogenesis through regulation of steroidogenic enzyme gene expression was assessed in insulin-injected mouse models and high fat diet-induced obesity. In insulin-injected mouse models, insulin receptor signal pathway was activated and subsequently inhibited steroidogenesis via induction of DAX-1 without significant change of luteinizing hormone or FSH levels. Likewise, the levels of steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and steroidogenesis were low, but interestingly, the level of DAX-1 was high in the testes of high fat diet-fed mice. These results represent a novel regulatory mechanism of steroidogenesis in Leydig cells. Insulin-mediated induction of DAX-1 in Leydig cells of testis may be a key regulatory step of serum sex hormone level in insulin-resistant states.

  4. Cetuximab intensifies cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Levi, Mattan; Popovtzer, Aron; Tzabari, Moran; Mizrachi, Aviram; Savion, Naphtali; Stemmer, Salomon M; Shalgi, Ruth; Ben-Aharon, Irit

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has proliferative properties in the testis. Cetuximab, an anti-EGFR, is administered together with chemotherapy to patients with various types of cancer. This studies aim was to investigate the effect of cetuximab on testicular function. Adult male mice were injected with cetuximab (10 mg/kg), cisplatin (8 mg/kg) or a combination of both, and killed one week or one month later. The doses were chosen by human equivalent dose calculation. Testicular function was evaluated by epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count and sperm motility, weights of testes and epididymides, and the level of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in the serum. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine germ cell proliferation (Ki-67), apoptosis (Terminal transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphosphate nick-end labelling), reserve (DAZL-Deleted in azoospermia-like, Promyelocytic leukaemia zinc-finger), blood vessels (CD34) and Sertoli cells (GATA-4). Administration of cetuximab alone increased testicular apoptosis and decreased epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count over time. When added to cisplatin, cetuximab exacerbated most of the recorded testicular parameters, compared with the effect of cisplatin alone, including testis and epididymis weights, epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count, AMH concentration, meiosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, cetuximab has only a mild effect on testicular reserve, but when added to cisplatin, it exacerbates cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity.

  5. Do We Know What Causes Testicular Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Factors, and Prevention Do We Know What Causes Testicular Cancer? The exact cause of most testicular cancers is ... Cancer? Can Testicular Cancer Be Prevented? More In Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  6. What Happens After Treatment for Testicular Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Testicular Cancer? For most people with testicular cancer, treatment removes ... Treatment for Testicular Cancer Stops Working More In Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. Heterogenous effect of androgen receptor CAG tract length on testicular germ cell tumor risk: shorter repeats associated with seminoma but not other histologic types

    PubMed Central

    Davis-Dao, Carol A.; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Vandenberg, David J.; Skinner, Eila C.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Cortessis, Victoria K.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing rates of testicular germ cells tumors (TGCTs) overtime suggest that environmental factors are involved in disease etiology, but familial risk and genome-wide association studies implicate genetic factors as well. We investigated whether variation in the functional CAGn polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) gene is associated with TGCT risk, using data from a population-based family study. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of CAG repeat length and TGCT risk using matched pairs logistic regression. Analyses of 273 TGCT case–mother pairs revealed no association between AR CAG repeat length and overall TGCT risk. However, risk of seminoma was significantly associated with shorter CAG repeat length [CAG 20–21 versus CAG ≤ 19: OR = 0.82 (95% CI: 0.43–1.58), CAG 22–23 versus CAG ≤ 19: OR = 0.39 (95% CI: 0.19–0.83) and CAG ≥ 24 versus CAG ≤ 19: OR = 0.42 (95% CI: 0.20–0.86)], with a highly significant trend over these four categories of decreasing CAG repeat length (Ptrend = 0.0030). This is the first report of a statistically significant association between AR CAG repeat length and seminoma risk, suggesting that increased AR transactivation may be involved in development of seminoma and/or progression of carcinoma in situ/intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified to seminoma. This result provides a rationale whereby androgenic environmental compounds could contribute to increases in TGCT incidence, and identifies for the first time a potential biological pathway influencing whether TGCTs achieve seminomatous versus nonseminomatous histology, a clinically and biologically important distinction. PMID:21642359

  8. Lithium clearance in mineralocorticoid escape in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, W.H.; Koomans, H.A.; Mees, E.J.D.

    1987-03-01

    Lithium clearance (C/sub Li/) has been advanced as an indicator of Na delivery from the proximal tubules. The authors studied C/sub Li/ in eight healthy males before and after mineralocorticoid escape, a maneuver that may induce suppression of fractional proximal Na reabsorption (FPR/sub Na/). FPR/sub Na/ was also estimated from changes in maximal free water clearance (C/sub H/sub 2/O/). Plasma volume was measured as the /sup 131/I-labeled albumin distribution space. Extracellular fluid volume was estimated as the /sup 82/Br vector distribution volume. According to the latter method, FPR/sub Na/ dropped whereas inulin clearance rose. The changes in C/sub Li/ were surprisingly large. If lithium is a valid marker of Na handling in the proximal tubule in humans, this change would imply a fall in FPR/sub Na/, suggesting a much larger shift in tubular Na reabsorption in escape than hitherto suspected. In addition, it would suggest that the inevitable back diffusion of a part of the solute-free water in the distal nephron, and thus overestimation of FPR/sub Na/ by the C/sub H/sub 2/O/ method, increases importantly during escape. Alternately, lithium may not be a good marker of proximal tubular Na handling. For instance, both lithium reabsorption and escape may take place beyond the proximal tubule, or lithium may be excreted in the distal nephron in certain conditions. Present methods do not permit further analysis of these options in the human model.

  9. Infertility with Testicular Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Kevin A; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer is one of the most curable cancers. Most patients are treated during their reproductive years, making infertility a significant quality of life issue after successful treatment. This focused review evaluates the factors that contribute to infertility and specific fertility risks with the various testicular cancer treatments. Timing of patient discussions and current fertility treatments are reviewed.

  10. Localization of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH), Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone (GnIH), Kisspeptin and GnRH Receptor and Their Possible Roles in Testicular Activities From Birth to Senescence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    ANJUM, SHABANA; KRISHNA, AMITABH; SRIDARAN, RAJAGOPALA; TSUTSUI, KAZUYOSHI

    2013-01-01

    The changes in distribution and concentration of neuropeptides, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), kisspeptin, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) were evaluated and compared with reproductive parameters, such as cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450 SCC) enzyme activity, androgen receptors (AR) in the testis and serum testosterone levels, from birth to senescence in mice. The results showed the localization of these molecules mainly in the interstitial and germ cells as well as showed significant variations in immunostatining from birth to senescence. It was found that increased staining of testicular GnRH-R coincided with increased steroidogenic activity during pubertal and adult stages, whereas decreased staining coincides with decreased steroidogenic activity during senescence. Similar changes in immunostaining were confirmed by Western/slot blot analysis. Thus, these results suggest a putative role of GnRH during testicular pubertal development and senescence. Treatment with a GnRH agonist ([DTrp6, Pro9-NEt] GnRH) to mice from prepubertal to pubertal period showed a significant increase in steroidogenic activity of the mouse testis and provided further support to the role of GnRH in testicular pubertal maturation. The significant decline in GnRH-R during senescence may be due to a significant increase in GnIH synthesis during senescence causing the decrease in GnRH-R expression. It is considered that significant changes in the levels of GnRH-R may be responsible for changes in steroidogenesis that causes either pubertal activation or senescence in testis of mice. Furthermore, changes in the levels of GnRH-R may be modulated by interactions among GnRH, GnIH, and kisspeptin in the testis. PMID:23027641

  11. Liver growth factor induces testicular regeneration in EDS-treated rats and increases protein levels of class B scavenger receptors.

    PubMed

    Lobo, M V T; Arenas, M I; Huerta, L; Sacristán, S; Pérez-Crespo, M; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Díaz-Gil, J J; Lasunción, M A; Martín-Hidalgo, A

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of liver growth factor (LGF) on the regeneration process of rat testes after chemical castration induced by ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) by analyzing some of the most relevant proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism, such as hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), scavenger receptor SR-BI, and other components of the SR family that could contribute to the recovery of steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis. Sixty male rats were randomized to nontreated (controls) and LGF-treated, EDS-treated, and EDS + LGF-treated groups. Testes were obtained on days 10 (T1), 21 (T2), and 35 (T3) after EDS treatment, embedded in paraffin, and analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. LGF improved the recovery of the seminiferous epithelia, the appearance of the mature pattern of Leydig cell interstitial distribution, and the expression of mature SR-BI. Moreover, LGF treatment resulted in partial recovery of HSL expression in Leydig cells and spermatogonia. No changes in serum testosterone were observed in control or LGF-treated rats, but in EDS-castrated animals LGF treatment induced a progressive increase in serum testosterone levels and 3β-HSD expression. Based on the pivotal role of SR-BI in the uptake of cholesteryl esters from HDL, it is suggested that the observed effects of LGF would facilitate the provision of cholesterol for sperm cell growth and Leydig cell recovery. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Rosiglitazone, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, prevents contralateral testicular ischaemia-reperfusion injury in prepubertal rats.

    PubMed

    Inan, Mustafa; Basaran, Umit; Dokmeci, Dikmen; Kanter, Mehmet; Yalcin, Omer; Aydogdu, Nurettin; Turan, Nesrin

    2007-01-01

    1. Rosiglitazone plays a positive role in the reparation of ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in different tissues. Thus, we examined its biochemical and histological effects on the contralateral testes to determine whether exogenous rosiglitazone affords any protection against testicular damage. 2. Forty-eight prepubertal male Wistar-Albino rats were divided into six groups. Testicular torsion was created by rotating the right testis 720 degrees in a clockwise direction for 5 h in all groups except group I, which was the sham-control group. In group II, bilateral orchiectomy was performed following the torsion period. After detorsion both testes were removed in the fifth hour in group III and on the seventh day in group IV. In group V, one-shot rosiglitazone (4 mg/kg) was administered 40 min before detorsion and both testes were removed following the torsion period. In group VI, rosiglitazone was administered (4 mg/kg) 40 min before detorsion and for 7 days, and then both testes were harvested. The tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured and mean testicular biopsy score (MTBS) and mean seminiferous tubule diameter (MSTD) were examined. Immunoexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in testes tissues was investigated by immunohistochemical studies. 3. In the contralateral testis, the MTBS and MSTD values of group VI were significantly higher than those in group IV. Immunohistochemically, mild eNOS immunostaining was present in the germ cells of the contralateral testes in group IV after I/R. In group VI, intense eNOS immunoreactivity was seen in the contralateral testes. 4. Rosiglitazone reduces contralateral testicular damage formed after unilateral testicular torsion and alleviates the oxidative events.

  13. Analysis of the hormone-binding domain of steroid receptors using chimeras generated by homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Danielsen, Mark . E-mail: dan@bc.georgetown.edu

    2005-08-15

    The glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor are members of the steroid receptor family that exhibit ligand cross-reactivity. Specificity of steroid receptor action is investigated in the present work by the construction and characterization of chimeras between the glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor. We used an innovative approach to make novel steroid receptor proteins in vivo that in general, contrary to our expectations, show increased ligand specificity compared to the parental receptors. We describe a receptor that is specific for the potent synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide and does not bind aldosterone. A further set of chimeras has an increased ability to discriminate between ligands, responding potently to mineralocorticoids and only very weakly to synthetic glucocorticoids. A chimera with the fusion site in the hinge highlights the importance of the region between the DNA-binding and the hormone-binding domains since, unlike both the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, it only responds to mineralocorticoids. One chimera has reduced specificity in that it acts as a general corticoid receptor, responding to glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids with similar potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that regions of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domains are functionally non-reciprocal. We present transcriptional, hormone-binding, and structure-modeling evidence that suggests that receptor-specific interactions within and across domains mediate aspects of specificity in transcriptional responses to steroids.

  14. Testicular Cancer Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... my what?! Cancer AGAIN?! --- Our comments on the report linking testicular cancer treatments to secondary cancers... Faith and Spirituality --- Not carrying the load alone... Alternative Treatments? --- When all else fails? Spread the Word --- We have even created a, ...

  15. Nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K M; Lovich, J E; Lam, C; Camp, M E; Wiley, A A; Bartol, F F; Bagnell, C A

    2014-07-01

    The lactocrine hypothesis suggests a mechanism whereby milk-borne bioactive factors delivered to nursing offspring affect development of neonatal tissues. The objective of this study was to assess whether nursing affects testicular development in neonatal boars as reflected by: (1) Sertoli cell number and proliferation measured by GATA-4 expression and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining patterns; (2) Leydig cell development and steroidogenic activity as reflected by insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3), and P450 side chain cleavage (scc) enzyme expression; and (3) expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A, and relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP) 1. At birth, boars were randomly assigned (n = 6-7/group) to nurse ad libitum or to be pan fed porcine milk replacer for 48 h. Testes were collected from boars at birth, before nursing and from nursed and replacer-fed boars at 50 h on postnatal day (PND) 2. Sertoli cell proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index increased (P < 0.01) from birth to PND 2 in nursed, but not in replacer-fed boars. Sertoli cell number and testicular GATA-4 protein levels increased (P < 0.01) from PND 0 to PND 2 only in nursed boars. Neither age nor nursing affected testicular INSL3, P450scc, ESR1, or VEGFA levels. However, testicular relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) levels increased (P < 0.01) with age and were greater in replacer-fed boars on PND 2. Results suggest that nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development and provide additional evidence for the importance of lactocrine signaling in pigs.

  16. Testicular Microlithiasis: Is It Associated with Testicular Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosed during a testicular ultrasound — in which small clusters of calcium form in the testicles. A number ... 48:1079. Wang T, et al. A meta-analysis of the relationship between testicular microlithiasis and incidence ...

  17. Testicular Microlithiasis: Is It Associated with Testicular Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell tumors (FTGCT) — Overview of a multidisciplinary etiologic study. Andrology. 2015;3:47. Pedersen MR, et al. Testicular microlithiasis and testicular cancer: Review of the literature. International Urology and Nephrology. 2016;48:1079. Wang T, ...

  18. Activation of the ET-1/ETA pathway contributes to erectile dysfunction associated with mineralocorticoid hypertension.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Fernando S; Nunes, Kênia P; Giachini, Fernanda R C; Lima, Victor V; Carneiro, Zidonia N; Nogueira, Edson F; Leite, Romulo; Ergul, Adviye; Rainey, William E; Clinton Webb, R; Tostes, Rita C

    2008-12-01

    The cavernosal tissue is highly responsive to endothelin-1 (ET-1), and penile smooth muscle cells not only respond to but also synthesize ET-1. Considering that ET-1 is directly involved in end-organ damage in salt-sensitive forms of hypertension, we hypothesized that activation of the ET-1/ET(A) receptor pathway contributes to erectile dysfunction (ED) associated with mineralocorticoid hypertension. Wistar rats were uninephrectomized and submitted to deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt treatment for 5 weeks. Control (Uni [uninephrectomized control]) animals were uninephrectomized and given tap water. Uni and DOCA-salt rats were simultaneously treated with vehicle or atrasentan (ET(A) receptor antagonist, 5 mg/Kg/day). Cavernosal reactivity to ET-1, phenylephrine (PE), ET(B) receptor agonist (IRL-1620) and electric field stimulation (EFS) were evaluated in vitro. Expression of ROCKalpha, ROCKbeta, myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) were evaluated by western blot analysis. ET-1 and ET(A) receptor mRNA expression was evaluated by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Voltage-dependent increase in intracavernosal pressure/mean arterial pressure (ICP/MAP) was used to evaluate erectile function in vivo. ET(A) receptor blockade prevents DOCA-salt-associated ED. Cavernosal strips from DOCA-salt rats displayed augmented preproET-1 expression, increased contractile responses to ET-1 and decreased relaxation to IRL-1620. Contractile responses induced by EFS and PE were enhanced in cavernosal tissues from DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. These functional changes were associated with increased activation of the RhoA/Rho-kinase and ERK 1/2 pathways. Treatment of rats with atrasentan completely prevented changes in cavernosal reactivity in DOCA-salt rats and restored the decreased ICP/MAP, completely preventing ED in DOCA-salt rats. Activation of the ET-1/ET(A) pathway contributes to

  19. Teaching about Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Because testicular cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in young men, it is important that they become informed about it. This paper reviews the pathology and epidemiology of testicular cancer, the technique of testicular self-examination, and some suggestions for teaching about this subject. (Authors/JMK)

  20. Testicular calculus: A rare case.

    PubMed

    Sen, Volkan; Bozkurt, Ozan; Demır, Omer; Tuna, Burcin; Yorukoglu, Kutsal; Esen, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Testicular calculus is an extremely rare case with unknown etiology and pathogenesis. To our knowledge, here we report the third case of testicular calculus. A 31-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with painful solid mass in left testis. After diagnostic work-up for a possible testicular tumour, he underwent inguinal orchiectomy and histopathologic examination showed a testicular calculus. Case hypothesis: Solid testicular lesions in young adults generally correspond to testicular cancer. Differential diagnosis should be done carefully. Future implications: In young adults with painful and solid testicular mass with hyperechogenic appearance on scrotal ultrasonography, testicular calculus must be kept in mind in differential diagnosis. Further reports on this topic may let us do more clear recommendations about the etiology and treatment of this rare disease.

  1. Spironolactone inhibits the activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger in the aorta of mineralocorticoid-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Carreño, Juan E; Verdugo, Fernando J; Contreras, Felipe; Montellano, Felipe A; Veloso, Sebastian; Schalper, Kurt A; Sandoval, Mauricio; Villanueva, Sandra; Marusic, Elisa; Irarrazabal, Carlos E

    2015-12-01

    Aldosterone can induce changes in the expression or activity of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 (NHE-1) in vascular smooth muscle cells. We aimed to clarify whether chronic mineralocorticoid receptor activation exerts an effect on the activity of NHE-1 in the aorta of mineralocorticoid-induced hypertensive rats. Uninephrectomized male Sprague-Dawley rats received subcutaneously 10 mg/week of desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) with or without 20 mg/kg of spironolactone, or vehicle alone (n = 20). After four weeks of treatment, the animals were sacrificed; the aorta was excised for subsequent studies, including histological analysis, RT-PCR, Western blot, measurement of NHE-1 activity and vascular contractility in the presence or absence of the selective NHE-1 inhibitor ethyl-isopropyl amiloride (EIPA). Chronic DOCA treatment increased the NHE-1 activity, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and aortic wall thickness. All these effects were prevented by co-treatment with Spironolactone (p < 0.05). Phenylephrine-induced vascular contractility was significantly reduced in the DOCA group when EIPA was added in the media (p < 0.05). No significant differences in NHE-1 mRNA or protein levels were detected between groups. Chronic DOCA administration induced functional and morphological alterations in the rat aorta that are partially explained by enhanced NHE-1 activity and prevented by spironolactone. However, we did not observe changes in the NHE-1 transcript or protein levels, suggesting that the effect may be due to post-transcriptional modifications induced by mineralocorticoid receptor activation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Treatment Options for Testicular Cancer, by Type and Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treating Testicular Cancer Surgery for Testicular Cancer Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer High-Dose Chemotherapy ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  3. Spin on perinatal testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Samnakay, Naeem; Tudehope, David; Walker, Rosslyn

    2006-11-01

    We describe a recent case of perinatal testicular torsion at our institution. The presentation, management and outcome of perinatal testicular torsion are quite different to testicular torsion in the general paediatric population. The literature describes a variety of management options for perinatal testicular torsion and these are briefly reviewed. In cases of unilateral perinatal testicular torsin, there is controversy over whether surgery to fix the contralateral testis is required, and if so, the appropriate timing for the surgery. A good understanding of the issues unique to perinatal torsion will facilitate appropriate counseling of parents of affected neonates.

  4. Testicular cancer and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Darius A

    2006-11-01

    Testicular cancer and infertility affect a similar age group of patients and have common biologic, epidemiologic, and environmental backgrounds. In this review, we provide current literature on links between infertility and testicular cancer, and new developments in the management of testicular cancer aimed at improving quality of life in men with testicular cancer. In-utero environmental exposure to endocrine disruptors modulates the genetically determined fate of primitive gonad and results in testicular dysgenesis syndrome, which may result in infertility and testicular cancer. Excellent response of testicular cancer to radiation and chemotherapy results in over 90% of survival and quality of life--fertility and sexual function--is of significant concern to patients and clinicians. The testicular-sparing management of testicular masses emerges as a sound alternative to radical orchiectomy and allows for preservation of spermatogenesis and hormonal function, and at the same time achieving similar survival rates. Secondary malignancies, pulmonary, and cardiovascular complications are recognized as late complications of treatment for testicular cancer. Better understanding of common mechanisms involved in infertility and testicular cancer, and scientifically driven evidence-based treatment options should improve quality of life in young men faced with this potentially life-threatening disease.

  5. Testicular Cancer and Cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Lydia; Agoulnik, Alexander I.

    2013-01-01

    The failure of testicular descent or cryptorchidism is the most common defect in newborn boys. The descent of the testes during development is controlled by insulin-like 3 peptide and steroid hormones produced in testicular Leydig cells, as well as by various genetic and developmental factors. While in some cases the association with genetic abnormalities and environmental causes has been shown, the etiology of cryptorchidism remains uncertain. Cryptorchidism is an established risk factor for infertility and testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT). Experimental animal models suggest a causative role for an abnormal testicular position on the disruption of spermatogenesis however the link between cryptorchidism and TGCT is less clear. The most common type of TGCT in cryptorchid testes is seminoma, believed to be derived from pluripotent prenatal germ cells. Recent studies have shown that seminoma cells and their precursor carcinoma in situ cells express a number of spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) markers suggesting that TGCTs might originate from adult stem cells. We review here the data on changes in the SSC somatic cell niche observed in cryptorchid testes of mouse models and in human patients. We propose that the misregulation of growth factors’ expression may alter the balance between SSC self-renewal and differentiation and shift stem cells toward neoplastic transformation. PMID:23519268

  6. Primary testicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S S; Idris, S F; Follows, G A; Williams, M V

    2012-06-01

    Primary testicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PTL) comprises around 9% of testicular cancers and 1-2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Its incidence is increasing and it primarily affects older men, with a median age at presentation of around 67 years. By far the most common histological subtype is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, accounting for 80-90% of PTLs. Most patients present with a unilateral testicular mass or swelling. Up to 90% of patients have stage I or II disease at diagnosis (60 and 30%, respectively) and bilateral testicular involvement is seen in around 35% of patients. PTL demonstrates a continuous pattern of relapse and propensity for extra-nodal sites such as the central nervous system and contralateral testis. Retrospective data have emphasised the importance of prophylactic radiotherapy in reducing recurrence rates within the contralateral testis. Recent outcome data from the prospective IELSG-10 trial have shown far better progression-free and overall survival than historical outcomes. This supports the use of orchidectomy followed by Rituximab- cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone (R-CHOP), central nervous system prophylaxis and prophylactic radiotherapy to the contralateral testis with or without nodal radiotherapy in patients with limited disease. Central nervous system relapse remains a significant issue and future research should focus on identifying the best strategy to reduce its occurrence. Here we discuss the evidence supporting combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy in PTL.

  7. Renal inactivation, mineralocorticoid generation, and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibition ameliorate the antimineralocorticoid effect of progesterone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Quinkler, M; Meyer, B; Oelkers, W; Diederich, S

    2003-08-01

    Progesterone (P) is a strong mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist in vitro. The high P concentrations seen in normal pregnancy only moderately increase renin and aldosterone concentrations. In previous in vitro studies we hypothesized that this may be explained by intrarenal conversion of P to less potent metabolites. To investigate the in vivo anti-MR potency of P, we performed an infusion study in patients with adrenal insufficiency (n = 8). They omitted 9alpha-fluorocortisol for 4 d and hydrocortisone for 0.5 d before a continuous iv infusion of aldosterone for 8.5 h, with an additional iv P infusion commenced at 4 h. During aldosterone infusions the initially elevated urinary sodium to potassium ratio decreased significantly. Despite the 1000-fold excess of P over aldosterone, the urinary sodium to potassium ratio and urinary sodium excretion increased only slightly after 3 h of P infusion. We detected inhibition of renal 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 by P, thus giving cortisol/prednisolone access to the MR. Urinary and plasma concentrations of 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, a major metabolite of renal P metabolism, and those of serum androstenedione and deoxycorticosterone, a mineralocorticoid itself, increased significantly during P infusion. This supports the hypothesis of an effective protection of the MR from P by efficient extraadrenal downstream conversion of P.

