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Sample records for minerals calcium carbonate

  1. Modification of the N-Terminus of a Calcium Carbonate Precipitating Peptide Affects Calcium Carbonate Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Usui, Kenji; Yokota, Shin-Ichiro; Ozaki, Makoto; Sakashita, Shungo; Imai, Takahito; Tomizaki, Kin-Ya

    2018-01-01

    A core sequence (the 9 C-terminal residues) of calcification-associated peptide (CAP- 1) isolated from the exoskeleton of the red swamp crayfish was previously shown to control calcium carbonate precipitation with chitin. In addition, a modified core sequence in which the phosphorylated serine at the N terminus is replaced with serine exhibits was also previously shown to alter precipitation characteristics with chitin. We focused on calcium carbonate precipitation and attempted to elucidate aspects of the mechanism underlying mineralization. We attempted to evaluate in detail the effects of modifying the N-terminus in the core sequence on calcium carbonate mineralization without chitin. The peptide modifications included phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and a free or acetylated Nterminus. The peptides were synthesized manually on Wang resin using the DIPCI-DMAP method for the first residue, and Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis with HBTU-HOBt for the subsequent residues. Prior to calcium carbonate precipitation, calcium carbonate was suspended in MilliQ water. Carbon dioxide gas was bubbled into the stirred suspension, then the remaining solid CaCO3 was removed by filtration. The concentration of calcium ions in the solution was determined by standard titration with ethylenediaminetetraacetate. Calcium carbonate precipitation was conducted in a micro tube for 3 h at 37°C. We used the micro-scale techniques AFM (atomic force microscopy) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy), and the macro-scale techniques chelate titration, HPLC, gel filtration, CD (circular dichroism) and DLS (dynamic light scattering). We determined the morphologies of the calcium carbonate deposits using AFM and TEM. The pS peptide provided the best control of the shape and size of the calcium carbonate round particles. The acetylated peptides (Ac-S and Ac-pS) provided bigger particles with various shapes. S peptide provided a mixture of bigger particles and amorphous particles. We

  2. FT-Raman spectroscopic study of calcium-rich and magnesium-rich carbonate minerals.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Villar, Susana E Jorge; Jehlicka, Jan; Munshi, Tasnim

    2005-08-01

    Calcium and magnesium carbonates are important minerals found in sedimentary environments. Although sandstones are the most common rock colonized by endolith organisms, the production of calcium and magnesium carbonates is important in survival strategies of organisms and as a source for the removal of oxalate ions. Extremophile organisms in some situations may convert or destroy carbonates of calcium and magnesium, which gives important information about the conditions under which these organisms can survive. The identification on the surface of Mars of 'White Rock' formations, in Juventae Chasma or Sabaea Terra, as possibly carbonate rocks makes the study of these minerals a prerequisite of remote Martian exploration. Here, we show the protocol for the identification by Raman spectroscopy of different calcium and magnesium carbonates and we present a database of relevance in the search for life, extinct or extant, on Mars; this will be useful for the assessment of data obtained from remote, miniaturized Raman spectrometers now proposed for Mars exploration.

  3. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Maalox® (as a combination product containing Calcium Carbonate, Simethicone) ... Relief (as a combination product containing Calcium Carbonate, Simethicone) ... Plus (as a combination product containing Calcium Carbonate, Simethicone)

  4. Enzymatic, urease-mediated mineralization of gellan gum hydrogel with calcium carbonate, magnesium-enriched calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate for bone regeneration applications.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Timothy E L; Łapa, Agata; Samal, Sangram Keshari; Declercq, Heidi A; Schaubroeck, David; Mendes, Ana C; der Voort, Pascal Van; Dokupil, Agnieszka; Plis, Agnieszka; De Schamphelaere, Karel; Chronakis, Ioannis S; Pamuła, Elżbieta; Skirtach, Andre G

    2017-12-01

    Mineralization of hydrogel biomaterials is considered desirable to improve their suitability as materials for bone regeneration. Calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) has been successfully applied as a bone regeneration material, but hydrogel-CaCO 3 composites have received less attention. Magnesium (Mg) has been used as a component of calcium phosphate biomaterials to stimulate bone-forming cell adhesion and proliferation and bone regeneration in vivo, but its effect as a component of carbonate-based biomaterials remains uninvestigated. In the present study, gellan gum (GG) hydrogels were mineralized enzymatically with CaCO 3 , Mg-enriched CaCO 3 and magnesium carbonate to generate composite biomaterials for bone regeneration. Hydrogels loaded with the enzyme urease were mineralized by incubation in mineralization media containing urea and different ratios of calcium and magnesium ions. Increasing the magnesium concentration decreased mineral crystallinity. At low magnesium concentrations calcite was formed, while at higher concentrations magnesian calcite was formed. Hydromagnesite (Mg 5 (CO 3 ) 4 (OH) 2 .4H 2 O) formed at high magnesium concentration in the absence of calcium. The amount of mineral formed and compressive strength decreased with increasing magnesium concentration in the mineralization medium. The calcium:magnesium elemental ratio in the mineral formed was higher than in the respective mineralization media. Mineralization of hydrogels with calcite or magnesian calcite promoted adhesion and growth of osteoblast-like cells. Hydrogels mineralized with hydromagnesite displayed higher cytotoxicity. In conclusion, enzymatic mineralization of GG hydrogels with CaCO 3 in the form of calcite successfully reinforced hydrogels and promoted osteoblast-like cell adhesion and growth, but magnesium enrichment had no definitive positive effect. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Amorphous calcium carbonate controls avian eggshell mineralization: A new paradigm for understanding rapid eggshell calcification.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Marie, Pauline; Nys, Yves; Hincke, Maxwell T; Gautron, Joel

    2015-06-01

    Avian eggshell mineralization is the fastest biogenic calcification process known in nature. How this is achieved while producing a highly crystalline material composed of large calcite columnar single crystals remains largely unknown. Here we report that eggshell mineral originates from the accumulation of flat disk-shaped amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles on specific organic sites on the eggshell membrane, which are rich in proteins and sulfated proteoglycans. These structures known as mammillary cores promote the nucleation and stabilization of a amorphous calcium carbonate with calcitic short range order which predetermine the calcite composition of the mature eggshell. The amorphous nature of the precursor phase was confirmed by the diffuse scattering of X-rays and electrons. The nascent calcitic short-range order of this transient mineral phase was revealed by infrared spectroscopy and HRTEM. The ACC mineral deposited around the mammillary core sites progressively transforms directly into calcite crystals without the occurrence of any intermediate phase. Ionic speciation data suggest that the uterine fluid is equilibrated with amorphous calcium carbonate, throughout the duration of eggshell mineralization process, supporting that this mineral phase is constantly forming at the shell mineralization front. On the other hand, the transient amorphous calcium carbonate mineral deposits, as well as the calcite crystals into which they are converted, form by the ordered aggregation of nanoparticles that support the rapid mineralization of the eggshell. The results of this study alter our current understanding of avian eggshell calcification and provide new insights into the genesis and formation of calcium carbonate biominerals in vertebrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mineralization of gellan gum hydrogels with calcium and magnesium carbonates by alternate soaking in solutions of calcium/magnesium and carbonate ion solutions.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Heredia, Marco A; Łapa, Agata; Reczyńska, Katarzyna; Pietryga, Krzysztof; Balcaen, Lieve; Mendes, Ana C; Schaubroeck, David; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Dokupil, Agnieszka; Plis, Agnieszka; Stevens, Chris V; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan V; Samal, Sangram Keshari; Vanhaecke, Frank; Chai, Feng; Chronakis, Ioannis S; Blanchemain, Nicolas; Pamuła, Elżbieta; Skirtach, Andre G; Douglas, Timothy E L

    2018-04-27

    Mineralization of hydrogels is desirable prior to applications in bone regeneration. CaCO 3 is a widely used bone regeneration material and Mg, when used as a component of calcium phosphate biomaterials, has promoted bone-forming cell adhesion and proliferation and bone regeneration. In this study, gellan gum (GG) hydrogels were mineralized with carbonates containing different amounts of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) by alternate soaking in, firstly, a calcium and/or magnesium ion solution and, secondly, a carbonate ion solution. This alternate soaking cycle was repeated five times. Five different calcium and/or magnesium ion solutions, containing different molar ratios of Ca to Mg ranging from Mg-free to Ca-free were compared. Carbonate mineral formed in all sample groups subjected to the Ca:Mg elemental ratio in the carbonate mineral formed was higher than in the respective mineralizing solution. Mineral formed in the absence of Mg was predominantly CaCO 3 in the form of a mixture of calcite and vaterite. Increasing the Mg content in the mineral formed led to the formation of magnesian calcite, decreased the total amount of the mineral formed and its crystallinity. Hydrogel mineralization and increasing Mg content in mineral formed did not obviously improve proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells or differentiation after 7 days. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium carbonate mineralization mediated by in vitro cultured mantle cells from Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei; Li, Shiguo; Xiang, Liang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-08-07

    Formation of the molluscan shell is believed to be an extracellular event mediated by matrix proteins. We report calcium carbonate mineralization mediated by Pinctada fucata mantle cells. Crystals only appeared when mantle cells were present in the crystallization solution. These crystals were piled up in highly ordered units and showed the typical characteristics of biomineralization products. A thin organic framework was observed after dissolving the crystals in EDTA. Some crystals had etched surfaces with a much smoother appearance than other parts. Mantle cells were observed to be attached to some of these smooth surfaces. These results suggest that mantle cells may be directly involved in the nucleation and remodeling process of calcium carbonate mineralization. Our result demonstrate the practicability of studying the mantle cell mechanism of biomineralization and contribute to the overall understanding of the shell formation process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of substrate mineralogy on bacterial mineralization of calcium carbonate: implications for stone conservation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Jroundi, Fadwa; Schiro, Mara; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; González-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2012-06-01

    The influence of mineral substrate composition and structure on bacterial calcium carbonate productivity and polymorph selection was studied. Bacterial calcium carbonate precipitation occurred on calcitic (Iceland spar single crystals, marble, and porous limestone) and silicate (glass coverslips, porous sintered glass, and quartz sandstone) substrates following culturing in liquid medium (M-3P) inoculated with different types of bacteria (Myxococcus xanthus, Brevundimonas diminuta, and a carbonatogenic bacterial community isolated from porous calcarenite stone in a historical building) and direct application of sterile M-3P medium to limestone and sandstone with their own bacterial communities. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and 2-dimensional XRD (2D-XRD) analyses revealed that abundant highly oriented calcite crystals formed homoepitaxially on the calcitic substrates, irrespective of the bacterial type. Conversely, scattered spheroidal vaterite entombing bacterial cells formed on the silicate substrates. These results show that carbonate phase selection is not strain specific and that under equal culture conditions, the substrate type is the overruling factor for calcium carbonate polymorph selection. Furthermore, carbonate productivity is strongly dependent on the mineralogy of the substrate. Calcitic substrates offer a higher affinity for bacterial attachment than silicate substrates, thereby fostering bacterial growth and metabolic activity, resulting in higher production of calcium carbonate cement. Bacterial calcite grows coherently over the calcitic substrate and is therefore more chemically and mechanically stable than metastable vaterite, which formed incoherently on the silicate substrates. The implications of these results for technological applications of bacterial carbonatogenesis, including building stone conservation, are discussed.

  9. Influence of Substrate Mineralogy on Bacterial Mineralization of Calcium Carbonate: Implications for Stone Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Schiro, Mara; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; González-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The influence of mineral substrate composition and structure on bacterial calcium carbonate productivity and polymorph selection was studied. Bacterial calcium carbonate precipitation occurred on calcitic (Iceland spar single crystals, marble, and porous limestone) and silicate (glass coverslips, porous sintered glass, and quartz sandstone) substrates following culturing in liquid medium (M-3P) inoculated with different types of bacteria (Myxococcus xanthus, Brevundimonas diminuta, and a carbonatogenic bacterial community isolated from porous calcarenite stone in a historical building) and direct application of sterile M-3P medium to limestone and sandstone with their own bacterial communities. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and 2-dimensional XRD (2D-XRD) analyses revealed that abundant highly oriented calcite crystals formed homoepitaxially on the calcitic substrates, irrespective of the bacterial type. Conversely, scattered spheroidal vaterite entombing bacterial cells formed on the silicate substrates. These results show that carbonate phase selection is not strain specific and that under equal culture conditions, the substrate type is the overruling factor for calcium carbonate polymorph selection. Furthermore, carbonate productivity is strongly dependent on the mineralogy of the substrate. Calcitic substrates offer a higher affinity for bacterial attachment than silicate substrates, thereby fostering bacterial growth and metabolic activity, resulting in higher production of calcium carbonate cement. Bacterial calcite grows coherently over the calcitic substrate and is therefore more chemically and mechanically stable than metastable vaterite, which formed incoherently on the silicate substrates. The implications of these results for technological applications of bacterial carbonatogenesis, including building stone conservation, are discussed. PMID:22447589

  10. Peptoid nanosheets as soluble, two-dimensional templates for calcium carbonate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Jun, Joo Myung V; Altoe, M Virginia P; Aloni, Shaul; Zuckermann, Ronald N

    2015-06-25

    Nacre-mimetic materials are of great interest, but difficult to synthesize, because they require the ordering of organic and inorganic materials on several length scales. Here we introduce peptoid nanosheets as a versatile two-dimensional platform to develop nacre mimetic materials. Free-floating zwitterionic nanosheets were mineralized with thin films of amorphous calcium carbonate (of 2-20 nm thickness) on their surface to produce planar nacre synthons. These can serve as tunable building blocks to produce layered brick and mortar nanoarchitectures.

  11. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacterially induced mineralization of calcium carbonate: the role of exopolysaccharides and capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Ercole, Claudia; Cacchio, Paola; Botta, Anna Lucia; Centi, Valeria; Lepidi, Aldo

    2007-02-01

    Bacterially induced carbonate mineralization has been proposed as a new method for the restoration of limestones in historic buildings and monuments. We describe here the formation of calcite crystals by extracellular polymeric substances isolated from Bacillus firmus and Bacillus sphaericus. We isolated bacterial outer structures (glycocalix and parietal polymers), such as exopolysaccharides (EPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and checked for their influence on calcite precipitation. CPS and EPS extracted from both B. firmus and B. sphaericus were able to mediate CaCO3 precipitation in vitro. X-ray microanalysis showed that in all cases the formed crystals were calcite. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the shape of the crystals depended on the fractions utilized. These results suggest the possibility that biochemical composition of CPS or EPS influences the resulting morphology of CaCO3. There were no precipitates in the blank samples. CPS and EPS comprised of proteins and glycoproteins. Positive alcian blue staining also reveals acidic polysaccharides in CPS and EPS fractions. Proteins with molecular masses of 25-40 kDa and 70 kDa in the CPS fraction were highly expressed in the presence of calcium oxalate. This high level of synthesis could be related to the binding of calcium ions and carbonate deposition.

  13. The mineral phase in the cuticles of two species of Crustacea consists of magnesium calcite, amorphous calcium carbonate, and amorphous calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Becker, Alexander; Ziegler, Andreas; Epple, Matthias

    2005-05-21

    The cuticules (shells) of the woodlice Porcellio scaber and Armadillidium vulgare were analysed with respect to their content of inorganic material. It was found that the cuticles consist of crystalline magnesium calcite, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), besides small amounts of water and an organic matrix. It is concluded that the cuticle, which constitutes a mineralized protective organ, is chemically adapted to the biological requirements by this combination of different materials.

  14. Calcium Carbonate Mineralized Nanoparticles as an Intracellular Transporter of Cytochrome c for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ahn Na; Min, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Hong Jae; Jegal, Jun Ho; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Sang Cheon

    2015-11-01

    A new intracellular delivery system based on an apoptotic protein-loaded calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) mineralized nanoparticle (MNP) is described. Apoptosis-inducing cytochrome c (Cyt c) loaded CaCO3 MNPs (Cyt c MNPs) were prepared by block copolymer mediated in situ CaCO3 mineralization in the presence of Cyt c. The resulting Cyt c MNPs had a vaterite polymorph of CaCO3 with a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 360.5 nm and exhibited 60% efficiency for Cyt c loading. The Cyt c MNPs were stable at physiological pH (pH 7.4) and effectively prohibited the release of Cyt c, whereas, at intracellular endosomal pH (pH 5.0), Cyt c release was facilitated. The MNPs enable the endosomal escape of Cyt c for effective localization of Cyt c in the cytosols of MCF-7 cells. Flow cytometry showed that the Cyt c MNPs effectively induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells. These findings indicate that the CaCO3 MNPs can meet the prerequisites for delivery of cell-impermeable therapeutic proteins for cancer therapy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Carbonate mineralization via an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) pathway: Tuning polymorph selection by Mg, pH, and mixing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; Blue, C.; Mergelsberg, S. T.; Giuffre, A. J.; Han, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral formation by nonclassical processes is widespread with many pathways that include aggregation of nanoparticles, oriented attachment of fully formed crystals, and sequential nucleation/transformation of amorphous phases (De Yoreo et al., 2015, Science). Field observations indicate amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) can be the initial precipitate when local conditions promote high supersaturations for short time periods. Examples include microbial mats, marine porewaters that undergo pulses of increased alkalinity, closed basin lakes, and sabkhas. The crystalline products exhibit diverse morphologies and complex elemental and isotopic signatures. This study quantifies relationships between solution composition and the crystalline polymorphs that transform from ACC (Blue et al., GCA, 2017). Our experimental design synthesized ACC under controlled conditions for a suite of compositions by tuning input pH, Mg/Ca, and total carbonate concentration. ACC products were allowed to transform within output suspensions under stirred or quiescent mixing while characterizing the polymorph and composition of evolving solutions and solids. We find that ACC transforms to crystalline polymorphs with a systematic relationship to solution composition to give a quantitative framework based upon solution aMg2+/aCa2+ and aCO32-/aCa2+. We also measure a polymorph-specific evolution of pH and Mg/Ca during the transformation that indicates the initial polymorph to form. Pathway is further modulated by stirring versus quiescent conditions. The findings reconcile discrepancies among previous studies of ACC to crystalline products and supports claims that monohydrocalcite may be an overlooked, transient phase during formation of some aragonite and calcite deposits. Organic additives and extreme pH are not required to tune composition and polymorph. Insights from this study reiterate the need to revisit long-standing dogmas regarding controls on CaCO3 polymorph selection. Classical models

  16. Roles of larval sea urchin spicule SM50 domains in organic matrix self-assembly and calcium carbonate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ashit; Seto, Jong; Berg, John K; Kreft, Stefan G; Scheffner, Martin; Cölfen, Helmut

    2013-08-01

    The larval spicule matrix protein SM50 is the most abundant occluded matrix protein present in the mineralized larval sea urchin spicule. Recent evidence implicates SM50 in the stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). Here, we investigate the molecular interactions of SM50 and CaCO3 by investigating the function of three major domains of SM50 as small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) fusion proteins - a C-type lectin domain (CTL), a glycine rich region (GRR) and a proline rich region (PRR). Under various mineralization conditions, we find that SUMO-CTL is monomeric and influences CaCO3 mineralization, SUMO-GRR aggregates into large protein superstructures and SUMO-PRR modifies the early CaCO3 mineralization stages as well as growth. The combination of these mineralization and self-assembly properties of the major domains synergistically enable the full-length SM50 to fulfill functions of constructing the organic spicule matrix as well as performing necessary mineralization activities such as Ca(2+) ion recruitment and organization to allow for proper growth and development of the mineralized larval sea urchin spicule. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacillus megaterium mediated mineralization of calcium carbonate as biogenic surface treatment of green building materials.

    PubMed

    Dhami, Navdeep Kaur; Reddy, M Sudhakara; Mukherjee, Abhijit

    2013-12-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation is a biomineralization process that has various applications in remediation and restoration of range of building materials. In the present study, calcifying bacteria, Bacillus megaterium SS3 isolated from calcareous soil was applied as biosealant to enhance the durability of low energy, green building materials (soil-cement blocks). This bacterial isolate produced high amounts of urease, carbonic anhydrase, extra polymeric substances and biofilm. The calcium carbonate polymorphs produced by B. megaterium SS3 were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transmission infra red spectroscopy. These results suggested that calcite is the most predominant carbonate formed by this bacteria followed by vaterite. Application of B. megaterium SS3 as biogenic surface treatment led to 40 % decrease in water absorption, 31 % decrease in porosity and 18 % increase in compressive strength of low energy building materials. From the present investigation, it is clear that surface treatment of building materials by B. megaterium SS3 is very effective and eco friendly way of biodeposition of coherent carbonates that enhances the durability of building materials.

  18. Co-effects of amines molecules and chitosan films on in vitro calcium carbonate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jifei; Kennedy, John F; Nie, Jun; Ma, Guiping

    2015-11-20

    Amines monomers, N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), N,N-dimethylethanolamine (DMEA), 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMEDA) and N-methiyldiethanolamine (MDEA) were used to induce the formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals on chitosan films, by using (NH4)2CO3 diffusion method at ambient temperature. The obtained CaCO3 particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The influence of reaction variables, such as the additive concentration and their types were also investigated on the products. The morphologies of CaCO3 crystals, inter-grown in cube-shape, were controlled by DMAEMA and DMEA. It was observed that the morphologies of CaCO3 changed from the cube grown arms to massive calcite with a hole on the face by increasing the concentrations of DMEDA and MDEA. While the precipitation grew on chitosan film without any organic additive, only single cube-shaped crystals were obtained. By these results the possible mechanisms can be proposed that electronic movement of the groups on the monomer effected ions configuration and molecules absorbed on the exposed surface, resulted the change of the surface energy, which caused the change in the morphology of CaCO3. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis of sodium caseinate-calcium carbonate microspheres and their mineralization to bone-like apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhewu; Liang, Guobin; Jin, Lin; Wang, Zhenling; Xing, Chao; Jiange, Qing; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2014-06-01

    Phosphoproteins can induce and stabilize calcium carbonate (CaCO3) vaterite, which has desirable features for high reactivity. The purpose of this study was to synthesize bioactive CaCO3 microspheres for bone regeneration. Sodium caseinate (NaCas)-containing CaCO3 microspheres, with the crystal phase of vaterite, were synthesized by fast precipitation in an aqueous solution of CaCl2, Na2CO3, and 2 mg/mL of NaCas. The uniform microspheres exhibited rougher surfaces and lower negative charges than CaCO3 particles without NaCas addition. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) of the microspheres showed characteristic peaks or bands corresponding to phosphate and hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves exhibited approximately 5% weight loss below 600 °C due to the decomposition of NaCas. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed lath-like hydroxyapatite (HAp) on the surface after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) revealed that the agglomerates were composed of Ca, C, O, P, Na, and Mg elements, and the Ca/P ratios ranged from 1.53 to 1.56. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns exhibited peaks characteristic of hydroxyapatite. The results of this study demonstrated that the addition of NaCas induced the formation of vaterite microspheres which possesses an enhanced apatite formation after soaking in SBF at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. These NaCas-CaCO3 microspheres may be a potential biomaterial for bone regeneration.

  20. Variations in the patterns of soil organic carbon mineralization and microbial communities in response to exogenous application of rice straw and calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuzhen; Huang, Yuan; Ge, Yunhui; Su, Yirong; Xu, Xinwen; Wang, Yongdong; He, Xunyang

    2016-11-15

    The addition of exogenous inorganic carbon (CaCO3) and organic carbon has an important influence on soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization in karst soil, but the microbial mechanisms underlying the SOC priming effect are poorly understood. We conducted a 100-day incubation experiment involving four treatments of the calcareous soil in southwestern China's karst region: control, (14)C-labeled rice straw addition, (14)C-labeled CaCO3 addition, and a combination of (14)C-labeled rice straw and CaCO3. Changes in soil microbial communities were characterized using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with polymerase chain reaction (PCR-DGGE) and real-time quantitative PCR (q-PCR). Both (14)C-rice straw and Ca(14)CO3 addition stimulated SOC mineralization, suggesting that organic and inorganic C affected SOC stability. Addition of straw alone had no significant effect on bacterial diversity; however, when the straw was added in combination with calcium carbonate, it had an inhibitory effect on bacterial and fungal diversity. At the beginning of the experimental period, exogenous additives increased bacterial abundance, although at the end of the 100-day incubation bacterial community abundance had gradually declined. Incubation time, exogenous input, and their interaction significantly affected SOC mineralization (in terms of priming and the cumulative amount of mineralization), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and microbial community abundance and diversity. Moreover, the key factors influencing SOC mineralization were MBC, bacterial diversity, and soil pH. Overall, these findings support the view that inorganic C is involved in soil C turnover with the participation of soil microbial communities, promoting soil C cycling in the karst region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrogels from Amorphous Calcium Carbonate and Polyacrylic Acid: Bio-Inspired Materials for "Mineral Plastics".

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengtong; Mao, Li-Bo; Lei, Zhouyue; Yu, Shu-Hong; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-09-19

    Given increasing environmental issues due to the large usage of non-biodegradable plastics based on petroleum, new plastic materials, which are economic, environmentally friendly, and recyclable are in high demand. One feasible strategy is the bio-inspired synthesis of mineral-based hybrid materials. Herein we report a facile route for an amorphous CaCO3 (ACC)-based hydrogel consisting of very small ACC nanoparticles physically cross-linked by poly(acrylic acid). The hydrogel is shapeable, stretchable, and self-healable. Upon drying, the hydrogel forms free-standing, rigid, and transparent objects with remarkable mechanical performance. By swelling in water, the material can completely recover the initial hydrogel state. As a matrix, thermochromism can also be easily introduced. The present hybrid hydrogel may represent a new class of plastic materials, the "mineral plastics". © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. [INDICES OF THE OXIDATIVE STATUS IN CHRONIC ADMINISTRATION OF COLLOID CARBONATE CALCIUM PRAPARATION WITH FAUCET AND LOW-MINERALIZED DRINKING WATER IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Khripach, L V; Mikhaylova, R I; Koganova, Z I; Knyazeva, T D; Alekseeva, A V; Savostikova, O N; Ryzhova, I N; Kruglova, E V; Revzova, T L

    2015-01-01

    There are discussed the changes of an array of indices of the oxidative status in chronic administration of colloidal calcium carbonate preparation with faucet and low-mineralized drinking water to rats. Slight differences between significant effects of administration of 3 and 30 mg/L of preparation permit to suggest that the process of its incoming delivery into organism of rats has a bottleneck in the nature of total capacity of macrophages of intestinal lymphoid tissue to absorption of particles.

  3. Calcium phosphate mineralization is widely applied in crustacean mandibles.

    PubMed

    Bentov, Shmuel; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Tynyakov, Jenny; Glazer, Lilah; Sagi, Amir

    2016-02-24

    Crustaceans, like most mineralized invertebrates, adopted calcium carbonate mineralization for bulk skeleton reinforcement. Here, we show that a major part of the crustacean class Malacostraca (which includes lobsters, crayfishes, prawns and shrimps) shifted toward the formation of calcium phosphate as the main mineral at specified locations of the mandibular teeth. In these structures, calcium phosphate is not merely co-precipitated with the bulk calcium carbonate but rather creates specialized structures in which a layer of calcium phosphate, frequently in the form of crystalline fluorapatite, is mounted over a calcareous "jaw". From a functional perspective, the co-existence of carbonate and phosphate mineralization demonstrates a biomineralization system that provides a versatile route to control the physico-chemical properties of skeletal elements. This system enables the deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate, amorphous calcium phosphate, calcite and apatite at various skeletal locations, as well as combinations of these minerals, to form graded composites materials. This study demonstrates the widespread occurrence of the dual mineralization strategy in the Malacostraca, suggesting that in terms of evolution, this feature of phosphatic teeth did not evolve independently in the different groups but rather represents an early common trait.

  4. Calcium phosphate mineralization is widely applied in crustacean mandibles

    PubMed Central

    Bentov, Shmuel; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Tynyakov, Jenny; Glazer, Lilah; Sagi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Crustaceans, like most mineralized invertebrates, adopted calcium carbonate mineralization for bulk skeleton reinforcement. Here, we show that a major part of the crustacean class Malacostraca (which includes lobsters, crayfishes, prawns and shrimps) shifted toward the formation of calcium phosphate as the main mineral at specified locations of the mandibular teeth. In these structures, calcium phosphate is not merely co-precipitated with the bulk calcium carbonate but rather creates specialized structures in which a layer of calcium phosphate, frequently in the form of crystalline fluorapatite, is mounted over a calcareous “jaw”. From a functional perspective, the co-existence of carbonate and phosphate mineralization demonstrates a biomineralization system that provides a versatile route to control the physico-chemical properties of skeletal elements. This system enables the deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate, amorphous calcium phosphate, calcite and apatite at various skeletal locations, as well as combinations of these minerals, to form graded composites materials. This study demonstrates the widespread occurrence of the dual mineralization strategy in the Malacostraca, suggesting that in terms of evolution, this feature of phosphatic teeth did not evolve independently in the different groups but rather represents an early common trait. PMID:26906263

  5. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is not very poisonous. Recovery is quite likely. But, long-term overuse is more serious than a single overdose, because it can cause kidney damage. Few people die from an antacid overdose. Keep ...

  6. Salt-enhanced chemical weathering of building materials and bacterial mineralization of calcium carbonate as a treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro, M.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Jroundi, F.; Gonzalez-Muñoz, M. T.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2012-04-01

    Salt weathering is an important mechanism contributing to the degradation and loss of stone building materials. In addition to the physical weathering resulting from crystallization pressure, the presence of salts in solution greatly enhances the chemical weathering potential of pore waters. Flow through experiments quantify the dissolution rates of calcite and quartz grains (63-125 micrometer diameter) when subjected to 1.0 ionic strength solutions of MgSO4, MgCl, Na2SO4 or NaCl. Results indicate that the identity of the cation is the primary control over the dissolution rate of both calcite and quartz substrates, with salt-enhanced dissolution occurring most rapidly in Mg2+ bearing solutions. It has been observed that weathering rates of rocks in nature, as well as building stones, are slowed down by naturally occurring or artificially produced patinas. These tend to be bacterially produced, durable mineralized coatings that lend some degree of protection to the underlying stone surface [1]. Our research shows that bacterially produced carbonate coatings can be quite effective at reducing chemical weathering of stone by soluble salts. The calcite-producing-bacteria used in this study were isolated from stone monuments in Granada, Spain [2] and cultivated in an organic-rich culture medium on a variety of artificial and natural substrates (including limestone, marble, sandstone, quartz, calcite single crystals, glass cover-slips, and sintered porous glass). Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was used to image bacterial calcite growth and biofilm formation. In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) enabled calculation of dissolution rates of untreated and bacterially treated surfaces. 2D-XRD showed the mineralogy and crystallographic orientation of bacterial calcium carbonate. Results indicate that bacterially produced calcite crystals form a coherent, mechanically resistant surface layer in perfect crystallographic continuity with the calcite substrate (self

  7. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids. These medicines provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  8. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  9. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  10. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yutao U T; Killian, Christopher E; Olson, Ian C; Appathurai, Narayana P; Amasino, Audra L; Martin, Michael C; Holt, Liam J; Wilt, Fred H; Gilbert, P U P A

    2012-04-17

    Crystalline biominerals do not resemble faceted crystals. Current explanations for this property involve formation via amorphous phases. Using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), here we examine forming spicules in embryos of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchins, and observe a sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC · H(2)O) → dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) → calcite. Unexpectedly, we find ACC · H(2)O-rich nanoparticles that persist after the surrounding mineral has dehydrated and crystallized. Protein matrix components occluded within the mineral must inhibit ACC · H(2)O dehydration. We devised an in vitro, also using XANES-PEEM, assay to identify spicule proteins that may play a role in stabilizing various mineral phases, and found that the most abundant occluded matrix protein in the sea urchin spicules, SM50, stabilizes ACC · H(2)O in vitro.

  11. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yutao U. T.; Killian, Christopher E.; Olson, Ian C.; Appathurai, Narayana P.; Amasino, Audra L.; Martin, Michael C.; Holt, Liam J.; Wilt, Fred H.; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Crystalline biominerals do not resemble faceted crystals. Current explanations for this property involve formation via amorphous phases. Using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), here we examine forming spicules in embryos of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchins, and observe a sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC·H2O) → dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) → calcite. Unexpectedly, we find ACC·H2O-rich nanoparticles that persist after the surrounding mineral has dehydrated and crystallized. Protein matrix components occluded within the mineral must inhibit ACC·H2O dehydration. We devised an in vitro, also using XANES-PEEM, assay to identify spicule proteins that may play a role in stabilizing various mineral phases, and found that the most abundant occluded matrix protein in the sea urchin spicules, SM50, stabilizes ACC·H2O in vitro. PMID:22492931

  12. Biomineralization of calcium carbonate in the cell wall of Lithothamnion crispatum (Hapalidiales, Rhodophyta): correlation between the organic matrix and the mineral phase.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Rodrigo Tomazetto; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; Amado Filho, Gilberto Menezes; Leal, Rachel Nunes; Werckmann, Jacques; Rossi, André Linhares; Campos, Andrea Porto Carreiro; Karez, Cláudia Santiago; Farina, Marcos

    2017-06-01

    Over the past few decades, progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of coralline algae mineralization. However, the relationship between the mineral phase and the organic matrix in coralline algae has not yet been thoroughly examined. The aim of this study was to describe the cell wall ultrastructure of Lithothamnion crispatum, a cosmopolitan rhodolith-forming coralline algal species collected near Salvador (Brazil), and examine the relationship between the organic matrix and the nucleation and growth/shape modulation of calcium carbonate crystals. A nanostructured pattern was observed in L. crispatum along the cell walls. At the nanoscale, the crystals from L. crispatum consisted of several single crystallites assembled and associated with organic material. The crystallites in the bulk of the cell wall had a high level of spatial organization. However, the crystals displayed cleavages in the (104) faces after ultrathin sectioning with a microtome. This organism is an important model for biomineralization studies as the crystallographic data do not fit in any of the general biomineralization processes described for other organisms. Biomineralization in L. crispatum is dependent on both the soluble and the insoluble organic matrix, which are involved in the control of mineral formation and organizational patterns through an organic matrix-mediated process. This knowledge concerning the mineral composition and organizational patterns of crystals within the cell walls should be taken into account in future studies of changing ocean conditions as they represent important factors influencing the physico-chemical interactions between rhodoliths and the environment in coralline reefs. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  13. Relative influences of solution composition and presence of intracrystalline proteins on magnesium incorporation in calcium carbonate minerals: Insight into vital effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Julie; André, Luc; Navez, Jacques; Pernet, Philippe; Dubois, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    Biogenic calcites may contain considerable magnesium concentrations, significantly higher than those observed in inorganic calcites. Control of ion concentrations in the calcifying space by transport systems and properties of the organic matrix of mineralization are probably involved in the incorporation of high magnesium quantities in biogenic calcites, but their relative effects have never been quantified. In vitro precipitation experiments performed at different Mg/Ca ratios in the solution and in the presence of soluble organic matrix macromolecules (SOM) extracted from sea urchin tests and spines showed that, at a constant temperature, magnesium incorporation in the precipitated minerals was mainly dependent on the Mg/Ca ratio of the solution. However, a significant increase in magnesium incorporation was observed in the presence of SOM compared with control experiments. Furthermore, this effect was more pronounced with SOM extracted from the test, which was richer in magnesium than the spines. According to SEM observations, amorphous calcium carbonate was precipitated at high Mg/Casolution. The observed predominant effect of Mg/Casolution, probably mediated in vivo by ion transport to and from the calcifying space, was suggested to induce and stabilize a transient magnesium-rich amorphous phase essential to the formation of high magnesium calcites. Aspartic acid rich proteins, shown to be more abundant in the test than in the spine matrix, further stabilize this amorphous phase. The involvement of the organic matrix in this process can explain the observation that sympatric organisms or even different skeletal elements of the same individual present different skeletal magnesium concentrations.

  14. Oxalate secretion by ectomycorrhizal Paxillus involutus is mineral-specific and controls calcium weathering from minerals

    PubMed Central

    Schmalenberger, A.; Duran, A. L.; Bray, A. W.; Bridge, J.; Bonneville, S.; Benning, L. G.; Romero-Gonzalez, M. E.; Leake, J. R.; Banwart, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Trees and their associated rhizosphere organisms play a major role in mineral weathering driving calcium fluxes from the continents to the oceans that ultimately control long-term atmospheric CO2 and climate through the geochemical carbon cycle. Photosynthate allocation to tree roots and their mycorrhizal fungi is hypothesized to fuel the active secretion of protons and organic chelators that enhance calcium dissolution at fungal-mineral interfaces. This was tested using 14CO2 supplied to shoots of Pinus sylvestris ectomycorrhizal with the widespread fungus Paxillus involutus in monoxenic microcosms, revealing preferential allocation by the fungus of plant photoassimilate to weather grains of limestone and silicates each with a combined calcium and magnesium content of over 10 wt.%. Hyphae had acidic surfaces and linear accumulation of weathered calcium with secreted oxalate, increasing significantly in sequence: quartz, granite < basalt, olivine, limestone < gabbro. These findings confirmed the role of mineral-specific oxalate exudation in ectomycorrhizal weathering to dissolve calcium bearing minerals, thus contributing to the geochemical carbon cycle. PMID:26197714

  15. Oxalate secretion by ectomycorrhizal Paxillus involutus is mineral-specific and controls calcium weathering from minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalenberger, A.; Duran, A. L.; Bray, A. W.; Bridge, J.; Bonneville, S.; Benning, L. G.; Romero-Gonzalez, M. E.; Leake, J. R.; Banwart, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    Trees and their associated rhizosphere organisms play a major role in mineral weathering driving calcium fluxes from the continents to the oceans that ultimately control long-term atmospheric CO2 and climate through the geochemical carbon cycle. Photosynthate allocation to tree roots and their mycorrhizal fungi is hypothesized to fuel the active secretion of protons and organic chelators that enhance calcium dissolution at fungal-mineral interfaces. This was tested using 14CO2 supplied to shoots of Pinus sylvestris ectomycorrhizal with the widespread fungus Paxillus involutus in monoxenic microcosms, revealing preferential allocation by the fungus of plant photoassimilate to weather grains of limestone and silicates each with a combined calcium and magnesium content of over 10 wt.%. Hyphae had acidic surfaces and linear accumulation of weathered calcium with secreted oxalate, increasing significantly in sequence: quartz, granite < basalt, olivine, limestone < gabbro. These findings confirmed the role of mineral-specific oxalate exudation in ectomycorrhizal weathering to dissolve calcium bearing minerals, thus contributing to the geochemical carbon cycle.

  16. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC → dehydrated ACC → biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  17. Calcium carbonate gallstones in children.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Mark D; Soloway, Roger D; Taylor, Donald R; Riyad, Kallingal; Toogood, Giles

    2007-10-01

    In the United States, cholesterol stones account for 70% to 95% of adult gallstones and black pigment stones for most of the remainder. Calcium carbonate stones are exceptionally rare. A previous analysis of a small number of pediatric gallstones from the north of England showed a remarkably high prevalence of calcium carbonate stones. The aims of this study were to analyze a much larger series of pediatric gallstones from our region and to compare their chemical composition with a series of adult gallstones from the same geographic area. A consecutive series of gallbladder stones from 63 children and 50 adults from the north of England were analyzed in detail using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. Demographic and clinical data were collected on all patients. The relative proportions of each major stone component were assessed: cholesterol, protein and calcium salts of bilirubin, fatty acids, calcium carbonate, and hydroxyapatite. Thirty-nine (78%) adults had typical cholesterol stones, 7 (14%) had black pigment bilirubinate stones, and only 2 (4%) had calcium carbonate stones. In contrast, 30 (48%) children had black pigment stones, 13 (21%) had cholesterol stones, 15 (24%) had calcium carbonate stones, 3 (5%) had protein dominant stones, and 2 (3%) had brown pigment stones. In children, cholesterol stones were more likely in overweight adolescent girls with a family history of gallstones, whereas black pigment stones were equally common in boys and girls and associated with hemolysis, parenteral nutrition, and neonatal abdominal surgery. Calcium carbonate stones were more common in boys, and almost half had undergone neonatal abdominal surgery and/or required neonatal intensive care. The composition of pediatric gallstones differs significantly from that found in adults. In particular, one quarter of the children in this series had calcium carbonate stones, previously considered rare. Geographic differences are not the major reason for the high

  18. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS Reg. No. 471-34-1) is prepared by... of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of...

  19. Amphiphilic polypeptides as a bifunctional template in the mineralization of calcium carbonate at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Cao, Heng; Lin, Guoqiang; Yao, Jinrong; Shao, Zhengzhong

    2013-05-01

    A well-defined amphiphilic polypeptide, poly(glutamic acid)22 -block-poly(alanine)8 (PGlu22 -b-PAla8 ), which plays the roles of both soluble (functional) additive and insoluble (structural) matrix, is employed to mediate the mineralization of CaCO3 at the air/water interface. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, for example, show that the polymorph of CaCO3 particles obtained is calcite. The observations from SEM and TEM suggest that PGlu22 -b-PAla8 initiates the amorphous precursor phase and heterogeneous nucleation of CaCO3 at the air/water interface, while temporarily stabilizes the gelatinous precursors as a process-directing agent; nevertheless, the initial concentration of Ca(2+) controls the procedure of crystallization and the final morphology of CaCO3 particles. Such "bifunctional" amphiphilic-polypeptide-regulated mineralization at the air/water interface may be applied to the synthesis of many kinds of symmetrical inorganic/organic hybrids. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Carbon K-edge spectra of carbonate minerals.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Jay A; Wirick, Sue; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-09-01

    Carbon K-edge X-ray spectroscopy has been applied to the study of a wide range of organic samples, from polymers and coals to interstellar dust particles. Identification of carbonaceous materials within these samples is accomplished by the pattern of resonances in the 280-320 eV energy region. Carbonate minerals are often encountered in the study of natural samples, and have been identified by a distinctive resonance at 290.3 eV. Here C K-edge and Ca L-edge spectra from a range of carbonate minerals are presented. Although all carbonates exhibit a sharp 290 eV resonance, both the precise position of this resonance and the positions of other resonances vary among minerals. The relative strengths of the different carbonate resonances also vary with crystal orientation to the linearly polarized X-ray beam. Intriguingly, several carbonate minerals also exhibit a strong 288.6 eV resonance, consistent with the position of a carbonyl resonance rather than carbonate. Calcite and aragonite, although indistinguishable spectrally at the C K-edge, exhibited significantly different spectra at the Ca L-edge. The distinctive spectral fingerprints of carbonates provide an identification tool, allowing for the examination of such processes as carbon sequestration in minerals, Mn substitution in marine calcium carbonates (dolomitization) and serpentinization of basalts.

  1. Testing Urey's carbonate-silicate cycle using the calcium isotopic composition of sedimentary carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blättler, Clara L.; Higgins, John A.

    2017-12-01

    Carbonate minerals constitute a major component of the sedimentary geological record and an archive of a fraction of the carbon and calcium cycled through the Earth's surface reservoirs for over three billion years. For calcium, carbonate minerals constitute the ultimate sink for almost all calcium liberated during continental and submarine weathering of silicate minerals. This study presents >500 stable isotope ratios of calcium in Precambrian carbonate sediments, both limestones and dolomites, in an attempt to characterize the isotope mass balance of the sedimentary carbonate reservoir through time. The mean of the dataset is indistinguishable from estimates of the calcium isotope ratio of bulk silicate Earth, consistent with the Urey cycle being the dominant mechanism exchanging calcium among surface reservoirs. The variability in bulk sediment calcium isotope ratios within each geological unit does not reflect changes in the global calcium cycle, but rather highlights the importance of local mineralogical and/or diagenetic effects in the carbonate record. This dataset demonstrates the potential for calcium isotope ratios to help assess these local effects, such as the former presence of aragonite, even in rocks with a history of neomorphism and recrystallization. Additionally, 29 calcium isotope measurements are presented from ODP (Ocean Drilling Program) Site 801 that contribute to the characterization of altered oceanic crust as an additional sink for calcium, and whose distinct isotopic signature places a limit on the importance of this subduction flux over Earth history.

  2. Magnetically responsive calcium carbonate microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Bikmullin, Aidar G; Nurgaliev, Danis K

    2009-09-01

    Here we report the fabrication of magnetically responsive calcium carbonate microcrystals produced by coprecipitation of calcium carbonate in the presence of citrate-stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles. We demonstrate that the calcite microcrystals obtained possess superparamagnetic properties due to incorporated magnetite nanoparticles and can be manipulated by an external magnetic field. The microcrystals doped with magnetic nanoparticles were utilized as templates for the fabrication of hollow polyelectrolyte microcapsules, which retain the magnetic properties of the sacrificial cores and might be spatially manipulated using a permanent magnet, thus providing the magnetic-field-facilitated delivery and separation of materials templated on magnetically responsive calcite microcrystals.

  3. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  4. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. Initial stages of calcium uptake and mineral deposition in sea urchin embryos

    PubMed Central

    Vidavsky, Netta; Addadi, Sefi; Mahamid, Julia; Shimoni, Eyal; Ben-Ezra, David; Shpigel, Muki; Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Sea urchin larvae have an endoskeleton consisting of two calcitic spicules. We reconstructed various stages of the formation pathway of calcium carbonate from calcium ions in sea water to mineral deposition and integration into the forming spicules. Monitoring calcium uptake with the fluorescent dye calcein shows that calcium ions first penetrate the embryo and later are deposited intracellularly. Surprisingly, calcium carbonate deposits are distributed widely all over the embryo, including in the primary mesenchyme cells and in the surface epithelial cells. Using cryo-SEM, we show that the intracellular calcium carbonate deposits are contained in vesicles of diameter 0.5–1.5 μm. Using the newly developed airSEM, which allows direct correlation between fluorescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy, we confirmed the presence of solid calcium carbonate in the vesicles. This mineral phase appears as aggregates of 20–30-nm nanospheres, consistent with amorphous calcium carbonate. The aggregates finally are introduced into the spicule compartment, where they integrate into the growing spicule. PMID:24344263

  15. Initial stages of calcium uptake and mineral deposition in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Vidavsky, Netta; Addadi, Sefi; Mahamid, Julia; Shimoni, Eyal; Ben-Ezra, David; Shpigel, Muki; Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2014-01-07

    Sea urchin larvae have an endoskeleton consisting of two calcitic spicules. We reconstructed various stages of the formation pathway of calcium carbonate from calcium ions in sea water to mineral deposition and integration into the forming spicules. Monitoring calcium uptake with the fluorescent dye calcein shows that calcium ions first penetrate the embryo and later are deposited intracellularly. Surprisingly, calcium carbonate deposits are distributed widely all over the embryo, including in the primary mesenchyme cells and in the surface epithelial cells. Using cryo-SEM, we show that the intracellular calcium carbonate deposits are contained in vesicles of diameter 0.5-1.5 μm. Using the newly developed airSEM, which allows direct correlation between fluorescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy, we confirmed the presence of solid calcium carbonate in the vesicles. This mineral phase appears as aggregates of 20-30-nm nanospheres, consistent with amorphous calcium carbonate. The aggregates finally are introduced into the spicule compartment, where they integrate into the growing spicule.

  16. Calcium isotope fractionation between soft and mineralized tissues as a monitor of calcium use in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Skulan, J; DePaolo, D J

    1999-11-23

    Calcium from bone and shell is isotopically lighter than calcium of soft tissue from the same organism and isotopically lighter than source (dietary) calcium. When measured as the (44)Ca/(40)Ca isotopic ratio, the total range of variation observed is 5.5 per thousand, and as much as 4 per thousand variation is found in a single organism. The observed intraorganismal calcium isotopic variations and the isotopic differences between tissues and diet indicate that isotopic fractionation occurs mainly as a result of mineralization. Soft tissue calcium becomes heavier or lighter than source calcium during periods when there is net gain or loss of mineral mass, respectively. These results suggest that variations of natural calcium isotope ratios in tissues may be useful for assessing the calcium and mineral balance of organisms without introducing isotopic tracers.

  17. Calcium isotope fractionation between soft and mineralized tissues as a monitor of calcium use in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Skulan, Joseph; DePaolo, Donald J.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium from bone and shell is isotopically lighter than calcium of soft tissue from the same organism and isotopically lighter than source (dietary) calcium. When measured as the 44Ca/40Ca isotopic ratio, the total range of variation observed is 5.5‰, and as much as 4‰ variation is found in a single organism. The observed intraorganismal calcium isotopic variations and the isotopic differences between tissues and diet indicate that isotopic fractionation occurs mainly as a result of mineralization. Soft tissue calcium becomes heavier or lighter than source calcium during periods when there is net gain or loss of mineral mass, respectively. These results suggest that variations of natural calcium isotope ratios in tissues may be useful for assessing the calcium and mineral balance of organisms without introducing isotopic tracers. PMID:10570137

  18. Mineral deposition in bacteria-filled and bacteria-free calcium bodies in the crustacean Hyloniscus riparius (Isopoda: Oniscidea).

    PubMed

    Vittori, Miloš; Rozman, Alenka; Grdadolnik, Jože; Novak, Urban; Štrus, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Crustacean calcium bodies are epithelial sacs which contain a mineralized matrix. The objectives of this study were to describe the microscopic anatomy of calcium bodies in the terrestrial isopod Hyloniscus riparius and to establish whether they undergo molt-related structural changes. We performed 3D reconstruction of the calcium bodies from paraffin sections and analyzed their structure with light and electron microscopy. In addition, we analyzed the chemical composition of their mineralized matrices with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Two pairs of these organs are present in H. riparius. One pair is filled with bacteria while the other pair is not. In non-molting animals, the bacteria-filled calcium bodies contain apatite crystals and the bacteria-free calcium bodies enclose CaCO3-containing concretions with little organic matrix. During preparation for molt, an additional matrix layer is deposited in both pairs of calcium bodies. In the bacteria-filled calcium bodies it contains a mixture of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate, whereas only calcium carbonate is present in bacteria-free calcium bodies. After ecdysis, all mineral components in bacteria-free calcium bodies and the additional matrix layer in bacteria-filled calcium bodies are completely resorbed. During calcium resorption, the apical surface of the calcium body epithelium is deeply folded and electron dense granules are present in spaces between epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the presence of bacteria might be linked to calcium phosphate mineralization. Calcium bodies likely provide a source of calcium and potentially phosphate for the mineralization of the new cuticle after molt. Unlike other terrestrial isopods, H. riparius does not form sternal CaCO3 deposits and the bacteria-free calcium bodies might functionally replace them in this species.

  19. Mineral Deposition in Bacteria-Filled and Bacteria-Free Calcium Bodies in the Crustacean Hyloniscus riparius (Isopoda: Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Vittori, Miloš; Rozman, Alenka; Grdadolnik, Jože; Novak, Urban; Štrus, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Crustacean calcium bodies are epithelial sacs which contain a mineralized matrix. The objectives of this study were to describe the microscopic anatomy of calcium bodies in the terrestrial isopod Hyloniscus riparius and to establish whether they undergo molt-related structural changes. We performed 3D reconstruction of the calcium bodies from paraffin sections and analyzed their structure with light and electron microscopy. In addition, we analyzed the chemical composition of their mineralized matrices with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Two pairs of these organs are present in H. riparius. One pair is filled with bacteria while the other pair is not. In non-molting animals, the bacteria-filled calcium bodies contain apatite crystals and the bacteria-free calcium bodies enclose CaCO3-containing concretions with little organic matrix. During preparation for molt, an additional matrix layer is deposited in both pairs of calcium bodies. In the bacteria-filled calcium bodies it contains a mixture of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate, whereas only calcium carbonate is present in bacteria-free calcium bodies. After ecdysis, all mineral components in bacteria-free calcium bodies and the additional matrix layer in bacteria-filled calcium bodies are completely resorbed. During calcium resorption, the apical surface of the calcium body epithelium is deeply folded and electron dense granules are present in spaces between epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the presence of bacteria might be linked to calcium phosphate mineralization. Calcium bodies likely provide a source of calcium and potentially phosphate for the mineralization of the new cuticle after molt. Unlike other terrestrial isopods, H. riparius does not form sternal CaCO3 deposits and the bacteria-free calcium bodies might functionally replace them in this species. PMID:23554963

  20. Induced calcium carbonate precipitation using Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Seifan, Mostafa; Samani, Ali Khajeh; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-12-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation is an emerging process for the production of self-healing concrete. This study was aimed to investigate the effects and optimum conditions on calcium carbonate biosynthesis. Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus sphaericus, yeast extract, urea, calcium chloride and aeration were found to be the most significant factors affecting the biomineralization of calcium carbonate. It was noticed that the morphology of microbial calcium carbonate was mainly affected by the genera of bacteria (cell surface properties), the viscosity of the media and the type of electron acceptors (Ca 2+ ). The maximum calcium carbonate concentration of 33.78 g/L was achieved at the optimum conditions This value is the highest concentration reported in the literature.

  1. Mapping the Mineral Resource Base for Mineral Carbon-Dioxide Sequestration in the Conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krevor, S.C.; Graves, C.R.; Van Gosen, B. S.; McCafferty, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This database provides information on the occurrence of ultramafic rocks in the conterminous United States that are suitable for sequestering captured carbon dioxide in mineral form, also known as mineral carbon-dioxide sequestration. Mineral carbon-dioxide sequestration is a proposed greenhouse gas mitigation technology whereby carbon dioxide (CO2) is disposed of by reacting it with calcium or magnesium silicate minerals to form a solid magnesium or calcium carbonate product. The technology offers a large capacity to permanently store CO2 in an environmentally benign form via a process that takes little effort to verify or monitor after disposal. These characteristics are unique among its peers in greenhouse gas disposal technologies. The 2005 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage suggested that a major gap in mineral CO2 sequestration is locating the magnesium-silicate bedrock available to sequester the carbon dioxide. It is generally known that silicate minerals with high concentrations of magnesium are suitable for mineral carbonation. However, no assessment has been made in the United States that details their geographical distribution and extent, nor has anyone evaluated their potential for use in mineral carbonation. Researchers at Columbia University and the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a digital geologic database of ultramafic rocks in the conterminous United States. Data were compiled from varied-scale geologic maps of magnesium-silicate ultramafic rocks. The focus of our national-scale map is entirely on ultramafic rock types, which typically consist primarily of olivine- and serpentine-rich rocks. These rock types are potentially suitable as source material for mineral CO2 sequestration.

  2. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... mixtures for coloring drugs. (b) Specifications. Calcium carbonate shall meet the specifications for...

  3. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... mixtures for coloring drugs. (b) Specifications. Calcium carbonate shall meet the specifications for...

  4. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color...

  5. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color...

  6. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color...

  7. Calcium carbonates: induced biomineralization with controlled macromorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Aileen; Kastner, Anne; Harries, Dennis; Wierzbicka-Wieczorek, Maria; Majzlan, Juraj; Büchel, Georg; Kothe, Erika

    2017-11-01

    Biomineralization of (magnesium) calcite and vaterite by bacterial isolates has been known for quite some time. However, the extracellular precipitation has hardly ever been linked to different morphologies of the minerals that are observed. Here, isolates from limestone-associated groundwater, rock and soil were shown to form calcite, magnesium calcite or vaterite. More than 92 % of isolates were indeed able to form carbonates, while abiotic controls failed to form minerals. The crystal morphologies varied, including rhombohedra, prisms and pyramid-like macromorphologies. Different conditions like varying temperature, pH or media components, but also cocultivation to test for collaborative effects of sympatric bacteria, were used to differentiate between mechanisms of calcium carbonate formation. Single crystallites were cemented with bacterial cells; these may have served as nucleation sites by providing a basic pH at short distance from the cells. A calculation of potential calcite formation of up to 2 g L-1 of solution made it possible to link the microbial activity to geological processes.

  8. Unexpected link between polyketide synthase and calcium carbonate biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Motoki; Omi, Ai; Hamanaka, Gen; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Shimada, Atsuko; Kondo, Mariko; Narita, Takanori; Kiyomoto, Masato; Katsuyama, Yohei; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Irie, Naoki; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Calcium carbonate biominerals participate in diverse physiological functions. Despite intensive studies, little is known about how mineralization is initiated in organisms. We analyzed the medaka spontaneous mutant, ha, defective in otolith (calcareous ear stone) formation. ha lacks a trigger for otolith mineralization, and the causative gene was found to encode polyketide synthase (pks), a multifunctional enzyme mainly found in bacteria, fungi, and plant. Subsequent experiments demonstrate that the products of medaka PKS, most likely polyketides or their derivatives, act as nucleation facilitators in otolith mineralization. The generality of this novel PKS function is supported by the essential role of echinoderm PKS in calcareous skeleton formation together with the presence of PKSs in a much wider range of animals from coral to vertebrates. The present study first links PKS to biomineralization and provides a genetic cue for biogeochemistry of carbon and calcium cycles.

  9. Calcium Bioavailability from Mineral Waters with Different Mineralization in Comparison to Milk and a Supplement.

    PubMed

    Greupner, Theresa; Schneider, Inga; Hahn, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the bioavailability of calcium from 3 mineral waters with different concentrations of minerals with that of milk and a calcium supplement. A single-center, randomized controlled trial with a crossover design with 21 healthy men and women was conducted at the Institute of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Leibniz University Hannover. The participants consumed the 5 test products providing 300 mg of calcium each on 5 examination days with 1-week wash-out phases in between. Primary outcome variables were the area under the curve of serum calcium levels for 10-hour (AUC 0-10h ) and 24-hour urinary calcium excretion. In all groups, no significant differences in the AUC 0-10h of serum calcium levels as well as in the 24-hour urinary calcium excretion were observed. Likewise, mean changes in serum phosphate and urinary phosphate, as well as serum parathormone, showed no differences between the groups. Given an equivalent bioavailability of calcium in all test products, neither a high concentration of SO 4 2- or of HCO 3 influenced the bioavailability of calcium. Accordingly, the use of mineral water with high concentrations of calcium constitutes a calorie-free calcium source that can improve calcium supply.

  10. Solubility and bioavailability of stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Meiron, Oren E; Bar-David, Elad; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Shechter, Assaf; Stepensky, David; Berman, Amir; Sagi, Amir

    2011-02-01

    Since its role in the prevention of osteoporosis in humans was proven some 30 years ago, calcium bioavailability has been the subject of numerous scientific studies. Recent technology allowing the production of a stable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) now enables a bioavailability analysis of this unique form of calcium. This study thus compares the solubility and fractional absorption of ACC, ACC with chitosan (ACC-C), and crystalline calcium carbonate (CCC). Solubility was evaluated by dissolving these preparations in dilute phosphoric acid. The results demonstrated that both ACC and ACC-C are more soluble than CCC. Fractional absorption was evaluated by intrinsically labeling calcium carbonate preparations with (45)Ca, orally administrated to rats using gelatin capsules. Fractional absorption was determined by evaluating the percentage of the administrated radioactive dose per milliliter that was measured in the serum, calcium absorption in the femur, and whole-body retention over a 34-hour period. Calcium serum analysis revealed that calcium absorption from ACC and ACC-C preparations was up to 40% higher than from CCC, whereas retention of ACC and ACC-C was up to 26.5% higher than CCC. Absorbed calcium in the femurs of ACC-administrated rats was 30% higher than in CCC-treated animals, whereas 15% more calcium was absorbed following ACC-C treatment than following CCC treatment. This study demonstrates the enhanced solubility and bioavailability of ACC over CCC. The use of stable ACC as a highly bioavailable dietary source for calcium is proposed based on the findings of this study. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  11. Protein-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Polowczyk, Izabela; Bastrzyk, Anna; Fiedot, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is an important component in exoskeletons of many organisms. The synthesis of calcium carbonate was performed by mixing dimethyl carbonate and an aqueous solution of calcium chloride dihydrate. The precipitation product was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. In addition, the turbidity of the reaction solution was acquired to monitor the kinetics of the calcium carbonate structure’s growth in the investigated system. In this study, samples of CaCO3 particles obtained with individual proteins, such as ovalbumin, lysozyme, and a mixture of the proteins, were characterized and compared with a control sample, i.e., synthesized without proteins. The obtained data indicated that the addition of ovalbumin to the reaction changed the morphology of crystals from rhombohedral to ‘stack-like’ structures. Lysozyme, however, did not affect the morphology of calcium carbonate, yet the presence of the protein mixture led to the creation of more complex composites in which the calcium carbonate crystals were constructed in protein matrices formed by the ovalbumin-lysozyme interaction. It was also observed that in the protein mixture, ovalbumin has a major influence on the CaCO3 formation through a strong interaction with calcium ions, which leads to the coalescence and creation of a steric barrier reducing particle growth. The authors proposed a mechanism of calcium carbonate grain growth in the presence of both proteins, taking into account the interaction of calcium ions with the protein. PMID:28774065

  12. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. Th...

  13. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. Scope A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent-to-treat population (N=2520), 752 patients with recorded dose data for calcium acetate (n=551)/calcium carbonate (n=201) at baseline and lanthanum carbonate at week 16 were studied. Elemental calcium intake, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, and serum intact parathyroid hormone levels were analyzed. Findings Of the 551 patients with calcium acetate dose data, 271 (49.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day at baseline, and 142 (25.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) serum phosphate levels were 6.1 (5.89, 6.21) mg/dL at baseline and 6.2 (6.04, 6.38) mg/dL at 16 weeks; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.3 (9.16, 9.44) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Of the 201 patients with calcium carbonate dose data, 117 (58.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day, and 76 (37.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% CI) serum phosphate levels were 5.8 (5.52, 6.06) mg/dL at baseline and 5.8 (5.53, 6.05) mg/dL at week 16; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.7 (9.15, 10.25) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Conclusion Calcium acetate/calcium carbonate phosphate binders, taken to control serum phosphate levels, may result in high levels of elemental calcium intake. This may lead to complications related to calcium balance. PMID:28182142

  14. Mineral Carbonation Feasibility, an Economic Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquier, L. C.; Kemache, N.; Cecchi, E.; Mercier, G.; Blais, J. F.; Kentish, S.

    2016-12-01

    Mineral Carbonation (MC) is one of the ways proposed to mitigate Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Although it intends to transform CO2 into a stable and inert carbonate by reacting it with any divalent containing material, MC is still globally seen as an unrealistic methodology to reduce CO2, mostly because carbonation was seen as a sequestration technique only (after CO2 capture). Nevertheless, recent studies considered and showed the feasibility of an integrated capture/storage approach. Thus, MC can be adapted to flue gas or other industrial gas streams more or less concentrated in CO2. Furthermore, carbonation can be applied to various problematics and offers the advantage to be feasible with a broad range of feedstock such as alkaline industrial or mining residues. Using an economic approach where by-product valorization is favored, interesting approaches were identified. More specifically, the particular case of the Québec province shows that different synergies between wastes and industries can be elaborated. The results indicate that MC can be seen as a practical approach to both reduce CO2 emissions and enhance waste remediation. For instance, the feasibility to export significant amounts of serpentinite mining residue to distant industrial sites using the St Lawrence maritime route was demonstrated. Here the applicability stands on the high value of the generated by-products. On the other hand, steel slags or waste concrete need more local applications due to their limited reaction efficiencies and the lower price of calcium carbonates. While transportation is a major factor for the OPEX cost, the profitability relies on the by-products potential sale. Indeed, the production of low carbon footprint materials from the reaction product will also expand the offer of CO2 utilization avenues. The presentation highlights the results of research made in the lab and using economic modeling to draw a portrait of the opportunities and challenges identified with

  15. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms. Key Words: Microbial iron reduction-Micropore-Electron transfer strategies-Microbial carbonate. Astrobiology 18, 28-36.

