Science.gov

Sample records for miniature direct methanol

  1. The direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Halpert, G.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H.

    1995-08-01

    This presentation describes the approach and progress in the ARPA-sponsored effort to develop a Direct Methanol, Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell (DMLFFC) with a solid Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) for battery replacement in small portable applications. Using Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) developed by JPL and Giner, significant voltage was demonstrated at relatively high current densities. The DMLFFC utilizes a 3 percent aqueous solution of methanol that is oxidized directly in the anode (fuel) chamber and oxygen (air) in the cathode chamber to produce water and significant power. The only products are water and CO{sub 2}. The ARPA effort is aimed at replacing the battery in the BA 5590 military radio.

  2. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  3. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren; Xiaoming

    2003-07-22

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  4. Direct methanol fuel cell for portable applications

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez, T.I.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H.; Chun, W.

    1997-12-01

    A five cell direct methanol fuel cell stack has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Presently direct methanol fuel cell technology is being incorporated into a system for portable applications. Electrochemical performance and its dependence on flow rate and temperature for a five cell stack are presented. Water transport data, and water transport mechanisms for direct methanol fuel cells are discussed. Stack response to pulse loads has been characterized. Implications of stack performance and operating conditions on system design have been addressed.

  5. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

  6. Methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cell systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovar, B. S.; Bender, G.; Davey, J. R.; Zelenay, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are currently being investigated for a number of different applications from several milliwatts to near kilowatt size scales (cell phones, laptops, auxiliary power units, etc .). Because methanol has a very high energy density, over 6000 W hr/kg, a DMFC can possibly have greatly extended lifetimes compared to the batteries, doesn't present the storage problems associated with hydrogen fuel cells and can possibly operate more efficiently and cleanly than internal combustion engines.

  7. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  8. Single passive direct methanol fuel cell supplied with pure methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ligang; Zhang, Jing; Cai, Weiwei; Liang, Liang; Xing, Wei; Liu, Changpeng

    2011-03-01

    A new single passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) supplied with pure methanol is designed, assembled and tested using a pervaporation membrane (PM) to control the methanol transport. The effect of the PM size on the fuel cell performances and the constant current discharge of the fuel cell with one-fueling are studied. The results show that the fuel cell with PM 9 cm2 can yield a maximum power density of about 21 mW cm-2, and a stable performances at a discharge current of 100 mA can last about 45 h. Compared with DMFC supplied with 3 M methanol solution, the energy density provided by this new DMFC has increased about 6 times.

  9. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  10. Advanced direct methanol fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdan, Monjid; Kosek, John A.

    1999-11-01

    The goal of the program was an advanced proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for use as the electrolyte in a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell which provides reduced methanol crossover while simultaneously providing high conductivity and low membrane water content. The approach was to use a membrane containing precross-linked fluorinated base polymer films and subsequently to graft the base film with selected materials. Over 80 different membranes were prepared. The rate of methanol crossover through the advanced membranes was reduced 90%. A 5-cell stack provided stable performance over a 100-hour life test. Preliminary cost estimates predicted a manufacturing cost at $4 to $9 per kW.

  11. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  12. Methanol Oxidation on Pt3Sn(111) for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Methanol Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zhigang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Weili; Wei, Shuxian; Ng, Siu-Pang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Ding, Ning; Guo, Wenyue; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-05-18

    PtSn alloy, which is a potential material for use in direct methanol fuel cells, can efficiently promote methanol oxidation and alleviate the CO poisoning problem. Herein, methanol decomposition on Pt3Sn(111) was systematically investigated using periodic density functional theory and microkinetic modeling. The geometries and energies of all of the involved species were analyzed, and the decomposition network was mapped out to elaborate the reaction mechanisms. Our results indicated that methanol and formaldehyde were weakly adsorbed, and the other derivatives (CHxOHy, x = 1-3, y = 0-1) were strongly adsorbed and preferred decomposition rather than desorption on Pt3Sn(111). The competitive methanol decomposition started with the initial O-H bond scission followed by successive C-H bond scissions, (i.e., CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO). The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations and energy barrier decomposition analyses identified the C-H and O-H bond scissions as being more competitive than the C-O bond scission. Microkinetic modeling confirmed that the vast majority of the intermediates and products from methanol decomposition would escape from the Pt3Sn(111) surface at a relatively low temperature, and the coverage of the CO residue decreased with an increase in the temperature and decrease in partial methanol pressure.