  8. Testicular cancer in cryptorchids.

    PubMed

    Batata, M A; Chu, F C; Hilaris, B S; Whitmore, W F; Golbey, R B

    1982-03-01

    One-hundred thirty-seven patients with a history or clinical evidence of cryptorchidism and testicular germinal tumor were treated at our hospital from 1934 to 1976. Cryptorchidism was corrected ipsilaterally or contralaterally in 93 patients with intrascrotal testis cancer when they were from 2 to 42 years old, either spontaneously (24 patients), by orchiopexy (58 patients), or by hormonal therapy (11 patients). Forty-four cryptorchid patients (uncorrected cases) had either ipsilateral inguinal (24 patients), or abdominal (14 patients), or contralateral intrascrotal tumors (six patients). Tumor histologic types on orchiectomy were pure seminoma in 56 patients, embryonal carcinoma in 41, teratocarcinoma in 37, and pure choriocarcinoma in 3. The five-year survival rates were similar in the corrected (61%) and uncorrected (63%) cases, and they were higher in patients with pure seminoma (79%) than in patients with germinal carcinomas (50%). The majority (64 of 80) of five-year survivors received regional lymphatic irradiation in 41 patients with pure seminoma and/or systemic chemotherapy in 23 patients with other germinomas. Since the testicular tumors that developed despite correction of the cryptorchid state were predominantly (72%) germinal carcinomas, unilateral cryptorchidism, which usually is associated with testicular atrophy, should be treated by orchiectomy instead of orchiopexy to prevent ipsilateral carcinogenesis. Cryptorchid patients with testicles that descended late should be observed periodically, especially after the 20-year latent period, for early detection of cancer.

  9. Inheritance of mineralocorticoid effector abnormalities of human mononuclear leucocytes in families with pseudohypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Wehling, M; Kuhnle, U; Daumer, C; Armanini, D

    1989-11-01

    In-vitro effects of aldosterone on intracellular sodium and potassium concentrations have been described for normal human mononuclear leucocytes (HML). After incubation for 1 h at 37 degrees C, intracellular sodium and potassium in HML are significantly higher in the presence of 1.4 nM aldosterone than after incubation without aldosterone. As published earlier, these effects were absent in patients with pseudohypoaldosteronism. In the present paper, the families of seven patients with pseudohypoaldosteronism (index cases) were studied. In the first family, two siblings were affected by the disease and had a reduced number of mineralocorticoid (MC) receptors on HML. Intracellular sodium and potassium in HML from these patients did not show a response to 1.4 nM aldosterone. The parents, who were first cousins, had no history of disease and normal receptor data, but in the mother, the response of HML electrolytes to aldosterone was abnormal. In the second family, the mother of a child with pseudohypoaldosteronism, the mother's sister, and her son, had low numbers of MC receptors. Only the aunt of the index case had an uncertain history of the disease. The MC effector mechanism was abnormal in both children and both mothers studied. In a third family, the effector defect was present only in HML of the father. In three further families the abnormality of the effector mechanism was detected in HML of the patient's mother. These data suggest an autosomal dominant inheritance of pseudohypoaldosteronism with variable expression of the gene.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF MINERALOCORTICOID AND ANGIOTENSIN II ON INCENTIVE AND MESOLIMBIC ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Grafe, Laura A.; Flanagan-Cato, Loretta M.

    2016-01-01

    The controls of thirst and sodium appetite are mediated in part by the hormones aldosterone and angiotensin II (AngII). The present study examined the behavioral and neural mechanisms of altered effort-value in animals treated with systemic mineralocorticoids, intracerebroventricular AngII, or both. First, rats treated with mineralocorticoid and AngII were tested in the progressive ratio operant task. The willingness to work for sodium versus water depended on hormonal treatment. In particular, rats treated with both mineralocorticoid and AngII preferentially worked for access to sodium versus water compared with rats given only one of these hormones. Second, components of the mesolimbic dopamine pathway were examined for modulation by mineralocorticoids and AngII. Based on cFos immunohistochemistry, AngII treatment activated neurons in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens, with no enhancement by mineralocorticoid pretreatment. In contrast, western blot analysis revealed that combined hormone treatment increased levels of phospho-tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral tegmental area. Thus, mineralocorticoid and AngII treatments differentially engaged the mesolimbic pathway based on tyrosine hydroxylase levels versus cFos activation. PMID:26730722

  11. Impaired renal 11 beta-oxidation of 9 alpha-fluorocortisol: an explanation for its mineralocorticoid potency.

    PubMed

    Oelkers, W; Buchen, S; Diederich, S; Krain, J; Muhme, S; Schöneshöfer, M

    1994-04-01

    9 alpha-Fluorocortisol (9 alpha FF) is about 200 times more potent as a mineralocorticoid than cortisol (F) in man, although it binds with the same affinity as F and aldosterone to the human mineralocorticoid receptor. The low mineralocorticoid activity of F has been shown to be due to its rapid conversion by the kidney to cortisone (E), which does not bind to the receptor. Therefore, we compared the conversion of F to E with that of 9 alpha FF to 9 alpha-fluorocortisone (9 alpha FE) by 11-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases in man in vivo and in vitro. Single oral doses of 9 alpha FF, 9 alpha FE, and F were given to normal males, and the excretion of free 9 alpha FF, 9 alpha FE, F, and E was measured in urine. Human kidney and liver slices were incubated with unlabeled steroids, and the free 11-hydroxy- and 11-oxosteroids were quantitated after high performance liquid chromatography separation by UV absorption. Oral F (5 mg) is excreted 70% as free E and 30% as free F (percentage of free steroids only). Oral 9 alpha FF (5 mg) is excreted 90% as free 9 alpha FF and 10% as free 9 alpha FE. Free 9 alpha FF excretion is 14 times greater than that of F after ingesting an identical dose. Oral 9 alpha FE (4 mg) is also excreted 90% as 9 alpha FF and 10% as 9 alpha FE. Kidney slices convert F much faster to E than 9 alpha FF to 9 alpha FE. The conversion of 9 alpha FE to 9 alpha FF is, on the contrary, much faster than that of E to F. Thus, the equilibrium of the reaction is on the 11-oxo side for F/E and on the 11-hydroxy side for 9 alpha FF/9 alpha FE. The interconversion of both pairs of steroids is inhibited by glycyrrhetinic acid in a dose-dependent manner. Liver slices do not measurably convert 9 alpha FF to 9 alpha FE, but do rapidly convert 9 alpha FE into 9 alpha FF. Reflecting this negligible conversion of 9 alpha FF to 9 alpha FE and the low plasma-protein binding of 9 alpha FF, free urinary 9 alpha FF excretion is much higher than that of F after the same oral dose

  12. Primary testicular lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Filiz; Cagirgan, Seckin; Saydam, Guray; Hekimgil, Mine; Soyer, Nur Akad; Tombuloglu, Murat

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated clinical features, management and survival of 12 patients with primary testicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma presented to our hematology unit between January 1992 and July 2006, retrospectively. The median age of patients was 47 years at presentation (range 29-78 years) and > 80% of them were < 50 years old. In the majority of cases, orchidectomy was performed as diagnostic and first-line therapeutic procedures. Dominant histological subtype was diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Seven patients out of 12 (58%) were Ann Arbor stages I and II, and the remaining five patients (42%) were stages III and IV. All the patients received doxorubicin-based chemotherapy and achieved complete remission. The addition of rituximab and central nervous system prophylaxis with intrathecal combined chemotherapy containing methotrexate, cytarabine and dexametasone were applied to three patients who were recently admitted. The rate of relapse was 8% and progression-free survival (PFS) at 10 years was 88%. Median duration of response was 84 months (range 14-173 months), median 97.5 months of follow-up. All patients are alive and in case remission. Because of the spreading nature and relapse probability at different sites, including central nervous system and contralateral testis, systemic treatment with doxorubicin-based chemotherapy with or without prophylaxis for contralateral testis and the central nervous system seems to improve the outcome of primary testicular lymphoma. PMID:18020104

  13. Genetics of mineralocorticoid excess: an update for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Zennaro, Maria-Christina; Rickard, Amanda Jane; Boulkroun, Sheerazed

    2013-07-01

    Aldosterone plays a major role in the regulation of sodium and potassium homeostasis and blood pressure. More recently, aldosterone has emerged as a key hormone mediating end organ damage. In extreme cases, dysregulated aldosterone production leads to primary aldosteronism (PA), the most common form of secondary hypertension. However, even within the physiological range, high levels of aldosterone are associated with an increased risk of developing hypertension over time. PA represents the most common and curable form of hypertension, with a prevalence that increases with the severity of hypertension. Although genetic causes underlying glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism, one of the three Mendelian forms of PA, were established some time ago, somatic and inherited mutations in the potassium channel GIRK4 have only recently been implicated in the formation of aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and in familial hyperaldosteronism type 3. Moreover, recent findings have shown somatic mutations in two additional genes, involved in maintaining intracellular ionic homeostasis and cell membrane potential, in a subset of APAs. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the genetic determinants that contribute to variations in plasma aldosterone and renin levels in the general population and the genetics of familial and sporadic PA. Various animal models that have significantly improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of excess aldosterone production are also discussed. Finally, we outline the cardiovascular, renal, and metabolic consequences of mineralocorticoid excess beyond blood pressure regulation.

  14. [Treatment of testicular cancer].

    PubMed

    Droz, Jean-Pierre; Boyle, Helen; Culine, Stéphane; Fizazi, Karim; Fléchon, Aude; Massard, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    Germ-cell tumours (GCTs) are the most common type of cancer in young men. Since the late 1970s, disseminated GCT have been a paradigm for curable metastatic cancer and metastatic GCTs are highly curable with cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by surgical resection of residual masses. Patients' prognosis is currently assessed using the International Germ-Cell Consensus Classification (IGCCC) and used to adapt the burden of chemotherapy. Approximately 20% of patients still do not achieve cure after first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and need salvage chemotherapy (high dose or standard dose chemotherapy). Clinical stage I testicular cancer is the most common presentation and different strategies are proposed: adjuvant therapies, surgery or surveillance. During the last three decades, clinical trials and strong international collaborations lead to the development of a consensus in the management of GCTs.

  15. Micropsia and testicular retractions.

    PubMed

    Myers, W A

    1977-01-01

    Five episodes of micropsia, which were precipitated by oedipal masturbatory fantasies, are described in the analysis of an adult male. Traumatic visual events and testicular retractions during the oedipal and latency years predisposed the ego functions concerned with visual perception to later involvement in conflict. The micropsia itself is seen as defending against castration anxiety by means of a series of unconscious fantasies of denial. These fantasies cause a regression to an earlier mode of visual perception (and to micropsia) characteristic of latency. The defensive modifications of the functions of the ego itself seen in micropsia are closely allied to those seen in the dèjá vu experience and in depersonalization.

  16. General Information about Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 tumor markers are used in staging testicular cancer : Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Tumor marker levels are measured again, ...

  17. Testicular Cancer Treatments: After Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to alphafetoprotein (AFP), beta-hCG (b-hCG), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). AFP and b-hCG are proteins ... Our recommendations are divided by type of testicular cancer, stage, and treatment given. Clinical Stage I Nonseminoma - ...

  18. How to Perform a Testicular Self-Examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can Get Weight Loss Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness How to Do a Testicular ... autoexamen testicular Testicular self-exams (TSE) can help you check for things like cancer. Although testicular cancer is rare in teenage guys, ...

  19. What's New in Testicular Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer What’s New in Testicular Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research ... findings may help individualize treatment and help find new drugs to treat testicular cancer that can target ...

  20. [Anti-Ma2, anti-NMDA-receptor and anti-GluRε2 limbic encephalitis with testicular seminoma: short-term memory disturbance].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Akihiro; Tajima, Takashi; Narukawa, Shinya; Yamazato, Masamizu; Fukaura, Hikoaki; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Tanaka, Keiko; Shimizu, Jun; Nomura, Kyoichi

    2012-01-01

    A 36-year-old man presented with cognitive impairment and disturbance of short-term memory functions with character change. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed no abnormalities; however, brain MRI revealed high-signal intensity from bilateral hippocampus lesions on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and T(2) weighted images. The 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET demonstrated high glucose uptake in the bilateral hippocampus lesions. He was diagnosed as limbic encephalitis, and was administered high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone and immune adsorption plasma therapy followed by intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. MRI abnormalities improved after treatment but recent memory disturbance remained. Ma2 antibody, NMDA-receptor antibody, and GluRε2 antibody were positive. Eleven months atter the onset of disease, the tumor was identified in left testicle by ultrasound and removed the tumor. The pathological findings were seminoma. We experienced a case of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with seminoma with short-term memory disturbance. The occurrence of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with antibodies against cell membrane (NMDA-receptor antibody and GluRε2 antibody) and intracellular (Ma2 antibody) is rare even in the literature.

  1. Are we missing a mineralocorticoid in teleost fish? Effects of cortisol, deoxycorticosterone and aldosterone on osmoregulation, gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity and isoform mRNA levels in Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, S.D.; Regish, A.; O'Dea, M. F.; Shrimpton, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    It has long been held that cortisol, acting through a single receptor, carries out both glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid actions in teleost fish. The recent finding that fish express a gene with high sequence similarity to the mammalian mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) suggests the possibility that a hormone other than cortisol carries out some mineralocorticoid functions in fish. To test for this possibility, we examined the effect of in vivo cortisol, 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) and aldosterone on salinity tolerance, gill Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA) activity and mRNA levels of NKA α1a and α1b in Atlantic salmon. Cortisol treatment for 6–14 days resulted in increased, physiological levels of cortisol, increased gill NKA activity and improved salinity tolerance (lower plasma chloride after a 24 h seawater challenge), whereas DOC and aldosterone had no effect on either NKA activity or salinity tolerance. NKA α1a and α1b mRNA levels, which increase in response to fresh water and seawater acclimation, respectively, were both upregulated by cortisol, whereas DOC and aldosterone were without effect. Cortisol, DOC and aldosterone had no effect on gill glucocorticoid receptor GR1, GR2 and MR mRNA levels, although there was some indication of possible upregulation of GR1 by cortisol (p = 0.07). The putative GR blocker RU486 inhibited cortisol-induced increases in salinity tolerance, NKA activity and NKA α1a and α1b transcription, whereas the putative MR blocker spironolactone had no effect. The results provide support that cortisol, and not DOC or aldosterone, is involved in regulating the mineralocorticoid functions of ion uptake and salt secretion in teleost fish.

  2. Neonatal Testicular Torsion; a Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Riaz-Ul-haq, Muhammad; Mahdi, Diaa Eldin Abdelhamid; Elhassan, Elbagir Uthman

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal testicular torsion, also known as perinatal testicular torsion is a subject of debate among surgeons. Neonatal testicular torsion either intrauterine or postnatal results into extravaginal torsion which is a different entity than intravaginal type but has the same devastating consequences if not diagnosed and managed well in time. Testicular torsion results into acute ischemia with its resultant sequelae such as abnormality of testicular function and fertility. Urgent surgical exploration and fixation of the other testis are the key points in the management. General anesthesia is not a contraindication for exploration as thought before. Diagnosis and controversies on management of testicular torsion are discussed in this review. PMID:23400637

  3. Steroid receptor coupling becomes nuclear.

    PubMed

    Galigniana, Mario D

    2012-06-22

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Grossman et al. report a study on aldosterone-dependent nuclear translocation of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). They analyze the dependency of MR retrotransport, DNA-binding, and transcriptional activity on Hsp90 and demonstrate that MR dimerization is a nuclear event. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The roles of testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) in male fertility-priapism and sexual behavior defects in TR4 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Collins, Loretta L; Lee, Yi-Fen; Ting, Huei-Ju; Lin, Wen-Jye; Liu, Ning-Chun; Meshul, Charles K; Uno, Hideo; Bao, Bo-Ying; Chen, Yen-Ta; Chang, Chawnshang

    2011-10-13

    Successful reproductive efforts require the establishment of a situation favorable for reproduction that requires integration of both behavior and internal physiological events. TR4 nuclear receptor is known to be involved in male fertility via controlling spermatogenesis, yet its roles in regulating other biological events related to reproduction have not been completely revealed. Male TR4 knockout (TR4 -/-) and wild type mice were used for the sexual behavior and penile dysfunction studies. Mice were sacrificed for histological examination and corresponding genes profiles were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Reporter gene assays were performed. We describe an unexpected finding of priapism in TR4 -/- mice. As a transcriptional factor, we demonstrated that TR4 transcriptionally modulates a key enzyme regulating penis erection and neuronal nitric oxide synthese NOS (nNOS). Thereby, elimination of TR4 results in nNOS reduction in both mRNA and protein levels, consequently may lead to erectile dysfunction. In addition, male TR4 -/- mice display defects in sexual and social behavior, with increased fear or anxiety, as well as reduced mounting, intromission, and ejaculation. Reduction of ER alpha, ER beta, and oxytocin in the hypothalamus may contribute to defects in sexual behavior and stress response. Together, these results provide in vivo evidence of important TR4 roles in penile physiology, as well as in male sexual behavior. In conjunction with previous finding, TR4 represents a key factor that controls male fertility via regulating behavior and internal physiological events.

  5. Testicular cancer and antecedent diseases.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, A J; Huttly, S R; Smith, P G

    1987-01-01

    A case-control study of the aetiology of testicular cancer was conducted using information obtained by interview and from case-notes of 259 cases with testicular cancer and two sets of control patients -238 men with diagnoses other than testicular cancer attending the same radiotherapy centres as those attended by the cases, and 251 hospital in-patients not attending radiotherapy departments. Logistic regression analyses were performed, after stratifying by age and region of residence, to estimate the relative risks (RRs) associated with various aspects of prior medical history. The risk of testicular cancer was found to be raised for men with a history of cryptorchidism (RR based on comparison with all controls = 6.3; P less than 0.001), inguinal hernia (RR = 1.6; P = 0.14), mumps orchitis (RR = 12.7; P = 0.006), atopy (RR = 1.8; P = 0.03), and meningitis (RR = 3.0; P = 0.21). Inguinal herniorrhaphy before the age of 15 years was particularly a risk factor for seminoma, whereas the relative risks were similar for seminoma and teratoma for the other factors. The results add to the growing evidence that congenital abnormalities involving the process of testicular descent and closure of the processus vaginalis are risk factors for testicular cancer, and that some types of testicular damage later in life may also be important. The findings of associations with previous atopy and certain infections suggest a possible second aetiological mechanism - that immunological abnormalities may be associated with an increased risk of testis cancer.

  6. Sex-Specificity of Mineralocorticoid Target Gene Expression during Renal Development, and Long-Term Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Dumeige, Laurence; Storey, Caroline; Decourtye, Lyvianne; Nehlich, Melanie; Lhadj, Christophe; Viengchareun, Say; Kappeler, Laurent; Lombès, Marc; Martinerie, Laetitia

    2017-01-01

    Sex differences have been identified in various biological processes, including hypertension. The mineralocorticoid signaling pathway is an important contributor to early arterial hypertension, however its sex-specific expression has been scarcely studied, particularly with respect to the kidney. Basal systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR) were measured in adult male and female mice. Renal gene expression studies of major players of mineralocorticoid signaling were performed at different developmental stages in male and female mice using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), and were compared to those of the same genes in the lung, another mineralocorticoid epithelial target tissue that regulates ion exchange and electrolyte balance. The role of sex hormones in the regulation of these genes was also investigated in differentiated KC3AC1 renal cells. Additionally, renal expression of the 11 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11βHSD2) protein, a regulator of mineralocorticoid specificity, was measured by immunoblotting and its activity was indirectly assessed in the plasma using liquid-chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in tandem (LC-MSMS) method. SBP and HR were found to be significantly lower in females compared to males. This was accompanied by a sex- and tissue-specific expression profile throughout renal development of the mineralocorticoid target genes serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (Sgk1) and glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (Gilz), together with Hsd11b2, Finally, the implication of sex hormones in this sex-specific expression profile was demonstrated in vitro, most notably for Gilz mRNA expression. We demonstrate a tissue-specific, sex-dependent and developmentally-regulated pattern of expression of the mineralocorticoid pathway that could have important implications in physiology and pathology. PMID:28230786

  7. How to Do a Testicular Self Examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... of good testicular self exam sites on the internet A good article on several testicular problems, including illustrations Information on a variety of health issues affecting Men Click on this to go back ...

  8. Can Testicular Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... testicular cancer diagnosed? ). This is an easy and painless way of finding a tumor. If you choose ... editors, and translators with extensive experience in medical writing. See all references for Testicular Cancer Last Medical ...

  9. Testicular Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Testicular Cancer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Testicular Cancer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  10. Cryptorchidism and testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Batata, M A; Whitmore, W F; Chu, F C; Hilaris, B S; Loh, J; Grabstald, H; Golbey, R

    1980-09-01

    An analysis of 125 patients with a history or clinical evidence of cryptorchidism and testicular germinal tumor treated at our hospital from 1934 to 1975 is presented. Cryptorchidism was corrected ipsilaterally or contralaterally in 83 patients with intrascrotal testis cancer when they were from 4 to 42 years old, either spontaneously (21 patients), by orchiopexy (51 patients) or by hormonal therapy (11 patients). Forty-two cryptorchid patients (uncorrected cases) presented with either ipsilateral inguinal (24 patients), abdominal (14 patients) or contralateral intrascrotal tumors (4 patients). Tumor histologic types on orchiectomy were pure seminoma in 54 patients, embryonal carcinoma in 35, teratocarcinoma in 33 and pure choriocarcinoma in 3. The 5-year survival rates were 60 per cent for the corrected cases and 63 per cent for the uncorrected cases according to cryptorchid state, and they were 78 per cent in patients with pure seminoma and 48 per cent in patients with other germinomas according to histologic type. The majority (58 of 73) of 5-year survivors received regional lymphatic irradiation, in 39 patients with pure seminoma, and/or systemic chemotherapy, in 19 patients with germinal carcinomas, with or without regional lymphadenectomy.

  11. [Epididymal and testicular chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Sibert, L; Safsaf, A; Rigaud, J; Delavierre, D; Labat, J-J

    2010-11-01

    To list clinical and ethiopathogenical elements relevant to the analysis of an epididymal and testicular pain. Review of published articles on the subject in the Medline(®) (PubMed(®)) database, selected according to their scientific relevance. Assessment of a chronic epididymal and testicular pain is mostly clinical and should: (1) eliminate local urological disorder; (2) suggest a neurological problem, based on signs and semiology; (3) suggest injury of nervous truncus according to medical history and scars; (4) detect referred pains, primarily back and thoracolumbar pains. The causal link between epididymal cysts, surgical aftereffect, local infection and chronic epididymal and testicular pain is not established with certainty. Spermatic cord nerve block, as a diagnostic test, should be done before undergoing any invasive procedure. The fundamental notion is being able to distinguish epididymal and testicular pain and scrotal pain, because the testis has an abdominal origin, and therefore a sympathetic instead of sacral innervation. An absence evident somatic or iatrogenous cause should suggest hypersensibility to pain. Assessment of an epididymal and testicular pain requires a global clinical examination, which should take into account every aspect of the pain, including its functional and emotional components. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [Testicular torsion: A case report].

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Gustavo; Bravo-Hernández, Alberto; Bautista-Cruz, Raúl

    2016-07-13

    The acute scrotum is an emergency. Testicular torsion represents approximately 25% of the causes. The annual incidence of testicular torsion is approximately 1/4,000 persons under 25 years, with highest prevalence between 12 and 18 years old. It usually occurs without apparent cause, but it has been associated with anatomical, traumatic, and environmental factors, among others. A male 15 year-old male, with no history of importance, was seen in the Emergency Department, presenting with a sudden and continuous pain in the left testicle. It was accompanied by a pain that radiated to the abdomen and left inguinal area, with nausea and vomiting of more than 12h onset. Doppler ultrasound showed changes suggestive of testicular torsion. Surgery was performed that showed findings of a necrotic left testicle with rotation of the spermatic cord of 360°. A left orchiectomy was performed. Testicular torsion should always be considered one of the leading causes of acute scrotal pain. Delays in diagnosis should be avoided as this is directly related to the percentage of testicular salvage or loss. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a) Identification. A testicular prosthesis is an implanted device that consists of a solid or gel-filled...

  14. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a) Identification. A testicular prosthesis is an implanted device that consists of a solid or gel-filled...

  15. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a) Identification. A testicular prosthesis is an implanted device that consists of a solid or gel-filled...

  16. Origin of INSL3-mediated testicular descent in therian mammals.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Il; Semyonov, Jenia; Chang, Chia Lin; Yi, Wei; Warren, Wesley; Hsu, Sheau Yu Teddy

    2008-06-01

    Testicular descent is a unique physiological adaptation found in therian mammals allowing optimal spermatogenesis below core body temperature. Recent studies show that INSL3, produced by Leydig cells, and its receptor LGR8 (RXFP2) are essential for mediating the transabdominal phase of testicular descent during early development. However, the origin and genetic basis for this physiological adaptation is not clear. Using syntenic mapping and the functional characterization of contemporary and resurrected relaxin family hormones, we show that derivation of INSL3-mediated testicular descent involved the duplication of an ancestral RLN3-like gene that encodes an indiscriminate ligand for LGR7 (RXFP1) and LGR8. This event was followed by acquisition of the LGR7-selective characteristics by a daughter gene (RLN3) prior to the evolution of the common ancestor of monotremes, marsupials, and placentals. A subsequent mutation of the other daughter gene (INSL3) occurred before the emergence of therian mammals, which then led to the derivation of the reciprocal LGR8-specific characteristics of INSL3. The stepwise evolution of these independent signaling pathways through gene duplication and subsequent divergence is consistent with Darwinian theory of selection and adaptation, and the temporal proximity suggests an association between these genetic events and the concurrent evolution of testicular descent in ancestral therian mammals.