  16. In-Situ Production of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles in Fresh Concrete Using Pre-carbonation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin

    To reduce the carbon footprint of ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based concrete, a novel technique, pre-carbonation process, has been developed to produce CaCO3 nanoparticles in fresh concrete. In this technique, gaseous CO2 is first absorbed into a slurry of calcium-rich minerals which is then blended with other ingredients to produce mortar/concrete. The objective of this work is to obtain an in-depth understanding of the underlying scientific mechanisms associated with the enhancement of strength and durability of the concrete induced by the new method. A comprehensive research plan has been carried out to study the carbonated slaked lime slurry and the effect of carbonated slaked lime slurry on the performance of OPC-based concrete, and to evaluate the potentials of the pre-carbonation method. Experimental studies show that carbonating the calcium-rich mineral slurry with CO2 can produce CaCO3 nanoparticles and Ca(HCO 3)2 in the slurry, and these carbonation products were dictated by four parameters of the pre-carbonation method: the duration and temperature of the carbonation, the concentration of the calcium source slurry, and the stirring method of the calcium source slurry during the carbonation. The mechanical properties and durability of the mortar/concrete made with the carbonated slurry were significantly improved, which can be attributed to major mechanisms induced by the pre-carbonation method: promoted hydration of the cement and denser microstructure of the mortar/concrete. Calorimetry testing showed that the hydration of OPC was greatly improved by the pre-carbonation because of the extra heterogenous nucleation sites provided by the CaCO3 nanoparticles. XRD and TGA results revealed that more ettringite was produced in the mortar/concrete with pre-carbonated slaked lime slurry. The overall volume of the hydration products of the cement was increased by the pre-carbonation, leading to denser microstructure of the mortar/concrete. It has been found

  17. Co-precipitation of dissolved organic matter by calcium carbonate in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, Jerry A.; Reddy, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    Our previous research has demonstrated that dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences calcium carbonate mineral formation in surface and ground water. To better understand DOM mediation of carbonate precipitation and DOM co-precipitation and/or incorporation with carbonate minerals, we characterized the content and speciation of DOM in carbonate minerals and in the lake water of Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA. A 400-gram block of precipitated calcium carbonate from the Pyramid Lake shore was dissolved in 8 liters of 10% acetic acid. Particulate matter not dissolved by acetic acid was removed by centrifugation. DOM from the carbonate rock was fractionated into nine portions using evaporation, dialysis, resin adsorption, and selective precipitations to remove acetic acid and inorganic constituents. The calcium carbonate rock contained 0.23% DOM by weight. This DOM was enriched in polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids in comparison with the present lake water. DOM in lake water was composed of aliphatic, alicyclic polycarboxylic acids. These compound classes were found in previous studies to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation. DOM fractions from the carbonate rock were 14C-age dated at about 3,100 to 3,500 years before present. The mechanism of DOM co-precipitation and/or physical incorporation in the calcium carbonate is believed to be due to formation of insoluble calcium complexes with polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids that have moderately large stability constants at the alkaline pH of the lake. DOM co-precipitation with calcium carbonate and incorporation in precipitated carbonate minerals removes proteinaceous DOM, but nearly equivalent concentrations of neutral and acidic forms of organic nitrogen in DOM remain in solution. Calcium carbonate precipitation during lime softening pretreatment of drinking water may have practical applications for removal of proteinaceous disinfection by-product precursors.

  18. Models for Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sourabh

    Many species e.g. sea urchin form amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phases that subsequently transform into crystalline CaCO3. It is certainly possible that the biogenic ACC might have more than 10 wt% Mg and ˜3 wt% of water. The structure of ACC and the mechanisms by which it transforms to crystalline phase are still poorly understood. In this dissertation our goal is to determine an atomic structure model that is consistent with diffraction and IR measurements of ACC. For this purpose a calcite supercell with 24 formula units, containing 120 atoms, was constructed. Various configurations with substitution of Ca by 6 Mg ions (6 wt.%) and insertion of 3-5 H 2O molecules (2.25-3.75 wt.%) in the interstitial positions of the supercell, were relaxed using a robust density function code VASP. The most noticeable effects were the tilts of CO3 groups and the distortion of Ca sub-lattice, especially in the hydrated case. The distributions of Ca-Ca nearest neighbor distance and CO3 tilts were extracted from various configurations. The same methods were also applied to aragonite. Sampling from the calculated distortion distributions, we built models for amorphous calcite/aragonite of size ˜ 1700 nm3 based on a multi-scale modeling scheme. We used these models to generate diffraction patterns and profiles with our diffraction code. We found that the induced distortions were not enough to generate a diffraction profile typical of an amorphous material. We then studied the diffraction profiles from several nano-crystallites as recent studies suggest that ACC might be a random array of nano-cryatallites. It was found that the generated diffraction profile from a nano-crystallite of size ˜ 2 nm3 is similar to that from the ACC.

  19. Modeling of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sourabh; Rez, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Many species (e.g. sea urchin) form amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phases that subsequently transform into crystalline CaCO3. It is certainly possible that ACC might have up to 10 wt% Mg and ˜3 wt% of water. The structure of ACC and mechanisms by which it transforms to crystalline phase are still unknown. Our goal here is to determine an atomic structure model that is consistent with diffraction and IR measurements of ACC. For this purpose a calcite supercell with 24 formula units (120 atoms) was constructed. Various configurations with 6 Mg atoms substituting for Ca (6 wt%) and 3-5 H2O molecules (2.25- 3.75 wt%) inserted in the spaces between Ca atoms, were relaxed using VASP. Most noticeable effects were the tilts of CO3 groups and distortion of Ca sub-lattice, especially in the case of water. The distributions of nearest Ca-Ca distance and CO3 tilts were extracted from those configurations. We also performed the same analysis starting with aragonite. Sampling from above distributions we built models for amorphous calcite/aragonite of size ˜1700 nm^3. We found that the induced distortions were not enough to generate a diffraction pattern typical of an amorphous material. Next we studied diffraction pattern of several nano-crystallites as recent studies suggest that amorphous calcite might be composed of nano- crystallites. We could then generate a diffraction pattern that appeared similar to that from ACC, for a nano-crystallite of size ˜2 nm^3.

  20. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M.

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms.

  1. Amorphous calcium carbonate transforms into calcite during sea urchin larval spicule growth

    PubMed Central

    Beniash, E.; Aizenberg, J.; Addadi, L.; Weiner, S.

    1997-01-01

    Sea urchin larvae form an endoskeleton composed of a pair of spicules. For more than a century it has been stated that each spicule comprises a single crystal of the CaCO3 mineral, calcite. We show that an additional mineral phase, amorphous calcium carbonate, is present in the sea urchin larval spicule, and that this inherently unstable mineral transforms into calcite with time. This observation significantly changes our concepts of mineral formation in this well-studied organism.

  2. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A.

    2017-09-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  3. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons.

    PubMed

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A; Frazier, Matthew J; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V; Marcus, Matthew A; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2017-09-12

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed "vital effects," that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO 3 ). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO 2 increases, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  4. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    DOE PAGES

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang -Yu; ...

    2017-08-28

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO 3).more » We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO 2 increases, such as the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.« less

  5. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    SciTech Connect

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang -Yu

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO 3).more » We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO 2 increases, such as the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.« less

  6. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2017-01-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya. PMID:28847944

  7. Mineralization of Carbon Dioxide: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V; Soong, Y; Carney, C

    2015-01-01

    CCS research has been focused on CO2 storage in geologic formations, with many potential risks. An alternative to conventional geologic storage is carbon mineralization, where CO2 is reacted with metal cations to form carbonate minerals. Mineralization methods can be broadly divided into two categories: in situ and ex situ. In situ mineralization, or mineral trapping, is a component of underground geologic sequestration, in which a portion of the injected CO2 reacts with alkaline rock present in the target formation to form solid carbonate species. In ex situ mineralization, the carbonation reaction occurs above ground, within a separate reactor or industrialmore » process. This literature review is meant to provide an update on the current status of research on CO2 mineralization. 2« less

  8. Microbially mediated carbon mineralization: Geoengineering a carbon-neutral mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; McCutcheon, J.; Harrison, A. L.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2013-12-01

    Ultramafic and mafic mine tailings are a potentially valuable feedstock for carbon mineralization, affording the mining industry an opportunity to completely offset their carbon emissions. Passive carbon mineralization has previously been documented at the abandoned Clinton Creek asbestos mine, and the active Diavik diamond mine and Mount Keith nickel mine, yet the majority of tailings remain unreacted. Examples of microbe-carbonate interactions at each mine suggest that biological pathways could be harnessed to promote carbon mineralization. In suitable environmental conditions, microbes can mediate geochemical processes to accelerate mineral dissolution, increase the supply of carbon dioxide (CO2), and induce carbonate precipitation, all of which may accelerate carbon mineralization. Tailings mineralogy and the availability of a CO2 point source are key considerations in designing tailings storage facilities (TSF) for optimizing carbon mineralization. We evaluate the efficacy of acceleration strategies including bioleaching, biologically induced carbonate precipitation, and heterotrophic oxidation of waste organics, as well as abiotic strategies including enhancing passive carbonation through modifying tailings management practices and use of CO2 point sources (Fig. 1). With the aim of developing carbon-neutral mines, implementation of carbon mineralization strategies into TSF design will be driven by economic incentives and public pressure for environmental sustainability in the mining industry. Figure 1. Schematic illustrating geoengineered scenarios for carbon mineralization of ultramafic mine tailings. Scenarios A and B are based on non-point and point sources of CO2, respectively.

  9. Calcination of calcium carbonate and blend therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mallow, William A.; Dziuk, Jr., Jerome J.

    1989-01-01

    A method for calcination of a calcium carbonate material comprising heating the calcium carbonate material to a temperature and for a time sufficient to calcine the material to the degree desired while in the presence of a catalyst; said catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula MCO.sub.3.CaCO.sub.3.CaO.H.sub.2 O.sub.x, wherein M is an alkali metal and x is 0 to 1 and formed by fusing MCO.sub.3 and CaCO.sub.3 in a molar ratio of about 1:2 to 2:1, and a blend adapted to be heated to CaO comprising a calcium carbonate material and at least one such fused salt.

  10. Calcium carbonate crystals promote calcium oxalate crystallization by heterogeneous or epitaxial nucleation: possible involvement in the control of urinary lithogenesis.

    PubMed

    Geider, S; Dussol, B; Nitsche, S; Veesler, S; Berthézène, P; Dupuy, P; Astier, J P; Boistelle, R; Berland, Y; Dagorn, J C; Verdier, J M

    1996-07-01

    A large proportion of urinary stones have calcium oxalate (CaOx) as the major mineral phase. In these stones, CaOx is generally associated with minor amounts of other calcium salts. Several reports showing the presence of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and calcium phosphate in renal stones suggested that crystals of those salts might be present in the early steps of stone formation. Such crystals might therefore promote CaOx crystallization from supersaturated urine by providing an appropriate substrate for heterogeneous nucleation. That possibility was investigated by seeding a metastable solution of 45Ca oxalate with vaterite or calcite crystallites. Accretion of CaOx was monitored by 45Ca incorporation. We showed that (1) seeds of vaterite (the hexagonal polymorph of CaCO3) and calcite (the rhomboedric form) could initiate calcium oxalate crystal growth; (2) in the presence of lithostathine, an inhibitor of CaCO3 crystal growth, such accretion was not observed. In addition, scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that growth occurred by epitaxy onto calcite seeds whereas no special orientation was observed onto vaterite. It was concluded that calcium carbonate crystals promote crystallization of calcium oxalate and that inhibitors controlling calcium carbonate crystal formation in Henle's loop might play an important role in the prevention of calcium oxalate stone formation.

  11. The review of recent carbonate minerals processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solihin

    2018-02-01

    Carbonate is one of the groups of minerals that can be found in relatively large amount in the earth crust. The common carbonate minerals are calcium carbonate (calcite, aragonite, depending on its crystal structure), magnesium carbonate (magnesite), calcium-magnesium carbonate (dolomite), and barium carbonate (barite). A large amount of calcite can be found in many places in Indonesia such as Padalarang, Sukabumi, and Tasikmalaya (West Java Provence). Dolomite can be found in a large amount in Gresik, Lamongan, and Tuban (East Java Provence). Magnesite is quite rare in Indonesia, and up to the recent years it can only be found in Padamarang Island (South East Sulawesi Provence). The carbonate has been being exploited through open pit mining activity. Traditionally, calcite can be ground to produce material for brick production, be carved to produce craft product, or be roasted to produce lime for many applications such as raw materials for cement, flux for metal smelting, etc. Meanwhile, dolomite has traditionally been used as a raw material to make brick for local buildings and to make fertilizer for coconut oil plant. Carbonate minerals actually consist of important elements needed by modern application. Calcium is one of the elements needed in artificial bone formation, slow release fertilizer synthesis, dielectric material production, etc. Magnesium is an important material in automotive industry to produce the alloy for vehicle main parts. It is also used as alloying element in the production of special steel for special purpose. Magnesium oxide can be used to produce slow release fertilizer, catalyst and any other modern applications. The aim of this review article is to present in brief the recent technology in processing carbonate minerals. This review covers both the technology that has been industrially proven and the technology that is still in research and development stage. One of the industrially proven technologies to process carbonate mineral is

  12. Fungal degradation of calcium-, lead- and silicon-bearing minerals.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Ademola O; Gadd, Geoffrey M

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine nutritional influence on the ability of selected filamentous fungi to mediate biogenic weathering of the minerals, apatite, galena and obsidian in order to provide further understanding of the roles of fungi as biogeochemical agents, particularly in relation to the cycling of metals and associated elements found in minerals. The impact of three organic acid producing fungi (Aspergillus niger, Serpula himantioides and Trametes versicolor) on apatite, galena and obsidian was examined in the absence and presence of a carbon and energy source (glucose). Manifestation of fungal weathering included corrosion of mineral surfaces, modification of the mineral substrate through transformation into secondary minerals (i.e. crystal formation) and hyphal penetration of the mineral substrate. Physicochemical interactions of fungal metabolites, e.g. H+ and organic acids, with the minerals are thought to be the primary driving forces responsible. All experimental fungi were capable of mineral surface colonization in the absence and presence of glucose but corrosion of the mineral surface and secondary mineral formation were affected by glucose availability. Only S. himantioides and T. versicolor were able to corrode apatite in the absence of glucose but none of the fungi were capable of doing so with the other minerals. In addition, crystal formation with galena was entirely dependent on the availability of glucose. Penetration of the mineral substrates by fungal hyphae occurred but this did not follow any particular pattern. Although the presence of glucose in the media appeared to influence positively the mineral penetrating abilities of the fungi, the results obtained also showed that some geochemical change(s) might occur under nutrient-limited conditions. It was, however, unclear whether the hyphae actively penetrated the minerals or were growing into pre-existing pores or cracks.

  13. A comparative study of calcium absorption following a single serving administration of calcium carbonate powder versus calcium citrate tablets in healthy premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyuan; Bua, Peter; Capodice, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium is an essential mineral often taken as a daily, long-term nutritional supplement. Data suggests that once-daily dosing is important with regard to long-term compliance of both drugs and nutritional supplements. Objective This study was undertaken to compare the bioavailability of a single serving of two calcium supplements in healthy, premenopausal women. Design A two-period, crossover bioavailability study of a single serving of calcium citrate tablets (two tablets=500 mg calcium) versus a single serving of calcium carbonate powder (one packet of powder=1,000 mg calcium) was performed in healthy women aged between 25 and 45. All subjects were on a calcium-restricted diet 7 days prior to testing and fasted for 12 h before being evaluated at 0, 1, 2, and 4 h after oral administration of the test agents. Blood measurements for total and ionized calcium and parathyroid hormone were performed and adverse events were monitored. Results Twenty-three women were evaluable with a mean age of 33.2±8.71. Results showed that administration of a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder resulted in greater absorption in total and ionized calcium versus a single serving of calcium citrate tablets at 4 h (4.25±0.21 vs. 4.16±0.16, p=0.001). There were minimal side effects and no reported serious adverse events. Conclusions This study shows that a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder is more bioavailable than a single serving of calcium citrate tablets. This may be beneficial for long-term compliance. PMID:24772062

  14. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate in Biomineralization: Stable and Precursor Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, S.

    2003-12-01

    The biological formation of the crystalline polymorphs of calcium carbonate, aragonite and calcite, is widespread. The less stable polymorphs, vaterite and monohydrocalcite are also formed by some organisms. Surprisingly, the highly unstable phase, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), is formed by a variety of organisms from different phyla. Most of these are stable at least within the lifetime of the organism. The stable forms all have a stoichiometry of CaCO3.H2O. Despite the fact that they do not diffract X-rays. Studies of their short range order by EXAFS, reveal species specific variations in the number and distances of atoms that surround the calcium ion. Proteins extracted from stable biogenic ACC are able to stabilize the phase in vitro. ACC has also been identified as a transient precursor phase during the formation of the calcitic larval spicule of the sea urchin and the formation of the larval shell of a bivalve. The transient form has little or no water associated with the CaCO3. Preliminary EXAFS data suggest that the short range order of the sea urchin spicule transient ACC resembles calcite. Proteins extracted from these spicules are able to stabilize ACC provided Mg is present in the solution. As the mollusks and the echinoderms are on two different branches of the animal phylogenetic tree, it is conceivable that the strategy of using ACC as a precursor phase at least for larval mineralization may be widespread. It has yet to be shown that it is used by adults of either phylum. The manner in which organisms precipitate, stabilize and destabilize if necessary, this highly metastable phase of calcium carbonate presents many fascinating and enigmatic questions, whose solutions could well contribute to a better understanding of basic processes in biomineralization. For more details and references, see Addadi, L., Raz, S. and Weiner, S. (2003). Taking advantage of disorder: Amorphous calcium carbonate and its roles in biomineralization. Adv. Mat.15, 959-970.

  15. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, Nachum; Shaltiel, Galit; Daniely, Michal; Meiron, Oren E; Shechter, Assaf; Abrams, Steven A; Niv, Eva; Shapira, Yami; Sagi, Amir

    2014-10-01

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (CCC) using the dual stable isotope technique. The study was conducted in the Unit of Clinical Nutrition, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Israel. The study population included 15 early postmenopausal women aged 54.9 ± 2.8 (mean ± SD) years with no history of major medical illness or metabolic bone disorder, excess calcium intake, or vitamin D deficiency. Standardized breakfast was followed by randomly provided CCC or ACC capsules containing 192 mg elemental calcium labeled with 44Ca at intervals of at least 3 weeks. After swallowing the capsules, intravenous CaCl2 labeled with 42Ca on was administered on each occasion. Fractional calcium absorption (FCA) of ACC and CCC was calculated from the 24-hour urine collection following calcium administration. The results indicated that FCA of ACC was doubled (± 0.96 SD) on average compared to that of CCC (p < 0.02). The higher absorption of the synthetic stable ACC may serve as a more efficacious way of calcium supplementation. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  16. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (Ω) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has Ω values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high Ω, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean Ω at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water Ω. Calcium concentration and Ω regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower Ω than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and Ω at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (Ω) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (Δ mM/Δ min) = -0.0026 Ω + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, Ω at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  17. Calcium Carbonate Nucleation in an Alkaline Lake Surface Water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (??) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has ?? values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high ??, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean ?? at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water ??. Calcium concentration and ?? regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower ?? than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and ?? at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (??) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (?? mM/?? min) = -0.0026 ?? + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, ?? at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors. ?? 2011 U.S. Government.

  18. Calcium isotope evidence for suppression of carbonate dissolution in carbonate-bearing organic-rich sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchyn, Alexandra V.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-11-01

    sites (the actual rates could be significantly slower) because other processes that impact the calcium isotope composition of sedimentary pore fluid have not been included. The results provide direct geochemical evidence for the anecdotal observation that the best-preserved carbonate fossils are often found in clay or organic-rich sedimentary horizons. The results also suggest that the presence of clay minerals has a strong passivating effect on the surfaces of biogenic carbonate minerals, slowing dissolution dramatically even in relation to the already-slow rates typical of carbonate-rich sediments.

  19. Amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate distribution in the tergite cuticle of moulting Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea).

    PubMed

    Neues, Frank; Hild, Sabine; Epple, Matthias; Marti, Othmar; Ziegler, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    The main mineral components of the isopod cuticle consists of crystalline magnesium calcite and amorphous calcium carbonate. During moulting isopods moult first the posterior and then the anterior half of the body. In terrestrial species calcium carbonate is subject to resorption, storage and recycling in order to retain significant fractions of the mineral during the moulting cycle. We used synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analysis and Raman spectroscopy to quantify the ACC/calcite ratio, the mineral phase distribution and the composition within the anterior and posterior tergite cuticle during eight different stages of the moulting cycle of Porcellio scaber. The results show that most of the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is resorbed from the cuticle, whereas calcite remains in the old cuticle and is shed during moulting. During premoult resorption of ACC from the posterior cuticle is accompanied by an increase within the anterior tergites, and mineralization of the new posterior cuticle by resorption of mineral from the anterior cuticle. This suggests that one reason for using ACC in cuticle mineralization is to facilitate resorption and recycling of cuticular calcium carbonate. Furthermore we show that ACC precedes the formation of calcite in distal layers of the tergite cuticle. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multi-Functions of Carbonated Calcium Deficient Hydroxyapatite (CDHA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huan

    Natural bone is a complex composite mainly constituted of inorganic minerals and organic collagen molecules. Calcium phosphate (CaP) based materials have been proposed as the predominant bone substitute for bone tissue engineering applications due to their chemical similarity to bone mineral. Amorphous carbonated calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) is an important compound among CaP materials because of the amorphous crystallite structure. The presence of extra ions in its lattice structure not only influences cell attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts, but also helps in bone metabolism. Biomimetic coating approach is the most widely used approach to produce CDHA coatings to implant. It is a process using simulated body fluid (SBF) to deposit bone-like CDHA coating to various material surfaces. The CDHA formation mechanism, SBF compositions and reacting conditions of biomimetic coating have already been sufficiently studied and compared in the past 20 years. It is an attempt in this thesis to explore new applications of SBF in biomedical research, focusing on different biomaterial applications: 1) based on the low temperature reaction condition of SBF, bisphosphonate incorporated CDHA coatings were deposited onto Ti6Al4V surface for the treatment of osteoporosis; 2) amorphous calcium phosphate nanospheres with extra elements in the lattice structure were prepared by a novel microwave assisted approach, providing a new potential of CaP materials production; 3) CDHA particles formed in SBF can be used as great fillers with biopolymers for preparing biocomposites for biomedical applications; 4) based on the high activity of CDHA amorphous structure and the stabilization ability of ethanol, yttrium and europium doped calcium phosphates were prepared using CDHA as a sacrificing template. In the end, future work based on these observations in the thesis is addressed, including areas of drug delivery, biocomposite fabrication and preparation of functionalized

  1. Mineral carbonation of gaseous carbon dioxide using a clay-hosted cation exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Il-Mo; Roh, Ki-Min

    2013-01-01

    The mineral carbonation method is still a challenge in practical application owing to: (1) slow reaction kinetics, (2) high reaction temperature, and (3) continuous mineral consumption. These constraints stem from the mode of supplying alkaline earth metals through mineral acidification and dissolution. Here, we attempt to mineralize gaseous carbon dioxide into calcium carbonate, using a cation exchange reaction of vermiculite (a species of expandable clay minerals). The mineralization is operated by draining NaCI solution through vermiculite powders and continuously dropping into the pool of NaOH solution with CO2 gas injected. The mineralization temperature is regulated here at 293 and 333 K for 15 min. As a result of characterization, using an X-ray powder diffractometer and a scanning electron microscopy, two types of pure CaCO3 polymorphs (vaterite and calcite) are identified as main reaction products. Their abundance and morphology are heavily dependent on the mineralization temperature. Noticeably, spindle-shaped vaterite, which is quite different from a typical vaterite morphology (polycrystalline spherulite), forms predominantly at 333 K (approximately 98 wt%).

  2. Synthesis of calcium vanadate minerals and related compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin, Richard F.

    1956-01-01

    Synthesis of natural vanadates shows that most of them are stable in an acid environment. Phase studies of a portion of the system CaO-V2O5-H2O indicate that calcium vanadates are an indicator of environmental pH conditions. Some minerals, such as pascoute, indicate rapid evaporation of vanadite solutions; other minerals, such as hewettite, show that slow evaporation took place. Cursory examination of systems K2O-UO2-(NO3)2-V2O5 and CaO-UO2(NO3)2-V2O5, both in aqueous solution, has yielded information on the relationships among carnotite, tyuyamunite, and rauvite.

  3. Shock vaporization of carbonate and sulfate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, A. H.; Ahrens, T. J.; O'Keefe, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    Strong shock waves induced by impacts can cause vaporization of rocks and minerals. The products of such process play important roles in planetary differentiation (Yakovlev et al., Geochem. International, 38, 1027, 2000) and in effecting the planetary climate. Many experiments and computer simulations have been performed to simulate the Chicxulub impact at Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary (see, for example, Pierazzo et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 28607, 1998 and Pope et al., J. Geophys. Res., 102, 21645, 1997). However, the pressure range for incipient and complete vaporization of carbonates and sulfates are not well constrained, especially, for minerals with various initial porosities. Furthermore, evidence for chemical species in the products of vaporized carbonate and sulfate minerals is almost non-existing. In this study, we employed published Hugoniot data for carbonate and sulfate minerals. By using the methods described in Ahrens (J. Appl. Phys., 43, 2443, 1972) and Ahrens and O'Keefe (The Moon, 4, 214, 1972), we calculated the entropy associated with the thermodynamic states produced by hypervelocity impacts at various velocities for carbonate and sulfate minerals with different initial porosities. The results were compared with the entropy of incipient vaporization and complete vaporization of these minerals to determine the degree of vaporization due to impacts. Moreover, these results are utilized to guide our experimental study in speciation reactions in shock-induced vaporization of carbonates and sulfates.

  4. The Skeletal Organic Matrix from Mediterranean Coral Balanophyllia europaea Influences Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Goffredo, Stefano; Vergni, Patrizia; Reggi, Michela; Caroselli, Erik; Sparla, Francesca; Levy, Oren; Dubinsky, Zvy; Falini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Scleractinian coral skeletons are made mainly of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite. The mineral deposition occurs in a biological confined environment, but it is still a theme of discussion to what extent the calcification occurs under biological or environmental control. Hence, the shape, size and organization of skeletal crystals from the cellular level through the colony architecture, were attributed to factors as diverse as mineral supersaturation levels and organic mediation of crystal growth. The skeleton contains an intra-skeletal organic matrix (OM) of which only the water soluble component was chemically and physically characterized. In this work that OM from the skeleton of the Balanophyllia europaea, a solitary scleractinian coral endemic to the Mediterranean Sea, is studied in vitro with the aim of understanding its role in the mineralization of calcium carbonate. Mineralization of calcium carbonate was conducted by overgrowth experiments on coral skeleton and in calcium chloride solutions containing different ratios of water soluble and/or insoluble OM and of magnesium ions. The precipitates were characterized by diffractometric, spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The results showed that both soluble and insoluble OM components influence calcium carbonate precipitation and that the effect is enhanced by their co-presence. The role of magnesium ions is also affected by the presence of the OM components. Thus, in vitro, OM influences calcium carbonate crystal morphology, aggregation and polymorphism as a function of its composition and of the content of magnesium ions in the precipitation media. This research, although does not resolve the controversy between environmental or biological control on the deposition of calcium carbonate in corals, sheds a light on the role of OM, which appears mediated by the presence of magnesium ions. PMID:21799830

  5. Defining reactive sites on hydrated mineral surfaces: Rhombohedral carbonate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Jiménez, Adrián; Mucci, Alfonso; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Schott, Jacques

    2009-08-01

    Despite the success of surface complexation models (SCMs) to interpret the adsorptive properties of mineral surfaces, their construct is sometimes incompatible with fundamental chemical and/or physical constraints, and thus, casts doubts on the physical-chemical significance of the derived model parameters. In this paper, we address the definition of primary surface sites (i.e., adsorption units) at hydrated carbonate mineral surfaces and discuss its implications to the formulation and calibration of surface equilibria for these minerals. Given the abundance of experimental and theoretical information on the structural properties of the hydrated (10.4) cleavage calcite surface, this mineral was chosen for a detailed theoretical analysis of critical issues relevant to the definition of primary surface sites. Accordingly, a single, generic charge-neutral surface site ( tbnd CaCO 3·H 2O 0) is defined for this mineral whereupon mass-action expressions describing adsorption equilibria were formulated. The one-site scheme, analogous to previously postulated descriptions of metal oxide surfaces, allows for a simple, yet realistic, molecular representation of surface reactions and provides a generalized reference state suitable for the calculation of sorption equilibria for rhombohedral carbonate minerals via Law of Mass Action (LMA) and Gibbs Energy Minimization (GEM) approaches. The one-site scheme is extended to other rhombohedral carbonate minerals and tested against published experimental data for magnesite and dolomite in aqueous solutions. A simplified SCM based on this scheme can successfully reproduce surface charge, reasonably simulate the electrokinetic behavior of these minerals, and predict surface speciation agreeing with available spectroscopic data. According to this model, a truly amphoteric behavior is displayed by these surfaces across the pH scale but at circum-neutral pH (5.8-8.2) and relatively high ΣCO 2 (⩾1 mM), proton/bicarbonate co

  6. Molecular dynamics study of the solvation of calcium carbonate in water.

    PubMed

    Bruneval, Fabien; Donadio, Davide; Parrinello, Michele

    2007-10-25

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of diluted solutions of calcium carbonate in water. To this end, we combined and tested previous polarizable models. The carbonate anion forms long-living hydrogen bonds with water and shows an amphiphilic character, in which the water molecules are expelled in a region close to its C(3) symmetry axis. The calcium cation forms a strongly bound ion pair with the carbonate. The first hydration shell around the CaCO(3) pair is found to be very similar to the location of the water molecules surrounding CaCO(3) in ikaite, the hydrated mineral.

  7. [Organic carbon and carbon mineralization characteristics in nature forestry soil].

    PubMed

    Yang, Tian; Dai, Wei; An, Xiao-Juan; Pang, Huan; Zou, Jian-Mei; Zhang, Rui

    2014-03-01

    Through field investigation and indoor analysis, the organic carbon content and organic carbon mineralization characteristics of six kinds of natural forest soil were studied, including the pine forests, evergreen broad-leaved forest, deciduous broad-leaved forest, mixed needle leaf and Korean pine and Chinese pine forest. The results showed that the organic carbon content in the forest soil showed trends of gradual decrease with the increase of soil depth; Double exponential equation fitted well with the organic carbon mineralization process in natural forest soil, accurately reflecting the mineralization reaction characteristics of the natural forest soil. Natural forest soil in each layer had the same mineralization reaction trend, but different intensity. Among them, the reaction intensity in the 0-10 cm soil of the Korean pine forest was the highest, and the intensities of mineralization reaction in its lower layers were also significantly higher than those in the same layers of other natural forest soil; comparison of soil mineralization characteristics of the deciduous broad-leaved forest and coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest found that the differences of litter species had a relatively strong impact on the active organic carbon content in soil, leading to different characteristics of mineralization reaction.

  8. Epitaxial Relationships between Calcium Carbonate and Inorganic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Taewook; Jho, Jae Young; Kim, Il Won

    2014-01-01

    The polymorph-selective crystallization of calcium carbonate has been studied in terms of epitaxial relationship between the inorganic substrates and the aragonite/calcite polymorphs with implication in bioinspired mineralization. EpiCalc software was employed to assess the previously published experimental results on two different groups of inorganic substrates: aragonitic carbonate crystals (SrCO3, PbCO3, and BaCO3) and a hexagonal crystal family (α-Al2O3, α-SiO2, and LiNbO3). The maximum size of the overlayer (aragonite or calcite) was calculated for each substrate based on a threshold value of the dimensionless potential to estimate the relative nucleation preference of the polymorphs of calcium carbonate. The results were in good agreement with previous experimental observations, although stereochemical effects between the overlayer and substrate should be separately considered when existed. In assessing the polymorph-selective nucleation, the current method appeared to provide a better tool than the oversimplified mismatch parameters without invoking time-consuming molecular simulation\\. PMID:25226539

  9. Magnesium supplementation through seaweed calcium extract rather than synthetic magnesium oxide improves femur bone mineral density and strength in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Bae, Yun Jung; Bu, So Young; Kim, Jae Young; Yeon, Jee-Young; Sohn, Eun-Wha; Jang, Ki-Hyo; Lee, Jae-Cheol; Kim, Mi-Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Commercially available seaweed calcium extract can supply high amounts of calcium as well as significant amounts of magnesium and other microminerals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree to which the high levels of magnesium in seaweed calcium extract affects the calcium balance and the bone status in ovariectomized rats in comparison to rats supplemented with calcium carbonate and magnesium oxide. A total of 40 Sprague-Dawley female rats (7 weeks) were divided into four groups and bred for 12 weeks: sham-operated group (Sham), ovariectomized group (OVX), ovariectomized with inorganic calcium and magnesium supplementation group (OVX-Mg), and ovariectomized with seaweed calcium and magnesium supplementation group (OVX-SCa). All experimental diets contained 0.5% calcium. The magnesium content in the experimental diet was 0.05% of the diet in the Sham and OVX groups and 0.1% of the diet in the OVX-Mg and OVX-SCa groups. In the calcium balance study, the OVX-Mg and OVX-SCa groups were not significantly different in calcium absorption compared to the OVX group. However, the femoral bone mineral density and strength of the OVX-SCa group were higher than those of the OVX-Mg and OVX groups. Seaweed calcium with magnesium supplementation or magnesium supplementation alone did not affect the serum ALP and CTx levels in ovariectomized rats. In summary, consumption of seaweed calcium extract or inorganic calcium carbonate with magnesium oxide demonstrated the same degree of intestinal calcium absorption, but only the consumption of seaweed calcium extract resulted in increased femoral bone mineral density and strength in ovariectomized rats. Our results suggest that seaweed calcium extract is an effective calcium and magnesium source for improving bone health compared to synthetic calcium and magnesium supplementation.

  10. Calcium content of different compositions of gallstones and pathogenesis of calcium carbonate gallstones.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji-Kuen; Pan, Huichin; Huang, Shing-Moo; Huang, Nan-Lan; Yao, Chung-Chin; Hsiao, Kuang-Ming; Wu, Chew-Wun

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the calcium content of different gallstone compositions and the pathogenic mechanisms of calcium carbonate gallstones. Between August 2001 and July 2007, gallstones from 481 patients, including 68 calcium carbonate gallstones, were analyzed for total calcium content. Gallbladder bile samples from 33 cases and six controls were analyzed for pH, carbonate anion level, free-ionized calcium concentration and saturation index for calcium carbonate. Total calcium content averaged 75.6 %, 11.8 %, and 4.2 % for calcium carbonate, calcium bilirubinate and cholesterol gallstones. In 29.4 % of patients, chronic and/or intermittent cystic duct obstructions were caused by polypoid lesions in the neck region and 70.6 % were caused by stones. A total of 82 % of patients had chronic low-grade inflammation of the gallbladder wall and 18.0 % had acute inflammatory exacerbations. In the bile, we found the mean pH, mean carbonate anion, free-ionized calcium concentrations, and mean saturation index for calcium carbonate to be elevated in comparison to controls. From our study, we found chronic and/or intermittent cystic duct obstructions and low-grade GB wall inflammation lead to GB epithelium hydrogen secretion dysfunction. Increased calcium ion efflux into the GB lumen combined with increased carbonate anion presence increases SI_CaCO(3) from 1 to 22.4. Thus, in an alkaline milieu with pH 7.8, calcium carbonate begins to aggregate and precipitate. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Clonorcis sinensis eggs are associated with calcium carbonate gallbladder stones.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Tie; Ma, Rui-hong; Luo, Zhen-liang; Yang, Liu-qing; Luo, Xiao-bing; Zheng, Pei-ming

    2014-10-01

    Calcium carbonate gallbladder stones were easily neglected because they were previously reported as a rare stone type in adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between calcium carbonate stones and Clonorchis sinensis infection. A total of 598 gallbladder stones were studied. The stone types were identified by FTIR spectroscopy. The C. sinensis eggs and DNA were detected by microscopic examination and real-time fluorescent PCR respectively. And then, some egg-positive stones were randomly selected for further SEM examination. Corresponding clinical characteristics of patients with different types of stones were also statistically analyzed. The detection rate of C. sinensis eggs in calcium carbonate stone, pigment stone, mixed stone and cholesterol stone types, as well as other stone types was 60%, 44%, 36%, 6% and 30%, respectively, which was highest in calcium carbonate stone yet lowest in cholesterol stone. A total of 182 stones were egg-positive, 67 (37%) of which were calcium carbonate stones. The C. sinensis eggs were found adherent to calcium carbonate crystals by both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Patients with calcium carbonate stones were mainly male between the ages of 30 and 60, the CO2 combining power of patients with calcium carbonate stones were higher than those with cholesterol stones. Calcium carbonate gallbladder stones are not rare, the formation of which may be associated with C. sinensis infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Estimation of palaeohydrochemical conditions using carbonate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amamiya, H.; Mizuno, T.; Iwatsuki, T.; Yuguchi, T.; Murakami, H.; Saito-Kokubu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The long-term evolution of geochemical environment in deep underground is indispensable research subject for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, because the evolution of geochemical environment would impact migration behavior of radionuclides in deep underground. Many researchers have made efforts previously to elucidate the geochemical environment within the groundwater residence time based on the analysis of the actual groundwater. However, it is impossible to estimate the geochemical environment for the longer time scale than the groundwater residence time in this method. In this case, analysis of the chemical properties of secondary minerals are one of useful method to estimate the paleohydrochemical conditions (temperature, salinity, pH and redox potential). In particular, carbonate minerals would be available to infer the long-term evolution of hydrochemical for the following reasons; -it easily reaches chemical equilibrium with groundwater and precipitates in open space of water flowing path -it reflects the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwater at the time of crystallization We reviewed the previous studies on carbonate minerals and geochemical conditions in deep underground and estimated the hydrochemical characteristics of past groundwater by using carbonate minerals. As a result, it was found that temperature and salinity of the groundwater during crystallization of carbonate minerals were evaluated quantitatively. On the other hand, pH and redox potential can only be understood qualitatively. However, it is suggested that the content of heavy metal elements such as manganese, iron and uranium, and rare earth elements in the carbonate minerals are useful indicators for estimating redox potential. This study was carried out under a contract with METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) as part of its R&D supporting program for developing geological disposal technology.

  13. Calcium and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Calcium Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayr, Andrea; Eisenhauer, Anton; Böhm, Florian; Kisakürek, Basak; Balzer, Isabelle; Immenhauser, Adrian; Jürgen Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Different isotopic systems are influenced in multiple ways corresponding to the crystal structure, dehydration, deprotonation, adsorption, desorption, isotope exchange and diffusion processes. In this study we investigated the structural and kinetic effects on fractionation of stable Ca- and O-isotopes during CaCO3 precipitation. Calcite, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated using the CO2 diffusion technique[1]at a constant pH of 8.3, but various temperatures (6, 10, 25 and 40° C) and precipitation rates R (101.5 to 105 μmol h-1 m-2). The calcium isotopic fractionation between solution and vaterite is lower (Δ44/40Ca= -0.10 to -0.55 ‰) compared to calcite (-0.69 to -2.04 ‰) and aragonite (-0.91 to -1.55 ‰). In contrast the fractionation of oxygen isotopes is highest for vaterite (32.1 ‰), followed by aragonite (29.2 ‰) and calcite (27.6 ‰) at 25° C and equilibrium. The enrichment of 18O vs. 16O in all polymorphs decreases with increasing precipitation rate by around -0.7 ‰ per log(R). The calcium isotopic fractionation between calcite/ vaterite and aqueous Ca2+ increases with increasing precipitation rate by ˜0.45 ‰ per log(R) and ˜0.1 ‰ per log(R) at 25° C and 40° C, respectively. In contrast the fractionation of Ca-isotopes between aragonite and aqueous Ca2+ decreases with increasing precipitation rates. The large enrichment of 18O vs. 16O isotopes in carbonates is related to the strong bond of oxygen to the small and highly charged C4+-ion. In contrast equilibrium isotopic fractionation between solution and calcite or vaterite is nearly zero as the Ca-O bond length is similar for calcite, vaterite and the hydrated Ca. Aragonite incorporates preferentially the lighter 40Ca isotope as it has very large Ca-O bonds in comparison to the hydrated Ca. At the crystal surface the lighter 40Ca isotopes are preferentially incorporated as dehydration and diffusion of lighter isotopes are faster. Consequently, the surface becomes enriched in 40

  14. Conversion of calcium sulphide to calcium carbonate during the process of recovery of elemental sulphur from gypsum waste.

    PubMed

    de Beer, M; Maree, J P; Liebenberg, L; Doucet, F J

    2014-11-01

    The production of elemental sulphur and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) from gypsum waste can be achieved by thermally reducing the waste into calcium sulphide (CaS), which is then subjected to a direct aqueous carbonation step for the generation of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and CaCO3. H2S can subsequently be converted to elemental sulphur via the commercially available chemical catalytic Claus process. This study investigated the carbonation of CaS by examining both the solution chemistry of the process and the properties of the formed carbonated product. CaS was successfully converted into CaCO3; however, the reaction yielded low-grade carbonate products (i.e. <90 mass% as CaCO3) which comprised a mixture of two CaCO3 polymorphs (calcite and vaterite), as well as trace minerals originating from the starting material. These products could replace the Sappi Enstra CaCO3 (69 mass% CaCO3), a by-product from the paper industry which is used in many full-scale AMD neutralisation plants but is becoming insufficient. The insight gained is now also being used to develop and optimize an indirect aqueous CaS carbonation process for the production of high-grade CaCO3 (i.e. >99 mass% as CaCO3) or precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerically Simulating Carbonate Mineralization of Basalt with Injection of Carbon Dioxide into Deep Saline Formations

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2006-07-08

    The principal mechanisms for the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep saline formations include geological structural trapping, hydrological entrapment of nonwetting fluids, aqueous phase dissolution and ionization, and geochemical sorption and mineralization. In sedimentary saline formations the dominant mechanisms are structural and dissolution trapping, with moderate to weak contributions from hydrological and geochemical trapping; where, hydrological trapping occurs during the imbibition of aqueous solution into pore spaces occupied by gaseous carbon dioxide, and geochemical trapping is controlled by generally slow reaction kinetics. In addition to being globally abundant and vast, deep basaltic lava formations offer mineralization kinetics that makemore » geochemical trapping a dominate mechanism for trapping carbon dioxide in these formations. For several decades the United States Department of Energy has been investigating Columbia River basalt in the Pacific Northwest as part of its environmental programs and options for natural gas storage. Recently this nonpotable and extensively characterized basalt formation is being reconsidered as a potential reservoir for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The reservoir has an estimated storage capacity of 100 giga tonnes of carbon dioxide and comprises layered basalt flows with sublayering that generally alternates between low permeability massive and high permeability breccia. Chemical analysis of the formation shows 10 wt% Fe, primarily in the +2 valence. The mineralization reaction that makes basalt formations attractive for carbon dioxide sequestration is that of calcium, magnesium, and iron silicates reacting with dissolved carbon dioxide, producing carbonate minerals and amorphous quartz. Preliminary estimates of the kinetics of the silicate-to-carbonate reactions have been determined experimentally and this research is continuing to determine effects of temperature, pressure, rock

  16. Sorption of Groundwater Dissolved Organic Carbon onto Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutlidge, H.; Oudone, P.; McDonough, L.; Meredith, K.; Andersen, M. S.; O'Carrol, D. M.; Baker, A.

    2017-12-01

    Our understanding of groundwater organic matter (OM) as a carbon source or sink in the environmental carbon cycle is limited. The dynamics of groundwater OM is mainly governed by biological processing and its sorption to minerals. In saturated groundwaters, dissolved OM (DOM) represents one part of the groundwater organic carbon pool. Without consideration of the DOM sorption, it is not possible to quantify governing groundwater OM processes. This research explores the rate and extent of DOM sorption on different minerals. Groundwater DOM samples, and International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) standard solutions, were analysed. Each was mixed with a range of masses of iron coated quartz, clean quartz, and calcium carbonate, and shaken for 2 hours to reach equilibrium before being filtered through 0.2 μm for total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and composition analysis by size-exclusion chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). Sorption isotherms were constructed and groundwater DOM sorption were compared to the sorption of IHSS standards. Initial results suggest that for the IHSS standards, the operationally-defined humic substances fraction had the strongest sorption compared to the other LC-OCD fractions and total DOC. Some samples exhibited a small increase in the low molecular weight neutral (LMW-N) aqueous concentration with increasing humic substances sorption. This gradual increase observed could be the result of humic substances desorbing or their breakdown during the experiment. Further results comparing these IHSS standards with groundwater samples will be presented. In conjunction with complementary studies, these results can help provide more accurate prediction of whether groundwater OM is a carbon source or sink, which will enable the management of the groundwater resources as part of the carbon economy.

  17. Mineral Carbonation Employing Ultramafic Mine Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southam, G.; McCutcheon, J.; Power, I. M.; Harrison, A. L.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate minerals are an important, stable carbon sink being investigated as a strategy to sequester CO2 produced by human activity. A natural playa (Atlin, BC, CAN) that has demonstrated the ability to microbially-accelerate hydromagnesite formation was used as an experimental model. Growth of microbial mats from Atlin, in a 10 m long flow-through bioreactor catalysed hydromagnesite precipitation under 'natural' conditions. To enhance mineral carbonation, chrysotile from the Clinton Creek Asbestos Mine (YT, CAN) was used as a target substrate for sulphuric acid leaching, releasing as much as 94% of the magnesium into solution via chemical weathering. This magnesium-rich 'feedstock' was used to examine the ability of the microbialites to enhance carbonate mineral precipitation using only atmospheric CO2 as the carbon source. The phototrophic consortium catalysed the precipitation of platy hydromagnesite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O] accompanied by magnesite [MgCO3], aragonite [CaCO3], and minor dypingite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·5H2O]. Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy indicated that cell exteriors and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) served as nucleation sites for carbonate precipitation. In many cases, entire cyanobacteria filaments were entombed in magnesium carbonate coatings, which appeared to contain a framework of EPS. Cell coatings were composed of small crystals, which intuitively resulted from rapid crystal nucleation. Excess nutrient addition generated eutrophic conditions in the bioreactor, resulting in the growth of a pellicle that sealed the bioreactor contents from the atmosphere. The resulting anaerobic conditions induced fermentation and subsequent acid generation, which in turn caused a drop in pH to circumneutral values and a reduction in carbonate precipitation. Monitoring of the water chemistry conditions indicated that a high pH (> 9.4), and relatively high concentrations of magnesium (> 3000 ppm), compared with the natural

  18. Precipitation Rate Investigation on synthesis of precipitated calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulistiyono, E.; Handayani, M.; Firdiyono, F.; Fajariani, E. N.

    2018-03-01

    Study on the formation of precipitated calcium carbonate from natural limestone Sukabumi with the influenced of various parameters such as precipitation rate, concentration of CaCl2 and amplitudes were investigated. We also investigated the result with the precipitated calcium carbonate from Merck (p.a) for comparison. The higher concentration of CaCl2 would give effect to the lower of the precipitation rate. It was observed that precipitation rate of calcium carbonate from limestone Sukabumi at concentration of 0.08 molar was 3.66 cm/minutes and showing the optimum condition, while the precipitation rate of calcium carbonate Merck at the concentration 0.08 molar was 3.53 cm/minutes. The characterization of precipitated calcium carbonate was done using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The characterization using XRF showed that CaO content of precipitated calcium carbonate from natural limestone Sukabumi had high purity of 99.16%. The particle distribution using scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that precipitated calcium carbonate from natural limestone Sukabumi revealed 1.79 µm – 11.46 µm, meanwhile the particle distribution of precipitated calcium carbonate Merck showed larger particles with the size of 3.22 µm – 10.68 µm.

  19. Spectral features of biogenic calcium carbonates and implications for astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, B. L.; Ronholm, J.; Applin, D. M.; Mann, P.; Izawa, M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Whyte, L. G.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to discriminate biogenic from abiogenic calcium carbonate (CaCO3) would be useful in the search for extant or extinct life, since CaCO3 can be produced by both biotic and abiotic processes on Earth. Bioprecipitated CaCO3 material was produced during the growth of heterotrophic microbial isolates on medium enriched with calcium acetate or calcium citrate. These biologically produced CaCO3, along with natural and synthetic non-biologically produced CaCO3 samples, were analysed by reflectance spectroscopy (0.35-2.5 μm), Raman spectroscopy (532 and 785 nm), and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (365 and 405 nm excitation). Optimal instruments for the discrimination of biogenic from abiogenic CaCO3 were determined to be reflectance spectroscopy, and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Multiple absorption features in the visible light region occurred in reflectance spectra for most biogenic CaCO3 samples, which are likely due to organic pigments. Multiple fluorescence peaks occurred in emission spectra (405 nm excitation) of biogenic CaCO3 samples, which also are best attributed to the presence of organic compounds; however, further analyses must be performed in order to better determine the cause of these features to establish criteria for confirming the origin of a given CaCO3 sample. Raman spectroscopy was not useful for discrimination since any potential Raman peaks in spectra of biogenic carbonates collected by both the 532 and 785 nm lasers were overwhelmed by fluorescence. However, this also suggests that biogenic carbonates may be identified by the presence of this organic-associated fluorescence. No reliable spectroscopic differences in terms of parameters such as positions or widths of carbonate-associated absorption bands were found between the biogenic and abiogenic carbonate samples. These results indicate that the presence or absence of organic matter intimately associated with carbonate minerals is the only potentially useful

  20. Variations in Urine Calcium Isotope: Composition Reflect Changes in Bone Mineral Balance in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skulan, Joseph; Anbar, Ariel; Bullen, Thomas; Puzas, J. Edward; Shackelford, Linda; Smith, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    Changes in bone mineral balance cause rapid and systematic changes in the calcium isotope composition of human urine. Urine from subjects in a 17 week bed rest study was analyzed for calcium isotopic composition. Comparison of isotopic data with measurements of bone mineral density and metabolic markers of bone metabolism indicates the calcium isotope composition of urine reflects changes in bone mineral balance. Urine calcium isotope composition probably is affected by both bone metabolism and renal processes. Calcium isotope. analysis of urine and other tissues may provide information on bone mineral balance that is in important respects better than that available from other techniques, and illustrates the usefulness of applying geochemical techniques to biomedical problems.

  1. A review of mineral carbonation technologies to sequester CO2.

    PubMed

    Sanna, A; Uibu, M; Caramanna, G; Kuusik, R; Maroto-Valer, M M

    2014-12-07

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and sequestration includes a portfolio of technologies that can potentially sequester billions of tonnes of CO2 per year. Mineral carbonation (MC) is emerging as a potential CCS technology solution to sequester CO2 from smaller/medium emitters, where geological sequestration is not a viable option. In MC processes, CO2 is chemically reacted with calcium- and/or magnesium-containing materials to form stable carbonates. This work investigates the current advancement in the proposed MC technologies and the role they can play in decreasing the overall cost of this CO2 sequestration route. In situ mineral carbonation is a very promising option in terms of resources available and enhanced security, but the technology is still in its infancy and transport and storage costs are still higher than geological storage in sedimentary basins ($17 instead of $8 per tCO2). Ex situ mineral carbonation has been demonstrated on pilot and demonstration scales. However, its application is currently limited by its high costs, which range from $50 to $300 per tCO2 sequestered. Energy use, the reaction rate and material handling are the key factors hindering the success of this technology. The value of the products seems central to render MC economically viable in the same way as conventional CCS seems profitable only when combined with EOR. Large scale projects such as the Skyonic process can help in reducing the knowledge gaps on MC fundamentals and provide accurate costing and data on processes integration and comparison. The literature to date indicates that in the coming decades MC can play an important role in decarbonising the power and industrial sector.

  2. Construction of two ureolytic model organisms for the study of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Connolly, James; Kaufman, Megan; Rothman, Adam; Gupta, Rashmi; Redden, George; Schuster, Martin; Colwell, Frederick; Gerlach, Robin

    2013-09-01

    Two bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MJK1 and Escherichia coli MJK2, were constructed that both express green fluorescent protein (GFP) and carry out ureolysis. These two novel model organisms are useful for studying bacterial carbonate mineral precipitation processes and specifically ureolysis-driven microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP). The strains were constructed by adding plasmid-borne urease genes (ureABC, ureD and ureFG) to the strains P. aeruginosa AH298 and E. coli AF504gfp, both of which already carried unstable GFP derivatives. The ureolytic activities of the two new strains were compared to the common, non-GFP expressing, model organism Sporosarcina pasteurii in planktonic culture under standard laboratory growth conditions. It was found that the engineered strains exhibited a lower ureolysis rate per cell but were able to grow faster and to a higher population density under the conditions of this study. Both engineered strains were successfully grown as biofilms in capillary flow cell reactors and ureolysis-induced calcium carbonate mineral precipitation was observed microscopically. The undisturbed spatiotemporal distribution of biomass and calcium carbonate minerals were successfully resolved in 3D using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Observations of this nature were not possible previously because no obligate urease producer that expresses GFP had been available. Future observations using these organisms will allow researchers to further improve engineered application of MICP as well as study natural mineralization processes in model systems. © 2013.

  3. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3–4 chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kathleen M.; Martin, Berdine R.; Wastney, Meryl; McCabe, George P.; Moe, Sharon M.; Weaver, Connie M.; Peacock, Munro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus and reduce phosphorus retention, and to prevent negative calcium balance. Data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance in CKD to support this. The aim of this study was to determine calcium and phosphorus balance and calcium kinetics with and without calcium carbonate in CKD patients. Eight stage 3/4 CKD patients, eGFR 36 mL/min, participated in two 3-week balances in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study of calcium carbonate (1500 mg/d calcium). Calcium and phosphorus balance were determined on a controlled diet. Oral and intravenous 45calcium with blood sampling and urine and fecal collections were used for calcium kinetics. Fasting blood and urine were collected at baseline and end of each week of each balance period for biochemical analyses. Results showed that patients were in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on placebo. Calcium carbonate produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance suggesting tissue deposition. Fasting biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. If they can be extrapolated to effects of chronic therapy, these data caution against the use of calcium carbonate as a phosphate binder. PMID:23254903

  4. Calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in Martian meteorite EETA79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chips of glassy Lithology C of EETA79001 were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the mineralogy and petrogenesis of the glass that was shown by others to contain trapped Mars-like gases. Calcium carbonite was identified as massive to acicular crystals for which Ca, C, and O were the major elements. Calcium sulfate was identified as prismatic-acicular crystals with Ca and S as the major elements.

  5. Interplay between black carbon and minerals contributes to long term carbon stabilization and mineral transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, B.; Weng, Y. T.; Wang, C. C.; Chiang, C. C.; Liu, C. C.; Lehmann, J.

    2017-12-01

    Black carbon receives increasing global wide research attention due to its role in carbon sequestration, soil fertility enhancement and remediation application. Generally considered chemically stable in bulk, the reactive surface of BC can interplays with minerals and form strong chemical bondage, which renders physical protection of BC and contributes to its long term stabilization. Using historical BC-rich Amazonian Dark Earth (ADE), we probe the in-situ organo-mineral association and transformation of BC and minerals over a millennium scale using various synchrotron-based spectroscopic (XANES, FTIR) and microscopic (TXM) methods. Higher content of SRO minerals was found in BC-rich ADE compare to adjacent tropical soils. The iron signature found in BC-rich ADE was mainly ferrihydrite/lepidocrocite, a more reactive form of Fe compared to goethite, which was dominant in adjacent soil. Abundant nano minerals particles were observed in-situ associated with BC surface, in clusters and layers. The organo-mineral interaction lowers BC bioavailability and enhances its long-term stabilization in environment, while at the same time, transforms associated minerals into more reactive forms under rapid redox/weathering environment. The results suggest that mineral physical protection for BC sequestration may be more important than previous understanding. The scale up application of BC/biochar into agricultural systems and natural environments have long lasting impact on the in-situ transformation of associated minerals.

  6. Nanoscale analysis of the morphology and surface stability of calcium carbonate polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    Sekkal, W.; Zaoui, A.

    2013-01-01

    Under earth surface conditions, in ocean and natural water, calcium carbonate is ubiquitous, forming anhydrous and hydrous minerals. These hydrous phases are of considerable interest for their role as precursors to stable carbonate minerals. Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed here to perform a comprehensive and quantitative study of the structural and energetic stability of dry and hydrous surfaces of calcium carbonate polymorphs using two recently developed forcefields. Results show that the dry forms are prone to ductility; while hydrous phases are found to be brittle. The (001) surface of monohydrocalcite appears to be the most stable (0.99 J/m2) whereas for the ikaite phase, the (001) surface is the most stable. The corresponding value is 0.2 J/m2, i.e. even lower than the surface energy of the Beautiful computed morphology pictures are obtained with Xiao's model and are very similar to the observed SEM images. PMID:23545842

  7. Nanoscale analysis of the morphology and surface stability of calcium carbonate polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Sekkal, W; Zaoui, A

    2013-01-01

    Under earth surface conditions, in ocean and natural water, calcium carbonate is ubiquitous, forming anhydrous and hydrous minerals. These hydrous phases are of considerable interest for their role as precursors to stable carbonate minerals. Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed here to perform a comprehensive and quantitative study of the structural and energetic stability of dry and hydrous surfaces of calcium carbonate polymorphs using two recently developed forcefields. Results show that the dry forms are prone to ductility; while hydrous phases are found to be brittle. The (001) surface of monohydrocalcite appears to be the most stable (0.99 J/m(2)) whereas for the ikaite phase, the (001) surface is the most stable. The corresponding value is 0.2 J/m(2), i.e. even lower than the surface energy of the Beautiful computed morphology pictures are obtained with Xiao's model and are very similar to the observed SEM images.

  8. Nanoscale analysis of the morphology and surface stability of calcium carbonate polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekkal, W.; Zaoui, A.

    2013-04-01

    Under earth surface conditions, in ocean and natural water, calcium carbonate is ubiquitous, forming anhydrous and hydrous minerals. These hydrous phases are of considerable interest for their role as precursors to stable carbonate minerals. Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed here to perform a comprehensive and quantitative study of the structural and energetic stability of dry and hydrous surfaces of calcium carbonate polymorphs using two recently developed forcefields. Results show that the dry forms are prone to ductility; while hydrous phases are found to be brittle. The (001) surface of monohydrocalcite appears to be the most stable (0.99 J/m2) whereas for the ikaite phase, the (001) surface is the most stable. The corresponding value is 0.2 J/m2, i.e. even lower than the surface energy of the Beautiful computed morphology pictures are obtained with Xiao's model and are very similar to the observed SEM images.

  9. Presence and dehydration of ikaite, calcium carbonate hexahydrate, in frozen shrimp shell.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, A; Andersen, A B; Engelsen, S B; Hansen, H C; Larsen, O; Skibsted, L H

    1999-03-01

    Ikaite, calcium carbonate hexahydrate, has by means of X-ray diffraction analyses of frozen samples been identified as the mineral component of the white spots formed in the shell of frozen shrimp during storage. When the shrimp thaw and the shell material is dried and kept at room temperature, ikaite rapidly transforms into a mixture of anhydrous calcium carbonate forms. X-ray diffraction analyses and Raman spectra of synthetic ikaite as well as the dehydration product confirm the assignments, and the rate constant for dehydration is approximately 7 x 10(-)(4) s(-)(1) at ambient temperature. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that dehydration of synthetic ikaite is an entropy-driven, athermal process and confirms that a single first-order reaction is rate-determining. Ikaite is found to be stable in aqueous solution at temperatures below 5 degrees C and in the shell of frozen shrimps but decomposes on thawing to form anhydrous calcium carbonates.

  10. Microorganisms in the deposits of cold carbon mineral waters of the Russian Far East and their habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalitina, E. G.; Kharitonova, N. A.; Kuzmina, T. V.; Chelnokov, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Study of the chemical composition of carbon mineral waters has shown the prevalence of calcium, magnesium and sodium among the cations, sulfate, nitrate and chloride ions among the anions, and ferric iron, strontium and manganese in the microelement composition. Results of the microbiological studies have revealed that carbon mineral waters contain various microorganisms that can transform the physical and chemical composition of mineral waters by interfering with geochemical cycles. The sanitary and microbiological properties of carbon mineral waters have been evaluated thus proving that the waters of Medvezhii (Shmakovskoe deposit) are microbiologically clean.

  11. Risk factors for calcium carbonate urolithiasis in goats.

    PubMed

    Nwaokorie, Eugene E; Osborne, Carl A; Lulich, Jody P; Fletcher, Thomas F; Ulrich, Lisa K; Koehler, Lori A; Buettner, Michelle T

    2015-08-01

    To identify demographic or signalment factors associated with calcium carbonate urolith formation in goats. Retrospective case series and case-control study. 354 goats with calcium carbonate uroliths (case animals) and 16,366 goats without urinary tract disease (control animals). Medical records of the Minnesota Urolith Center were reviewed to identify case goats for which samples were submitted between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 2012. Control goats evaluated at US veterinary teaching hospitals in the same time period were identified by searching Veterinary Medical Database records. Age, breed, sex, reproductive status, geographic location, season, and anatomic location of collected uroliths were analyzed to identify risk or protective factors associated with calcium carbonate urolithiasis. Nigerian dwarf goats had higher odds of developing calcium carbonate uroliths than did Pygmy goats (reference group). Several breeds had lower odds of this finding, compared with Pygmy goats; odds were lowest for mixed, Anglo-Nubian, and Toggenburg breeds. Breeds of African origin (Pygmy, Nigerian Dwarf, and Boer) comprised 146 of 275 (53%) case goats with data available. Goats of African descent had a higher risk of developing calcium carbonate uroliths than did goats of non-African descent (reference group). Males and neutered goats had higher odds of calcium carbonate urolithiasis, compared with females and sexually intact goats, respectively. Age category, geographic location, and season were associated with detection of calcium carbonate uroliths. Goats with calcium carbonate uroliths were typically neutered males, > 1 year of age, and of African descent. This study identified factors associated with calcium carbonate urolithiasis in goats; however, these associations do not allow conclusions regarding cause-and-effect relationships.