  13. A self-sustained, complete and miniaturized methanol fuel processor for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Jiao, Fengjun; Li, Shulian; Li, Hengqiang; Chen, Guangwen

    2015-08-01

    A self-sustained, complete and miniaturized methanol fuel processor has been developed based on modular integration and microreactor technology. The fuel processor is comprised of one methanol oxidative reformer, one methanol combustor and one two-stage CO preferential oxidation unit. Microchannel heat exchanger is employed to recover heat from hot stream, miniaturize system size and thus achieve high energy utilization efficiency. By optimized thermal management and proper operation parameter control, the fuel processor can start up in 10 min at room temperature without external heating. A self-sustained state is achieved with H2 production rate of 0.99 Nm3 h-1 and extremely low CO content below 25 ppm. This amount of H2 is sufficient to supply a 1 kWe proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The corresponding thermal efficiency of whole processor is higher than 86%. The size and weight of the assembled reactors integrated with microchannel heat exchangers are 1.4 L and 5.3 kg, respectively, demonstrating a very compact construction of the fuel processor.

  14. Design and Operation of an Electrochemical Methanol Concentration Sensor for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.; Chun, W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a 150-Watt packaged power source based on liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells is being pursued currently at the Jet propulsion Laboratory for defense applications. In our studies we find that the concentration of methanol in the fuel circulation loop affects the electrical performance and efficiency the direct methanol fuel cell systems significantly. The practical operation of direct methanol fuel cell systems, therefore, requires accurate monitoring and control of methanol concentration. The present paper reports on the principle and demonstration of an in-house developed electrochemical sensor suitable for direct methanol fuel cell systems.

  15. Design and Operation of an Electrochemical Methanol Concentration Sensor for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.; Chun, W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a 150-Watt packaged power source based on liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells is being pursued currently at the Jet propulsion Laboratory for defense applications. In our studies we find that the concentration of methanol in the fuel circulation loop affects the electrical performance and efficiency the direct methanol fuel cell systems significantly. The practical operation of direct methanol fuel cell systems, therefore, requires accurate monitoring and control of methanol concentration. The present paper reports on the principle and demonstration of an in-house developed electrochemical sensor suitable for direct methanol fuel cell systems.

  16. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  17. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Aricò, Antonino S; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D'Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion(®) were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate-PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion(®) 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm(-2) vs. 64 mW·cm(-2)). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm(-2) equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm(-2) for Nafion(®) 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm² for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm² for Nafion(®) 115).

  18. Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

  19. Recent Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the effects of methanol crossover and airflow rates on the cathode potential of an operating direct methanol fuel cell are explored. Techniques for quantifying methanol crossover in a fuel cell and for separating the electrical performance of each electrode in a fuel cell are discussed. The effect of methanol concentration on cathode potential has been determined to be significant. The cathode is found to be mass transfer limited when operating on low flow rate air and high concentrations of methanol. Improvements in cathode structure and operation at low methanol concentration have been shown to result in improved cell performance.

  20. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Ramsey, John C.

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  1. Recent Advances in High-Performance Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Chun, W.; Valdez, T. I.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Frank, H.; Surumpudi, S.; Halpert, G.; Kosek, J.; Cropley, C.; La Conti, A. B.; hide

    1996-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications have been advanced significantly under DARPA- and ARO-sponsored programs over the last five years. A liquid-feed, direct methanol fuel cell developed under these programs, employs a proton exchange membrane as electrolyte and operates on aqueous solutions of methanol with air or oxygen as the oxidant.

  2. A micro direct methanol fuel cell demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Konrad; Johansson, David; Bring, Martin; Sanz-Velasco, Anke; Enoksson, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The demand for compact power sources with high energy density is increasing. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is a renewable energy source which works at near room temperature, and allows for easier liquid fuel storage, which makes it a potential candidate. We report the design, fabrication and characterization of a self-driven DMFC made by micromachining techniques and macro-assembly. Several designs were created on the basis of state-of-the-art DMFCs. A simplified mathematical model was used mainly to design the flow channels and verify the polarization curves, which reveal the output power of a cell. Silicon was used as a substrate for the fabrication of electrodes, and the membrane electrode assembly was provided by Ion Power, Inc. A 0.25 cm2 cell showed a performance of 0.29 mW cm-2 and an open circuit voltage of 0.7 V. Ten microliters of 6 M methanol solution is sufficient to operate the cell for more than 1 h.