  17. Androgen Action via Testicular Arteriole Smooth Muscle Cells Is Important for Leydig Cell Function, Vasomotion and Testicular Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michelle; Sharpe, Richard M.; Moffat, Lindsey; Atanassova, Nina; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Kilter, Sigrid; Bergh, Anders; Smith, Lee B.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of blood flow through the testicular microvasculature by vasomotion is thought to be important for normal testis function as it regulates interstitial fluid (IF) dynamics which is an important intra-testicular transport medium. Androgens control vasomotion, but how they exert these effects remains unclear. One possibility is by signalling via androgen receptors (AR) expressed in testicular arteriole smooth muscle cells. To investigate this and determine the overall importance of this mechanism in testis function, we generated a blood vessel smooth muscle cell-specific AR knockout mouse (SMARKO). Gross reproductive development was normal in SMARKO mice but testis weight was reduced in adulthood compared to control littermates; this reduction was not due to any changes in germ cell volume or to deficits in testosterone, LH or FSH concentrations and did not cause infertility. However, seminiferous tubule lumen volume was reduced in adult SMARKO males while interstitial volume was increased, perhaps indicating altered fluid dynamics; this was associated with compensated Leydig cell failure. Vasomotion was impaired in adult SMARKO males, though overall testis blood flow was normal and there was an increase in the overall blood vessel volume per testis in adult SMARKOs. In conclusion, these results indicate that ablating arteriole smooth muscle AR does not grossly alter spermatogenesis or affect male fertility but does subtly impair Leydig cell function and testicular fluid exchange, possibly by locally regulating microvascular blood flow within the testis. PMID:21049031

  18. Sleep EEG effects of anti-gluco- and anti-mineralocorticoids in old-aged men: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Demiralay, Cüneyt; Agorastos, Agorastos; Steiger, Axel; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Age-related sleep changes have been associated with altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity and impaired feedback inhibition at the glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptor level. To further investigate the specific role of this binary receptor system in the elderly, sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) effects of the MR antagonist spironolactone and GR antagonist mifepristone in old-aged men were compared in this pilot study. Old-aged healthy men (n = 6, 65-91 years) were treated on three occasions in a single-blinded design in random order with mifepristone, spironolactone and placebo, respectively, and nocturnal sleep EEG was recorded. Mifepristone led to increased wake time, decreased stage 2 and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and prolonged REM sleep latency in the first half of the night, whereas spironolactone had no considerable effects on sleep EEG. GR antagonism can potentiate age-related sleep pattern alterations and further support the role of impaired GR signaling in age-related changes in sleep architecture. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  19. Blunted glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid sensitivity to stress in people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Livia A; Urbanova, Livia; Hamer, Mark; Hackett, Ruth A; Lazzarino, Antonio I; Steptoe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Psychological stress may contribute to type 2 diabetes but mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this study, we examined whether stress responsiveness is associated with glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid sensitivity in a controlled experimental comparison of people with type 2 diabetes and non-diabetic participants. Thirty-seven diabetes patients and 37 healthy controls underwent psychophysiological stress testing. Glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid sensitivity (MR) sensitivity were measured by dexamethasone- and prednisolone-inhibition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin (IL) 6 levels, respectively. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate were monitored continuously, and we periodically assessed salivary cortisol, plasma IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1). Following stress, both glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid sensitivity decreased among healthy controls, but did not change in people with diabetes. There was a main effect of group on dexamethasone (F(1,74)=6.852, p=0.013) and prednisolone (F(1,74)=7.295, p=0.010) sensitivity following stress at 45 min after tasks. People with diabetes showed blunted stress responsivity in systolic BP, diastolic BP, heart rate, IL-6, MCP-1, and impaired post-stress recovery in heart rate. People with Diabetes had higher cortisol levels as measured by the total amount excreted over the day and increased glucocorticoid sensitivity at baseline. Our study suggests that impaired stress responsivity in type-2 diabetes is in part due to a lack of stress-induced changes in mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid sensitivity.

  20. Impaired renal H+ secretion and NH3 production in mineralocorticoid-deficient glucocorticoid-replete dogs.

    PubMed

    Hulter, H N; Ilnicki, L P; Harbottle, J A; Sebastian, A

    1977-02-01

    When the administration of exogenous mineralocorticoid hormones was discontinued in adrenalectomized dogs maintained on glucocorticoid, net acid excretion decreased due largely to a reduction in urinary ammonium excretion (UNH4+V), and hyperchloremic hyperkalemic metabolic acidosis occurred and persisted. The reduction in UNH4+V was not associated with an increase in urine pH (UpH) or a decrease in urine flow, but correlated with the severity of hyperkalemia and was mitigated by dietary potassium restriction. UpH decreased to values as low as 5.3. During acidosis, UpH varied directly with UNH4+V, but in relation to UNH4+V, UpH exceeded that in acid-fed mineralocorticoid-replete dogs. Extrapolated to UNH4+V=0, however, UpH was not significantly different in the two groups (5.27 vs. 5.44). When distal delivery of sodium was increased by infusion of sodium phosphate, titratable acid excretion increased in both groups but pateaued at lower rates in the mineralocorticoid-deficient dogs. These results suggest that in mineralocorticoid-deficient dogs, renal ammonia production is diminished, in part due to potassium retention and hyperkalemia; renal hydrogen ion secretory capacity is reduced even when sodium and buffer delivery to the distal nephron is not reduced; and the ability of the kidney to generate normally steep urine-to-blood hydrogen ion concentration gradients is unimpaired.

  1. Defects in the HSD11 gene encoding 11[beta]-hydroxysteriod dehydrogenase are not found in patients with apparent mineralocorticoid excess or 11-oxoreductase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkila, H.; White, P.C. ); Tannin, G.M. ); New, M.I.; Taylor, N.F. ); Kalaitzoglou, G.; Monder, C. )

    1993-09-01

    The syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is a form of low renin hypertension that is thought to be caused by congenital deficiency of 11[beta]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11HSD) activity. This enzyme converts cortisol to cortisone and apparently prevents cortisol from acting as a ligand for the mineralocorticoid (type I) receptor. It also catalyzes the reverse oxoreductase (cortisone to cortisol) reaction. Four patients with AME and the parents of the first patient described (now deceased) were analyzed for mutations in the cloned HSD11 gene encoding an 11HSD enzyme. A patient with suspected cortisone reductase deficiency was also studied. No gross deletions or rearrangements in the HSD11 gene were apparent on hybridizations of blot of genomic DNA. Direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified fragments corresponding to the coding sequences, intronexon junctions, and proximal untranslated regions of this gene revealed no mutations. AME may involve mutations in a gene for another enzyme with 11HSD activity or perhaps another cortisol metabolizing enzyme. 48 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Ultrasound demonstration of testicular microlithiasis in pediatric patients: is there an association with testicular germ cell tumors?

    PubMed

    Volokhina, Yulia V; Oyoyo, Udochukwu E; Miller, John H

    2014-01-01

    There is suggestion that testicular microlithiasis predicts risk of testicular malignancy, especially testicular germ cell tumors. This association remains uncertain. We retrospectively reviewed testicular germ cell tumor occurrence in patients with testicular microlithiasis to assess this association and determined the prevalence of testicular microlithiasis in symptomatic boys. This study was IRB and HIPAA compliant. Two-thousand six-hundred twenty-five testicular US exams performed on 2,266 children (younger than 19 years of age) in our institution from 2000 through 2011 were reviewed for presence of testicular microlithiasis and masses. Testicular microlithiasis was defined as presence of five or more testicular microcalcifications on a single US image. Incidence of testicular germ cell tumors was calculated in a group of patients with testicular microlithiasis and in a control group without testicular microlithiasis. Relative risk, odds ratio, 90% and 95%CI were calculated. Eighty-seven patients out of 2,266 had testicular microlithiasis. One child was found to have both testicular germ cell tumor and testicular microlithiasis. In 2,179 children without testicular microlithiasis, 8 had testicular germ cell tumors. Incidence of testicular microlithiasis was 3.8%. Incidence of testicular germ cell tumors in testicular microlithiasis patients was 1.2%, and 0.38% in non-testicular microlithiasis patients. Relative risk of testicular germ cell tumors in testicular microlithiasis patients vs. non-testicular microlithiasis patients was 3.13 (90%CI: 0.55-17.76; 95%CI: 0.40-24.76), odds ratio 3.16 (90%CI: 0.55-18.32; 95%CI: 0.39-25.5). There is no association between testicular microlithiasis and testicular germ cell tumors. We had hoped to do a meta-analysis, but only two studies had a sufficient case control group of non-testicular microlithiasis patients.

  3. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Testicular Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of testicular cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  5. The role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 in the mammalian testis and their involvement in testicular torsion and autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Lysiak, Jeffrey J

    2004-03-10

    This review will focus the roles of TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, and IL-1 beta in the mammalian testis and in two testicular pathologies, testicular torsion and orchitis. TNF alpha in the testis is produced by round spermatids, pachytene spermatocytes, and testicular macrophages. The type 1 TNF receptor has been found on Sertoli and Leydig cells and numerous studies suggest a paracrine mode of action for TNF alpha in the normal testis. IL-1 alpha has been reported to be produced by Sertoli cells, testicular macrophages, and possibly postmeiotic germ cells. IL-1 receptors have been reported on Sertoli cells, Leydig cells, testicular macrophages, and germ cells suggesting both autocrine and paracrine functions. While these proinflammatory cytokines have important roles in normal testicular homeostasis, an elevation of their expression can lead to testicular dysfunctions. Testicular torsion is a clinical pathology with results in testicular ischemia and surgical intervention is often required for reperfusion. A pivotal role for IL-1beta in the pathology of testicular torsion has been recently described whereby an increase in IL-1beta production after reperfusion of the testis is correlated with the activation of the stress-related kinase, c-jun N-terminal kinase, and ultimately resulting in neutrophil recruitment to the testis and germ cell apoptosis. In autoimmune orchitis, on the other hand, TNF alpha produced by T-lymphocytes and macrophages of the testis has been implicated in the development and progression of the disease. Thus, both proinflammatory cytokines, TNF alpha and IL-1, have significant roles in normal testicular functions as well as in certain testicular pathologies.

  6. What Are the Key Statistics about Testicular Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer About Testicular Cancer What Are the Key Statistics About Testicular Cancer? The American Cancer Society’s estimates ... you would like to know more about survival statistics, see Testicular cancer survival rates . Visit the American ...

  7. Timely diagnosis of testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Moul, Judd W

    2007-05-01

    Early detection of testicular tumors has been touted as beneficial for more than 100 years. In earlier eras, early detection was virtually the only way to improve outcomes. According to statistics that have been tracked in the literature, however, the delay from initial symptoms to definitive diagnosis by radical orchiectomy has averaged 4 to 5 months. In the modern era of effective chemotherapy, the effects of a delayed diagnosis on survival can be overcome but at the cost of a more morbid treatment regimen. Although screening on a population basis is not currently recommended by the National Cancer Institute, teaching testicular self examination to young men, particularly those who have risk factors, is reasonable.

  8. The stimulatory effect of canrenoate, a mineralocorticoid antagonist, on the activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis is abolished by alprazolam, a benzodiazepine, in humans.

    PubMed

    Grottoli, S; Giordano, R; Maccagno, B; Pellegrino, M; Ghigo, E; Arvat, E

    2002-10-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the hippocampus play a major role in the control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, mediating the proactive feedback of glucocorticoids in the maintenance of basal activity. Intracerebroventricular and intrahippocampal MR blockade stimulates HPA axis in animals; the systemic administration of mineralocorticoid antagonists enhances spontaneous and CRH-stimulated ACTH and cortisol secretion in humans. Benzodiazepines, namely alprazolam, activate central gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic receptors, which are mainly distributed in the hippocampus. Alprazolam has a inhibitory effect on HPA axis either in basal conditions or after central nervous system-mediated stimuli. In humans, alprazolam strongly reduces the corticotroph responsiveness to removal of glucocorticoid feedback by metyrapone. We studied the effect of alprazolam (0.02 mg/kg, orally) on the effect of canrenoate (CAN), an MR antagonist (200 mg as an iv bolus, followed by 200 mg infused in 250 ml saline) or placebo on ACTH, cortisol, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion in six normal young women (aged 25-32 yr; body mass index, 19-23 kg/m(2)). During placebo, ACTH, cortisol, and DHEA secretion showed a progressive decrease (baseline vs. nadir, mean +/- SEM, from 1830-2400 h, 2.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.4 +/- 0.3 pmol/liter, 133.2 +/- 16.4 vs. 46.9 +/- 5.2 nmol/liter, and 22.6 +/- 2.3 vs. 18.6 +/- 2.3 nmol/liter, respectively), although statistical significance was obtained for ACTH and cortisol only (P < 0.05). During CAN treatment, ACTH, cortisol, and DHEA secretion showed a progressive rise, which began at approximately 2100 h and peaked between 2300 and 2400 h (2.9 +/- 0.3 pmol/liter, 172.6 +/- 27.9 nmol/liter, and 45.3 +/- 10.7 nmol/liter, respectively; P < 0.05). Alprazolam abolished the CAN-induced increases in ACTH, cortisol, and DHEA levels (1.8 +/- 0.1 pmol/liter, 59.7 +/- 8.6 nmol/liter, and 19.8 +/- 6.7 nmol/liter; P < 0.05), inducing hormonal

  9. Testicular growth and development in puberty.

    PubMed

    Koskenniemi, Jaakko J; Virtanen, Helena E; Toppari, Jorma

    2017-06-01

    To describe pubertal testicular growth in humans, changes in testicular cell populations that result in testicular growth, and the role of testosterone and gonadotrophins follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in testicular growth. When human data were not available, studies in nonhuman primates and/or rodents were used as surrogates. Testicular growth in puberty follows a sigmoidal growth curve, with a large variation in timing of testicular growth and adult testicular volume. Testicular growth early in puberty is due to increase in Sertoli cell number and length of seminiferous tubules, whereas the largest and fastest growth results from the increase in the diameter of the seminiferous tubules first due to spermatogonial proliferation and then due to the expansion of meiotic and haploid germ cells. FSH stimulates Sertoli cell and spermatogonial proliferation, whereas LH/testosterone is mandatory to complete spermatogenesis. However, FSH and LH/testosterone work in synergy and are both needed for normal spermatogenesis. Testicular growth during puberty is rapid, and mostly due to germ cell expansion and growth in seminiferous tubule diameter triggered by androgens. Pre-treatment with FSH before the induction of puberty may improve the treatment of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, but remains to be proven.

  10. Apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome: report of one family with three affected children.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Taiba; Al-Shaikh, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    The syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypertension, hypokalemia, low renin, and hypoaldosteronism. It is caused by deficiency of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, which results in a defect of the peripheral metabolism of cortisol to cortisone. As a consequence, the serum cortisol half-life (T½) is prolonged, ACTH is suppressed, and serum cortisol concentration is normal. The hormonal diagnosis of the disorder is made by the increased ratio of urine-free cortisol to cortisone. In patients with AME, this ratio is 5-18, while in normal individuals it is <0.5. These studies suggest that an abnormality in cortisol action or metabolism results in cortisol behaving as a potent mineralocorticoid and causing the syndrome of AME. We report three siblings - two female and one male - with the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess who presented with hypertension, hypokalemia, low renin, and low aldosterone levels. The finding of abnormally high ratios of 24-h urine-free cortisol to cortisone in our three patients (case 1, 8.4; case 2, 25; and case 3, 7.5) confirmed the diagnosis of apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome in these children. They were treated with oral potassium supplements. The addition of spironolactone resulted in a decrease in blood pressure, rise in serum potassium and a gradual increase in plasma renin activity in all three. In this study, the genetic testing of those three siblings with the typical clinical features of AME has detected missense mutation c.662C>T (p.Arg208Cys) in exon 3 of the HSD11B2 gene in the homozygous state.

  11. Effects of hyper- and hypothyroidism on the development and proliferation of testicular cells in prepubertal rats.

    PubMed

    Fadlalla, Mohamed Babo; Wei, Quanwei; Fedail, Jaafar Sulieman; Mehfooz, Asif; Mao, Dagan; Shi, Fangxiong

    2017-08-07

    Thyroid hormones are important in the development and regulation of testes. This study was conducted to determine the effects of hyper- and hypothyroidism on testicular development in prepubertal rats aged 20-70 days. Weaning male rats (20 days old) until day 70 age were randomly divided into four groups: control, hyperthyroid (hyper-T), hypothyroid (hypo-T) and hypothyroid treated with thyroxine (T4) (hypo-T+T4). The results indicated that thyroid hormones caused a significant effect in body and testis weights, and food and water consumption. In addition there were changes in serum concentrations of tri-iodothyronine, T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and testosterone. Histomorphology showed a significant decrease in seminiferous tubule diameter in hyper-T compared to the other groups. Leydig cell numbers showed a significant elevation in hyper-T but not in hypo-T groups. Immunostaining indicated that TSH receptor (TSHR), thyroid hormone receptors α/β (TRαβ) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) have the roles in testicular development. Our findings suggest that hyper- and hypo-thyroidism regulate testicular cell proliferation and spermatogenesis in prepubertal rats, indicating that expression of TSHR, TRαβ and PCNA may be regulated by thyroid hormones that are involved in testicular development; and that the administration of T4 to the hypo-T+T4 group leads to an improvement in the testicular condition. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Differential expression of aromatase, estrogen receptor alpha and 17β-HSD associated with the processes of total testicular regression and recrudescence in the bat Myotis nigricans (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae).

    PubMed

    Beguelini, Mateus R; Falleiros, Luiz R; Góes, Rejane M; Rahal, Paula; Morielle-Versute, Eliana; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2014-05-15

    Despite the worldwide distribution and many unique reproductive adaptations that bats present, many aspects of their reproductive hormonal regulation have not been adequately studied, especially in species that presented patterns of total testicular regression. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the testicular expression of 17β-HSD type 1, aromatase and ERα in the bat Myotis nigricans, during the four periods of its reproductive cycle. Immunoreactivity for ERα was detected only in the cytoplasm of elongated spermatids and in the nuclei of spermatogonia and Sertoli cells. Expression of aromatase was observed in round and elongated spermatids and in Sertoli and Leydig cells. Immunoreactivity for 17β-HSD was restricted to the cytoplasm of Leydig cells. The three expression patterns varied significantly during the four periods of the reproductive cycle. Expression of ERα and aromatase in spermatids was continuous, while expression of ERα in spermatogonia occurred only in initial types (Ap). Expression of ERα and aromatase in Sertoli cells varied, with expression only in periods of spermatogenetic activities; and the same variation was observed for the expression of aromatase and 17β-HSD in Leydig cells. We, therefore, propose that the processes of total testicular regression and posterior recrudescence suffered by M. nigricans from September to January in the northwest of the São Paulo State of Brazil, are directly regulated by testosterone and estrogen. This occurs via the production of testosterone by 17β-HSD, its conversion into estrogen by aromatase, and activation/deactivation of Sertoli cells' AR and spermatogonia's ERα. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  14. Testicular cancer health education: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Rosella, J D

    1994-10-01

    Cancer of the testis is the most common malignancy in men between the ages of 15 and 35, yet it is one of the most curable cancers. The optimistic prognosis that results from early detection and treatment of testicular cancer underscores the critical need for teaching testicular self-examination (TSE). However, an integrative review of the health education literature suggests that the men most susceptible are virtually unaware of the symptoms of testicular cancer and how to detect them. Although educational materials have been available, very little intervention research has been published on testicular cancer. The literature to date has focused on the pyschosocial factors associated with the practice of TSE and increasing knowledge of testicular cancer. Although an important beginning step, knowledge of testicular cancer alone as a preventive health behaviour is not sufficient if young men either do not know how to do the examination on their own testicles or do not believe it is important to them. Nurses should incorporate health education for testicular cancer and TSE in the delivery of routine primary health care. Furthermore, future research should aim to (a) increase knowledge through the educational curricula of high schools and colleges by use of video presentations, (b) examine the efficacy of using silicone models to ensure that men can be trained to detect the symptoms of testicular cancer, and (c) study compliance with recommendations to perform TSE.

  15. Testicular Cancer Education in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohl, Royal E.

    1998-01-01

    Testicular cancer (TC) education is not widespread, though TC is the most common cancer in men ages 15-34 years. Teachers can positively influence young men by providing TC and testicular self-examination (TSE) education in school. The paper describes TC and TSE, discussing strategies for and barriers to implementation of TC/TSE instruction in the…

  16. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a...

  17. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a...

  18. [Isolated testicular tuberculosis: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Joual, A; Rabii, R; Guessous, H; Benjelloun, M; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2000-06-01

    In this study, a case has been reported involving a 66-year old male who was admitted for scrotal pain on the right side with possible testicular involvement, but with no associated urinary disorder. At physical examination, the right testicle was found to have increased in volume: this was further confirmed by ultrasonography, but the findings were insufficient to exclude the hypothesis of testicular cancer. An exploratory orchidectomy by upper inguinal route was therefore carried out, and histopathological examination showed the destruction of testicular tissue by several granulomas, and caseous necrosis with giant cells. Antibacterial chemotherapy was administered after an i.v. urography found no evidence of abnormality or urinary disorder, thereby eliminating an active site of genitourinary tuberculosis. This case shows the importance of considering testicular tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of testicular enlargement in a region where this disease is endemic, despite the absence of systemic pulmonary and urinary signs of tuberculosis.

  19. Cimetidine-induced vascular cell apoptosis impairs testicular microvasculature in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, Flávia L; Yamauti, Caroline T; Caneguim, Breno H; Cerri, Paulo S; Miraglia, Sandra M; Sasso-Cerri, Estela

    2012-10-01

    Cimetidine, an H₂ receptor antagonist used for treatment of gastric ulcers, exerts antiandrogenic and antiangiogenic effects. In the testes cimetidine impairs spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells and peritubular tissue, inducing apoptosis in the myoid cells. Regarding the importance of histamine and androgens for vascular maintenance, the effect of cimetidine on the structural integrity of the testicular vasculature was evaluated. Adult male rats received cimetidine (CMTG) and saline (CG) for 50 days. The testes were fixed in buffered 4% formaldehyde and embedded in historesin and paraffin. In the PAS-stained sections, the microvascular density (MVD) and the vascular luminal area (VLA) were obtained. TUNEL method was performed for detection of cell death. Testicular fragments embedded in Araldite were analyzed under transmission electron microscopy. A significant decrease in the MVD and VLA and a high number of collapsed blood vessel profiles were observed in CMTG. Endothelial cells and vascular muscle cells were TUNEL-positive and showed ultrastructural features of apoptosis. These results indicate that cimetidine induces apoptosis in vascular cells, leading to testicular vascular atrophy. A possible antagonist effect of cimetidine on the H₂ receptors and/or androgen receptors in the vascular cells may be responsible for the impairment of the testicular microvasculature.

  20. [Fertility in testicular cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Shin, Takeshi; Miyata, Akane; Arai, Gaku; Okada, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Testicular cancer(TC)is the most common and curable cancer affecting men of reproductive age. Successful treatment approaches have resulted in longer life expectancy in TC survivors. The most frequently used treatment for TC is a combination of inguinal orchiectomy, and either radiotherapy or cisplatin-based chemotherapy. In many TC patients, sperm quality is already abnormal and there may even be a lack of viable spermatozoa at the time of diagnosis. Therefore, the effect of cancer treatment on fertility is a potentially significant issue. Fertility preservation in these men has become essential and needs to be discussed prior to the start of cancer treatment. The only currently established fertility preservation method is the cryopreservation of sperm before therapy. For most patients seeking cryopreservation, the semen sample is collected via masturbation. If the patient is unable to ejaculate for any reason, other techniques such as vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation can be performed. In azoospermic or severely oligozoospermic patients, testicular sperm extraction at the time of the inguinal orchiectomy is a useful technique for obtaining spermatozoa before cytotoxic therapy. We herein present an overview of the current topics on fertility in TC patients, including the effects of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. We also describe the strategy for fertility preservation in these patients.

  1. Testicular Schistosomiasis Mimicking Malignancy in a Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ekenze, Sebastian O; Modekwe, Victor O; Nzegwu, Martin A; Ekpemo, Samuel C; Ezomike, Uchechukwu O

    2015-08-01

    Schistosomiasis is an important communicable disease in the developing world. However, testicular schistosomiasis is an extremely rare condition. We report a case of testicular schistosomiasis mimicking testicular tumour in a 13 year old who presented with huge unilateral testicular mass. The dilemma encountered in the diagnosis and treatment of this child is presented to highlight the need for high index of suspicion of this pathology in children with testicular mass presenting from schistosomiasis-endemic areas.

  2. Testicular conditions in athletes: torsion, tumors, and epididymitis.

    PubMed

    Sandella, Bradley; Hartmann, Brett; Berkson, David; Hong, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Individuals involved in sports are at risk for sustaining various injuries. In addition to musculoskeletal complaints, male athletes are at risk of incurring testicular injuries. These issues can range from an acute emergency such as testicular torsion to indolent testicular tumors. In contrast, epididymitis can present in stages. Presentation and management of testicular complaints can vary depending on the condition. Physicians who provide medical care to athletes need to be competent in diagnosing and managing testicular injuries.

  3. [Verification of testicular cancer guidelines].