  12. Speciation of Mg in biogenic calcium carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, F.; Meibom, A.; Flank, A.-M.; Lagarde, P.; Janousch, M.; Stolarski, J.

    2009-11-01

    A selection of marine biominerals, mostly aragonitic coral skeletons were probed at the Mg K-edge by XANES spectroscopy coupled to μXRF methods and compared to an extensive set of relevant model compounds (silicates, carbonates, oxides and organic). Extensive methodologies are required to better describe the speciation of Mg in those minerals. A combination of ab-initio XANES calculations for defective clusters around Mg in aragonite together with wavelets analyzes of the XANES region are required to robustly interpret the spectra. When using those methodologies, the speciation of Mg ranges from a magnesite-type environment in some scleractinian corals to an organic-type environment. In all environments, the Mg-domains probed appear to be less than 1 nm in size.

  13. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY: TREATMENT IS WITH CALCIUM CARBONATE OR CALCIUM CITRATE?

    PubMed Central

    BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; RODRIGUES, Arieli Luz; MENDES, Silvana Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background : Bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, can cause serious nutritional complications arising from poor absorption of essential nutrients. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is one such complications that leads to increased parathyroid hormone levels due to a decrease in calcium and vitamin D, which may compromise bone health. Aim : To compare calcium carbonate and calcium citrate in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Method : Patients were selected on the basis of their abnormal biochemical test and treatment was randomly done with citrate or calcium carbonate. Results : After 60 days of supplementation, biochemical tests were repeated, showing improvement in both groups. Conclusion : Supplementation with calcium (citrate or carbonate) and vitamin D is recommended after surgery for prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26537273

  14. Ubiquitylation Functions in the Calcium Carbonate Biomineralization in the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Dong; Pan, Cong; Lin, Huijuan; Lin, Ya; Xu, Guangrui; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2012-01-01

    Mollusks shell formation is mediated by matrix proteins and many of these proteins have been identified and characterized. However, the mechanisms of protein control remain unknown. Here, we report the ubiquitylation of matrix proteins in the prismatic layer of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The presence of ubiquitylated proteins in the prismatic layer of the shell was detected with a combination of western blot and immunogold assays. The coupled ubiquitins were separated and identified by Edman degradation and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Antibody injection in vivo resulted in large amounts of calcium carbonate randomly accumulating on the surface of the nacreous layer. These ubiquitylated proteins could bind to specific faces of calcite and aragonite, which are the two main mineral components of the shell. In the in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization assay, they could reduce the rate of calcium carbonate precipitation and induce the calcite formation. Furthermore, when the attached ubiquitins were removed, the functions of the EDTA-soluble matrix of the prismatic layer were changed. Their potency to inhibit precipitation of calcium carbonate was decreased and their influence on the morphology of calcium carbonate crystals was changed. Taken together, ubiquitylation is involved in shell formation. Although the ubiquitylation is supposed to be involved in every aspect of biophysical processes, our work connected the biomineralization-related proteins and the ubiquitylation mechanism in the extracellular matrix for the first time. This would promote our understanding of the shell biomineralization and the ubiquitylation processes. PMID:22558208

  15. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: Double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in post-menopausal women

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (C...

  16. Aluminum hydroxide, calcium carbonate and calcium acetate in chronic intermittent hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Janssen, M J; van der Kuy, A; ter Wee, P M; van Boven, W P

    1996-02-01

    Prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism in uremia necessitates correction of hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemia. In order to avoid aluminum toxicity, calcium containing phosphate binders are used increasingly, instead of aluminium hydroxide. Recent studies have shown that calcium acetate has many characteristics of an ideal phosphate binder. It is, for instance, a more readily soluble salt compared with calcium carbonate. This advantage might, however, disappear if calcium carbonate is taken on an empty stomach, a few minutes before meals. We examined the efficacy of three different phosphate binding agents in a randomized prospective study of 53 patients on regular hemodialysis. Bicarbonate dialyses were performed with a dialysate calcium concentration of 1.75 mmol/l. After a three-week wash-out period, patients received either aluminum hydroxide (control group), calcium acetate, or calcium carbonate as their phosphate binder. Patients were instructed to take the calcium salts a few minutes before meals on an empty stomach, and aluminum hydroxide during meals. Serum calcium, phosphate, intact parathormone, and alkaline phosphatase levels were determined every month. Patient compliance was estimated every month by asking the patients which phosphate binder and what daily dose they had used. Aluminum hydroxide tended to be the most effective phosphate binder. The mean +/- SEM required daily dose of calcium acetate at 12 months was 5.04 +/- 0.60 g, corresponding to 10.1 +/- 1.20 tablets of 500 mg. Co-medication with aluminum hydroxide, however, was needed (1.29 +/- 0.54 g per day, corresponding to 2.6 +/- 1.08 tablets of 500 mg). The required daily calcium carbonate dose appeared to be 2.71 +/- 0.48 g, corresponding to 5.4 +/- 0.95 capsules of 500 mg, with an adjuvant daily aluminum hydroxide dose of 0.69 +/- 0.27 g, corresponding to 1.4 +/- 0.55 tablets of 500 mg (p = 0.0055). Thus, the mean daily doses of elemental calcium were comparable between the calcium

  17. Increasing Soil Calcium Availability Alters Forest Soil Carbon Stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, A.; Goodale, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    Acid deposition in the Northeastern U.S. has been linked to a loss of soil base cations, especially calcium (Ca). While much research has addressed the effects of Ca depletion on soil and stream acidification, few studies have investigated its effects on ecosystem carbon (C) balance. We studied the long-term effects of increased Ca availability on C cycling in a northern hardwood forest in the Adirondack Park, NY. In 1989, calcium carbonate (lime) was added to ~ 100 ha of the Woods Lake Watershed to ameliorate the effects of soil Ca depletion. An additional 100 ha were maintained as controls. We hypothesized that the lime addition would improve forest health and that this improvement would be evident in increased tree biomass, leaf litter, and fine root production. Within the forest floor, we anticipated that the increased pH associated with liming would stimulate microbial activity resulting in increased decomposition and basal soil respiration, and reduced C stocks. Additionally, we hypothesized that increased Ca availability could enhance Ca-OM complexation in the upper mineral soils, leading to increased C stocks in these horizons. Eighteen years after liming, soil pH and exchangeable Ca pools remained elevated in the forest floor and upper mineral soil of the limed plots. Forest floor C stocks were significantly larger in limed plots (68 vs. 31 t C ha-1), and were driven primarily by greater C accumulation in the forest floor Oa horizon. Mineral soil C stocks did not differ between limed and control soils. Liming did not affect tree growth, however a net decline in biomass was observed across the entire watershed. There was a trend for larger fine root and foliar litter inputs in limed plots relative to controls, but the observed forest floor accumulation appears to be driven primarily by a suppression of decomposition. Liming reduced basal soil respiration rates by 17 and 43 % in the Oe and Oa horizons, respectively. This research suggests that Ca may

  18. Calcium carbonate does not affect nilotinib pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tawbi, Hussein A; Tran, An L; Christner, Susan M; Lin, Yan; Johnson, Matthew; Mowrey, Emily; Appleman, Leonard R; Stoller, Ronald; Miller, Brian M; Egorin, Merrill J; Beumer, Jan H

    2013-11-01

    Gastric upset is a common side effect of nilotinib therapy, and calcium carbonate is frequently used concomitantly, either as antacid or as calcium supplementation. With the increasing number of oral agents in cancer therapy, oral drug-drug interactions are becoming more relevant. Nilotinib has already been shown to be absorbed to a much lesser extent when co-administered with proton pump inhibitors. Because exposure to sub-therapeutic concentrations of anticancer drugs such as nilotinib may result in selection of resistant clones and ultimately relapse, we studied the effect of a calcium carbonate supplement (Tums Ultra 1000®) on nilotinib pharmacokinetics. Calcium carbonate may be co-administered with nilotinib without significantly affecting the pharmacokinetics of nilotinib and potentially impacting efficacy. Nilotinib is a second-generation oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor with superior efficacy compared with imatinib mesylate in the treatment for chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia. Calcium carbonate is commonly used as a source of calcium supplementation or as antacid to ameliorate the gastrointestinal side effects associated with nilotinib, which could have unknown effects on nilotinib absorption. The purpose of this study was to provide information on the effect of calcium carbonate on the PK of nilotinib in healthy volunteers. Healthy subjects were enrolled in a two-period, open-label, single-institution, randomized, cross-over, fixed-schedule study. In one period, each subject received 400 mg of nilotinib p.o. In the other period, 4,000 mg of calcium carbonate (4 X Tums Ultra 1000®) was administered p.o. 15 min prior to the nilotinib dose. Plasma samples were collected at specified timepoints, concentrations of nilotinib were quantitated by LC-MS, and data were analyzed non-compartmentally. Eleven subjects were evaluable. Calcium supplementation did not significantly affect nilotinib pharmacokinetic parameters including area under the plasma

  19. Behaviour of calcium carbonate in sea water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloud, P.E.

    1962-01-01

    Anomalies in the behaviour of calcium carbonate in natural solutions diminish when considered in context. Best values found by traditional oceanographie methods for the apparent solubility product constant K'CaCO3 in sea water at atmospheric pressure are consistent mineralogically-at 36 parts per thousand salinity and T-25??C, K'aragonlte is estimated as 1.12 ?? 10-6 and K'calcite as 0.61 ?? 10-6. At 30??C the corresponding values are 0.98 ?? 10-6 for aragonite and 0.53 ?? 10-6 for calcite. Because the K' computations do not compensate for ionic activity, however, they cannot give thermodynamically satisfactory results. It is of interest, therefore, that approximate methods and information now available permit the estimation from the same basic data of an activity product constant KCaCO3 close to that found in solutions to which Debye-Hu??ckel theory applies. Such methods indicate approximate Karagonite 7.8 ?? 10-9 for surface sea water at 29??C; Kcalcite would be proportionately lower. Field data and experimental results indicate that the mineralogy of precipitated CaCO3 depends primarily on degree of supersaturation, thus also on kinetic or biologic factors that facilitate or inhibit a high degree of supersaturation. The shallow, generally hypersaline bank waters west of Andros Island yield aragonitic sediments with O18 O16 ratios that imply precipitation mainly during the warmer months, when the combination of a high rate of evaporation, increasing salinity (and ionic strength), maximal temperatures and photosynthetic removal of CO2 result in high apparent supersaturation. The usual precipitate from solutions of low ionic strength is calcite, except where the aragonite level of supersaturation is reached as a result of diffusion phenomena (e.g. dripstones), gradual and marked evaporation, or biologic intervention. Published data also suggest the possibility of distinct chemical milieus for crystallographic variations in skeletal calcium carbonate. It appears

  20. Atom probe tomography (APT) of carbonate minerals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Laiginhas, Fernando; Reinhard, David A; Prosa, Ty J; Martens, Rich L

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) combines the highest spatial resolution with chemical data at atomic scale for the analysis of materials. For geological specimens, the process of field evaporation and molecular ion formation and interpretation is not yet entirely understood. The objective of this study is to determine the best conditions for the preparation and analysis by APT of carbonate minerals, of great importance in the interpretation of geological processes, focusing on the bulk chemical composition. Results show that the complexity of the mass spectrum is different for calcite and dolomite and relates to dissimilarities in crystalochemical parameters. In addition, APT bulk chemistry of calcite closely matches the expected stoichiometry but fails to provide accurate atomic percentages for elements in dolomite under the experimental conditions evaluated in this work. For both calcite and dolomite, APT underestimates the amount of oxygen based on their chemical formula, whereas it is able to detect small percentages of elemental substitutions in crystal lattices. Overall, our results demonstrate that APT of carbonate minerals is possible, but further optimization of the experimental parameters are required to improve the use of atom probe tomography for the correct interpretation of mineral geochemistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Calcium carbonate does not affect imatinib pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tawbi, Hussein; Christner, Susan M; Lin, Yan; Johnson, Matthew; Mowrey, Emily T; Cherrin, Craig; Chu, Edward; Lee, James J; Puhalla, Shannon; Stoller, Ronald; Appleman, Leonard R; Miller, Brian M; Beumer, Jan H

    2014-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec(®)/Glivec(®)) has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemias and gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and there is evidence for an exposure response relationship. Calcium carbonate is increasingly used as a calcium supplement and in the setting of gastric upset associated with imatinib therapy. Calcium carbonate could conceivably elevate gastric pH and complex imatinib, thereby influencing imatinib absorption and exposure. We aimed to evaluate whether use of calcium carbonate has a significant effect on imatinib pharmacokinetics. Eleven healthy subjects were enrolled in a 2-period, open-label, single-institution, randomized crossover, fixed-schedule study. In one period, each subject received 400 mg of imatinib p.o. In the other period, 4,000 mg calcium carbonate (Tums Ultra(®)) was administered p.o. 15 min before 400 mg of imatinib. Plasma concentrations of imatinib and its active N-desmethyl metabolite CGP74588 were assayed by LC-MS; data were analyzed non-compartmentally and compared after log transformation. Calcium carbonate administration did not significantly affect the imatinib area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC) (41.2 μg/mL h alone vs. 40.8 μg/mL h with calcium carbonate, P = 0.99), maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) (2.35 μg/mL alone vs. 2.39 μg/mL with calcium carbonate, P = 0.89). Our results indicate that the use of calcium carbonate does not significantly affect imatinib pharmacokinetics.

  2. The effect of brushing with nano calcium carbonate and calcium carbonate toothpaste on the surface roughness of nano-ionomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisja, D. H.; Indrani, D. J.; Herda, E.

    2017-08-01

    Nanotechnology developments in dentistry have resulted in the development of nano-ionomer, a new restorative material. The surface roughness of restorative materials can increase bacteria adhesion and lead to poor oral hygiene. Abrasive agents in toothpaste can alter tooth and restorative material surfaces. The aim of this study is to identify the effect of brushing with nano calcium carbonate, and calcium carbonate toothpaste on surface roughness of nano-ionomer. Eighteen nano-ionomer specimens were brushed with Aquabidest (doubledistilled water), nano calcium carbonate and calcium carbonate toothpaste. Brushing lasted 30 minutes, and the roughness value (Ra) was measured after each 10 minute segment using a surface roughness tester. The data was analyzed using repeated ANOVA and one-way ANOVA test. The value of nano-ionomer surface roughness increased significantly (p<0.05) after 20 minutes of brushing with the nano calcium carbonate toothpaste. Brushing with calcium carbonate toothpaste leaves nano-ionomer surfaces more rugged than brushing with nano calcium carbonate toothpaste.

  3. Coexistence of three calcium carbonate polymorphs in the shell of the Antarctic clam Laternula elliptica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrke, Gernot; Poigner, Harald; Wilhelms-Dick, Dorothee; Brey, Thomas; Abele, Doris

    2012-05-01

    We analyzed shell cuts of five individuals of the Antarctic bivalve Laternula elliptica from three locations along the Antarctic Peninsula by means of Confocal Raman Microscopy (CRM) as well as Electron Microprobe (EMP). The shell of L. elliptica has been previously described as being composed of aragonite exclusively. Now, CRM mapping reveals that three polymorphs of calcium carbonate - aragonite, calcite, and vaterite - are present in the chondrophore region of the examined individuals. Annual shell growth layers continue through aragonite and vaterite, suggesting simultaneous mineralization of both polymorphs. Spatially congruent EMP scans showed that the calcium carbonate polymorph affects the distribution of magnesium and strontium within the chondrophore. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of the coexistence of these three calcium carbonate polymorphs within the mineralized structures of a marine calcifying organism. Particularly the presence of vaterite is unexpected, but shows striking similarities to some fish otoliths. The strong effect of the calcium carbonate polymorph on trace element incorporation restrict the suitability of magnesium and strontium based proxies for the chondrophore area of L. elliptica.

  4. Mineralized alginate hydrogels using marine carbonates for bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Rodriguez, P; Garcia-Triñanes, P; Echezarreta López, M M; Santoveña, A; Landin, M

    2018-09-01

    The search for an ideal bone tissue replacement has led to the development of new composite materials designed to simulate the complex inorganic/organic structure of bone. The present work is focused on the development of mineralized calcium alginate hydrogels by the addition of marine derived calcium carbonate biomineral particles. Following a novel approach, we were able to obtain calcium carbonate particles of high purity and complex micro and nanostructure dependent on the source material. Three different types of alginates were selected to develop inorganic/organic scaffolds in order to correlate alginate composition with scaffold properties and cell behavior. The incorporation of calcium carbonates into alginate networks was able to promote extracellular matrix mineralization and osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells when added at 7 mg/ml. We demonstrated that the selection of the alginate type and calcium carbonate origin is crucial to obtain adequate systems for bone tissue engineering as they modulate the mechanical properties and cell differentiation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Physical Training and Calcium Intake on Bone Mineral Density of Students with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of physical training and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with mental retardation. Forty mentally retarded boys (age 7-10 years old) were randomly assigned to four groups (no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake and physical activity): training groups with or…

  6. Effects of copyrolysis of sludge with calcium carbonate and calcium hydrogen phosphate on chemical stability of carbon and release of toxic elements in the resultant biochars.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuebin; Hu, Xin; Ding, Zhuhong; Chen, Yijun

    2017-12-01

    The potential release of toxic elements and the stability of carbon in sludge-based biochars are important on their application in soil remediation and wastewater treatment. In this study, municipal sludge was co-pyrolyzed with calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) and calcium dihydrogen phosphate [Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 ] under 300 and 600 °C, respectively. The basic physicochemical properties of the resultant biochars were characterized and laboratory chemical oxidation and leaching experiments of toxic elements were conducted to evaluate the chemical stability of carbon in biochars and the potential release of toxic elements from biochars. Results show that the exogenous minerals changed the physico-chemical properties of the resultant biochars greatly. Biochars with exogenous minerals, especially Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 , decreased the release of Zn, Cr, Ni, Cu, Pb, and As and the release ratios were less than 1%. Tessier's sequential extraction analysis revealed that labile toxic elements were transferred to residual fraction in the biochars with high pyrolysis temperature (600 °C) and exogenous minerals. Low risks for biochar-bound Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Cr, and Cu were confirmed according to risk assessment code (RAC) while the potential ecological risk index (PERI) revealed that the exogenous Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 significantly decreased the risks from considerable to moderate level. Moreover, the exogenous minerals significantly increased the chemical stability of carbon in 600 °C-pyrolyzed biochars by 10-20%. These results indicated that the copyrolysis of sludge with phosphate and carbonate, especially phosphate, were effective methods to prepare the sludge-based biochars with immobilized toxic elements and enhanced chemical stability of carbon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of pigeon yolk sac fluid on the growth behavior of calcium carbonate crystals.

    PubMed

    Song, Juan; Cheng, Haixia; Shen, Xinyu; Tong, Hua

    2015-03-01

    Previous experiments have proved that thermodynamically unstable calcium carbonate vaterite can exist for long periods in the yolk sac of a pigeon embryo. The aim of this article was to demonstrate the effect of in vitro mineralization of yolk sac fluid on calcium carbonate by direct precipitation. Experiments were conducted using pigeon yolk sac fluid and using lecithin extracted from pigeon yolk sac fluid as a control to investigate the regulating effects of the organic components in the embryo on the formation of the calcium carbonate precipitate. Multiple characterization methods were employed to study the various morphological patterns, sizes, crystal growth, and crystal phase transformations of the calcium carbonate precipitates as regulated by the yolk sac fluid extracted at different stages of incubation. The experimental results demonstrate that as the incubation proceeds towards the later stages, the composition and environmental features of the yolk sac fluid become more favorable for the formation of relatively unstable calcium carbonate phases with high energies of the vaterite state. The experiments conducted with extracted lecithin as the template for crystal growth yielded similar results. A large amount of organic molecules with polar functional groups carried by the yolk sac fluid have strong effects and can both initially induce the crystallization and regulate the aggregation of calcium carbonate. Furthermore, this regulation process is found to be closely related to the lecithin contained in yolk sac fluid. These observations confirm the changes in yolk sac fluid composition during incubation have significant effects on the production of vaterite, which implicates the calcium transport during embryo growth. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    DOE PAGES

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; ...

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value inmore » iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.« less

  9. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal.

    PubMed

    Islam, Aminul; Teo, Siow Hwa; Rahman, M Aminur; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33-41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed.

  10. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Aminul; Teo, Siow Hwa; Rahman, M. Aminur; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33–41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed. PMID:26700479

  11. Glycolytic intermediates induce amorphous calcium carbonate formation in crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Sato, Ai; Nagasaka, Seiji; Furihata, Kazuo; Nagata, Shinji; Arai, Isao; Saruwatari, Kazuko; Kogure, Toshihiro; Sakuda, Shohei; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2011-04-01

    It has been thought that phosphorus in biominerals made of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) might be related to ACC formation, but no such phosphorus-containing compounds have ever been identified. Crustaceans use ACC biominerals in exoskeleton and gastroliths so that they will have easy access to calcium carbonate inside the body before and after molting. We have identified phosphoenolpyruvate and 3-phosphoglycerate, intermediates of the glycolytic pathway, in exoskeleton and gastroliths and found them important for stabilizing ACC.

  12. Gallbladder mucin production and calcium carbonate gallstones in children.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Craig; Wyatt, Judy; Soloway, Roger D; Taylor, Donald R; Stringer, Mark D

    2007-03-01

    In contrast to adults, calcium carbonate gallstones are relatively common in children. Their pathogenesis is poorly understood. Cystic duct obstruction promotes calcium carbonate formation in bile and increases gallbladder mucin production. We tested the hypothesis that mucin producing epithelial cells would be increased in gallbladders of children with calcium carbonate gallstones. Archival gallbladder specimens from 20 consecutive children who had undergone elective cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis were examined. In each case, gallstone composition was determined by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. Gallbladder specimens from six children who had undergone cholecystectomy for conditions other than cholelithiasis during the same period were used as controls. Multiple sections were examined in a blinded fashion and scored semiquantitatively for mucin production using two stains (alcian blue and periodic acid-Schiff). Increased mucin staining was observed in 50% or more epithelial cells in five gallbladder specimens from seven children with calcium carbonate stones, compared to 5 of 13 with other stone types (P = 0.17) and none of the control gallbladders (P = 0.02). Gallbladders containing calcium carbonate stones were significantly more likely than those containing other stone types or controls to contain epithelial cells with the greatest mucin content (P = 0.03). Gallbladders containing calcium carbonate stones were also more likely to show the ulcer-associated cell lineage. These results demonstrate an increase in mucin producing epithelial cells in gallbladders from children containing calcium carbonate stones. This supports the hypothesis that cystic duct obstruction leading to increased gallbladder mucin production may play a role in the development of calcium carbonate gallstones in children.

  13. Relationship between carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a subtropical soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qianru; Sun, Yue; Zhang, Xinyu; Xu, Xingliang; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    In most soils, more than 90% nitrogen is bonded with carbon in organic forms. This indicates that carbon mineralization should be closely coupled with nitrogen mineralization, showing a positive correlation between carbon and nitrogen mineralization. To test this hypothesis above, we conducted an incubation using a subtropical soil for 10 days at 15 °C and 25 °C. 13C-labeled glucose and 15N-labeled ammonium or nitrate was used to separate CO2 and mineral N released from mineralization of soil organic matter and added glucose or inorganic nitrogen. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and four exoenzymes (i.e. β-1,4- Glucosaminidase, chitinase, acid phosphatase, β-1,4-N- acetyl glucosamine glycosidase) were also analyzed to detect change in microbial activities during the incubation. Our results showed that CO2 release decreased with increasing nitrogen mineralization rates. Temperature did not change this relationship between carbon and nitrogen mineralization. Although some changes in PLFA and the four exoenzymes were observed, these changes did not contribute to changes in carbon and nitrogen mineralization. These findings indicates that carbon and nitrogen mineralization in soil are more complicated than as previously expected. Future investigation should focus on why carbon and nitrogen mineralization are coupled in a negative correlation not in a positive correlation in many soils for a better understanding of carbon and nitrogen transformation during their mineralization.

  14. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kathleen M; Martin, Berdine R; Wastney, Meryl E; McCabe, George P; Moe, Sharon M; Weaver, Connie M; Peacock, Munro

    2013-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus, reduce phosphorus retention, and prevent negative calcium balance; however, data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance during CKD to support this. Here, we studied eight patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 36 ml/min) who received a controlled diet with or without a calcium carbonate supplement (1500 mg/day calcium) during two 3-week balance periods in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over design. All feces and urine were collected during weeks 2 and 3 of each balance period and fasting blood, and urine was collected at baseline and at the end of each week. Calcium kinetics were determined using oral and intravenous (45)calcium. Patients were found to be in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on the placebo. Calcium carbonate supplementation produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance, suggesting soft-tissue deposition. Fasting blood and urine biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. Thus, the positive calcium balance produced by calcium carbonate treatment within 3 weeks cautions against its use as a phosphate binder in patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD, if these findings can be extrapolated to long-term therapy.

  15. Mechanisms of mineral membrane fouling growth modulated by pulsed modes of current during electrodialysis: evidences of water splitting implications in the appearance of the amorphous phases of magnesium hydroxide and calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-Araya, Nicolás; Astudillo-Castro, Carolina; Bazinet, Laurent

    2014-07-15

    Experiments revealed the fouling nature evolutions along different electrodialysis (ED) trials, and how it disappears when current pulsation acts repetitively on the interfaces of ion-exchange membranes (IEMs). Fouling was totally controlled on the diluate side of cation-exchange membrane (CEM) by the repetitive pulsation frequency of the higher on-duty ratios applied. They created steady water splitting proton-barriers that neutralized OH(-) leakage through the membrane, decreasing the interfacial pH, and fouling of the concentrate side. The anion-exchange membrane (AEM) on the diluate side was similarly protected, but it was fouled once water splitting OH(-) generation became either intense enough or excessively weak. Interestingly, amorphous magnesium hydroxide (AMH) stemmed on the CEM-diluate side from brucite under intense water splitting OH(-) generation, and/or strong OH(-) leakage electromigration through the membrane. Water dissociation and overlimiting current regimes triggered drastic water molecule removal from crystal lattices through an accelerated cascade water splitting reaction. Also, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) appeared on CEM under intense water splitting reaction, and disappeared once intense OH(-) leakage was allowed by the water splitting proton-barrier dissipation. Our findings have implications for membrane fouling control, as well as for the understanding of the growth behavior of CaCO3 and Mg(OH)2 species on electromembrane interfaces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation: application in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, A. J.; Eldring, J.; Lauchnor, E.; Hiebert, R.; Gerlach, R.; Mitchell, A. C.; Esposito, R.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L.

    2012-12-01

    We have investigated mitigation strategies for sealing high permeability regions, like fractures, in the subsurface. This technology has the potential to, for example, improve the long-term security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide (CO2) by sealing fractures in cap rocks or to mitigate leakage pathways to prevent contamination of overlying aquifers from hydraulic fracturing fluids. Sealing technologies using low-viscosity fluids are advantageous since they potentially reduce the necessary injection pressures and increase the radius of influence around injection wells. In this technology, aqueous solutions and suspensions are used to promote microbially-induced mineral precipitation which can be applied in subsurface environments. To this end, a strategy was developed to twice seal a hydraulically fractured, 74 cm (2.4') diameter Boyles Sandstone core, collected in North-Central Alabama, with biofilm-induced calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitates under ambient pressures. Sporosarcina pasteurii biofilms were established and calcium and urea containing reagents were injected to promote saturation conditions favorable for CaCO3 precipitation followed by growth reagents to resuscitate the biofilm's ureolytic activity. Then, in order to evaluate this process at relevant deep subsurface pressures, a novel high pressure test vessel was developed to house the 74 cm diameter core under pressures as high as 96 bar (1,400 psi). After determining that no impact to the fracture permeability occurred due to increasing overburden pressure, the fractured core was sealed under subsurface relevant pressures relating to 457 meters (1,500 feet) below ground surface (44 bar (650 psi) overburden pressure). After fracture sealing under both ambient and subsurface relevant pressure conditions, the sandstone core withstood three times higher well bore pressure than during the initial fracturing event, which occurred prior to biofilm-induced CaCO3 mineralization. These studies suggest

  17. Influence of zinc on the calcium carbonate biomineralization of Halomonas halophila

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The salt tolerance of halophilic bacteria make them promising candidates for technical applications, like isolation of salt tolerant enzymes or remediation of contaminated saline soils and waters. Furthermore, some halophilic bacteria synthesize inorganic solids resulting in organic–inorganic hybrids. This process is known as biomineralization, which is induced and/or controlled by the organism. The adaption of the soft and eco-friendly reaction conditions of this formation process to technical syntheses of inorganic nano materials is desirable. In addition, environmental contaminations can be entrapped in biomineralization products which facilitate the subsequent removal from waste waters. The moderately halophilic bacteria Halomonas halophila mineralize calcium carbonate in the calcite polymorph. The biomineralization process was investigated in the presence of zinc ions as a toxic model contaminant. In particular, the time course of the mineralization process and the influence of zinc on the mineralized inorganic materials have been focused in this study. Results H. halophila can adapt to zinc contaminated medium, maintaining the ability for biomineralization of calcium carbonate. Adapted cultures show only a low influence of zinc on the growth rate. In the time course of cultivation, zinc ions accumulated on the bacterial surface while the medium depleted in the zinc contamination. Intracellular zinc concentrations were below the detection limit, suggesting that zinc was mainly bound extracellular. Zinc ions influence the biomineralization process. In the presence of zinc, the polymorphs monohydrocalcite and vaterite were mineralized, instead of calcite which is synthesized in zinc-free medium. Conclusions We have demonstrated that the bacterial mineralization process can be influenced by zinc ions resulting in the modification of the synthesized calcium carbonate polymorph. In addition, the shape of the mineralized inorganic material is chancing

  18. Hypoparathyroidism: what is the best calcium carbonate supplementation intake form?

    PubMed

    Gollino, Loraine; Biagioni, Maria Fernanda Giovanetti; Sabatini, Nathalia Regina; Tagliarini, José Vicente; Corrente, José Eduardo; Paiva, Sérgio Alberto Rupp de; Mazeto, Gláucia Maria Ferreira da Silva

    2017-11-15

    In hypoparathyroidism, calcium supplementation using calcium carbonate is necessary for the hypocalcemia control. The best calcium carbonate intake form is unknown, be it associated with feeding, juice or in fasting. The objective was to evaluate the calcium, phosphorus and Calcium×Phosphorus product serum levels of hypoparathyroidism women after total thyroidectomy, following calcium carbonate intake in three different forms. A crossover study was carried out with patients presenting definitive hypoparathyroidism, assessed in different situations (fasting, with water, orange juice, breakfast with a one-week washout). Through the review of clinical data records of tertiary hospital patients from 1994 to 2010, 12 adult women (18 50 years old) were identified and diagnosed with definitive post-thyroidectomy hypoparathyroidism. The laboratory results of calcium and phosphorus serum levels dosed before and every 30min were assessed, for 5h, after calcium carbonate intake (elementary calcium 500mg). The maximum peak average values for calcium, phosphorus and Calcium×Phosphorus product were 8.63mg/dL (water), 8.77mg/dL (orange juice) and 8.95mg/dL (breakfast); 4.04mg/dL (water), 4.03mg/dL (orange juice) and 4.12mg/dL (breakfast); 34.3mg 2 /dL 2 (water), 35.8mg 2 /dL 2 (orange juice) and 34.5mg 2 /dL 2 (breakfast), respectively, and the area under the curve 2433mg/dLmin (water), 2577mg/dLmin (orange juice) and 2506mg/dLmin (breakfast), 1203mg/dLmin (water), 1052mg/dLmin (orange juice) and 1128mg/dLmin (breakfast), respectively. There was no significant difference among the three different tests (p>0.05). The calcium, phosphorus and Calcium×Phosphorus product serum levels evolved in a similar fashion in the three calcium carbonate intake forms. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Calcium acetate or calcium carbonate for hyperphosphatemia of hemodialysis patients: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Xie, Guoqiang; Huang, Yuanhang; Zhang, Han; Yang, Bo; Mao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    High levels of serum phosphorus both at baseline and during follow-up are associated with increased mortality in dialysis patients, and administration of phosphate binders was independently associated with improved survival among hemodialysis population. Calcium-based phosphate binders are the most commonly used phosphate binders in developing countries for their relatively low costs. To compare the efficacy and safety between calcium carbonate and calcium acetate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google scholar and Chinese databases (Wanfang, Weipu, National Knowledge Infrastructure of China) were searched for relevant studies published before March 2014. Reference lists of nephrology textbooks and review articles were checked. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that assessed the effects and adverse events of calcium acetate and calcium carbonate in adult patients with MHD was performed using Review Manager 5.0. A total of ten studies (625 participants) were included in this meta-analysis. There was insufficient data in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events for meta-analysis. Compared with calcium carbonate group, the serum phosphorus was significantly lower in calcium acetate group after4 weeks' administration (MD -0.15 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.28 to -0.01) and after 8 weeks' administration (MD -0.25 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.11). There was no difference in serum calcium levels or the incidence of hypercalcemia between two groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks. No statistical difference was found in parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels or serum calcium by phosphorus (Ca x P) product. There was significantly higher risk of intolerance with calcium acetate treatment (RR 3.46, 95% CI 1.48 to 8.26). For hyperphosphatemia treatment, calcium acetate showed better efficacy and with a higher incidence of intolerance compared with calcium carbonate. There are insufficient data to

  20. Calcium Acetate or Calcium Carbonate for Hyperphosphatemia of Hemodialysis Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Yang, Bo; Mao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Background High levels of serum phosphorus both at baseline and during follow-up are associated with increased mortality in dialysis patients, and administration of phosphate binders was independently associated with improved survival among hemodialysis population. Calcium-based phosphate binders are the most commonly used phosphate binders in developing countries for their relatively low costs. Objectives To compare the efficacy and safety between calcium carbonate and calcium acetate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google scholar and Chinese databases (Wanfang, Weipu, National Knowledge Infrastructure of China) were searched for relevant studies published before March 2014. Reference lists of nephrology textbooks and review articles were checked. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that assessed the effects and adverse events of calcium acetate and calcium carbonate in adult patients with MHD was performed using Review Manager 5.0. Results A total of ten studies (625 participants) were included in this meta-analysis. There was insufficient data in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events for meta-analysis. Compared with calcium carbonate group, the serum phosphorus was significantly lower in calcium acetate group after4 weeks’ administration (MD -0.15 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.28 to -0.01) and after 8 weeks’ administration (MD -0.25 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.11). There was no difference in serum calcium levels or the incidence of hypercalcemia between two groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks. No statistical difference was found in parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels or serum calcium by phosphorus (Ca x P) product. There was significantly higher risk of intolerance with calcium acetate treatment (RR 3.46, 95% CI 1.48 to 8.26). Conclusions For hyperphosphatemia treatment, calcium acetate showed better efficacy and with a higher incidence of intolerance compared with

  1. Biomineralization of calcium carbonates and their engineered applications: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dhami, Navdeep K.; Reddy, M. Sudhakara; Mukherjee, Abhijit

    2013-01-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is a naturally occurring biological process in which microbes produce inorganic materials as part of their basic metabolic activities. This technology has been widely explored and promising with potential in various technical applications. In the present review, the detailed mechanism of production of calcium carbonate biominerals by ureolytic bacteria has been discussed along with role of bacteria and the sectors where these biominerals are being used. The applications of bacterially produced carbonate biominerals for improving the durability of buildings, remediation of environment (water and soil), sequestration of atmospheric CO2 filler material in rubbers and plastics etc. are discussed. The study also sheds light on benefits of bacterial biominerals over traditional agents and also the issues that lie in the path of successful commercialization of the technology of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation from lab to field scale. PMID:24194735

  2. [Does carbonate originate from carbonate-calcium crystal component of the human urinary calculus?].

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, Masayuki; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Kumamaru, Takatoshi; Nukui, Akinori; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Minoru; Sugaya, Yasuhiro; Morita, Tatsuo

    2008-09-01

    It gives important information in selecting the appropriate treatment for urolithiasis to confirm the component of urinary calculus. Presently component analysis of the urinary calculus is generally performed by infrared spectroscopy which is employed by companies providing laboratory testing services in Japan. The infrared spectroscopy determines the molecular components from the absorption spectra in consequence of atomic vibrations. It has the drawback that an accurate crystal structure cannot be analyzed compared with the X-ray diffraction method which analyzes the crystal constituent based on the diffraction of X-rays on crystal lattice. The components of the urinary calculus including carbonate are carbonate apatite and calcium carbonate such as calcite. Although the latter is reported to be very rare component in human urinary calculus, the results by infrared spectroscopy often show that calcium carbonate is included in calculus. The infrared spectroscopy can confirm the existence of carbonate but cannot determine whether carbonate is originated from carbonate apatite or calcium carbonate. Thus, it is not clear whether calcium carbonate is included in human urinary calculus component in Japan. In this study, we examined human urinary calculus including carbonate by use of X-ray structural analysis in order to elucidate the origin of carbonate in human urinary calculus. We examined 17 human calculi which were reported to contain calcium carbonate by infrared spectroscopy performed in the clinical laboratory. Fifteen calculi were obtained from urinary tract, and two were from gall bladder. The stones were analyzed by X-ray powder method after crushed finely. The reports from the clinical laboratory showed that all urinary culculi consisted of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate, while the gallstones consisted of calcium carbonate. But the components of all urinary calculi were revealed to be carbonate apatite by X-ray diffraction. The components of

  3. Genomics of mineral nutrient biofortification: calcium, iron and zinc

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dietary deficiencies affect nearly half of the people on the planet, who simply do not receive sufficient nutrition from the food they buy or grow. Inadequate calcium, iron, and zinc consumption create short and long term health problems, which in turn can magnify and stagnate national development. ...

  4. Mars Life? - Orange-colored Carbonate Mineral Globules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photograph shows orange-colored carbonate mineral globules found in a meteorite, called ALH84001, believed to have once been a part of Mars. These carbonate minerals in the meteorite are believed to have been formed on Mars more than 3.6 billion years ago. Their structure and chemistry suggest that they may have been formed with the assistance of primitive, bacteria-like living organisms. A two-year investigation by a NASA research team found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils inside of carbonate minerals such as these in the meteorite.

  5. Automatic photometric titrations of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, L.; Brannock, W.W.

    1955-01-01

    Rapid nonsubjective methods have been developed for the determination of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks. From a single solution of the sample, calcium is titrated directly, and magnesium is titrated after a rapid removal of R2O3 and precipitation of calcium as the tungstate. A concentrated and a dilute solution of disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate are used as titrants. The concentrated solution is added almost to the end point, then the weak solution is added in an automatic titrator to determine the end point precisely.

  6. Effects of mineral additives on biochar formation: carbon retention, stability, and properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Feiyue; Cao, Xinde; Zhao, Ling; Wang, Jianfei; Ding, Zhenliang

    2014-10-07

    Biochar is being recognized as a promising tool for long-term carbon sequestration, and biochar with high carbon retention and strong stability is supposed to be explored for that purpose. In this study, three minerals, including kaolin, calcite (CaCO3), and calcium dihydrogen phosphate [Ca(H2PO4)2], were added to rice straw feedstock at the ratio of 20% (w/w) for biochar formation through pyrolysis treatment, aiming to improve carbon retention and stabilization in biochar. Kaolin and CaCO3 had little effect on the carbon retention, whereas Ca(H2PO4)2 increased the carbon retention by up to 29% compared to untreated biochar. Although the carbon loss from the kaolin-modified biochar with hydrogen peroxide oxidation was enhanced, CaCO3 and Ca(H2PO4)2 modification reduced the carbon loss by 18.6 and 58.5%, respectively. Moreover, all three minerals reduced carbon loss of biochar with potassium dichromate oxidation from 0.3 to 38.8%. The microbial mineralization as CO2 emission in all three modified biochars was reduced by 22.2-88.7% under aerobic incubation and 5-61% under anaerobic incubation. Enhanced carbon retention and stability of biochar with mineral treatment might be caused by the enhanced formation of aromatic C, which was evidenced by cross-polarization magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. Our results indicated that the three minerals, especially Ca(H2PO4)2, were effective in increasing carbon retention and strengthening biochar stabilization, which provided a novel idea that people could explore and produce the designated biochar with high carbon sequestration capacity and stability.

  7. Hake fish bone as a calcium source for efficient bone mineralization.

    PubMed

    Flammini, Lisa; Martuzzi, Francesca; Vivo, Valentina; Ghirri, Alessia; Salomi, Enrico; Bignetti, Enrico; Barocelli, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Calcium is recognized as an essential nutritional factor for bone health. An adequate intake is important to achieve or maintain optimal bone mass in particular during growth and old age. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of hake fish bone (HBF) as a calcium source for bone mineralization: in vitro on osteosarcoma SaOS-2 cells, cultured in Ca-free osteogenic medium (OM) and in vivo on young growing rats fed a low-calcium diet. Lithotame (L), a Ca supplement derived from Lithothamnium calcareum, was used as control. In vitro experiments showed that HBF supplementation provided bone mineralization similar to standard OM, whereas L supplementation showed lower activity. In vivo low-Ca HBF-added and L-added diet similarly affected bone deposition. Physico-chemical parameters concerning bone mineralization, such as femur breaking force, tibia density and calcium/phosphorus mineral content, had beneficial effects from both Ca supplementations, in the absence of any evident adverse effect. We conclude HBF derived from by-product from the fish industry is a good calcium supplier with comparable efficacy to L.

  8. [The functions of calcium-sensing receptor in regulating mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yuka

    Calcium-sensing receptor(CaSR)which belongs to a G protein-coupled receptor family is one of the key elements in regulating calcium homeostasis. CaSR has been identified as a receptor to control parathyroid hormone(PTH)secretion in parathyroid glands according to serum calcium ion(Ca2+)levels. It has also been shown that CaSR controls reabsorption of water and several cations including Ca2+and magnesium ion(Mg2+)in renal tubular cells. This review summarizes the functions and roles of CaSR in mineral metabolism that are exerted in parathyroid glands, kidney, and intestine.

  9. Carbonate Mineralization of Volcanic Province Basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter; Owen, Antionette T.

    2010-03-31

    Flood basalts are receiving increasing attention as possible host formations for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, with studies underway in the United States, India, Iceland, and Canada. As an extension of our previous experiments with Columbia River basalt, basalts from the eastern United States, India, and South Africa were reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 and aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions to study the geochemical reactions resulting from injection of CO2 in such formations. The results of these studies are consistent with cation release behavior measured in our previous experiments (in press) for basalt samples tested inmore » single pass flow through dissolution experiments under dilute solution and mildly acidic conditions. Despite the basalt samples having similar bulk chemistry, mineralogy and apparent dissolution kinetics, long-term static experiments show significant differences in rates of mineralization as well as compositions and morphologies of precipitates that form when the basalts are reacted with CO2-saturated water. For example, basalt from the Newark Basin in the United States was by far the most reactive of any basalt tested to date. Carbonate reaction products for the Newark Basin basalt were globular in form and contained significantly more Fe than the secondary carbonates that precipitated on the other basalt samples. In comparison, the post-reacted samples associated with the Columbia River basalts from the United States contained calcite grains with classic dogtooth spar morphology and trace cation substitution (Mg and Mn). Carbonation of the other basalts produced precipitates with compositions that varied chemically throughout the entire testing period. Examination of polished cross sections of the reacted grains by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy show precipitate overgrowths with varying chemical compositions. Compositional differences in

  10. Effect of silk sericin on morphology and structure of calcium carbonate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui-Bo; Han, Hua-Feng; Ding, Shao; Li, Ze-Hao; Kong, Xiang-Dong

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, silk sericin was employed to regulate the mineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). CaCO3 composite particles were prepared by the precipitation reaction of sodium carbonate with calcium chloride solution in the presence of silk sericin. The as-prepared samples were collected at different reaction time to study the crystallization process of CaCO3 by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that silk sericin significantly affected the morphology and crystallographic polymorph of CaCO3. With increasing the reaction time, the crystal phase of CaCO3 transferred from calcite dominated to vaterite dominated mixtures, while the morphology of CaCO3 changed from disk-like calcite crystal to spherical vaterite crystal. These studies showed the potential of silk sericin used as a template molecule to control the growth of inorganic crystal.

  11. Supplementation with bio-calcium from shells Pinctada maxima in postmenopausal women with decreased mineral bone density--pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vujasinović-Stupar, Nada; Novković, Snezana; Jezdić, Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of osteoporosis, in addition to a specific antiresorptive or anabolic treatment, requires supplementation with calcium and vitamin D. Widespread cultivation of pearl shells has made pearls available for commercial use for a very reasonable price. The main chemical compound of pearls from shells Pinctada maxima is calcium-carbonate (CaCO3). Recently developed technologies applied in a micronisation process have provided increased gastrointestinal resorption of calcium, estimated at over 90% of calcium intake. The paper is aimed at monitoring of efficacy and tolerance of six-month bio-calcium supplementation in postmenopausal women with reduced bone mineral density. Group 1 (30 patients) received, three times a day, capsules of pearl powder from shells Pinctada maxima (it is equal to 260 mg of elementary calcium); group II (20 patients) received a daily dose of 500 mg inorganic CaCO3. Both groups received 666 IU of cholecalciferol per day. In all patients, bone mineral density (BMD) of the spine or hip, serum blood and urine levels of Ca, phosphates and alkaline phosphatase, were measured before and after six months of the treatment. Group I/Group II: average age 61.7/61.7 years; beginning of menopause: 48.32 /48 years; menopause duration 13.4/13.7 years; average body mass index 27.2/27 kg/m2. These two groups did not different significantly before supplementation. Six-month supplementation with CaCO3 of the biological origin led to the increase of BMD from 0.901 g/cm2 to 0.948 g/cm2 (p = 0.067), while BMD remained the same in the group supplemented with inorganic CaCO3 Gastrointestinal tolerability of bio-calcium was excellent, without any adverse events. These data could not strongly support the hypothesis of better efficacy of bio-calcium taking into account a small number of patients and a short follow-up period in this pilot study. Tolerance of CaCO3 of the biological origin was excellent and free of any adverse events. The results of laboratory values

  12. Calcium-silicate mesoporous nanoparticles loaded with chlorhexidine for both anti- Enterococcus faecalis and mineralization properties.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Li, Yanyun; Sun, Qing; Ma, Tengjiao; Fan, Bing

    2016-10-21

    In infected periapical tissues, Enterococcus faecalis is one of the most common dominant bacteria. Chlorhexidine has been proved to show strong antibacterial ability against E. faecalis but is ineffective in promoting mineralization for tissues around root apex. Mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles are newly synthesized biomaterials with excellent ability to promote mineralization and carry-release bioactive molecules in a controlled manner. In this study, mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles were functionalized with chlorhexidine and their releasing profile, antibacterial ability, effect on cell proliferation and in vitro mineralization property were evaluated. The chlorhexidine was successfully incorporated into mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles by a mixing-coupling method. The new material could release chlorhexidine as well as Ca 2+ and SiO 3 2- in a sustained manner with an alkaline pH value under different conditions. The antimicrobial ability against planktonic E. faecalis was dramatically improved after chlorhexidine incorporation. The nanoparticles with chlorhexidine showed no negative effect on cell proliferation with low concentrations. On dentin slices, the new synthesized material demonstrated a similar inhibitory effect on E. faecalis as the chlorhexidine. After being immersed in SBF for 9 days, numerous apatite crystals could be observed on surfaces of the material tablets. Mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles loaded with chlorhexidine exhibited release of ions and chlorhexidine, low cytotoxicity, excellent antibacterial ability and in vitro mineralization. This material could be developed into a new effective intra-canal medication in dentistry or a new bone defect filling material for infected bone defects.

  13. [Effects of nandrolone decanoate on bone mineral content and intestinal absorption of calcium].

    PubMed

    Nuti, R; Righi, G A; Turchetti, V; Vattimo, A

    1984-01-28

    To evaluate the effects of a long-term treatment with nandrolone decanoate on metabolism of the skeleton, a double-blind randomized study was carried out in women with joint diseases without metabolic bone derangement. Ten patients were treated with 50 mg of nandrolone decanoate every three weeks for two years; in six subjects a treatment with placebo was performed. As it concerns plasma calcium and phosphate, serum alkaline phosphatase, urinary excretion of calcium, phosphate, hydroxyproline and cAMP, as parathyroid index, it was not observed significant differences in the two examined groups. While in placebo group at the end of the study the intestinal radiocalcium remained unchanged and bone mineral content showed a slight decrease, on the contrary nandrolone decanoate treatment promoted a significant improvement in intestinal calcium absorption and an increase in bone mineral content.

  14. Micro and colloidal stickie pacification with precipitated calcium carbonate

    Treesearch

    John H. Klungness; Roland L. Gleisner; Marguerite Sykes

    2004-01-01

    The colloidal stickies which build up in mill process water during pulping are problematic and difficult to remove. The USDA Forestry Service examined precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) as a means to ameliorate process water stickies, comparing: i) the effectiveness of PCC added directly into a slurry of deinked pulp with ii) in situ precipitation of PCC by the fibre...

  15. Micro and colloidal stickie pacification with precipitated calcium carbonate

    Treesearch

    John H. Klungness; Roland L. Gleisner; Marguerite S. Sykes

    2002-01-01

    Colloidal stickies that build up in mill process water during pulping are problematic and difficult to remove. We examined precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) as a means to ameliorate process water stickies. The effectiveness of PCC added directly into a slurry of deinked pulp was compared with in situ precipitation of PCC by the fiber loading method. We found that...

  16. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Based-Microparticles for Peptide Pulmonary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tewes, Frederic; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Healy, Anne Marie

    2016-01-20

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to interact with proteins, for example, in biogenic ACC, to form stable amorphous phases. The control of amorphous/crystalline and inorganic/organic ratios in inhalable calcium carbonate microparticles may enable particle properties to be adapted to suit the requirements of dry powders for pulmonary delivery by oral inhalation. For example, an amorphous phase can immobilize and stabilize polypeptides in their native structure and amorphous and crystalline phases have different mechanical properties. Therefore, inhalable composite microparticles made of inorganic (i.e., calcium carbonate and calcium formate) and organic (i.e., hyaluronan (HA)) amorphous and crystalline phases were investigated for peptide and protein pulmonary aerosol delivery. The crystalline/amorphous ratio and polymorphic form of the inorganic component was altered by changing the microparticle drying rate and by changing the ammonium carbonate and HA initial concentration. The bioactivity of the model peptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT), coprocessed with alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), a model protein with peptidase inhibitor activity, was maintained during processing and the microparticles had excellent aerodynamic properties, making them suitable for pulmonary aerosol delivery. The bioavailability of sCT after aerosol delivery as sCT and AAT-loaded composite microparticles to rats was 4-times higher than that of sCT solution.

  17. Natural calcium isotonic composition of urine as a marker of bone mineral balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skulan, J.; Bullen, T.; Anbar, A.D.; Puzas, J.E.; Shackelford, L.; LeBlanc, A.; Smith, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: We investigated whether changes in the natural isotopic composition of calcium in human urine track changes in net bone mineral balance, as predicted by a model of calcium isotopic behavior in vertebrates. If so, isotopic analysis of natural urine or blood calcium could be used to monitor short-term changes in bone mineral balance that cannot be detected with other techniques. Methods: Calcium isotopic compositions are expressed as ??44Ca, or the difference in parts per thousand between the 44Ca/40Ca of a sample and the 44Ca/ 40Ca of a standard reference material. ??44Ca was measured in urine samples from 10 persons who participated in a study of the effectiveness of countermeasures to bone loss in spaceflight, in which 17 weeks of bed rest was used to induce bone loss. Study participants were assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: controls received no treatment, one treatment group received alendronate, and another group performed resistive exercise. Measurements were made on urine samples collected before, at 2 or 3 points during, and after bed rest. Results: Urine ??44Ca values during bed rest were lower in controls than in individuals treated with alendronate (P <0.05, ANOVA) or exercise (P <0.05), and lower than the control group baseline (P <0.05, Mest). Results were consistent with the model and with biochemical and bone mineral density data. Conclusion: Results confirm the predicted relationship between bone mineral balance and calcium isotopes, suggesting that calcium isotopic analysis of urine might be refined into a clinical and research tool. ?? 2007 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  18. Natural calcium isotopic composition of urine as a marker of bone mineral balance.

    PubMed

    Skulan, Joseph; Bullen, Thomas; Anbar, Ariel D; Puzas, J Edward; Shackelford, Linda; LeBlanc, Adrian; Smith, Scott M

    2007-06-01

    We investigated whether changes in the natural isotopic composition of calcium in human urine track changes in net bone mineral balance, as predicted by a model of calcium isotopic behavior in vertebrates. If so, isotopic analysis of natural urine or blood calcium could be used to monitor short-term changes in bone mineral balance that cannot be detected with other techniques. Calcium isotopic compositions are expressed as delta(44)Ca, or the difference in parts per thousand between the (44)Ca/(40)Ca of a sample and the (44)Ca/(40)Ca of a standard reference material. delta(44)Ca was measured in urine samples from 10 persons who participated in a study of the effectiveness of countermeasures to bone loss in spaceflight, in which 17 weeks of bed rest was used to induce bone loss. Study participants were assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: controls received no treatment, one treatment group received alendronate, and another group performed resistive exercise. Measurements were made on urine samples collected before, at 2 or 3 points during, and after bed rest. Urine delta(44)Ca values during bed rest were lower in controls than in individuals treated with alendronate (P <0.05, ANOVA) or exercise (P <0.05), and lower than the control group baseline (P <0.05, t-test). Results were consistent with the model and with biochemical and bone mineral density data. Results confirm the predicted relationship between bone mineral balance and calcium isotopes, suggesting that calcium isotopic analysis of urine might be refined into a clinical and research tool.

  19. Biomimetic nanoparticles with polynucleotide and PEG mixed-monolayers enhance calcium phosphate mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, Kayla B.; McHugh, Sean M.; Dapsis, Katherine J.; Petty, Alexander R.; Gerdon, Aren E.

    2013-09-01

    Biomineralization of hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is of significant importance in biomedical applications such as bone and dental repair, and biomimetic control of mineral formation may lead to more effective restorative procedures. Gold nanoparticles are functional scaffolds on which to assemble multi-component monolayers capable of mimicking protein activity in the templated synthesis of calcium phosphate. The goal of this research was to explore nanoparticle templates with mixed-monolayers of uncharged polar polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules and highly charged polynucleotide and amino acid molecules in their ability to influence mineralization rates and mineral particle size and morphology. This research demonstrates through time-resolved optical density and dynamic light scattering measurements that the combination of tiopronin, PEG, and DNA presented on a nanoparticle surface decreases nanoparticle aggregation from 59 to 21 nm solvated radius, increases mineralization kinetics from 1.5 × 10-3 to 3.1 × 10-3 OD/min, and decreases mineral particle size from 685 to 442 nm average radius. FT-IR and TEM data demonstrate that mineralized material, while initially amorphous, transforms to a semi-crystalline material when guided by template interactions. This demonstrates that surface-tailored monolayer protected cluster scaffolds are successful and controllable mineralization templates with further potential for biomedical applications involving calcium phosphate and other biomaterials.

  20. Natural mineral bottled waters available on the Polish market as a source of minerals for the consumers. Part 1. Calcium and magnesium.

    PubMed

    Gątarska, Anna; Tońska, Elżbieta; Ciborska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Natural mineral waters may be an essential source of calcium, magnesium and other minerals. In bottled waters, minerals occur in an ionized form which is very well digestible. However, the concentration of minerals in underground waters (which constitute the material for the production of bottled waters) varies. In view of the above, the type of water consumed is essential. The aim of the study was to estimate the calcium and magnesium contents in products available on the market and to evaluate calcium and magnesium consumption with natural mineral water by different consumer groups with an assumed volume of the consumed product. These represented forty different brands of natural mineral available waters on Polish market. These waters were produced in Poland or other European countries. Among the studied products, about 30% of the waters were imported from Lithuania, Latvia, Czech Republic, France, Italy and Germany. The content of calcium and magnesium in mineral waters was determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry in an acetylene-air flame. Further determinations were carried out using atomic absorption spectrometer--ICE 3000 SERIES-THERMO-England, equipped with a GLITE data station, background correction (a deuterium lamp) as well as other cathode lamps. Over half of the analysed natural mineral waters were medium-mineralized. The natural mineral waters available on the market can be characterized by a varied content of calcium and magnesium and a high degree of product mineralization does not guarantee significant amounts of these components. Among the natural mineral waters available on the market, only a few feature the optimum calcium-magnesium proportion (2:1). Considering the mineralization degree of the studied products, it can be stated that the largest percentage of products with significant calcium and magnesium contents can be found in the high-mineralized water group. For some natural mineral waters, the consumption of 1 litre daily may

  1. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  2. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  3. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  4. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  5. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  6. Microalgal bacterial flocs treating paper mill effluent: A sunlight-based approach for removing carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and calcium.

    PubMed

    Van Den Hende, Sofie; Rodrigues, André; Hamaekers, Helen; Sonnenholzner, Stanislaus; Vervaeren, Han; Boon, Nico

    2017-10-25

    Treatment of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) effluent from a paper mill in aerated activated sludge reactors involves high aeration costs. Moreover, this calcium-rich effluent leads to problematic scale formation. Therefore, a novel strategy for the aerobic treatment of paper mill UASB effluent in microalgal bacterial floc sequencing batch reactors (MaB-floc SBRs) is proposed, in which oxygen is provided via photosynthesis, and calcium is removed via bio-mineralization. Based on the results of batch experiments in the course of this study, a MaB-floc SBR was operated at an initial neutral pH. This SBR removed 58±21% organic carbon, 27±8% inorganic carbon, 77±5% nitrogen, 73±2% phosphorus, and 27±11% calcium. MaB-flocs contained 10±3% calcium, including biologically-influenced calcite crystals. The removal of calcium and inorganic carbon by MaB-flocs significantly decreased when inhibiting extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that catalyses the hydration and dehydration of CO 2 . This study demonstrates the potential of MaB-floc SBRs for the alternative treatment of calcium-rich paper mill effluent, and highlights the importance of extracellular CA in this treatment process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biogenic Fish-gut Calcium Carbonate is a Stable Amorphous Phase in the Gilt-head Seabream, Sparus aurata

    PubMed Central

    Foran, Elizabeth; Weiner, Steve; Fine, Maoz

    2013-01-01

    The main source of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the ocean comes from the shells of calcifying planktonic organisms, but substantial amounts of CaCO3 are also produced in fish intestines. The precipitation of CaCO3 assists fish in intestinal water absorption and aids in whole body Ca2+ homeostasis. Here we report that the product formed in the intestinal lumen of the gilt-head seabream, Sparus aurata, is an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) phase. With FTIR spectroscopy and SEM imaging, our study shows that the fish-derived carbonates from S. aurata are maintained as a stable amorphous phase throughout the intestinal tract. Moreover, intestinal deposits contained up to 54 mol% Mg2+, the highest concentration yet reported in biogenic ACC. Mg is most likely responsible for stabilizing this inherently unstable mineral. The fish carbonates also displayed initial rapid dissolution when exposed to seawater, exhibiting a significant increase in carbonate concentration. PMID:23609008

  8. Normocalcemia is maintained in mice under conditions of calcium malabsorption by vitamin D–induced inhibition of bone mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Lieben, Liesbet; Masuyama, Ritsuko; Torrekens, Sophie; Van Looveren, Riet; Schrooten, Jan; Baatsen, Pieter; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Dresselaers, Tom; Feng, Jian Q.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Meyer, Mark B.; Pike, J. Wesley; Bouillon, Roger; Carmeliet, Geert

    2012-01-01

    Serum calcium levels are tightly controlled by an integrated hormone-controlled system that involves active vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], which can elicit calcium mobilization from bone when intestinal calcium absorption is decreased. The skeletal adaptations, however, are still poorly characterized. To gain insight into these issues, we analyzed the consequences of specific vitamin D receptor (Vdr) inactivation in the intestine and in mature osteoblasts on calcium and bone homeostasis. We report here that decreased intestinal calcium absorption in intestine-specific Vdr knockout mice resulted in severely reduced skeletal calcium levels so as to ensure normal levels of calcium in the serum. Furthermore, increased 1,25(OH)2D levels not only stimulated bone turnover, leading to osteopenia, but also suppressed bone matrix mineralization. This resulted in extensive hyperosteoidosis, also surrounding the osteocytes, and hypomineralization of the entire bone cortex, which may have contributed to the increase in bone fractures. Mechanistically, osteoblastic VDR signaling suppressed calcium incorporation in bone by directly stimulating the transcription of genes encoding mineralization inhibitors. Ablation of skeletal Vdr signaling precluded this calcium transfer from bone to serum, leading to better preservation of bone mass and mineralization. These findings indicate that in mice, maintaining normocalcemia has priority over skeletal integrity, and that to minimize skeletal calcium storage, 1,25(OH)2D not only increases calcium release from bone, but also inhibits calcium incorporation in bone. PMID:22523068

  9. Human colon tissue in organ culture: calcium and multi-mineral-induced mucosal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dame, Michael K.; Veerapaneni, Indiradevi; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Naik, Madhav; Varani, James

    2011-01-01

    We have recently shown that a multi-mineral extract from the marine red algae, Lithothamnion calcareum, suppresses colon polyp formation and inflammation in mice. In the present study, we used intact human colon tissue in organ culture to compare responses initiated by Ca2+ supplementation versus the multi-mineral extract. Normal human colon tissue was treated for 2 d in culture with various concentrations of calcium or the mineral-rich extract. The tissue was then prepared for histology/immunohistochemistry, and the culture supernatants were assayed for levels of type I procollagen and type I collagen. At higher Ca2+ concentrations or with the mineral-rich extract, proliferation of epithelial cells at the base and walls of the mucosal crypts was suppressed, as visualized by reduced Ki67 staining. E-cadherin, a marker of differentiation, was more strongly expressed at the upper third of the crypt and at the luminal surface. Treatment with Ca2+ or with the multi-mineral extract influenced collagen turnover, with decreased procollagen and increased type I collagen. These data suggest that calcium or mineral-rich extract has the capacity to (1) promote differentiation in human colon tissue in organ culture and (2) modulate stromal function as assessed by increased levels of type I collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that human colon tissue in organ culture (supporting in vivo finding in mice) will provide a valuable model for the preclinical assessment of agents that regulate growth and differentiation in the colonic mucosa. PMID:21104039

  10. Rates of CO2 Mineralization in Geological Carbon Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; DePaolo, Donald J

    2017-09-19

    Geologic carbon storage (GCS) involves capture and purification of CO 2 at industrial emission sources, compression into a supercritical state, and subsequent injection into geologic formations. This process reverses the flow of carbon to the atmosphere with the intention of returning the carbon to long-term geologic storage. Models suggest that most of the injected CO 2 will be "trapped" in the subsurface by physical means, but the most risk-free and permanent form of carbon storage is as carbonate minerals (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO 3 . The transformation of CO 2 to carbonate minerals requires supply of the necessary divalent cations by dissolution of silicate minerals. Available data suggest that rates of transformation are highly uncertain and difficult to predict by standard approaches. Here we show that the chemical kinetic observations and experimental results, when they can be reduced to a single cation-release time scale that describes the fractional rate at which cations are released to solution by mineral dissolution, show sufficiently systematic behavior as a function of pH, fluid flow rate, and time that the rates of mineralization can be estimated with reasonable certainty. The rate of mineralization depends on both the abundance (determined by the reservoir rock mineralogy) and the rate at which cations are released from silicate minerals by dissolution into pore fluid that has been acidified with dissolved CO 2 . Laboratory-measured rates and field observations give values spanning 8 to 10 orders of magnitude, but when they are evaluated in the context of a reservoir-scale reactive transport simulation, this range becomes much smaller. The reservoir scale simulations provide limits on the applicable conditions under which silicate mineral dissolution and subsequent carbonate mineral precipitation are likely to occur (pH 4.5 to 6, fluid flow velocity less than 5 m/year, and 50-100 years or more after the start of injection). These constraints lead to estimates of

  11. Altered steady state pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin in adult cystic fibrosis patients receiving calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Pai, Manjunath P; Allen, Sarah E; Amsden, Guy W

    2006-08-01

    Levofloxacin is used in adult patients with cystic fibrosis but its pharmacokinetics is not well characterized in this population. Patients with cystic fibrosis use calcium routinely to prevent osteoporosis. A slower intestinal transit time is common in cystic fibrosis implying that the standard 2-h spacing of minerals and levofloxacin to prevent a chelation interaction may be insufficient. The objectives of this study were to characterize the steady state pharmacokinetics of oral levofloxacin 750 mg with and without 2-h spaced calcium carbonate in patients with cystic fibrosis compared to matched healthy volunteers. In an open-label, randomized, cross-over study of five patients with cystic fibrosis and five age, sex, race, and serum creatinine matched healthy volunteers received 750 mg of oral levofloxacin alone daily for 5 days and the same dose of levofloxacin with 2-h spaced calcium carbonate supplementation 500 mg po thrice daily with meals in random sequence. Blood was collected for plasma assay of levofloxacin pre-dose, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24h after the fifth levofloxacin dose. There was no significant interaction in healthy volunteers, however, when cystic fibrosis patients were given levofloxacin with 2-h spaced calcium, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) decreased by 19% and time to Cmax increased by 37% (p<0.05). This difference in peak concentrations resulted in a lack of bioequivalence (Cmax geometric mean ratio 81.6%, 90% confidence intervals: 71.8%, 91.4%) even when levofloxacin and calcium supplements were spaced by the standard 2h administration instruction in patients with cystic fibrosis. These results indicate that multivalent cations such as calcium should be maximally separated from oral levofloxacin administration in adult patients with cystic fibrosis to prevent this drug interaction, thereby better optimizing antibiotic efficacy and decreasing the potential for resistance development.