  3. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2004-10-26

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  4. Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-03-21

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of a platinum-chromium alloy so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  5. Methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst composite for direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-09-05

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of Pt.sub.3Cr/C so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  6. Integrated anode structure for passive direct methanol fuel cells with neat methanol operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huijuan; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Peng; Guo, Jing; Yuan, Ting; Zheng, Junwei; Yang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    A microporous titanium plate based integrated anode structure (Ti-IAS) suitable for passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) fueled with neat methanol is reported. This anode structure incorporates a porous titanium plate as a methanol mass transfer barrier and current collector, pervaporation film for passively vaporizing methanol, vaporous methanol cavity for evenly distributing fuel, and channels for carbon dioxide venting. With the effective control of methanol delivery rate, the Ti-IAS based DMFC allows the direct use of neat methanol as the fuel source. In the meantime, the required water for methanol-oxidation reaction at the anode can also be fully recovered from the cathode with the help of the highly hydrophobic microporous layer in the cathode. DMFCs incorporating this new anode structure exhibit a power density as high as 40 mW cm-2 and a high volumetric energy density of 489 Wh L-1 operating with neat methanol and at 25 °C. Importantly, no obvious performance degradation of the passive DMFC system is observed after more than 90 h of continuous operation. The experimental results reveal that the compact DMFC based on the Ti-IAS exhibits a substantial potential as power sources for portable applications.

  7. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, James H.; Cox, Philip; Harrington, William J; Campbell, Joseph L

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  8. Assessment of methanol electro-oxidation for direct methanol-air fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, S.D.; Sen, R.K.

    1988-07-01

    The Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of a methanol-air fuel cell for transportation application. The approach used at Los Alamos National Laboratory converts the methanol fuel to a hydrogen-rich gas in a reformer, then operates the fuel cell on hydrogen and air. The reformer tends to be bulky (raising vehicle packaging problems), has a long startup period, and is not well suited for the transient operation required in a vehicle. Methanol, however, can be oxidized electrochemically in the fuel cell. If this process can be conducted efficiently, a direct methanol-air fuel cell can be used, which does not require a reformer. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of developing a suitable catalyst for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methanol. The primary conclusion of this study is that no acceptable catalysts exist can efficiently oxidize methanol electrochemically and have the desired cost and lifetime for vehicle applications. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanism of methanol oxidation indicates that a predictive base can be developed to search for methanol oxidation catalysts and can be used to methodically develop improved catalysts. Such an approach is strongly recommended. The study also recommends that until further progress in developing high-performance catalysts is achieved, research in cell design and testing is not warranted. 43 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Thermodynamic properties of direct methanol polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Ji Yun; Bae, Young Chan; Sun, Yang Kook

    A new semi-empirical model is established to describe the cell voltage of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) as a function of current density. The model equation is validated experimental data over a wide range of a methanol concentration and temperatures. A number of existing models are semi-empirical. They, however, have a serious mathematical defect. When the current density, j, becomes zero, the equation should reduce to the open circuit voltage, E0. These models, however, do not meet the mathematical boundary condition. The proposed model focuses on very unfavorable conditions for the cell operation, i.e. low methanol solution concentrations and relatively low cell temperatures. A newly developed semi-empirical equation with reasonable boundary conditions includes the methanol crossover effect that plays a major role in determining the cell voltage of DMFC. Also, it contains methanol activity based on thermodynamic functions to represent methanol crossover effect.

  10. The JPL Direct Methanol Liquid-feed PEM Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, G.; Surampudi, S.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, there has been a breakthrough in fuel cell technology in the Energy Storage Systems Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with the develpment of a direct methanol, liquid-feed, solid polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell... The methanol liquid-feed, solid polymer electrolyte (PEM) design has numerous system level advantages over the gas-feed design. These include:...