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Norio; Azuma, Haruhito

    2012-12-01

    Testicular cancer is a rare disease that affects 1-2 in 100,000 people in Japan ; however, it is a very significant disease in that it has a high prevalence amongst young adults aged in their 20s and 30s and it brings about metastasis from a relatively early stage. The 2009 edition of the Testicular Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines sets out a detailed summary of 32 clinical questions (CQ) considered necessary in routine clinical practice across the fields of epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, etc, in the form of recommendations and commentary. These CQs are considered extremely important in understanding the foundation of future testicular cancer treatment guidelines. In this symposium, five doctors gave lectures consisting of the following contents in which they validated the guidelines and gave concrete clinical practice examples through cases they had experienced themselves with regards to the treatment strategies for (1) stage I patients, (2) patients with advanced cancer and (3) patients with extragonadal germ cell tumors. (1) Stage I patients : In seminoma cases, the doctors focused on the relapse prevention effect provided by single-agent carboplatin adjuvant chemotherapy. In non-seminoma cases, treatment options were considered according to risk based on the presence or absence of vascular invasion, a prognostic factor. (2) Patients with advanced cancer : 30% of testicular cancers are metastatic and progress to advanced cancer. In refractory cases resistant to bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin therapy, etoposide ifosfamide, and cisplatin therapy and vinblastine, ifosfamide and cisplatin therapy have been used, but without satisfactory results and the development of new salvage chemotherapy is an important issue. The therapeutic strategies against advanced testicular cancer were narrowed down to (2) -1) therapeutic effects from ultra-high-dose chemotherapy, (2) -2) salvage chemotherapy in cases where residual tumors are observed in induction

  4. Mineralocorticoid escape by the kidney but not the heart in experimental asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Costello-Boerrigter, Lisa C; Boerrigter, Guido; Harty, Gail J; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Redfield, Margaret M; Burnett, John C

    2007-09-01

    Unlike healthy subjects, overt congestive heart failure cannot "escape" the sodium- and water-retaining actions of mineralocorticoid excess. It is undefined whether escape occurs in asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (ALVD), which is characterized by preserved sodium homeostasis, natriuretic peptide activation, and normal circulating aldosterone. We hypothesized that, in ALVD, mineralocorticoid excess with exogenous deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) would overwhelm renal compensatory mechanisms, resulting in sodium and water retention, and promote renal and cardiac collagen deposition. ALVD was induced in 2 groups (N=5 each) of dogs by tachypacing at 180 bpm. Urine was collected daily and blood drawn at baseline and days 2, 5, 8, and 11. One group served as control (ALVD), and the other received DOCA (ALVD+DOCA) starting at day 2 of pacing. Urine flow and sodium excretion were unchanged in the ALVD group. In ALVD+DOCA, urine flow and sodium excretion decreased on the first 2 days DOCA was given but normalized starting day 4. Urine flow and urinary cGMP excretion increased in ALVD+DOCA after DOCA escape. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide, and cGMP increased equally in both groups. There were no differences in cardiorenal and hemodynamic parameters in an acute study on day 11. Although renal collagen area fraction was similar, left ventricular collagen area fraction in ALVD+DOCA was significantly higher than in ALVD (3.3+/-0.4% versus 2.0+/-0.2%; P=0.012). We conclude that ALVD can escape the sodium- and water-retaining effects of mineralocorticoid excess. Despite renal escape, increased left ventricular collagen deposition suggests that the heart but not the kidney failed to escape the tissue effects of DOCA.

  5. Scrotal/testicular thermoregulation and the effects of increased testicular temperature in the bull.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, J P; Cook, R B; Coulter, G H

    1997-07-01

    Scrotal/testicular thermoregulation is a complex process controlled by numerous local mechanisms that attempt to maintain the testes at conditions ideal for spermatogenesis. This article provides a background of the anatomy and physiology of the bovine scrotum and its contents with emphasis on thermoregulation. Experiments are cited that demonstrate scrotal/testicular thermoregulation mechanisms and the effect that changes in ambient temperature have on internal testicular temperature and subsequent seminal quality.

  6. Morphologic manifestations of testicular and epididymal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Justin D; Whitney, Katharine M

    2014-01-01

    Histopathologic examination of the testis is the most sensitive means to detect effects on spermatogenesis; however, the complexity of testicular histology, interrelatedness of cell types within the testis, and long duration of spermatogenesis can make assessment of a testicular toxicant challenging. A thorough understanding of the histology and morphologic manifestations of response to injury is critical to successfully identify a testicular effect and to begin to understand the underlying mechanism of action. The basic patterns of response to xenobiotic-induced injury to the testis and epididymis are detailed and discussed. PMID:26413388

  7. [Segmental testicular infarction in sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Mueller, F E

    2014-05-01

    Vascular occlusions are the clinical indicators of sickle cell disease and in urology they can lead to papillary necrosis, renal infarction or priapism. Segmental testicular infarction in patients with sickle cell disease is a rare event and only a few cases have been reported. We present a 25-year-old man with right testicular pain increasing over 3 days and sickle cell disease. Ultrasound of the right scrotum presented an inhomogeneous, mainly hypoechegenic mass with a hyperechogenic margin and no sign of blood flow. A partial orchiectomy was performed with total enucleation of the lesion, which was histologically diagnosed as benign hemorrhagic necrotic testicular tissue.

  8. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 complicated by mineralocorticoid-responsive hyponatremia of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Hidekatsu; Okamoto, Seiko; Kunimatsu, Junwa

    2010-09-15

    We experienced the first case with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 (anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody-positive hypothyroidism and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-positive diabetes) complicated by mineralocorticoid-responsive hyponatremia of the elderly. This case is also a rare slowly progressive insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (SPIDDM) case, for which the patient has been treated for many years with sulfonylurea or glinide. Our observation also demonstrated that glucose metabolism in autoimmune diabetes such as SPIDDM is influenced by appetite, thyroid function and glucocorticoid effect.

  9. Testicular thermoregulation in Bos indicus, crossbred and Bos taurus bulls: relationship with scrotal, testicular vascular cone and testicular morphology, and effects on semen quality and sperm production.

    PubMed

    Brito, Leonardo F C; Silva, Antonio E D F; Barbosa, Rogerio T; Kastelic, John P

    2004-01-15

    Mechanisms of testicular thermoregulation, the relationship of scrotal, testicular vascular cone (TVC), and testicular morphology with thermoregulatory capability, and their effects on semen quality and sperm production were studied in 20 Bos indicus, 28 crossbred, and 26 Bos taurus bulls. The ratio of testicular artery length and volume to testicular volume were larger (P<0.05) in B. indicus and crossbred bulls than in B. taurus bulls (1.03 and 0.94 cm/cm3 versus 0.48 cm/cm3; 0.034 and 0.047 ml/cm3 versus 0.017 ml/cm3, respectively). Testicular artery wall thickness (average 192.5, 229.0, and 290.0 microm, respectively) and arterial-venous blood distance in the TVC (average 330.5, 373.7, and 609.4 microm, respectively) were smallest in B. indicus, intermediary in crossbred, and greatest in B. taurus bulls (P<0.05); the proximity between arterial and venous blood was consistent with the estimated decrease in arterial blood temperature after passage through the TVC (5.9, 5.0, and 2.9 degrees C, in B. indicus, crossbred, and B. taurus bulls, respectively). In crossbred and B. taurus bulls, there was a positive top-to-bottom scrotal temperature gradient and a negative testicular subtunic temperature gradient. However, in B. indicus bulls, both scrotal and testicular subtunic temperatures gradients were positive. Differences in the vascular arrangement, characteristics of the artery (e.g. wall thickness) or thickness of the tunica albuginea may have affected the testicular arterial blood and subtunic temperatures in B. indicus bulls. Better testicular thermoregulatory capability was associated with increased scrotal shape (pendulosity), testicular artery length and volume, and top-to-bottom gradient of the distance between the artery wall and the veins in the TVC. Increased semen quality was associated with increased testicular volume and scrotal subcutaneous (SQT) temperature gradient, and with decreased scrotal surface and testicular temperatures. Increased sperm

  10. Educating young men about testicular cancer: support for a comprehensive testicular cancer campaign.

    PubMed

    Wanzer, Melissa Bekelja; Foster, S Catherine; Servoss, Timothy; LaBelle, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of testicular cancer among men 15-39 years of age, little has been done to increase awareness of this disease or educate males about its prevention. To fill this gap, the Standard Model of Health Communication was incorporated to design and implement a comprehensive testicular cancer campaign among male college students. To test the effectiveness of these messages, college students (N = 220) completed measures before and after the campaign. In addition, the authors obtained a control group of male college students (N = 52) who were not exposed to the messages. Survey items assessed awareness of testicular cancer and behaviors related to testicular cancer. Participants' knowledge of testicular cancer and likelihood of conducting a testicular self-exam increased significantly after being exposed to the campaign information. Men who were exposed to testicular cancer messages were more knowledgeable about testicular cancer and were more likely to conduct testicular self-examinations than were men in the control group.

  11. Testicular myeloid sarcoma: case report

    PubMed Central

    Zago, Luzia Beatriz Ribeiro; Ladeia, Antônio Alexandre Lisbôa; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; de Oliveira, Leonardo Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid sarcomas are extramedullary solid tumors composed of immature granulocytic precursor cells. In association with acute myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders, they may arise concurrently with compromised bone marrow related to acute myeloid leukemia, as a relapsed presentation, or occur as the first manifestation. The testicles are considered to be an uncommon site for myeloid sarcomas. No therapeutic strategy has been defined as best but may include chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This study reports the evolution of a patient with testicular myeloid sarcoma as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. The patient initially refused medical treatment and died five months after the clinical condition started. PMID:23580888

  12. Scrotal reconstruction and testicular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Jacob W; Lester, Kyle M; Chen, Andrew; Simhan, Jay

    2017-08-01

    Scrotal surgery encompasses a wide-variety of surgical techniques for an even wider variety of indications. In this manuscript, we review our indications, techniques, and pit-falls for various reconstructive scrotal surgeries as-well-as surgical tips for placement of testicular prostheses. Penoscrotal webbing (PSW) is an abnormal, often-problematic distal insertion of scrotal skin onto the ventral penile shaft. There are several effective and straightforward techniques used to revise this condition, which include simple scrotoplasty, single- or double-Z-plasty, or the VY-flap scrotoplasty. Reconstruction is also commonly indicated following scrotal skin loss caused by infection, trauma, lymphedema, hidradenitis, and cancer. Although initial management of these conditions often involves scrotal skin removal, repair of expansive scrotal skin loss can be technically difficult and can be accomplished by using one of several skin flaps or skin grafting. Split-thickness skin grafting of scrotal defects can be accomplished easily, and provides durable results.

  13. Testicular lesions of streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Oksanen, A

    1975-01-01

    Diabetes was induced in adult male albino rats by a single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (75 mg/kg body weight). The diabetes was allowed to stabilize for at least 15 days, whereafter the testicular and seminal vesicle histology was studied at various time intervals. Reduction in testis weights and tubule diameters was significant after 2 weeks of diabetes. The changes in seminiferous tubules ranged from premature sloughing of epithelium to total cessation of spermatogenesis. The testicular histology of diabetic animals frequently greatly simulated the situation described following hypophysectomy. By subjective visual assessment the number of Leydig cells was found to be normal or reduced in all of the diabetic animals. Diabetes was also demonstrated to induce seminal vesicle atrophy, which did not show any correlation with the degree of testicular lesions. The possible etiology of testicular damage in diabetic animals is discussed.

  14. Cadmium-induced testicular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn{sup 2+} and/or Ca{sup 2+} mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men.

  15. Cadmium-induced Testicular Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, and the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor, oxidative stress inducer and how it may disrupt the Zn+2 and/or Ca+2 mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity is emerged, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men. PMID:19236889

  16. The Danish Testicular Cancer database.

    PubMed

    Daugaard, Gedske; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Bandak, Mikkel; Mortensen, Mette Saksø; Larsson, Heidi; Søgaard, Mette; Toft, Birgitte Groenkaer; Engvad, Birte; Agerbæk, Mads; Holm, Niels Vilstrup; Lauritsen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The nationwide Danish Testicular Cancer database consists of a retrospective research database (DaTeCa database) and a prospective clinical database (Danish Multidisciplinary Cancer Group [DMCG] DaTeCa database). The aim is to improve the quality of care for patients with testicular cancer (TC) in Denmark, that is, by identifying risk factors for relapse, toxicity related to treatment, and focusing on late effects. All Danish male patients with a histologically verified germ cell cancer diagnosis in the Danish Pathology Registry are included in the DaTeCa databases. Data collection has been performed from 1984 to 2007 and from 2013 onward, respectively. The retrospective DaTeCa database contains detailed information with more than 300 variables related to histology, stage, treatment, relapses, pathology, tumor markers, kidney function, lung function, etc. A questionnaire related to late effects has been conducted, which includes questions regarding social relationships, life situation, general health status, family background, diseases, symptoms, use of medication, marital status, psychosocial issues, fertility, and sexuality. TC survivors alive on October 2014 were invited to fill in this questionnaire including 160 validated questions. Collection of questionnaires is still ongoing. A biobank including blood/sputum samples for future genetic analyses has been established. Both samples related to DaTeCa and DMCG DaTeCa database are included. The prospective DMCG DaTeCa database includes variables regarding histology, stage, prognostic group, and treatment. The DMCG DaTeCa database has existed since 2013 and is a young clinical database. It is necessary to extend the data collection in the prospective database in order to answer quality-related questions. Data from the retrospective database will be added to the prospective data. This will result in a large and very comprehensive database for future studies on TC patients.

  17. Mineralocorticoid receptor genotype moderates the association between physical neglect and serum BDNF.

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, Andressa; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Blaya, Carolina; Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; da Rosa, Eduarda Dias; de Aguiar, Bianca Wollenhaupt; Stertz, Laura; Bosa, Vera Lúcia; Schuch, Ilaine; Goldani, Marcelo; Kapczinski, Flavio; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate if a polymorphism in the NR3C2 gene moderates the association between childhood trauma on serum levels of brain derived neurothrophic factor (sBDNF). sBDNF was used here as a general marker of alteration in brain function. This is a community cross sectional study comprising 90 adolescents (54 with anxiety disorders). DNA was extracted from saliva in order to genotype the MR-2G/C (rs2070951) polymorphism using real time PCR. Blood was collected for sBDNF Elisa immunoassay. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was used to evaluate childhood abuse and neglect. Main effects and gene environment interactions were tested using linear regression models. Anxiety disorders were not associated with the MR-2G/C polymorphism or with sBDNF levels, but the number of C alleles of the MR-2G/C polymorphism was significantly associated with higher sBDNF levels (b = 8.008; p-value = 0.001). Subjects with intermediate and high exposure to physical neglect showed higher sBDNF levels if compared to subjects non-exposed (b = 11.955; p = 0.004 and b = 16.186; p = 0.009, respectively). In addition, we detected a significant physical neglect by MR-2G/C C allele interaction on sBDNF levels (p = 0.005), meaning that intermediate and high exposure to childhood neglect were only associated with increased sBDNF levels in subjects with the CC genotype, but not in subjects with other genotypes. Our findings suggest that genetic variants in NR3C2 gene may partially explain plastic brain vulnerability to traumatic events. Further studies are needed to investigate the moderating effects of NR3C2 gene in more specific markers of alteration in brain function.

  18. Mineralocorticoid receptor haplotypes sex-dependently moderate depression susceptibility following childhood maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Vinkers, Christiaan H; Joëls, Marian; Milaneschi, Yuri; Gerritsen, Lotte; Kahn, René S; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Boks, Marco P M

    2015-04-01

    The MR is an important regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and a prime target for corticosteroids. There is increasing evidence from both clinical and preclinical studies that the MR has different effects on behavior and mood in males and females. To investigate the hypothesis that the MR sex-dependently influences the relation between childhood maltreatment and depression, we investigated three common and functional MR haplotypes (GA, CA, and CG haplotype, based on rs5522 and rs2070951) in a population-based cohort (N = 665) and an independent clinical cohort from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) (N = 1639). The CA haplotype sex-dependently moderated the relation between childhood maltreatment and depressive symptoms both in the population-based sample (sex × maltreatment × haplotype: β = -4.07, P = 0.029) and in the clinical sample (sex × maltreatment × haplotype, β = -2.40, P = 0.011). Specifically, female individuals in the population-based sample were protected (β = -4.58, P = 2.0 e(-5)), whereas males in the clinical sample were at increased risk (β = 2.54, P = 0.0022). In line with these results, female GA haplotype carriers displayed increased vulnerability in the population-based sample (β = 4.58, P = 7.5 e(-5)) whereas male CG-carriers showed increased resilience in the clinical sample (β = -2.71, P = 0.016). Consistently, we found a decreased lifetime MDD risk for male GA haplotype carriers following childhood maltreatment but an increased risk for male CA haplotype carriers in the clinical sample. In both samples, sex-dependent effects were observed for GA-GA diplotype carriers. In summary, sex plays an important role in determining whether functional genetic variation in MR is beneficial or detrimental, with an apparent female advantage for the CA haplotype but male advantage for the GA and CG haplotype. These sex-dependent effects of MR on depression susceptibility following childhood maltreatment are relevant in light of the increased prevalence of mood disorders in women and point to a sex-specific role of MR in the etiology of depression following childhood maltreatment.

  19. Secondary malignant neoplasms in testicular cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Curreri, Stephanie A; Fung, Chunkit; Beard, Clair J

    2015-09-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among men aged 15 to 40 years, and the incidence of testicular cancer is steadily increasing. Despite successful treatment outcomes and the rate of survival at 5 to 10 years being 95%, survivors can experience late effects of both their cancer and the treatment they received, including secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs). We discuss the development of non-germ cell SMNs that develop after diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer and their effect on mortality. Patients diagnosed with testicular cancer frequently choose postoperative surveillance if they are diagnosed with clinical stage I disease. These patients may experience an increased risk for developing SMNs following radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging. Similarly, radiotherapy for testicular cancer is associated with increased risks of developing both solid tumors and leukemia. Studies have reported that patients exposed to higher doses of radiation have an increased risk of developing SMNs when compared with patients who received lower doses of radiation. Patients treated with chemotherapy also experience an increased risk of developing SMNs following testicular cancer, though the risk following chemotherapy and radiation therapy combined is not well described. A large population-based study concluded that the rate ratios for both cancer-specific and all-cause mortality for SMNs among testicular cancer survivors were not significantly different from those of matched first cancers. Although it is known that patients who receive adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy or who undergo routine diagnostic or follow-up imaging for a primary testicular cancer are at an increased risk for developing SMNs, the extent of this risk is largely unknown. It is critically important that research be conducted to determine this risk and its contributing factors as accurately as possible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lifetime growth and risk of testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Lorenzo; Vizzini, Loredana; Pastore, Guido; Segnan, Nereo; Gillio-Tos, Anna; Fiano, Valentina; Grasso, Chiara; Ciuffreda, Libero; Lista, Patrizia; Pearce, Neil; Merletti, Franco

    2014-08-01

    Adult height is associated with testicular cancer risk. We studied to what extent this association is explained by parental height, childhood height and age at puberty. We conducted a case-control study on germ-cell testicular cancer patients diagnosed in 1997-2008 and resident in the Province of Turin. Information was collected using mailed questionnaires in 2008-2011. Specifically, we asked for adult height (in cm), height at age 9 and 13 (compared to peers) and age at puberty (compared to peers). We also asked for paternal and maternal height (in cm) as indicators of genetic components of adult height. The analysis included 255 cases and 459 controls. Odds ratios (ORs) of testicular cancer were estimated for the different anthropometric variables. Adult height was associated with testicular cancer risk [OR: 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.31 per 5-cm increase]. The risk of testicular cancer was only slightly increased for being taller vs. shorter than peers at age 9 (OR: 1.55, 95% CI: 0.91-2.64) or age 13 (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 0.78-2.01), and parental height was not associated with testicular cancer risk. The OR for adult height was 1.32 (95% CI: 1.12-1.56) after adjustment for parental height. Among participants with small average parental height (<167 cm or less), the OR of testicular cancer for tall (>180 cm) vs. short (<174 cm) subjects was 3.47 (95% CI: 1.60-7.51). These results suggest that the association between height and testicular cancer is likely to be explained by environmental factors affecting growth in early life, childhood and adolescence.

  1. The protective effect of dexpanthenol on testicular atrophy at 60th day following experimental testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Etensel, Barlas; Ozkisacik, Sezen; Ozkara, Esra; Serbest, Yeşim Aksu; Oztan, Onur; Yazici, Mesut; Gürsoy, Harun

    2007-03-01

    Despite the prompt diagnosis and treatment of testicular torsion (TT), there are problems with fertility and atrophy after testicular salvage. Dexpanthenol (Dxp) is the biologically active alcohol of pantothenic acid (PA). Dxp is converted to PA in tissues. PA increases the content of reduced glutathione (GSH), Coenzyme A and ATP synthesis in cells. GSH and glutathione-dependent peroxidases (GPX) are the major defense systems against oxidative stress. GPX-4 is the major antioxidant in testicular tissue. However, the activity of GPX-4 appeared and increased only after puberty. We investigated the effect of Dxp on testicular atrophy after TT at the 60th day. Rats were separated randomly into four groups. Group C: control group, group Td: torsion + detorsion, group Sal: torsion + saline + detorsion, group Dxp: torsion + Dxp + detorsion. The left testis was rotated 720 degrees for 2 h. In group Sal, normal saline and in group Dxp, Dexpanthenol were injected intraperitonally, 30 min before detorsion. After 60 days, the testicular weights and volumes were measured. Histopathology of the left testis was evaluated with mean seminiferous tubular diameter (MSTD) and mean testicular biopsy score (MTBS). The left (torsed) testicular weight and volume of groups Td and Sal were significantly lower compared to group Dxp. The MSTD and MTBS of group Td and Sal were significantly lower than group Dxp. Contralateral testicular weight and volume of groups Td, Sal and Dxp had no significant difference compared to the control group. Dxp significantly prevented testicular atrophy after 60 days of TT. Dxp has FDA approval, is safe, cost effective and readily available. Its relevance for clinical trials may especially be for the problem of testicular atrophy catastrophe, seen very frequently following testicular salvage.

  2. Polyorchidism with presumed contralateral intrauterine testicular torsion

    PubMed Central

    Leodoro, B.M.; Beasley, S.W.; Stringer, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Polyorchidism was first described by Blasius in 16701 during a routine autopsy. We report a child with unilateral polyorchidism and a contralateral absent testis, a combination not reported previously. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 2-year-old boy was referred to the outpatient clinic with an impalpable left testis. At laparoscopy, the left vas deferens and testicular vessels ended blindly proximal to a closed internal ring. No gonadal tissue was identified. On the right side, a single vas deferens and testicular vessels were seen entering the internal ring as normal. The right side of the scrotum was explored and two testes were identified within a single tunica vaginalis. DISCUSSION Polyorchidism is rare with a literature search identifying approximately 230 reported cases. Whilst prenatal testicular torsion is increasing being recognized and treated as a surgical emergency,9 prenatal testicular torsion in association with polyorchidism has not been previously reported. CONCLUSION We describe a unique case of a 2-year-old boy with right-sided polyorchidism and an absent left testis associated with a blind ending vas deferens and testicular vessels, presumed secondary to intrauterine testicular torsion. PMID:25462053

  3. Clusterin expression and human testicular seminoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Min; Li, Jie; Liu, Bianjiang; Song, Ninghong; Wang, Zengjun; Yin, Changjun

    2013-10-01

    Clusterin expression has a positive correlation with the occurrence and progression of various types of tumors from different genetic backgrounds. Clusterin overexpression may protect tumor cells from apoptosis and damage caused by autoimmunity or anti-tumor therapy. Using immunohistochemisty, one previous study showed that clusterin protein expression is downregulated in human testicular seminoma, which is highly sensitive to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We thus postulate that clusterin expression in human testicular seminoma differs from clusterin expression in other tumors. It may be the cause of the treatable characteristics of testicular seminoma. In the present preliminary study, we detected the abundance of clusterin mRNA in human testicular seminoma and normal testis. The results showed decreased clusterin expression in seminoma at the gene transcription level. Our primary data and summarized previous literature suggest that the downregulation of clusterin expression may be the cause of the high sensitivity of testicular seminoma to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. It may be that the scarcity of clusterin leaves tumor cells with insufficient protection from treatment. This is the first study to focus on the relationship between clusterin expression and human testicular cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of clonidine in the isolated rat testicular capsule.

    PubMed

    Dantas da Silva Júnior, Edilson; Palmieri de Souza, Bruno; Rodrigues, Juliano Quintella Dantas; Caricati-Neto, Afonso; Jurkiewicz, Aron; Jurkiewicz, Neide H

    2014-03-05

    The testicular capsule contracts in response to noradrenaline and adrenaline, but the effects of adrenoceptor agonists, as for instance clonidine, had not yet been thoroughly evaluated. The testicular capsule from adult male Wistar rats was isolated and mounted in organ bath and cumulative concentration curves were performed for clonidine and other adrenergic agonists in the absence or presence of α-adrenoceptors antagonists. The order of potency for agonists (pD2) was clonidine=adrenaline>UK 14,304>noradrenaline>phenylephrine>methoxamine. The consecutive curves for clonidine showed desensitization with 3-fold rightward shift and Emax reduction of 40%. The noradrenaline curves were 4.5, 19 and 190-fold less potent after clonidine pretreatment at 10−5, 10−4 or 10−3 M for 10 min, respectively, added to Emax decrease by about 20%. Clonidine (10−5 M for 10 min) was unable to alter the noradrenaline curves if the treatment was made in the presence of idazoxan (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) whereas prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) was ineffective. The effect of idazoxan 3×10−7 M on noradrenaline curves was decreased by 50% after clonidine pretreatment, as reflected by the concentration ratio of 5.2±1.2 (treated tissue) and 10.1±1.0 (untreated tissue). However, the concentration ratio for prazosin 3×10−8 M was unchanged. After phenoxybenzamine (irreversible antagonist of α1-adrenoceptor) pretreatment, the residual noradrenaline contraction was antagonized by idazoxan or prazosin with pKB values of 7.8 and 5.1, respectively. The results indicate the presence of α2-adrenoceptors in testicular capsule. Furthermore, these receptors may be desensitized by clonidine, causing a decreased potency of noradrenaline.