  12. Dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation in basalts due to reactions with carbonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakiya, Shreya; Adam, Ludmila; Esteban, Lionel; Rowe, Michael C.; Shane, Phil

    2017-06-01

    One of the leading hydrothermal alteration processes in volcanic environments is when rock-forming minerals with high concentrations of iron, magnesium, and calcium react with CO2 and water to form carbonate minerals. This is used to the advantage of geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Here we experimentally investigate how mineral carbonation processes alter the rock microstructure due to CO2-water-rock interactions. In order to characterize these changes, CO2-water-rock alteration in Auckland Volcanic Field young basalts (less than 0.3 Ma) is studied before and after a 140 day reaction period. We investigate how whole core basalts with similar geochemistry but different porosity, permeability, pore geometry, and volcanic glass content alter due to CO2-water-rock reactions. Ankerite and aluminosilicate minerals precipitate as secondary phases in the pore space. However, rock dissolution mechanisms are found to dominate this secondary mineral precipitation resulting in an increase in porosity and decrease in rigidity of all samples. The basalt with the highest initial porosity and volcanic glass volume shows the most secondary mineral precipitation. At the same time, this sample exhibits the greatest increase in porosity and permeability, and a decrease in rock rigidity post reaction. For the measured samples, we observe a correlation between volcanic glass volume and rock porosity increase due to rock-fluid reactions. We believe this study can help understand the dynamic rock-fluid interactions when monitoring field scale CO2 sequestration projects in basalts.

  13. Impaired calcium sensing distinguishes primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) patients with low bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas J; Koh, James; Thomas, Samantha M; Hogue, Joyce A; Scheri, Randall P; Roman, Sanziana A; Sosa, Julie A

    2017-09-01

    A subset of PHPT patients exhibit a more severe disease phenotype characterized by bone loss, fractures, recurrent nephrolithiasis, and other dysfunctions, but the underlying reasons for this disparity in clinical presentation remain unknown. We sought to identify new mechanistic indices that could inform more personalized management of PHPT. Pre-, peri-, and postoperative data and demographic, clinical, and pathological information from patients undergoing parathyroidectomy for PHPT were collected. Univariate and partial Spearman correlation was used to estimate the association of parathyroid tumor calcium sensing capacity with select variables. An unselected series of 237 patients aged >18years and undergoing parathyroidectomy for PHPT were enrolled. Calcium sensing capacity, expressed as the concentration required for half-maximal biochemical response (EC50), was evaluated in parathyroid tumors from an unselected series of 74 patients and assessed for association with clinical parameters. The hypothesis was that greater disease severity would be associated with attenuated calcium sensitivity and biochemically autonomous parathyroid tumor behavior. Parathyroid tumors segregated into two distinct groups of calcium responsiveness (EC50<3.0 and ≥3.0mM). The low EC50 group (n=27) demonstrated a mean calcium EC50 value of 2.49mM [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.43-2.54mM], consistent with reference normal activity. In contrast, the high EC50 group (n=47) displayed attenuated calcium sensitivity with a mean EC50 value of 3.48mM [95% CI: 3.41-3.55mM]. Retrospective analysis of the clinical registry data suggested that high calcium EC50 patients presented with a more significant preoperative bone mineral density (BMD) deficit with a t-score of -2.7, (95% CI: -3.4 to -1.9) versus 0.9, (95% CI: -2.1 to -0.4) in low EC50 patients (p<0.001). After adjusting for gender, age, BMI, 25 OH vitamin D level and preoperative iPTH, lowest t-score and calcium EC50 were inversely

  14. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4

  15. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    ions would enhance the absorption of CO2 into the aerosol even more than the singly or doubly charged ions. Ion containing aerosols also help to catalyze reactions between water and CO2. Hydrated phosphate and silicate ions tend to attract hydrogen atoms from neighboring water molecules to reduce the charged state. When there is CO2 in the vicinity of the ion, the remainder of the water molecule which loses the hydrogen(s) reacts with CO2 to form carbonates. (PO4---) + H2O + CO2 -> (HPO3--) + (HCO3-) (SiO4----) + H2O + CO2 -> (HSiO4---) + (HCO3-) (SiO4----) + H2O + CO2 -> (H2SiO4--) + (CO3--) In conclusion, highly charged phosphate and silicate ions dissolved in water and aerosolized into small droplets can facilitate both the capture and the mineralization of CO2. This method would be especially effective in a CO2 rich environment such as the exhaust gas of a combustion process. [1] H. Gokturk, "Geoengineering with Charged Droplets," AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco 2011 [2] H. Gokturk, "Atomistic Simulation of Sea Spray Particles," AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco 2012

  16. Non-ureolytic calcium carbonate precipitation by Lysinibacillus sp. YS11 isolated from the rhizosphere of Miscanthus sacchariflorus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Suk; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, Woojun

    2017-06-01

    Although microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) through ureolysis has been widely studied in environmental engineering fields, urea utilization might cause environmental problems as a result of ammonia and nitrate production. In this study, many non-ureolytic calcium carbonate-precipitating bacteria that induced an alkaline environment were isolated from the rhizosphere of Miscanthus sacchariflorus near an artificial stream and their ability to precipitate calcium carbonate minerals with the absence of urea was investigated. MICP was observed using a phase-contrast microscope and ion-selective electrode. Only Lysinibacillus sp. YS11 showed MICP in aerobic conditions. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of calcium carbonate. Field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated the formation of morphologically distinct minerals around cells under these conditions. Monitoring of bacterial growth, pH changes, and Ca 2+ concentrations under aerobic, hypoxia, and anaerobic conditions suggested that strain YS11 could induce alkaline conditions up to a pH of 8.9 and utilize 95% of free Ca 2+ only under aerobic conditions. Unusual Ca 2+ binding and its release from cells were observed under hypoxia conditions. Biofilm and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formation were enhanced during MICP. Strain YS11 has resistance at high pH and in high salt concentrations, as well as its spore-forming ability, which supports its potential application for self-healing concrete.

  17. Growth of aragonite calcium carbonate nanorods in the biomimetic anodic aluminum oxide template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inho; Han, Haksoo; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a biomimetic template was prepared and applied for growing calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) nanorods whose shape and polymorphism were controlled. A biomimetic template was prepared by adsorbing catalytic dipeptides into the pores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. Using this peptide-adsorbed template, mineralization and aggregation of CaCO 3 was carried out to form large nanorods in the pores. The nanorods were aragonite and had a structure similar to nanoneedle assembly. This aragonite nanorod formation was driven by both the AAO template and catalytic function of dipeptides. The AAO membrane pores promoted generation of aragonite polymorph and guided nanorod formation by guiding the nanorod growth. The catalytic dipeptides promoted the aggregation and further dehydration of calcium species to form large nanorods. Functions of the AAO template and catalytic dipeptides were verified through several control experiments. This biomimetic approach makes possible the production of functional inorganic materials with controlled shapes and crystalline structures.

  18. Novel morphology of calcium carbonate controlled by poly(L-lysine).

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Dong, Wenyong; Zhu, Shenmin; Yu, Xinhai; Yan, Deyue

    2009-11-17

    The novel calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) morphology, twin-sphere with an equatorial girdle, has been obtained under the control of poly(L-lysine) (PLys) through gas-diffusion method. The effect of the concentration of calcium cation and PLys, the reaction time, and the initial pH value are investigated, and various interesting morphologies, including twin-sphere, discus-like, hexagonal plate, and hallow structure are observed by using scanning electronic microscopy. Laser microscopic Raman spectroscopy studies indicated that all these CaCO(3) are vaterite. A possible mechanism is suggested to explain the formation of the twin-sphere based morphologies according to the results. It is proven that alkaline polypeptides can control the mineralization of CaCO(3) precisely as the reported acidic polypeptides and double hydrophilic block copolymers.

  19. Effects of Astragalus membranaceus with supplemental calcium on bone mineral density and bone metabolism in calcium-deficient ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Se-Chan; Kim, Hee Jung; Kim, Mi-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that Astragalus membranaceus, an Asian traditional herb, has an estrogenic effect in vitro. To examine the possible role of A. membranaceus extract with supplemental calcium (Ca) on bone status in calcium-deficient (LCa) ovariectomized (OVX) rats, a total of 48 female rats were divided into six groups: (1) normal control, (2) sham operation with LCa (sham-LCa), (3) OVX with LCa (OVX-LCa), (4) A. membranaceus supplementation with OVX-LCa (OVX-MLCa), (5) Ca supplementation with OVX (OVX-Ca), and (6) A. membranaceus and Ca supplementation with OVX (OVX-MCa). A. membranaceus ethanol extract (500 mg/kg BW) and/or Ca (800 mg/kg BW) were administered orally for 8 weeks along with a Ca-deficient diet. Results revealed that Ca supplementation with or without A. membranaceus extract significantly improved bone mineral density, biomechanical strength, and ash weight of the femur and tibia in OVX rats. High Ca with A. membranaceus combination supplementation significantly increased the ash weight of the femur and tibia and decreased urinary Ca excretion compared with supplementation of Ca alone. Uterine weight was not changed by A. membranaceus administration in OVX rats. These results suggest that A. membranaceus extract combined with supplemental Ca may be more protective against the Ca loss of bone than A. membranaceus or supplementation of Ca alone in calcium-insufficient postmenopausal women.

  20. Evidence for Calcium Carbonate at the Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Ming, D. W.; Sutter, B.; Arvidson, R. E.; Hoffman, J.; Niles, P. B.; Smith, P.

    2009-01-01

    The Phoenix mission has recently finished its study of the north polar environment of Mars with the aim to help understand both the current climate and to put constraints on past climate. An important part of understanding the past climate is the study of secondary minerals, those formed by reaction with volatile compounds such as H2O and CO2. This work describes observations made by the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the Phoenix Lander related to carbonate minerals. Carbonates are generally considered to be products of aqueous processes. A wet and warmer climate during the early history of Mars coupled with a much denser CO2 atmosphere are ideal conditions for the aqueous alteration of basaltic materials and the subsequent formation of carbonates. Carbonates (Mg- and Ca-rich) are predicted to be thermodynamically stable minerals in the present martian environment, however, there have been only a few indications of carbonates on the surface by a host of orbiting and landed missions to Mars. Carbonates (Mg-rich) have been suggested to be a component (2-5 wt %) of the martian global dust based upon orbital thermal emission spectroscopy. The identifications, based on the presence of a 1480 cm-1 absorption feature, are consistent with Mgcarbonates. A similar feature is observed in brighter, undisturbed soils by Mini-TES on the Gusev plains. Recently, Mg-rich carbonates have been identified in the Nili Fossae region by the CRISM instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Carbonates have also been confirmed as aqueous alteration phases in martian meteorites so it is puzzling why there have not been more discoveries of carbonates by landers, rovers, and orbiters. Carbonates may hold important clues about the history of liquid water and aqueous processes on the surface of Mars.

  1. Electrodeposition on nanofibrous polymer scaffolds: Rapid mineralization, tunable calcium phosphate composition and topography

    PubMed Central

    He, Chuanglong; Xiao, Guiyong; Jin, Xiaobing; Sun, Chenghui; Ma, Peter X.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a straightforward, fast, and versatile technique to fabricate mineralized nanofibrous polymer scaffolds for bone regeneration in this work. Nanofibrous poly(l-lactic acid) scaffolds were fabricated using both electrospinning and phase separation techniques. An electrodeposition process was designed to deposit calcium phosphate on the nanofibrous scaffolds. Such scaffolds contain a high quality mineral coating on the fiber surface with tunable surface topography and chemical composition by varying the processing parameters, which can mimic the composition and structure of natural bone extracellular matrix and provide a more biocompatible interface for bone regeneration. PMID:21673827

  2. Carbonate and sulfate minerals in the Chassigny meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; Gooding, James L.

    1991-01-01

    SO2 and CO2 from pyrolysis and combustion of bulk Chassigny and infrared traces of sulfate and carbonate minerals have been previously reported. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x ray spectrometry (EDS), portions of these samples are searched, and a Ca-sulfate/carbonate association is confirmed.

  3. Development of poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) composites for calcium carbonate and sulphate scale inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mithil Kumar, N; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Jagadeesh, Dani; Kanny, K; Bux, F

    2015-01-01

    Polyaspartic acid (PSI) is suitable for the inhibition of inorganic scale deposition. To enhance its scale inhibition efficiency, PSI was modified by reacting aspartic acid with malic acid (MA) using thermal polycondensation polymerization. This reaction resulted in poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) (PSI-co-MA) dual polymer. The structural, chemical and thermal properties of the dual polymers were analysed by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and gel permeation chromatography. The effectiveness of six different molar ratios of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate scale inhibition at laboratory scale batch experiments was evaluated with synthetic brine solution at selected doses of polymer at 65-70°C by the static scale test method. The performance of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for the inhibition of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate precipitation was compared with that of a PSI single polymer. The PSI-co-MA exhibited excellent ability to control inorganic minerals, with approximately 85.36% calcium carbonate inhibition and 100% calcium sulphate inhibition at a level of 10 mg/L PSI-co-MA, respectively. Therefore, it may be reasonably concluded that PSI-co-MA is a highly effective scale inhibitor for cooling water treatment applications.

  4. Structure and reactivity of ferrihydrite-soil organic carbon-calcium ternary complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Adhikari, D.; Sowers, T.; Stuckey, J.; Poulson, S.; Sparks, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Complete understanding about the interactions between soil organic carbon (SOC) and minerals is important for predicting the stability of SOC and its response to climate change. Recent studies have shown the importance of calcium (Ca)-bearing minerals and iron (Fe) oxide in associating with and stabilizing SOC. In this study, we have investigated the formation and reactivity of ferrihydrite-SOC-Ca ternary complexes. During the co-precipitation of ferrihydrite with SOC in the presence of Ca2+, 60% of SOC can be co-precipitated with ferrihydrite at a C/Fe (molar ratio) of up to 10, whereas the Ca/Fe ratio was saturated at 0.2. Increasing amount of Ca2+ did not affect the co-precipitation of SOC with ferrihydrite or the lability of ferrihydrite-bound SOC. In addition, microbial reduction of ferrihydrite and reductive release of ferrihydrite-bound SOC were not influenced by the presence of Ca, but the pathway for Fe mineral transformation during the reduction was affected by Ca. In the meantime, Fe reduction selectively released carboxylic-enriched SOC. As a comparison, the presence of SOC increased the incorporation of Ca into the structure of ferrihydrite. Our results indicate the formation of ferrihydrite-SOC-Ca complexes, with organic carbon bridging the ferrihydrite and Ca. Such ternary complexes potentially play an important role in regulating the interactions between SOC and mineral phases in soil.

  5. The calcium concentration of public drinking waters and bottled mineral waters in Spain and its contribution to satisfying nutritional needs.

    PubMed

    Vitoria, Isidro; Maraver, Francisco; Ferreira-Pêgo, Cíntia; Armijo, Francisco; Moreno Aznar, Luis; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    A sufficient intake of calcium enables correct bone mineralization. The bioavailability of calcium in water is similar to that in milk. To determine the concentration of calcium in public drinking water and bottled mineral water. We used ion chromatography to analyse the calcium concentrations of public drinking waters in a representative sample of 108 Spanish municipalities (21,290,707 people) and of 109 natural mineral waters sold in Spain, 97 of which were produced in Spain and 12 of which were imported. The average calcium concentration of public drinking waters was 38.96 ± 32.44 mg/L (range: 0.40- 159.68 mg/L). In 27 municipalities, the water contained 50-100 mg/L of calcium and in six municipalities it contained over 100 mg/L. The average calcium concentration of the 97 Spanish natural mineral water brands was 39.6 mg/L (range: 0.6-610.1 mg/L). Of these, 34 contained 50-100 mg/L of calcium and six contained over 100 mg/L. Of the 12 imported brands, 10 contained over 50 mg/L. Assuming water consumption is as recommended, water containing 50-100 mg/L of calcium provides 5.4-12.8% of the recommended intake of calcium for children aged one to thirteen, up to 13.6% for adolescents, 5.8-17.6% for adults, and up to 20.8% for lactating mothers. Water with 100-150 mg/L of calcium provides 10-31% of the recommended dietary allowance, depending on the age of the individual. Public drinking water and natural mineral water consumption in a third of Spanish cities can be considered an important complementary source of calcium. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Calcium carbonate scale control, effect of material and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Macadam, J; Parsons, S A

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on developing a reproducible method for reducing calcium carbonate scale formation on heated surfaces where scaling can cause serious problems. It is known that calcium carbonate precipitation is sensitive to impurity ions, such as iron and zinc, even at trace concentration levels. In this paper two sets of experiments are reported. The first experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of zinc, copper and iron dosing on CaCO3 nucleation and precipitation. Results from the experiments showed that the most effective inhibitor of CaCO3 precipitation was zinc and the effect was linked to dose levels and temperature. Copper and iron had little effect on precipitation in the dose range investigated. The second trial was undertaken to translate the precipitation data to scale formation. These tests were undertaken at 70 degrees C. 5 mg x L(-1) zinc dose reduced the scale formation by 35%. The effect of iron on calcium carbonate scaling rate was not significant. The physical nature of the material on which the scale is formed also influences the scaling. The scaling experiment was also used to investigate the effect of different surface material (stainless steel, copper and aluminium) on CaCO3 scale formation. Copper surface scaled the most.

  7. Capping a Pulpotomy with Calcium Aluminosilicate Cement: Comparison to Mineral Trioxide Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Phillip R.; Woodmansey, Karl F.; White, Robert; Primus, Carolyn M.; Opperman, Lynne A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Calcium aluminate cements have shown little affinity for bacterial growth, low toxicity, and immunogenicity when used as a restoration material, but calcium aluminate cements have not been tested in vivo in pulpotomy procedures. Methods To address this question, a calcium aluminate cement (Quick-Set) was tested along with 2 mineral trioxide aggregates, ProRoot MTA and MTA Plus. These cements were used as a capping agent after pulpotomy. Control rats had no pulpotomy, or the pulpotomy was not capped. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-1α were measured, and histology was performed at 30 and 60 days after capping. The nociceptive response was determined by measuring the lengthening of the rat's meal duration. Results and Conclusions: IL-1β and IL-1α concentrations were reduced in the capped teeth, but no differences were observed among the 3 cements. Dentinal bridging could be detected at both 30 and 60 days with each of the 3 cements, and the pulps were still vital 60 days after capping. Meal duration significantly shortened after placement of the 3 different cements, indicating a nociceptive response, but there were no differences among the materials. Calcium aluminate cements had similar properties to mineral trioxide aggregates and is a viable option for pulpotomy procedures. PMID:25146026

  8. Women with Fibromyalgia Have Lower Levels of Calcium, Magnesium, Iron and Manganese in Hair Mineral Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Sang; Kim, Kwang-Min; Lee, Duck-Joo; Kim, Bom-Taeck; Park, Sat-Byul; Cho, Doo-Yeoun; Suh, Chang-Hee; Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Park, Rae-Woong

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about hair mineral status in fibromyalgia patients. This study evaluated the characteristics of hair minerals in female patients with fibromyalgia compared with a healthy reference group. Forty-four female patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria were enrolled as the case group. Ageand body mass index-matched data were obtained from 122 control subjects enrolled during visit for a regular health check-up. Hair minerals were analyzed and compared between the two groups. The mean age was 43.7 yr. General characteristics were not different between the two groups. Fibromyalgia patients showed a significantly lower level of calcium (775 µg/g vs 1,093 µg/g), magnesium (52 µg/g vs 72 µg/g), iron (5.9 µg/g vs 7.1 µg/g), copper (28.3 µg/g vs 40.2 µg/g) and manganese (140 ng/g vs 190 ng/g). Calcium, magnesium, iron, and manganese were loaded in the same factor using factor analysis; the mean of this factor was significantly lower in fibromyalgia group in multivariate analysis with adjustment for potential confounders. In conclusion, the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, iron, and manganese in the hair of female patients with fibromyalgia are lower than of controls, even after adjustment of potential confounders. PMID:22022174

  9. A flow-system comparison of the reactivities of calcium superoxide and potassium superoxide with carbon dioxide and water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, P. C.; Ballou, E. V.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1982-01-01

    A single pass flow system was used to test the reactivity of calcium superoxide with respiratory gases and the performance was compared to that of potassium superoxide. The KO2 system is used by coal miners as a self-contained unit in rescue operations. Particular attention was given to the reactivity with carbon dioxide and water vapor at different temperatures and partial pressures of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. The calcium superoxide beds were found to absorb CO2 and H2O vapor, releasing O2. The KO2 bed, however, released O2 at twice the rate of CO2 absorption at 37 C. It is concluded that the calcium superoxide material is not a suitable replacement for the KO2 bed, although Ca(O2)2 may be added to the KO2 bed to enhance the CO2 absorption.

  10. Radiological study of the effect of low calcium diet on the mineral metabolism of bone tissue. With reference to mineralization in callus (in Japanese)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.

    1972-01-01

    Deficiency of available food material due either to poor diet or to malabsorption may adversely affect the skeleton. To study the affection, DDN mice were fed low calcium diet to induce low calcium state corresponding to malabsorption of calcium from the intestine. The femur was fractured manually. Then, calcium deposition in the callus was observed by microradiography and tracer technics with /sup 47/Ca. Increase of the body weight in mice fed low calcium diet was much slower than in the control. The affection of the low calcium diet on bone tissue appeared as a decrease of precipitation of calcium salt.more » This tendency was also observed in callus, Tracer study with /sup 47/Ca was performed in mice fed the low calcium diet for 24 days. Incorporation activity of calcium was generally high in each organ except the kidney. Callus in the site of the fracture in mice fed a low calcium diet was formed to the same degree as the control, although the amount of precipitated calcium in it was significantly poorer. In summary, insufficient mineralization in relation to osteogenesis occurred when the supply of the requisite electrolytes was insufficient or inappropriate. On the other hand, the uptake rate of calcinm in the callus was elevated even in the calcium deficient state. (auth)« less

  11. Evidence for the involvement of carbonic anhydrase and urease in calcium carbonate formation in the gravity-sensing organ of Aplysia californica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrozo, H. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Dean, D. D.; Harrison, J. L.; Campbell, J. W.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Boyan, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms that could modulate the formation of otoconia, calcium carbonate granules in the inner ear of vertebrate species, we examined statoconia formation in the gravity-sensing organ, the statocyst, of the gastropod mollusk Aplysia californica using an in vitro organ culture model. We determined the type of calcium carbonate present in the statoconia and investigated the role of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and urease in regulating statocyst pH as well as the role of protein synthesis and urease in statoconia production and homeostasis in vitro. The type of mineral present in statoconia was found to be aragonitic calcium carbonate. When the CA inhibitor, acetazolamide (AZ), was added to cultures of statocysts, the pH initially (30 min) increased and then decreased. The urease inhibitor, acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), decreased statocyst pH. Simultaneous addition of AZ and AHA caused a decrease in pH. Inhibition of urease activity also reduced total statoconia number, but had no effect on statoconia volume. Inhibition of protein synthesis reduced statoconia production and increased statoconia volume. In a previous study, inhibition of CA was shown to decrease statoconia production. Taken together, these data show that urease and CA play a role in regulating statocyst pH and the formation and maintenance of statoconia. CA produces carbonate ion for calcium carbonate formation and urease neutralizes the acid formed due to CA action, by production of ammonia.

  12. Pseudomonas, Pantoea and Cupriavidus isolates induce calcium carbonate precipitation for biorestoration of ornamental stone.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, M I; Magoulas, A; Kotoulas, G; Catsikis, I; Bakolas, A; Karageorgis, A P; Mavridou, A; Doulia, D; Rigas, F

    2013-08-01

    Bacterially induced calcium carbonate precipitation from various isolates was investigated aiming at developing an environmentally friendly technique for ornamental stone protection and restoration. Micro-organisms isolated from stone samples and identified using 16S rDNA and biochemical tests promoted calcium carbonate precipitation in solid and novel liquid growth media. Biomineral morphology was studied on marble samples with scanning electron microscopy. Most isolates demonstrated specimen weight increase, covering partially or even completely the marble surfaces mainly with vaterite. The conditions under which vaterite precipitated and its stability throughout the experimental runs are presented. A growth medium that facilitated bacterial growth of different species and promoted biomineralization was formulated. Most isolates induced biomineralization of CaCO3 . Micro-organisms may actually be a milestone in the investigation of vaterite formation facilitating our understanding of geomicrobiological interactions. Pseudomonas, Pantoea and Cupriavidus strains could be candidates for bioconsolidation of ornamental stone protection. Characterization of biomineralization capacity of different bacterial species improves understanding of the bacterially induced mineralization processes and enriches the list of candidates for biorestoration applications. Knowledge of biomineral morphology assists in differentiating mineral from biologically induced precipitates. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Crystallinity of chitin and carbonate mineral components independently record crustacean biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergelsberg, S. T.; Michel, F. M.; Mukhopadhyay, B.; Dove, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    Some of the earliest evidence for crustacean organisms is attributed to the discovery of Peytoia nathorsti, a predatory arthropod from 500 Ma (Cong, P. et al., 2014). These animals presumably began with a soft exoskeleton and evolved to fill diverse ecological niches while adopting a mineralized skeleton that is rarely preserved in its entirety (Klompmaker, A.A. et al., 2015). That is, one or more of the primary skeleton components (calcium carbonate minerals, the polysaccharide chitin, and minor proteins) were subject to decomposition during fossilization and preservation. These missing pieces present a significant obstacle to reconstructing ecosystem variability over long time periods. Our recent study of the exoskeletons from ten Malacostraca species suggests the physical and chemical structure of chitin holds promise as a secondary proxy for reconstructing skeleton reinforcement. Using high-energy X-ray diffraction and a novel Raman spectroscopy technique to enhance resolution, we determined the detailed nanostructures of chitin and the associated calcium carbonate minerals that comprise the cuticles of multiple body parts. Crab cuticles from the order Brachyura (Dungeness and Rock crabs) exhibit elevated crystallinities of the chitin and calcite in the more reinforced structures (such as the claw). In contrast, the cuticle of lobster body parts show a much greater variability of calcium carbonate crystallinity and a very consistent crystallinity of chitin. Calcite and chitin crystallinity exhibit a dependency within a species (body part to body part), but these dependencies can be different between taxa. Insights from this study suggest high resolution structural analyses hold promise for developing new proxies for the paleo-environment and paleo-ecology of specific Malacostraca animals, regardless of how well the specimen is preserved.

  14. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO 2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO 2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO 2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO 2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This final report details all development, analysis, design and testing of the project. Also included in the final report are an updatedmore » Techno-Economic Analysis and CO 2 Lifecycle Analysis. The subsystems included in the pilot demonstration plant are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant was proven to be capable of capturing CO 2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing it into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The final report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. The report also discusses the results of the fully integrated operation of the facility. Fiber cement boards have been produced in this facility exclusively using reactive calcium carbonate from captured CO 2 from flue gas. These boards meet all US and China appropriate acceptance standards. Use demonstrations for these boards are now underway.« less

  15. Response of Microbial Soil Carbon Mineralization Rates to Oxygen Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiluweit, M.; Denney, A.; Nico, P. S.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The rate of soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is known to be controlled by climatic factors as well as molecular structure, mineral-organic associations, and physical protection. What remains elusive is to what extent oxygen (O2) limitations impact overall rates of microbial SOM mineralization (oxidation) in soils. Even within upland soils that are aerobic in bulk, factors limiting O2 diffusion such as texture and soil moisture can result in an abundance of anaerobic microsites in the interior of soil aggregates. Variation in ensuing anaerobic respiration pathways can further impact SOM mineralization rates. Using a combination of (first) aggregate model systems and (second) manipulations of intact field samples, we show how limitations on diffusion and carbon bioavailability interact to impose anaerobic conditions and associated respiration constraints on SOM mineralization rates. In model aggregates, we examined how particle size (soil texture) and amount of dissolved organic carbon (bioavailable carbon) affect O2 availability and distribution. Monitoring electron acceptor profiles (O2, NO3-, Mn and Fe) and SOM transformations (dissolved, particulate, mineral-associated pools) across the resulting redox gradients, we then determined the distribution of operative microbial metabolisms and their cumulative impact on SOM mineralization rates. Our results show that anaerobic conditions decrease SOM mineralization rates overall, but those are partially offset by the concurrent increases in SOM bioavailability due to transformations of protective mineral phases. In intact soil aggregates collected from soils varying in texture and SOM content, we mapped the spatial distribution of anaerobic microsites. Optode imaging, microsensor profiling and 3D tomography revealed that soil texture regulates overall O2 availability in aggregate interiors, while particulate SOM in biopores appears to control the fine-scale distribution of anaerobic microsites. Collectively, our

  16. Electrospinning of calcium carbonate fibers and their conversion to nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Jani; Santala, Eero; Heikkilä, Mikko; Ritala, Mikko

    2014-12-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) fibers were prepared by electrospinning followed by annealing. Solutions consisting of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (Ca(NO3)2·4H2O) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) dissolved in ethanol or 2-methoxyethanol were used for the fiber preparation. By varying the precursor concentrations in the electrospinning solutions CaCO3 fibers with average diameters from 140 to 290 nm were obtained. After calcination the fibers were identified as calcite by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The calcination process was studied in detail with high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The initially weak fiber-to-substrate adhesion was improved by adding a strengthening CaCO3 layer by spin or dip coating Ca(NO3)2/PVP precursor solution on the CaCO3 fibers followed by annealing of the gel formed inside the fiber layer. The CaCO3 fibers were converted to nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) fibers by treatment in a dilute phosphate solution. The resulting hydroxyapatite had a plate-like crystal structure with resemblance to bone mineral. The calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite fibers are interesting materials for bone scaffolds and bioactive coatings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J; Olgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1998-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the phosphate-binding efficacy, side effects, and cost of therapy of calcium ketoglutarate granulate as compared with calcium carbonate tablets in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The study design used was a randomized, crossover open trial, and the main outcome measurements were plasma ionized calcium levels, plasma phosphate levels, plasma intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, requirements for supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate therapy, patient tolerance, and cost of therapy. Nineteen patients on chronic hemodialysis were treated with a dialysate calcium concentration of 1.25 mmol/L and a fixed alfacalcidol dose for at least 2 months. All had previously tolerated therapy with calcium carbonate. Of the 19 patients included, 10 completed both treatment arms. After 12 weeks of therapy, the mean (+/-SEM) plasma ionized calcium level was significantly lower in the ketoglutarate arm compared with the calcium carbonate arm (4.8+/-0.1 mg/dL v 5.2+/-0.1 mg/dL; P = 0.004), whereas the mean plasma phosphate (4.5+/-0.3 mg/dL v 5.1+/-0.1 mg/dL) and PTH levels (266+/-125 pg/mL v 301+/-148 pg/mL) did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms. Supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate was not required during calcium ketoglutarate treatment, while two patients needed this supplement when treated with calcium carbonate. Five of 17 (29%) patients were withdrawn from calcium ketoglutarate therapy within 1 to 2 weeks due to intolerance (anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, general uneasiness), whereas the remaining 12 patients did not experience any side effects at all. The five patients with calcium ketoglutarate intolerance all had pre-existing gastrointestinal symptoms; four of them had received treatment with cimetidine or omeprazol before inclusion into the study. Calculations based on median doses after 12 weeks showed that the cost of the therapy in Denmark was 10 times higher for calcium ketoglutarate compared with calcium

  18. An experimental model for calcium carbonate urolithiasis in goats

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Brandon J.; Deveau, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    Background Calcium carbonate is a common urolith type in small ruminants with no high‐yield experimental model to evaluate animal susceptibility or preventative measure response. Hypothesis That novel plastic winged implants would allow accumulation and quantification of calcium carbonate calculus formation in goats on a high‐calcium diet and identify individual variation between goats in the mass of calculi produced. Animals Eight nonpregnant 3‐ and 4‐year‐old Boer‐cross does, weighing 22.3–39.5 kg, determined to be healthy based on physical examination, were used in these experiments. Methods Prospective cohort study for in vivo experimental model development. Implants were placed into the urinary bladder lumen in 8 goats over 2 evaluation periods. The alfalfa‐based ration had a total ration Ca : P of 3.29 and 3.84 : 1, respectively. Urine was collected at 0, 28, 56, and 84 days in the 1st experiment; blood and urine at those timepoints in the 2nd experiment. For each evaluation period, the implants were removed 84 days after implantation and weighed. Accumulated calculi mass was calculated and compared between goats and was analyzed for composition. Results Implant retention was 100% and 86% in the 2 studies. All goats with retained implants accumulated calcium carbonate at a mean implant gain per day across studies ranging from 0.44 to 57.45 mg. Two goats accumulated (0.44–7.65 mg/day and 33.64 & 57.45 mg/day) significantly more urolith material than the cohort across both studies (P = .047). No routine analytes on blood or urine were found to be explanatory for the difference observed. Conclusions and Clinical Importance These findings form a basis for implant and diet selection for use in future studies of urolithiasis development and for studies regarding individual susceptibility to urolithiasis. PMID:29524246

  19. Improvement of calcium mineral separation contrast using anionic reagents: electrokinetics properties and flotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafhaj, Z.; Filippov, L. O.; Filippova, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    The flotation separation of salt type calcium minerals is problematic, due to the similarities in their same active Ca2+ related site for interaction with anionic collectors and similar physicochemical characteristics such as solubility, zero-point charge, surface speciation and Ca-site density. The work was performed to achieve effective and selective separation of the calcium-minerals using pure minerals samples: orange calcite with Mg impurities, optic calcite with impurities level and an apatite. The pure samples surface was examined using techniques sensitive near-surface like infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and chemical composition was obtained by ICPMS. The isoelectric point (IEP) and point of zero charge (PZC) in electrolyte were recorded using electrophoresis method at different ionic strengths of the solution. Mechanisms of charge development at the mineral-water interface are discussed. The time of contact as important parameter for the charge equilibrium was deduced from kinetics study and fixed to 30 minutes. The difference in the values obtained between IEP and PZSE can be explained by the presence of a specific adsorption of cations and anions on the surface. The effect of pure anionic collectors such as oleic and linoleic acid were studied. At low pH, both collectors lead to a good recovery for the calcites. The flotation recovery of optic calcite at pH 9 with sodium oleate is higher than with sodium linoleate. At alkaline pH, apatite showed a better recovery with sodium linoleate.

  20. Using Calcium Isotopic Composition of Calcium Carbonate Veins to Assess the Roles of Vein Formation and Seafloor Alteration in Regulation of the Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Coggon, R. M.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Turchyn, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Calcium carbonate vein formation in the oceanic crust has been proposed as a climate-sensitive feedback mechanism that regulates the carbon cycle on million-year timescales. The suggestion has been that higher pCO2 levels may drive changes in ocean temperature and pH that increase seafloor alteration, releasing more calcium from oceanic basalt. This results in more removal of carbon from Earth's surface through calcium carbonate formation, which includes calcium carbonate vein formation in oceanic crust. The importance of this feedback mechanism remains enigmatic. Measurements of the δ44Ca of calcium carbonate veins in the oceanic crust may constrain the sources of calcium and timing of vein formation. Seawater and basalt are the only sources present shortly after crustal formation, whereas other sources, such as anhydrite dissolution and sedimentary carbonates become available when the crust ages, at which point carbonate veins may form far from the ridge axis. We report the calcium isotopic composition of 65 calcium carbonate veins, ranging from 108 to 1.2 million years old, in hydrothermally altered basalt from the Mid-Atlantic and Juan de Fuca ridges. We also present 43 δ44Ca measurements of 5.9 million year old basalts and dikes from the Costa Rica Rift that have undergone hydrothermal alteration over a range of conditions in upper crust. The δ44Ca of the calcium carbonate veins ranges from -1.59 to 1.01‰ (versus Bulk Silicate Earth), whereas the δ44Ca of altered basalts ranges from -0.18 to 0.28‰. Depth and temperature of formation seem to be major influences on calcium carbonate vein δ44Ca, with veins formed at cool, shallower depths having higher δ44Ca, closer to seawater. In contrast, we note no temporal variation in δ44Ca of calcium carbonate veins when comparing samples from older and younger crust. The majority of veins (54 out of 65) have δ44Ca between that of seawater and basalt, which implies that they may have formed quite soon after

  1. Restoration of parathyroid function after change of phosphate binder from calcium carbonate to lanthanum carbonate in hemodialysis patients with suppressed serum parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Masaaki; Okuno, Senji; Nagayama, Harumi; Yamada, Shinsuke; Ishimura, Eiji; Imanishi, Yasuo; Shoji, Shigeichi

    2015-03-01

    Control of phosphate is the most critical in the treatment of chronic kidney disease with mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Because calcium-containing phosphate binder to CKD patients is known to induce adynamic bone disease with ectopic calcification by increasing calcium load, we examined the effect of lanthanum carbonate (LaC), a non-calcium containing phosphate binder, to restore bone turnover in 27 hemodialysis patients with suppressed parathyroid function (serum intact parathyroid hormone [iPTH] ≦ 150 pg/mL). At the initiation of LaC administration, the dose of calcium-containing phosphate binder calcium carbonate (CaC) was withdrawn or reduced based on serum phosphate. After initiation of LaC administration, serum calcium and phosphate decreased significantly by 4 weeks, whereas whole PTH and iPTH increased. A significant and positive correlation between decreases of serum calcium, but not phosphate, with increases of whole PTH and iPTH, suggested that the decline in serum calcium with reduction of calcium load by LaC might increase parathyroid function. Serum bone resorption markers, such as serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, and N-telopeptide of type I collagen increased significantly by 4 weeks after LaC administration, which was followed by increases of serum bone formation markers including serum bone alkaline phosphatase, intact procollagen N-propeptide, and osteocalcin. Therefore, it was suggested that LaC attenuated CaC-induced suppression of parathyroid function and bone turnover by decreasing calcium load. In conclusion, replacement of CaC with LaC, either partially or totally, could increase parathyroid function and resultant bone turnover in hemodialysis patients with serum iPTH ≦ 150 pg/mL. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Catalysis of carbon monoxide methanation by deep sea manganate minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, A. L.; Maple, M. B.; Arrhenius, G.

    1990-01-01

    The catalytic activity of deep sea manganese nodule minerals for the methanation of carbon monoxide was measured with a microcatalytic technique between 200 and 460 degrees C. The manganate minerals were activated at 248 degrees C by immersion into a stream of hydrogen in which pulses of carbon monoxide were injected. Activation energies for the methanation reaction and hydrogen desorption from the manganate minerals were obtained and compared with those of pure nickel. Similar energy values indicate that the activity of the nodule materials for the reaction appears to be related to the amount of reducible transition metals present in the samples (ca. 11 wt.-%). Since the activity of the nodule minerals per gram is comparable to that of pure nickel, most of the transition metal ions located between manganese oxide layers appear to be exposed and available to catalyze the reaction.

  3. The Effect of Prepubertal Calcium Carbonate Supplementation on Skeletal Development in Gambian Boys—A 12-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Cole, T. J.; Laskey, M. A.; Ceesay, M.; Mendy, M. B.; Sawo, Y.; Prentice, A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Calcium intake during growth is essential for future bone health but varies widely between individuals and populations. The impact on bone of increasing calcium intake is unknown in a population where low calcium intake, stunting, and delayed puberty are common. Objective: To determine the effect of prepubertal calcium supplementation on mean age at peak velocity for bone growth and mineral accrual. Design and Setting: Prospective follow-up of boys in rural Gambia, West Africa, who had participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of calcium supplementation. Participants: Eighty boys, initially aged 8.0–11.9 years, were followed up for 12 years. Interventions: Subjects received 1 year of calcium carbonate supplementation (1000 mg daily, 5 d/wk). Main Outcome Measures: Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry measurements were carried out for whole body (WB), lumbar spine, and total hip bone mineral content, bone area (BA), and WB lean mass. Super imposition by translation and rotation models was made to assess bone growth. Results: Age at peak velocity was consistently earlier in the calcium group compared to the placebo group, for WB bone mineral content (mean, −6.2 [SE, 3.1]; P = .05), WB BA (mean, −7.0 [SE, 3.2] mo; P = .03), lumbar spine and total hip BA. By young adulthood, supplementation did not change the amount of bone accrued (mineral or size) or the rate of bone growth. Conclusions: Twelve months of prepubertal calcium carbonate supplementation in boys with a low calcium diet advanced the adolescent growth spurt but had no lasting effect on bone mineral or bone size. There is a need for caution when applying international recommendations to different populations. PMID:24762110

  4. Bone Mineral Density Changes after Physical Training and Calcium Intake in Students with Attention Deficit and Hyper Activity Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arab ameri, Elahe; Dehkhoda, Mohammad Reza; Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the effects of weight bearing exercise and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with attention deficit and hyper activity (ADHD) disorder. For this reason 54 male students with ADHD (age 8-12 years old) were assigned to four groups with no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake, and physical…

  5. Bone Mineral Density Accrual in Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Effects of Calcium Intake and Physical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodarzi, Mahmood; Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of weight bearing exercise and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with autism spectrum disorders. For this reason 60 boy students with autism disorder (age 8-10 years old) were assigned to four groups with no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake, and physical…

  6. Mineral protection of soil carbon counteracted by root exudates [Root exudates counteract mineral control on soil carbon turnover

    DOE PAGES

    Keiluweit, Marco; Bougoure, Jeremy J.; Nico, Peter S.; ...

    2015-03-30

    Multiple lines of existing evidence suggest that climate change enhances root exudation of organic compounds into soils. Recent experimental studies show that increased exudate inputs may cause a net loss of soil carbon. This stimulation of microbial carbon mineralization (‘priming’) is commonly rationalized by the assumption that exudates provide a readily bioavailable supply of energy for the decomposition of native soil carbon (co-metabolism). Here we show that an alternate mechanism can cause carbon loss of equal or greater magnitude. We find that a common root exudate, oxalic acid, promotes carbon loss by liberating organic compounds from protective associations with minerals.more » By enhancing microbial access to previously mineral-protected compounds, this indirect mechanism accelerated carbon loss more than simply increasing the supply of energetically more favourable substrates. Lastly, our results provide insights into the coupled biotic–abiotic mechanisms underlying the ‘priming’ phenomenon and challenge the assumption that mineral-associated carbon is protected from microbial cycling over millennial timescales.« less

  7. Comparison of the Absorption of Calcium Carbonate and Calcium Citrate after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Tondapu, P.; Provost, D.; Adams-Huet, B.; Sims, T.; Chang, C.; Sakhaee, K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) restricts food intake. Consequently, patients consume less calcium. In addition, food no longer passes through the duodenum, the main site of calcium absorption. Therefore, calcium absorption is significantly impaired. The goal of this study is to compare two common calcium supplements in gastric bypass patients. Method Nineteen patients were enrolled in a randomized, double-blinded, crossover study comparing the absorption of calcium from calcium carbonate and calcium citrate salts. Serum and urine calcium levels were assessed for peak values (Cmax) and cumulative calcium increment (area under the curve [AUC]). Serum PTH was assessed for minimum values (PTHmin) and cumulative PTH decrement (AUC). Statistical analysis was performed using a repeated analysis of variance model. Results Eighteen subjects completed the study. Calcium citrate resulted in a significantly higher serum Cmax (9.4+0.4 mg/dl vs. 9.2+0.3 mg/dl, p=0.02) and serum AUC (55+2 mg/dl vs. 54+2 mg/dl, p=0.02). Calcium citrate resulted in a significantly lower PTHmin (24+11 pg/ml vs. 30+13 pg/ml, p=0.01) and a higher AUC (−32+51 pg/ml vs. −3+56 pg/ml, p=0.04). There was a non-significant trend for higher urinary AUC in the calcium citrate group (76.13+36.39 mg/6 h vs. 66.04+40.82, p=0.17). Conclusion Calcium citrate has superior bioavailability than calcium carbonate in RYGB patients. PMID:19437082

  8. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  9. Proteomic analysis of a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kiyoko; Matsuta, Yosuke; Moriyama, Manabu; Yasuda, Makoto; Chishima, Noriharu; Yamaoka, Noriko; Fukuuchi, Tomoko; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Suzuki, Koji

    2014-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the matrix protein of a rare urinary stone that contained calcium carbonate. A urinary stone was extracted from a 34-year-old male patient with metabolic alkalosis. After X-ray diffractometry and infrared analysis of the stone, proteomic analysis was carried out. The resulting mass spectra were evaluated with protein search software, and matrix proteins were identified. X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis confirmed that the stone contained calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Of the identified 53 proteins, 24 have not been previously reported from calcium oxalate- or calcium phosphate-containing stones. The protease inhibitors and several proteins related to cell adhesion or the cytoskeleton were identified for the first time. We analyzed in detail a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Considering the formation of a calcium carbonate stone, the new identified proteins should play an important role on the urolithiasis process in alkaline condition. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  10. Calcium Isotope Fractionation during Carbonate Weathering in the Northern Guangdong, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Mao, G.; Wei, G.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-12-01

    CO2 is consumed during the weathering of carbonates, whereas carbonates are precipitated rapidly in the oceans, which are pivotal to modulate atmospheric CO2, oceanic pH and climate. Calcium carbonate in limestone is one of the largest reservoirs of carbon at the Earth's surface, so calcium is an important element that links the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and the atmosphere. Compared with silicate rocks, carbonate rocks have more rapid rates of physical and chemical erosions, so the carbonate weathering will respond more quickly to the climatic changes. In the southeast of China, enormous of carbonate rocks are widely distributed. Due to the influence of the subtropical monsoon climate, the rocks experienced strong chemical weathering and pedogenic process, resulting in red weathering crust of carbonate rocks. This type of weathering crust is geochemistry-sensitive and ecology-vulnerable, which can provide important insights into the recycle of supergene geochemistry in the karst areas. In this study, we report calcium isotopic compositions of saprolites from a weathering profile developed on argillaceous carbonate rocks in northern Guangdong, South China. The acid-leachable fraction, which was extracted by 1N hydrochloride acid, showed limited variation of δ44/40Ca(NIST 915a) spanning from 0.55 ± 0.06‰ (2SD) to 0.72 ± 0.05‰ (2SD) despite CaO content ranging from 0.01 wt.% to 45.7 wt.%, implying that Ca isotope didn't fractionate much which may due to the congruent dissolution of limestone minerals. In contrast, radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the whole rocks changed with depth from 0.710086 ± 6 (2SE) at the base rock to 0.722164± 8 (2SE) at the top-soil, which are possibly attributed to the mixing effect between carbonate and silicate fractions. Sr is an analogue for Ca due to its similar ionic size and charge; however, these two systems can differ in certain respects. The coupled study of Ca and Sr will be helpful to verify sources of Ca and the

  11. Bioleaching of serpentine group mineral by fungus Talaromyces flavus: application for mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Lianwen, L.; Zhao, L.; Teng, H.

    2011-12-01

    Many studies of serpentine group mineral dissolution for mineral carbonation have been published in recent years. However, most of them focus mainly on either physical and chemical processes or on bacterial function, rather than fungal involvement in the bioleaching of serpentine group mineral. Due to the excessive costs of the magnesium dissolution process, finding a lower energy consumption method will be meaningful. A fungal strain Talaromyces flavus was isolated from serpentinic rock of Donghai (China). No study of its bioleaching ability is currently available. It is thus of great significance to explore the impact of T. flavus on the dissolution of serpentine group mineral. Serpentine rock-inhabiting fungi belonging to Acremonium, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Botryotinia, Cladosporium, Clavicipitaceae, Cosmospora, Fusarium, Monascus, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, Talaromyces, Trichoderma were isolated. These strains were chosen on the basis of resistance to magnesium and nickel characterized in terms of minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC). Specifically, the strain Talaromyces flavus has a high tolerance to both magnesium (1 mol/L) and nickel (10 mM/L), and we examine its bioleaching ability on serpentine group mineral. Contact and separation experiments (cut-off 8 000-14 000 Da), as well as three control experiments, were set up for 30 days. At least three repeated tests were performed for each individual experiment. The results of our experiments demonstrate that the bioleaching ability of T. flavus towards serpentine group mineral is evident. 39.39 wt% of magnesium was extracted from lizardite during the bioleaching period in the contact experiment, which showed a dissolution rate at about a constant 0.126 mM/d before reaching equilibrium in 13 days. The amount of solubilized Mg from chrysotile and antigorite were respectively 37.79 wt% and 29.78 wt% in the contact experiment. These results make clear the influence of mineral structure on mineral bioleaching

  12. New agent to treat elevated phosphate levels: magnesium carbonate/calcium carbonate tablets.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Caitlin; Cameron, Karen; Battistella, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    In summary, Binaphos CM, a magnesium carbonate/calcium carbonate combination phosphate binder, is marketed for treating elevated phosphate levels in dialysis patients. Although studies using magnesium/calcium carbonate as a phosphate binder are short term with small numbers of patients, this phosphate binder has shown some promising results and may provide clinicians with an alternative for phosphate binding. Using a combination phosphate binder may reduce pill burden and encourage patient compliance. In addition to calcium and phosphate, it is imperative to diligently monitor magnesium levels in patients started on this medication, as magnesium levels may increase with longer duration of use. Additional randomized controlled trials are necessary to evaluate long-term efficacy and safety of this combination phosphate binder.

  13. Determination of Sodium, Potassium, Magnesium, and Calcium Minerals Level in Fresh and Boiled Broccoli and Cauliflower by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerdy

    2018-01-01

    Vegetables from the cabbage family vegetables consumed by many people, which is known healthful, by eaten raw, boiled, or cooked (stir fry or soup). Vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber. This study aims to determine the decrease percentage of sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium minerals level caused by boiled broccoli and cauliflower by atomic absorption spectrometry. Boiled broccoli and cauliflower prepared by given boiled treatment in boiling water for 3 minutes. Fresh and boiled broccoli and cauliflower carried out dry destruction, followed by quantitative analysis of sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium minerals respectively at a wavelength of 589.0 nm; 766.5 nm; 285.2 nm; and 422.7 nm, using atomic absorption spectrometry methods. After the determination of the sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium minerals level followed by validation of analytical methods with accuracy, precision, linearity, range, limit of detection (LOD), and limit of quantitation (LOQ) parameters. Research results show a decrease in the sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium minerals level in boiled broccoli and cauliflower compared with fresh broccoli and cauliflower. Validation of analytical methods gives results that spectrometry methods used for determining sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium minerals level are valid. It concluded that the boiled gives the effect of decreasing the minerals level significantly in broccoli and cauliflower.

  14. Bone Mineral Density, Mechanical, Microstructural Properties and Mineral Content of the Femur in Growing Rats Fed with Cactus Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) Cladodes as Calcium Source in Diet.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Becerra, Ezequiel; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; Del Real, Alicia; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Rodríguez-García, Mario; Rubio, Efraín; Quintero-García, Michelle; Rojas-Molina, Isela

    2017-02-04

    Mechanical, microstructural properties, mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur were evaluated in growing rats fed with Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) cladodes at different maturity stages as calcium source. Male weanling rats were fed with cladodes at early maturity stage (25 and 60 days of age, belonging to groups N-60 and N-200, respectively) and cladodes at late maturity stage (100 and 135 days of age, belonging to groups N-400 and N-600, respectively) for 6 weeks. Additionally, a control group fed with calcium carbonate as calcium source was included for comparative purposes. All diets were fitted to the same calcium content (5 g/kg diet). The failure load of femurs was significantly lower ( p ≤ 0.05) in groups N-60 and N-200 in comparison to N-400, N-600 and control groups. The cortical width (Ct.Wi) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) of the femurs in control and N-600 groups were significantly higher ( p ≤ 0.05) than Ct.Wi and Tb.Th of femurs in groups N-60 and N-200. Trabecular separation of the femurs in N-60 and N-200 groups showed the highest values compared with all experimental groups. The highest calcium content in the femurs were observed in control, N-600 and N-400 groups; whereas the lowest phosphorus content in the bones were detected in N-200, N-600 and N-400 groups. Finally, the BMD in all experimental groups increased with age; nevertheless, the highest values were observed in N-600 and control groups during pubertal and adolescence stages. The results derived from this research demonstrate, for the first time, that the calcium found in Opuntia ficus indica cladodes is actually bioavailable and capable of improving mineral density and mechanical and microstructural properties of the bones. These findings suggest that the consumption of cladodes at late maturity stage within the diet might have a beneficial impact on bone health.

  15. Bone marrow induced osteogenesis in hydroxyapatite and calcium carbonate implants.

    PubMed

    Vuola, J; Göransson, H; Böhling, T; Asko-Seljavaara, S

    1996-09-01

    In this experimental study, blocks of natural coral (calcium carbonate) and its structurally similar derivate in the form of hydroxyapatite (calcium phosphate) were implanted in rat latissimus dorsi muscle with autogenous bone marrow to compare their bone-forming capability. A block without marrow placed in the opposite latissimus muscle served as a control. The animals were killed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks and, in the hydroxyapatite group, also at 24 weeks. The sections were analysed histologically and histomorphometrically. Bone was found only in implants containing bone marrow. Bone formation was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in coral than in hydroxyapatite implants at 3 weeks (10.8% versus 4.8%) and at 12 weeks (13.7% versus 6.3%, bone/total original block area). At 12 weeks all the coral implants had lost their original structure, and the cross-sectional area of the block had diminished to 40% of the original area.

  16. Rapid carbon mineralization for permanent disposal of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, Juerg M.; Stute, Martin; Snæbjörnsdottir, Sandra Ó.; Oelkers, Eric H.; Gislason, Sigurdur R.; Aradottir, Edda S.; Sigfusson, Bergur; Gunnarsson, Ingvi; Sigurdardottir, Holmfridur; Gunnlaugsson, Einar; Axelsson, Gudni; Alfredsson, Helgi A.; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Mesfin, Kiflom; Taya, Diana Fernandez de la Reguera; Hall, Jennifer; Dideriksen, Knud; Broecker, Wallace S.

    2016-06-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) provides a solution toward decarbonization of the global economy. The success of this solution depends on the ability to safely and permanently store CO2. This study demonstrates for the first time the permanent disposal of CO2 as environmentally benign carbonate minerals in basaltic rocks. We find that over 95% of the CO2 injected into the CarbFix site in Iceland was mineralized to carbonate minerals in less than 2 years. This result contrasts with the common view that the immobilization of CO2 as carbonate minerals within geologic reservoirs takes several hundreds to thousands of years. Our results, therefore, demonstrate that the safe long-term storage of anthropogenic CO2 emissions through mineralization can be far faster than previously postulated.

  17. Adsorption and release of amino acids mixture onto apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Rhilassi, A.; Mourabet, M.; El Boujaady, H.; Bennani-Ziatni, M.; Hamri, R. El; Taitai, A.

    2012-10-01

    Study focused on the interaction of adsorbate with poorly crystalline apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral. Calcium phosphates prepared in water-ethanol medium at physiological temperature (37 °C) and neutral pH, their Ca/P ratio was between 1.33 and 1.67. Adsorbate used in this paper takes the mixture form of two essential amino acids L-lysine and DL-leucine which have respectively a character hydrophilic and hydrophobic. Adsorption and release are investigated experimentally; they are dependent on the phosphate type and on the nature of adsorbate L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture. Adsorption of mixture of amino acids on the apatitic calcium phosphates is influenced by the competition between the two amino acids: L-lysine and DL-leucine which exist in the medium reaction. The adsorption kinetics is very fast while the release kinetics is slow. The chemical composition of apatite has an influence on both adsorption and release. The interactions adsorbate-adsorbent are electrostatic type. Adsorption and release reactions of the amino acid mixture are explained by the existence of the hydrated surface layer of calcium phosphate apatite. The charged sbnd COOsbnd and sbnd NH3+ of adsorbates are the strongest groups that interact with the surface of apatites, the adsorption is mainly due to the electrostatic interaction between the groups sbnd COOsbnd of amino acids and calcium Ca2+ ions of the apatite. Comparative study of interactions between adsorbates (L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture) and apatitic calcium phosphates is carried out in vitro by using UV-vis and infrared spectroscopy IR techniques.

  18. Nacre-like calcium carbonate controlled by ionic liquid/graphene oxide composite template.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chengli; Xie, Anjian; Shen, Yuhua; Zhu, Jinmiao; Li, Hongying

    2015-06-01

    Nacre-like calcium carbonate nanostructures have been mediated by an ionic liquid (IL)-graphene oxide (GO) composite template. The resultant crystals were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD). The results showed that either 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4) or graphene oxide can act as a soft template for calcium carbonate formation with unusual morphologies. Based on the time-dependent morphology changes of calcium carbonate particles, it is concluded that nacre-like calcium carbonate nanostructures can be formed gradually utilizing [BMIM]BF4/GO composite template. During the process of calcium carbonate formation, [BMIM]BF4 acted not only as solvents but also as morphology templates for the fabrication of calcium carbonate materials with nacre-like morphology. Based on the observations, the possible mechanisms were also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Transglutaminase-induced crosslinking of gelatin-calcium carbonate composite films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuemeng; Liu, Anjun; Ye, Ran; Wang, Wenhang; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The effects of transglutaminase (TGase) on the rheological profiles and interactions of gelatin-calcium carbonate solutions were studied. In addition, mechanical properties, water vapour permeability and microstructures of gelatin-calcium carbonate films were also investigated and compared. Fluorescence data suggested that the interaction of TGase and gelation-calcium carbonate belonged to a static quenching mechanism, and merely one binding site between TGase and gelatin-calcium carbonate was identified. Moreover, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the mechanical properties and the water vapour permeability studies revealed that TGase favoured the strong intramolecular polymerisation of the peptides in gelatin. The microstructures of the surfaces and cross sections in gelatin-calcium carbonate films were shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs. The results of the fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that TGase caused conformational changes in the proteins films. Therefore, TGase successfully facilitated the formation of gelatin-calcium carbonate composite films. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Crystallization of Calcium Carbonate in a Large Scale Field Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Wismeth, Carina; Baumann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The long term efficiency of geothermal facilities and aquifer thermal energy storage in the carbonaceous Malm aquifer in the Bavarian Molasse Basin is seriously affected by precipitations of carbonates. This is mainly caused by pressure and temperature changes leading to oversaturation during production. Crystallization starts with polymorphic nuclei of calcium carbonate and is often described as diffusion-reaction controlled. Here, calcite crystallization is favoured by high concentration gradients while aragonite crystallization is occurring at high reaction rates. The factors affecting the crystallization processes have been described for simplified, well controlled laboratory experiments, the knowledge about the behaviour in more complex natural systems is still limited. The crystallization process of the polymorphic forms of calcium carbonate were investigated during a heat storage test at our test site in the eastern part of the Bavarian Molasse Basin. Complementary laboratory experiments in an autoclave were run. Both, field and laboratory experiments were conducted with carbonaceous tap water. Within the laboratory experiments additionally ultra pure water was used. To avoid precipitations of the tap water, a calculated amount of {CO_2} was added prior to heating the water from 45 - 110°C (laboratory) resp. 65 - 110°C (field). A total water volume of 0.5 L (laboratory) resp. 1 L (field) was immediately sampled and filtrated through 10 - 0.1

  1. Dehydration-induced amorphous phases of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Saharay, Moumita; Yazaydin, A Ozgur; Kirkpatrick, R James

    2013-03-28

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a critical transient phase in the inorganic precipitation of CaCO3 and in biomineralization. The calcium carbonate crystallization pathway is thought to involve dehydration of more hydrated ACC to less hydrated ACC followed by the formation of anhydrous ACC. We present here computational studies of the transition of a hydrated ACC with a H2O/CaCO3 ratio of 1.0 to anhydrous ACC. During dehydration, ACC undergoes reorganization to a more ordered structure with a significant increase in density. The computed density of anhydrous ACC is similar to that of calcite, the stable crystalline phase. Compared to the crystalline CaCO3 phases, calcite, vaterite, and aragonite, the computed local structure of anhydrous ACC is most-similar to those of calcite and vaterite, but the overall structure is not well described by either. The strong hydrogen bond interaction between the carbonate ions and water molecules plays a crucial role in stabilizing the less hydrated ACC compositions compared to the more hydrated ones, leading to a progressively increasing hydration energy with decreasing water content.