  11. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  12. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  13. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Improvements to non-acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  14. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  15. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  16. A selective electrocatalyst–based direct methanol fuel cell operated at high concentrations of methanol

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the serious crossover of methanol from the anode to the cathode through the polymer electrolyte membrane, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) usually use dilute methanol solutions as fuel. However, the use of high-concentration methanol is highly demanded to improve the energy density of a DMFC system. Instead of the conventional strategies (for example, improving the fuel-feed system, membrane development, modification of electrode, and water management), we demonstrate the use of selective electrocatalysts to run a DMFC at high concentrations of methanol. In particular, at an operating temperature of 80°C, the as-fabricated DMFC with core-shell-shell Au@Ag2S@Pt nanocomposites at the anode and core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles at the cathode produces a maximum power density of 89.7 mW cm−2 at a methanol feed concentration of 10 M and maintains good performance at a methanol concentration of up to 15 M. The high selectivity of the electrocatalysts achieved through structural construction accounts for the successful operation of the DMFC at high concentrations of methanol. PMID:28695199

  17. A selective electrocatalyst-based direct methanol fuel cell operated at high concentrations of methanol.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Owing to the serious crossover of methanol from the anode to the cathode through the polymer electrolyte membrane, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) usually use dilute methanol solutions as fuel. However, the use of high-concentration methanol is highly demanded to improve the energy density of a DMFC system. Instead of the conventional strategies (for example, improving the fuel-feed system, membrane development, modification of electrode, and water management), we demonstrate the use of selective electrocatalysts to run a DMFC at high concentrations of methanol. In particular, at an operating temperature of 80°C, the as-fabricated DMFC with core-shell-shell Au@Ag2S@Pt nanocomposites at the anode and core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles at the cathode produces a maximum power density of 89.7 mW cm(-2) at a methanol feed concentration of 10 M and maintains good performance at a methanol concentration of up to 15 M. The high selectivity of the electrocatalysts achieved through structural construction accounts for the successful operation of the DMFC at high concentrations of methanol.

  18. Towards neat methanol operation of direct methanol fuel cells: a novel self-assembled proton exchange membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Cai, Weiwei; Ma, Liying; Zhang, Yunfeng; Chen, Zhangxian; Cheng, Hansong

    2015-04-18

    We report here a novel proton exchange membrane with remarkably high methanol-permeation resistivity and excellent proton conductivity enabled by carefully designed self-assembled ionic conductive channels. A direct methanol fuel cell utilizing the membrane performs well with a 20 M methanol solution, very close to the concentration of neat methanol.

  19. The Direct Methanol Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    Until the early 1990's the idea of a practical direct methanol fuel cell from transportation and other applications was just that, an idea. Several types of fuel cells that operate under near ambient conditions were under development.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Micromachined polymer electrolyte membrane and direct methanol fuel cells—a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Chan, Siew Hwa

    2006-04-01

    This review reports recent progress of the development of micromachined membrane-based fuel cells. The review first discusses the scaling law applied to this type of fuel cell. Impacts of miniaturization on the performance of membrane-based fuel cells are highlighted. This review includes only the two most common micro fuel cell types: proton exchange membrane micro fuel cells (PEMµFC) and direct methanol micro fuel cells (DMµFC). Furthermore, we only consider fuel cells with the active area of a single cell less than 1 square inch. Since the working principles of these fuel cell types are well known, the review only focuses on the choice of material and the design consideration of the components in the miniature fuel cell. Next, we compare and discuss the performance of different micro fuel cells published recently in the literature. Finally, this review gives an outlook on possible future development of micro fuel cell research.

  1. High performance direct methanol fuel cell with thin electrolyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Nianfang

    2017-06-01

    A high performance direct methanol fuel cell is achieved with thin electrolyte membrane. 320 mW cm-2 of peak power density and over 260 mW cm-2 at 0.4 V are obtained when working at 90 °C with normal pressure air supply. It is revealed that the increased anode half-cell performance with temperature contributes primarily to the enhanced performance at elevated temperature. From the comparison of iR-compensated cathode potential of methanol/air with that of H2/air fuel cell, the impact of methanol crossover on cathode performance decreases with current density and becomes negligible at high current density. Current density is found to influence fuel efficiency and methanol crossover significantly from the measurement of fuel efficiency at different current density. At high current density, high fuel efficiency can be achieved even at high temperature, indicating decreased methanol crossover.