  5. Public awareness of testicular cancer and testicular self-examination in academic environments: a lost opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Ugboma, Henry A A; Aburoma, H L S

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although testicular cancer is the most common cancer among 18- to 50-year-old males, healthcare providers seldom teach testicular self-examination techniques to clients, thus potentially missing opportunities for early detection. This form of cancer is easily diagnosable by testicular self-examination and is 96% curable if detected early. Periodic self-examination must be performed for early detection. Knowledge deficits and sociocultural norms contribute to low levels of health-related knowledge in most patients, resulting in undue delays before seeking medical advice. OBJECTIVE: Our aim is to assess the level of awareness of testicular cancer and the prevalence of the practice of testicular self-examination in academic environments to enable appropriate interventions. METHOD: A cross-sectional survey was administered to 750 consecutive males aged 18–50 years in three tertiary institutions in Port Harcourt from October 2008 to April 2009. RESULT: Knowledge or awareness of testicular cancer was poor. Almost all of the respondents were unaware that testicular lumps may be signs of cancer. A lump was typically construed as a benign carbuncle or something that could resolve spontaneously. The main factor contributing to respondents' lack of knowledge of testicular cancer was that few reported that they were “ever taught about testicular self-examination.” CONCLUSION: Young adult men are unaware of their risk for testicular cancer, which is the most common neoplasm in this age group. Healthcare providers are not informing them of this risk, nor are they teaching them the simple early detection technique of self-examination of the testes. PMID:21876962

  6. Genetics Home Reference: 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development

    MedlinePlus

    ... of sex development 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Close All Description 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development is a condition in which individuals with ...

  7. Testicular Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    For testicular cancer, there is no standard or routine screening test. Review the limited evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for testicular cancer using ultrasound, physical examination, and self-examination in this expert-reviewed summary.

  8. Alopecia universalis in a dog with testicular neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Outerbridge, Catherine A; White, Stephen D; Affolter, Verena K

    2016-12-01

    To describe a case of testicular neoplasia and alopecia universalis in a dog, and successful treatment of the latter with ciclosporin. Twelve-year-old intact male wirehaired fox terrier. Castration, skin biopsy for histopathology, lymphocyte immunophenotyping and clonality analysis of the canine T-cell receptor gamma locus (TCRγ) rearrangement. The dog presented with symmetrical generalized alopecia. Testicular enlargement was noted which on castration was determined to be caused by bilateral interstitial cell tumours, Sertoli cell tumours and a unilateral seminoma. During the four months after castration the alopecia became more severe and widespread. Histopathology of the skin showed moderate, multifocal, mural folliculitis, peribulbar mucinosis and lymphocytic bulbitis, and targeting of anagen hair follicles. Immunophenotyping of the infiltrate showed a population of well-differentiated, small CD3-positive T lymphocytes, some expressing CD4 and others CD8. Molecular analysis revealed a polyclonal lymphocytic infiltrate, substantiating the diagnosis of alopecia areata rather than lymphoma. Treatment with ciclosporin (4.6 mg/kg) and ketoconazole (4.6 mg/kg) resulted in complete hair regrowth. Ciclosporin treatment, in combination with ketoconazole, can be effective for treatment of alopecia universalis in the dog. Alopecia universalis may present with clinically noninflammatory, symmetrical, generalized alopecia, mimicking an endocrine alopecia, and skin biopsies are needed to confirm the diagnosis. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  9. Zika virus causes testicular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Uraki, Ryuta; Hwang, Jesse; Jurado, Kellie Ann; Householder, Sarah; Yockey, Laura J.; Hastings, Andrew K.; Homer, Robert J.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Fikrig, Erol

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that has recently been found to cause fetal infection and neonatal abnormalities, including microcephaly and neurological dysfunction. ZIKV persists in the semen months after the acute viremic phase in humans. To further understand the consequences of ZIKV persistence in males, we infected Ifnar1−/− mice via subcutaneous injection of a pathogenic but nonlethal ZIKV strain. ZIKV replication persists within the testes even after clearance from the blood, with interstitial, testosterone-producing Leydig cells supporting virus replication. We found high levels of viral RNA and antigen within the epididymal lumen, where sperm is stored, and within surrounding epithelial cells. Unexpectedly, at 21 days post-infection, the testes of the ZIKV-infected mice were significantly smaller compared to those of mock-infected mice, indicating progressive testicular atrophy. ZIKV infection caused a reduction in serum testosterone, suggesting that male fertility can be affected. Our findings have important implications for nonvector-borne vertical transmission, as well as long-term potential reproductive deficiencies, in ZIKV-infected males. PMID:28261663

  10. Zika virus causes testicular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Uraki, Ryuta; Hwang, Jesse; Jurado, Kellie Ann; Householder, Sarah; Yockey, Laura J; Hastings, Andrew K; Homer, Robert J; Iwasaki, Akiko; Fikrig, Erol

    2017-02-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that has recently been found to cause fetal infection and neonatal abnormalities, including microcephaly and neurological dysfunction. ZIKV persists in the semen months after the acute viremic phase in humans. To further understand the consequences of ZIKV persistence in males, we infected Ifnar1(-/-) mice via subcutaneous injection of a pathogenic but nonlethal ZIKV strain. ZIKV replication persists within the testes even after clearance from the blood, with interstitial, testosterone-producing Leydig cells supporting virus replication. We found high levels of viral RNA and antigen within the epididymal lumen, where sperm is stored, and within surrounding epithelial cells. Unexpectedly, at 21 days post-infection, the testes of the ZIKV-infected mice were significantly smaller compared to those of mock-infected mice, indicating progressive testicular atrophy. ZIKV infection caused a reduction in serum testosterone, suggesting that male fertility can be affected. Our findings have important implications for nonvector-borne vertical transmission, as well as long-term potential reproductive deficiencies, in ZIKV-infected males.

  11. Management of non-germinal testicular tumors.

    PubMed

    Risk, Michael C; Porter, Christopher R

    2009-08-01

    Non-germinal tumors account for less than 10% of all testicular tumors and consist of a wide array of benign and malignant lesions. Due to their rarity, little is known about the appropriate management of malignant non-germinal testicular tumors. A literature review directed at the variety of non-germinal testicular tumors using the Medline/PubMed database was performed. Our review was focused on the natural history of these diseases, the treatment regimens utilized, and the outcomes of the various treatments. The majority of data on the treatment of non-germinal testicular tumors comes from case series and retrospective reviews; thus the management of many of these diseases is a matter of debate. Recommendations for the treatment of patients with these rare diseases are made based on available data. For many of these diseases, radical inguinal orchiectomy is the initial treatment of choice, and further treatment differs based on pathology and staging studies. Non-germinal testicular tumors are a diverse group of rare lesions, and as a result their management is often difficult. A multi-disciplinary approach to management is needed in these patients; however, efficacious chemotherapeutic regimens are often lacking. Due to poor alternatives, patients may benefit from early surgical intervention, including RPLND.

  12. Tissue Engineered Testicular Prostheses With Prolonged Testosterone Release

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    and Hospital Infantil de Mexico “Federico Gomez”, Mexico City, Mexico* ABSTRACT Young soldiers with testicular tissue injury may require...Rustin, 2001: Testicular implants and patient satisfaction: a questionnaire-based study of men after orchidectomy for testicular cancer .[see comment

  13. Effect of mineralocorticoid treatment in mice with collecting duct-specific knockout of endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Lynch, I Jeanette; Welch, Amanda K; Gumz, Michelle L; Kohan, Donald E; Cain, Brian D; Wingo, Charles S

    2015-12-15

    Aldosterone increases blood pressure (BP) by stimulating sodium (Na) reabsorption within the distal nephron and collecting duct (CD). Aldosterone also stimulates endothelin-1 (ET-1) production that acts within the CD to inhibit Na reabsorption via a negative feedback mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that this renal aldosterone-endothelin feedback system regulates electrolyte balance and BP by comparing the effect of a high-salt (NaCl) diet and mineralocorticoid stimulation in control and CD-specific ET-1 knockout (CD ET-1 KO) mice. Metabolic balance and radiotelemetric BP were measured before and after treatment with desoxycorticosterone pivalate (DOCP) in mice fed a high-salt diet with saline to drink. CD ET-1 KO mice consumed more high-salt diet and saline and had greater urine output than controls. CD ET-1 KO mice exhibited increased BP and greater fluid retention and body weight than controls on a high-salt diet. DOCP with high-salt feeding further increased BP in CD ET-1 KO mice, and by the end of the study the CD ET-1 KO mice were substantially hypernatremic. Unlike controls, CD ET-1 KO mice failed to respond acutely or escape from DOCP treatment. We conclude that local ET-1 production in the CD is required for the appropriate renal response to Na loading and that lack of local ET-1 results in abnormal fluid and electrolyte handling when challenged with a high-salt diet and with DOCP treatment. Additionally, local ET-1 production is necessary, under these experimental conditions, for renal compensation to and escape from the chronic effects of mineralocorticoids.

  14. Captopril and telmisartan treatments attenuate cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Amr A; Jresat, Iyad

    2013-04-01

    The possible protective effect of captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, vs. telmisartan, an angiotensin II-receptor antagonist, was investigated in rats with testicular injury induced by a single i.p. injection of cadmium chloride (2 mg/kg). Captopril (60 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day, p.o.) were given for five consecutive days, starting 3 days before cadmium administration. Both agents significantly increased serum testosterone level, which was reduced by cadmium, suppressed lipid peroxidation, restored the depleted reduced glutathione, decreased the elevations of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, and cadmium ion levels, and attenuated the reductions of selenium and zinc ions in testicular tissue resulted from cadmium administration. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that both captopril and telmisartan significantly reduced the cadmium-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor-κB, Fas ligand, and caspase-3 in testicular tissue. The differences between the results obtained with captopril and telmisartan were insignificant, suggesting that both drugs equally protected the testicular tissue from the detrimental effects of cadmium.

  15. Functional status of testicular macrophages in an immunopriviledged niche in cadmium intoxicated murine testes.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sumana; Gang, Sneha; Sengupta, Mahuya

    2014-07-01

    The present study investigates the extent of immunomodulatory effects associated with semenological alterations in the testes, after exposure to cadmium (in vivo) in male Swiss albino mice. Despite residing in an immunopriviledged site, testicular macrophages have immunogenic functions. Experimental animals were divided into two groups: (i) control (isotonic saline) and (ii) treated (0.35 mg/kg b.w of cadmium chloride) intraperitoneally for 15 days. Murine testicular macrophages were isolated and the cell function studies such as morphological alteration and tumor-necrosis factor (TNF-α) release assay were performed. Among the semenological parameters, sperm count, sperm motility, sperm morphology and the testosterone levels in the epididymal semen samples from both groups were determined. The present work shows that cadmium is responsible for a significant alteration, degenerative changes and reduced cell function in testicular macrophages probably by increasing oxidative damage. Such oxidative stress also causes a parallel dysfunction of the semenological parameters. TNF-α which is probably unable to bind with the surface receptor in testicular macrophages as because of altered structural morphology with reduction of cell function, render the animals more prone to infection and ultimately causes subfertility. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Methylene blue increases contralateral testicular ischaemia-reperfusion injury after unilateral testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Inan, Mustafa; Basaran, Umit N; Dokmeci, Dikmen; Yalcin, Omer; Aydogdu, Nurettin; Turan, Nesrin

    2008-01-01

    1. Testicular ischaemia-reperfusion injury is commonly seen in childhood. Infertility occurs in 25% of patients after unilateral testicular ischaemia. It is has been reported that methylene blue has a positive effect in the reparation of ischaemia-reperfusion injury in different tissues. Therefore, we hypothesized that methylene blue may prevent the hazardous effects of ischaemia-reperfusion injury in testicular tissue after unilateral testicular torsion. 2. Thirty-two prepubertal Wistar-albino rats were divided into four groups. Testicular torsion was created by rotating the right testis 720 degrees in a clockwise direction for 5 h in all groups except for Group C, which was the sham control group. In Group T, bilateral orchiectomy was performed following the torsion period. In Group TD, both testes were removed 5 days after the torsion period. In Group MB, methylene blue (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 40 min before detorsion and once daily over 5 days; then, both testes were harvested. Tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), serum levels of creatine kinase (CK), mean testicular biopsy score (MTBS) and mean seminifer tubule diameter (MSTD) were determined. 3. There was a significant difference in MTBS between Groups T and TD (P < 0.05) in both ipsilateral and contralateral testes. In the contralateral testis, treatment with methylene blue decreased MTBS and MSTD (P < 0.05) and increased MDA levels (P < 0.05). In Group T, mean serum CK concentrations were higher than in any of the other groups (P < 0.05). 4. After 5 h of unilateral testicular torsion and a 5 day reperfusion period, serious tissue damage occurred on both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides. Serum CK concentrations may be an indicator for ischaemia, but not for ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Contrary to our hypothesis, methylene blue increased contralateral testicular damage after unilateral testicular torsion and exacerbated oxidative events.

  17. [Multicystic mesothelioma of the testicular tunica vaginalis].

    PubMed

    Rosales Leal, José Luis; Tallada Buñuel, Miguel; Espejo Maldonado, Eduardo; Cózar Olmo, José Manuel; Vicente Prados, Francisco Javier; Martínez Morcillo, Antonio; Buitragosivianes, Soledad; Rodríguez Herrera, Francisco; Ortiz Gorráiz, Manuel; Zilbermman Morales, Sonia; Chamorro Santos, Clara

    2003-12-01

    To report an exceptional case of multicystic mesothelioma of the testicular tunica vaginalis. A 72-year-old male was referred for study of a scrotal mass. Physical examination, blood tests, and ultrasound were performed prior to surgical excision and pathologic study of the lesion. The ultrasound study showed a multilobar cystic lesion near the spermatic cord. Pathology reported multiple 3-4 mm cystic formations, with rudimentary papillae covered by a hyperchromatic epithelium and vimentin (+), CD 34 (+) immunophenotype. Multicystic mesothelioma is a rare form of mesothelioma, easy to recognize but infrequent. This tumor generally affects the peritoneal surface of the pelvis and abdomen; although other less frequent locations have been described testicular location is exceptional. We report the case of a patient presenting with a multicystic mesothelioma of the testicular tunica vaginalis and review the diagnosis, pathology and treatment options for this type of tumor.

  18. Testicular atrophy as a risk inguinal hernioplasty.

    PubMed

    Wantz, G E

    1982-04-01

    In my experience, the complication of testicular atrophy after primary hernioplasty occurred only in patients in whom a complete indirect inguinal hernia sac was dissected from the spermatic cord. Avoiding this dissection by leaving the distal part of the sac in place reduces the incidence of the complication. All patients with scrotal inguinal hernias and all patients with recurrent inguinal hernias should have the complications of ischemic orchitis and testicular atrophy explained to them in depth because of the litigious nature of some of the men in whom this condition occurs. Patients who had undergone two or more operations for inguinal hernia should give prior written permission for orchiectomy even though this procedure is rarely necessary. In these patients, the performance of preperitoneal inguinal hernioplasty will permit the surgeon to avoid dissecting previously mobilized spermatic cords and should reduce the incidence of testicular atrophy in men fearful of this complication.

  19. Endogenous interleukin 18 regulates testicular germ cell apoptosis during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Taketo; Aoyama-Ishikawa, Michiko; Kamoshida, Shingo; Nishino, Satoshi; Sasano, Maki; Oka, Nobuki; Yamashita, Hayato; Kai, Motoki; Nakao, Atsunori; Kotani, Joji; Usami, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    Orchitis (testicular swelling) often occurs during systemic inflammatory conditions, such as sepsis. Interleukin 18 (IL18) is a proinflammatory cytokine and is an apoptotic mediator during endotoxemia, but the role of IL18 in response to inflammation in the testes was unclear. WT and IL18 knockout (KO) mice were injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce endotoxemia and examined 12 and 48  h after LPS administration to model the acute and recovery phases of endotoxemia. Caspase activation was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Protein and mRNA expression were examined by western blot and quantitative real-time RT-PCR respectively. During the acute phase of endotoxemia, apoptosis (as indicated by caspase-3 cleavage) was increased in WT mice but not in IL18 KO mice. The death receptor-mediated and mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathways were both activated in the WT mice but not in the KO mice. During the recovery phase of endotoxemia, apoptosis was observed in the IL18 KO mice but not in the WT mice. Activation of the death-receptor mediated apoptotic pathway could be seen in the IL18 KO mice but not the WT mice. These results suggested that endogenous IL18 induces germ cell apoptosis via death receptor mediated- and mitochondrial-mediated pathways during the acute phase of endotoxemia and suppresses germ cell apoptosis via death-receptor mediated pathways during recovery from endotoxemia. Taken together, IL18 could be a new therapeutic target to prevent orchitis during endotoxemia.

  20. Testicular Cancer Survivorship: Research Strategies and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Clair; Allan, James M.; Dahl, Alv A.; Feldman, Darren R.; Oldenburg, Jan; Daugaard, Gedske; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Hannigan, Robyn; Constine, Louis S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Okunieff, Paul; Armstrong, Greg; Wiljer, David; Miller, Robert C.; Gietema, Jourik A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Nichols, Craig R.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2010-01-01

    Testicular cancer represents the most curable solid tumor, with a 10-year survival rate of more than 95%. Given the young average age at diagnosis, it is estimated that effective treatment approaches, in particular, platinum-based chemotherapy, have resulted in an average gain of several decades of life. This success, however, is offset by the emergence of considerable long-term morbidity, including second malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, pulmonary toxicity, hypogonadism, decreased fertility, and psychosocial problems. Data on underlying genetic or molecular factors that might identify those patients at highest risk for late sequelae are sparse. Genome-wide association studies and other translational molecular approaches now provide opportunities to identify testicular cancer survivors at greatest risk for therapy-related complications to develop evidence-based long-term follow-up guidelines and interventional strategies. We review research priorities identified during an international workshop devoted to testicular cancer survivors. Recommendations include 1) institution of lifelong follow-up of testicular cancer survivors within a large cohort setting to ascertain risks of emerging toxicities and the evolution of known late sequelae, 2) development of comprehensive risk prediction models that include treatment factors and genetic modifiers of late sequelae, 3) elucidation of the effect(s) of decades-long exposure to low serum levels of platinum, 4) assessment of the overall burden of medical and psychosocial morbidity, and 5) the eventual formulation of evidence-based long-term follow-up guidelines and interventions. Just as testicular cancer once served as the paradigm of a curable malignancy, comprehensive follow-up studies of testicular cancer survivors can pioneer new methodologies in survivorship research for all adult-onset cancer. PMID:20585105

  1. Testicular cancer at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi.

    PubMed

    Opot, E N; Magoha, G A

    2000-02-01

    This retrospective study was undertaken to determine the prevalence, clinical characteristics, management methods and prognosis of testicular cancer at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. All histologically confirmed testicular cancer patients recorded at the Histopathology Department between 1993 and 1997 were analyzed. The mean age was 34.8 years with a peak incidence in the 30-44 year age group. About 10.26% of patients had history of cryptochirdism. The clinical symptoms presented were painless testicular swelling (n = 31, 79.49%), testicular pain (n = 11, 28.08%), scrotal heaviness (n = 9, 23.08%), abdominal swelling (n = 6, 15.38%), gynecomastia (n = 1, 2.56%), and eye swelling (n = 1, 2.56%). On examination, 32 patients (82.05%) had testicular masses, 10 (25.64%) had abdominal masses, 7 (17.91%) had supraclavicular and cervical lymphadenopathy, 1 had gynecomastia, and 1 had an orbital mass. More than 89% of patients had germ cell cancers with seminoma accounting for 67.35%, teratoma for 12.24%, embryonal carcinoma for 8.16%, rhabdomyosarcoma for 6.12%, and malignant germ cell tumor, orchioblastoma, and dysgerminoma each accounting for 2.04%. The various methods of treatment include orchidectomy and radiotherapy and chemotherapy in 3 patients (7.7%), orchidectomy and radiotherapy in 16 patients (41.03%), orchidectomy and chemotherapy in 6 patients (15.38%), and radiotherapy and chemotherapy in 10 patients (25.64%). No cisplatin-based chemotherapy was used. 18 patients were followed up, of whom 7 were alive after 5 years. Prognosis with current regimens was poor, with a 38.89% survival ratio in 5 years. Hence, cisplatin-based chemotherapy with up to 90% cure rates should be included in the testicular cancer management in this hospital.

  2. Malignant testicular tumour incidence and mortality trends

    PubMed Central

    Wojtyła-Buciora, Paulina; Więckowska, Barbara; Krzywinska-Wiewiorowska, Małgorzata; Gromadecka-Sutkiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study In Poland testicular tumours are the most frequent cancer among men aged 20–44 years. Testicular tumour incidence since the 1980s and 1990s has been diversified geographically, with an increased risk of mortality in Wielkopolska Province, which was highlighted at the turn of the 1980s and 1990s. The aim of the study was the comparative analysis of the tendencies in incidence and death rates due to malignant testicular tumours observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province. Material and methods Data from the National Cancer Registry were used for calculations. The incidence/mortality rates among men due to malignant testicular cancer as well as the tendencies in incidence/death ratio observed in Poland and Wielkopolska were established based on regression equation. The analysis was deepened by adopting the multiple linear regression model. A p-value < 0.05 was arbitrarily adopted as the criterion of statistical significance, and for multiple comparisons it was modified according to the Bonferroni adjustment to a value of p < 0.0028. Calculations were performed with the use of PQStat v1.4.8 package. Results The incidence of malignant testicular neoplasms observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province indicated a significant rising tendency. The multiple linear regression model confirmed that the year variable is a strong incidence forecast factor only within the territory of Poland. A corresponding analysis of mortality rates among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province did not show any statistically significant correlations. Conclusions Late diagnosis of Polish patients calls for undertaking appropriate educational activities that would facilitate earlier reporting of the patients, thus increasing their chances for recovery. Introducing preventive examinations in the regions of increased risk of testicular tumour may allow earlier diagnosis. PMID:27095941

  3. The Expression of RAC1 and Mineralocorticoid Pathway-Dependent Genes are Associated With Different Responses to Salt Intake.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Castillo, Alejandra; Carvajal, Cristian A; Campino, Carmen; Hill, Caroline; Allende, Fidel; Vecchiola, Andrea; Carrasco, Carmen; Bancalari, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Carolina; Lagos, Carlos; Martinez-Aguayo, Alejandro; Garcia, Hernan; Aglony, Marlene; Baudrand, Rene F; Kalergis, Alexis M; Michea, Luis F; Riedel, Claudia A; Fardella, Carlos E

    2015-06-01

    Rac1 upregulation has been implicated in salt-sensitive hypertension as a modulator of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activity. Rac1 could affect the expression of oxidative stress markers, such as hemoxigenase-1 (HO-1) or nuclear factor-B (NF-κB), and the expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), a cytokine upregulated upon MR activation. We evaluated RAC1 expression in relation of high salt intake and association with MR, NGAL, HO-1, and NF-κB expression, mineralo- and glucocorticoids levels, and inflammatory parameters. We studied 147 adult subjects. A food survey identified the dietary sodium (Na) intake. RAC1 expression was considered high or low according to the value found in normotensive subjects with low salt intake. We determined the gene expression of RAC1, MR, NGAL, HO-1, NF-κB, and 18S, isolated from peripheral leukocytes. We measured aldosterone, cortisol, sodium, potassium excretion, metalloproteinase (MMP9 y MMP2), and C-reactive protein. We identified 126 subjects with high Na-intake, 18 subjects had high, and 108 low-RAC1 expression. The subjects with high-RAC1 expression showed a significant increase in MR (P = 0.0002), NGAL (P < 0.0001) HO-1 (P = 0.0004), and NF-κB (P < 0.0001) gene expression. We demonstrated an association between RAC1 expression and MR (R sp 0.64; P < 0.0001), NGAL (R sp 0.48; P < 0.0001), HO-1 (R sp 0.53; P < 0.0001), and NF-κB (R sp0.52; P < 0.0001). We did not identify any association between RAC1 and clinical or biochemical variables. RAC1 expression was associated with an increase in MR, NGAL, NF-κB, and HO-1 expression, suggesting that RAC1 could be a mediator of cardiovascular damage induced by sodium, and may also useful to identify subjects with different responses to salt intake. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. An Overview on Predictive Biomarkers of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Chieffi, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are frequent solid malignant tumors and cause of death in men between 20-40 years of age. Genetic and environmental factors play an important role in the origin and development of TGCTs. Although the majority of TGCTs are responsive to chemotherapy, about 20% of patient presents incomplete response or tumors relapse. In addition, the current treatments cause acute toxicity and several chronic collateral effects, including sterility. The present mini-review collectively summarize the most recent findings on the new discovered molecular biomarkers such as tyrosine kinases, HMGAs, Aurora B kinase, and GPR30 receptor predictive of TGCTs and as emerging new possible molecular targets for therapeutic strategies. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 276-280, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Colon cancer presenting as a testicular metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Mohiuddin, Majid; Sharif, Asma

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old male who initially presented with intermittent testicular pain as the first sign of metastatic stage IV colon cancer. Physical examination revealed a normal penis, scrotum and testes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pelvis showed an irregular 3 cm mass of the spermatic cord and right radical inguinal orchiectomy was performed. The pathological diagnosis was metastatic adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, even though metastases to the testes are rare, they should be considered in clinical practice especially in older men who present with a testicular mass or discomfort. PMID:28138654

  6. Etiologic factors in testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Katherine A.; Cook, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Globally, testicular cancer incidence is highest among men of northern European ancestry and lowest among men of Asian and African descent. Incidence rates have been increasing around the world for at least 50 years, but mortality rates, at least in developed countries, have been declining. While reasons for the decreases in mortality are related to improvements in therapeutic regimes introduced in the late 1970s, reasons for the increase in incidence are less well understood. An accumulating body of evidence suggests, however, that testicular cancer arises in fetal life. Perinatal factors, including exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, have been suggested to be related to risk. PMID:19903067

  7. Intracardiac metastasis from germ cell testicular tumor.

    PubMed

    Jonjev, Z S; Rajić, J; Majin, M; Donat, D

    2012-09-01

    Intracardiac metastases of germ cell testicular tumors are not commonly seen in clinical practice. The clinical presentation of right-sided heart metastases ranges widely. Depending upon its size and intracardiac location, it could be highly symptomatic, leading to a congestive heart failure, pulmonary embolism, and death, or completely asymptomatic. Improved imaging techniques and treatment strategies demonstrate that right-sided heart metastasis should be considered a potentially dangerous but treatable disease. Presented is the case of a 24-year-old man with a testicular nonseminomatous germ cell tumor, which after metastasizing in the right atrium differentiated into a teratoma and resulted in an inflow obstruction of the right ventricle.