  2. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Castro, G. A.; Uad, I.; Gonzalez-Martinez, A.; Rivadeneyra, A.; Gonzalez-Lopez, J.; Rivadeneyra, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments. PMID:26273646

  3. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine.

    PubMed

    Silva-Castro, G A; Uad, I; Gonzalez-Martinez, A; Rivadeneyra, A; Gonzalez-Lopez, J; Rivadeneyra, M A

    2015-01-01

    The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments.

  4. Constraints on Biogenic Emplacement of Crystalline Calcium Carbonate and Dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, B.; Clark, S. M.; Jacob, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a biogenic precursor of calcium carbonates forming shells and skeletons of marine organisms, which are key components of the whole marine environment. Understanding carbonate formation is an essential prerequisite to quantify the effect climate change and pollution have on marine population. Water is a critical component of the structure of ACC and the key component controlling the stability of the amorphous state. Addition of small amounts of magnesium (1-5% of the calcium content) is known to promote the stability of ACC presumably through stabilization of the hydrogen bonding network. Understanding the hydrogen bonding network in ACC is fundamental to understand the stability of ACC. Our approach is to use Monte-Carlo simulations constrained by X-ray and neutron scattering data to determine hydrogen bonding networks in ACC as a function of magnesium doping. We have already successfully developed a synthesis protocol to make ACC, and have collected X-ray data, which is suitable for determining Ca, Mg and O correlations, and have collected neutron data, which gives information on the hydrogen/deuterium (as the interaction of X-rays with hydrogen is too low for us to be able to constrain hydrogen atom positions with only X-rays). The X-ray and neutron data are used to constrain reverse Monte-Carlo modelling of the ACC structure using the Empirical Potential Structure Refinement program, in order to yield a complete structural model for ACC including water molecule positions. We will present details of our sample synthesis and characterization methods, X-ray and neutron scattering data, and reverse Monte-Carlo simulations results, together with a discussion of the role of hydrogen bonding in ACC stability.

  5. GFP Facilitates Native Purification of Recombinant Perlucin Derivatives and Delays the Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Eva; Guth, Christina; Weiss, Ingrid M.

    2012-01-01

    Insolubility is one of the possible functions of proteins involved in biomineralization, which often limits their native purification. This becomes a major problem especially when recombinant expression systems are required to obtain larger amounts. For example, the mollusc shell provides a rich source of unconventional proteins, which can interfere in manifold ways with different mineral phases and interfaces. Therefore, the relevance of such proteins for biotechnological processes is still in its infancy. Here we report a simple and reproducible purification procedure for a GFP-tagged lectin involved in biomineralization, originally isolated from mother-of-pearl in abalone shells. An optimization of E. coli host cell culture conditions was the key to obtain reasonable yields and high degrees of purity by using simple one-step affinity chromatography. We identified a dual functional role for the GFP domain when it became part of a mineralizing system in vitro. First, the GFP domain improved the solubility of an otherwise insoluble protein, in this case recombinant perlucin derivatives. Second, GFP inhibited calcium carbonate precipitation in a concentration dependent manner. This was demonstrated here using a simple bulk assay over a time period of 400 seconds. At concentrations of 2 µg/ml and higher, the inhibitory effect was observed predominantly for HCO3 − as the first ionic interaction partner, but not necessarily for Ca2+ . The interference of GFP-tagged perlucin derivatives with the precipitation of calcium carbonate generated different types of GFP-fluorescent composite calcite crystals. GFP-tagging offers therefore a genetically tunable tool to gently modify mechanical and optical properties of synthetic biocomposite minerals. PMID:23056388

  6. Effects of temperature during the irradiation of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia; Camargo-Raya, Claudia; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Uribe, Roberto M; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    Calcium carbonate received gamma irradiation at different doses (0-309kGy) and temperature regimes (77-298K) to study the effects of irradiation temperature. The changes were followed by EPR spectroscopy. We observed the formation of a composite EPR spectrum, even at low radiation doses and temperature. There was a strong effect on the evaluation of the radicals formed as a function of irradiation temperature, probably due to the diffusion in the frozen powder and the recombination of some radicals at room temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Two-way Valorization of Blast Furnace Slag: Synthesis of Precipitated Calcium Carbonate and Zeolitic Heavy Metal Adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Georgakopoulos, Evangelos; Santos, Rafael M; Chiang, Yi Wai; Manovic, Vasilije

    2017-02-21

    The aim of this work is to present a zero-waste process for storing CO2 in a stable and benign mineral form while producing zeolitic minerals with sufficient heavy metal adsorption capacity. To this end, blast furnace slag, a residue from iron-making, is utilized as the starting material. Calcium is selectively extracted from the slag by leaching with acetic acid (2 M CH3COOH) as the extraction agent. The filtered leachate is subsequently physico-chemically purified and then carbonated to form precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) of high purity (<2 wt% non-calcium impurities, according to ICP-MS analysis). Sodium hydroxide is added to neutralize the regenerated acetate. The morphological properties of the resulting calcitic PCC are tuned for its potential application as a filler in papermaking. In parallel, the residual solids from the extraction stage are subjected to hydrothermal conversion in a caustic solution (2 M NaOH) that leads to the predominant formation of a particular zeolitic mineral phase (detected by XRD), namely analcime (NaAlSi2O6∙H2O). Based on its ability to adsorb Ni 2+ , as reported from batch adsorption experiments and ICP-OES analysis, this product can potentially be used in wastewater treatment or for environmental remediation applications.

  8. Two-way Valorization of Blast Furnace Slag: Synthesis of Precipitated Calcium Carbonate and Zeolitic Heavy Metal Adsorbent

    PubMed Central

    Georgakopoulos, Evangelos; Santos, Rafael M.; Chiang, Yi Wai; Manovic, Vasilije

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present a zero-waste process for storing CO2 in a stable and benign mineral form while producing zeolitic minerals with sufficient heavy metal adsorption capacity. To this end, blast furnace slag, a residue from iron-making, is utilized as the starting material. Calcium is selectively extracted from the slag by leaching with acetic acid (2 M CH3COOH) as the extraction agent. The filtered leachate is subsequently physico-chemically purified and then carbonated to form precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) of high purity (<2 wt% non-calcium impurities, according to ICP-MS analysis). Sodium hydroxide is added to neutralize the regenerated acetate. The morphological properties of the resulting calcitic PCC are tuned for its potential application as a filler in papermaking. In parallel, the residual solids from the extraction stage are subjected to hydrothermal conversion in a caustic solution (2 M NaOH) that leads to the predominant formation of a particular zeolitic mineral phase (detected by XRD), namely analcime (NaAlSi2O6∙H2O). Based on its ability to adsorb Ni2+, as reported from batch adsorption experiments and ICP-OES analysis, this product can potentially be used in wastewater treatment or for environmental remediation applications. PMID:28287605

  9. Carbon nanopipettes characterize calcium release pathways in breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrlau, Michael G.; Brailoiu, Eugen; Patel, Sandip; Gogotsi, Yury; Dun, Nae J.; Bau, Haim H.

    2008-08-01

    Carbon-based nanoprobes are attractive for minimally invasive cell interrogation but their application in cell physiology has thus far been limited. We have developed carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with nanoscopic tips and used them to inject calcium-mobilizing messengers into cells without compromising cell viability. We identify pathways sensitive to cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPr) and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) in breast carcinoma cells. Our findings demonstrate the superior utility of CNPs for intracellular delivery of impermeant molecules and, more generally, for cell physiology studies. The CNPs do not appear to cause any lasting damage to cells. Their advantages over commonly used glass pipettes include smaller size, breakage and clogging resistance, and potential for multifunctionality such as in concurrent injection and electrical measurements.

  10. Carbon nanopipettes characterize calcium release pathways in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schrlau, Michael G; Brailoiu, Eugen; Patel, Sandip; Gogotsi, Yury; Dun, Nae J; Bau, Haim H

    2008-08-13

    Carbon-based nanoprobes are attractive for minimally invasive cell interrogation but their application in cell physiology has thus far been limited. We have developed carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with nanoscopic tips and used them to inject calcium-mobilizing messengers into cells without compromising cell viability. We identify pathways sensitive to cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPr) and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) in breast carcinoma cells. Our findings demonstrate the superior utility of CNPs for intracellular delivery of impermeant molecules and, more generally, for cell physiology studies. The CNPs do not appear to cause any lasting damage to cells. Their advantages over commonly used glass pipettes include smaller size, breakage and clogging resistance, and potential for multifunctionality such as in concurrent injection and electrical measurements.

  11. Modification of nanostructured calcium carbonate for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong; Wang, Chao-Qun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Cheng, Si-Xue

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a facile method to modify nanostructured calcium carbonate (CaCO3) gene delivery systems by adding calcium phosphate (CaP) component was developed. CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation of Ca(2+) ions with plasmid DNA in the presence of carbonate and phosphate ions. For comparison, CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles and CaP/DNA co-precipitates were also prepared. The effects of carbonate ion/phosphate ion (CO3(2-)/PO4(3-)) ratio on the particle size and gene delivery efficiency were investigated. With an appropriate CO3(2-)/PO4(3-) ratio, the co-existence of carbonate and phosphate ions could control the size of co-precipitates effectively, and CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles with a decreased size and improved stability could be obtained. The in vitro gene transfections mediated by different nanoparticles in 293T cells and HeLa cells were carried out, using pGL3-Luc as a reporter plasmid. The gene transfection efficiency of CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles could be significantly improved as compared with CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles and CaP/DNA co-precipitates. The confocal microscopy study indicated that the cellular uptake and nuclear localization of CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles were significantly enhanced as compared with unmodified CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An experimental model for calcium carbonate urolithiasis in goats.

    PubMed

    Jones, Meredyth L; Dominguez, Brandon J; Deveau, Michael A

    2018-05-01

    Calcium carbonate is a common urolith type in small ruminants with no high-yield experimental model to evaluate animal susceptibility or preventative measure response. That novel plastic winged implants would allow accumulation and quantification of calcium carbonate calculus formation in goats on a high-calcium diet and identify individual variation between goats in the mass of calculi produced. Eight nonpregnant 3- and 4-year-old Boer-cross does, weighing 22.3-39.5 kg, determined to be healthy based on physical examination, were used in these experiments. Prospective cohort study for in vivo experimental model development. Implants were placed into the urinary bladder lumen in 8 goats over 2 evaluation periods. The alfalfa-based ration had a total ration Ca : P of 3.29 and 3.84 : 1, respectively. Urine was collected at 0, 28, 56, and 84 days in the 1st experiment; blood and urine at those timepoints in the 2nd experiment. For each evaluation period, the implants were removed 84 days after implantation and weighed. Accumulated calculi mass was calculated and compared between goats and was analyzed for composition. Implant retention was 100% and 86% in the 2 studies. All goats with retained implants accumulated calcium carbonate at a mean implant gain per day across studies ranging from 0.44 to 57.45 mg. Two goats accumulated (0.44-7.65 mg/day and 33.64 & 57.45 mg/day) significantly more urolith material than the cohort across both studies (P = .047). No routine analytes on blood or urine were found to be explanatory for the difference observed. These findings form a basis for implant and diet selection for use in future studies of urolithiasis development and for studies regarding individual susceptibility to urolithiasis. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  13. Carbonation of Rock Minerals by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide at 250 degrees C.

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Ecker, L.; Butcher, T.

    2010-06-01

    Wet powder-samples of five rock minerals, granite, albite, hornblende, diorite, and biotite mica, were exposed in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) for 3 days at 250 C under 17.23 MPa pressure, and then the susceptibility of the various crystalline phases present in these mineral structures to reactions with hot scCO2 was investigated by XRD and FT-IR. The anorthite present in diorite was identified as the most vulnerable phase to carbonation. In contrast, biotite displayed a great resistance, although its phase was transformed hydrothermally to sanidine and quartz. Granite comprised of two phases, anorthoclase-type albite and quartz. The carbonation of former phasemore » led to the formation of amorphous sodium and potassium carbonates coexisting with the clay-like by-products of the carbonation reaction. The reactivity of quartz to scCO2 was minimal, if any. Among these rock minerals, only hornblende formed crystalline carbonation products, such as calcite and magnesite after exposure, reflecting the likelihood of an increase in its volume. Based upon the feldspar ternary diagram, the carbonation rate of various different minerals in the plagioclase feldspar family depended primarily on the amount of anorthite. On the other hand, alkali feldspar minerals involving anorthoclase-type albite and sanidine had a lower reactivity with scCO2, compared with that of plagioclase feldspar minerals.« less

  14. Carbonate substitution in the mineral component of bone: Discriminating the structural changes, simultaneously imposed by carbonate in A and B sites of apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madupalli, Honey; Pavan, Barbara; Tecklenburg, Mary M. J.

    2017-11-01

    The mineral component of bone and other biological calcifications is primarily a carbonate substituted calcium apatite. Integration of carbonate into two sites, substitution for phosphate (B-type carbonate) and substitution for hydroxide (A-type carbonate), influences the crystal properties which relate to the functional properties of bone. In the present work, a series of AB-type carbonated apatites (AB-CAp) having varying A-type and B-type carbonate weight fractions were prepared and analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and carbonate analysis. A detailed characterization of A-site and B-site carbonate assignment in the FTIR ν3 region is proposed. The mass fractions of carbonate in A-site and B-site of AB-CAp correlate differently with crystal axis length and crystallite domain size. In this series of samples reduction in crystal domain size correlates only with A-type carbonate which indicates that carbonate in the A-site is more disruptive to the apatite structure than carbonate in the B-site. High temperature methods were required to produce significant A-type carbonation of apatite, indicating a higher energy barrier for the formation of A-type carbonate than for B-type carbonate. This is consistent with the dominance of B-type carbonate substitution in low temperature synthetic and biological apatites.

  15. Calcium carbonate solubility: a reappraisal of scale formation and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gal, J Y; Bollinger, J C; Tolosa, H; Gache, N

    1996-09-01

    Considerable disparity exists in the published thermodynamic data for selected species in the Ca(2+) /CO(2)/H(2)O system near 25 degrees C and 1 atm pressure. Some authors doubt the significance of CaCO(3)(0)aq) complexes although there is experimental evidence of their occurrence. Evaluation of all the published experimental and estimated data for aqueous calcium carbonate species confirms that the consistent set of constants given by Plummer and Busenberg in 1982 is the best available, and suggests a formation constant log beta = 3.22 for CaCO(3)(0)(aq). This value was confirmed by additional experimental data and calculations using a specially developed computer program. The solubility s and solubility product K(s) are critically evaluated for each solid polymorph (amorphous CaCO(3), ikaite, vaterite, aragonite and calcite) using a hydrated ion pair model and we give coherent explanations for the calcium carbonate precipitation/dissolution process and the existence of supersaturated waters. The practical cases of scale formation and its inhibition by phosphonate-type compounds are discussed and explained with the same model, taking into account the CaCO(3)(0)(aq) species.

  16. Onsite defluoridation system for drinking water treatment using calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Wong, Elaine Y; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2018-06-15

    Fluoride in drinking water has several effects on teeth and bones. At concentrations of 1-1.5 mg/L, fluoride can strengthen enamel, improving dental health, but at concentrations above 1.5 to 4 mg/L can cause dental fluorosis. At concentrations of 4-10 mg/L, skeletal fluorosis can occur. There are many areas of the world that have excessive fluoride in drinking water, such as China, India, Sri Lanka, and the Rift Valley countries in Africa. Treatment solutions are needed, especially in poor areas where drinking water treatment plants are not available. On-site or individual treatment alternatives can be attractive if constructed from common materials and if simple enough to be constructed and maintained by users. Advanced on-site methods, such as under sink reserve osmosis units, can remove fluoride but are too expensive for developing areas. This paper investigates calcium carbonate as a cost effective sorbent for an onsite defluoridation drinking water system. Batch and column experiments were performed to characterize F - removal properties. Fluoride sorption was described by a Freundlich isotherm model, and it was found that the equilibrium time was approximately 3 h. Calcium carbonate was found to have comparable F - removal abilities as the commercial ion exchange resins and possessed higher removal effectiveness compared to calcium containing eggshells and seashells. It was also found that the anion Cl- did not compete with F - at typical drinking water concentrations, having little impact on the effectiveness of the treatment system. A fluoride removal system is proposed that can be used at home and can be maintained by users. Through this work, we can be a step closer to bringing safe drinking water to those that do not have access to it. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Image-based Modeling of Biofilm-induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J. M.; Rothman, A.; Jackson, B.; Klapper, I.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.

    2013-12-01

    Pore scale biological processes in the subsurface environment are important to understand in relation to many engineering applications including environmental contaminant remediation, geologic carbon sequestration, and petroleum production. Specifically, biofilm induced calcium carbonate precipitation has been identified as an attractive option to reduce permeability in a lasting way in the subsurface. This technology may be able to replace typical cement-based grouting in some circumstances; however, pore-scale processes must be better understood for it to be applied in a controlled manor. The work presented will focus on efforts to observe biofilm growth and ureolysis-induced mineral precipitation in micro-fabricated flow cells combined with finite element modelling as a tool to predict local chemical gradients of interest (see figure). We have been able to observe this phenomenon over time using a novel model organism that is able to hydrolyse urea and express a fluorescent protein allowing for non-invasive observation over time with confocal microscopy. The results of this study show the likely existence of a wide range of local saturation indices even in a small (1 cm length scale) experimental system. Interestingly, the locations of high predicted index do not correspond to the locations of higher precipitation density, highlighting the need for further understanding. Figure 1 - A micro-fabricated flow cell containing biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation. (A) Experimental results: Active biofilm is in green and dark circles are calcium carbonate crystals. Note the channeling behavior in the top of the image, leaving a large hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm mass. (B) Finite element model: The prediction of relative saturation of calcium carbonate (as calcite). Fluid enters the system at a low saturation state (blue) but areas of high supersaturation (red) are predicted within the hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm. If only effluent

  18. Perlwapin, an Abalone Nacre Protein with Three Four-Disulfide Core (Whey Acidic Protein) Domains, Inhibits the Growth of Calcium Carbonate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Treccani, Laura; Mann, Karlheinz; Heinemann, Fabian; Fritz, Monika

    2006-01-01

    We have isolated a new protein from the nacreous layer of the shell of the sea snail Haliotis laevigata (abalone). Amino acid sequence analysis showed the protein to consist of 134 amino acids and to contain three sequence repeats of ∼40 amino acids which were very similar to the well-known whey acidic protein domains of other proteins. The new protein was therefore named perlwapin. In addition to the major sequence, we identified several minor variants. Atomic force microscopy was used to explore the interaction of perlwapin with calcite crystals. Monomolecular layers of calcite crystals dissolve very slowly in deionized water and recrystallize in supersaturated calcium carbonate solution. When perlwapin was dissolved in the supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, growth of the crystal was inhibited immediately. Perlwapin molecules bound tightly to distinct step edges, preventing the crystal layers from growing. Using lower concentrations of perlwapin in a saturated calcium carbonate solution, we could distinguish native, active perlwapin molecules from denaturated ones. These observations showed that perlwapin can act as a growth inhibitor for calcium carbonate crystals in saturated calcium carbonate solution. The function of perlwapin in nacre growth may be to inhibit the growth of certain crystallographic planes in the mineral phase of the polymer/mineral composite nacre. PMID:16861275

  19. Mineral contents and their solubility on calcium carbonat calcite nanocrystals from cockle shell powder (Anadara granosa Linn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyastuti, S.; Pramushinta, I. A.

    2018-03-01

    Prepared and characterized calcium carbonat calcite nanocrystals improves solubility. Calcium carbonat calcite nanocrystals were synthesized using precipitation method from the waste of blood clam cockle shells (Anadara granosa Linn). This study was conducted to analyze mineral composition of nanocrystals calcium carbonat calcite cockle (Anadara granosa) shell for calcium fortification of food applications and to evaluate the solubilities of Calsium and Phospor. The sample of nanocrystals from cockle shells was evaluated to determine the content of 11 macro-and micro-elements. These elements are Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), Sodium (Na), Phosphorus (P), Potassium (K), Ferrum (Fe), Copper (Cu), Nickel (Ni), Zink (Zn), Boron (B) and Silica (Si)). Cockleshell powders were found to contain toxic elements below detectable levels. The solubilities of Calcium and Phospor were p<0.05.

  20. Structural optimization and amorphous calcium phosphate mineralization in sensory setae of a terrestrial crustacean (Isopoda: Oniscidea).

    PubMed

    Vittori, Miloš; Srot, Vesna; Bussmann, Birgit; Predel, Felicitas; van Aken, Peter A; Štrus, Jasna

    2018-06-09

    Terrestrial isopods possess large sensory setae on their walking legs. Increased fracture resistance of these elongated structures is of crucial importance, making the exoskeleton forming the setae an interesting durable material that may inspire biomimetic designs. We studied the cuticle of the sensory setae with analytical electron microscopy in order to gain detailed insights into its structure and composition at the nanometer scale and identify features that increase the fracture resistance of these minute skeletal elements. The setae are stiff structures formed by mineralized cuticle that are connected to the leg exoskeleton by a non-mineralized joint membrane. Our results demonstrate that different layers of the setal cuticle display contrasting organizations of the chitin-protein fibers and mineral particles. While in the externally positioned exocuticle organic fibers shift their orientation helicoidally in sequential layers, the fibers are aligned axially in the internally positioned endocuticle. In the setal cuticle, layers of structurally anisotropic cuticle likely providing strength in the axial direction are combined with layers of isotropic cuticle which may allow the setae to better resist perpendicular loading. They are further strengthened with amorphous calcium phosphate, a highly fracture resistant mineral rarely observed in invertebrate skeletons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reaction mechanisms for enhancing carbon dioxide mineral sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Karalee Ann

    Increasing global temperature resulting from the increased release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is one of the greatest problems facing society. Nevertheless, coal plants remain the largest source of electrical energy and carbon dioxide gas. For this reason, researchers are searching for methods to reduce carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere from the combustion of coal. Mineral sequestration of carbon dioxide reacted in electrolyte solutions at 185°C and 2200 psi with olivine (magnesium silicate) has been shown to produce environmentally benign carbonates. However, to make this method feasible for industrial applications, the reaction rate needs to be increased. Two methods were employed to increase the rate of mineral sequestration: reactant composition and concentration were altered independently in various runs. The products were analyzed with complete combustion for total carbon content. Crystalline phases in the product were analyzed with Debye-Scherrer X-ray powder diffraction. To understand the reaction mechanism, single crystals of San Carlos Olivine were reacted in two solutions: (0.64 M NaHCO3/1 M NaCl) and (5.5 M KHCO3) and analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) to study the surface morphology, atomic crystalline structure, composition and amorphous structure. From solution chemistry studies, it was found that increasing the activity of the bicarbonate ion increased the conversion rate of carbon dioxide to magnesite. The fastest conversion, 60% conversion in one hour, occurred in a solution of 5.5 M KHCO3. The reaction product particles, magnesium carbonate, significantly increased in both number density and size on the coupon when the bicarbonate ion activity was increased. During some experiments reaction vessel corrosion also altered the mineral sequestration mechanism. Nickel ions from vessel

  2. Methotrexate intercalated calcium carbonate nanostructures: Synthesis, phase transformation and bioassay study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chao-Fan; Wang, Wei-Yuan; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Lei; Li, Shu-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2016-12-01

    The formation and stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is an active area of research owing to the presence of stable ACC in various biogenic minerals. In this paper, the synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) under the participation of methotrexate (MTX) via a facile gas diffusion route was reported. The results indicated that the addition of MTX can result in the phase transformation of CaCO3, and then two kinds of hybrids, i.e., MTX-vaterite and stable MTX-ACC came into being. Interestingly, the functional agent MTX served as both the target anticancer drug loaded and effective complexation agents to modify and control the morphology of final samples. The examination of MTX-ACC biodegradation process revealed that the collapse of MTX-ACC nanoparticles was due to the synergistic effect of drug release and the phase transformation. Finally, our study also proved that MTX-ACC exhibited the most excellent suppressing function on the viability of cancer cells, especially after long-time duration. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Synthesis of three-dimensional calcium carbonate nanofibrous structure from eggshell using femtosecond laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Natural biomaterials from bone-like minerals derived from avian eggshells have been considered as promising bone substitutes owing to their biodegradability, abundance, and lower price in comparison with synthetic biomaterials. However, cell adhesion to bulk biomaterials is poor and surface modifications are required to improve biomaterial-cell interaction. Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are preferred to act as growth support platforms for bone and stem cells. Although there have been several studies on generating nanoparticles from eggshells, no research has been reported on synthesizing 3D nanofibrous structures. Results In this study, we propose a novel technique to synthesize 3D calcium carbonate interwoven nanofibrous platforms from eggshells using high repetition femtosecond laser irradiation. The eggshell waste is value engineered to calcium carbonate nanofibrous layer in a single step under ambient conditions. Our striking results demonstrate that by controlling the laser pulse repetition, nanostructures with different nanofiber density can be achieved. This approach presents an important step towards synthesizing 3D interwoven nanofibrous platforms from natural biomaterials. Conclusion The synthesized 3D nanofibrous structures can promote biomaterial interfacial properties to improve cell-platform surface interaction and develop new functional biomaterials for a variety of biomedical applications. PMID:21251288

  4. Controlling the strontium-doping in calcium phosphate microcapsules through yeast-regulated biomimetic mineralization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miaojun; Li, Tianjie; Pan, Ting; Zhao, Naru; Yao, Yongchang; Zhai, Zhichen; Zhou, Jiaan; Du, Chang; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-10-01

    Yeast cells have controllable biosorption on metallic ions during metabolism. However, few studies were dedicated to using yeast-regulated biomimetic mineralization process to control the strontium-doped positions in calcium phosphate microcapsules. In this study, the yeast cells were allowed to pre-adsorb strontium ions metabolically and then served as sacrificing template for the precipitation and calcination of mineral shell. The pre-adsorption enabled the microorganism to enrich of strontium ions into the inner part of the microcapsules, which ensured a slow-release profile of the trace element from the microcapsule. The co-culture with human marrow stromal cells showed that gene expressions of alkaline phosphatase and Collagen-I were promoted. The promotion of osteogenic differentiation was further confirmed in the 3D culture of cell-material complexes. The strategy using living microorganism as 'smart doping apparatus' to control incorporation of trace element into calcium phosphate paved a pathway to new functional materials for hard tissue regeneration.

  5. Effect of ceramic calcium-phosphorus ratio on chondrocyte-mediated biosynthesis and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Boushell, Margaret K; Khanarian, Nora T; LeGeros, Raquel Z; Lu, Helen H

    2017-10-01

    The osteochondral interface functions as a structural barrier between cartilage and bone, maintaining tissue integrity postinjury and during homeostasis. Regeneration of this calcified cartilage region is thus essential for integrative cartilage healing, and hydrogel-ceramic composite scaffolds have been explored for calcified cartilage formation. The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that Ca/P ratio of the ceramic phase of the composite scaffold regulates chondrocyte biosynthesis and mineralization potential. Specifically, the response of deep zone chondrocytes to two bioactive ceramics with different calcium-phosphorus ratios (1.35 ± 0.01 and 1.41 ± 0.02) was evaluated in agarose hydrogel scaffolds over two weeks in vitro. It was observed that the ceramic with higher calcium-phosphorus ratio enhanced chondrocyte proliferation, glycosaminoglycan production, and induced an early onset of alkaline phosphorus activity, while the ceramic with lower calcium-phosphorus ratio performed similarly to the ceramic-free control. These results underscore the importance of ceramic bioactivity in directing chondrocyte response, and demonstrate that Ca/P ratio is a key parameter to be considered in osteochondral scaffold design. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2694-2702, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... You'll also find calcium in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables (especially collard and turnip greens, ... can enjoy good sources of calcium such as dark green, leafy vegetables, broccoli, chickpeas, and calcium-fortified ...

  7. Sequestration of Martian CO2 by mineral carbonation

    PubMed Central

    Tomkinson, Tim; Lee, Martin R.; Mark, Darren F.; Smith, Caroline L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonation is the water-mediated replacement of silicate minerals, such as olivine, by carbonate, and is commonplace in the Earth’s crust. This reaction can remove significant quantities of CO2 from the atmosphere and store it over geological timescales. Here we present the first direct evidence for CO2 sequestration and storage on Mars by mineral carbonation. Electron beam imaging and analysis show that olivine and a plagioclase feldspar-rich mesostasis in the Lafayette meteorite have been replaced by carbonate. The susceptibility of olivine to replacement was enhanced by the presence of smectite veins along which CO2-rich fluids gained access to grain interiors. Lafayette was partially carbonated during the Amazonian, when liquid water was available intermittently and atmospheric CO2 concentrations were close to their present-day values. Earlier in Mars’ history, when the planet had a much thicker atmosphere and an active hydrosphere, carbonation is likely to have been an effective mechanism for sequestration of CO2. PMID:24149494

  8. Evaluation of calcium hydrogen carbonate mesoscopic crystals as a disinfectant for influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    NAKASHIMA, Ryuji; KAWAMOTO, Masaomi; MIYAZAKI, Shigeru; ONISHI, Rumiko; FURUSAKI, Koichi; OSAKI, Maho; KIRISAWA, Rikio; SAKUDO, Akikazu; ONODERA, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the virucidal effect of a novel electrically charged disinfectant CAC-717 was investigated. CAC-717 is produced by applying an electric field to mineral water containing calcium hydrogen carbonate to generate mesoscopic crystals. Virus titration analysis showed a >3 log reduction of influenza A viruses after treatment with CAC-717 for 1 min in room temperature, while infectivity was undetectable after 15 min treatment. Adding bovine serum albumin to CAC-717 solution did not affect the disinfectant effect. Although CAC-717 is an alkaline solution (pH=12.39), upon contact with human tissue, its pH becomes almost physiological (pH 8.84) after accelerated electric discharge, which enables its use against influenza viruses. Therefore, CAC-717 may be used as a preventative measure against influenza A viruses and for biosecurity in the environment. PMID:28392537

  9. Transformation mechanism of amorphous calcium carbonate into calcite in the sea urchin larval spicule

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Yael; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Abrecht, Mike; Gilbert, Benjamin; Wilt, Fred H.; Sagi, Irit; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Sea urchin larval spicules transform amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite single crystals. The mechanism of transformation is enigmatic: the transforming spicule displays both amorphous and crystalline properties, with no defined crystallization front. Here, we use X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy with probing size of 40–200 nm. We resolve 3 distinct mineral phases: An initial short-lived, presumably hydrated ACC phase, followed by an intermediate transient form of ACC, and finally the biogenic crystalline calcite phase. The amorphous and crystalline phases are juxtaposed, often appearing in adjacent sites at a scale of tens of nanometers. We propose that the amorphous-crystal transformation propagates in a tortuous path through preexisting 40- to 100-nm amorphous units, via a secondary nucleation mechanism. PMID:18987314

  10. Transformation mechanism of amorphous calcium carbonate into calcite in the sea urchin larval spicule.

    PubMed

    Politi, Yael; Metzler, Rebecca A; Abrecht, Mike; Gilbert, Benjamin; Wilt, Fred H; Sagi, Irit; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Gilbert, P U P A; Gilbert, Pupa

    2008-11-11

    Sea urchin larval spicules transform amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite single crystals. The mechanism of transformation is enigmatic: the transforming spicule displays both amorphous and crystalline properties, with no defined crystallization front. Here, we use X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy with probing size of 40-200 nm. We resolve 3 distinct mineral phases: An initial short-lived, presumably hydrated ACC phase, followed by an intermediate transient form of ACC, and finally the biogenic crystalline calcite phase. The amorphous and crystalline phases are juxtaposed, often appearing in adjacent sites at a scale of tens of nanometers. We propose that the amorphous-crystal transformation propagates in a tortuous path through preexisting 40- to 100-nm amorphous units, via a secondary nucleation mechanism.

  11. Postural stabilizing effect of alfacalcidol and active absorbable algal calcium (AAA Ca) compared with calcium carbonate assessed by computerized posturography.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takuo; Nakamura, Shoji; Ohue, Mutsumi; Fujii, Yoshio; Miyauchi, Akimitsu; Takagi, Yasuyuki; Tsugeno, Hirofumi

    2007-01-01

    Sway and postural instability have drawn attention as a risk factor for osteoporotic fracture, in addition to low bone mineral density (BMD) and poor bone quality. In view of the fracture-reducing effect of alfacalcidol and active absorbable algal calcium (AAA Ca) not readily explained by rather mild increases of BMD, attempts were made to evaluate postural stabilizing effect of alfacalcidol, AAA Ca, and calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) by computerized posturography. Track of the gravity center was analyzed to calculate parameters related to tract length, track range, and track density to express the degree of sway before and after supplementation in 126 subjects ranging in age between 20 and 81 years randomly divided into four groups. Supplementation with AAA Ca containing 900 mg elemental Ca (group A), no calcium (group B), CaCO(3) also containing 900 mg elemental Ca (group C), or alfacalcidol (group D) continued daily for 12 months. For each parameter, the ratio closed eye value/open eye value (Romberg ratio) was calculated to detect aggravation of sway by eye closure. Age, parameters of Ca and P, and proportions of subjects with fracture and those with low BMD showed no marked deviation among the groups. With eyes open, significant decreases of a track range parameter (REC) from group B was noted in groups A (P = 0.0397) and D (P = 0.0296), but not in group C according to multiple comparison by Scheffe, indicating superior postural stabilizing effect of A and D over C. In the first 2 months, a significant fall was already evident in REC from group B in group D (P = 0.0120) with eyes open. Paired comparison of sway parameters before and after supplementation revealed a significant increase of track density parameter (LNGA), indicating sway control efficiency and a significant decrease of REC in groups A and D compared to group B with eyes open. With eyes closed, only group A showed a significant improvement from group B (P = 0.0456; Fig. 1), with a significant

  12. Granule fraction inhomogeneity of calcium carbonate/sorbitol in roller compacted granules.

    PubMed

    Bacher, C; Olsen, P M; Bertelsen, P; Sonnergaard, J M

    2008-02-12

    The granule fraction inhomogeneity of roller compacted granules was examined on mixtures of three different morphologic forms of calcium carbonate and three particle sizes of sorbitol. The granule fraction inhomogeneity was determined by the distribution of the calcium carbonate in each of the 10 size fractions between 0 and 2000 microm and by calculating the demixing potential. Significant inhomogeneous occurrence of calcium carbonate in the size fractions was demonstrated, depending mostly on the particles sizes of sorbitol but also on the morphological forms of calcium carbonate. The heterogeneous distribution of calcium carbonate was related to the decrease in compactibility of roller compacted granules in comparison to the ungranulated materials. This phenomenon was explained by a mechanism where fracturing of the ribbon during granulation occurred at the weakest interparticulate bonds (the calcium carbonate: calcium carbonate bonds) and consequently exposed the weakest areas of bond formation on the surface of the granules. Accordingly, the non-uniform allocation of the interparticulate attractive forces in a tablet would cause a lowering of the compactibility. Furthermore, the ability of the powder to agglomerate in the roller compactor was demonstrated to be related to the ability of the powder to be compacted into a tablet, thus the most compactable calcium carbonate and the smallest sized sorbitol improved the homogeneity by decreasing the demixing potential.

  13. Effect of Strength Enhancement of Soil Treated with Environment-Friendly Calcium Carbonate Powder

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho; Jun, Sangju; Kim, Daehyeon

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of the strength improvement of soft ground (sand) by producing calcium carbonate powder through microbial reactions. To analyze the cementation effect of calcium carbonate produced through microbial reaction for different weight ratios, four different types of specimens (untreated, calcium carbonate, cement, and calcium carbonate + cement) with different weight ratios (2%, 4%, 6%, and 8%) were produced and cured for a period of 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days, and 28 days to test them. The uniaxial compression strength of specimens was measured, and the components in the specimen depending on the curing period were analyzed by means of XRD analysis. The result revealed that higher weight ratios and longer curing period contributed to increased strength of calcium carbonate, cement, and calcium carbonate + cement specimens. The calcium carbonate and the calcium carbonate + cement specimens in the same condition showed the tendency of decreased strength approximately 3 times and two times in comparison with the 8% cement specimens cured for 28 days, but the tendency of increased strength was approximately 4 times and 6 times in comparison with the untreated specimen. PMID:24688401

  14. Effect of strength enhancement of soil treated with environment-friendly calcium carbonate powder.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungho; Jun, Sangju; Kim, Daehyeon

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of the strength improvement of soft ground (sand) by producing calcium carbonate powder through microbial reactions. To analyze the cementation effect of calcium carbonate produced through microbial reaction for different weight ratios, four different types of specimens (untreated, calcium carbonate, cement, and calcium carbonate + cement) with different weight ratios (2%, 4%, 6%, and 8%) were produced and cured for a period of 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days, and 28 days to test them. The uniaxial compression strength of specimens was measured, and the components in the specimen depending on the curing period were analyzed by means of XRD analysis. The result revealed that higher weight ratios and longer curing period contributed to increased strength of calcium carbonate, cement, and calcium carbonate + cement specimens. The calcium carbonate and the calcium carbonate + cement specimens in the same condition showed the tendency of decreased strength approximately 3 times and two times in comparison with the 8% cement specimens cured for 28 days, but the tendency of increased strength was approximately 4 times and 6 times in comparison with the untreated specimen.

  15. Ab initio studies of methane and carbon dioxide affinity to carbon compounds and minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlazlo, Mateusz; Siklitskaya, Alexandra; Majewski, Jacek

    2017-04-01

    Understanding of physico-chemistry of capture and storage of carbon dioxide and methane might be crucial for development of the novel technologies meant: (i) to deal with the global warming process through the reduction of the CO2 atmospheric concentration by sequestration, and (ii) to enhance oil recovery, on the other hand. The accurate description of CO2 and CH4 adsorption to minerals and carbonaceous systems (which constitute the main component of sedimentary rocks) is essential to reach this goal. We have employed the ab initio molecular dynamics AIMD) based on the density functional theory (DFT) to study the affinity of CO2 and CH4 from gaseous phase, also at elevated temperatures and hydrostatic pressure, to pristine and defected graphene, spiral carbon nanoparticles (spiroids), calcite rocks (represented by the most stable (10-14) surface of CaCoO3), CaO, MgO, illite, and kaolonite. In the case of kaolonite that exhibits layered crystallographic structure, we have also studied the intercalation of CO2. These studies provide valuable quantitative predictions and shed light on physical mechanisms governing the processes of chemisorption and physisorption of the CO2 and CH4 molecules, revealing also the essential role of Van der Waals interaction. In particular, we find out that CO2 molecules in supercritical gaseous phase (i.e. at temperature of order 60oC and moderate hydrostatic pressure of 20-30 MPa) change their shape from linear one to the water like bended V-shape with angle between C-O chemical bonds smaller than 180 degrees. This shape change of CO2 molecules facilitates the CO2 adsorption. Therefore, in the temperature-pressure conditions of shale deposits, the adsorption probability of CO2 can be enhanced in comparison to the ambient conditions. It turns out that the carbon atoms in the surrounding of characteristic Stone-Wales (or 5-7) defects in graphene are more reactive towards adsorption of CO2 and CH4 molecules. In the case of CO2 adsorption

  16. Design of a continuous process setup for precipitated calcium carbonate production from steel converter slag.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Hannu-Petteri; Zevenhoven, Ron

    2014-03-01

    A mineral carbonation process "slag2PCC" for carbon capture, utilization, and storage is discussed. Ca is extracted from steel slag by an ammonium salt solvent and carbonated with gaseous CO2 after the separation of the residual slag. The solvent is reused after regeneration. The effects of slag properties such as the content of free lime, fractions of Ca, Si, Fe, and V, particle size, and slag storage on the Ca extraction efficiency are studied. Small particles with a high free-lime content and minor fractions of Si and V are the most suitable. To limit the amount of impurities in the process, the slag-to-liquid ratio should remain below a certain value, which depends on the slag composition. Also, the design of a continuous test setup (total volume ∼75 L) is described, which enables quick process variations needed to adapt the system to the varying slag quality. Different precipitated calcium carbonate crystals (calcite and vaterite) are generated in different parts of the setup. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Calcium absorbability from milk products, an imitation milk, and calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Recker, R.R.; Bammi, A.; Barger-Lux, M.J.

    Whole milk, chocolate milk, yogurt, imitation milk (prepared from dairy and nondairy products), cheese, and calcium carbonate were labeled with /sup 45/Ca and administered as a series of test meals to 10 healthy postmenopausal women. Carrier Ca content of the test meals was held constant at 250 mg and subjects fasted before each meal. The absorbability of Ca from the six sources was compared by measuring fractional absorption by the double isotope method. The mean absorption values for all six sources were tightly clustered between 21 and 26% and none was significantly different from the others using one-way analysis ofmore » variance. We conclude that none of the sources was significantly superior or inferior to the others.« less

  18. [Effect on calcium carbonate morphology by a strain of rock actinomycete].

    PubMed

    Chu, Yue; Cao, Chengliang; Lian, Bin

    2016-07-04

    Microbes-induced mineralization is one of the hottest issues in the field of geomicrobiology. Strain DHS C013T isolated from the surfaces of rocks in the Karst region was used to investigate microbial influence on the formation of carbonate and its morphology in the metallogenic system consisting NaHCO3 and Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. Strain DHS C013T was inoculated into malt extract-glucose-yeast extract peptone (MGYP) liquid medium. After cultivation we put the fermented solution, supernatant, hypha pellets, sterile MGYP liquid medium and ultrapure water into the metallogenic system separately. Scanning electronic microscope was applied to observe the crystals at the bottom of the petri dishes. In the metallogenic system with ultrapure water, only standard calcite of rhombohedron was found. However, special morphology of CaCO3, such as dumbbelllike, spherulite and scaly cylindrical shapes, were found in the metallogenic system with actinomycetes, hyphae fragment and their cell metabolism products. These calcium carbonates of special morphology might be resulted from their nucleation on smaller hypha pellets, hyphae fragment or extracellular secretion. Actinomycetes can induce the formation of CaCO3, and the mycelium and metabolites have important effects on regulating and influencing CaCO3 morphology. Our data provide new evidence for further understanding of the biological mineralization mediated by actinomycete and its metabolic products.

  19. A review on the kinetics of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation by urea hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Paassen, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this study the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation induced by the ureolytic bacteria are reviewed based on experiments and mathematical modelling. The study shows how urea hydrolysis rate depends on the amount of bacteria and the conditions during growth, storage, hydrolysis and precipitation. The dynamics of Microbially Induced Carbonate Precipitation has been monitored in non-seeded liquid batch experiments. Results show that particulary for a fast hydrolysis of urea (>1 M-urea day-1) in a highly concentrated equimolar solution with calcium chloride (>0.25 M) the solubility product of CaCO3 is exceeded within a short period (less than 30 minutes), the supersaturation remains high for an exended period, resulting in prolonged periods of nucleation and crystal growth and extended growth of metastable precursor mineral phases. The pH, being a result of the speciation, quickly rises until critical supersaturation is reached and precipitation is initiated. Then pH drops (sometimes showing oscillating behaviour) to about neutral where it stays until all substrates are depleted. Higher hydrolysis rates lead to higher supersaturation and pH and relatively many small crystals, whereas higher concentrations of urea and calcium chloride mainly lead to lower pH values. The conversion can be reasonably monitored by electrical conductivity and reasonably predicted, using a simplified model based on a single reaction as long as the urea hydrolysis rate is known. Complex geochemical models, which include chemical speciciation through acid-base equilibria and kinetic equations to describe mineral precipitation, do not show significant difference from the simplified model regarding the bulk chemistry and the total amount of precipitates. However, experiments show that ureolytic MICP can result in a highly variable crystal morphologies with large variation in the affected hydraulic properties when applied in a porous medium. In order to calculate the number, size and

  20. On the structure of amorphous calcium carbonate--a detailed study by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Holger; Neumann, Markus; Mayer, Christian; Epple, Matthias

    2008-09-01

    The calcium carbonate phases calcite, aragonite, vaterite, monohydrocalcite (calcium carbonate monohydrate), and ikaite (calcium carbonate hexahydrate) were studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy ( (1)H and (13)C). Further model compounds were sodium hydrogencarbonate, potassium hydrogencarbonate, and calcium hydroxide. With the help of these data, the structure of synthetically prepared additive-free amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was analyzed. ACC contains molecular water (as H 2O), a small amount of mobile hydroxide, and no hydrogencarbonate. This supports the concept of ACC as a transient precursor in the formation of calcium carbonate biominerals.

  1. Red mud carbonation using carbon dioxide: Effects of carbonate and calcium ions on goethite surface properties and settling.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaojie; Chen, Wenmi; Nguyen, Anh V; Nguyen, Tuan A H

    2018-05-01

    Carbonation using CO 2 appears as an attractive solution for disposing of red mud suspensions, an aluminum industry hazardous waste since it also offers an option for CO 2 sequestration. Here we report the novel findings that CO 3 2- together with Ca 2+ can significantly affect the surface properties and settling of goethite, a major component of red mud. Specifically, their effects on the goethite surface chemistry, colloidal interaction forces and settling in alkaline solutions are investigated. The surface potential becomes more negative by the formation of carbonate inner-sphere complexes on goethite surface. It is consistent with the strong repulsion, decreased particle size and settling velocity with increased carbonate concentrations as measured by atomic force microscopy, particle size analysis, and particle settling. Adding Ca 2+ that forms outer-sphere complexes with pre-adsorbed carbonate changes goethite surface charge negligibly. Changing repulsion to the attraction between goethite surfaces by increasing calcium dosage indicates the surface bridging, in accordance with the increased settling velocity. The adverse effect of carbonate on goethite flocculation is probably due to its specific chemisorption and competition with flocculants. By forming outer-sphere complexes together with the flocculant-calcium bridging effect, calcium ions can eliminate the negative influence of carbonate and improve the flocculation of goethite particles. These findings contribute to a better understanding of goethite particle interaction with salt ions and flocculants in controlling the particle behavior in the handling processes, including the red mud carbonation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcium carbonate obstructive urolithiasis in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Dana M; Gamble, Kathryn C; Corner, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    A 6-yr-old male red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) presented for a history of inappetance, abnormal behavior, and unconfirmed elimination for 6 hr prior to presentation. Based on abdominal ultrasound, abdominocentesis, and cystocentesis, a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract obstruction with uroabdomen and hydronephrosis was reached. Abdominal radiographs did not assist in reaching an antemortem diagnosis. Postmortem examination confirmed a urinary bladder rupture secondary to urethral obstruction by a single urethrolith. Bilateral hydronephrosis and hydroureter were identified and determined to be a result of bilateral ureteroliths. Urolith analysis revealed a composition of 100% calcium carbonate. A dietary analysis was performed, implicating an increased Ca:P ratio from a food preparation miscommunication as a contributing factor. Appropriate husbandry changes were made, and mob surveillance procedures were performed, which resolved the urolithiasis risk for the remaining five animals.

  3. Modeling CO2-Water-Mineral Wettability and Mineralization for Carbon Geosequestration.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yunfeng; Tsuji, Shinya; Jia, Jihui; Tsuji, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2017-07-18

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage (CCS) is an important climate change mitigation option along with improved energy efficiency, renewable energy, and nuclear energy. CO 2 geosequestration, that is, to store CO 2 under the subsurface of Earth, is feasible because the world's sedimentary basins have high capacity and are often located in the same region of the world as emission sources. How CO 2 interacts with the connate water and minerals is the focus of this Account. There are four trapping mechanisms that keep CO 2 in the pores of subsurface rocks: (1) structural trapping, (2) residual trapping, (3) dissolution trapping, and (4) mineral trapping. The first two are dominated by capillary action, where wettability controls CO 2 and water two-phase flow in porous media. We review state-of-the-art studies on CO 2 /water/mineral wettability, which was found to depend on pressure and temperature conditions, salt concentration in aqueous solutions, mineral surface chemistry, and geometry. We then review some recent advances in mineral trapping. First, we show that it is possible to reproduce the CO 2 /water/mineral wettability at a wide range of pressures using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. As the pressure increases, CO 2 gas transforms into a supercritical fluid or liquid at ∼7.4 MPa depending on the environmental temperature. This transition leads to a substantial decrease of the interfacial tension between CO 2 and reservoir brine (or pure water). However, the wettability of CO 2 /water/rock systems depends on the type of rock surface. Recently, we investigated the contact angle of CO 2 /water/silica systems with two different silica surfaces using MD simulations. We found that contact angle increased with pressure for the hydrophobic (siloxane) surface while it was almost constant for the hydrophilic (silanol) surface, in excellent agreement with experimental observations. Furthermore, we found that the CO 2 thin films at the CO 2 -hydrophilic

  4. Amorphous calcium carbonate associated with biofilms in hot spring deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian; Peng, Xiaotong

    2012-08-01

    Calcium carbonate nanoparticles are intimately associated with crystalline calcite and aragonite in the Eryuan, Gongxiaoshe, and Zhuyuan hot springs (water temperature > 75 °C), which are located in Yunnan Province, China. The nanoparticles, < 1 μm long, are spherical to disc-shaped and commonly fuse together into small clusters. Their general appearance and lack of crystal faces or edges indicate that they are noncrystalline. Morphologically, these nanoparticles are similar to calcified nannobacteria or the constituent grains in amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), which can be formed by various biogenic and abiogenic processes. In the Chinese hot springs, the ACC is always found under, in, or on top of biofilms, commonly in close proximity to crystalline calcite and/or aragonite. Textural evidence indicates that the ACC probably developed in microdomains that develop in the complex biofilm hydrogels. Critically, there is no evidence to support the notion that the nanoparticles are calcified nannobacteria. In the Chinese springs, ACC appears to play a formative role in the development of wheat-sheaf arrays of aragonite crystals and some of the calcite crystals. Hollow cores in some of the aragonite bundles probably formed as ACC was dissolved and many of the aragonite crystals appear to have developed as ACC recrystallized. Similarly, layers of ACC that coat the surfaces of some calcite crystals could be diagenetically transformed into calcite. The development of ACC in hot spring systems may be widespread and may play a critical but transitory role in the development of crystalline CaCO3 in these high temperature environments.

  5. Astronaut Bones: Stable Calcium Isotopes in Urine as a Biomarker of Bone Mineral Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skulan, J.; Gordon, G. W.; Romaniello, S. J.; Anbar, A. D.; Smith, S. M.; Zwart, S.

    2016-12-01

    Bone loss is a common health concern, in conditions ranging from osteoporosis to cancer. Bone loss due to unloading is also an important health issue for astronauts. We demonstrate stable calcium isotopes, a tool developed in geochemistry, are capable of detecting real-time quantitative changes in net bone mineral balance (BMB) using serum and urine [1]. We validated this technique by comparing with DEXA and biomarker data in subjects during bed rest, a ground-based analog of space flight effects [2-4]. We now apply this tool to assess changes in astronauts' BMB before, during and after 4-6 month space missions. There is stable isotope fractionation asymmetry between bone formation and resorption. During bone formation there is a mass-dependent preference for "lighter" calcium isotopes to be removed from serum and incorporated into bone mineral. During bone resorption, there is no measurable isotopic discrimination between serum and bone. Hence, when bone formation rates exceed that of resorption, serum and urine become isotopically "heavy" due to the sequestration of "light" calcium in bone. Conversely, when bone resorption exceeds bone formation, serum and urine become isotopically "light" due to the release of the sequestered light calcium from bone. We measured Ca isotopes in urine of thirty International Space Station astronauts. Average Ca isotope values in astronauts' urine shift isotopically lighter during microgravity, consistent with negative net BMB. Within a month of return to Earth, astronauts returned to within error of their δ44Ca value prior to departure. Urine samples from astronauts testing bone loss countermeasures showed bisphosphonates provide a viable pharmacological countermeasure. Some, but not all, individuals appear able to resist bone loss through diet and intensive resistive exercise alone. This is a promising new technique for monitoring BMB in astronauts, and hopefully someday on the way to/from Mars, this also has important clinical

  6. Formate oxidation-driven calcium carbonate precipitation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP.

    PubMed

    Ganendra, Giovanni; De Muynck, Willem; Ho, Adrian; Arvaniti, Eleni Charalampous; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Ramos, Jose Angel; Rahier, Hubert; Boon, Nico

    2014-08-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) applied in the construction industry poses several disadvantages such asammonia release to the air and nitric acid production. An alternative MICP from calcium formate by Methylocystis parvus OBBP is presented here to overcome these disadvantages. To induce calcium carbonate precipitation, M. parvus was incubated at different calcium formate concentrations and starting culture densities. Up to 91.4% ± 1.6% of the initial calcium was precipitated in the methane-amended cultures compared to 35.1% ± 11.9% when methane was not added. Because the bacteria could only utilize methane for growth, higher culture densities and subsequently calcium removals were exhibited in the cultures when methane was added. A higher calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when higher culture densities were used but not necessarily when more calcium formate was added. This was mainly due to salt inhibition of the bacterial activity at a high calcium formate concentration. A maximum 0.67 ± 0.03 g of CaCO3 g of Ca(CHOOH)2(-1) calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when a culture of 10(9) cells ml(-1) and 5 g of calcium formate liter(-)1 were used. Compared to the current strategy employing biogenic urea degradation as the basis for MICP, our approach presents significant improvements in the environmental sustainability of the application in the construction industry.

  7. Formate Oxidation-Driven Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP

    PubMed Central

    Ganendra, Giovanni; De Muynck, Willem; Ho, Adrian; Arvaniti, Eleni Charalampous; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Ramos, Jose Angel; Rahier, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) applied in the construction industry poses several disadvantages such as ammonia release to the air and nitric acid production. An alternative MICP from calcium formate by Methylocystis parvus OBBP is presented here to overcome these disadvantages. To induce calcium carbonate precipitation, M. parvus was incubated at different calcium formate concentrations and starting culture densities. Up to 91.4% ± 1.6% of the initial calcium was precipitated in the methane-amended cultures compared to 35.1% ± 11.9% when methane was not added. Because the bacteria could only utilize methane for growth, higher culture densities and subsequently calcium removals were exhibited in the cultures when methane was added. A higher calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when higher culture densities were used but not necessarily when more calcium formate was added. This was mainly due to salt inhibition of the bacterial activity at a high calcium formate concentration. A maximum 0.67 ± 0.03 g of CaCO3 g of Ca(CHOOH)2−1 calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when a culture of 109 cells ml−1 and 5 g of calcium formate liter−1 were used. Compared to the current strategy employing biogenic urea degradation as the basis for MICP, our approach presents significant improvements in the environmental sustainability of the application in the construction industry. PMID:24837386

  8. Particle size of calcium carbonate does not affect apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium, retention of calcium, or growth performance of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Merriman, L A; Stein, H H

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate particle size of calcium carbonate used in diets fed to growing pigs. Experiment 1 was conducted to determine apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD), standardized total tract digestibility (STTD), and retention of Ca among diets containing calcium carbonate produced to different particle sizes, and Exp. 2 was conducted to determine if growth performance of weanling pigs is affected by particle size of calcium carbonate. In Exp. 1, 4 diets based on corn and potato protein isolate were formulated to contain 0.70% Ca and 0.33% standardized total tract digestible P, but the calcium carbonate used in the diets was ground to 4 different particle sizes (200, 500, 700, or 1,125 μm). A Ca-free diet was formulated to determine basal endogenous losses of Ca. In Exp. 2, 4 diets were based on corn and soybean meal and the only difference among diets was that each diet contained calcium carbonate ground to the 4 particle sizes used in Exp. 1. In Exp. 1, 40 barrows (15.42 ± 0.70 kg initial BW) were allotted to the 5 diets with 8 replicate pigs per diet using a randomized complete block design, and in Exp. 2, 128 pigs with an initial BW of 9.61 ± 0.09 kg were randomly allotted to 4 experimental diets. Results of Exp. 1 indicated that basal endogenous losses of Ca were 0.329 g/kg DMI. The ATTD of Ca was 70.0 ± 3.2, 74.3 ± 2.7, 70.0 ± 2.9, and 72.1 ± 2.7 and the STTD of Ca was 74.2 ± 3.2, 78.5 ± 2.7, 74.1 ± 2.9, and 76.2 ± 2.7 for calcium carbonate ground to 200, 500, 700, or 1,125 μm, respectively. Retention of Ca was 67.4 ± 3.1, 70.4 ± 2.6, 63.9 ± 2.8, and 67.2 ± 2.2 for diets containing calcium carbonate ground to 200, 500, 700, or 1,125 μm, respectively. There were no differences among diets for ATTD of Ca, STTD of Ca, or retention of Ca. The ATTD of P was 64.5 ± 1.7, 66.8 ± 2.6, 64.2 ± 3.0, and 63.2 ± 1.7% and retention of P was 61.4 ± 1.4, 63.8 ± 2.8, 61.9 ± 2.8, and 60.9 ± 1.5 for diets containing calcium

  9. Biological effects of drinking-water mineral composition on calcium balance and bone remodeling markers.

    PubMed

    Roux, S; Baudoin, C; Boute, D; Brazier, M; De La Guéronniere, V; De Vernejoul, M C

    2004-01-01

    To compare the effects of 2 drinking waters containing similar calcium (Ca) concentration in order to analyze the role of ions other than Ca on bone metabolism. These mineral drinking-waters differed by their mineral composition primarily concerning the concentration of bicarbonate (HCO3-), high in the HB, and sulfate, high in HS water. Of 60 included women, 39 completed the study. Patients were randomly assigned to an intake of 1 liter per day of mineral water HB or HS for 28 d, followed by cross-over to the alternative drinking-water for a further 28 d. At baseline and after each period of one month, Ca metabolism parameters, acid-base status, and bone remodeling markers were measured. Changes in Ca metabolism were significant in the HB group where the ionized Ca increased and the PTH decreased. Serum pH showed a similar increase whatever the used drinking water compared to baseline. In the HB group, significant increase in urine pH, and significant decrease in AT-HCO3- and NH4+ were observed. Bone resorption markers, urinary CTx/Cr, Pyr/Cr, and D-Pyr/Cr, significantly decreased in the HB group compared to baseline, and were not significantly modified in the HS group. These results showed a beneficial effect of the bicarbonaterich HB water on bone metabolism. This may account for a better bioavailability of the Ca, a greater alkalinization, and a larger decrease in PTH level secondary to a higher ionized Ca level. The higher content of silica in HB water may have also participated to the positive action on bone balance that was observed. In this short term study, these data underlined the potential role of the mineral drinking water composition on bone metabolism.

  10. Preparation and characterization of carbonic anhydrase-conjugated liposomes for catalytic synthesis of calcium carbonate particles.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Keisuke; Yoshimoto, Makoto

    2017-10-01

    The biomimetic approach using immobilized enzymes is useful for the synthesis of structurally defined inorganic materials. In this work, carbonic anhydrase (CA) from bovine erythrocytes was covalently conjugated at 25°C to the liposomes composed of 15mol% 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(glutaryl) (NG-POPE), and the zwitterionic and anionic phospholipids with the same acyl chains as NG-POPE. For the conjugation, the carboxyl groups of liposomal NG-POPE were activated with 11mM 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and 4.6mM N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS). The carbonic anhydrase-conjugated liposomes (CALs) with the mean hydrodynamic diameter of 149nm showed the esterase activity corresponding to on average 5.5×10 2 free CA molecules per liposome. On the other hand, the intrinsic fluorescence and absorbance measurements consistently revealed that on average 1.4×10 3 CA molecules were conjugated to a liposome, suggesting that the molecular orientation of enzyme affected its activity. The formation of calcium carbonate particles was significantly accelerated by the CALs ([lipid]=50μ M) in the 0.3M Tris solution at 10-40°C with dissolved CO 2 (≈17mM) and CaCl 2 (46mM). The anionic CALs were adsorbed with calcium as revealed with the ζ-potential measurements. The CAL system offered the calcium-rich colloidal interface where the bicarbonate ions were catalytically produced by the liposome-conjugated CA molecules. The CALs also functioned in the external loop airlift bubble column operated with a model flue gas (10vol/vo% CO 2 ), yielding partly agglomerated calcium carbonate particles as observed with the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aerobic microbial mineralization of dichloroethene as sole carbon substrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    Microorganisms indigenous to the bed sediments of a black- water stream utilized 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE) as a sole carbon substrate for aerobic metabolism. Although no evidence of growth was observed in the minimal salts culture media used in this study, efficient aerobic microbial mineralization of 1,2-DCE as sole carbon substrate was maintained through three sequential transfers (107 final dilution) of the original environmental innoculum. These results indicate that 1,2-DCE can be utilized as a primary substrate to support microbial metabolism under aerobic conditions.Microorganisms indigenous to the bed sediments of a black-water stream utilized 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE) as a sole carbon substrate for aerobic metabolism. Although no evidence of growth was observed in the minimal salts culture media used in this study, efficient aerobic microbial mineralization of 1,2-DCE as sole carbon substrate was maintained through three sequential transfers (107 final dilution) of the original environmental innoculum. These results indicate that 1,2-DCE can be utilized as a primary substrate to support microbial metabolism under aerobic conditions.

  12. Effect of excess dietary salt on calcium metabolism and bone mineral in a spaceflight rat model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navidi, Meena; Wolinsky, Ira; Fung, Paul; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1995-01-01

    High levels of salt promote urinary calcium (UCa) loss and have the potential to cause bone mineral deficits if intestinal Ca absorption does not compensate for these losses. To determine the effect of excess dietary salt on the osteopenia that follows skeletal unloading, we used a spaceflight model that unloads the hindlimbs of 200-g rats by tail suspension (S). Rats were studied for 2 wk on diets containing high salt (4 and 8%) and normal calcium (0.45%) and for 4 wk on diets containing 8% salt (HiNa) and 0.2% Ca (LoCa). Final body weights were 9-11% lower in S than in control rats (C) in both experiments, reflecting lower growth rates in S than in C during pair feeding. UCa represented 12% of dietary Ca on HiNA diets and was twofold higher in S than in C transiently during unloading. Net intestinal Ca absorption was consistently 11-18% lower in S than in C. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was unaffected by either LoCa or HiNa diets in S but was increased by LoCa and HiNa diets in C. Despite depressed intestinal Ca absoption in S and a sluggish response of the Ca endocrine system to HiNa diets, UCa loss did not appear to affect the osteopenia induced by unloading. Although any deficit in bone mineral content from HiNa diets may have been too small to detect or the duration of the study too short to manifest, there were clear differences in Ca metabolism from control levels in the response of the spaceflight model to HiNa diets, indicated by depression of intestinal Ca absorption and its regulatory hormone.

  13. Nutrient transport in the mammary gland: calcium, trace minerals and water soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Montalbetti, Nicolas; Dalghi, Marianela G; Albrecht, Christiane; Hediger, Matthias A

    2014-03-01

    Milk nutrients are secreted by epithelial cells in the alveoli of the mammary gland by several complex and highly coordinated systems. Many of these nutrients are transported from the blood to the milk via transcellular pathways that involve the concerted activity of transport proteins on the apical and basolateral membranes of mammary epithelial cells. In this review, we focus on transport mechanisms that contribute to the secretion of calcium, trace minerals and water soluble vitamins into milk with particular focus on the role of transporters of the SLC series as well as calcium transport proteins (ion channels and pumps). Numerous members of the SLC family are involved in the regulation of essential nutrients in the milk, such as the divalent metal transporter-1 (SLC11A2), ferroportin-1 (SLC40A1) and the copper transporter CTR1 (SLC31A1). A deeper understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of these transporters will be of great value for drug discovery and treatment of breast diseases.

  14. Soil Organic Carbon Loss: An Overlooked Factor in the Carbon Sequestration Potential of Enhanced Mineral Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzen, Christiana; Harrison, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Weathering of silicate minerals regulates the global carbon cycle on geologic timescales. Several authors have proposed that applying finely ground silicate minerals to soils, where organic acids would enhance the rate of weathering, could increase carbon uptake and mitigate anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Silicate minerals such as olivine could replace lime, which is commonly used to remediate soil acidification, thereby sequestering CO2 while achieving the same increase in soil pH. However, the effect of adding this material on soil organic matter, the largest terrestrial pool of carbon, has yet to be considered. Microbial biomass and respiration have been observed to increase with decreasing acidity, but it is unclear how long the effect lasts. If the addition of silicate minerals promotes the loss of soil organic carbon through decomposition, it could significantly reduce the efficiency of this process or even create a net carbon source. However, it is possible that this initial flush of microbial activity may be compensated for by additional organic matter inputs to soil pools due to increases in plant productivity under less acidic conditions. This study aimed to examine the effects of olivine amendments on soil CO2 flux. A liming treatment representative of typical agricultural practices was also included for comparison. Samples from two highly acidic soils were split into groups amended with olivine or lime and a control group. These samples were incubated at 22°C and constant soil moisture in jars with airtight septa lids. Gas samples were extracted periodically over the course of 2 months and change in headspace CO2 concentration was determined. The effects of enhanced mineral weathering on soil organic matter have yet to be addressed by those promoting this method of carbon sequestration. This project provides the first data on the potential effects of enhanced mineral weathering in the soil environment on soil organic carbon pools.

  15. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false If I am mining calcium chloride, may I... Lease Terms and Conditions § 3511.11 If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride in...

  16. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false If I am mining calcium chloride, may I... Lease Terms and Conditions § 3511.11 If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride in...

  17. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false If I am mining calcium chloride, may I... Lease Terms and Conditions § 3511.11 If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride in...

  18. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false If I am mining calcium chloride, may I... Lease Terms and Conditions § 3511.11 If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride in...

  19. Evaluation of calcium, phosphorus, and selected trace mineral status in commercially available dry foods formulated for dogs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective – To evaluate the mineral content including calcium, phosphorus, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and selenium of canine commercial pet foods and compare them to current AAFCO recommendations for adult maintenance. Design - Descriptive study. Sample – Forty-five over the counter dry canine p...

  20. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guidelines for Americans and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's MyPlate . Where can I find out more about ... on food sources of calcium: U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Nutrient Database Nutrient List for calcium ( ...

  1. Rates of mineral dissolution and carbonation in peridotite and basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Matter, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    We study natural rates and processes of mineral carbonation in peridotite (olivine-rich rock) in mantle rocks exposed to weathering in northern Oman to learn effective mechanisms from natural processes, and seek ways to accelerate them to achieve significant CO2 capture and storage via mineral carbonation at the lowest possible cost. In our first paper (1), we fit data on mantle olivine carbonation from the DOE Albany Research Center (2,3, ARC). These data, and data from Arizona State University (4, ASU) suggest that a peridotite rock volume heated to 185°C and infused with H2O+CO2 at PCO2 > 75 bars could consume ~ 1 ton CO2 per cubic meter of rock per year. Because it is more abundant than peridotite, other workers focus on carbonation of the most common type of lava on Earth, basalt, whose main mineral constituent is generally labradorite, part of the plagioclase feldspar solid solution series. Our intuition is that labradorite carbonation is much slower than mantle olivine carbonation. To quantify this, we compiled data on dissolution of mantle olivine, labradorite, crystalline basalt, and basaltic glass in aqueous fluids, as well as data on mantle olivine carbonation. The dissolution data are calibrated as a function of surface area (i.e., grain size and shape) and pH, as well as temperature, whereas most of the ARC and ASU experiments were done at a single pH and grain size. Thus, for comparison, we calculated dissolution rates for 70 micron spheres at pH 8, close to the ARC and ASU experimental conditions. At these conditions, olivine carbonation observed by ARC and ASU is 100 to 1000 times faster than labradorite and crystalline basalt, and faster than conventionally measured olivine dissolution rates. The ARC and ASU experiments were different from conventional dissolution experiments in several ways that could lead to an enhancement in olivine reaction rates: (a) they may have lower a(Mg) in fluid due to solid MgCO3 (magnesite) precipitation, (b) they

  2. Waste oil shale ash as a novel source of calcium for precipitated calcium carbonate: carbonation mechanism, modeling, and product characterization.

    PubMed

    Velts, O; Uibu, M; Kallas, J; Kuusik, R

    2011-11-15

    In this paper, a method for converting lime-containing oil shale waste ash into precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), a valuable commodity is elucidated. The mechanism of ash leachates carbonation was experimentally investigated in a stirred semi-batch barboter-type reactor by varying the CO(2) partial pressure, gas flow rate, and agitation intensity. A consistent set of model equations and physical-chemical parameters is proposed to describe the CaCO(3) precipitation process from oil shale ash leachates of complex composition. The model enables the simulation of reactive species (Ca(2+), CaCO(3), SO(4)(2-), CaSO(4), OH(-), CO(2), HCO(3)(-), H(+), CO(3)(2-)) concentration profiles in the liquid, gas, and solid phases as well as prediction of the PCC formation rate. The presence of CaSO(4) in the product may also be evaluated and used to assess the purity of the PCC product. A detailed characterization of the PCC precipitates crystallized from oil shale ash leachates is also provided. High brightness PCC (containing up to ∼ 96% CaCO(3)) with mean particle sizes ranging from 4 to 10 μm and controllable morphology (such as rhombohedral calcite or coexisting calcite and spherical vaterite phases) was obtained under the conditions studied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High calcium to phosphorus ratio impairs growth and bone mineralization in Pekin ducklings.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y W; Wen, J; Jiang, X X; Wang, W C; Yang, L

    2018-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of high dietary calcium (Ca) level on growth performance, Ca and phosphorus (P) metabolism, and nutrient utilization in ducklings subjected to normal and low P levels in diets. A completely randomized design was used with a factorial arrangement of 2 total dietary P levels [normal-P (0.60%) and low-P (0.45%) groups] × 4 dietary Ca levels [low-Ca (0.55%), normal-Ca (0.75%), medium-Ca (0.95%) and high-Ca (1.15%) groups)]. Compared to normal-P group, low-P group had lower (P < 0.05) final body weight (BW), average daily gain (ADG), and average daily feed intake (ADFI) and reduced (P < 0.05) serum Ca and P levels, bone Ca, P, and ash content, and bone mineral density in ducklings during the starter period. Under the low-P group, birds from high-Ca group had lower (P < 0.05) final BW, ADG, ADFI, bone ash content, bone mineral density, and the utilization of energy, Ca, and P than those from low-Ca, normal-Ca, and medium-Ca groups. Our results indicate that high-Ca diet induced greater growth suppression and bone mineralization loss in ducklings fed a low-P diet. The aggravated negative effect of high dietary Ca level with a low P level might be related to the elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity and the reduced utilization of energy, Ca, and P.

  4. Effect of temperature on the reaction pathway of calcium carbonate formation via precursor phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Konrad, Florian; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It has been earlier postulated that some biogenic and sedimentary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals (e.g. calcite and aragonite) are secondary in origin and have originally formed via a metastable calcium carbonate precursor phase (e.g. amorphous CaCO3, [1-2]). Such formation pathways are likely affected by various physicochemical parameters including aqueous Mg and temperature. In an effort to improve our understanding on the formation mechanism of CaCO3 minerals, precipitation experiments were carried out by the addition of a 0.6 M (Ca,Mg)Cl2 solution at distinct Mg/Ca ratios (1/4 and 1/8) into a 1 M NaHCO3 solution under constant pH conditions(8.3 ±0.1). The formation of CaCO3 was systematically examined as a function of temperature (6, 12, 18 and 25 ±0.3° C). During the experimental runs mineral precipitation was monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy as well as by continuous sampling and analyzing of precipitates and reactive solutions. The results revealed two pathways of CaCO3 formation depending on the initial Mg/Ca ratio and temperature: (i) In experiments with a Mg/Ca ratio of 1/4 at ≤ 12° C as well as in experiments with a Mg/Ca ratio of 1/8 at ≤ 18° C, ikaite (CaCO3 6H2O) acts as a precursor phase for aragonite formation. (ii) In contrast higher temperatures induced the formation of Mg-rich amorphous CaCO3 (Mg-ACC) which was subsequently transformed to Mg-rich calcite. In situ Raman spectra showed that the transformation of Mg-ACC to Mg-calcite occurs at a higher rate (˜ 8 min) compared to that of ikaite to aragonite (> 2 h). Thus, the formation of aragonite rather than of Mg-calcite occurs due to the slower release of Ca2+and CO32- ions into the Mg-rich reactive solution during retarded ikaite dissolution. This behavior is generally consistent with the observation that calcite precipitation is inhibited at elevated aqueous Mg/Ca ratios. [1] Addadi L., Raz S. and Weiner S. (2003) Advanced Materials 15, 959-970. [2] Rodriguez-Blanco J. D

  5. Active Layer Soil Carbon and Nutrient Mineralization, Barrow, Alaska, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Stan D. Wullschleger; Holly M. Vander Stel; Colleen Iversen

    This data set consists of bulk soil characteristics as well as carbon and nutrient mineralization rates of active layer soils manually collected from the field in August, 2012, frozen, and then thawed and incubated across a range of temperatures in the laboratory for 28 day periods in 2013-2015. The soils were collected from four replicate polygons in each of the four Areas (A, B, C, and D) of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Soil samples were coincident with the established Vegetation Plots that are located in center, edge, and trough microtopographymore » in each polygon. Data included are 1) bulk soil characteristics including carbon, nitrogen, gravimetric water content, bulk density, and pH in 5-cm depth increments and also by soil horizon, 2) carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus mineralization rates for soil horizons incubated aerobically (and in one case both aerobically and anaerobically) for 28 days at temperatures that included 2, 4, 8, and 12 degrees C. Additional soil and incubation data are forthcoming. They will be available when published as part of another paper that includes additional replicate analyses.« less

  6. Vitamin D and calcium supplementation for three years in postmenopausal osteoporosis significantly alters bone mineral and organic matrix quality.

    PubMed

    Paschalis, E P; Gamsjaeger, S; Hassler, N; Fahrleitner-Pammer, A; Dobnig, H; Stepan, J J; Pavo, I; Eriksen, E F; Klaushofer, K

    2017-02-01

    Prospective, controlled clinical trials in postmenopausal osteoporosis typically compare effects of an active drug with placebo in addition to vitamin D and calcium supplementation in both treatment arms. While clinical benefits are documented, the effect of this supplementation in the placebo arm and in clinical practice on bone material composition properties is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate these bone quality indices (specifically mineral/matrix, nanoporosity, glycosaminoglycan content, mineral maturity/crystallinity, and pyridinoline content) in patients that either received long-term vitamin D (400-1200IU) and calcium (1.0-1.5g) supplementation, or did not. We have analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy the bone forming trabecular surfaces of iliac crest in pre-treatment samples of a teriparatide study and the endpoint biopsies of the control arm obtained from the HORIZON trial. In general, the mineral/matrix ratio and the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content was higher while nanoporosity, (a surrogate for tissue water content), the mineral maturity/crystallinity (MMC) and the pyridinoline (Pyd) content was lower in patients without long-term supplementation. Moreover, all indices were significantly dependent on tissue age. In conclusion, vitamin D and calcium supplementation is associated with altered mineral and organic matrix properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bone Mineral Density, Mechanical, Microstructural Properties and Mineral Content of the Femur in Growing Rats Fed with Cactus Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) Cladodes as Calcium Source in Diet

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Becerra, Ezequiel; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; Del Real, Alicia; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Rodríguez-García, Mario; Rubio, Efraín; Quintero-García, Michelle; Rojas-Molina, Isela

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical, microstructural properties, mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur were evaluated in growing rats fed with Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) cladodes at different maturity stages as calcium source. Male weanling rats were fed with cladodes at early maturity stage (25 and 60 days of age, belonging to groups N-60 and N-200, respectively) and cladodes at late maturity stage (100 and 135 days of age, belonging to groups N-400 and N-600, respectively) for 6 weeks. Additionally, a control group fed with calcium carbonate as calcium source was included for comparative purposes. All diets were fitted to the same calcium content (5 g/kg diet). The failure load of femurs was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) in groups N-60 and N-200 in comparison to N-400, N-600 and control groups. The cortical width (Ct.Wi) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) of the femurs in control and N-600 groups were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) than Ct.Wi and Tb.Th of femurs in groups N-60 and N-200. Trabecular separation of the femurs in N-60 and N-200 groups showed the highest values compared with all experimental groups. The highest calcium content in the femurs were observed in control, N-600 and N-400 groups; whereas the lowest phosphorus content in the bones were detected in N-200, N-600 and N-400 groups. Finally, the BMD in all experimental groups increased with age; nevertheless, the highest values were observed in N-600 and control groups during pubertal and adolescence stages. The results derived from this research demonstrate, for the first time, that the calcium found in Opuntia ficus indica cladodes is actually bioavailable and capable of improving mineral density and mechanical and microstructural properties of the bones. These findings suggest that the consumption of cladodes at late maturity stage within the diet might have a beneficial impact on bone health. PMID:28165410

  8. Tuning calcium carbonate growth through physical confinement and templating with amyloid-like polypeptide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaco, Martin Francis

    The creation of useful composite materials requires precise control of the interface between the components in order to tune the overall shape and material properties. Despite the current research into nanotechnology, our ability to create materials with nanoscale precision is nascent. However, nature has a paradigm for the creation of finely structured composites under mild conditions called biomineralization. Through control of protein template assembly, solution conditions, and physical confinement, organisms are able to create useful optical and structural materials, such as bones, teeth, and mollusk shells. The objective of this thesis is to elucidate the importance of these various controls in synthetic systems to further our ability to create nanostructured materials. We begin by examining the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of organosilanes on silica oxides. The formation of functionalized surfaces can help control the mineralization of amorphous or crystalline calcium carbonate. Long-chained organosilanes organize on surfaces to form dense, solid-like films, with the terminal groups determining the hydrophobicity and stereochemistry of the film. Our work has shown that uniform hydrophobic and hydrophilic films can be formed by using cleaned silica over glass or mica and through a vapor phase reaction over a liquid one. Additionally, we showed that mixed SAMs with phase-separated domains could be created through the selection of organosilanes and reaction conditions. We have built on these functionalized surfaces through the use of microfabrication and a gas permeable polymer to create three-dimensionally confined microcrystallizers. Other researchers have shown that one-dimensional confinement with a multi-functional surface (patterned with a small nucleating ordered region in a disordered SAM) can stabilize the creation of an amorphous calcium carbonate film before a single, large, micropatterned crystal is grown. Our work has determined

  9. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Constantz; Randy Seeker; Martin Devenney

    2010-06-30

    Calera's innovative Mineralization via Aqueous Precipitation (MAP) technology for the capture and conversion of CO{sub 2} to useful materials for use in the built environment was further developed and proven in the Phase 1 Department of Energy Grant. The process was scaled to 300 gallon batch reactors and subsequently to Pilot Plant scale for the continuous production of product with the production of reactive calcium carbonate material that was evaluated as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). The Calera SCM{trademark} was evaluated as a 20% replacement for ordinary portland cement and demonstrated to meet the industry specification ASTM 1157 which ismore » a standard performance specification for hydraulic cement. The performance of the 20% replacement material was comparable to the 100% ordinary portland cement control in terms of compressive strength and workability as measured by a variety of ASTM standard tests. In addition to the performance metrics, detailed characterization of the Calera SCM was performed using advanced analytical techniques to better understand the material interaction with the phases of ordinary portland cement. X-ray synchrotron diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Lab confirmed the presence of an amorphous phase(s) in addition to the crystalline calcium carbonate phases in the reactive carbonate material. The presence of carboaluminate phases as a result of the interaction of the reactive carbonate materials with ordinary portland cement was also confirmed. A Life Cycle Assessment was completed for several cases based on different Calera process configurations and compared against the life cycle of ordinary portland cement. In addition to the materials development efforts, the Calera technology for the production of product using an innovative building materials demonstration plant was developed beyond conceptual engineering to a detailed design with a construction schedule and cost estimate.« less

  10. Calcium carbonate as ikaite crystals in Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, Gerhard S.; Nehrke, Gernot; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Kennedy, Hilary; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter; Thomas, David N.

    2008-04-01

    We report on the discovery of the mineral ikaite (CaCO3.6H2O) in sea-ice from the Southern Ocean. The precipitation of CaCO3 during the freezing of seawater has previously been predicted from thermodynamic modelling, indirect measurements, and has been documented in artificial sea ice during laboratory experiments but has not been reported for natural sea-ice. It is assumed that CaCO3 formation in sea ice may be important for a sea ice-driven carbon pump in ice-covered oceanic waters. Without direct evidence of CaCO3 precipitation in sea ice, its role in this and other processes has remained speculative. The discovery of CaCO3.6H2O crystals in natural sea ice provides the necessary evidence for the evaluation of previous assumptions and lays the foundation for further studies to help elucidate the role of ikaite in the carbon cycle of the seasonally sea ice-covered regions

  11. SM50 Repeat-Polypeptides Self-Assemble into Discrete Matrix Subunits and Promote Appositional Calcium Carbonate Crystal Growth during Sea Urchin Tooth Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yelin; Satchell, Paul G.; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.

    2015-01-01

    The two major proteins involved in vertebrate enamel formation and echinoderm sea urchin tooth biomineralization, amelogenin and SM50, are both characterized by elongated polyproline repeat domains in the center of the macromolecule. To determine the role of polyproline repeat polypeptides in basal deuterostome biomineralization, we have mapped the localization of SM50 as it relates to crystal growth, conducted self-assembly studies of SM50 repeat polypeptides, and examined their effect on calcium carbonate and apatite crystal growth. Electron micrographs of the growth zone of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchin teeth documented a series of successive events from intravesicular mineral nucleation to mineral deposition at the interface between tooth surface and odontoblast syncytium. Using immunohistochemistry, SM50 was detected within the cytoplasm of cells associated with the developing tooth mineral, at the mineral secreting front, and adjacent to initial mineral deposits, but not in muscles and ligaments. Polypeptides derived from the SM50 polyproline alternating hexa- and hepta-peptide repeat region (SM50P6P7) formed highly discrete, donut-shaped self-assembly patterns. In calcium carbonate crystal growth studies, SM50P6P7 repeat peptides triggered the growth of expansive networks of fused calcium carbonate crystals while in apatite growth studies, SM50P6P7 peptides facilitated the growth of needle-shaped and parallel arranged crystals resembling those found in developing vertebrate enamel. In comparison, SM50P6P7 surpassed the PXX24 polypeptide repeat region derived from the vertebrate enamel protein amelogenin in its ability to promote crystal nucleation and appositional crystal growth. Together, these studies establish the SM50P6P7 polyproline repeat region as a potent regulator in the protein-guided appositional crystal growth that occurs during continuous tooth mineralization and eruption. In addition, our studies highlight the role of species

  12. The flame photometric determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, H.

    1957-01-01

    A flame photometric method of determining calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate locks has been developed Aluminum and phosphate interference was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. The method is rapid and suitable for routine analysis Results obtained are within ?? 2% of the calcium oxide content. ?? 1957.

  13. Calcium carbonate nanoparticles as cancer drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Zarrintan, Mohammad Hossein; Adibkia, Khosro; Lotfipour, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) has broad biomedical utilizations owing to its availability, low cost, safety, biocompatibility, pH-sensitivity and slow biodegradability. Recently, there has been widespread interest in their application as drug delivery systems for different groups of drugs. Among them, CaCO3 nanoparticles have exhibited promising potential as drug carriers targeting cancer tissues and cells. The pH-dependent properties, alongside the potential to be functionalized with targeting agents give them the unique property that can be used in targeted delivery systems for anticancer drugs. Also, due to the slow degradation of CaCO3 matrices, these nanoparticles can be used as sustained release systems to retain drugs in cancer tissues for longer times after administration. Development of drug delivery carriers using CaCO3 nanoparticles has been reviewed. The current state of CaCO3 nanoparticles as cancer drug delivery systems with focus on their special properties like pH-sensitivity and biodegradability has also been evaluated. According to our review, CaCO3 nanoparticles, owing to their special characteristics, will have a potential role in safe and efficient cancer treatment in future.

  14. Structure of hydrated calcium carbonates: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demichelis, Raffaella; Raiteri, Paolo; Gale, Julian D.

    2014-09-01

    The structures of both ikaite (CaCO3 · 6H2 O) and monohydrocalcite (CaCO3 ·H2 O) were computed at the PBE0 level of theory, using all electron Gaussian type basis sets. Correction for the long-range dispersion contribution was included for the oxygen-oxygen interactions by using an additive pairwise term with the atomic coefficients fitted against the calcite vs aragonite enthalpy difference. The potential chirality of monohydrocalcite is discussed, as well as the helical motifs created by the three-fold rototranslational axes parallel to the [001] direction. These elements represent a significant link between monohydrocalcite and vaterite, both appearing as intermediate species during CaCO3 crystallization from amorphous calcium carbonate. The hydrogen bond pattern, never fully discussed for monohydrocalcite, is here described and compared to the available experimental data. Both phases are characterized by the presence of hydrogen bonds of moderate to high strength. Water molecules in monohydrocalcite interact quite strongly with 2 CO32- units through such hydrogen bonds, whereas their interaction with each other is minor. On the contrary, water molecules in ikaite create a complex network of hydrogen bonds, where each water molecule is strongly hydrogen bonded to one CO32- anion and to one or two other water molecules.

  15. Hyaluronan and calcium carbonate hybrid nanoparticles for colorectal cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jinghui; Xu, Jian; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Rui

    2017-09-01

    A hybrid drug delivery system (DDS) composed of hyaluronan and calcium carbonate (CC) was developed. By taking advantage of the tumor-targeting ability of hyaluronan and the drug-loading property of CC, the well-formed hyaluronan-CC nanoparticles were able to serve as a DDS targeting colorectal cancer with a decent drug loading content, which is beneficial in the chemotherapy of colorectal cancer. In this study, hyaluronan-CC nanoparticles smaller than 100 nm were successfully developed to load the wide-range anti-cancer drug adriamycin (Adr) to construct hyaluronan-CC/Adr nanoparticles. On the other hand, we also found that hyaluronan-CC/Adr nanoparticles can possibly increase the uptake ratio of Adr into HT29 colorectal cancer cells when compared with hyaluronan-free nanoparticles (CC/Adr) via the CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis via competitive uptake and in vivo imaging assays. Note that both in vitro (CCK-8 assay on HT29 cells) and in vivo (anti-cancer assay on HT-29 tumor-bearing nude mice model) experiments revealed that hyaluronan-CC/Adr nanoparticles exhibited stronger anti-cancer activity than free Adr or CC/Adr nanoparticles with minimized toxic side effects and preferable cancer-suppression potential.

  16. Comparison of sevelamer and calcium carbonate on endothelial function and inflammation in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Chennasamudram, Sudha P; Noor, Tanjila; Vasylyeva, Tetyana L

    2013-06-01

    Hyperphosphataemia is a known independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. The objective of the study was to compare the effects of two phosphate binders, sevelamer carbonate and calcium carbonate on endothelial function (EF) and inflammation in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Fifteen subjects with hyperphosphataemia discontinued all phosphate binders to undergo a two-week washout and were assigned to sevelamer carbonate or calcium carbonate treatments for eight weeks. After a second two-week washout period, subjects crossed over to either of the alternate treatments for another eight weeks. At the beginning and end of each treatment, biomarkers of EF, pro-inflammatory cytokines, serum albumin, calcium, phosphate and lipids were measured. Sevelamer carbonate significantly improved lipid profile compared with calcium carbonate. Amongst the EF and pro-inflammatory biomarkers, sevelamer carbonate decreased serum endothelin-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. Both phosphate binders were effective in decreasing serum phosphate but sevelamer had a positive effect on EF. Treatment with sevelamer carbonate has beneficial effects compared with calcium carbonate in decreasing inflammation and improving EF in patients with T2DM on PD. © 2013 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  17. Mineral Influence on Microbial Survival During Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, E. U.; Shanahan, T. M.; Wolfe, W. W.; Bennett, P.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 sequestered in a deep saline aquifer will perturb subsurface biogeochemistry by acidifying the groundwater and accelerating mineral diagenesis. Subsurface microbial communities heavily influence geochemistry through their metabolic processes, such as with dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB). However, CO2 also acts as a sterilant and will perturb these communities. We investigated the role of mineralogy and its effect on the survival of microbes at high PCO2 conditions using the model DIRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Batch cultures of Shewanella were grown to stationary phase and exposed to high PCO2 using modified Parr reactors. Cell viability was then determined by plating cultures after exposure. Results indicate that at low PCO2 (2 bar), growth and iron reduction are decreased and cell death occurs within 1 hour when exposed to CO2 pressures of 10 bar or greater. Further, fatty acid analysis indicates microbial lipid degradation with C18 fatty acids being the slowest lipids to degrade. When cultures were grown in the presence of rocks or minerals representative of the deep subsurface such as carbonates and silicates and exposed to 25 bar CO2, survival lasted beyond 2 hours. The most effective protecting substratum was quartz sandstone, with cultures surviving beyond 8 hours of CO2 exposure. Scanning electron microscope images reveal biofilm formation on the mineral surfaces with copious amounts of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) present. EPS from these biofilms acts as a reactive barrier to the CO2, slowing the penetration of CO2 into cells and resulting in increased survival. When biofilm cultures were grown with Al and As to simulate the release of toxic metals from minerals such as feldspars and clays, survival time decreased, indicating mineralogy may also enhance microbial death. Biofilms were then grown on iron-coated quartz sand to determine conversely what influence biofilms may have on mineral dissolution during CO2 perturbation

  18. Effects of exercise on bone mineral density in calcium-replete postmenopausal women with and without hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Going, Scott; Lohman, Timothy; Houtkooper, Linda; Metcalfe, Lauve; Flint-Wagner, Hilary; Blew, Robert; Stanford, Vanessa; Cussler, Ellen; Martin, Jane; Teixeira, Pedro; Harris, Margaret; Milliken, Laura; Figueroa-Galvez, Arturo; Weber, Judith

    2003-08-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health concern. The combination of exercise, hormone replacement therapy, and calcium supplementation may have added benefits for improving bone mineral density compared to a single intervention. To test this notion, 320 healthy, non-smoking postmenopausal women, who did or did not use hormone replacement therapy (HRT), were randomized within groups to exercise or no exercise and followed for 12 months. All women received 800 mg calcium citrate supplements daily. Women who exercised performed supervised aerobic, weight-bearing and weight-lifting exercise, three times per week in community-based exercise facilities. Regional bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Women who used HRT, calcium, and exercised increased femoral neck, trochanteric and lumbar spine bone mineral density by approximately 1-2%. Trochanteric BMD was also significantly increased by approximately 1.0% in women who exercised and used calcium without HRT compared to a negligible change in women who used HRT and did not exercise. The results demonstrate that regional BMD can be improved with aerobic, weight-bearing activity combined with weight lifting at clinically relevant sites in postmenopausal women. The response was significant at more sites in women who used HRT, suggesting a greater benefit with hormone replacement and exercise compared to HRT alone.

  19. Chlorhexidine Prevents Root Dentine Mineral Loss and Fracture Caused by Calcium Hydroxide over Time

    PubMed Central

    Thomaz, Érika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the mineral ion loss of root dentine after treatment with 2% chlorhexidine solution (CHX) and to compare its yield and flexural strength (fs) after exposure to calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2]. Materials and Methods. Dentine bars (DB) were made from 90 roots of bovine incisors and randomized into three groups: GControl: distilled/deionized water (DDW), GNaOCl: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite + 17% EDTA, and GCHX: CHX + DDW. The release of phosphate (PO4) and calcium (Ca) ions was measured by spectrophotometry. The DB were exposed to Ca(OH)2 paste for 0, 30, 90, and 180 days. DB were subjected to the three-point bending test to obtain yield and fs values. The fracture patterns were evaluated (20x). Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's post hoc tests or one- and two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). Results. GCHX showed lower PO43− and Ca2+ ionic release than GNaOCl (p < 0.001). For yield and fs, GCHX > GNaOCl in all periods (p < 0.001), except for yield strength values on 90 days (p = 0.791). A larger frequency of vertical fractures was observed in GNaOCl and that of oblique fractures in GCHX (p < 0.05). Conclusions. CHX prevented PO43− and Ca2+ loss and showed a tendency to preserve the yield and fs of root dentine over time following exposure to Ca(OH)2 paste. PMID:28539937

  20. Effects of Leaching Behavior of Calcium Ions on Compression and Durability of Cement-Based Materials with Mineral Admixtures

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, An; Chao, Sao-Jeng; Lin, Wei-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of calcium ions increases the porosity of cement-based materials, consequently resulting in a negative effect on durability since it provides an entry for aggressive harmful ions, causing reinforcing steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of leaching behavior of calcium ions on the compression and durability of cement-based materials. Since the parameters influencing the leaching behavior of cement-based materials are unclear and diverse, this paper focuses on the influence of added mineral admixtures (fly ash, slag and silica fume) on the leaching behavior of calcium ions regarding compression and durability of cemented-based materials. Ammonium nitrate solution was used to accelerate the leaching process in this study. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis were employed to analyze and compare the cement-based material compositions prior to and after calcium ion leaching. The experimental results show that the mineral admixtures reduce calcium hydroxide quantity and refine pore structure through pozzolanic reaction, thus enhancing the compressive strength and durability of cement-based materials. PMID:28809247

  1. Meeting calcium recommendations during middle childhood reflects mother-daughter beverage choices and predicts bone mineral status2

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jennifer O; Mitchell, Diane C; Smiciklas-Wright, Helen; Mannino, Michelle L; Birch, Leann L

    2008-01-01

    Background Longitudinal data regarding the influence of beverage intakes on calcium adequacy are lacking. Objective This study evaluated calcium intake from ages 5 to 9 y as a function of mother-daughter beverage choices and as a predictor of bone mineral status. Design Intakes of energy, calcium, milk, sweetened beverages, fruit juices, and non-energy-containing beverages were measured with the use of three 24-h dietary recalls in 192 non-Hispanic white girls aged 5, 7, and 9 y and their mothers. Calcium intakes from ages 5 to 9 y were categorized as either meeting or falling below recommended adequate intakes (AIs). The girls’ bone mineral status was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at age 9 y. Results The mean 5-y calcium intake was related to bone mineral density at age 9 y (β = 0.27, P < 0.001). The girls who met the AI for calcium were not heavier (P = 0.83) but had higher energy intakes (P < 0.0001) than did the girls who consumed less than the AI. Compared with the girls who consumed less than the AI, the girls who met the AI consumed, on average, almost twice as much milk (P < 0.0001), had smaller decreases in milk intake (P < 0.01), and consumed 18% less sweetened beverages (P < 0.01) from ages 5 to 9 y; the 2 groups did not differ significantly in juice and non-energy-containing beverage intakes. The girls who met the AI were also served milk more frequently than were the girls who consumed less than the AI (P < 0.0001) and had mothers who drank milk more frequently (P < 0.01) than did the mothers of the girls who consumed less than the AI. Conclusions These findings provide new longitudinal evidence that calcium intake predicts bone mineral status during middle childhood and reflects mother-daughter beverage choice patterns that are established well before the rapid growth and bone mineralization observed in adolescence. PMID:15051617

  2. Exaggerated levothyroxine malabsorption due to calcium carbonate supplementation in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Csako, G; McGriff, N J; Rotman-Pikielny, P; Sarlis, N J; Pucino, F

    2001-12-01

    To describe a patient with primary hypothyroidism in whom ingestion of levothyroxine with calcium carbonate led to markedly elevated serum thyrotropin concentrations. A 61-year-old white woman with primary hypothyroidism, systemic lupus erythematosus, celiac disease, and history of Whipple resection for pancreatic cancer was euthyroid with levothyroxine 175-188 micrograms/d. After taking a high dose of calcium carbonate (1250 mg three times daily) with levothyroxine, she developed biochemical evidence of hypothyroidism (thyrotropin up to 41.4 mU/L) while remaining clinically euthyroid. Delaying calcium carbonate administration by four hours returned her serum thyrotropin to a borderline high concentration (5.7 mU/L) within a month. Serum concentrations of unbound and total thyroxine and triiodothyronine tended to decrease, but remained borderline low to normal while the patient concomitantly received levothyroxine and calcium carbonate. Concomitant administration of levothyroxine and calcium carbonate often results in levothyroxine malabsorption. While in most patients the clinical consequences of this interaction, even with prolonged exposure, are relatively small, overt hypothyrodism may develop in patients with preexisting malabsorption disorders. However, as the current case illustrates, the clinical manifestations of the initial levothyroxine deficit may not always be apparent and, of all usual laboratory thyroid function tests, only thyrotropin measurement will reliably uncover the exaggerated levothyroxine malabsorption. Decreased absorption of levothyroxine when given with calcium carbonate may be particularly pronounced in patients with preexisting malabsorption disorders. Once recognized, a change in drug administration schedule usually minimizes or eliminates this interaction.

  3. Inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by organic additives using the constant composition method in conditions of recirculating cooling circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhim, Norinda; Kharbachi, Chams; Neveux, Thibaut; Bouteleux, Céline; Teychené, Sébastien; Biscans, Béatrice

    2017-08-01

    The cooling circuits used in power plants are subject to mineral crystallization which can cause scaling on the surfaces of equipment and construction materials reducing their heat exchange efficiency. Precipitated calcium carbonate is the predominant mineral scale commonly observed in cooling systems. Supersaturation is the key parameter controlling the nucleation and growth of calcite in these systems. The present work focuses on the precipitation of calcite using the constant composition method at constant supersaturation, through controlled addition of reactants to a semi-batch crystallizer, in order to maintain constant solution pH. The determination of the thermodynamic driving force (supersaturation) was based on the relevant chemical equilibria, total alkalinity and calculation of the activity coefficients. Calcite crystallization rates were derived from the experiments performed at supersaturation levels similar to those found in industrial station cooling circuits. Several types of seeds particles were added into the aqueous solution to mimic natural river water conditions in terms of suspended particulate matters content, typically: calcite, silica or illite particles. The effect of citric and copolycarboxylic additive inhibitors added to the aqueous solution was studied. The calcium carbonate growth rate was reduced by 38.6% in the presence of the citric additive and a reduction of 92.7% was observed when the copolycarboxylic additive was used under identical experimental conditions. These results are explained by the location of the adsorbed inhibitor at the crystal surface and by the degree of chemical bonding to the surface.

  4. Evidence of calcium carbonates in coastal (Talos Dome and Ross Sea area) East Antarctica snow and firn: Environmental and climatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, M.; Delmonte, B.; Frezzotti, M.; Proposito, M.; Scarchilli, C.; Maggi, V.; Artioli, G.; Dapiaggi, M.; Marino, F.; Ricci, P. C.; De Giudici, G.

    2008-07-01

    Micrometre-sized aeolian dust particles stored in Antarctic firn and ice layers are a useful tool for reconstructing climate and environmental changes in the past. The mineral content, particle concentration and chemical composition of modern dust in firn cores from the peripherycal dome (Talos Dome) and coastal area of East Antarctica (Ross Sea sector) were investigated. During analyses there was a considerable decrease in microparticle concentrations within a few hours of ice sample melting, accompanied by a systematic increase in the concentration of calcium ions (Ca 2+) in solution. Based on mineralogical phase analyses, which reveal the presence of anhydrous and hydrous calcium carbonates such as calcite (CaCO 3), monohydrocalcite (CaCO 3·H 2O) and ikaite (CaCO 3·6H 2O, hexahydrate calcium carbonate), the observed variations in concentrations are ascribed to the partial dissolution of the carbonate content of samples. Soluble carbonate compounds are thus primary aerosols included into the samples along with insoluble aluminosilicate minerals. We hypothesize hydrous carbonates may derive from the sea ice surface, where ikaite typically forms at the early stages of sea ice formation. Back trajectory calculations show that favourable events for air mass advection from the sea ice surface to Talos Dome are rare but likely to occur.

  5. Carbonate Mineral Assemblages as Inclusions in Yakutian Diamonds: TEM Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, A. M.; Wirth, R.; Sobolev, N. V.; Taylor, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate mineral inclusions are quite rare in diamonds from the upper mantle, but are evidence for a carbonate abundance in the mantle. It is believed that such carbonatitic inclusions originated from high-density fluids (HDFs) that were enclosed in diamond during its growth. Using TEM and EPMA, several kinds of carbonate inclusions have been identified in Yakutian diamonds : aragonite, dolomite, magnesite, Ba-, Sr-, and Fe-rich carbonates. Most of them are represented by multi-phase inclusions of various chemically distinct carbonates, rich in Ca, Mg, and K and associated with minor amounts of silicate, oxide, saline, and volatile phases. Volatiles, leaving some porosity, played a significant role in the diamond growth. A single crystal of aragonite (60μm) is herein reported for the first time. This inclusion is located in the center of a diamond from the Komsomolskaya pipe. Careful CL imaging reveals the total absence of cracks around the aragonite inclusion - i.e., closed system. This inclusion has been identified by X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. At temperatures above 1000 0C, aragonite is only stable at high pressures of 5-6 GPa. Inside this aragonite, we observed nanocrystalline inclusions of titanite, Ni-rich sulfide, magnetite, water-bearing Mg-silicate, and fluid bubbles. Dolomite is common in carbonate multi-phase inclusions in diamonds from the Internatsionalnaya, Yubileinaya, and Udachnaya kimberlite pipes. Alluvial diamonds of the northeastern Siberian Platform are divided into two groups based on the composition of HDFs: 1) Mg-rich multi-phase inclusions (60% magnesite + dolomite + Fe-spinel + Ti-silicate + fluid bubbles); and 2) Ca-rich multi-phase inclusions (Ca,Ba-, Ca,Sr-, Ca,Fe-carbonates + Ti-silicate + Ba-apatite + fluid bubbles). High-density fluids also contain K. Volatiles in the fluid bubbles are represented by water, Cl, F, S, CO2, CH4, and heavy hydrocarbons. Origin of the second group of HDFs may be related to the non

  6. Obtaining and Characterization of Polyolefin-Filled Calcium Carbonate Composites Modified with Stearic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, C.; Pascu, A.; Roata, I. C.; Stanciu, E. M.

    2017-06-01

    In order to obtain high performance calcium carbonate-reinforced HDPE and PP composites, the dispersibility and compatibility of the inorganic phase in the polymer has been achieved through surface treatment of the amorphous calcium carbonate filler with stearic acid. The surface coating of the inorganic phase has been proved by XRD and FTIR spectroscopy, through forming of an intermediate layer of calcium stearate which acts as a surfactant, efficient in providing an optimum compatibility with the dominatingly hydrophobic polymer matrix, as determined from the structural information obtained through samples cross-sections analysing.

  7. Enhanced production of mineralized nodules and collagenous proteins in vitro by calcium ascorbate supplemented with vitamin C metabolites.

    PubMed

    Rowe, D J; Ko, S; Tom, X M; Silverstein, S J; Richards, D W

    1999-09-01

    Vitamin C or ascorbate is important in wound healing due to its essential role in collagen synthesis. To study wound healing in the periodontium, cells adherent to expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) augmentation membranes, recovered from edentulous ridge augmentation procedures, have been established in culture in our laboratories. The objective of this study was to determine whether treatment of these cells with a calcium ascorbate, which contains vitamin C metabolites (metabolite-supplemented ascorbate), would increase the production of collagenous protein and mineralized tissue in vitro, as compared to unsupplemented calcium ascorbate (ascorbate). Cells derived from ePTFE membranes were cultured with beta-glycerophosphate and the test agents for 2 to 5 weeks, and the surface areas of the cell cultures occupied by mineralized nodules were measured using computerized image analysis. One experiment tested the effects of calcium threonate, one of the vitamin C metabolites in metabolite-supplemented ascorbate. Incorporation of radioactive proline and glycine was used as a measure of total protein (radioactivity precipitated by trichloracetic acid) and collagenase-digestible protein (radioactivity released by collagenase digestion.) Co-localization of collagen and fibronectin was examined by immunofluorescence. In vitro treatment of these cells with metabolite-supplemented ascorbate increased the area of the cell cultures occupied by mineralized nodules after 5 weeks. Cell cultures treated with metabolite-supplemented ascorbate also exhibited significant increases in total protein. The increase in collagenous proteins in these cultures accounted for 85% of the increase in total protein. The greatest difference between treatment groups was observed in the cell-associated fraction containing the extracellular matrix. The additional collagen exhibited normal co-distribution with fibronectin. In cultures treated with ascorbate spiked with calcium threonate, the area

  8. A probabilistic assessment of calcium carbonate export and dissolution in the modern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, G.; Steinacher, M.; Joos, F.

    2015-12-01

    The marine cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is an important element of the carbon cycle and co-governs the distribution of carbon and alkalinity within the ocean. However, CaCO3 fluxes and mechanisms governing CaCO3 dissolution are highly uncertain. We present an observationally-constrained, probabilistic assessment of the global and regional CaCO3 budgets. Parameters governing pelagic CaCO3 export fluxes and dissolution rates are sampled using a Latin-Hypercube scheme to construct a 1000 member ensemble with the Bern3D ocean model. Ensemble results are constrained by comparing simulated and observation-based fields of excess dissolved calcium carbonate (TA*). The minerals calcite and aragonite are modelled explicitly and ocean-sediment fluxes are considered. For local dissolution rates either a strong, a weak or no dependency on CaCO3 saturation is assumed. Median (68 % confidence interval) global CaCO3 export is 0.82 (0.67-0.98) Gt PIC yr-1, within the lower half of previously published estimates (0.4-1.8 Gt PIC yr-1). The spatial pattern of CaCO3 export is broadly consistent with earlier assessments. Export is large in the Southern Ocean, the tropical Indo-Pacific, the northern Pacific and relatively small in the Atlantic. Dissolution within the 200 to 1500 m depth range (0.33; 0.26-0.40 Gt PIC yr-1) is substantially lower than inferred from the TA*-CFC age method (1 ± 0.5 Gt PIC yr-1). The latter estimate is likely biased high as the TA*-CFC method neglects transport. The constrained results are robust across a range of diapycnal mixing coefficients and, thus, ocean circulation strengths. Modelled ocean circulation and transport time scales for the different setups were further evaluated with CFC11 and radiocarbon observations. Parameters and mechanisms governing dissolution are hardly constrained by either the TA* data or the current compilation of CaCO3 flux measurements such that model realisations with and without saturation-dependent dissolution achieve

  9. A probabilistic assessment of calcium carbonate export and dissolution in the modern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Gianna; Steinacher, Marco; Joos, Fortunat

    2016-05-01

    The marine cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is an important element of the carbon cycle and co-governs the distribution of carbon and alkalinity within the ocean. However, CaCO3 export fluxes and mechanisms governing CaCO3 dissolution are highly uncertain. We present an observationally constrained, probabilistic assessment of the global and regional CaCO3 budgets. Parameters governing pelagic CaCO3 export fluxes and dissolution rates are sampled using a Monte Carlo scheme to construct a 1000-member ensemble with the Bern3D ocean model. Ensemble results are constrained by comparing simulated and observation-based fields of excess dissolved calcium carbonate (TA*). The minerals calcite and aragonite are modelled explicitly and ocean-sediment fluxes are considered. For local dissolution rates, either a strong or a weak dependency on CaCO3 saturation is assumed. In addition, there is the option to have saturation-independent dissolution above the saturation horizon. The median (and 68 % confidence interval) of the constrained model ensemble for global biogenic CaCO3 export is 0.90 (0.72-1.05) Gt C yr-1, that is within the lower half of previously published estimates (0.4-1.8 Gt C yr-1). The spatial pattern of CaCO3 export is broadly consistent with earlier assessments. Export is large in the Southern Ocean, the tropical Indo-Pacific, the northern Pacific and relatively small in the Atlantic. The constrained results are robust across a range of diapycnal mixing coefficients and, thus, ocean circulation strengths. Modelled ocean circulation and transport timescales for the different set-ups were further evaluated with CFC11 and radiocarbon observations. Parameters and mechanisms governing dissolution are hardly constrained by either the TA* data or the current compilation of CaCO3 flux measurements such that model realisations with and without saturation-dependent dissolution achieve skill. We suggest applying saturation-independent dissolution rates in Earth system

  10. Mineral trioxide aggregate versus calcium hydroxide for pulpotomy in primary molars.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Zhou, Qiong; Qin, Man

    2011-01-01

    To compare the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (CH) for pulpotomy in primary molars. A randomised, bilateral self-controlled clinical trial was designed to compare the clinical effect of MTA and CH in pulpotomies in primary molars in 4- to 9-year-old children. Children with two similar-sized cavities on bilateral primary molar counterparts requiring pulpotomies were included. The two contralateral molars in each patient were randomly assigned to MTA or CH treatment. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed to evaluate the treatment results at post-treatment recall. Seventeen pairs of self-controlled contralateral teeth were available for follow-up evaluations. The success rate of MTA was 94.1% (16/17), while the success rate of CH was 64.7% (11/17). Internal root resorption was the most frequent reason for failure in the CH group. Crown discolouration was common in the MTA-treated group. MTA was more successful than CH for pulpotomies in primary molar teeth, and may be a suitable replacement for CH in primary molar pulpotomies.

  11. Calcium isotopic composition of mantle xenoliths and minerals from Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jin-Ting; Zhu, Hong-Li; Liu, Yu-Fei; Liu, Fang; Wu, Fei; Hao, Yan-Tao; Zhi, Xia-Chen; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Huang, Fang

    2016-02-01

    This study presents calcium isotope data for co-existing clinopyroxenes (cpx), orthopyroxenes (opx), and olivine (ol) in mantle xenoliths to investigate Ca isotopic fractionation in the upper mantle. δ44/40Ca (δ44/40Ca (‰) = (44Ca/40Ca)SAMPLE/(44Ca/40Ca)SRM915a - 1) in opx varies from 0.95 ± 0.05‰ to 1.82 ± 0.01‰ and cpx from 0.71 ± 0.06‰ to 1.03 ± 0.12‰ (2se). δ44/40Ca in ol (P-15) is 1.16 ± 0.08‰, identical to δ44/40Ca of the co-existing opx (1.12 ± 0.09‰, 2se). The Δ44/40Caopx-cpx (Δ44/40Caopx-cpx = δ44/40Caopx-δ44/40Cacpx) shows a large variation ranging from -0.01‰ to 1.11‰ and it dramatically increases with decreasing of Ca/Mg (atomic ratio) in opx. These observations may reflect the effect of opx composition on the inter-mineral equilibrium fractionation of Ca isotopes, consistent with the theoretical prediction by first-principles theory calculations (Feng et al., 2014). Furthermore, Δ44/40Caopx-cpx decreases when temperature slightly increases from 1196 to 1267 K. However, the magnitude of such inter-mineral isotopic fractionation (1.12‰) is not consistent with the value calculated by the well-known correlation between inter-mineral isotope fractionation factors and 1/T2 (Urey, 1947). Instead, it may reflect the temperature control on crystal chemistry of opx (i.e., Ca content), which further affects Δ44/40Caopx-cpx. The calculated δ44/40Ca of bulk peridotites and pyroxenites range from 0.76 ± 0.06‰ to 1.04 ± 0.12‰ (2se). Notably, δ44/40Ca of bulk peridotites are positively correlated with CaO and negatively with MgO content. Such correlations can be explained by mixing between a fertile mantle end-member and a depleted one with low δ44/40Ca, indicating that Ca isotopes could be a useful tool in studying mantle evolution.

  12. Tribological properties of nanosized calcium carbonate filled polyamide 66 nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Itagaki, Kaito; Nishitani, Yosuke; Kitano, Takeshi

    For the purpose of developing high performance tribomaterials for mechanical sliding parts such as gears, bearings and so on, nanosized calcium carbonate (nano-CaCO{sub 3}) filled polyamide 66 (PA66) nanocomposites were investigated. The nano-CaCO{sub 3} was a kind of precipitated (colloid typed) CaCO{sub 3}, and its average particle size was 40, 80 and 150 nm. Surface treatment was performed by fatty acid on the nano-CaCO{sub 3} and its volume fraction in the nanocomposite was varied from 1 to 20vol.%. These nanocomposites were melt-mixed by a twin screw extruder and injection-molded. Tribological properties were measured by two types of sliding wear testers suchmore » as ring-on-plate type and ball-on-plate type one under dry condition. The counterface, worn surface and wear debris were observed by digital microscope and scanning electron microscope. It was found that the nano-CaCO{sub 3} has a good effect on the tribological properties, although the effect on the frictional coefficient and specific wear rate is differed by the volume fraction and the type of sliding wear modes. This is attributed to the change of wear mechanisms, which is the change of form of the transfer films on the counterface and the size of wear debris. It follows from these results that PA66/nano-CaCO{sub 3} nanocomposites may be possible to be the high performance tribomaterials.« less

  13. Synthesis of Hydroxyapatite using Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) from Limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardhani, Sri; Isnaini Azkiya, Noor; Triandi Tjahjanto, Rachmat

    2018-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is a material that widely applied in bone and teeth implant due to its biocompatibility and bioactivity. This material can be prepared from PCC by precipitation method using CaO and H3PO4 in ethanol. In this work, variations of phosphoric acid amount and aging time were investigated. The synthesized HAp was characterized by FT-IR, AAS, UV-Vis Spectrophotometer, PSA, SEM, and powder XRD. The results showed that the high concentration of calcium in PCC gives better yields in which PCC obtained from carbonation method has higher yield than that of caustic soda method. The determination of optimum phosphoric acid addition based on targeted Ca/P ratio (1.67) from HAp was obtained on the addition of 0.1271 mol phosphoric acid with Ca/P ratio of 1.66. The aging time gave significant effect to the particle size of synthesised HAp. The smallest particle size was obtained in aging time for 48 hours as high as 49.25 μm. FTIR spectra of the synthesized HAp show the presence of hydroxyl (-OH) group at 3438.8 cm-1, PO4 3- at 557.39 and 1035.7 cm-1, and CaO at 1413.72 cm-1. The synthesized HAp forms agglomeration solid based on the SEM analysis. The powder XRD data shows three highest peaks at 2θ i.e. 27.8296; 31.1037; and 34.3578 which corresponds to β-TCP (tricalcium phosphate) in accordance with JCPDS no.09-0169. The characteristic 2θ peak of hydroxyapatite with low intensity is observed from the synthesized HAp refer to the JCPDS data no. 09-0432.

  14. Sulfur Cycling Mediates Calcium Carbonate Geochemistry in Modern Marine Stromatolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, P. T.; Hoeft, S. E.; Bebout, B. M.; Reid, R. P.

    2004-01-01

    Modem marine stromatolites forming in Highborne Cay, Exumas (Bahamas), contain microbial mats dominated by Schizothrix. Although saturating concentrations of Ca2+ and CO32- exist, microbes mediate CaCO3 precipitation. Cyanobacterial photosynthesis in these stromatolites aids calcium carbonate precipitation by removal of HS+ through CO2 use. Photorespiration and exopolymer production predominantly by oxygenic phototrophs fuel heterotrophic activity: aerobic respiration (approximately 60 umol/sq cm.h) and sulfate reduction (SR; 1.2 umol SO42-/sq cm.h) are the dominant C- consuming processes. Aerobic microbial respiration and the combination of SR and H2S oxidation both facilitate CaCO3 dissolution through H+ production. Aerobic respiration consumes much more C on an hourly basis, but duel fluctuating O2 and H2 depth profiles indicate that overall, SR consumes only slightly less (0.2-0.5) of the primary production. Moreover, due to low O2 concentrations when SR rates are peaking, reoxidation of the H2S formed is incomplete: both thiosulfate and polythionates are formed. The process of complete H2S oxidation yields H+. However, due to a low O2 concentration late in the day and relatively high O2 concentrations early in the following morning, a two-stage oxidation takes place: first, polythionates are formed from H2S, creating alkalinity which coincides with CaCO3 precipitation; secondly, oxidation of polythionates to sulfate yields acidity, resulting in dissolution, etc. Vertical profiles confirmed that the pH peaked late in the afternoon (greater than 8.8) and had the lowest values (less than 7.4) early in the morning. Thus, the effect of this S-cycling through alkalinity production, followed by acidification during H2S oxidation, results in a six times stronger fluctuation in acidity than photosynthesis plus aerobic respiration accomplish. This implies that anaerobic processes play a pivotal role in stromatolite formation.

  15. Review of calcium carbonate polymorph precipitation in spring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian

    2017-05-01

    Many spring deposits throughout the world are characterized by spectacular deposits of calcium carbonate that are formed of various combinations of aragonite and calcite, and in very rare cases vaterite. The factors that control the precipitation of the aragonite and calcite have been the subject of considerable debate that has been based on natural precipitates and information gained from numerous laboratory experiments. Synthesis of this information indicates that there is probably no single universal factor that controls calcite and aragonite precipitation in all springs. Instead, the reason for aragonite as opposed to calcite precipitation should be ascertained by considering the following ordered series of possibilities for each system. First, aragonite, commonly with calcite as a co-precipitate, will form from spring water that has a high CO2 content and rapid CO2 degassing, irrespective of the Mg:Ca ratio and scale of precipitation. Second, aragonite can be precipitated from waters that have low levels of CO2 degassing provided that the Mg:Ca ratio is high enough to inhibit calcite precipitation. Third, the presence of biofilms may lead to the simultaneous precipitation of aragonite and calcite (irrespective of CO2 degassing or Mg:Ca ratio) either within the different microdomains that develop in the biofilm or because of diurnal changes in various geochemical parameters associated with the biofilm. Although the precipitation of calcite and aragonite has commonly been linked directly to water temperature, there is no clear evidence for this proposition. It is possible, however, that temperature may be influencing another parameter that plays a more direct role in the precipitation of these CaCO3 polymorphs. Despite the advances that have been made, the factors that ultimately control calcite and aragonite are still open to debate because this long-standing problem has still not been fully resolved.

  16. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as ...

  17. Dietary acid load is associated with lower bone mineral density in men with low intake of dietary calcium.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Kelsey M; Walsh, Stephen J; Kenny, Anne M; Insogna, Karl L; Kerstetter, Jane E

    2014-02-01

    High dietary acid load (DAL) may be detrimental to bone mineral density (BMD). The objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluate the cross-sectional relation between DAL and BMD; and (2) determine whether calcium intake modifies this association. Men (n = 1218) and women (n = 907) aged ≥60 years were included from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2008. Nutrient intake from 2, 24-hour recalls was used to calculate net endogenous acid production (NEAP) and potential renal acid load (PRAL) (mEq/d). PRAL was calculated from dietary calcium (PRALdiet ) and diet + supplemental calcium (PRALtotal ). Tests for linear trend in adjusted mean BMD of the hip and lumbar spine were performed across energy-adjusted NEAP and PRAL quartiles. Modification by calcium intake (dietary or total) above or below 800 mg/d was assessed by interaction terms. Overall, mean age was 69 ± 0.3 years. Among women, there was no association between NEAP and BMD. PRALdiet was positively associated with proximal femur BMD (p trend = 0.04). No associations were observed with PRALtotal at any BMD site (p range, 0.38-0.82). Among men, no significant associations were observed between BMD and NEAP or PRAL. However, an interaction between PRALdiet and calcium intake was observed with proximal femur BMD (p = 0.08). An inverse association between PRALdiet and proximal femur BMD was detected among men with <800 mg/d dietary calcium (p = 0.02); no associations were found among men with ≥800 mg/d (p = 0.98). A significant interaction with PRALtotal was not observed. In conclusion, when supplemental calcium is considered, there is no association between DAL and BMD among adults. Men with low dietary calcium showed an inverse relation with PRAL at the proximal femur; in women no interaction was observed. This study highlights the importance of calcium intake in counteracting the adverse effect of DAL on bone health. Further research should

  18. Isolation and metagenomic characterization of bacteria associated with calcium carbonate and struvite precipitation in a pure moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, A; Leyva-Díaz, J C; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A; Muñoz-Palazon, B; Rivadeneyra, A; Poyatos, J M; Rivadeneyra, M A; Martinez-Toledo, M V

    2015-01-01

    A bench-scale pure moving bed bioreactor-membrane bioreactor (MBBR-MBR) used for the treatment of urban wastewater was analyzed for the identification of bacterial strains with the potential capacity for calcium carbonate and struvite biomineral formation. Isolation of mineral-forming strains on calcium carbonate and struvite media revealed six major colonies with a carbonate or struvite precipitation capacity in the biofouling on the membrane surface and showed that heterotrophic bacteria with the ability to precipitate calcium carbonate and struvite constituted ~7.5% of the total platable bacteria. These belonged to the genera Lysinibacillus, Trichococcus, Comamomas and Bacillus. Pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial communities in the suspended cells and membrane biofouling showed a high degree of similarity in all the samples collected with respect to bacterial assemblage. The study of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified through pyrosequencing suggested that ~21% of the total bacterial community identified in the biofouling could potentially form calcium carbonate or struvite crystals in the pure MBBR-MBR system used for the treatment of urban wastewater.

  19. Amorphous calcium carbonate: A precursor phase for aragonite in shell disease of the pearl oyster.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Chuang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2018-02-26

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) has long been shown to act as an important constituent or precursor phase for crystalline material in mollusks. However, the presence and the role of ACC in bivalve shell formation are not fully studied. In this study, we found that brown deposits containing heterogeneous calcium carbonates were precipitated when a shell disease occurred in the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Calcein-staining of the brown deposits indicated that numerous amorphous calcium deposits were present, which was further confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectrum and X-ray difraction (XRD) analyses. So we speculate that ACC plays an important role in rapid calcium carbonate precipitation during shell repair process in diseased oysters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of exotic earthworms on organic carbon sorption on mineral surfaces and soil carbon inventories in a northern hardwood forest

    Treesearch

    Amy Lyttle; Kyungsoo Yoo; Cindy Hale; Anthony Aufdenkampe; Stephen D. Sebestyen; Kathryn Resner; Alex Blum

    2015-01-01

    Exotic earthworms are invading forests in North America where native earthworms have been absent since the last glaciation. These earthworms bioturbate soils and may enhance physical interactions between minerals and organic matter (OM), thus affecting mineral sorption of carbon (C) which may affect C cycling. We quantitatively show how OM-mineral sorption and soil C...

  1. Tibial bone mineral distribution as influenced by calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D feeding levels in the growing turkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrell, F. A.; Brenes, J.; Waibel, P.

    1974-01-01

    Roentgen signs, subperiosteal, endosteal, and trabecular bone growth are evaluated in turkeys fed phosphorus at the 0.5, 0.56, 0.68, 0.90, and 2.70 percent levels. Calcium levels of 0.30, 0.40, 0.60, 1.2, and 3.60 percent were also tested. Vitamin D levels of 0, 100, 300, 900 and 27,000 I.U. per day were likewise evaluated. Roentgen signs, bone mineral as measured by T-125 gamma ray absorption, and bone mineral growth patterns as shown by radiograph area projection are correlated with calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D feeding levels. Differences in bone growth at the various feeding levels were observed which were not reflected by differences in other studied parameters.

  2. Effect of calcium carbonate combined with calcitonin on hypercalcemia in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yong; Kong, Xiang Lei; Li, Wen Bin; Wang, Zun Song

    2014-12-01

    This short-term study assessed the efficacy and safety of calcium carbonate combined with calcitonin in the treatment of hypercalcemia in hemodialysis patients. Patients (n=64) on hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease for more than 6 months were included based on total serum calcium more than 10.5 mg/dL. All patients were randomized (1:1) to receive calcium carbonate combined with calcitonin (Group I) or lanthanum carbonate (Group II) for 12 weeks. Blood levels of calcium, phosphorus and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were measured every month, bone mass density (BMD) and coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) were measured at 3 months. During the study period, serum calcium decreased from 10.72 ± 0.39 to 10.09 ± 0.28 mg/dL (P < 0.05), serum phosphorus decreased from 6.79 ± 1.05 to 5.46 ± 1.18 mg/dL (P < 0.05), and serum iPTH levels in the Group I and Group II were not significantly different from the baseline. There were no significant differences in CACS in either group. There were no significant differences in the BMD values between Group I and baseline. In Group II, the BMD values at the lumbar spine and femoral neck were significantly lower than those before the trial and significantly lower than the corresponding values of Group I (P<0.05). Calcium carbonate combined with calcitonin and lanthanum carbonate were equally effective in the suppression of hypercalcemia in hemodialysis patients. There were no serious treatment-related adverse events in treatment with calcium carbonate combined with calcitonin. © 2014 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2014 International Society for Apheresis.