  8. Antidepressants and testicular cancer: cause versus association.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-03-01

    A data mining study that examined associations between 105 drugs and 55 cancer sites found significant associations between 2 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine and paroxetine) and testicular cancer. The study suggested several reasons why these associations merited further investigation. A later study tested specific relationships between 12 antidepressant drugs and testicular cancer and subtypes thereof; whereas significant relationships were again found, these disappeared after adjusting for confounding variables. These 2 studies are educative because they illustrate how false-positive results can easily arise in exploratory research and how confounding may be responsible for statistically significant relationships in study designs that are not randomized controlled trials.

  9. Grayscale and Color Doppler Features of Testicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bertolotto, Michele; Derchi, Lorenzo E.; Secil, Mustafa; Dogra, Vikram; Sidhu, Paul S.; Clements, Richard; Freeman, Simon; Grenier, Nicolas; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ramchandani, Parvati; Cicero, Calogero; Abete, Luca; Bussani, Rossana; Rocher, Laurence; Spencer, John; Tsili, Athina; Valentino, Massimo; Pavlica, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Pooled data from 16 radiology centers were retrospectively analyzed to seek patients with pathologically proven testicular lymphoma and grayscale and color Doppler images available for review. Forty-three cases were found: 36 (84%) primary and 7 (16%) secondary testicular lymphoma. With unilateral primary lymphoma, involvement was unifocal (n = 10), multifocal (n = 11), or diffuse (n = 11). Synchronous bilateral involvement occurred in 6 patients. Color Doppler sonography showed normal testicular vessels within the tumor in 31 of 43 lymphomas (72%). Testicular lymphoma infiltrates through the tubules, preserving the normal vascular architecture of the testis. Depiction of normal testicular vessels crossing the lesion is a useful adjunctive diagnostic criterion. PMID:26014335

  10. MicroRNAs in Testicular Cancer Diagnosis and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ling, Hui; Krassnig, Lisa; Bullock, Marc D; Pichler, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Testicular cancer processes a unique and clear miRNA expression signature. This differentiates testicular cancer from most other cancer types, which are usually more ambiguous when assigning miRNA patterns. As such, testicular cancer may represent a unique cancer type in which miRNAs find their use as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, with a potential to surpass the current available markers usually with low sensitivity. In this review, we present literature findings on miRNAs associated with testicular cancer, and discuss their potential diagnostic and prognostic values, as well as their potential as indicators of drug response in patients with testicular cancer.

  11. The R337C mutation generates a high Km 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II enzyme in a family with apparent mineralocorticoid excess

    SciTech Connect

    Obeyisekere, V.R.; Ferrari, P.; Funder, J.W.; Krozowski, Z.S.

    1995-10-01

    The 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II enzyme (11{beta}HSD2) inactivates glucocorticoids in the kidney and thus permits aldosterone to occupy the non-selective mineralocortiocid receptor in epithelial tissues. We have recently described a C to T transition in the HSD11B2 gene which results in an arginine to cysteine mutation (R337C) in the 11{beta}HSD2 enzyme in a consanguineous family with three siblings suffering from Apparent Mineralocorticoid Excess (AME). In the present study we have examined the metabolism of cortisol in mammalian cells transfected with plasmids expressing the wild type and mutant enzymes. In whole cells the Km of the normal enzyme was 110nM, while the enzyme containing the R337C mutation displayed a Km of 1010nM. Further experiments revealed that the mutant was totally inactive in cell free preparations, suggesting that it has additional properties which may compromise its activity in whole cells. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Testicular Cancer and Genetics Knowledge Among Familial Testicular Cancer Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Beckjord, Ellen B.; Banda Ryan, Deliya R.; Carr, Ann G.; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Korde, Larissa; Greene, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose It was our aim to determine baseline levels of testicular cancer and genetics knowledge among members of families with Familial Testicular Cancer (FTC). Methods This is a sub-study of an ongoing National Cancer Institute (NCI) multidisciplinary, etiologically-focused, cross-sectional study of FTC. We evaluated 258 male and female participants including testicular cancer (TC) survivors, blood relatives and spouses to assess factors associated with a Genetic Knowledge Scale (GKS) and Testicular Cancer Knowledge Scale (TCKS). Results Knowledge levels were generally low, with genetic knowledge lower than TC knowledge (p<0.01). Men with a personal TC history scored highest on TC knowledge, while gender, age and education differentially influenced knowledge levels, particularly among unaffected relatives. Conclusions Prior to identifying FTC susceptibility genes, we recommend tailoring FTC genetic education to the different informational needs of TC survivors, their spouses and relatives, in preparation for the day when clinical susceptibility testing may be available. PMID:18481162

  13. Fertilization after intracytoplasmic sperm injection with cryopreserved testicular spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Romero, J; Remohí, J; Mínguez, Y; Rubio, C; Pellicer, A; Gil-Salom, M

    1996-04-01

    To assess the possibility of cryopreserving testicular tissue extracted sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). A report of two cases. Our study was approved by the Ethical Committee at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad. In vitro fertilization program at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad. Two azoospermic patients with severe spermatogenic failure but with focal spermatogenesis on testicular biopsies. In both cases, a first ICSI attempt with fresh testicular biopsy extracted sperm was unsuccessful. Cryopreservation of testicular spermatozoa in 100-micro L "pills." Intracytoplasmic sperm injection with thawed testicular spermatozoa. Fertilization rate, cleavage rate, embryo quality, clinical pregnancy. Fertilization rates were 36 percent and 100 percent after ICSI with fresh testicular spermatozoa, and 63 percent and 57 percent after ICSI with cryopreserved testicular sperm. In both cases, cleavage rates and embryo quality were similar when using fresh and cryopreserved testicular spermatozoa. No clinical pregnancies were achieved. High fertilization rates can be obtained after ICSI with frozen-thawed testicular tissue extracted spermatozoa. Cryopreservation of testicular sperm may avoid repetition of testicular biopsies in azoospermic patients in whom the only source of spermatozoa is the testicle.

  14. The clinical utility of testicular prosthesis placement in children with genital and testicular disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Testicular prosthesis placement is a useful important adjunctive reconstructive therapy for managing children with testicular loss or absence. Though these prostheses are functionless, experience has shown that they are extremely helpful in creating a more normal male body image and in preventing/relieving psychological stress in males with a missing testicle. With attention to details of implant technique, excellent cosmetic results can be anticipated in simulating a normal appearing scrotum. PMID:26816795

  15. Downregulation of cytochrome P450scc as an initial adverse effect of adult exposure to diethylstilbestrol on testicular steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Naoyuki; Okumura, Kanako; Tanaka, Emi; Suzuki, Tomokazu; Miyasho, Taku; Haeno, Satoko; Ueda, Hiromi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Reproductive toxicities and endocrine disruptions caused by chemicals in adult males are still poorly understood. It is our objectives to understand further details of the initial adverse effects leading severe testicular toxicities of a pharmaceutical endocrine disruptor, diethylstilbestrol (DES). Downregulations of both testicular regulatory proteins, such as the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), which play important roles in the transport of cholesterol into the mitochondria, and cytochrome P450 mediating the cholesterol side chain cleavage reaction (P450scc), were observed in the rat orally administered DES (340 μg/kg/2 days) for 2 weeks. We found that after only 1 week treatment with DES, the blood and testicular testosterone (TS) levels were drastically decreased without abnormalities of the StAR and PBR; however, the protein and mRNA levels of P450scc were diminished. Decrease in the conversion rate of cholesterol to pregnenolone was delayed in the in vitro assay using the testicular mitochondrial fraction from the rat treated with DES for 1 week. When the precursors in TS biosynthesis containing the testis were identified and determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, decreased levels of all precursors except cholesterol were observed. In conclusion, suppressed cytochrome P450scc expression in adult male rat was identified as an initial target of DES in testicular steroidogenesis disorder leading reproductive toxicities. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Impact of the processes of testicular regression and recrudescence in the prostatic complex of the bat Myotis nigricans (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae).

    PubMed

    Beguelini, Mateus R; Góes, Rejane M; Rahal, Paula; Morielle-Versute, Eliana; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2015-07-01

    Myotis nigricans is a species of vespertilionid bat, whose males show two periods of total testicular regression during the annual reproductive cycle in the northwest São Paulo State, Brazil. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of total testicular regression on the prostatic morphophisyology and its regulation. The prostatic complex (PC) of animals from the four periods of the reproductive cycle (active, regressing, regressed, and recrudescence) was analyzed by different histological, morphometric, and immunohistochemical procedures to characterize its variations, analyze its hormonal regulation and evaluate whether the prostate is affected by the processes of testicular regression and recrudescence. The results indicated a decrease in the prostatic parameters from the active to regressed periods, which are related to decreases in the testicular production of testosterone and in the prostatic expression of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor α (ERα) and aromatase. However, in regressed-recrudescence periods, the prostatic expression of AR, ERα and aromatase increased, indicating the reactivation of the PC. Despite this, the PC appears to have a slower reactivation and seems not to follow the testicular recrudescence in morphological and morphometric terms. With these data, we demonstrate that the prostatic physiology is directly affected by total testicular regression and conclude that it is regulated by testosterone and estrogen, via the production of testosterone by the testes, its conversion to dihydrotestosterone by 5α-redutase and to estrogen by aromatase, and the activation/deactivation of AR and ERα in epithelial cells, which regulate cell expression and proliferation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Role of Somatic Testicular Cells during Mouse Spermatogenesis in Three-Dimensional Collagen Gel Culture System.

    PubMed

    Khajavi, Noushafarin; Akbari, Mohammad; Abdolsamadi, Hamid Reza; Abolhassani, Farid; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Koruji, Morteza; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar

    2014-02-03

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are the only cell type that can restore fertility to an infertile recipient following transplantation. Much effort has been made to develop a protocol for differentiating isolated SSCs in vitro. Recently, three-dimensional (3D) culture system has been introduced as an appropriate microenvironment for clonal expansion and differentiation of SSCs. This system provides structural support and multiple options for several manipulation such as addition of different cells. Somatic cells have a critical role in stimulating spermatogenesis. They provide complex cell to cell interaction, transport proteins and produce enzymes and regulatory factors. This study aimed to optimize the culture condition by adding somatic testicular cells to the collagen gel culture system in order to induce spermatogenesis progression. In this experimental study, the disassociation of SSCs was performed by using a two-step enzymatic digestion of type I collagenase, hyaluronidase and DNase. Somatic testicular cells including Sertoli cells and peritubular cells were obtained after the second digestion. SSCs were isolated by Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting (MACS) using GDNF family receptor alpha-1 (Gfrα-1) antibody. Two experimental designs were investigated. 1. Gfrα-1 positive SSCs were cultured in a collagen solution. 2. Somatic testicular cells were added to the Gfrα-1 positive SSCs in a collagen solution. Spermatogenesis progression was determined after three weeks by staining of synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SCP3)-positive cells. Semi-quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR was undertaken for SCP3 as a meiotic marker and, Crem and Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF1) as post meiotic markers. For statistical analysis student t test was performed. Testicular supporter cells increased the expression of meiotic and post meiotic markers and had a positive effect on extensive colony formation. Collagen gel culture system supported by somatic testicular cells

  18. Testicular Functions and Clinical Characterization of Patients with Gender Dysphoria (GD) Undergoing Sex Reassignment Surgery (SRS).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Florian; Neuhaus, Nina; Wistuba, Joachim; Zitzmann, Michael; Heß, Jochen; Mahler, Dorothee; van Ahlen, Hermann; Schlatt, Stefan; Kliesch, Sabine

    2015-11-01

    Cross-sex hormone treatment of gender dysphoria (GD) patients changing from male to female a prerequisite for sex reassignment. For initial physical adaptation, a combined treatment of anti-androgens and estrogens is used. Provided that patients fulfill specific criteria, sex reassignment surgery (SRS) presents the final step toward physical adaptation. However, systematic studies analyzing effects of hormone treatment regimens are lacking. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of three different hormonal treatment strategies regarding endocrinological parameters and testicular histology. Testicular tissues were obtained in a multicenter study from 108 patients on the day of SRS from three clinics following different treatment strategies. Patients either discontinued treatment 6 weeks (clinic A) or 2 weeks (clinic B) prior to SRS or not at all (clinic C). Testicular tissues, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood and questionnaires were obtained on the day of SRS. Blood hormone and intratesticular testosterone (ITT) levels were measured. Testicular weight and histology were evaluated and the percentage of luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) positive cells was determined. According to the questionnaires, patients showed desired phenotypical changes including breast growth (75%) and smooth skin (32%). While patients from clinics A and B presented with rather virilized hormonal levels, patients from clinic C showed generally feminized blood serum levels. Histological evaluation revealed highly heterogeneous results with about 24% of patients presenting with qualitatively normal spermatogenesis. In accordance with serum endocrine profile, ITT levels were lowest in clinic C and correlated with testosterone and free testosterone, but not with the spermatogenic state. The percentage of LHCGR-positive cells and ITT levels did not correlate. Only patients that did not discontinue hormonal treatment showed feminized blood levels on the day of

  19. Testicular self-examination and testicular cancer: a cost-utility analysis.

    PubMed

    Aberger, Michael; Wilson, Bradley; Holzbeierlein, Jeffrey M; Griebling, Tomas L; Nangia, Ajay K

    2014-12-01

    The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has recommended against testicular self-examinations (TSE) or clinical examination for testicular cancer screening. However, in this recommendation there was no consideration of the significant fiscal cost of treating advanced disease versus evaluation of benign disease. In this study, a cost-utility validation for TSE was performed. The cost of treatment for an advanced-stage testicular tumor (both seminomatous and nonseminomatous) was compared to the cost of six other scenarios involving the clinical assessment of a testicular mass felt during self-examination (four benign and two early-stage malignant). Medicare reimbursements were used as an estimate for a national cost standard. The total treatment cost for an advanced-stage seminoma ($48,877) or nonseminoma ($51,592) equaled the cost of 313-330 benign office visits ($156); 180-190 office visits with scrotal ultrasound ($272); 79-83 office visits with serial scrotal ultrasounds and labs ($621); 6-7 office visits resulting in radical inguinal orchiectomy for benign pathology ($7,686) or 2-3 office visits resulting in treatment and surveillance of an early-stage testicular cancer ($17,283: seminoma, $26,190: nonseminoma). A large number of clinical evaluations based on the TSE for benign disease can be made compared to the cost of one missed advanced-stage tumor. An average of 2.4 to 1 cost benefit ratio was demonstrated for early detected testicular cancer versus advanced-stage disease.

  20. From testicular biopsy to human embryo.

    PubMed

    Jezek, D; Knezević, N; Kalanj-Bognar, S; Vukelić, Z; Krhen, I

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of a testicular biopsy in the diagnosis and therapy of infertile men with a non-obstructive azoospermia. Overall, 70 testicular biopsies from infertile men were analysed. Samples were obtained by the "open testicular biopsy" method. After dissection, several pieces of the tissue were immediately immersed into the Sperm Prep Medium (Medi-Cult) and fixative (5.5% buffered glutaraldehyde). Tissue samples transported in Sperm Prep Medium were plunged into Sperm Freezing Medium (Medi-Cult) and were stored in liquid nitrogen for potential in vitro fertilization procedures. The tissue was also processed for semithin sections and transmission electron microscopy. Semithin sections from 8 infertile patients demonstrated regular testis structure and fully preserved spermatogenesis (control biopsies). In the remaining 62 cases, spermatogenesis was impaired and a variety of pathological changes could be seen: disorganization and desquamation of spermatogenic cells, spermatid or spermatocyte "stop", spermatogonia only, "Sertoli cells only" or tubular fibrosis. However, in 65% of cases (despite the above mentioned changes of seminiferous epithelium) foci of preserved spermatogenesis could be detected. These cases were classified as "mixed atrophy" of seminiferous tubules. In 63% of infertile patients, a successful extraction of sperm from the biopsy could be performed. In azoospermic patients, histological analysis of testicular biopsy proved to be very useful in terms of diagnosis as well as therapy, i.e. for further in vitro fertilization procedures.

  1. Testicular Vasculitis: A Sonographic and Pathologic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hague, Cameron; Bicknell, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Very little has been published about single-organ vasculitis of the testicle in the radiological literature. Consequently, it is a diagnosis that is unfamiliar to most radiologists. This case report describes the sonographic, pathologic, and laboratory findings of testicular vasculitis and reviews the available literature with regard to this subject. PMID:28246567

  2. Testicular Biopsy in Evaluation of Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Meinhard, Elizabeth; McRae, C. U.; Chisholm, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    Testicular biopsy findings in 100 infertile men were correlated with the clinical findings. Mild or moderately severe tubular lesions were seen in 57 cases and severe changes in 43. Clinical examination and semen analysis were no guide to the severity of the testicular lesion. Though patients with normal sized testes more commonly had mild tubular lesions, many were severe. Patients with small testes more often had severe lesions but some had only mild tubular changes. Biopsy findings in both aspermic and oligospermic patients ranged from normal to a complete loss of germinal tissue. Testicular biopsy is advocated in infertile men for the complete assessment of the case and for identifying those which are potentially treatable. Patients with a severe lesion can be spared further investigations. The choice and results of treatment are discussed, particularly the surgical treatment of varicocele or obstruction. Only patients with a mild or moderate testicular tubular lesion should participate in future trials with drugs for male infertility. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10 PMID:4726930

  3. Testicular Adrenal Rests Tumors and Testicular Microlithiasis in a Brazilian Case Series with Classic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ohana Marques Coelho de Carvalho, Laura; Miguel Garcia Lora, Raymundo; Renata Rezende Penna, Claudia; Calland Ricarte Beserra, Izabel

    2016-01-01

    Background Testicular adrenal rest tumors are a benign condition characterized by the presence of remnants of adrenal tissue within the testes that can lead to infertility. Testicular microlithiasis are calculus deposits within the seminiferous tubules. Both are described in congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Objectives Describe the frequency of testicular adrenal rest tumors and testicular microlithiasis in a Brazilian case series of patients with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to also relate these changes to disease control and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis disorders. Methods Case series study. An ultrasound examination of the scrotum was performed on 12 patients between the ages of 5.33 to 22 (14.72 ± 5.26) years. Testicular adrenal rest tumors were classified according to the degree of testicular infiltration in stages by adapting the Grinten’s classification, ranging from the absence of testicular adrenal rests visible by ultrasound (stage ≤ 1) to chronic obstruction of the testicular parenchyma with irreversible damage of the testicle (stage 5). Results Six patients (5 salt wasting and 1 simple virilizing) with an average age of 17.27 ± 3.09 years and have gone through puberty showed testicular adrenal rest tumors (Grinten stage ≥ 3). In 2 of the patients there was a coincidence with testicular microlithiasis. The frequency of testicular adrenal rest tumors did not relate with the levels of serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone and androstenedione. In 3 patients with testicular adrenal rest tumors, gonadotropin levels were suggestive of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and one of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Conclusions Testicular adrenal rest tumors were found in greater frequency during puberty and was not related to hormonal control in this group. Some of them happened with testicular microlithiasis. PMID:28835760

  4. Testicular microlithiasis: Correlation with doppler sonography of testicular arteries and sperm function.

    PubMed

    Mahafza, Waleed S; Alarini, Mahmoud Y; Awadghanem, Ahmed F; Odwan, Ghazi; Juweid, Malik E

    2016-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of testicular microlithiasis and its correlation with Doppler parameters of testicular arteries and sperm function. Reports of 1,200 consecutive scrotal sonographic examinations performed at our hospital were reviewed. Patients diagnosed with testicular microlithiasis were recalled for detailed scrotal sonographic examination, including Doppler sonography and sperm function. The same examinations were performed in an age-matched control group and the findings compared. Testicular microlithiasis was found in 64 cases (5.3%). Doppler sonography showed mean resistance index, Vmax, and Vmin of 61.1 ± 9.3%, 18.2 ± 4.7 cm/s, and 7.7 ± 2.3 cm/s, respectively, in the testicular microlithiasis group versus 62.4 ± 10.4%, 18.4 ± 5.7 cm/s, and 7.3 ± 2.4 cm/s, respectively, in the control group (p = 0.49, 0.84 and 0.35, respectively). Sperm function tests demonstrated sperm count, motility, and normal morphology (normal oval head) of 29.6 ± 20.4 × 10(6) /mL, 35.3 ± 16.2%, and 44.4 ± 12%, respectively, in patients with testicular microlithiasis versus 54.3 ± 22.4 × 10(6) /mL, 50.2% ± 14.4%, and 66.4 ± 11.6% in control subjects (p < 0.02). Prevalence of testicular microlithiasis of 5.3% in Jordanian patients is similar to what has been reported in the literature. Testicular microlithiasis does not have a significant effect on Doppler parameters of testicular arteries. The apparent impairment of sperm function in patients with testicular microlithiasis warrants further studies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:474-479, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A Critical Point of Male Gonad Development: Neuroendocrine Correlates of Accelerated Testicular Growth in Rats during Early Life

    PubMed Central

    Dygalo, Nikolay N.; Shemenkova, Tatjana V.; Kalinina, Tatjana S.; Shishkina, Galina T.

    2014-01-01

    Testis growth during early life is important for future male fertility and shows acceleration during the first months of life in humans. This acceleration coincides with the peak in gonadotropic hormones in the blood, while the role of hypothalamic factors remains vague. Using neonatal rats to assess this issue, we found that day 9 of life is likely critical for testis development in rats. Before this day, testicular growth was proportional to body weight gain, but after that the testes showed accelerated growth. Hypothalamic kisspeptin and its receptor mRNA levels begin to elevate 2 days later, at day 11. A significant increase in the mRNA levels for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors in the hypothalamus between days 5 and 7 was followed by a 3-fold decrease in GnRH mRNA levels in this brain region during the next 2 days. Starting from day 9, hypothalamic GnRH mRNA levels increased significantly and positively correlated with accelerated testicular growth. Triptorelin, an agonist of GnRH, at a dose that had no effect on testicular growth during “proportional” period, increased testis weights during the period of accelerated growth. The insensitivity of testicular growth to GnRH during “proportional” period was supported by inability of a 2.5-fold siRNA knockdown of GnRH expression in the hypothalamus of the 7-day-old animals to produce any effect on their testis weights. GnRH receptor blockade with cetrorelix was also without effect on testis weights during “proportional” period but the same doses of this GnRH antagonist significantly inhibited “accelerated” testicular growth. GnRH receptor mRNA levels in the pituitary as well as plasma LH concentrations were higher during “accelerated” period of testicular growth than during “proportional” period. In general, our data defined two distinct periods in rat testicular development that are primarily characterized by different responses to GnRH signaling. PMID:24695464

  6. A critical point of male gonad development: neuroendocrine correlates of accelerated testicular growth in rats during early life.