  3. In Situ Evaluation of Calcium Phosphate Nucleation Kinetics and Pathways during Intra- and Extrafibrillar Mineralization of Collagen Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Doyoon; Lee, Byeongdu; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) nanocrystals nucleate and grow in intrafibrillar and/or extrafibrillar spaces of collagen fibrils during the mineralization of bones and teeth. Little is known about the early stages of CaP nucleation and distribution in fibrillar matrices, despite their significant influence on the physical and chemical structures of tissue-level constructs. Using in situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we examined the nucleation and growth of CaP within collagen matrices and elucidated how a nucleation inhibitor, polyaspartic acid (pAsp), governs mineralization kinetics and pathways at multiple length scales. In situ SAXS analysis clearly revealed that nucleation sites, kinetically-controlled by the nucleationmore » inhibitor, determined the pathways of CaP morphological transformation. Mineralization with pAsp led to intrafibrillar CaP plates with a spatial distribution gradient through the depth of the matrix. Mineralization without pAsp led initially to spherical aggregates of CaP in the entire extrafibrillar spaces. With time, the spherical aggregates transformed into plates at the outermost surface of the collagen matrix, preventing intrafibrillar mineralization inside. The results illuminate mineral nucleation kinetics and real-time nanoparticle distributions within organic matrices in solutions containing body fluid components. Because the macroscale mechanical properties of collagen matrices depend on their mineral content, phase, and arrangement at the nanoscale, this study contributes to better design and fabrication of biomaterials for regenerative medicine.« less

  4. Adsorption, Aggregation, and Deposition Behaviors of Carbon Dots on Minerals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Li, Jiaxing; Huang, Yongshun; Wang, Xiangxue; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiangke

    2017-06-06

    The increased production of carbon dots (CDs) and the release and accumulation of CDs in both surface and groundwater has resulted in the increasing interest in their research. To assess the environmental behavior of CDs, the interaction between CDs and goethite was studied under different environmental conditions. Electrokinetic characterization of CDs suggested that the ζ-potential and size distribution of CDs were affected by pH and electrolyte species, indicating that these factors influenced the stability of CDs in aqueous solutions. Traditional Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory did not fit well the aggregation process of CDs. Results of the effects of pH and ionic strength suggested that electronic attraction dominated the aggregation of CDs. Compared with other minerals, hydrogen-bonding interactions and Lewis acid-base interactions contributed to the aggregation of CDs, in addition to van der Waals and electrical double-layer forces. Adsorption isotherms and microscopic Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy indicated that chemical bonds were formed between CDs and goethite. These findings are useful to understand the interaction of CDs with minerals, as well as the potential fate and toxicity of CDs in the natural environment, especially in soils and sediments.

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Sucroferric Oxyhydroxide and Calcium Carbonate in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Koiwa, Fumihiko; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Akizawa, Tadao

    2018-01-01

    In this phase III, open-label, single-arm, multi-center 12-week study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of combination therapy with sucroferric oxyhydroxide (PA21) and calcium carbonate for hemodialysis patients with hyperphosphatemia. We enrolled 35 subjects aged ≥ 20 years with end-stage kidney disease and serum phosphorus 3.5-6.0 mg/dl who were undergoing hemodialysis 3 times weekly and taking calcium carbonate and sevelamer hydrochloride. Patients switched from sevelamer hydrochloride and calcium carbonate to sucroferric oxyhydroxide and calcium carbonate. Sucroferric oxyhydroxide was orally administered 3 times daily within 750 mg/d (250 mg per dose) to 3000 mg/d (1000 mg per dose), immediately before every meal, for 12 weeks. Calcium carbonate was orally administered 3 times daily after every meal. Outcomes were serum phosphorus concentration, safety, and satisfaction with bowel movements. Mean (SD) serum phosphorus concentrations were 5.01 (0.63) mg/dl at week 0 and 4.89 (1.14) mg/dl at the end of treatment, after patients switched from sevelamer hydrochloride to sucroferric oxyhydroxide. The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 31.4% (11/35), with diarrhea being the most frequent (31.4%). More sucroferric oxyhydroxide-treated patients were satisfied with their bowel movements. More patients with constipation, as well as those who experienced diarrhea, were satisfied with their bowel movements at the end of the study. Combined administration of sucroferric oxyhydroxide and calcium carbonate at low doses was effective in maintaining serum phosphorus concentrations within the target range, and patients' gastrointestinal status improved. Sucroferric oxyhydroxide maintained its serum phosphorus-lowering effect with a decreased pill burden, and its concomitant administration with calcium carbonate was well tolerated.

  6. Influence of Calcium Carbonate on Cobalt Phytoavailability in Fluvo-aquic Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengyuan; Liu, Borui; Ma, Yufei; Xue, Qianhui; Huang, Qing

    2017-12-01

    In order to study the efficacy of calcium carbonate for cobalt (Co) fixation, as well as its influence on chemical speciation of Co in fluvo-aquic soil, pakchoies were planted in the soil with different quantities of exogenous Co and calcium carbonate. Co concentrations in the mature plant shoots were analyzed, and the chemical speciation of Co were detected with the Tessier five-step sequential extraction. The results showed that the Co concentration in plants tended to decrease first and then get higher with the concentration of calcium carbonate increasing (0-12g/kg) in soil (P < 0.05). The proportion of Co in the exchangeable form in the soil followed the similar tendency (P < 0.05), which might transform from the exchangeable form into the carbonate-associated and organic-associated forms. A regression analysis showed that when the concentrations of calcium carbonate were in the range of 5.0 to 7.5 g/kg, Co concentration in the plant reached to the lowest point, while the proportion of Co in the exchangeable form reached the minimum. In conclusion, to get the optimum effect, the dosage of calcium carbonate should be kept in the range of 5.0 to 7.5 g/kg when it is applied to Co fixation.

  7. Composites of gellan gum hydrogel enzymatically mineralized with calcium-zinc phosphate for bone regeneration with antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Timothy E L; Pilarz, Magdalena; Lopez-Heredia, Marco; Brackman, Gilles; Schaubroeck, David; Balcaen, Lieve; Bliznuk, Vitaliy; Dubruel, Peter; Knabe-Ducheyne, Christine; Vanhaecke, Frank; Coenye, Tom; Pamula, Elzbieta

    2017-05-01

    Gellan gum hydrogels functionalized with alkaline phosphatase were enzymatically mineralized with phosphates in mineralization medium containing calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) to improve their suitability as biomaterials for bone regeneration. The aims of the study were to endow mineralized hydrogels with antibacterial activity by incorporation of Zn in the inorganic phase, and to investigate the effect of Zn incorporation on the amount and type of mineral formed, the compressive modulus of the mineralized hydrogels and on their ability to support adhesion and growth of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. Mineralization medium contained glycerophosphate (0.05 m) and three different molar Ca:Zn ratios, 0.05:0, 0.04:0.01 and 0.025:0.025 (all mol/dm 3 ), hereafter referred to as A, B and C, respectively. FTIR, SAED and TEM analysis revealed that incubation for 14 days caused the formation of predominantly amorphous mineral phases in sample groups A, B and C. The presence of Zn in sample groups B and C was associated with a drop in the amount of mineral formed and a smaller mineral deposit morphology, as observed by SEM. ICP-OES revealed that Zn was preferentially incorporated into mineral compared to Ca. Mechanical testing revealed a decrease in compressive modulus in sample group C. Sample groups B and C, but not A, showed antibacterial activity against biofilm-forming, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. All sample groups supported cell growth. Zn incorporation increased the viable cell number. The highest values were seen on sample group C. In conclusion, the sample group containing the most Zn, i.e. group C, appears to be the most promising. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Calcium carbonate precipitation rate as a function of ion ratio in the presence & absence of Sr2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebrehiwet, T.; Beig, M. S.; Fujita, Y.; Redden, G. D.; Smith, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    Tsigabu Gebrehiwet 1*, Mikala Beig 2, Yoshiko Fujita 3, George Redden 3 and Robert W. Smith 1 1University of Idaho, 1776 Science Center Dr, Idaho Falls,ID, 83402 (*tgebrehiwet@uidaho.edu; smithbob@uidaho.edu ) 27963 Grasmere Dr.Boulder, CO 80301(mbeig@alumni.rice.edu) 3Idaho National Laboratory, MS 2208, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (Yoshiko.Fujita@inl.gov; George.Redden@inl.gov) Engineered in situ precipitation of calcium carbonate is a proposed strategy for remediating toxic or radioactive metals (e.g., Sr2+)in subsurface environments as well as for modifying the physical properties (e.g., stiffness, permeability) of geomedia. Inducing the precipitation reaction will likely involve manipulating the geochemical conditions by adding calcium, (bi)carbonate, or both, and relying on mixing of the two reactants. Under these conditions, the ratio of Ca2+ to CO32- will vary with distance from the mixing interface, and for most or all of the porous medium, a 1:1 stoichiometry between calcium and carbonate is unlikely to be achieved. Indeed, in engineered systems where rapid treatment is an important objective, very steep ion concentration gradients may be generated, which would result in local reactant ratios varying from very small to very large over short distances, depending on the mixing geometry and particular chemical composition of the mixing fluids. This in turn has an impact on the rate of mineral precipitation. Typically, the rate of calcium carbonate precipitation is expressed with an affinity-based rate law of the type: Rate = k(Ω-1)n, where k is a rate constant, Ω is the saturation state for the mineral (e.g., calcite), and n is an empirical reaction order. The saturation state Ω is defined as the ratio of the ion activity product to the mineral solubility product. In this expression, the rate is simply dependent on the value of Ω; the actual activities of the individual ions (Ca2+ and CO32-) do not appear in the expression. In support of the development of

  9. Transformation of Strontium during formation of biogenic calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, T.; Kozai, N.; Sakamoto, F.; Yamashita, M.; Horiieke, T.; Utsunomiya, S.

    2016-12-01

    Some amounts of radionuclides contaminated water containing 90Sr generated in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant were leaked to sea water in the port. One of the possible method to eliminate 90Sr is co-precipitated with biogenic carbonates minerals (CCM). Specific bacteria are known to form biogenic CCM in groundwater. In the present study, we have screened specific bacterium to form CCM in saline water, and studied transformation of Sr during biogenic CCM. A marine microbe of strain TK2d, which is screened from Tokyo bay to form CCM in saline solution, was grown in the medium solution contained urea and Sr. The concentratuion of Sr2+ in the solution was monitored by ICP-OES (ICP-OES; 720 Agilent Technologies, Inc., USA) during the formation of biogenic CCM. The precipitates were analyzed by SEM, TEM, and XAFS. When 1.0 mM Sr was dissolved in the medium solution, the concentration of Sr decreased up to 0.02 mM within 10 days, indicating that most of Sr in the solution was eliminated within 10 days. SEM and TEM analyses showed that needle shaped CCM containing Ca and Sr were formed. The CCM was not single crystalline, but poly-crystalline of calcite and aragonite. The elemental mapping showed that Sr was present at the same position of Ca, indicating that Sr was coprecipitated with Ca. The XANES analysis of Sr in the precipitates showed that the XANES spectrum was not the same as that of Sr coprecipitated with an abiotic Ca carbonates. Linear combination fitting of XANES spectra by those of SrCl2 and SrCO3 showed that both Sr2+ and SrCO3 were present in CCM. Longer contact time resulted in higher content of SrCO3, indicating that Sr was incorporated gradually with time into CCM structure. Thus, Sr was changed its chemical species from adsorbed one to the incorporated one in biogenic CCM in saline solution. This work was partially supported by a research grant from the Japan Science and Technology Agency, Japan (research grant No. 260502).

  10. Chiral acidic amino acids induce chiral hierarchical structure in calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenge; Pacella, Michael S.; Athanasiadou, Dimitra; Nelea, Valentin; Vali, Hojatollah; Hazen, Robert M.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; McKee, Marc D.

    2017-01-01

    Chirality is ubiquitous in biology, including in biomineralization, where it is found in many hardened structures of invertebrate marine and terrestrial organisms (for example, spiralling gastropod shells). Here we show that chiral, hierarchically organized architectures for calcium carbonate (vaterite) can be controlled simply by adding chiral acidic amino acids (Asp and Glu). Chiral, vaterite toroidal suprastructure having a ‘right-handed' (counterclockwise) spiralling morphology is induced by L-enantiomers of Asp and Glu, whereas ‘left-handed' (clockwise) morphology is induced by D-enantiomers, and sequentially switching between amino-acid enantiomers causes a switch in chirality. Nanoparticle tilting after binding of chiral amino acids is proposed as a chiral growth mechanism, where a ‘mother' subunit nanoparticle spawns a slightly tilted, consequential ‘daughter' nanoparticle, which by amplification over various length scales creates oriented mineral platelets and chiral vaterite suprastructures. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for how biomineralization-related enantiomers might exert hierarchical control to form extended chiral suprastructures. PMID:28406143

  11. Calcium and Dairy Products Consumption and Association with Total Hip Bone Mineral Density in Women from Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Bahtiri, Elton; Islami, Hilmi; Hoxha, Rexhep; Bytyqi, Hasime Qorraj-; Sermaxhaj, Faton; Halimi, Enis

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: There is paucity of evidence in southeastern Europe and Kosovo regarding dairy products consumption and association with bone mineral density (BMD). Therefore, the objective of present study was to assess calcium intake and dairy products consumption and to investigate relationship with total hip BMD in a Kosovo women sample. Methods: This cross-sectional study included a sample of 185 women divided into respective groups according to total hip BMD. All the study participants completed a food frequency questionnaire and underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) to estimate BMD. Nonparametric tests were performed to compare characteristics of the groups. Results: The average dietary calcium intake was 818.41 mg/day. Only 16.75% of the subjects met calcium recommended dietary reference intakes (DRIs). There were no significant differences between low BMD group and normal BMD group regarding average dietary calcium intake, but it was significantly higher in BMDT3 subgroup than in BMDT2 and BMDT1 subgroups. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrate significant relationship of daily dietary calcium intake with upper BMD tertile. Further initiatives are warranted from this study to highlight the importance of nutrition education. PMID:25568548

  12. Magnesium carbonate-containing phosphate binder prevents connective tissue mineralization in Abcc6(-/-) mice-potential for treatment of pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaoli; Larusso, Jennifer; Grand-Pierre, Alix E; Uitto, Jouni

    2009-12-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a heritable disorder characterized by ectopic mineralization of connective tissues primarily in the skin, eyes, and the cardiovascular system. PXE is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene. While PXE is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, there is currently no effective or specific treatment. In this study, we tested oral phosphate binders for treatment of a mouse model of PXE which we have developed by targeted ablation of the corresponding mouse gene (Abcc6(-/-)). This "knock-out" (KO) mouse model recapitulates features of PXE and demonstrates mineralization of a number of tissues, including the connective tissue capsule surrounding vibrissae in the muzzle skin which serves as an early biomarker of the mineralization process. Treatment of these mice with a magnesium carbonate-enriched diet (magnesium concentration being 5-fold higher than in the control diet) completely prevented mineralization of the vibrissae up to 6 months of age, as demonstrated by computerized morphometric analysis of histopathology as well as by calcium and phosphate chemical assays. The magnesium carbonate-enriched diet also prevented the progression of mineralization when the mice were placed on that experimental diet at 3 months of age and followed up to 6 months of age. Treatment with magnesium carbonate was associated with a slight increase in the serum concentration of magnesium, with no effect on serum calcium and phosphorus levels. In contrast, concentration of calcium in the urine was increased over 10-fold while the concentration of phosphorus was markedly decreased, being essentially undetectable after long-term (> 4 month) treatment. No significant changes were noted in the serum parathyroid hormone levels. Computerized axial tomography scan of bones in mice placed on magnesium carbonate-enriched diet showed no differences in the bone density compared to mice on the control diet, and chemical assays showed a small increase in

  13. First-principles Calculations of Equilibrium Calcium Isotope Fractionation among Ca-bearing Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Wang, W.; Kang, J.; Wu, Z.; Huang, F.

    2016-12-01

    Calcium isotope fractionation factors of Ca-bearing minerals are investigated with the first principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The sequence of heavy Ca isotope enrichment is forsterite > grossular > butschliite > lime > fluorite > tremolite diopside > anhydrite dolomite titanite > anorthite > perovskite gehlenite aragonite richterite > akermanite > oldhamite. This order is consistent with variation of Ca-O bond lengths, indicating that Ca-O bond energy plays an overwhelming role on the fractionations of Ca isotopes. Our study provides important insights into the Ca isotopic data of meteorites. Our calculation predicts that oldhamites (CaS) are enriched in light Ca isotopes relative to silicate phase if they are in equilibrium, contrast with the observations in Valdes et al (2014). Therefore, oldhamite and silicate phase in the meteorites should be in disequilibrium for Ca isotopes. Our results can also be used to understand Ca isotopic composition of the Moon. Δ44/40Ca between olivine (with CaO content of 2.48 wt%) and diopside is up to 0.41‰ and Δ44/40Cagrossular-diopside is 0.26‰ at 1500K. Feng et al. (2014) calculated that Δ44/40Ca between opx with CaO content of 1.74 wt% and cpx is about 0.27‰ at 1500 K. According to the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) model, the modern Moon is chemically stratified (Snyder et al., 1992; Elardo et al., 2011). Assuming that the lower cumulate and upper residual melt are in isotopic equilibrium during the evolution of Lunar Magma Ocean where the cumulate may be mainly composed of olivine and orthopyroxene or garnet/spinel, δ44/40Ca of the Moon could be underestimated by 0.05‰ to 0.25‰ if the shallow lunar samples are used to represent the bulk Moon.

  14. Graphene oxide/oxidized carbon nanofiber/mineralized hydroxyapatite based hybrid composite for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, N.; Sundaramurthy, Anandhakumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Sundramoorthy, Ashok K.

    2017-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAP), a multi-mineral substituted calcium phosphate is the main mineral component of tooth enamel and bone, has become an important biomaterial for biomedical applications. However, as-synthesized HAP has poor mechanical properties and inferior wear resistance, so it is not suitable to use in bone tissue engineering applications. We report the successful incorporation of oxidized carbon nanofibers (O-CNF) and graphene oxide (GO) into the mineralized hydroxyapatite (M-HAP) which showed excellent mechanical and biological properties. GO improved the high mechanical strength and corrosion protection of the substrate in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution and promoted the viability of osteoblasts MG63 cells. As-prepared M-HAP/O-CNF/GO composite showed materials characteristics that similar to natural bone (M-HAP) with high mechanical strength. The resultant M-HAP/O-CNF/GO composite was characterized out by x-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), respectively. The mechanical strength of the material was determined by Vicker’s micro-hardness method and it was found that M-HAP/O-CNF/GO (468  ±  4 Hv) composite has superior mechanical properties than M-HAP (330  ±  3 Hv) and M-HAP/GO (425  ±  5 Hv) samples. In addition, antibacterial activity of the composite was studied against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the cell viability of the composite was observed in vitro against osteoblast cells. All these studies confirmed that the M-HAP/O-CNF/GO composite can be considered as potential candidate for dental and orthopedic applications.

  15. A facile magnesium-containing calcium carbonate biomaterial as potential bone graft.

    PubMed

    He, Fupo; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Xiumei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-12-01

    The calcium carbonate is the main composition of coral which has been widely used as bone graft in clinic. Herein, we readily prepared novel magnesium-containing calcium carbonate biomaterials (MCCs) under the low-temperature conditions based on the dissolution-recrystallization reaction between unstable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) and metastable vaterite-type calcium carbonate with water involved. The content of magnesium in MCCs was tailored by adjusting the proportion of ACC starting material that was prepared using magnesium as stabilizer. The phase composition of MCCs with various amounts of magnesium was composed of one, two or three kinds of calcium carbonates (calcite, aragonite, and/or magnesian calcite). The different MCCs differed in topography. The in vitro degradation of MCCs accelerated with increasing amount of introduced magnesium. The MCCs with a certain amount of magnesium not only acquired higher compressive strength, but also promoted in vitro cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, the facile MCCs shed light on their potential as bone graft. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The cationic composition and pH in the moulting fluid of Porcellio scaber (Crustacea, Isopoda) during calcium carbonate deposit formation and resorption.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Before moulting, terrestrial isopods resorb calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) from the posterior cuticle and store it in sternal deposits. These consist mainly of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) spherules that develop within the ecdysial space between the anterior sternal epithelium and the old cuticle. Ions that occur in the moulting fluid, including those required for mineral deposition, are transported from the hemolymph into the ecdysial space by the anterior sternal epithelial cells. The cationic composition of the moulting fluid probably affects mineral deposition and may provide information on the ion-transport activity of the sternal epithelial cells. This study presents the concentrations of inorganic cations within the moulting fluid of the anterior sternites during the late premoult and intramoult stages. The most abundant cation is Na(+) followed by Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and K(+). The concentrations of these ions do not change significantly between the stages whereas the mean pH changed from 8.2 to 6.9 units between mineral deposition in late premoult, and resorption in intramoult, respectively. Measurements of the transepithelial potential show that there is little driving force for passive movements of calcium across the anterior sternal epithelium. The results suggest a possible role of magnesium ions in ACC formation, and a contribution of pH changes to CaCO(3) precipitation and dissolution.

  17. The investigations of changes in mineral-organic and carbon-phosphate ratios in the mixed saliva by synchrotron infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredin, Pavel; Goloshchapov, Dmitry; Kashkarov, Vladimir; Ippolitov, Yuri; Bambery, Keith

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of the saturation of mixed saliva by mineral complexes and groups necessary for the remineralisation of tooth enamel using exogenous and endogenous methods of caries prevention. Using IR spectroscopy and high-intensity synchrotron radiation, changes in the composition of the human mixed saliva were identified when exogenous and endogenous methods of caries prevention are employed. Based on the calculations of mineral/organic and carbon/phosphate ratios, changes in the composition of the human mixed saliva depending on a certain type of prevention were identified. It is shown that the use of a toothpaste (exogenous prevention) alone based on a multi-mineral complex including calcium glycerophosphate provides only a short-term effect of saturating the oral cavity with mineral complexes and groups. Rinsing of the oral cavity with water following the preventive use of a toothpaste completely removes the effect of the saturation of the mixed saliva with mineral groups and complexes. The use of tablets of a multi-mineral complex with calcium glycerophosphate (endogenous prevention) in combination with exogenous prevention causes an average increase of ∼10% in the content of mineral groups and complexes in the mixed saliva and allows long-term saturation of the oral fluid by them. This method outperforms the exogenous one owing to a long-term effect of optimal concentrations of endogenous and biologically available derivatives of phosphates on the enamel surface.

  18. Investigating the Basis of Biogenic Calcium Carbonate Formation from an Amorphous Precursor: Nature of the Transformation to Calcite on Hydroxyl Functionalized Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Lee, J. R.; Talley, C. E.; Murphy, K. E.; Han, T. Y.; Deyoreo, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2006-12-01

    Calcium carbonate biominerals are particularly significant because of their direct role in regulating the global carbon cycle, as well as their ubiquitous occurrence across earth environments. Biogenic carbonates are further distinguished by their broad phlyogenetic distribution; hence it has been suggested that unrelated eukaryotes must have used similar biochemical strategies to control mineralization. Recent studies have shown that an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) phase potentially plays a key role in the initial formation of carbonate minerals and in "shaping" them into complex morphologies widely seen in biominerals. Echinoderms, mollusks, and possibly many other organisms use ACC as a precursor phase that is first nucleated in cellularly controlled environments such as vesicles and subsequently transforms into a fully crystalline material. Recent studies on sea urchin embryos have shown that during transformation ACC develops short range that resembles calcite before fully crystallizing and serve as inspiration for our studies in synthetic systems. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on gold and silver have been used as simple model systems that approximate biological surfaces. Many studies have shown that thiol monolayers with hydroxyl termination stabilize a transitory ACC film that with prolonged exposure to aqueous solution transforms into calcite nucleated on {104} faces. Using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) we studied SAM/mineral interactions with well ordered mercaptophenol monolayers showed that when these films are first exposed to calcium carbonate solutions, they become disordered and remain so after subsequent deposition of an ACC over-layer. Yet calcite nucleates and grows from the surface bound ACC with predominantly {104} orientation, which suggests a dynamic structural relationship between the SAMs and the mineral phase. While the monolayer/mineral phase interaction has been characterized, the mechanism for nucleating

  19. Chapter 7:Mineral Scale Management

    Treesearch

    Alan W. Rudie; Peter W. Hart

    2012-01-01

    Mineral scale problems are not new to pulp mills and bleach plants. The liquor recovery system ensures that white liquor is saturated in calcium carbonate, and this mineral will precipitate when heated to cooking temperatures in the digester [1,2]. The original single-vessel continuous digesters sold by Kamyr had an extra liquor heater as standard equipment to enable...

  20. Synthesis of Composite Adsorbent from Calcium Carbonate and Cocos Nucifera Carbon Powder Crosslinked with Biopolymer Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaruddin, M. A.; Bakri, M. M. A.; Norashiddin, F. A.; Zawawi, M. H.; Zainol, M. R. R. A.

    2018-03-01

    The use of coconut shell based adsorbent for removing various pollutants from wastewater offers attractive advantages such as exceptional adsorption capacity with larger surface area, low-cost and biocompatibility for a wide range of pollutants. The same goes for calcium carbonate based adsorbent, which provides better removal for metals ions through precipitation method. In fact, recycling of waste material is considered environmentally preferable and is supported by public opinion and government policy. However, because of unit operations mechanisms and effectiveness are different to one another in downstream process, it is quite difficult to provide good adsorbent that exhibits dual attributes of hydrophobic and hydrophilic characters. This paper provides brief process for sintering of composite adsorbent for separation and purification of industrial wastewater application. Characterization was performed by physical and chemical approach. Results prove that the inclusion of biopolymer as composite binder improved mechanical properties of the composite adsorbent.

  1. Layer-by-Layer Assembled Nanotubes as Biomimetic Nanoreactors for Calcium Carbonate Deposition.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Möhwald, Helmuth; Li, Junbai

    2009-09-17

    Enzyme-loaded magnetic polyelectrolyte multilayer nanotubes prepared by layer-by-layer assembly combined with the porous template could be used as biomimetic nanoreactors. It is demonstrated that calcium carbonate can be biomimetically synthesized inside the cavities of the polyelectrolyte nanotubes by the catalysis of urease, and the size of the calcium carbonate precipitates was controlled by the cavity dimensions. The metastable structure of the calcium carbonate precipitates inside the nanotubes was protected by the outer shell of the polyelectrolyte multilayers. These features may allow polyelectrolyte nanotubes to be applied in the fields of nanomaterials synthesis, controlled release, and drug delivery. Copyright © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Regulatory inhibition of biological tissue mineralization by calcium phosphate through post-nucleation shielding by fetuin-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Joshua C.; Miura, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    In vertebrates, insufficient availability of calcium and inorganic phosphate ions in extracellular fluids leads to loss of bone density and neuronal hyper-excitability. To counteract this problem, calcium ions are usually present at high concentrations throughout bodily fluids—at concentrations exceeding the saturation point. This condition leads to the opposite situation where unwanted mineral sedimentation may occur. Remarkably, ectopic or out-of-place sedimentation into soft tissues is rare, in spite of the thermodynamic driving factors. This fortunate fact is due to the presence of auto-regulatory proteins that are found in abundance in bodily fluids. Yet, many important inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis are associated with this undesired calcification. Hence, it is important to gain an understanding of the regulatory process and the conditions under which it can go awry. In this manuscript, we extend mean-field continuum classical nucleation theory of the growth of clusters to encompass surface shielding. We use this formulation to study the regulation of sedimentation of calcium phosphate salts in biological tissues through the mechanism of post-nuclear shielding of nascent mineral particles by binding proteins. We develop a mathematical description of this phenomenon using a countable system of hyperbolic partial differential equations. A critical concentration of regulatory protein is identified as a function of the physical parameters that describe the system.

  3. Regulatory inhibition of biological tissue mineralization by calcium phosphate through post-nucleation shielding by fetuin-A

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joshua C., E-mail: joshchang@ucla.edu; Miura, Robert M., E-mail: miura@njit.edu

    In vertebrates, insufficient availability of calcium and inorganic phosphate ions in extracellular fluids leads to loss of bone density and neuronal hyper-excitability. To counteract this problem, calcium ions are usually present at high concentrations throughout bodily fluids—at concentrations exceeding the saturation point. This condition leads to the opposite situation where unwanted mineral sedimentation may occur. Remarkably, ectopic or out-of-place sedimentation into soft tissues is rare, in spite of the thermodynamic driving factors. This fortunate fact is due to the presence of auto-regulatory proteins that are found in abundance in bodily fluids. Yet, many important inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis andmore » osteoarthritis are associated with this undesired calcification. Hence, it is important to gain an understanding of the regulatory process and the conditions under which it can go awry. In this manuscript, we extend mean-field continuum classical nucleation theory of the growth of clusters to encompass surface shielding. We use this formulation to study the regulation of sedimentation of calcium phosphate salts in biological tissues through the mechanism of post-nuclear shielding of nascent mineral particles by binding proteins. We develop a mathematical description of this phenomenon using a countable system of hyperbolic partial differential equations. A critical concentration of regulatory protein is identified as a function of the physical parameters that describe the system.« less

  4. Immobilization of Pseudomonas sp. DG17 onto sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Qi; Hua, Fei; Zhao, Yi Cun; Li, Yi; Wang, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas sp. DG17, capable of degrading crude oil, was immobilized in sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate for biodegradation of crude oil contaminated soil. In this work, proportion of independent variables, the laboratory immobilization parameters, the micromorphology and internal structure of the immobilized granule, as well as the crude oil biodegradation by sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate immobilized cells and sodium alginate–attapulgite immobilized cells were studied to build the optimal immobilization carrier and granule-forming method. The results showed that the optimal concentrations of sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate and calcium chloride were 2.5%–3.5%, 0.5%–1%, 3%–7% and 2%–4%, respectively. Meanwhile, the optimal bath temperature, embedding cell amount, reaction time and multiplication time were 50–60 °C, 2%, 18 h and 48 h, respectively. Moreover, biodegradation was enhanced by immobilized cells with a total petroleum hydrocarbon removal ranging from 33.56% ± 3.84% to 56.82% ± 3.26% after 20 days. The SEM results indicated that adding calcium carbonate was helpful to form internal honeycomb-like pores in the immobilized granules. PMID:26019567

  5. [Calcium carbonate for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in chronic hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Kiss, D; Battegay, M; Meier, C; Lyrer, A

    1990-03-03

    Hyperphosphatemia in chronic hemodialysis patients is usually treated with aluminium containing phosphate binders. In recent years there has been increasing evidence of serious complications due to aluminium accumulation. We have investigated a new calcium carbonate preparation with an HCl-resistant capsule designed to prevent gastrointestinal side effects. Its phosphate binding capacity in comparison to aluminium chloride hydroxide was investigated in 17 chronic hemodialysis patients. The dose of the phosphate binder was adjusted regularly so that the serum phosphorus levels were below 1.8 mmol/l. The mean dose of aluminium chloride hydroxide was 3.36 g/day and of calcium carbonate 4.96 g/day. The mean (+/- SD) serum calcium level was 2.58 +/- 0.11 mmol/l under aluminium chloride hydroxide and 2.50 +/- 0.25 mmol/l under calcium carbonate. The mean phosphorus level was 1.69 +/- 0.31 mmol/l under aluminium chloride hydroxide and 1.71 +/- 0.33 under calcium carbonate. Serum aluminium fell from 64.5 +/- 14.4 micrograms/l to 28.5 +/- 17.5 micrograms/l after 3 months.

  6. Early stages of carbonate mineralization revealed from molecular simulations: Implications for biomineral formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.; DeYoreo, J.; Banfield, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    The carbonate mineral constituents of many biomineralized products, formed both in and ex vivo, grow by a multi-stage crystallization process that involves the nucleation and structural reorganization of transient amorphous phases. The existence of transient phases and cluster species has significant implications for carbonate nucleation and growth in natural and engineered environments, both modern and ancient. The structure of these intermediate phases remains elusive, as does the nature of the disorder to order transition, however, these process details may strongly influence the interpretation of elemental and isotopic climate proxy data obtained from authigenic and biogenic carbonates. While molecular simulations have been applied to certain aspects of crystal growth, studies of metal carbonate nucleation are strongly inhibited by the presence of kinetic traps that prevent adequate sampling of the potential landscape upon which the growing clusters reside within timescales accessible by simulation. This research addresses this challenge by marrying the recent Kawska-Zahn (KZ) approach to simulation of crystal nucleation and growth from solution with replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) techniques. REMD has been used previously to enhance sampling of protein conformations that occupy energy wells that are separated by sizable thermodynamic and kinetic barriers, and is used here to probe the initial formation and onset of order within hydrated calcium and iron carbonate cluster species during nucleation. Results to date suggest that growing clusters initiate as short linear ion chains that evolve into two- and three-dimensional structures with continued growth. The planar structures exhibit an obvious 2d lattice, while establishment of a 3d lattice is hindered by incomplete ion desolvation. The formation of a dehydrated core consisting of a single carbonate ion is observed when the clusters are ~0.75 nm. At the same size a distorted, but discernible

  7. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including keeping your bones, muscles, heart, and brain working properly. Minerals are also important for making enzymes and hormones. ...

  8. Effects of iron and calcium carbonate on the variation and cycling of carbon source in integrated wastewater treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhimiao, Zhao; Xinshan, Song; Yufeng, Zhao; Yanping, Xiao; Yuhui, Wang; Junfeng, Wang; Denghua, Yan

    2017-02-01

    Iron and calcium carbonate were added in wastewater treatments as the adjusting agents to improve the contaminant removal performance and regulate the variation of carbon source in integrated treatments. At different temperatures, the addition of the adjusting agents obviously improved the nitrogen and phosphorous removals. TN and TP removals were respectively increased by 29.41% and 23.83% in AC-100 treatment under 1-day HRT. Carbon source from dead algae was supplied as green microbial carbon source and Fe 2+ was supplied as carbon source surrogate. COD concentration was increased to 30mg/L and above, so the problem of the shortage of carbon source was solved. Dead algae and Fe 2+ as carbon source supplement or surrogate played significant role, which was proved by microbial community analysis. According to the denitrification performance in the treatments, dead algae as green microbial carbon source combined with iron and calcium carbonate was the optimal supplement carbon source in wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Calcium carbonate precipitation by strain Bacillus licheniformis AK01, newly isolated from loamy soil: a promising alternative for sealing cement-based materials.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Ali; Ramezanianpour, Ali Akbar; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Vali, Hojatollah; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2015-01-01

    The relevant experiments were designed to determine the ability of indigenous bacterial strains isolated from limestone caves, mineral springs, and loamy soils to induce calcium carbonate precipitation. Among all isolates examined in this study, an efficient carbonate-precipitating soil bacterium was selected from among the isolates and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequences as Bacillus licheniformis AK01. The ureolytic isolate was able to grow well on alkaline carbonate-precipitation medium and precipitate calcium carbonate more than 1 g L(-1). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) examinations were performed in order to confirm the presence of calcium carbonate in the precipitate and to determine which polymorphs were present. The selected isolate was determined to be an appropriate candidate for application in a surface treatment of cement-based material to improve the properties of the mortar. Biodeposition of a layer of calcite on the surface of cement specimens resulted in filling in pore spaces. This could be an alternative method to improve the durability of the mortar. The kind of bacterial culture and medium composition had a profound impact on the resultant CaCO(3) crystal morphology. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Controls of Polysaccharide Chemistry on the Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Heterogeneous Calcium Carbonate Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, A. J.; Han, N.; Dove, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    Polysaccharide fibrils control the orientation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) biominerals. Good examples are found in the multilayered extracellular mucilaginous sheath of green algae and cyanobacteria and in specialized vesicles inside coccolithophorids. More complex organisms such as arthropods and mollusks form biomineralized exoskeletons and shells that consist of insoluble polysaccharides and soluble acid-rich proteins. In these structures, CaCO3 mineral orientation occurs along fibers of the polysaccharide chitin. This raises the question of whether polysaccharide chemistry has specific roles in directing biomineralization. The last three decades of research show that acidic proteins influence CaCO3 polymorph selection, crystallographic orientation, and nucleation and growth rates but little is known about the function of polysaccharides. In fact, polysaccharides are long considered an inert component of organic frameworks. In this experimental investigation, we test the hypothesis that polysaccharides have chemistry-specific influences on calcification by measuring the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto three types of polysaccharide films under controlled solution compositions. Characterized polysaccharides of simple repeating monomer sequences were chosen as model compounds to represent the major carbohydrates seen in microbial and calcifying environments: 1) alginic acid with carboxyl groups, 2) hyaluronic acid with alternating carboxyl and acetylamine groups, and 3) chitosan with amine and acetylamine groups. Biosubstrates were prepared by electrodeposition of these compounds as thin gel-like films onto gold-coated silicon wafers. Using a flow-through cell, heterogeneous nucleation rates of calcite were measured for a suite of supersaturation conditions. These rate data were compared to similar measurements for carboxyl- and hydroxyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Calcite nucleation rates onto the three polysaccharides vary by a factor of 400x

  11. Thermal breakdown of calcium carbonate and constraints on its use as a biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Stephen P.; Parker, Julia E.; Tang, Chiu C.

    2014-02-01

    Observed differences in the thermal behaviour of calcium carbonates of biogenic and abiogenic origin (phase transformation and breakdown temperatures) are widely cited as potential biomarkers for whether life once existed on Mars. Although seemingly compelling, there has been no systematic investigation into the physical mechanism behind these apparent differences and therefore no direct proof that they are uniquely diagnostic of a biogenic versus abiogenic formation. In this paper we present a laboratory investigation into the thermal behaviour of two high purity calcium carbonates, one of which was produced in the presence of an amino acid as a biomimetic carbonate. In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements show the aragonite-to-calcite phase transition and calcite-to-oxide breakdown temperatures are significantly lower in the biomimetic carbonate. The observed thermal differences closely match reported differences between biogenic and geological abiogenic carbonates. The biomimetic carbonate exhibits a modified crystal morphology, with a highly strained internal crystal lattice, similar to biogenic carbonate structures. Since biogenic carbonates are formed in the presence of organic macromolecules such as amino acids, the induced microstrain appears to be the defining common factor as it adds an additional energy term to the carbonate lattice energy, which lowers the activation energy required for structural transformation or decomposition. Although produced via biomimetic means, the carbonate investigated here is nevertheless abiogenic in origin and we propose that given suitable localised conditions such as pooled water and a supply of organic molecules, naturally occurring biomimetic carbonates could have similarly formed on the martian surface and could therefore exhibit the same thermal characteristics as biogenic carbonate. Thus as a limiting case - without other supporting observations - the thermal behaviour of martian calcium carbonate

  12. Calcium Hydroxide-induced Proliferation, Migration, Osteogenic Differentiation, and Mineralization via the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luoping; Zheng, Lisha; Jiang, Jingyi; Gui, Jinpeng; Zhang, Lingyu; Huang, Yan; Chen, Xiaofang; Ji, Jing; Fan, Yubo

    2016-09-01

    Calcium hydroxide has been extensively used as the gold standard for direct pulp capping in clinical dentistry. It induces proliferation, migration, and mineralization in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway in calcium hydroxide-induced proliferation, migration, osteogenic differentiation, and mineralization in human DPSCs. Human DPSCs between passages 3 and 6 were used. DPSCs were preincubated with inhibitors of MAP kinases and cultured with calcium hydroxide. The phosphorylated MAP kinases were detected by Western blot analysis. Cell viability was analyzed via the methylthiazol tetrazolium assay. Cell migration was estimated using the wound healing assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression was analyzed using the ALP staining assay. Mineralization was studied by alizarin red staining analysis. Calcium hydroxide significantly promoted the phosphorylation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. The inhibition of JNK and p38 signaling abolished calcium hydroxide-induced proliferation of DPSCs. The inhibition of JNK, p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling suppressed the migration, ALP expression, and mineralization of DPSCs. Our study showed that the MAP kinase pathway was involved in calcium hydroxide-induced proliferation, migration, osteogenic differentiation, and mineralization in human DPSCs. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fracture resistance of immature teeth filled with BioAggregate, mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Elif Bahar; Dinçol, Muzaffer Emir; Gençay, Koray; Aktören, Oya

    2011-06-01

    Abstract -  Background: The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the long-term fracture resistance of human immature permanent teeth filled with BioAggregate (BA), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (CH).  The study consisted of single rooted premolar teeth with immature root formation extracted for orthodontic reasons. A total of 28 immature premolars with average root length of 10.7 mm and apical diameter of 3 mm were included in the study. The pulps were extirpated and the canals were prepared using an apical approach. The teeth were randomly assigned to four groups: Group I: DiaRoot(®) BA (DiaDent, Burnaby, BC, Canada), Group II: Angelus MTA (MTA-A; Angelus, Londrina, Brazil), Group III: ProRoot(®) MTA (MTA-PR; Dentsply, Tulsa, OK, USA), Group IV: CH (Sultan Chemists Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA). The teeth were placed in saline solution at 4°C for 1 year. The root of each tooth was then embedded in an acrylic resin block. All specimens were loaded at a crosshead speed of 1 mm min(-1) in an Instron testing machine and the peak loads up to fracture were recorded. Data were analysed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests.  Mean (±SD) failure loads (MPa) were: 37.69 ± 14.43 for BA group, 32.94 ± 8.15 for MTA-A group, 28.74 ± 9.49 for MTA-PR group and 23.18 ± 8.48 for CH group. The BA group exhibited the highest fracture resistance and the CH group showed the lowest resistance to fracture. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in fracture resistance were found between the DiaRoot-BA and CH groups, and also between the MTA-A and CH groups.  Within the limitations of this study, data suggest that DiaRoot-BA-filled immature teeth demonstrate higher fracture resistance than other groups at 1 year. Considering the long-term risk of cervical root fracture associated with immature teeth, the use of DiaRoot-BA as a root canal filling material appears to be the most advantageous of the

  14. Effects of cadmium, calcium, age and parity on bone mineral, density and strength in female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, B.F.

    Weanling female rats were fed diets containing one of three levels of calcium and one of four levels of cadmium in the drinking water. Approximately 10 animals from each group were sacrificed after the first pregnancy and the remaining animals after the fourth pregnancy. Reproductive performance, plasma and bone Ca and P and bone density and strength were measured. After the first pregnancy, offspring of dams treated with 5 or 10 ppM Cd were smaller at birth than offspring of dams treated with 0 or 1 ppM Cd. Offspring of dams fed 5 or 10 ppM Cd or the 0.3%more » Ca diet had decreased weaning weight regardless of parity. Cadmium treatment had no effect on the plasma Ca or the Ca-P ratio. At Cd levels of 5 or 10 ppM the plasma P was increased. The 0.3% Ca diet depressed the plasma Ca and the 0.9% Ca diet elevated the plasma Ca and depressed the plasma P when compared to the 0.6% diet. Parity did not affect plasma Ca but, after four pregnancies, plasma P was decreased. Plasma Ca of mature dams was higher than that of adolescent dams but plasma P was unaffected. Bone mineral, density and strength were decreased by the 0.3% Ca diet especially when Cd levels reached 10 ppM. Increasing dietary Ca above normal increased femur Ca of dams fed 1 ppM Cd but did not increase the Ca of the femur of dams given higher levels of Cd. After the first pregnancy, femur Ca of mature dams was greater than that of adolescent dams. After the fourth pregnancy, femurs of mature dams were less strong than those of adolescent dams; however, the density was the same. Increasing dietary Ca above 0.6% lessened the detrimental effects of 5 ppM Cd ingestion on bone density. Mature dams were less affected by the 0.3% Ca 10 ppM Cd treatment than were adolescent dams. 60 refs., 3 figs., 26 tabs.« less

  15. Enzyme-accelerated and structure-guided crystallization of calcium carbonate: role of the carbonic anhydrase in the homologous system.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schlossmacher, Ute; Schröder, Heinz C; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Glasser, Gunnar; Korzhev, Michael; Neufurth, Meik; Wang, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    The calcareous spicules from sponges, e.g. from Sycon raphanus, are composed of almost pure calcium carbonate. In order to elucidate the formation of those structural skeletal elements, the function of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), isolated from this species, during the in vitro calcium carbonate-based spicule formation, was investigated. It is shown that the recombinant sponge CA substantially accelerates calcium carbonate formation in the in vitro diffusion assay. A stoichiometric calculation revealed that the turnover rate of the sponge CA during the calcification process amounts to 25 CO2s(-1) × molecule CA(-1). During this enzymatically driven process, initially pat-like particles are formed that are subsequently transformed to rhomboid/rhombohedroid crystals with a dimension of ~50 μm. The CA-catalyzed particles are smaller than those which are formed in the absence of the enzyme. The Martens hardness of the particles formed is ~4 GPa, a value which had been determined for other biogenic calcites. This conclusion is corroborated by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which revealed that the particles synthesized are composed predominantly of the elements calcium, oxygen and carbon. Surprising was the finding, obtained by light and scanning electron microscopy, that the newly formed calcitic crystals associate with the calcareous spicules from S. raphanus in a highly ordered manner; the calcitic crystals almost perfectly arrange in an array orientation along the two opposing planes of the spicules, leaving the other two plane arrays uncovered. It is concluded that the CA is a key enzyme controlling the calcium carbonate biomineralization process, which directs the newly formed particles to existing calcareous spicular structures. It is expected that with the given tools new bioinspired materials can be fabricated. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Stable prenucleation mineral clusters are liquid-like ionic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Demichelis, Raffaella; Raiteri, Paolo; Gale, Julian D.; Quigley, David; Gebauer, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is an abundant substance that can be created in several mineral forms by the reaction of dissolved carbon dioxide in water with calcium ions. Through biomineralization, organisms can harness and control this process to form various functional materials that can act as anything from shells through to lenses. The early stages of calcium carbonate formation have recently attracted attention as stable prenucleation clusters have been observed, contrary to classical models. Here we show, using computer simulations combined with the analysis of experimental data, that these mineral clusters are made of an ionic polymer, composed of alternating calcium and carbonate ions, with a dynamic topology consisting of chains, branches and rings. The existence of a disordered, flexible and strongly hydrated precursor provides a basis for explaining the formation of other liquid-like amorphous states of calcium carbonate, in addition to the non-classical behaviour during growth of amorphous calcium carbonate. PMID:22186886

  17. Establishing the solubility and local structure(s) of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate (ACC): Toward an understanding of invertebrate biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergelsberg, S. T.; Ulrich, R. N.; Michel, F. M.; Dove, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution imaging show the widespreadd occurrence of multistep pathways to mineralization in biological and geological settings (De Yoreo et al., 2015, Science). For example, carbonate biomineralization often involves precipitation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) as a reactive intermediate that subsequently transforms to crystalline products with diverse structures. Although current carbonate mineral proxies are based upon the composition of final crystalline products, the final signatures may be recording the properties of the initial amorphous phase. Thus, it is critical to establish the physical properties of ACC and understand the factors that influence its evolution to final products at conditions that approximate biological environments. This disconnect limits our ability to build a process-based understanding of when/how minor and trace elements are recorded in mineral composition proxies. In this experimental study, we quantified the chemical and physical properties of ACC and its evolution to final products. We first determined ACC solubility under controlled chemical conditions using a new type of flow-through reactor developed by our research group (Blue and Dove, 2015, GCA; Blue et al., 2017, GCA). The experimental design varied Mg concentration and total alkalinity while maintaining a mild pH that approximates biological environments. ACC solubility was measured at specific time points during the precipitation (from super- and undersaturated conditions) and during its subsequent evolution. Parallel experiments characterized the structure of the corresponding amorphous products using in situ pair distribution function (PDF) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses. The measurements demonstrate at least two types of ACC can be produced by tuning Mg concentration and alkalinity. Each "phase" exhibits distinct short-range ordering that demonstrates structure-specific solubility. We also find temporal changes in the

  18. CO.sub.2 Pretreatment prevents calcium carbonate formation

    DOEpatents

    Neavel, Richard C.; Brunson, Roy J.; Chaback, Joseph J.

    1980-01-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding carbonate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 14 to about 68 atmospheres and a carbon dioxide partial pressure within the range from about 14 to about 34 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 100.degree. to about 200.degree. C.

  19. A disconnect between O horizon and mineral soil carbon - Implications for soil C sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garten, Charles T., Jr.

    2009-03-01

    Changing inputs of carbon to soil is one means of potentially increasing carbon sequestration in soils for the purpose of mitigating projected increases in atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. The effect of manipulations of aboveground carbon input on soil carbon storage was tested in a temperate, deciduous forest in east Tennessee, USA. A 4.5-year experiment included exclusion of aboveground litterfall and supplemental litter additions (three times ambient) in an upland and a valley that differed in soil nitrogen availability. The estimated decomposition rate of the carbon stock in the O horizon was greater in the valley than in the upland due to higher litter quality (i.e., lower C/N ratios). Short-term litter exclusion or addition had no effect on carbon stock in the mineral soil, measured to a depth of 30 cm, or the partitioning of carbon in the mineral soil between particulate- and mineral-associated organic matter. A two-compartment model was used to interpret results from the field experiments. Field data and a sensitivity analysis of the model were consistent with little carbon transfer between the O horizon and the mineral soil. Increasing aboveground carbon input does not appear to be an effective means of promoting carbon sequestration in forest soil at the location of the present study because a disconnect exists in carbon dynamics between O horizon and mineral soil. Factors that directly increase inputs to belowground soil carbon, via roots, or reduce decomposition rates of organic matter are more likely to benefit efforts to increase carbon sequestration in forests where carbon dynamics in the O horizon are uncoupled from the mineral soil.

  20. Impact of calcium and vitamin D insufficiencies on serum parathyroid hormone and bone mineral density: analysis of the 4th & 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The relative contributions of calcium and vitamin D to calcium metabolism and bone mineral density (BMD) have been examined previously, but not in a population with very low calcium intake. To determine the relative importance of dietary calcium intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concent...

  1. Generation of composites for bone tissue-engineering applications consisting of gellan gum hydrogels mineralized with calcium and magnesium phosphate phases by enzymatic means.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Timothy E L; Krawczyk, Grzegorz; Pamula, Elzbieta; Declercq, Heidi A; Schaubroeck, David; Bucko, Miroslaw M; Balcaen, Lieve; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Bliznuk, Vitaliy; van den Vreken, Natasja M F; Dash, Mamoni; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Vanhaecke, Frank; Cornelissen, Maria; Dubruel, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Mineralization of hydrogels, desirable for bone regeneration applications, may be achieved enzymatically by incorporation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). ALP-loaded gellan gum (GG) hydrogels were mineralized by incubation in mineralization media containing calcium and/or magnesium glycerophosphate (CaGP, MgGP). Mineralization media with CaGP:MgGP concentrations 0.1:0, 0.075:0.025, 0.05:0.05, 0.025:0.075 and 0:0.1 (all values mol/dm 3 , denoted A, B, C, D and E, respectively) were compared. Mineral formation was confirmed by IR and Raman, SEM, ICP-OES, XRD, TEM, SAED, TGA and increases in the the mass fraction of the hydrogel not consisting of water. Ca was incorporated into mineral to a greater extent than Mg in samples mineralized in media A-D. Mg content and amorphicity of mineral formed increased in the order A < B < C < D. Mineral formed in media A and B was calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). Mineral formed in medium C was a combination of CDHA and an amorphous phase. Mineral formed in medium D was an amorphous phase. Mineral formed in medium E was a combination of crystalline and amorphous MgP. Young's moduli and storage moduli decreased in dependence of mineralization medium in the order A > B > C > D, but were significantly higher for samples mineralized in medium E. The attachment and vitality of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were higher on samples mineralized in media B-E (containing Mg) than in those mineralized in medium A (not containing Mg). All samples underwent degradation and supported the adhesion of RAW 264.7 monocytic cells, and samples mineralized in media A and B supported osteoclast-like cell formation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Microwave hydrothermal transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate nanospheres and application in protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chao; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Feng

    2014-03-26

    Calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate are the main components of biominerals. Among all of the forms of biominerals, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) are the most important forms because they play a pivotal role in the process of biomineralization and are the precursors to the crystalline polymorphs. In this work, we first synthesized ACC in vitro using adenosine 5'-triphosphate disodium salt (ATP) as the stabilizer and investigated the transformation of the ACC under microwave hydrothermal conditions, and ACC/ACP composite nanospheres and carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) nanospheres were successfully prepared. In this novel strategy, ATP has two main functions: it serves as the stabilizer for ACC and the phosphorus source for ACP and CHA. Most importantly, the morphology and the size of the ACC precursor can be well-preserved after microwave heating, so it provides a new method for the preparation of calcium phosphate nanostructured materials using phosphorus-containing biomolecule-stabilized ACC as the precursor. Furthermore, the as-prepared ACC/ACP composite nanospheres have excellent biocompatibility and high protein adsorption capacity, indicating that they are promising for applications in biomedical fields such as drug delivery and protein adsorption.

  3. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  4. Delineation of Magnesium-rich Ultramafic Rocks Available for Mineral Carbon Sequestration in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krevor, S.C.; Graves, C.R.; Van Gosen, B. S.; McCafferty, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    The 2005 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage suggested that a major gap in mineral carbon sequestration is locating the magnesium-silicate bedrock available to sequester CO2. It is generally known that silicate minerals with high concentrations of magnesium are suitable for mineral carbonation. However, no assessment has been made covering the entire United States detailing their geographical distribution and extent, or evaluating their potential for use in mineral carbonation. Researchers at Columbia University and the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a digital geologic database of ultramafic rocks in the continental United States. Data were compiled from varied-scale geologic maps of magnesium-silicate ultramafic rocks. These rock types are potentially suitable as source material for mineral carbon-dioxide sequestration. The focus of the national-scale map is entirely on suitable ultramafic rock types, which typically consist primarily of olivine and serpentine minerals. By combining the map with digital datasets that show non-mineable lands (such as urban areas and National Parks), estimates on potential depth of a surface mine, and the predicted reactivities of the mineral deposits, one can begin to estimate the capacity for CO2 mineral sequestration within the United States. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigating Interactions between the Silica and Carbon Cycles during Precipitation and Early Diagenesis of Authigenic Clay/Carbonate-Mineral Associations in the Carbonate Rock Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, J. A.; Francisca Martinez Ruiz, F.; Sanchez-Roman, M.; Anjos, S.; Bontognali, T. R. R.; Nascimento, G. S.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2017-12-01

    The study of authigenic clay/carbonate-mineral associations within carbonate sequences has important implications for the interpretation of scientific problems related with rock reservoir properties, such as alteration of potential porosity and permeability. More specifically, when clay minerals are randomly distributed within the carbonate matrix, it becomes difficult to predict reservoir characteristics. In order to understand this mineral association in the geological record, we have undertaken a comparative study of specially designed laboratory experiments with modern environments, where clay minerals have been shown to precipitate together with a range of carbonate minerals, including calcite, Mg-calcite and dolomite. Two modern dolomite-forming environments, the Coorong lakes, South Australia and Brejo do Espinho Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were selected for this investigation. For comparative evaluation, enrichment microbial culture experiments, using natural pore water from Brejo do Espinho as the growth medium to promote mineral precipitation, were performed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To establish the environmental parameters and biological processes facilitating the dual mineral association, the experimental samples have been compared with the natural minerals using HRTEM measurements. The results demonstrate that the clay and carbonate minerals apparently do not co-precipitate, but the precipitation of the different minerals in the same sample has probably occurred under different environmental conditions with variable chemistries, e.g., hypersalinity versus normal salinity resulting from the changing ratio of evaporation versus precipitation. Thus, the investigated mineral association is not a product of diagenetic processes but of sequential in situ precipitation processes related to changes in the silica and carbon availability. Implications for ancient carbonate formations will be presented and discussed in the context of a specific

  6. Mineral Dissolution and Precipitation due to Carbon Dioxide-Water-Rock Interactions: The Significance of Accessory Minerals in Carbonate Reservoirs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Marcon, V.; Chopping, C.

    2013-12-01

    Accessory minerals in carbonate reservoirs, and in the caprocks that seal these reservoirs, can provide insight into multiphase fluid (CO2 + H2O)-rock interactions and the behavior of CO2 that resides in these water-rock systems. Our program integrates field data, hydrothermal experiments, and geochemical modeling to evaluate CO2-water-rock reactions and processes in a variety of carbonate reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region of the US. These studies provide insights into a wide range of geologic environments, including natural CO2 reservoirs, geologic carbon sequestration, engineered geothermal systems, enhanced oil and gas recovery, and unconventional hydrocarbon resources. One suite of experiments evaluates the Madison Limestone on the Moxa Arch, Southwest Wyoming, a sulfur-rich natural CO2 reservoir. Mineral textures and geochemical features developed in the experiments suggest that carbonate minerals which constitute the natural reservoir will initially dissolve in response to emplacement of CO2. Euhedral, bladed anhydrite concomitantly precipitates in response to injected CO2. Analogous anhydrite is observed in drill core, suggesting that secondary anhydrite in the natural reservoir may be related to emplacement of CO2 into the Madison Limestone. Carbonate minerals ultimately re-precipitate, and anhydrite dissolves, as the rock buffers the acidity and reasserts geochemical control. Another suite of experiments emulates injection of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery in the Desert Creek Limestone (Paradox Formation), Paradox Basin, Southeast Utah. Euhedral iron oxyhydroxides (hematite) precipitate at pH 4.5 to 5 and low Eh (approximately -0.1 V) as a consequence of water-rock reaction. Injection of CO2 decreases pH to approximately 3.5 and increases Eh by approximately 0.1 V, yielding secondary mineralization of euhedral pyrite instead of iron oxyhydroxides. Carbonate minerals also dissolve and ultimately re-precipitate, as determined by experiments in the

  7. Influence of lysozyme on the precipitation of calcium carbonate: a kinetic and morphologic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Dominguez-Vera, Jose M.; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M.

    2003-05-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the interactions between proteins and mineral surfaces, among them a combination of electrostatic, stereochemical interactions and molecular recognition between the protein and the crystal surface. To identify the mechanisms of interaction in the lysozyme-calcium carbonate model system, the effect of this protein on the precipitation kinetics and morphology of calcite crystals was examined. The solution chemistry and morphology of the solid were monitored over time in a set of time-series free-drift experiments in which CaCO 3 was precipitated from solution in a closed system at 25°C and 1 atm total pressure, in the presence and absence of lysozyme. The precipitation of calcite was preceded by the precipitation of a metastable phase that later dissolved and gave rise to calcite as the sole phase. With increasing lysozyme concentration, the nucleation of both the metastable phase and calcite occurred at lower Ω calcite, indicating that lysozyme favored the nucleation of both phases. Calcite growth rate was not affected by the presence of lysozyme, at least at protein concentrations ranging from 0 mg/mL to 10 mg/mL. Lysozyme modified the habit of calcite crystals. The degree of habit modification changed with protein concentration. At lower concentrations of lysozyme, the typical rhombohedral habit of calcite crystals was modified by the expression of {110} faces, which resulted from the preferential adsorption of protein on these faces. With increasing lysozyme concentration, the growth of {110}, {100}, and finally {001} faces was sequentially inhibited. This adsorption sequence may be explained by an electrostatic interaction between lysozyme and calcite, in which the inhibition of the growth of {110}, {100}, and {001} faces could be explained by a combined effect of the density of carbonate groups in the calcite face and the specific orientation (perpendicular) of these carbonate groups with respect to the calcite

  8. In vitro synthesis and stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles within liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, Chantel C.; Brock, Ryan E.; Wu, Ching-Hsuan

    2012-02-07

    We show that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) can be synthesized in phospholipid bilayer vesicles (liposomes). Liposome-encapsulated ACC nanoparticles are stable against aggregation, do not crystallize for at least 20 h, and are ideally suited to investigate the influence of lipid chemistry, particle size, and soluble additives on ACC in situ.

  9. Climatically driven loss of calcium in steppe soil as a sink for atmospheric carbon

    Treesearch

    A.G. Lapenis; G.B. Lawrence; S.W. Bailey; B.F. Aparin; A.I. Shiklomanov; N.A. Speranskaya; M.S. Torn; M. Calef

    2008-01-01

    During the last several thousand years the semi-arid, cold climate of the Russian steppe formed highly fertile soils rich in organic carbon and calcium (classified as Chernozems in the Russian system). Analysis of archived soil samples collected in Kemannaya Steppe Preserve in 1920, 1947, 1970, and fresh samples collected in 1998 indicated that the native steppe...

  10. [Study on solid dispersion of precipitated calcium carbonate-based oleanolic acid].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-mei; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Jia, Xiao-bin; Jiang, Yan-rong; Sun, E

    2015-05-01

    Oleanolic acid-precipitated calcium carbonate solid dispersion was prepared by using solvent evaporation method. The microscopic structure and physicochemical properties of solid dispersion were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). And its in vitro release also was investigated. The properties of the precipitated calcium carbonate was studied which was as a carrier of oleanolic acid solid dispersion. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis suggested that oleanolic acid may be present in solid dispersion as amorphous substance. The in vitro release determination results of oleanolic acid-precipitated calcium carbonate (1: 5) solid dispersion showed accumulated dissolution rate of.oleanolic acid was up to 90% at 45 min. Accelerating experiment showed that content and in vitro dissolution of oleanolic acid solid dispersion did not change after storing over 6 months. The results indicated that in vitro dissolution of oleanolic acid was improved greatly by the solid dispersion with precipitated calcium carbonate as a carrier. The solid dispersion is a stabilizing system which has actual applied value.

  11. Fabrication of porous low crystalline calcite block by carbonation of calcium hydroxide compact.

    PubMed

    Matsuya, Shigeki; Lin, Xin; Udoh, Koh-ichi; Nakagawa, Masaharu; Shimogoryo, Ryoji; Terada, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2007-07-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) has been widely used as a bone substitute material because of its excellent tissue response and good resorbability. In this experimental study, we propose a new method obtaining porous CaCO(3) monolith for an artificial bone substitute. In the method, calcium hydroxide compacts were exposed to carbon dioxide saturated with water vapor at room temperature. Carbonation completed within 3 days and calcite was the only product. The mechanical strength of CaCO(3) monolith increased with carbonation period and molding pressure. Development of mechanical strength proceeded through two steps; the first rapid increase by bonding with calcite layer formed at the surface of calcium hydroxide particles and the latter increase by the full conversion of calcium hydroxide to calcite. The latter process was thought to be controlled by the diffusion of CO(2) through micropores in the surface calcite layer. Porosity of calcite blocks thus prepared had 36.8-48.1% depending on molding pressure between 1 MPa and 5 MPa. We concluded that the present method may be useful for the preparation of bone substitutes or the preparation of source material for bone substitutes since this method succeeded in fabricating a low-crystalline, and thus a highly reactive, porous calcite block.

  12. Design of a doubly-hydrophilic block copolypeptide that directs the formation of calcium carbonate microspheres.

    PubMed

    Euliss, Larken E; Trnka, Tina M; Deming, Timothy J; Stucky, Galen D

    2004-08-07

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate into microspheres has been accomplished using the rationally-designed, doubly-hydrophilic block copolypeptide poly(Nepsilon-2[2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy]acetyl-L-lysine)(100)-b-poly(L-aspartate sodium salt)30 as a structure-directing agent.

  13. Fractionated-combustion analysis of carbonate-containing phases in composite materials of the hydroxyapatite-calcium carbonate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M. A.; Shibaeva, T. V.; Smirnov, V. V.; Kutsev, S. V.; Barinov, S. M.; Grigorovich, K. V.

    2012-12-01

    Materials in the hydroxyapatite (HA)-calcium carbonate (CC) system were synthesized by a precipitation method from aqueous solutions. According to the data of X-ray phase analysis and IR spectroscopy, the powders consisted of CC and AB-type carbonate-substituted HA (CHA). In order to determine the content of carbonate-containing phases in materials, the temperature-temporal mode of fractionated-combustion analysis of carbon was developed. The quantitative phase ratios and the degree of substitution of carbonate groups in CHA were determined. It was shown that the degree of substitution of carbonate groups in CHA increased from 2.47 to 5.31 wt % as the CC content increased from 13.50 to 88.33 wt %.

  14. The effect of sodium hypochlorite application on the success of calcium hydroxide and mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomies in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Akcay, Merve; Sari, Saziye

    2014-01-01

    This study's purpose was to evaluate the success of calcium hydroxide (CH) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pulpotomies following the use of five percent sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) as an antibacterial agent to clean the chamber prior to application of the pulpotomy agent. A total of 128 teeth were randomly divided into two pulpotomy groups (CH or MTA). The teeth in each pulpotomy group, CH and MTA, were further randomly divided into subgroups to receive either the NaOCl (experimental) or saline (control) cleaning agent prior to applying the pulpotomy agent. The treatments were followed clinically and radiographically for 12 months. The radiographic success rates were 84 percent for CH NaOCl, 74 percent for CH saline control, 97 percent for MTA NaOCl, and 100 percent for MTA saline control. There were no significant differences between the radiographic success rates in the CH and MTA subgroups (CH NaOCl-CH control and MTA NaOCl-MTA control); no significant differences were observed when comparing the CH NaOCl-MTA NaOCl groups and the CH NaOCl-MTA control groups. Use of sodium hypochlorite as an antibacterial agent prior to application of the pulpotomy agent improved the success of calcium hydroxide pulpotomies to equal the success of mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomies for observation up to 12 months.

  15. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Accelerates Resorption of a Calcium Carbonate Biomaterial in Periodontal Defects.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ki-Tae; Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E; Choi, Seong-Ho; Kim, Chong-Kwan

    2007-04-01

    In a previous study, recombinant human transforming growth factor-beta1 (rhTGF-β 1 ) in a calcium carbonate carrier was implanted into critical-size, supraalveolar periodontal defects under conditions for guided tissue regeneration (GTR) to study whether rhTGF-β 1 would enhance or accelerate periodontal regeneration. The results showed minimal benefits of rhTGF-β 1 , and a clear account for this could not be offered. One potential cause may be that the rhTGF-β 1 formulation was biologically inactive. Several growth or differentiation factors have been suggested to accelerate degradation of biomaterials used as carriers. The objective of this study was to evaluate possible activity of rhTGF-β 1 on biodegradation of the calcium carbonate carrier. rhTGF-β 1 in a putty-formulated particulate calcium carbonate carrier was implanted into critical-size, supraalveolar periodontal defects under conditions for GTR in five beagle dogs. Contralateral defects received the calcium carbonate carrier combined with GTR without rhTGF-β 1 (control). The animals were euthanized at week 4 post-surgery and block biopsies of the defect sites were collected for histologic and histometric analysis. Radiographs were obtained at defect creation and weeks 2 and 4 after defect creation. No statistically significant differences were observed in new bone formation (bone height and area) among the treatments. However, total residual carrier was significantly reduced in sites receiving rhTGF-β 1 compared to control (P = 0.04). Similarly, carrier density was considerably reduced in sites receiving rhTGF-β 1 compared to control; the difference was borderline statistically significant (P = 0.06). Within the limitations of the study, it may be concluded that rhTGF-β 1 accelerates biodegradation of a particulate calcium carbonate biomaterial, indicating a biologic activity of the rhTGF-β 1 formulation apparently not encompassing enhanced or accelerated periodontal regeneration. © 2007

  16. Transforming growth factor-beta1 accelerates resorption of a calcium carbonate biomaterial in periodontal defects.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ki-Tae; Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E; Choi, Seong-Ho; Kim, Chong-Kwan

    2007-04-01

    In a previous study, recombinant human transforming growth factor-beta1 (rhTGF-beta(1)) in a calcium carbonate carrier was implanted into critical-size, supraalveolar periodontal defects under conditions for guided tissue regeneration (GTR) to study whether rhTGF-beta(1) would enhance or accelerate periodontal regeneration. The results showed minimal benefits of rhTGF-beta(1), and a clear account for this could not be offered. One potential cause may be that the rhTGF-beta(1) formulation was biologically inactive. Several growth or differentiation factors have been suggested to accelerate degradation of biomaterials used as carriers. The objective of this study was to evaluate possible activity of rhTGF-beta(1) on biodegradation of the calcium carbonate carrier. rhTGF-beta(1) in a putty-formulated particulate calcium carbonate carrier was implanted into critical-size, supraalveolar periodontal defects under conditions for GTR in five beagle dogs. Contralateral defects received the calcium carbonate carrier combined with GTR without rhTGF-beta(1) (control). The animals were euthanized at week 4 post-surgery and block biopsies of the defect sites were collected for histologic and histometric analysis. Radiographs were obtained at defect creation and weeks 2 and 4 after defect creation. No statistically significant differences were observed in new bone formation (bone height and area) among the treatments. However, total residual carrier was significantly reduced in sites receiving rhTGF-beta(1) compared to control (P = 0.04). Similarly, carrier density was considerably reduced in sites receiving rhTGF-beta(1) compared to control; the difference was borderline statistically significant (P = 0.06). Within the limitations of the study, it may be concluded that rhTGF-beta(1) accelerates biodegradation of a particulate calcium carbonate biomaterial, indicating a biologic activity of the rhTGF-beta(1) formulation apparently not encompassing enhanced or accelerated

  17. SM50 repeat-polypeptides self-assemble into discrete matrix subunits and promote appositional calcium carbonate crystal growth during sea urchin tooth biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yelin; Satchell, Paul G; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2016-01-01

    The two major proteins involved in vertebrate enamel formation and echinoderm sea urchin tooth biomineralization, amelogenin and SM50, are both characterized by elongated polyproline repeat domains in the center of the macromolecule. To determine the role of polyproline repeat polypeptides in basal deuterostome biomineralization, we have mapped the localization of SM50 as it relates to crystal growth, conducted self-assembly studies of SM50 repeat polypeptides, and examined their effect on calcium carbonate and apatite crystal growth. Electron micrographs of the growth zone of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchin teeth documented a series of successive events from intravesicular mineral nucleation to mineral deposition at the interface between tooth surface and odontoblast syncytium. Using immunohistochemistry, SM50 was detected within the cytoplasm of cells associated with the developing tooth mineral, at the mineral secreting front, and adjacent to initial mineral deposits, but not in muscles and ligaments. Polypeptides derived from the SM50 polyproline alternating hexa- and hepta-peptide repeat region (SM50P6P7) formed highly discrete, donut-shaped self-assembly patterns. In calcium carbonate crystal growth studies, SM50P6P7 repeat peptides triggered the growth of expansive networks of fused calcium carbonate crystals while in apatite growth studies, SM50P6P7 peptides facilitated the growth of needle-shaped and parallel arranged crystals resembling those found in developing vertebrate enamel. In comparison, SM50P6P7 surpassed the PXX24 polypeptide repeat region derived from the vertebrate enamel protein amelogenin in its ability to promote crystal nucleation and appositional crystal growth. Together, these studies establish the SM50P6P7 polyproline repeat region as a potent regulator in the protein-guided appositional crystal growth that occurs during continuous tooth mineralization and eruption. In addition, our studies highlight the role of species

  18. Zebra textures in carbonate rocks: Fractures produced by the force of crystallization during mineral replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Malcolm W.; Hood, Ashleigh v. S.

    2018-06-01

    Zebra textures are enigmatic banded fabrics that occur in many carbonate-hosted ore deposits, dolomite hydrocarbon reservoirs and carbonate successions globally. They consist of a variety of minerals and are characterised by parallel light and dark bands that occur at a millimetre- to centimetre-scale. Based on petrological evidence, there is general consensus that the dark bands formed by replacement of the carbonate host rock. Historically, more contention surrounds the origin of the light bands, but the dominant view is that these are mineral-filled cavities, which is supported by overwhelming textural evidence. Overall, the feature common to all versions of zebra textures is mineral replacement of the original carbonate host. We suggest that mineral replacement (and the force of crystallization) in association with open space generation is a viable mechanism for the development of zebra cavity systems. Dissolution and open space generation in either evaporites or carbonates adjacent to the site of replacement reactions is necessary to remove the confining pressure from the rock and to allow the development of fractures. The pressure of the growing replacement crystals within the carbonate pervasively splits the carbonate apart, producing thin strips of carbonate surrounded by open space. The fractures may then be subject to dissolution and are later filled by cements. Very regular stratabound zebra textures (as found in ore deposits like Cadjebut, Australia and San Vicente, Peru) may be related to stratabound dissolution (of evaporites or carbonates), whereas irregularly distributed zebra textures are more likely to be associated with irregular carbonate dissolution.

  19. Diet influences rates of carbon and nitrogen mineralization from decomposing grasshopper frass and cadavers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insect herbivory can produce a pulse of mineral nitrogen (N) in soil from the decomposition of frass and cadavers. In this study we examined how diet quality affects rates of N and carbon (C) mineralization from grasshopper frass and cadavers. Frass was collected from grasshoppers fed natural or mer...

  20. Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation and Loss of Bone Mineral Density in Women Undergoing Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Mridul; Schwartz, Gary G.

    2013-01-01

    An unintended consequence of breast cancer therapies is an increased risk of osteoporosis due to accelerated bone loss. We conducted a systematic review of calcium and/or vitamin D (Ca±D) supplementation trials for maintaining bone mineral density (BMD) in women with breast cancer using the “before-after” data from the Ca±D supplemented comparison group of trials evaluating the effect of drugs such as bisphosphonates on BMD. Whether Ca±D supplements increase BMD in women undergoing breast cancer therapy has never been tested against an unsupplemented control group. However, results from 16 trials indicate that the Ca±D doses tested (500-1500 mg calcium; 200-1000 IU vitamin D) were inadequate to prevent BMD loss in these women. Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of mortality in women with breast cancer. Because calcium supplements may increase cardiovascular disease risk, future trials should evaluate the safety and efficacy of Ca±D supplementation in women undergoing breast cancer therapy. PMID:23932583

  1. Carbonate mineral dissolution kinetics in high pressure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethlefsen, F.; Dörr, C.; Schäfer, D.; Ebert, M.

    2012-04-01

    The potential CO2 reservoirs in the North German Basin are overlain by a series of Mesozoic barrier rocks and aquifers and finally mostly by Tertiary and Quaternary close-to-surface aquifers. The unexpected rise of stored CO2 from its reservoir into close-to-surface aquifer systems, perhaps through a broken well casing, may pose a threat to groundwater quality because of the acidifying effect of CO2 dissolution in water. The consequences may be further worsening of the groundwater quality due to the mobilization of heavy metals. Buffer mechanisms counteracting the acidification are for instance the dissolution of carbonates. Carbonate dissolution kinetics is comparably fast and carbonates can be abundant in close-to-surface aquifers. The disadvantages of batch experiments compared to column experiments in order to determine rate constants are well known and have for instance been described by v. GRINSVEN and RIEMSDIJK (1992). Therefore, we have designed, developed, tested, and used a high-pressure laboratory column system to simulate aquifer conditions in a flow through setup within the CO2-MoPa project. The calcite dissolution kinetics was determined for CO2-pressures of 6, 10, and 50 bars. The results were evaluated by using the PHREEQC code with a 1-D reactive transport model, applying a LASAGA (1984) -type kinetic dissolution equation (PALANDRI and KHARAKA, 2004; eq. 7). While PALANDRI and KHARAKA (2004) gave calcite dissolution rate constants originating from batch experiments of log kacid = -0.3 and log kneutral = -5.81, the data of the column experiment were best fitted using log kacid = -2.3 and log kneutral = -7.81, so that the rate constants fitted using the lab experiment applying 50 bars pCO2 were approximately 100 times lower than according to the literature data. Rate constants of experiments performed at less CO2 pressure (pCO2 = 6 bars: log kacid = -1.78; log kneutral = -7.29) were only 30 times lower than literature data. These discrepancies in the

  2. Changes in mineral-associated soil organic carbon pools across a harvested temperate forest chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIntyre, S.; Kellman, L. M.; Gabriel, C. E.; Diochon, A.

    2016-12-01

    Due to their substantial pool size, changes in mineral soil carbon (C) stores have the potential to generate significant changes in forest soil C budgets. Harvesting represents a significant land use disturbance that can alter soil organic carbon (SOC) stores, with a number of field studies documenting large losses of SOC following clearcut harvesting. However, little is known about how the distribution of SOC changes amongst mineral-associated pools of differing crystallinity following this disturbance. The objective of this study was to quantify changes in mineral-associated SOC pool sizes through depth and time for podzol soils (mineral soil depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-20, 20-35, and 35-50 cm) of a temperate red spruce harvest chronosequence (representing stand ages of 1yr, 15yr, 45yr, 80yr, and 125+yr) in Nova Scotia, Canada. Samples were subjected to a 4-step sequential chemical dissolution to selectively extract C from mineral pools of increasing crystallinity: soluble minerals (deionized water), organo-metal complexes (Na-pyrophosphate), poorly crystalline minerals (hydroxylamine), and crystalline minerals (Na-dithionite HCl). Carbon concentrations were calculated for the solutions acquired during each stage of the selective dissolution process, providing a time series of changes in mineral-associated C through depth and time following harvesting. A loss of SOC from the organo-metal complexed pool following harvesting was observed, particularly in the deeper mineral soil (20-50cm), with this pool dominating the results. In the soluble and poorly crystalline pools, losses of C were also observed from the deeper mineral soil. Of the 5 sites, the 125+yr age class had the highest concentration of SOC associated with crystalline minerals, with the 0-5cm depth stratum holding a large portion of this C. This study may be useful as a model system for understanding how harvesting disturbance alters mineral pool SOM dynamics in humid temperate forest ecosystems.

  3. Effect of Biomineralization Ability on Push-out Strength of Proroot Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Branco, and Calcium Phosphate Cement on Dentin: An In vitro Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Revankar, Vanita D; Prathap, M S; Shetty, K Harish Kumar; Shahul, Azmin; Sahana, K

    2017-11-01

    Biomineralization is a process which leads to the formation of an interfacial layer with tag-like structures at the cement-dentin interface. It is due to interaction of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement with dentin in phosphate-buffered solution (PBS). This study is aimed to evaluate the effect of influence of biomineralization process on push-out bond strength of ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK, USA), MTA Branco (Angelus Soluc¸o˜es Odontolo´gicas, Londrina, PR, Brazil) and calcium phosphate cement (BioGraft CPC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of biomineralization process on the push-out strength of ProRoot MTA, MTA Branco, and CPC after mixing with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate solution (0.2% CHX) and 2% lidocaine solution (2% LA) on the bond strength of MTA-dentin. Dentin discs with uniform cavities were restored with ProRoot MTA, MTA Branco, and calcium phosphate cement after mixing with 0.2% CHX solution and 2% lidocaine solution. The samples were uniformly distributed into two groups. Experimental group being immersed in PBS solution and control group being immersed in saline for 2 months. Instron testing machine (Model 4444; Instron Corp., Canton, MA, USA) was used to determine the bond strength. A two-way analysis of variance and post hoc analysis by Bonferroni test. All samples immersed in experimental group displayed a significantly greater resistance to displacement than that observed for the samples in control group ( P < 0.05). MTAs displayed a significantly greater resistance to displacement than calcium phosphate cements. The main conclusion of this study was that the push-out bond strength of the cements, mainly the MTA groups, was positively influenced by the biomineralization process.

  4. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhengrong; Qiu, Lin; Zhang, Shuang

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trappingmore » carbon dioxide (CO 2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO 2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg 2SiO 4) reacting with CO 2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO 3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount that could have been removed if the olivine initially present

  5. Climatically driven loss of calcium in steppe soil as a sink for atmospheric carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapenis, A.G.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bailey, S.W.; Aparin, B.F.; Shiklomanov, A.I.; Speranskaya, N.A.; Torn, M.S.; Calef, M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last several thousand years the semi-arid, cold climate of the Russian steppe formed highly fertile soils rich in organic carbon and calcium (classified as Chernozems in the Russian system). Analysis of archived soil samples collected in Kemannaya Steppe Preserve in 1920, 1947, 1970, and fresh samples collected in 1998 indicated that the native steppe Chernozems, however, lost 17-28 kg m-2 of calcium in the form of carbonates in 1970-1998. Here we demonstrate that the loss of calcium was caused by fundamental shift in the steppe hydrologic balance. Previously unleached soils where precipitation was less than potential evapotranspiration are now being leached due to increased precipitation and, possibly, due to decreased actual evapotranspiration. Because this region receives low levels of acidic deposition, the dissolution of carbonates involves the consumption of atmospheric CO2. Our estimates indicate that this climatically driven terrestrial sink of atmospheric CO2 is ???2.1-7.4 g C m-2 a-1. In addition to the net sink of atmospheric carbon, leaching of pedogenic carbonates significantly amplified seasonal amplitude of CO2 exchange between atmosphere and steppe soil. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Mineral scale management. Part 1, Case studies

    Treesearch

    Peter W. Hart; Alan W. Rudie

    2006-01-01

    Mineral scale increases operating costs, extends downtime, and increases maintenance requirements. This paper presents several successful case studies detailing how mills have eliminated scale. Cases presented include calcium carbonate scale in a white liquor strainer, calcium oxalate scale in the D0 stage of the bleach plant, enzymatic treatment of brown stock to...

  7. Viral lysis of photosynthesizing microbes as a mechanism for calcium carbonate nucleation in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisle, John T.; Robbins, Lisa L.

    2016-01-01

    Removal of carbon through the precipitation and burial of calcium carbonate in marine sediments constitutes over 70% of the total carbon on Earth and is partitioned between coastal and pelagic zones. The precipitation of authigenic calcium carbonate in seawater, however, has been hotly debated because despite being in a supersaturated state, there is an absence of persistent precipitation. One of the explanations for this paradox is the geochemical conditions in seawater cannot overcome the activation energy barrier for the first step in any precipitation reaction; nucleation. Here we show that virally induced rupturing of photosynthetic cyanobacterial cells releases cytoplasmic-associated bicarbonate at concentrations ~23-fold greater than in the surrounding seawater, thereby shifting the carbonate chemistry toward the homogenous nucleation of one or more of the calcium carbonate polymorphs. Using geochemical reaction energetics, we show the saturation states (Ω) in typical seawater for calcite (Ω = 4.3), aragonite (Ω = 3.1), and vaterite (Ω = 1.2) are significantly elevated following the release and diffusion of the cytoplasmic bicarbonate (Ωcalcite = 95.7; Ωaragonite = 68.5; Ωvaterite = 25.9). These increases in Ω significantly reduce the activation energy for nuclei formation thresholds for all three polymorphs, but only vaterite nucleation is energetically favored. In the post-lysis seawater, vaterite's nuclei formation activation energy is significantly reduced from 1.85 × 10−17 J to 3.85 × 10−20 J, which increases the nuclei formation rate from highly improbable (<<1.0 nuclei cm−3 s−1) to instantaneous (8.60 × 1025 nuclei cm−3 s−1). The proposed model for homogenous nucleation of calcium carbonate in seawater describes a mechanism through which the initial step in the production of carbonate sediments may proceed. It also presents an additional role of photosynthesizing microbes and their viruses in marine carbon cycles and

  8. ATP-stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate nanospheres and their application in protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chao; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Lu, Bing-Qiang; Zhao, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Feng; Wu, Jin

    2014-05-28

    Calcium carbonate is a common substance found in rocks worldwide, and is the main biomineral formed in shells of marine organisms and snails, pearls and eggshells. Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is the least stable polymorph of calcium carbonate, which is so unstable under normal conditions that it is difficult to be prepared in vitro because it rapidly crystallizes to form one of the more stable polymorphs in aqueous solution. Herein, we report the successful synthesis of highly stable ACC nanospheres in vitro using adenosine 5'-triphosphate disodium salt (ATP) as a stabilizer. The effect of ATP on the stability of ACC nanospheres is investigated. Our experiments show that ATP plays an unique role in the stabilization of ACC nanospheres in aqueous solution. Moreover, the as-prepared ACC nanospheres are highly stable in phosphate buffered saline for a relatively long period of time (12 days) even under relatively high concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions. The cytotoxicity tests show that the as-prepared highly stable ACC nanospheres have excellent biocompatibility. The highly stable ACC nanospheres have high protein adsorption capacity, implying that they are promising for applications in biomedical fields such as drug delivery and protein adsorption. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Characterization of calcium carbonate crystals in pigeon yolk sacs with different incubation times.

    PubMed

    Song, Juan; Cheng, Haixia; Shen, Xinyu; Hu, Jingxiao; Tong, Hua

    2014-05-01

    Calcium carbonate crystals are known to form in the yolk sacs of fertile pigeon eggs at late stages of incubation. The composition and structure of these crystals were investigated, the crystallization environment was inspected, and the physical chemistry constants of the yolk fluid were determined through the incubation period. Polarized light microscopy was used to observe the generation and distribution of calcium carbonate crystals in the yolk sac. In addition, X-ray diffraction was employed to analyze the composition and crystal phase of the yolk sac. A decalcification and deproteination method was established to analyze the ultrastructure and composition of the crystals, as well as the internal relationship between inorganic and organic phases of the crystals. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to evaluate the characteristics of the crystals. Our results demonstrated that the calcium carbonate crystals were mainly composed of vaterite and calcite, with vaterite being the major component. Vaterite, a type of biomaterial generated by an organic template control, presented as a concentric hierarchical spherical structure. The organic nature of the biomaterial prevented vaterite from transforming into calcite, which is more thermodynamically stable than vaterite. Additionally, the configuration, size, and aggregation of vaterite were also mediated by the organic template. This bio-vaterite was found during the incubation period and is valuable in calcium transport during embryonic development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of calcium and vitamin D supplementation on bone mineral density in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Benchimol, Eric I; Ward, Leanne M; Gallagher, J C; Rauch, Frank; Barrowman, Nick; Warren, Jaime; Beedle, Susan; Mack, David R

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium and vitamin D2 supplementation on bone mineral density (BMD) in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This was an open-label, prospective study conducted over a 12-month period. Seventy-two patients were divided into 2 groups based on lumbar spine areal BMD (L2-4 aBMD). Patients with an L2-4 aBMD z score of -1 or higher were assigned to the control group (n = 33; mean age, 11.0 +/- 3.5 years; 20 boys). Patients with an L2-4 aBMD of less than -1 (n = 39; mean age 11.8 +/- 2.5 years; 25 boys) were allocated to the intervention group and received 1000 mg of supplemental elemental calcium daily for 12 months (n = 19) or supplemental calcium for 12 months and 50,000 IU of vitamin D2 monthly for 6 months (n = 20). The 2 groups differed in L2-4 aBMD z scores (intervention, -1.9 +/- 0.6; control, -0.2 +/- 0.6; P < 0.001) and volumetric L2-4 BMD (vBMD; intervention, 0.29 +/- 0.04; control, 0.33 +/- 0.06; P < 0.001). After 1 year of therapy, the control and intervention groups had similar changes in height z scores, L2-4 aBMD, L2-4 vBMD (z score change, L2-4 aBMD: control 0.2 +/- 0.6 [n = 21], intervention 0.4 +/- 0.6; P = 0.4 [n = 26]; z score change, L2-4 vBMD: control 0.1 +/- 0.4, intervention 0.2 +/- 0.6; P = 0.74). The changes in these parameters were similar between patients who had received calcium only or calcium plus vitamin D. These results suggest that, in children with IBD, supplementation of calcium and vitamin D does not accelerate accrual in L2-4 BMD.

  11. Carbon mineralization in surface and subsurface soils in a subtropical mixed forest in central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Tian, Q.

    2014-12-01

    About a half of soil carbon is stored in subsurface soil horizons, their dynamics have the potential to significantly affect carbon balancing in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the main factors regulating subsurface soil carbon mineralization are poorly understood. As affected by mountain humid monsoon, the subtropical mountains in central China has an annual precipitation of about 2000 mm, which causes strong leaching of ions and nutrition. The objectives of this study were to monitor subsurface soil carbon mineralization and to determine if it is affected by nutrient limitation. We collected soil samples (up to 1 m deep) at three locations in a small watershed with three soil layers (0-10 cm, 10-30 cm, below 30 cm). For the three layers, soil organic carbon (SOC) ranged from 35.8 to 94.4 mg g-1, total nitrogen ranged from 3.51 to 8.03 mg g-1, microbial biomass carbon (MBC) ranged from 170.6 to 718.4 μg g-1 soil. We measured carbon mineralization with the addition of N (100 μg N/g soil), P (50 μg P/g soil), and liable carbon (glucose labeled by 5 atom% 13C, at five levels: control, 10% MBC, 50% MBC, 100% MBC, 200% MBC). The addition of N and P had negligible effects on CO2 production in surface soil layers; in the deepest soil layer, the addition of N and P decreased CO2 production from 4.32 to 3.20 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1. Glucose addition stimulated both surface and subsurface microbial mineralization of SOC, causing priming effects. With the increase of glucose addition rate from 10% to 200% MBC, the primed mineralization rate increased from 0.19 to 3.20 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1 (fifth day of glucose addition). The magnitude of priming effect increased from 28% to 120% as soil layers go deep compare to the basal CO2 production (fifth day of 200% MBC glucose addition, basal CO2 production rate for the surface and the deepest soil was 11.17 and 2.88 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1). These results suggested that the mineralization of subsurface carbon is more

  12. Simplified models of rates of CO2 mineralization in Geologic Carbon Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePaolo, D. J.; Zhang, S.

    2017-12-01

    Geologic carbon storage (GCS) reverses the flow of carbon to the atmosphere, returning the carbon to long-term geologic storage. Models suggest that most of the injected CO2 will be "trapped" in the subsurface by physical means, but the most risk-free and permanent form of carbon storage is as carbonate minerals (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO3. The transformation of CO2 to carbonate minerals requires supply of divalent cations by dissolution of silicate minerals. Available data suggest that rates of transformation are difficult to predict. We show that the chemical kinetic observations and experimental results, when reduced to a single timescale that describes the fractional rate at which cations are released to solution by mineral dissolution, show sufficiently systematic behavior that the rates of mineralization can be estimated with reasonable certainty. Rate of mineralization depends on both the abundance (determined by the reservoir rock mineralogy) and the rate at which cations are released by dissolution into pore fluid that has been acidified with dissolved CO2. Laboratory-measured rates and field observations give values spanning 8 to 10 orders of magnitude, but when evaluated in the context of reservoir-scale reactive transport simulations, this range becomes much smaller. Reservoir scale simulations indicate that silicate mineral dissolution and subsequent carbonate mineral precipitation occur at pH 4.5 to 6, fluid flow velocity less than 5m/yr, and 50-100 years or more after the start of injection. These constraints lead to estimates of 200 to 2000 years for conversion of 60-90% of injected CO2 when the reservoir rock has a sufficient volume fraction of divalent cation-bearing silicate minerals (ca. 20%), and confirms that when reservoir rock mineralogy is not favorable the fraction of CO2 converted to carbonate minerals is minimal over 104 years. A sufficient amount of reactive minerals represents the condition by which the available cations per volume of rock plus pore

  13. Short-Range-Order Mineral Physical Protection On Black Carbon Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, B.; Weng, Y. T.; Wang, C. C.; Song, Y. F.; Lehmann, J.; Wang, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter is one of the largest reservoirs in global carbon cycle, and black carbon (BC) represents a chemical resistant component. Black C plays an important role in global climate change. Generally considered recalcitrant due to high aromaticity, the reactive surface and functional groups of BC are crucial for carbon sequestration in soils. Mineral sorption and physical protection is an important mechanism for BC long term stabilization and sequestration in environments. Previous studies on mineral protection of BC were limited to analysis techniques in two-dimensions, for example, by SEM, TEM, and NanoSIMS. Little is known about the scope of organo-mineral association, the in-situ distribution and forms of minerals, and the ultimate interplay of BC and minerals. The aim of this study is to investigate the three-dimensional interaction of organic C and minerals in submicron scale using synchrotron-based Transmission X-ray Microcopy (TXM) and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Abundant poorly-crystallined nano-minerals particles were observed. These short-range-order (SRO) minerals also aggregate into clusters and sheets, and form envelops-like structures on the surface of BC. On top of large surface contact area, the intimate interplay between BC and minerals reinforces the stability of both organic C and minerals, resulting from chemical bonding through cation bridging and ligand exchange. The mineral protection enhances BC stabilization and sequestration and lowers its bioavailability in environment. The results suggest that mineral physical protection for BC sequestration may be more important than previous understanding.

  14. Precipitation of calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions in presence of ethylene glycol and dodecane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsi, Panagiota D.; Rokidi, Stamatia; Koutsoukos, Petros G.

    2015-04-01

    The formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in aqueous supersaturated solutions has been intensively studied over the past decades, because of its significance for a number of processes of industrial and environmental interest. In the oil and gas production industry the deposition of calcium carbonate affects adversely the productivity of the wells. Calcium carbonate scale deposits formation causes serious problems in water desalination, CO2 sequestration in subsoil wells, in geothermal systems and in heat exchangers because of the low thermal coefficient of the salt. Amelioration of the operational conditions is possible only when the mechanisms underlying nucleation and crystal growth of calcium carbonate in the aqueous fluids is clarified. Given the fact that in oil production processes water miscible and immiscible hydrocarbons are present the changes of the dielectric constant of the fluid phase has serious impact in the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation, which remains largely unknown. The problem becomes even more complicated if polymorphism exhibited by calcium carbonate is also taken into consideration. In the present work, the stability of aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to all calcium carbonate polymorphs and the subsequent kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation were measured. The measurements included aqueous solutions and solutions in the presence of water miscible (ethylene glycol, MEG) and water immiscible organics (n-dodecane). All measurements were done at conditions of sustained supersaturation using the glass/ Ag/AgCl combination electrode as a probe of the precipitation and pH as the master variable for the addition of titrant solutions with appropriate concentration needed to maintenance the solution supersaturation. Initially, the metastable zone width was determined from measurements of the effect of the solution supersaturation on the induction time preceding the onset of precipitation at free-drift conditions. The

  15. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic.

    PubMed

    He, Fupo; Ren, Weiwei; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sequestering CO(2) by mineral carbonation: stability against acid rain exposure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel J; Brent, Geoff F

    2010-04-01

    Mineral carbonation is a potentially attractive alternative to storage of compressed CO(2) in underground repositories, known as geosequestration. Processes for the conversion of basic ores, such as magnesium silicates, to carbonates have been proposed by various researchers, with storage of the carbonate as backfill in the original mine representing a solid carbon sink. The stability of such carbon sinks against acid rain and other sources of strong acids is examined here. It is acknowledged that in the presence of strong acid, carbonates will dissolve and release carbon dioxide. A sensitivity analysis covering annual average rainfall and pH that may be encountered in industrialized areas of the United States, China, Europe, and Australia was conducted to determine maximum CO(2) rerelease rates from mineral carbonation carbon sinks. This analysis is based on a worst-case premise that is equivalent to assuming infinitely rapid kinetics of dissolution of the carbonate. The analysis shows that under any likely conditions of pH and rainfall, leakage rates of stored CO(2) are negligible. This is illustrated in a hypothetical case study under Australian conditions. It is thus proposed that sequestration by mineral carbonation can be considered to be permanent on practical human time scales. Other possible sources of acid have also been considered.

  17. Ocean acidification accelerates net calcium carbonate loss in a coral rubble community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubler, Amber D.; Peterson, Bradley J.

    2016-09-01

    Coral rubble communities are an important yet often overlooked component of a healthy reef ecosystem. The organisms inhabiting reef rubble are primarily bioeroders that contribute to the breakdown and dissolution of carbonate material. While the effects of ocean acidification on calcifying communities have been well studied, there are few studies investigating the response of bioeroding communities to future changes in pH and calcium carbonate saturation state. Using a flow-through pH-stat system, coral rubble pieces with a naturally occurring suite of organisms, along with bleached control rubble pieces, were subjected to three different levels of acidification over an 8-week period. Rates of net carbonate loss in bleached control rubble doubled in the acidification treatments (0.02 vs. 0.04% CaCO3 d-1 in ambient vs. moderate and high acidification), and living rubble communities experienced significantly increased rates of net carbonate loss from ambient to high acidification conditions (0.06 vs. 0.10% CaCO3 d-1, respectively). Although more experimentation is necessary to understand the long-term response and succession of coral rubble communities under projected conditions, these results suggest that rates of carbonate loss will increase in coral rubble as pH and calcium carbonate saturation states are reduced. This study demonstrates a need to thoroughly investigate the contribution of coral rubble to the overall carbonate budget, reef resilience, recovery, and function under future conditions.

  18. The role of gluconate production by Pseudomonas spp. in the mineralization and bioavailability of calcium-phytate to Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Giles, Courtney D; Hsu, Pei-Chun Lisa; Richardson, Alan E; Hurst, Mark R H; Hill, Jane E

    2015-12-01

    Organic phosphorus (P) is abundant in most soils but is largely unavailable to plants. Pseudomonas spp. can improve the availability of P to plants through the production of phytases and organic anions. Gluconate is a major component of Pseudomonas organic anion production and may therefore play an important role in the mineralization of insoluble organic P forms such as calcium-phytate (CaIHP). Organic anion and phytase production was characterized in 2 Pseudomonas spp. soil isolates (CCAR59, Ha200) and an isogenic mutant of strain Ha200, which lacked a functional glucose dehydrogenase (Gcd) gene (strain Ha200 gcd::Tn5B8). Wild-type and mutant strains of Pseudomonas spp. were evaluated for their ability to solubilize and hydrolyze CaIHP and to promote the growth and assimilation of P by tobacco plants. Gluconate, 2-keto-gluconate, pyruvate, ascorbate, acetate, and formate were detected in Pseudomonas spp. supernatants. Wild-type pseudomonads containing a functional gcd could produce gluconate and mineralize CaIHP, whereas the isogenic mutant could not. Inoculation with Pseudomonas improved the bioavailability of CaIHP to tobacco plants, but there was no difference in plant growth response due to Gcd function. Gcd function is required for the mineralization of CaIHP in vitro; however, further studies will be needed to quantify the relative contribution of specific organic anions such as gluconate to plant growth promotion by soil pseudomonads.

  19. Experimental evidence for chemo-mechanical coupling during carbon mineralization in ultramafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zhu, W.; Kelemen, P. B.; Ilgen, A.

    2017-09-01

    Storing carbon dioxide in the subsurface as carbonate minerals has the benefit of long-term stability and immobility. Ultramafic rock formations have been suggested as a potential reservoir for this type of storage due to the availability of cations to react with dissolved carbon dioxide and the fast reaction rates associated with minerals common in ultramafic formations; however, the rapid reactions have the potential to couple with the mechanical and hydraulic behavior of the rocks and little is known about the extent and mechanisms of this coupling. In this study, we argue that the dissolution of primary minerals and the precipitation of secondary minerals along pre-existing fractures in samples lead to reductions in both the apparent Young's modulus and shear strength of aggregates, accompanied by reduction in permeability. Hydrostatic and triaxial deformation experiments were run on dunite samples saturated with de-ionized water and carbon dioxide-rich solutions while stress, strain, permeability and pore fluid chemistry were monitored. Sample microstructures were examined after reaction and deformation using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that channelized dissolution and carbonate mineral precipitation in the samples saturated with carbon dioxide-rich solutions modify the structure of grain boundaries, leading to the observed reductions in stiffness, strength and permeability. A geochemical model was run to help interpret fluid chemical data, and we find that the apparent reaction rates in our experiments are faster than rates calculated from powder reactors, suggesting mechanically enhanced reaction rates. In conclusion, we find that chemo-mechanical coupling during carbon mineralization in dunites leads to substantial modification of mechanical and hydraulic behavior that needs to be accounted for in future modeling efforts of in situ carbon mineralization projects.

  20. Temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization along an elevation gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guobing; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Xia; Ruan, Honghua; Wang, Jiashe

    2013-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) actively participates in the global carbon (C) cycle. Despite much research, however, our understanding of the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization is still very limited. To investigate the responses of SOC mineralization to temperature, we sampled surface soils (0-10 cm) from evergreen broad-leaf forest (EBF), coniferous forest (CF), sub-alpine dwarf forest (SDF), and alpine meadow (AM) along an elevational gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China. The soil samples were incubated at 5, 15, 25, and 35°C with constant soil moisture for 360 days. The temperature sensitivity of SOC mineralization (Q(10)) was calculated by comparing the time needed to mineralize the same amount of C at any two adjacent incubation temperatures. Results showed that the rates of SOC mineralization and the cumulative SOC mineralized during the entire incubation significantly increased with increasing incubation temperatures across the four sites. With the increasing extent of SOC being mineralized (increasing incubation time), the Q(10) values increased. Moreover, we found that both the elevational gradient and incubation temperature intervals significantly impacted Q(10) values. Q(10) values of the labile and recalcitrant organic C linearly increased with elevation. For the 5-15, 15-25, and 25-35°C intervals, surprisingly, the overall Q(10) values for the labile C did not decrease as the recalcitrant C did. Generally, our results suggest that subtropical forest soils may release more carbon than expected in a warmer climate.

  1. Rapidly assessing changes in bone mineral balance using natural stable calcium isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Skulan, Joseph L.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Smith, Scott M.; Anbar, Ariel D.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to rapidly detect changes in bone mineral balance (BMB) would be of great value in the early diagnosis and evaluation of therapies for metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis and some cancers. However, measurements of BMB are hampered by difficulties with using biochemical markers to quantify the relative rates of bone resorption and formation and the need to wait months to years for altered BMB to produce changes in bone mineral density large enough to resolve by X-ray densitometry. We show here that, in humans, the natural abundances of Ca isotopes in urine change rapidly in response to changes in BMB. In a bed rest experiment, use of high-precision isotope ratio MS allowed the onset of bone loss to be detected in Ca isotope data after about 1 wk, long before bone mineral density has changed enough to be detectable with densitometry. The physiological basis of the relationship between Ca isotopes and BMB is sufficiently understood to allow quantitative translation of changes in Ca isotope abundances to changes in bone mineral density using a simple model. The rate of change of bone mineral density inferred from Ca isotopes is consistent with the rate observed by densitometry in long-term bed rest studies. Ca isotopic analysis provides a powerful way to monitor bone loss, potentially making it possible to diagnose metabolic bone disease and track the impact of treatments more effectively than is currently possible. PMID:22652567

  2. Mineral Carbonation Potential of CO2 from Natural and Industrial-based Alkalinity Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, J.; Kirchofer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral carbonation is a Carbon Capture and Storage (CSS) technology where gaseous CO2 is reacted with alkaline materials (such as silicate minerals and alkaline industrial wastes) and converted into stable and environmentally benign carbonate minerals (Metz et al., 2005). Here, we present a holistic, transparent life cycle assessment model of aqueous mineral carbonation built using a hybrid process model and economic input-output life cycle assessment approach. We compared the energy efficiency and the net CO2 storage potential of various mineral carbonation processes based on different feedstock material and process schemes on a consistent basis by determining the energy and material balance of each implementation (Kirchofer et al., 2011). In particular, we evaluated the net CO2 storage potential of aqueous mineral carbonation for serpentine, olivine, cement kiln dust, fly ash, and steel slag across a range of reaction conditions and process parameters. A preliminary systematic investigation of the tradeoffs inherent in mineral carbonation processes was conducted and guidelines for the optimization of the life-cycle energy efficiency are provided. The life-cycle assessment of aqueous mineral carbonation suggests that a variety of alkalinity sources and process configurations are capable of net CO2 reductions. The maximum carbonation efficiency, defined as mass percent of CO2 mitigated per CO2 input, was 83% for CKD at ambient temperature and pressure conditions. In order of decreasing efficiency, the maximum carbonation efficiencies for the other alkalinity sources investigated were: olivine, 66%; SS, 64%; FA, 36%; and serpentine, 13%. For natural alkalinity sources, availability is estimated based on U.S. production rates of a) lime (18 Mt/yr) or b) sand and gravel (760 Mt/yr) (USGS, 2011). The low estimate assumes the maximum sequestration efficiency of the alkalinity source obtained in the current work and the high estimate assumes a sequestration efficiency

  3. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Cellular Biomineralization in Mantle Cell Cultures of Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liang; Kong, Wei; Su, Jingtan; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    The growth of molluscan shell crystals is generally thought to be initiated from the extrapallial fluid by matrix proteins, however, the cellular mechanisms of shell formation pathway remain unknown. Here, we first report amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precipitation by cellular biomineralization in primary mantle cell cultures of Pinctada fucata. Through real-time PCR and western blot analyses, we demonstrate that mantle cells retain the ability to synthesize and secrete ACCBP, Pif80 and nacrein in vitro. In addition, the cells also maintained high levels of alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase activity, enzymes responsible for shell formation. On the basis of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we observed intracellular crystals production by mantle cells in vitro. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed the crystals to be ACC, and de novo biomineralization was confirmed by following the incorporation of Sr into calcium carbonate. Our results demonstrate the ability of mantle cells to perform fundamental biomineralization processes via amorphous calcium carbonate, and these cells may be directly involved in pearl oyster shell formation. PMID:25405357

  4. On the role of block copolymer additives for calcium carbonate crystallization: small angle neutron scattering investigation by applying contrast variation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hitoshi; Schwahn, Dietmar; Cölfen, Helmut

    2004-05-15

    The role of the double-hydrophilic block copolymer poly(ethylen glycol)-block-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEG-b-PMAA) on the morphogenesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was studied by applying the contrast variation small angle neutron scattering technique. The morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals is strongly affected by the addition of PEG-b-PMAA. In order to determine the partial scattering functions of the polymer and CaCO3 mineral, we developed both an experimental and theoretical approach with a sophisticated method of their determination from the scattering intensity. Partial scattering functions give detailed information for each component. In particular, the partial scattering function of the polymer, Spp, shows a monotonic slope with Q(-2 to -3) where the scattering vector Q is low (Q < 0.01 Angstrom(-1)), which is a clear evidence that the polymer within the CaCO3 mineral has a mass fractal dimension. The other partial scattering functions reflected the geometry of the CaCO3 particles or the "interaction" of polymer and CaCO3 on a microscopic scale, which leads to a coherent view with Spp.

  5. Charged Nanowire-Directed Growth of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Nanosheets in a Mixed Solvent for Biomimetic Composite Films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Yi; Liu, Lei; Chen, Si-Ming; Chang, Fu-Jia; Mao, Li-Bo; Gao, Huai-Ling; Ma, Tao; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2018-05-22

    Bio-inspired mineralization is an effective way for fabricating complex inorganic materials, which inspires us to develop new methods to synthesize materials with fascinating properties. In this article, we report that the charged tellurium nanowires (TeNWs) can be used as biomacromolecule analogues to direct the formation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanosheets (ACCNs) in a mixed solvent. The effects of surface charges and the concentration of the TeNWs on the formation of ACCNs have been investigated. Particularly, the produced ACCNs can be functionalized by Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles to produce magnetic ACC/Fe 3 O 4 hybrid nanosheets that can be used to construct ACC/Fe 3 O 4 composite films through a self-evaporation process. Moreover, sodium alginate-ACC nanocomposite films with remarkable toughness and good transmittance can also be fabricated by using such ACCNs as nanoscale building blocks. This mineralization approach in a mixed solvent using charged TeNWs as biomacromolecule analogues provides a new way for the synthesis of ACCNs, which can be used as nanoscale building blocks for the fabrication of biomimetic composite films.

  6. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... yogurt canned salmon and sardines with bones leafy green vegetables, such as broccoli calcium-fortified foods — from ... potato with skins dried fruits, like raisins leafy green vegetables, such as broccoli whole and enriched grains, ...

  7. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of the anhydrous carbonate minerals shortite and barytocalcite.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Dickfos, Marilla J

    2008-11-01

    The Raman spectra of shortite and barytocalcite complimented with infrared spectra have been used to characterise the structure of these carbonate minerals. The Raman spectrum of barytocalcite shows a single band at 1086 cm(-1) attributed to the (CO3)(2-) symmetric stretching mode, in contrast to shortite where two bands are observed. The observation of two bands for shortite confirms the concept of more than one crystallographically distinct carbonate unit in the unit cell. Multiple bands are observed for the antisymmetric stretching and bending region for these minerals proving that the carbonate unit is distorted in the structure of both shortite and barytocalcite.

  8. Estrogen receptor mRNA in mineralized tissues of rainbow trout: calcium mobilization by estrogen.

    PubMed

    Armour, K J; Lehane, D B; Pakdel, F; Valotaire, Y; Graham, R; Russell, R G; Henderson, I W

    1997-07-07

    RT-PCR was undertaken on total RNA extracts from bone and scales of the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The rainbow trout estrogen receptor (ER)-specific primers used amplified a single product of expected size from each tissue which, using Southern blotting, strongly hybridized with a 32P-labelled rtER probe under stringent conditions. These data provide the first in vivo evidence of ER mRNA in bone and scale tissues of rainbow trout and suggest that the effects of estrogen observed in this study (increased bone mineral and decreased scale mineral contents, respectively) may be mediated directly through ER.

  9. In situ evidence of mineral physical protection and carbon stabilization revealed by nanoscale 3-D tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Yi-Tse; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chiang, Cheng-Cheng; Tsai, Heng; Song, Yen-Fang; Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen; Liang, Biqing

    2018-05-01

    An approach for nanoscale 3-D tomography of organic carbon (OC) and associated mineral nanoparticles was developed to illustrate their spatial distribution and boundary interplay, using synchrotron-based transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM). The proposed 3-D tomography technique was first applied to in situ observation of a laboratory-made consortium of black carbon (BC) and nanomineral (TiO2, 15 nm), and its performance was evaluated using dual-scan (absorption contrast and phase contrast) modes. This novel tool was then successfully applied to a natural OC-mineral consortium from mountain soil at a spatial resolution of 60 nm, showing the fine structure and boundary of OC, the distribution of abundant nano-sized minerals, and the 3-D organo-mineral association in situ. The stabilization of 3500-year-old natural OC was mainly attributed to the physical protection of nano-sized iron (Fe)-containing minerals (Fe oxyhydroxides including ferrihydrite, goethite, and lepidocrocite), and the strong organo-mineral complexation. In situ evidence revealed an abundance of mineral nanoparticles, in dense thin layers or nano-aggregates/clusters, instead of crystalline clay-sized minerals on or near OC surfaces. The key working minerals for C stabilization were reactive short-range-order (SRO) mineral nanoparticles and poorly crystalline submicron-sized clay minerals. Spectroscopic analyses demonstrated that the studied OC was not merely in crisscross co-localization with reactive SRO minerals; there could be a significant degree of binding between OC and the minerals. The ubiquity and abundance of mineral nanoparticles on the OC surface, and their heterogeneity in the natural environment may have been severely underestimated by traditional research approaches. Our in situ description of organo-mineral interplay at the nanoscale provides direct evidence to substantiate the importance of mineral physical protection for the long-term stabilization of OC. This high-resolution 3-D

  10. Biochemical effects of lead exposure on battery manufacture workers with reference to blood pressure, calcium metabolism and bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Dongre, Nilima N; Suryakar, Adinath N; Patil, Arun J; Hundekari, Indira A; Devarnavadagi, Basavaraj B

    2013-01-01

    Lead is one of the most widely scattered toxic metals in the environment and used by mankind for over 9,000 years. Lead in the environment may be derived from natural or anthropogenic sources. In humans, lead can cause a wide range of biological effects depending upon the level and duration of exposure. The purpose of this study was to find out the effect of lead exposure on systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum calcium, ionized calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone and vitamin D and examine the overall effect of all these parameters on the bone mineral density of battery manufacture workers. For this study ninety battery manufacture workers were selected and divided in three groups depending upon duration of lead exposure. Group I-workers with duration of lead exposure 1-5 years, Group II-workers with duration of lead exposure 6-10 years and Group III-workers with duration of lead exposure more than 10 years. Each group consisted of thirty workers. Thirty age matched healthy control subjects were taken for comparison. Demographic, occupational and clinical data were collected by using questionnaire and interview. The venous blood samples were collected from the study groups and normal healthy control group. At the time of blood collection random urine samples were collected in amber coloured bottles. The biochemical parameters were estimated by using standard assay procedures. Statistical analysis of the data was done using independent student't' test for parametric variables. Values were expressed as mean ± standard deviation (SD). P values of 0.05 or less were considered to be statistically significant. The blood lead levels and urinary lead levels of all workers were significantly increased (P < 0.001) in proportion to the duration of lead exposure as compared to controls. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly raised (P < 0.001) in all three study groups of battery manufacture workers as compared to controls. Serum

  11. Carbonic Anhydrase-8 Regulates Inflammatory Pain by Inhibiting the ITPR1-Cytosolic Free Calcium Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Gerald Z.; Keeler, Benjamin; Grant, Jeff; Bianchi, Laura; Fu, Eugene S.; Zhang, Yan Ping; Erasso, Diana M.; Cui, Jian-Guo; Wiltshire, Tim; Li, Qiongzhen; Hao, Shuanglin; Sarantopoulos, Konstantinos D.; Candiotti, Keith; Wishnek, Sarah M.; Smith, Shad B.; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Martin, Eden R.; Levitt, Roy C.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium dysregulation is causally linked with various forms of neuropathology including seizure disorders, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s, spinal cerebellar ataxia (SCA) and chronic pain. Carbonic anhydrase-8 (Car8) is an allosteric inhibitor of inositol trisphosphate receptor-1 (ITPR1), which regulates intracellular calcium release fundamental to critical cellular functions including neuronal excitability, neurite outgrowth, neurotransmitter release, mitochondrial energy production and cell fate. In this report we test the hypothesis that Car8 regulation of ITPR1 and cytoplasmic free calcium release is critical to nociception and pain behaviors. We show Car8 null mutant mice (MT) exhibit mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from MT also demonstrate increased steady-state ITPR1 phosphorylation (pITPR1) and cytoplasmic free calcium release. Overexpression of Car8 wildtype protein in MT nociceptors complements Car8 deficiency, down regulates pITPR1 and abolishes thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity. We also show that Car8 nociceptor overexpression alleviates chronic inflammatory pain. Finally, inflammation results in downregulation of DRG Car8 that is associated with increased pITPR1 expression relative to ITPR1, suggesting a possible mechanism of acute hypersensitivity. Our findings indicate Car8 regulates the ITPR1-cytosolic free calcium pathway that is critical to nociception, inflammatory pain and possibly other neuropathological states. Car8 and ITPR1 represent new therapeutic targets for chronic pain. PMID:25734498

  12. Carbonation acceleration of calcium hydroxide nanoparticles: induced by yeast fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Arce, Paula; Zornoza-Indart, Ainara

    2015-09-01

    Carbonation of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles and consolidation of limestone are accelerated by high humidity and a yeast fermentation system that supplies a saturated atmosphere on CO2, H2O vapor and ethanol during 28 days. Nanoparticles were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analyses with thermogravimetry. Spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy analyses, and hydric and mechanical tests were also performed in stones specimens. Samples exposed to the yeast environment achieve 100 % relative CaCO3 yield, whereas at high humidity but without the yeast and under laboratory environment, relative yields of 95 % CaCO3 and 15 % CaCO3 are, respectively, reached, with white crusts and glazing left on the stone surfaces when the nanoparticles are applied at a concentration of 25 g/l. The largest increase in the drilling resistance and surface hardness values with slight increase in the capillarity absorption and desorption coefficients and with lesser stone color changes are produced at a concentration of 5 g/l, in the yeast system environment. This especially happens in stone specimens initially with bimodal pore size distributions, more amounts of pores with diameters between 0.1 and 1 µm, higher open porosity values and faster capillary coefficients. An inexpensive and reliable method based on water and yeast-sugar solution is presented to speed up carbonation of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles used as a consolidating product to improve the mechanical properties of decayed limestone from archaeological and architectural heritage.

  13. Vesicular delivery of crystalline calcium minerals to ECM in biomineralized nanoclay composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katti, Kalpana S.; Ambre, Avinash H.; Payne, Scott; Katti, Dinesh R.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of mineralization and new bone formation were explored in newly formed extracellular matrix in a nanoclay based composite. Nanoclay films were prepared by intercalating the clays with amino acids and using the amino acids for mineralization of hydroxyapatite. The biomineralized hydroxyapatite (HAP) inside nanoclay galleries or in situ HAP/clay was further used to make films (substrates) using polycaprolactone (PCL) that were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells in a two-stage seeding process. SEM imaging experiments performed on PCL/in situ HAPclay composite films seeded with human MSCs indicated formation of matrix vesicles. The vesicles appear to emerge from the cells that are adhered to the nanoclay HAP films and also deposited in the extracellular space. Vesicles are also observed to be embedded in the cells or under the surface of cells. Crystalline structures with Ca and P were found inside vesicles. The Ca/P ratios obtained using energy dispersive spectroscopy indicate values ranging from below 0.7 to the stoichiometric HAP value of 1.67. The Ca/P ratios were obtained to be closer to the stoichiometric value for single seeding experiments as compared to the double seeding experiments indicating more new bone formation in double seeding experiments. New bone formation with bone mimetic mineralization is thus observed on the in situ HAP nanoclay PCL samples. Hence the PCL/in situ HAPclay composites besides being osteoinductive are also capable of providing a favorable micro-environment for cell dependent processes involved in bone mineral formation.

  14. A rare case of Mirizzi syndrome due to pure calcium carbonate stones (Limy Bile).

    PubMed

    Gilani, Nooman; Hanif, Muhammad Farooq; Karasek, Veronika

    2016-06-01

    We report the first case of Mirizzi syndrome in a patient who presented with biliary obstruction caused by pure calcium carbonate stones. A 61 years old male with history of portal vein thrombosis presented with rash, nausea and jaundice. An ultrasound of biliary tree showed gallstones with dilatation of hepatic duct and intrahepatic biliary tree. There was suspicion of a stone in proximal CBD. CT scan showed an opaque gallbladder with dense radio-opaque material in its lumen. An ERCP was then performed revealing external common hepatic duct obstruction at the neck of the gallbladder. A plastic biliary stent was placed across the obstruction, followed by a cholecystectomy. Resected gallbladder specimen revealed thick whitish paste like material, and formed stones filling the gallbladder lumen. Laboratory testing showed this material to be composed of 100% calcium carbonate crystals.

  15. The inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalas, E; Chalias, A; Gatos, D; Barlos, K

    2006-08-15

    The crystal growth of calcite, the most stable calcium carbonate polymorph, in the presence of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide (containing 48 amino acids in the ring finger configuration), has been investigated by the constant composition technique. Crystallization took place exclusively on well-characterized calcite crystals in solutions supersaturated only with respect to this calcium carbonate salt. The kinetic results indicated a surface diffusion spiral growth mechanism. The presence of the Mdm2 peptide inhibited the crystal growth of calcite by 22-58% in the concentration range tested, through adsorption onto the active growth sites of the calcite crystal surface. The kinetic results favored a Langmuir-type adsorption model, and the value of the calculated affinity constant was k(aff)=147x10(4) dm(3)mol(-1), a(ads)=0.29.

  16. The impact of LRP5 polymorphism (rs556442) on calcium homeostasis, bone mineral density, and body composition in Iranian children.

    PubMed

    Ashouri, Elham; Meimandi, Elham Mahmoodi; Saki, Forough; Dabbaghmanesh, Mohammad Hossein; Omrani, Gholamhossein Ranjbar; Bakhshayeshkaram, Marzieh

    2015-11-01

    Failure to achieve optimal bone mass in childhood is the primary cause of decreased adult bone mineral density (BMD) and increased bone fragility in later life. Activating and inactivating LRP5 gene mutations has been associated with extreme bone-related phenotypes. Our aim was to investigate the role of LRP5 polymorphism on BMD, mineral biochemical parameters, and body composition in Iranian children. This cross-sectional study was performed on 9-18 years old children (125 boys, 137 girls). The serum level of calcium, phosphorous, alkaline phosphatase, and vitamin D parameters were checked. The body composition and BMD variables were measured by the Hologic system DXA. The rs566442 (V1119V) coding polymorphism in exon 15 of LRP5 was performed using PCR-RFLP method. Linear regression analysis, with adjustment for age, gender, body size parameters, and pubertal status was used to determine the association between LRP5 polymorphism (rs556442) and bone and body composition parameters. The allele frequency of the rs566442 gene was 35.5 % A and 63.9 % G. Our study revealed that LRP5 (rs556442) has not any significant influence on serum calcium, phosphorus, 25OHvitD, and serum alkaline phosphatase (P > 0.05). Total lean mass was greater in GG genotype (P = 0.028). Total body less head area (P = 0.044), spine BMD (P = 0.04), and total femoral BMC (P = 0.049) were lower in AG heterozygote genotype. This study show LRP5 polymorphism may associate with body composition and BMD in Iranian children. However, further investigations should be done to evaluate the role of other polymorphism.

  17. Calcium sources for milk production in Holstein cows via changes in dry matter intake, mineral utilization, and mineral source buffering potential.

    PubMed

    Wohlt, J E; Ritter, D E; Evans, J L

    1986-11-01

    Three supplemental sources of inorganic calcium (calcite flour, aragonite, albacar), each differing in particle size and rate of reactivity, provided .6 or .9% calcium in corn silage:grain (1:1 dry matter) diets of high producing dairy cows. All cows were fed calcite flour at .6% calcium during the first 4 wk of lactation. On d 29 of lactation 5 cows were assigned to each of the six diets. Peak milk yield paralleled dry matter intake and was higher when calcite flour and aragonite provided .9% calcium, intermediate when all sources provided .6% calcium, and lower when albacar provided .9% calcium. However, adaptations to calcium source and to particle sizes of a calcium source (.35 to 1190 mu) were made within 40 d by lactating Holsteins. Starch increased and pH decreased in feces of cows fed albacar. Increasing calcium in the diet provided more buffering capacity in the gastrointestinal tract. True absorption of calcium did not differ from linearity due to source when fecal calcium was regressed on ingested calcium but did vary as a function of diet percentage. Thus, calcium retention was increased when cows were fed .9 vs. .6% calcium. These data suggest that a slow reacting (coarser) inorganic calcium source should be fed at a higher amount to optimize feed intake and milk production.

  18. Surface-functionalized cockle shell–based calcium carbonate aragonite polymorph as a drug nanocarrier

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Abd Ghafar, Syairah Liyana; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Rukayadi, Yaya; Abu Bakar Zakaria, Md Zuki

    2017-01-01

    Calcium carbonate aragonite polymorph nanoparticles derived from cockle shells were prepared using surface functionalization method followed by purification steps. Size, morphology, and surface properties of the nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zetasizer, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry techniques. The potential of surface-functionalized calcium carbonate aragonite polymorph nanoparticle as a drug-delivery agent were assessed through in vitro drug-loading test and drug-release test. Transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and particle size distribution analyses revealed that size, morphology, and surface characterization had been improved after surface functionalization process. Zeta potential of the nanoparticles was found to be increased, thereby demonstrating better dispersion among the nanoparticles. Purification techniques showed a further improvement in the overall distribution of nanoparticles toward more refined size ranges <100 nm, which specifically favored drug-delivery applications. The purity of the aragonite phase and their chemical analyses were verified by X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry studies. In vitro biological response of hFOB 1.19 osteoblast cells showed that surface functionalization could improve the cytotoxicity of cockle shell–based calcium carbonate aragonite nanocarrier. The sample was also sensitive to pH changes and demonstrated good abilities to load and sustain in vitro drug. This study thus indicates that calcium carbonate aragonite polymorph nanoparticles derived from cockle shells, a natural biomaterial, with modified surface characteristics are promising and can be applied as efficient carriers for drug delivery. PMID:28572724

  19. Calcium carbonate in human gallstones and total CO2 in bile.

    PubMed Central

    Sutor, D J; Wilkie, L I

    1978-01-01

    Measurement of total CO2 concentrations in bile from patients undergoing cholecystectomy because of gallstones has shown that the presence of calcium carbonate in the stones can be associated with a raised total CO2 concentration in the common duct bile. In bile from functioning and poorly-functioning gallbladders, total CO2 was nearly always related to pH irrespective of stone composition. PMID:631643

  20. Lithostathine, the presumed pancreatic stone inhibitor, does not interact specifically with calcium carbonate crystals.

    PubMed

    De Reggi, M; Gharib, B; Patard, L; Stoven, V

    1998-02-27

    Lithostathine (pancreatic stone protein, Reg protein) is, in addition to albumin, the major nonenzymatic protein of the pancreatic juice. It has been assumed to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation and therefore to prevent stone formation in the pancreatic ducts. This function is, however, debatable. The assumption is based on the inhibition of in vitro crystal nucleation and growth by lithostathine. Considering that these phenomena occur only under certain critical conditions, we re-examined the question using a protein preparation where the purity and folding have been tested by mass spectroscopy and NMR in the absence of nonprotein contaminants. Under these conditions, we showed conclusively that lithostathine does not inhibit calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth. We demonstrated that previous findings on the alleged inhibition can be attributed to the uncontrolled presence of salts in the protein preparation used. Moreover, the affinity of lithostathine to calcite crystals, expressed as the half-life of bound iodinated protein in the presence of unlabeled competitor, was significantly lower than that of bovine serum albumin (8.8 and 11.2 h, respectively). Using glass microspheres instead of crystals did not significantly change the half-life of bound lithostathine (8.0 h). These findings are incompatible with the hypothesis of a specific interaction of lithostathine with calcium carbonate crystals. In conclusion, considering that components of pancreatic juice such as NaCl and phosphate ions are powerful inhibitors of calcium carbonate crystal growth, the mechanism of stone formation in pancreatic ducts must be reconsidered. The presence in normal pancreatic juice of small amounts of the 133-residue isoform of lithostathine (PSP-S1), which precipitates at physiological pH, should be noted, and the possibility should be considered that they form micro-precipitates that aggregate and are progressively calcified.

  1. Imaging calcium carbonate distribution in human sweat pore in vivo using nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueqin; Gasecka, Alicja; Formanek, Florian; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Rigneault, Hervé

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear microscopies, including two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), were used to study individual human sweat pore morphology and topically applied antiperspirant salt penetration inside sweat pore, in vivo on human palms. Sweat pore inner morphology in vivo was imaged up to the depth of 100 μm by TPEF microscopy. The 3D penetration and distribution of "in situ calcium carbonate" (isCC), an antiperspirant salt model, was investigated using CARS microscopy.

  2. Electromigration and Deposition of Micro-Scale Calcium Carbonate Structures with Controlled Morphology and Polymorphism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    precipitation of calcium carbonate in structured templates including microporous polycarbonate membranes and polyethylene foams. Para- meters...polyethylene foam). Microporous polycarbonate membranes and Medium-Density PolyEthylene (MDPE) foam specimens were used as the porous organic...voids in hardened concrete. DOI:10.1520/C624-06. West Conshohocken, PA: ASTM International . www.astm.org. Bersa, L., and M. Liu. 2007. A review on

  3. Copper retention, calcium release and ultrastructural evidence indicate specific Cuprolinic Blue uptake and peculiar modifications in mineralizing aortic valves.