    PubMed

    Dygalo, Nikolay N; Shemenkova, Tatjana V; Kalinina, Tatjana S; Shishkina, Galina T

    2014-01-01

    Testis growth during early life is important for future male fertility and shows acceleration during the first months of life in humans. This acceleration coincides with the peak in gonadotropic hormones in the blood, while the role of hypothalamic factors remains vague. Using neonatal rats to assess this issue, we found that day 9 of life is likely critical for testis development in rats. Before this day, testicular growth was proportional to body weight gain, but after that the testes showed accelerated growth. Hypothalamic kisspeptin and its receptor mRNA levels begin to elevate 2 days later, at day 11. A significant increase in the mRNA levels for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors in the hypothalamus between days 5 and 7 was followed by a 3-fold decrease in GnRH mRNA levels in this brain region during the next 2 days. Starting from day 9, hypothalamic GnRH mRNA levels increased significantly and positively correlated with accelerated testicular growth. Triptorelin, an agonist of GnRH, at a dose that had no effect on testicular growth during "proportional" period, increased testis weights during the period of accelerated growth. The insensitivity of testicular growth to GnRH during "proportional" period was supported by inability of a 2.5-fold siRNA knockdown of GnRH expression in the hypothalamus of the 7-day-old animals to produce any effect on their testis weights. GnRH receptor blockade with cetrorelix was also without effect on testis weights during "proportional" period but the same doses of this GnRH antagonist significantly inhibited "accelerated" testicular growth. GnRH receptor mRNA levels in the pituitary as well as plasma LH concentrations were higher during "accelerated" period of testicular growth than during "proportional" period. In general, our data defined two distinct periods in rat testicular development that are primarily characterized by different responses to GnRH signaling.

  7. Testicular prostheses in children: Is earlier better?

    PubMed

    Peycelon, M; Rossignol, G; Muller, C O; Carricaburu, E; Philippe-Chomette, P; Paye-Jaouen, A; El Ghoneimi, A

    2016-08-01

    The absence of a testis occurs for various reasons in children, but testicular prosthesis implantation in children is uncommon. The optimal time for prosthesis placement is still unclear, and its complication rate has been poorly studied in children. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors of complications in cases of testicular prosthesis implantation in children. A monocentric, retrospective review was performed of children implanted with a testicular prosthesis between 2008 and 2014. All implantations were performed through an inguinal incision with a standardized procedure. Children were divided into two groups depending on the interval after orchiectomy: (A) early implantation (delay between surgeries <1 year); and (B) delayed surgeries (delay ≥1 year). Statistical analysis was performed with Student and Fisher tests. Twenty-six patients (A, 15; B, 11) had a total of 38 testicular prostheses placements. Mean follow-up was 36.2 months. First surgery was performed at the mean age of 11.8 years (range 0-17.9) (A, 14.1; B, 8.1; P = 0.01) and testicular prosthesis implantation at the mean age of 14.7 years (range 9-18) (A, 14.3; B, 14.6) with a mean delay of 36.1 months (A, 1.3; B, 80.3). Indications were mainly spermatic cord torsion (27%), bilateral anorchia (27%), and testicular atrophy after cryptorchidism surgery (19.2%). Complications (10.5%) included two cases of extrusion, one infection and one migration. Patient 1 had a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with testicle relapse 2 years after induction therapy. High-dose chemotherapy, total body irradiation and bilateral orchiectomies were performed, and bilateral prostheses were implanted 12 years after the end of chemotherapy. Complications happened 85 days after surgery. Patient 2 was followed-up for a proximal hypospadias. The tunica vaginalis flap, which was used during a redo urethroplasty, lead to testicular atrophy. Thirteen years after the last penile surgery, a testicular

  8. Production of recombinant insulin-like androgenic gland hormones from three decapod species: In vitro testicular phosphorylation and activation of a newly identified tyrosine kinase receptor from the Eastern spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Joseph; Chandler, Jennifer C; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Sagi, Amir; Battaglene, Stephen C; Elizur, Abigail; Ventura, Tomer

    2016-04-01

    In crustaceans the insulin-like androgenic gland hormone (IAG) is responsible for male sexual differentiation. To date, the biochemical pathways through which IAG exerts its effects are poorly understood and could be elucidated through the production of a functional recombinant IAG (rIAG). We have successfully expressed glycosylated, biologically active IAG using the Pichia pastoris yeast expression system. We co-expressed recombinant single-chain precursor molecules consisting of the B and A chains (the mature hormone) tethered by a flexible linker, producing rIAGs of the following commercially important species: Eastern spiny lobster Sagmariasus verreauxi (Sv), redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (Cq) and giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr). We then tested the biological activity of each, through the ability to increase phosphorylation in the testis; both Sv and Cq rIAGs significantly elevated phosphorylation specific to their species, and in a dose-dependent manner. Mr rIAG was tested on Macrobrachium australiense (Ma), eliciting a similar response. Moreover, using bioinformatics analyses of the de novo assembled spiny lobster transcriptome, we identified a spiny lobster tyrosine kinase insulin receptor (Sv-TKIR). We validated this discovery with a receptor activation assay in COS-7 cells expressing Sv-TKIR, using a reporter SRE-LUC system designed for RTKs, with each of the rIAG proteins acting as the activation ligand. Using recombinant proteins, we aim to develop specific tools to control sexual development through the administration of IAG within the critical sexual differentiation time window. The biologically active rIAGs generated might facilitate commercially feasible solutions for the long sought techniques for sex-change induction and monosex population culture in crustaceans and shed new light on the physiological mode of action of IAG in crustaceans.

  9. Experiment K-7-16: Effects of Microgravity or Simulated Launch on Testicular Function in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amann, R. P.; Clemens, J. W.; Deaver, D.; Folmer, J.; Zirkin, B.; Veeramachaneni, D. N. R.; Grills, G. S.; Gruppi, C. M.; Wolgemuth, D.; Serova, L. V.; hide

    1994-01-01

    Fixed or frozen testicular tissues from five rats per group were analyzed by: subjective and quantitative evaluations of spermatogenesis; Northern-blot analysis for expression of selected genes; quantification of testosterone and receptors for LH; and morphometric analysis of Leydig cells. Based on observations of fixed tissue, it was evident that some rats in the flight and vivarium groups had testicular abnormalities unassociated with treatment, and probably existing when they were assigned randomly to the four treatment groups; the simulated-launch group contained no abnormal rat. Lesions induced in testes of caudal-elevation rats precluded discernment of any pre-existing abnormality. Considering rats without pre-existing abnormalities, diameter of seminiferous tubules and numbers of germ cells per tubule cross section were lower (E less than 0.05) in flight rats than in simulated-launch or vivarium rats. However, ratios of germ cells to each other, or to Sertoli cells, and number of homogenization-resistant spermatids did not differ from values for simulated-launch or vivarium controls. There was no effect of flight on normal expression of testis-specific hsp gene products, or evidence for production of stress-inducible transcripts of the hsp70 or hsp90 genes. Concentration of receptors for rLH in testicular tissue, and surface densities of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and peroxisomes in Leydig cells, were similar in flight and simulated-launch rats. However, concentrations of testosterone in testicular tissue or peripheral blood plasma were reduced (P less than 0.05) in flight rats to less than 20 percent of values for simulated-launch or vivarium controls. Thus, spermatogenesis was essentially normal in flight rats, but production of testosterone was severely depressed. Sequela of reduced androgen production on turnover of muscle and bone should be considered when interpreting data from mammals exposed to microgravity.

  10. Experiment K-7-16: Effects of Microgravity or Simulated Launch on Testicular Function in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amann, R. P.; Clemens, J. W.; Deaver, D.; Folmer, J.; Zirkin, B.; Veeramachaneni, D. N. R.; Grills, G. S.; Gruppi, C. M.; Wolgemuth, D.; Serova, L. V.; Sapp, W. J.; Williams, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    Fixed or frozen testicular tissues from five rats per group were analyzed by: subjective and quantitative evaluations of spermatogenesis; Northern-blot analysis for expression of selected genes; quantification of testosterone and receptors for LH; and morphometric analysis of Leydig cells. Based on observations of fixed tissue, it was evident that some rats in the flight and vivarium groups had testicular abnormalities unassociated with treatment, and probably existing when they were assigned randomly to the four treatment groups; the simulated-launch group contained no abnormal rat. Lesions induced in testes of caudal-elevation rats precluded discernment of any pre-existing abnormality. Considering rats without pre-existing abnormalities, diameter of seminiferous tubules and numbers of germ cells per tubule cross section were lower (E less than 0.05) in flight rats than in simulated-launch or vivarium rats. However, ratios of germ cells to each other, or to Sertoli cells, and number of homogenization-resistant spermatids did not differ from values for simulated-launch or vivarium controls. There was no effect of flight on normal expression of testis-specific hsp gene products, or evidence for production of stress-inducible transcripts of the hsp70 or hsp90 genes. Concentration of receptors for rLH in testicular tissue, and surface densities of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and peroxisomes in Leydig cells, were similar in flight and simulated-launch rats. However, concentrations of testosterone in testicular tissue or peripheral blood plasma were reduced (P less than 0.05) in flight rats to less than 20 percent of values for simulated-launch or vivarium controls. Thus, spermatogenesis was essentially normal in flight rats, but production of testosterone was severely depressed. Sequela of reduced androgen production on turnover of muscle and bone should be considered when interpreting data from mammals exposed to microgravity.

  11. Relationships of testicular iron and ferritin concentrations with testicular weight and sperm production in boars.

    PubMed

    Wise, T; Lunstra, D D; Rohrer, G A; Ford, J J

    2003-02-01

    The inverse relationship of testicular size and circulating follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations has been documented, and accompanying this relationship is the change in color of the parenchymal tissue of the testes. Large testes (300 to 400 g) are pink to light red and small testes (100 g) are dark maroon with color gradations for weights in between. It was hypothesized that this color most likely represented an iron protein. Chromatographic analysis of testicular tissue indicated that the Fe was associated primarily with ferritin, and immunohistochemistry showed that Leydig cells were the primary location of ferritin storage within the testes. Concentrations of Fe and ferritin were higher in small testes and decreased as testes weight increased (P < 0.05). As testicular Fe concentrations increased, daily sperm production (DSP) and total DSP declined (P < 0.05). Genotyping six generations of Meishan x White composite boars (n = 288) for a quantitative trait locus that is indicative of elevated FSH and small testes in boars indicated that the Meishan genotype had elevated testicular iron concentrations and darker color in conjunction with reduced total DSP (P < 0.01). It is not thought the elevated iron concentrations affect testicular weights but are probably a result of elevated FSH and FSH inducement of Fe transport. The storage of Fe in Leydig cells may provide a reservoir of Fe for easy access by Sertoli and germ cells, but still provide a degree of protection to germ cells from ionic iron.

  12. Testicular cancer trends as 'whistle blowers' of testicular developmental problems in populations.

    PubMed

    Skakkebaek, N E; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Jørgensen, N; Main, K M; Leffers, H; Andersson, A-M; Juul, A; Jensen, T K; Toppari, J

    2007-08-01

    Recently a worldwide rise in the incidence of testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) has been repeatedly reported. The changing disease pattern may signal that other testicular problems may also be increasing. We have reviewed recent research progress, in particular evidence gathered in the Nordic countries, which shows strong associations between testicular cancer, undescended testis, hypospadias, poor testicular development and function, and male infertility. These studies have led us to suggest the existence of a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS), of which TGCC, undescended testis, hypospadias/disorders of sex differentiation and male fertility problems may be symptoms with varying penetration. In spite of their fetal origin, most of the TDS symptoms, including TGCC and poor semen quality, can only be diagnosed in adulthood. Data from a Danish-Finnish research collaboration strongly suggest that trends in TGCC rates of a population may be 'whistle blowers' of other reproductive health problems. As cancer registries are often of excellent quality - in contrast to registries for congenital abnormalities - health authorities should consider an increase in TGCC as a warning that other reproductive health problems may also be rising.

  13. Regulation network analysis of testicular seminoma at various stages of progression.

    PubMed

    Sha, J-J; Dong, Y-H; Liu, D-M; Bo, J-J; Huang, Y-R; Li, Z; Ping, P

    2013-03-11

    Testicular seminoma has become the most common solid malignancy in young men, especially in the 20s group. We obtained the gene expression profile of human testicular seminoma cells from NCBI, identified the differentially expressed genes of testicular seminoma cells of different stages, and constructed the regulation networks of different stages of testicular seminoma using bioinformatics methodology. Forty differentially expressed genes of testicular seminoma cells of different stages were identified. These genes and pathways are apparently involved in the progression of testicular seminoma.

  14. A case of Carney complex presenting as acute testicular pain

    PubMed Central

    Alleemudder, Adam; Pillai, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with testicular pain but was found to have bilateral testicular lesions later confirmed as Sertoli cell tumors. Genetic testing confirmed a PRKAR1A gene mutation consistent with Carney complex, a rare genetic disorder characterized by skin lesions, myxomas, and multiple endocrine neoplasms. A review of the condition is made highlighting the association with testicular tumors, particularly of Sertoli cell origin. PMID:27453662

  15. Testicular Prostheses: Development and Modern Usage

    PubMed Central

    Bodiwala, D; Summerton, DJ; Terry, TR

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Testicular prostheses produced from various materials have been in use since 1941. The absence of a testicle has been shown to be a psychologically traumatic experience for males of all ages. The indications for insertion of a prosthesis include absence or following orchidectomy from a number of causes such as malignancy, torsion and orchitis. The most common substance used around the world in the manufacture of these implants is silicone; however, in the US, this material is currently banned because of theoretical health risks. This has led to the development of saline-filled prostheses as an alternative. PATIENTS AND METHODS A Medline search was carried out on all articles on testicular prosthesis between 1966 and 2006. CONCLUSIONS This review highlights the controversies regarding prosthetic materials, the complications of insertion and the potential benefits of this commonly performed procedure. PMID:17535609

  16. Testicular chloroma in a nonleukemic infant.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Michael B; Nafiu, Olubukola O; Valdez, Riccardo; Park, John M; Williams, James A; Wechsler, Daniel S

    2005-07-01

    Extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCT) are localized collections of immature myeloid cells that occur outside of the bone marrow. Usually observed concurrently with bone marrow disease, EMCT also may occur in the absence of overt marrow leukemia. In this report, we describe an infant with a testicular mass that was identified as an EMCT after orchiectomy. Unlike the only previously reported case of infantile testicular chloroma, this patient did not exhibit bone marrow disease at diagnosis. Because systemic chemotherapy is considered to be superior to local control (surgery, radiation therapy), the patient was treated with intensively timed induction chemotherapy followed by 3 cycles of maintenance treatment (according to CCG protocol #2891) but no radiation therapy. The patient remains disease-free 18 months after diagnosis.

  17. Management of Low-Stage Testicular Seminoma.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Shane M; Liauw, Stanley L; Eggener, Scott E

    2015-08-01

    Management of testicular seminoma has benefited from numerous advances in imaging, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy over the last 50 years leading to nearly 100% disease-specific survival for low-stage seminoma. This article examines the evaluation and management of low-stage testicular seminoma, which includes clinical stage I and IIA disease. Excellent outcomes for stage I seminoma are achieved with active surveillance, adjuvant radiotherapy, and adjuvant single-agent carboplatin. Current areas of research focus on optimizing surveillance regimens and minimizing the morbidity and long-term complications of adjuvant treatment. Radiotherapy continues to be the primary treatment option for patients with clinical stage IIa disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Methamphetamine use can mimic testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Michael H; Gerscovich, Eugenio O; Corwin, Michael T; Wilkendorf, Stephen R

    2013-09-01

    We report the case of a patient presenting with the classic clinical appearance of testicular torsion. Ultrasound showed testicular ischemia supporting the clinical diagnosis, but the lack of visualization of spermatic cord torsion was of concern. An attempt of clinical detorsion was considered unsuccessful and the patient was explored. No torsion was found. On postoperative review of the patient's medical history, we found methamphetamine use, with a positive urine test at the time of his emergent consultation for the scrotal pain episode. The use of amphetamines has been previously reported as the cause of ischemia of multiple organs, but we could not find previous reports of involvement of the testis mimicking torsion. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jeffrey N; Tyree, Curtis; Hu, Junlian; Berger, Elaine; Marschke, Keith; Nakane, Masaki; Coghlan, Michael J; Clemm, Dave; Lane, Ben; Rosen, Jon

    2003-01-01

    Selective intracellular receptor antagonists are used clinically to ameliorate hormone-dependent disease states. Patients with Cushing's syndrome have high levels of the glucocorticoid, cortisol, and suffer significant consequences from this overexposure. High levels of this hormone are also implicated in exacerbating diabetes and the stress response. Selectively inhibiting this hormone may have clinical benefit in these disease states. To this end, we have identified the first selective, nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist. This compound is characterized by a tri-aryl methane core chemical structure. This GR-specific antagonist binds with nanomolar affinity to the GR and has no detectable binding affinity for the highly related receptors for mineralocorticoids, androgens, estrogens, and progestins. We demonstrate that this antagonist inhibits glucocorticoid-mediated transcriptional regulation. This compound binds competitively with steroids, likely occupying a similar site within the ligand-binding domain. Once bound, however, the compound fails to induce critical conformational changes in the receptor necessary for agonist activity.

  20. Ultrasonography of Extravaginal Testicular Torsion in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Bombiński, Przemysław; Warchoł, Stanisław; Brzewski, Michał; Majkowska, Zofia; Dudek-Warchoł, Teresa; Żerańska, Maria; Panek, Małgorzata; Drop, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Extravaginal testicular torsion (ETT), also called prenatal or perinatal, occurs prenatally and is present at birth or appears within the first month of life. It has different etiology than intravaginal torsion, which appears later in life. Testicular torsion must be taken into consideration in differential diagnosis of acute scrotum and should be confirmed or ruled out at first diagnostic step. Ultrasonography is a basic imaging modality, however diagnostic pitfalls are still possible. There is still wide discussion concerning management of ETT, which varies from immediate orchiectomy to conservative treatment resulting in testicle atrophy. Material/Methods In this article we present ultrasonographic spectrum of ETT in neonates, which were diagnosed and treated in our hospital during the last 8 years (2008–2015), in correlation with clinical and intraoperative findings. Results Thirteen neonates with ETT were enrolled in the study – 11 patients with a single testicle affected and 2 patients with bilateral testicular torsion. Most common signs on clinical examination were: hardened and enlarged testicle and discoloration of the scrotum. Most common ultrasonographic signs were: abnormal size or echostructure of the affected testicle and absence of the blood flow in Doppler ultrasonography. In 3 patients ultrasound elastography was performed, which appeared very useful in testicle structure assessment. Conclusions Testicular torsion may concern boys even in the perinatal period. Ultrasonographic picture of acute scrotum in young boys may be confused. Coexistence of the abnormal size or echostructure of the torsed testicle with absence of the blood flow in Doppler ultrasonography appear as very specific but late ultrasonographic sings. Ultrasound elastography may be a very useful tool for visualisation of a very common clinical sign – hardening of the necrotic testicle. PMID:27757176

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Kaipia, A; Ryymin, P; Mäkelä, E; Aaltonen, M; Kähärä, V; Kangasniemi, M

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the feasibility of contrast enhanced (CE)-dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of testicular torsion induced hypoperfusion in an experimental rat model. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to unilateral testicular torsion of 360 or 720 degrees. After 1 h, the tail veins of the anaesthetized rats were cannulated and T2 -, diffusion-weighted and T1-weighted CE-dynamic MRI were subsequently performed by a 1.5 T MRI scanner. On apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) images, the region of interest values of the ischaemic and control testes was compared. From CE-dynamic MR images, the maximal slopes of contrast enhancement were calculated and compared. In testicular torsion of 360 degrees, the maximal slope of contrast enhancement was 0.072%/s vs. 0.47%/s in the contralateral control testis (p < 0.001). A torsion of 720 degrees diminished the slope of contrast enhancement to 0.046%/s vs. 0.37%/s in the contralateral testis (p < 0.001). Diminished blood flow during torsion also followed in decreased ADC values in both 360 degrees (12.4% decrease; p < 0.05) and 720 degrees (10.8% decrease; p < 0.001) of torsion. Torsion of the testis causes ipsilateral hypoperfusion and decreased gadolinium uptake in a rat model that can be easily detected and quantified by CE-dynamic MRI. In diffusion-weighted MRI images, acute hypoperfusion results in a slight decrease of ADC values. Our results suggest that CE-dynamic MRI in combination with diffusion-weighted MRI can be used to detect compromised blood flow due to acute testicular torsion.

  2. Testicular ischemia following mesh hernia repair and acute prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pietro, Pepe; Francesco, Aragona

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of a man admitted to our Hospital for right acute scrotum that six months before had undergone a right hernioplasty with mesh implantation. Clinical history and testicular color Doppler sonography (CDS) patterns suggested an orchiepididymitis following acute prostatitis. After 48h the clinical picture worsened and testicular CDS showed a decreased telediastolic velocity that suggested testicular ischemia. The patient underwent surgical exploration: spermatic cord appeared stretched by an inflammatory tissue in absence of torsion and releasing of spermatic cord was performed. In patients with genitourinary infection who previously underwent inguinal mesh implantation, testicular CDS follow-up is mandatory. PMID:19718342

  3. Long-term health effects among testicular cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Hashibe, Mia; Abdelaziz, Sarah; Al-Temimi, Mohammed; Fraser, Alison; Boucher, Kenneth M; Smith, Ken; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Rowe, Kerry; Rowley, Braden; Daurelle, Micky; Holton, Avery E; VanDerslice, James; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Bishoff, Jay; Lowrance, Will; Stroup, Antoinette

    2016-12-01

    Testicular cancer is diagnosed at a young age and survival rates are high; thus, the long-term effects of cancer treatment need to be assessed. Our objectives are to estimate the incidence rates and determinants of late effects in testicular cancer survivors. We conducted a population-based cohort study of testicular cancer survivors, diagnosed 1991-2007, followed up for a median of 10 years. We identified 785 testicular cancer patients who survived ≥5 years and 3323 men free of cancer for the comparison group. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to compare the hazard ratio between the cases and the comparison group and for internal analysis among case patients. Testicular cancer survivors experienced a 24 % increase in risk of long-term health effects >5 years after diagnosis. The overall incidence rate of late effects among testicular cancer survivors was 66.3 per 1000 person years. Higher risks were observed among testicular cancer survivors for hypercholesterolemia, infertility, and orchitis. Chemotherapy and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection appeared to increase the risk of late effects. Being obese prior to cancer diagnosis appeared to be the strongest factor associated with late effects. Testicular cancer survivors were more likely to develop chronic health conditions when compared to cancer-free men. While the late effects risk was increased among testicular cancer survivors, the incidence rates of late effects after cancer diagnosis was fairly low.

  4. Downregulation of clusterin expression in human testicular seminoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bianjiang; Han, Min Tang Zhijian; Zhang, Jiexiu; Lu, Pei; Li, Jie; Song, Ninghong; Wang, Zengjun; Yin, Changjun; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Clusterin, a heterodimeric glycoprotein of approximately 80 kDa, exists extensively in human body fluids. The abnormal expression of clusterin is closely related to the occurrence, progression, and prognosis of tumors. Up to now, few studies have focused on clusterin in human testicular cancer. This study describes an extensive exploration of the presence and expression of clusterin in testicular seminoma. Tumor tissues and normal testis tissues were collected from 13 patients with testicular seminoma and 16 patients undergoing surgical castration for prostate cancer. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to detect the expression difference of clusterin mRNA between testicular seminoma and normal testis. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis were performed to detect the presence and expression difference of clusterin protein between two groups. Real-time PCR showed the expression of clusterin mRNA in testicular seminoma to be significantly lower than in normal testis (only 13% relative quantification). Western blot analysis indicated marked reductions in the expression of clusterin protein in testicular seminoma. Similar results were observed upon immunohistochemical analysis. In testicular seminoma and normal testis, clusterin exists in its heterodimeric secretory isoform. Clusterin expression is significantly lower in testicular seminoma than in normal testis. This is the first comprehensive study of the presence and expression of clusterin in human testicular cancer. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Bilateral variant testicular arteries with double renal arteries

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The testicular arteries normally arise from the abdominal aorta. There are reports about the variant origin of these arteries. Accessory renal arteries are also a common finding but their providing origin to testicular arteries is an important observation. The variations described here are unique and provide significant information to surgeons dissecting the abdominal cavity. Case presentation During routine dissection classes of abdominal region of a 60-year-old male cadaver, we observed bilateral variant testicular arteries and double renal arteries. Conclusion Awareness of variations of the testicular arteries such as those presented here becomes important during surgical procedures like varicocele and undescended testes. PMID:19187540

  6. Perinatal testicular torsion and medicolegal considerations.

    PubMed

    Massoni, F; Troili, G M; Pelosi, M; Ricci, S

    2014-06-01

    Perinatal testicular torsion (PTT) is a very complex condition because of rarity of presentation and diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. In presence of perinatal testicular torsion, the involvement of contralateral testis can be present also in absence of other indications which suggest the bilateral involvement; therefore, occurrences supported by literature do not exclude the use of surgery to avoid the risk of omitted or delayed diagnosis. The data on possible recovery of these testicles are not satisfactory, and treatment consists of an observational approach ("wait-and-see") or an interventional approach. The hypothesis of randomized clinical trials seems impracticable because of rarity of disease. The authors present a case of PTT, analyzing injuries due to clinical and surgical management of these patients, according to medicolegal profile. The delayed diagnosis and the choice of an incorrect therapeutic approach can compromise the position of healthcare professionals, defective in terms of skill, prudence and diligence. Endocrine insufficiency is an unfortunate event. The analysis of literature seems to support, because of high risk, a surgical approach aimed not only at resolution of unilateral pathology or prevention of a relapse, but also at prevention of contralateral testicular torsion.

  7. Sorting the hype from the facts in testicular cancer: is testicular cancer related to trauma?

    PubMed

    Merzenich, H; Ahrens, W; Stang, A; Baumgardt-Elms, C; Jahn, I; Stegmaier, C; Jöckel, K H

    2000-12-01

    The rate of testicular cancer is increasing. Trauma severe enough to cause testicular atrophy is a putative risk factor for testicular cancer but the epidemiological evidence is not conclusive. A population based, multicenter case-control study was performed from 1995 to 1997 to investigate potential risk factors for gonadal and extragonadal germ cell cancer. The study was done in 5 German regions. Interviews were performed with 269 eligible male patients with a histologically verified diagnosis and 797 controls. Detailed information on medical and family history was collected at personal interviews. We identified a significantly elevated risk for testicular cancer in relation to testis and/or groin trauma (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.51 to 4.20). After introducing a lag time by excluding reports of trauma within the last 12 months before diagnosis or interview the corresponding odds ratio was 2.1 (95% CI 1.24 to 3.61). Analysis of the circumstances and the reported types of injury allowed us to restrict the study to testis trauma specifically, which had an odds ratio of 3.49 (95% CI 1.78 to 6.81). To account for a potential reporting bias analysis was restricted to traumatic episodes for which medical attention was sought. This restriction resulted in an odds ratio of 0.70 (95% CI 0.19 to 2.63) after excluding from study trauma reports within the last 12 months. The results of our study do not support the hypothesis that testicular trauma is an important risk factor for testicular cancer. The possibility of recall bias should be considered.

  8. A phytooxysterol, 28-homobrassinolide modulates rat testicular steroidogenesis in normal and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Premalatha, R; Jubendradass, Rajamanickam; Rani, S Judith Amala; Srikumar, K; Mathur, Premendu Prakash

    2013-05-01

    Steroidogenesis in testicular cells depends upon the availability of cholesterol within testicular mitochondria besides the activities of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [17b-HSD]), and the tissue levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), androgen-binding protein (ABP), and testosterone (T). Cellular cholesterol biosynthesis is regulated by endogenous oxycholesterols acting through nuclear hormone receptors. Plant oxysterols, such as 28-homobrassinolide (28-HB), available to human through diet, was shown to exhibit antihyperglycemic effect in diabetic male rat. Its role in rat testicular steroidogenesis and lipid peroxidation (LPO) was therefore assessed using normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic male rats. Administration of 28-HB (333 µg/kg body weight) by oral gavage for 15 consecutive days to experimental rats diminished LPO, increased antioxidant enzyme, 3β-HSD and 17β-HSD activities, and elevated StAR and ABP expression and T level in rat testis. We report that 28-HB induced steroidogenesis in normal and diabetic rat testis.

  9. The role of testicular hormones and luteinizing hormone in spatial memory in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Sarah E A; Alla, Juliet; Wheat, Elizabeth; Romeo, Russell D; McEwen, Bruce; Thornton, Janice E

    2012-04-01

    Attempts to determine the influence of testicular hormones on learning and memory in males have yielded contradictory results. The present studies examined whether testicular hormones are important for maximal levels of spatial memory in young adult male rats. To minimize any effect of stress, we used the Object Location Task which is a spatial working memory task that does not involve food or water deprivation or aversive stimuli for motivation. In Experiment 1 sham gonadectomized male rats demonstrated robust spatial memory, but gonadectomized males showed diminished spatial memory. In Experiment 2 subcutaneous testosterone (T) capsules restored spatial memory performance in gonadectomized male rats, while rats with blank capsules demonstrated compromised spatial memory. In Experiment 3, gonadectomized male rats implanted with blank capsules again showed compromised spatial memory, while those with T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), or estradiol (E) capsules demonstrated robust spatial memory, indicating that T's effects may be mediated by its conversion to E or to DHT. Gonadectomized male rats injected with Antide, a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor antagonist which lowers luteinizing hormone levels, also demonstrated spatial memory, comparable to that shown by T-, E-, or DHT-treated males. These data indicate that testicular androgens are important for maximal levels of spatial working memory in male rats, that testosterone may be converted to E and/or DHT to exert its effects, and that some of the effects of these steroid hormones may occur via negative feedback effects on LH.

  10. Ultrastructural and hormonal changes in the pineal-testicular axis following arecoline administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Saha, Indraneel; Chatterji, Urmi; Chaudhuri-Sengupta, Santasri; Nag, Tapas C; Nag, Debabrata; Banerjee, Samir; Maiti, B R

    2007-04-01

    Arecoline is an alkaloid of betel nut of Areca catechu. Betel nut is chewed by millions of people in the world and it causes oral and hepatic cancers in human. It has therapeutic value for the treatment of Alzheimer and schizophrenia. Arecoline has immunosuppressive, mutagenic and genotoxic effects in laboratory animals. It also affects endocrine functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of arecoline on pineal-testicular axis in rats. Since pineal activity is different between day and night, the current study is undertaken in both the photophase and scotophase. The findings were evaluated by ultrastructural and hormonal studies of pineal and testicular Leydig cells, with quantitations of fructose and sialic acid of sex accessories. Arecoline treatment (10 mg/kg body weight daily for 10 days) caused suppression of pineal activity at ultrastructural level by showing dilatation of the cisternae of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), large autophagosome-like bodies with swollen mitochondrial cristae, numerous lysosomes, degenerated synaptic ribbons and reduced number of synaptic-like microvesicles. Moreover, pineal and serum N-acetylserotonin and melatonin levels were decreased with increased serotonin levels in both the gland and serum. In contrast, testicular Leydig cell activity was stimulated with abundance of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER), electron-dense core vesicles and vacuolated secretory vesicles, and increased testosterone level in the arecoline recipients. Consequently, the testosterone target, like prostate, was ultrastructurally stimulated with abundance of RER and accumulation of secretory vesicles. Fructose and sialic acid concentrations were also significantly increased respectively in the coagulating gland and seminal vesicle. These results were more significant in the scotophase than the photophase. The findings suggest that arecoline inhibits pineal activity, but stimulates testicular function (testosterone level

  11. Pleiotropic Activities of HGF/c-Met System in Testicular Physiology: Paracrine and Endocrine Implications.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Giulia; Catizone, Angela

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, a growing body of evidence has been reported concerning the expression and functional role of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on different aspects of testicular physiology. This review has the aim to summarize what is currently known regarding this topic. From early embryonic development to adult age, HGF and its receptor c-Met appeared to be clearly detectable in the testis. These molecules acquire different distribution patterns and roles depending on the developmental stage or the post-natal age considered. HGF acts as a paracrine modulator of testicular functions promoting the epithelium-mesenchyme cross-talk as described even in other organs. Interestingly, it has been reported that testicular HGF acts even as an autocrine factor and that its receptor might be modulated by endocrine signals that change at puberty: HGF receptor expressed by Sertoli cells, in fact, is up-regulated by FSH administration. HGF is in turn able to modify endocrine state of the organism being able to increase testosterone secretion of both fetal and adult Leydig cells. Moreover, c-Met is expressed in mitotic and meiotic male germ cells as well as in spermatozoa. The distribution pattern of c-Met on sperm cell membrane changes in the caput and cauda epididymal sperms and HGF is able to maintain epididymal sperm motility in vitro suggesting a physiological role of this growth factor in the acquisition of sperm motility. Noteworthy changes in HGF concentration in seminal plasma have been reported in different andrological diseases. All together these data indicate that HGF has a role in the control of spermatogenesis and sperm quality either directly, acting on male germ cells, or indirectly acting on tubular and interstitial somatic cells of the testis.

  12. A simple vitrification method for cryobanking avian testicular tissue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cryopreservation of testicular tissue is a promising method of preserving male reproductive potential for avian species. This study was conducted to assess whether a vitrification method can be used to preserve avian testicular tissue, using the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) as a model. A sim...

  13. Testicular Cancer in U.S. Navy Personnel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    urogenital abnormalities, testicular atrophy and, possibly, with intrauterine exposure to di- ethylstilbestrol (2-7). Peak age of incidence of the...Association of diethylstilbes- trotl exposure in utero with cryptorchidism, testicular hypoplasia, and semen abnormaliti-s. J Urol 1979,122:36-9. 6. Bibbo

  14. Testicular cancer in androgen insensitivity syndrome in a Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Ponce, José; Chilaca Rosas, Fátima; Molina Calzada, Carlos; Granados García, Martín; Jiménez Ríos, Miguel Angel; De la Garza Salazar, Jaime

    2008-12-01

    Male pseudohermaphroditism and androgen insensitivity syndrome cases have an increased risk of developing testicular cancer due to many factors such as mutations, hormonal disturbances involving gonadotropins and cryptorchidism. We describe the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of two cases with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and testicular cancer development, which were handled at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico.

  15. Scrotal Exploration for Testicular Torsion and Testicular Appendage Torsion: Emergency and Reality

    PubMed Central

    Yu, You; Zhang, Feng; An, Qun; Wang, Long; Li, Chao; Xu, Zhilin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scrotal exploration is considered the procedure of choice for acute scrotum. Objectives: We evaluated the importance of early diagnosis and testicular salvage on the therapeutic outcomes of patients with pediatric testicular torsion (TT) and testicular appendage torsion (TAT) in our geographic area. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective database analysis of patients who underwent emergency surgery for TT or TAT between January 1996 and June 2009. Patient history, physical examination findings, laboratory test results, color Doppler sonography (CDS) results, and surgical findings were reviewed. Results: A total of 65 cases were included in our analysis. Forty-two cases were followed up for at least 3 months. Testicular tenderness was identified as the major clinical manifestation of TT, while only a few patients with TAT presented with swelling. CDS was an important diagnostic modality. The orchiectomy rate was 71% in the TT group. Conclusions: Cases of acute scrotum require attention in our area. Early diagnosis and scrotal exploration could salvage the testis or preserve normal function without the need for surgery. PMID:26199690

  16. Teachers' Beliefs Concerning Teaching about Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohl, Royal E.; Kane, William M.

    1997-01-01

    This study compared secondary health teachers' beliefs concerning teaching about testicular cancer (TC) and self-examination (TSE) to actual instruction. TC and TSE education levels were low. Perceived barriers to teaching about TSE was the main predictor of TSE instruction. Teachers with previous preparation in TC and TSE provided the most…

  17. MicroRNA profiles in a monkey testicular injury model induced by testicular hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Mikamoto, Kei; Shirai, Makoto; Iguchi, Takuma; Ito, Kazumi; Takasaki, Wataru; Mori, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To characterize microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in testicular toxicity in cynomolgus monkeys, miRNA profiles were investigated using next‐generation sequencing (NGS), microarray and reverse transcription‐quantitative real‐time‐PCR (RT‐qPCR) methods. First, to identify organ‐specific miRNAs, we compared the expression levels of miRNAs in the testes to those in representative organs (liver, heart, kidney, lung, spleen and small intestine) obtained from naïve mature male and female monkeys (n = 2/sex) using NGS analysis. Consequently, miR‐34c‐5p, miR‐202‐5p, miR‐449a and miR‐508‐3p were identified to be testicular‐specific miRNAs in cynomolgus monkeys. Next, we investigated miRNA profiles after testicular–hyperthermia (TH) treatment to determine which miRNAs are involved in testicular injury. In this experiment, mature male monkeys were divided into groups with or without TH‐treatment (n = 3/group) by immersion of the testes in a water bath at 43 °C for 30 min for 5 consecutive days. As a result, TH treatment induced testicular injury in all animals, which was characterized by decreased numbers of spermatocytes and spermatids. In a microarray analysis of the testis, 11 up‐regulated (>2.0 fold) and 13 down‐regulated (<0.5 fold) miRNAs were detected compared with those in the control animals. Interestingly, down‐regulated miRNAs included two testicular‐specific miRNAs, miR‐34c‐5p and miR‐449a, indicating their potential use as biomarkers for testicular toxicity. Furthermore, RT‐qPCR analysis revealed decreased expression levels of testicular miR‐34b‐5p and miR‐34c‐5p, which are enriched in meiotic cells, reflecting the decrease in pachytene spermatocytes and spermatids after TH treatment. These results provide valuable insights into the mechanism of testicular toxicity and potential translational biomarkers for testicular toxicity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology

  18. Testicular atrophy following paediatric primary orchidopexy: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Durell, J; Johal, N; Burge, D; Wheeler, R; Griffiths, M; Kitteringham, L; Stanton, M; Manoharan, S; Steinbrecher, H; Malone, P; Griffin, S J

    2016-08-01

    With the Nordic consensus statement advocating orchidopexy at an earlier age, the present study sought to investigate the outcomes of primary paediatric orchidopexy at a tertiary UK centre. To prospectively assess testicular atrophy following primary orchidopexy for undescended testes in a paediatric population. Secondary outcomes were complication rates and whether outcomes were dependent on grade of operating surgeon. Prospective data regarding age at operation, classification of the undescended testis, length of follow-up, and subjective comparison of intraoperative and postoperative testicular volumes compared with the contralateral testis were collected. Testicular atrophy was defined as >50% loss of testicular volume or a postoperative testicular volume <25% of the volume of the contralateral testis. Patients were excluded for incomplete data and follow-up <6 months. Data for 234 patients were analysed. Testicular atrophy occurred in 2.6% of cases. There was no reported testicular re-ascent. All secondary acquired cases underwent a previous ipsilateral hernia repair. There was no significant difference in outcomes comparing the grade of surgeon (consultant n = 8, trainee/staff-grade surgeon n = 7-8). There was a trend towards postoperative catch-up growth in approximately one fifth of cases. Previous studies have reported a testicular atrophy rate of 5%. The present study reported a similar rate of 2.6%. In agreement with a previous publication, it was also found that testicular atrophy was not dependent on the grade of operating surgeon. The mechanism for testicular catch-up growth is not well understood. Animal studies have supported the hypothesis that increased temperature has a detrimental effect on testicular volume. However, follow-up in the present cohort was short (median 6.9 months), making interpretation of this finding difficult. It is acknowledged that clinical palpation alone to determine testicular volume potentially introduces intra

  19. Testicular microlithiasis in a unilateral undescended testis: a rare phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Manchanda, V; Gupta, R

    2013-12-01

    Testicular microlithiasis (TM) is a rare benign condition with presence of multiple small microcalcifications in the seminiferous tubules. Though the aetiology is unknown, TM has been described in association with a variety of urological conditions. We report the clinico-pathological features of a 12-year-old male child who underwent orchidectomy for undescended testis. Histopathological examination of the excised testis showed multiple small intratubular calcifications without any evidence of testicular neoplasia. TM is an unusual phenomenon that should be kept in mind while evaluating testicular biopsies. Though it behaves in a benign manner in most of the cases, patients with positive family history of testicular cancer should be followed-up for testicular tumour.

  20. Development and clinical application of a new testicular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Ye; Cai, Zhikang; Chen, Huixing; Ping, Ping; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhong; Li, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    A new type of testicular prosthesis made of silastic with an elliptical shape to mimic a normal testis was developed by our team and submitted for patenting in China. The prosthesis was produced in different sizes to imitate the normal testis of the patient. To investigate the effects and safety of the testicular prosthesis, 20 patients receiving testicular prosthesis implantation were recruited for this study. Follow-up after 6 months revealed no complications in the patients. All the patients answered that they were satisfied with their body image and the position of the implants, 19 patients were satisfied with the size and 16 patients were satisfied with the weight. These results show that the testicular prosthesis used in this study can meet patient's expectations. Patients undergoing orchiectomy should be offered the option to receive a testicular prosthesis implantation. The dimensions and weight of the available prosthetic implants should be further addressed to improve patient satisfaction. PMID:21927041

  1. Testicular cancer knowledge among deaf and hearing men.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Loren; Nakaji, Melanie; Harry, Kadie M; Oen, Marcia; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2013-09-01

    Testicular cancer typically affects young and middle-aged men. An educational video about prostate and testicular cancer was created in American Sign Language, with English open captioning and voice overlay, so that it could be viewed by audiences of diverse ages and hearing characteristics. This study recruited young Deaf (n = 85) and hearing (n = 90) adult males to help evaluate the educational value of the testicular cancer portion of this video. Participants completed surveys about their general, testicular, and total cancer knowledge before and after viewing the video. Although hearing men had higher pre-test scores than Deaf men, both Deaf and hearing men demonstrated significant increases in General, Testicular, and Total Cancer Knowledge scores after viewing the intervention video. Overall, results demonstrate the value of the video to Deaf and hearing men.

  2. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  3. Effects of gonadoliberin analogue triptorelin on the pituitary-testicular complex in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Dygalo, N N; Shemenkova, T V; Kalinina, T S; Shishkina, G T

    2014-02-01

    Triptorelin, a synthetic analogue of neurohormone gonadoliberin (gonadotropin-releasing hormone, GnRH) administered daily to rats on postnatal days 5-7 suppressed the expression of GnRH receptor in the pituitary gland, but did not change functioning of the pituitary-testicular complex. Administration of triptorelin on postnatal days 12-14 (i.e. during the formation of pulsatile pattern of GnRH secretion and increasing levels of its mRNA receptor in the pituitary gland) had no effect on receptor expression, but increased the levels of luteinizing hormone mRNA in the pituitary gland and the weight of testes. At that time, blood levels of testosterone were lowered, which indicated disturbed pulsatile pattern of GnRH secretion.

  4. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination Training for Patient Care Personnel: Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akar, Serife Zehra; Bebis, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Testicular cancer (TC) is the most common malignancy among men aged 15-35 years. Testicular self-examination (TSE) is an important tool for preventing late-stage TC diagnoses. This study aimed to assess health beliefs and knowledge related to TC and TSE and the effectiveness of TC and TSE training for patient care staff in a hospital. This was a…

  5. Barriers Identified by Swedish School Nurses in Giving Information about Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination to Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudberg, Lennart; Nilsson, Sten; Wikblad, Karin; Carlsson, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent school nurses in Sweden inform adolescent men about testicular cancer (TC) and testicular self-examination (TSE). A questionnaire was completed by 129 school nurses from 29 randomly selected municipalities. All respondents were women, with a mean age of 42 years. The results showed that…

  6. Barriers Identified by Swedish School Nurses in Giving Information about Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination to Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudberg, Lennart; Nilsson, Sten; Wikblad, Karin; Carlsson, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent school nurses in Sweden inform adolescent men about testicular cancer (TC) and testicular self-examination (TSE). A questionnaire was completed by 129 school nurses from 29 randomly selected municipalities. All respondents were women, with a mean age of 42 years. The results showed that…

  7. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination Training for Patient Care Personnel: Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akar, Serife Zehra; Bebis, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Testicular cancer (TC) is the most common malignancy among men aged 15-35 years. Testicular self-examination (TSE) is an important tool for preventing late-stage TC diagnoses. This study aimed to assess health beliefs and knowledge related to TC and TSE and the effectiveness of TC and TSE training for patient care staff in a hospital. This was a…

  8. [A case of neonatal testicular torsion].

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Satoshi; Nanpo, Yoshihito; Kuramoto, Tomomi; Iba, Akinori; Fujii, Reona; Matsumura, Nagahide; Shintani, Yasuyo; Inagaki, Takeshi; Kohjimoto, Yasuo; Hara, Isao

    2008-12-01

    An infant normally delivered at the 38th week of gestation was referred to our department one day after birth for a firm and painless right hemiscrotal mass with bluish coloration. Since contralateral scrotum showed swelling, we performed emergency surgery on that day. The right spermatic cord was constricted due to extravaginal torsion, and degree and direction of torsion was unclear since the spermatic cord was already organized. Right testis showed irreversible necrotic change, requiring orchiectomy. We confirmed that left testis was intact and performed orchidopexy. Since high incidence of contralateral asymptomatic torsion has been reported in patients with prenatal testicular torsion, emergency surgery should be considered when contralateral scrotum shows abnormal findings.

  9. Testicular cancer in US Navy personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, F.C.; Gorham, E.D.; Garland, C.F.; Ducatman, A.M.

    1988-02-01

    Computerized career history and demographic information is obtained four times each year for all active-duty US Navy enlisted personnel by the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego, California. This system provided demographic, occupational (110 occupations), and service history information for enlisted men serving during 1974-1979 (2,275,829 person-years). This analysis is restricted to white males because of the relatively small number of events in nonwhites. Age-adjusted and age-specific incidence rates of testicular cancer in US Navy personnel did not differ significantly from those of the US population, and age-adjusted incidence rates did not increase with length of service in the Navy. There was a group of three occupations, however, which involved duties similar to those of the civilian occupation of automobile mechanic, and which had a significantly elevated age-adjusted rate of testicular cancer compared with the US population and the total Navy population. These occupations were aviation support equipment technician, engineman, and construction mechanic. All involve maintenance of internal combustion engines and exposure to the attendant lubricants, solvents, paints, and exhausts.

  10. Baldness, acne and testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Trabert, Britton; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Sweeney, Anne M.; Amato, Robert J.; Strom, Sara S.; McGlynn, Katherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Androgen levels during critical periods of testicular development may be involved in the etiology of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT). We evaluated the roles of adolescent and early adult life correlates of androgen exposure and TGCT in a hospital-based case control study. TGCT cases (n=187) and controls (n=148), matched on age, race and state of residence, participated in the study. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate associations between TGCT and male pattern baldness, severe acne, markers of puberty onset and body size. Cases were significantly less likely to report hair loss than controls (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4, 1.0). Amount of hair loss, increasing age at onset and increasing rate of loss were all inversely associated with TGCT (rate of hair loss: p-trend=0.03; age at onset: p-trend=0.03; amount of hair loss: p-trend=0.01). History of severe acne was inversely associated with TGCT (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3, 0.9) and height was positively associated with TGCT (p-trend=0.02). Increased endogenous androgen levels during puberty and early adulthood may be associated with decreased risk of TGCT. Additional studies of endogenous hormone levels during puberty and early adult life are warranted, especially studies evaluating the role of androgen synthesis, metabolism and uptake. PMID:21128977

  11. Organ-sparing approaches for testicular masses.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Alvaro; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Jewett, Michael A S

    2010-08-01

    Organ-sparing approaches are currently practiced in urology for many malignancies. Partial orchiectomy of germ cell tumors (GCT) provides potential benefits over radical surgery by reducing the need for androgen substitution, lessening psychological stress, and preserving fertility, with a durable cure rate. Furthermore, many testicular lesions detected clinically or by ultrasonography will be benign, in which case radical orchiectomy represents overtreatment. Partial orchiectomy for benign lesions allows preservation of endocrine and exocrine function, and reduced risk of local recurrence. However, selection criteria are not clear and one must always be suspicious that a GCT might exist. Carcinoma in situ that remains in the salvaged testicle is a challenge to treat. Radiation therapy is an option, although there is a high chance that patients will subsequently require hormonal replacement. Partial orchiectomy should be undertaken only in selected patients--men with bilateral testicular cancer or GCT in a solitary testis--if the size and location of the mass are amenable to surgery. Informed patient consent discussing radical orchiectomy as the gold standard is mandatory, and discussion of the risks associated with CIS and its treatment, as well as the need for androgen supplementation are paramount. Alternative strategies of organ preservation, such as radiotherapy, HIFU and chemotherapy, might be appropriate treatment options in the future. However, the safety and efficacy of these procedures needs to be demonstrated in comparison with partial orchiectomy in larger and prospective studies with longer follow-up.

  12. Ethics of testicular stem cell medicine.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, G

    2004-12-01

    The ethical issues raised by advances in reproductive technology allowing the transplantation of testicular stem cells to enable infertile men and cancer patients, including the pre-pubertal, to have children, and to provide new contraceptive prospects for fertile men are discussed. Consideration of respect for the patient's autonomy, the need for informed consent and the health of any offspring resulting from such a procedure are included. Topics covered include: the problems raised by cases needing consent for the transplantation of testicular stem cells from pre-pubertal and adolescent patients; the legal status of stem cells; the arguements for treating such tissue as property which might serve as a means of guaranteeing respect for patients' rights in disputed cases; aspects of patents and the ethics of allowing commercial traffic of such material; questions relating to health and safety, as well as xenotransplantation technology in humans; and posthumous procurement use of germ cells from minors. Proposals are made to enhance informed and effective consent, while supporting patient determination, choice, autonomy and technological advances. The paper appeals to the emerging EU directives in relation to tissue procurement, storing and use of tissue and cells to adopt a pragmatic and meaningful position which will help enhance patient determination and autonomy in relation to the emerging technologies in reproductive medicine, whilst providing a pragmatic way forward for fertility clinics and laboratories to function.

  13. New insights into perinatal testicular torsion

    PubMed Central

    Van Kerrebroeck, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Perinatal testicular torsion is a relatively rare event that remains unrecognized in many patients or is suspected and treated accordingly only after an avoidable loss of time. The authors report their own experience with several patients, some of them quite atypical but instructive. Missed bilateral torsion is an issue, as are partial torsion, possible antenatal signs, and late presentation. These data are discussed together with the existing literature and may help shed new light on the natural course of testicular torsion and its treatment. The most important conclusion is that a much higher index of suspicion based on clinical findings is needed for timely detection of perinatal torsion. It is the authors’ opinion that immediate surgery is mandatory not only in suspected bilateral torsions but also in cases of possible unilateral torsions. There is no place for a