  2. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous. The fuel cell system also comprises a fuel supplying part including a meter which meters an amount of fuel which is used by the fuel cell, and controls the supply of fuel based on said metering.

  3. Real-time mass spectrometric study of the methanol crossover in a direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.T.; Wasmus, S.; Savinell, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    The products of methanol crossover through the acid-doped polybenzimidazole polymer electrolyte membrane (PBI PEM) to the cathode of a prototype direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) were analyzed using multipurpose electrochemical mass spectrometry (MPEMS) coupled to the cathode exhaust gas outlet. It was found that the methanol crossing over reacts almost quantitatively to CO{sub 2} at the cathode with the platinum of the cathode acting as a heterogeneous catalyst. The cathode open-circuit potential is inversely proportional to the amount of CO{sub 2} formed. A poisoning effect on the oxygen reduction also was found. Methods for the estimation of the methanol crossover rate at operating fuel cells are suggested.

  4. Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Stephen; Mountz, David; He, Wensheng; Zhang, Tao

    2013-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cell membranes were developed using blends of different polyelectrolytes with PVDF. The membranes showed complex relationships between polyelectrolyte chemistry, morphology, and processing. Although the PVDF grade was found to have little effect on the membrane permselectivity, it does impact membrane conductivity and methanol permeation values. Other factors, such as varying the polyelectrolyte polarity, using varying crosslinking agents, and adjusting the equivalent weight of the membranes impacted methanol permeation, permselectivity, and areal resistance. We now understand, within the scope of the project work completed, how these inter-related performance properties can be tailored to achieve a balance of performance.

  5. Studies on an ultrasonic atomization feed direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaoqun; Liu, Linghao; Tang, Kai; Chen, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is promising as an energy conversion device for the replacement of conventional chemical cell in future, owing to its convenient fuel storage, high energy density and low working temperature. The development of DMFC technology is currently limited by catalyst poison and methanol crossover. To alleviate the methanol crossover, a novel fuel supply system based on ultrasonic atomization is proposed. Experimental investigations on this fuel supply system to evaluate methanol permeation rates, open circuit voltages (OCVs) and polarization curves under a series of conditions have been carried out and reported in this paper. In comparison with the traditional liquid feed DMFC system, it can be found that the methanol crossover under the ultrasonic atomization feed system was significantly reduced because the DMFC reaches a large stable OCV value. Moreover, the polarization performance does not vary significantly with the liquid feed style. Therefore, the cell fed by ultrasonic atomization can be operated with a high concentration methanol to improve the energy density of DMFC. Under the supply condition of relatively high concentration methanol such as 4M and 8M, the maximum power density fed by ultrasonic atomization is higher than liquid by 6.05% and 12.94% respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  7. Towards operating direct methanol fuel cells with highly concentrated fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T. S.; Yang, W. W.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    A significant advantage of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is the high specific energy of the liquid fuel, making it particularly suitable for portable and mobile applications. Nevertheless, conventional DMFCs have to be operated with excessively diluted methanol solutions to limit methanol crossover and the detrimental consequences. Operation with diluted methanol solutions significantly reduces the specific energy of the power pack and thereby prevents it from competing with advanced batteries. In view of this fact, there exists a need to improve conventional DMFC system designs, including membrane electrode assemblies and the subsystems for supplying/removing reactants/products, so that both the cell performance and the specific energy can be simultaneously maximized. This article provides a comprehensive review of past efforts on the optimization of DMFC systems that operate with concentrated methanol. Based on the discussion of the key issues associated with transport of the reactants/products, the strategies to manage the supply/removal of the reactants/products in DMFC operating with highly concentrated methanol are identified. With these strategies, the possible approaches to achieving the goal of concentrated fuel operation are then proposed. Past efforts in the management of the reactants/products for implementing each of the approaches are also summarized and reviewed.

  8. Modeling and Simulation of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohr, M.; Narayanan, S. R.; Halpert, G.

    1996-01-01

    From intro.: The direct methanol liquid feed fuel cell uses aqueous solutions of methanol as fuel and oxygen or air as the oxidant and uses an ionically conducting polymer membrane such as Nafion(sup r)117 and the electrolyte. This type of direct oxidation cell is fuel versatile and offers significant advantages in terms of simplicity of design and operation...The present study focuses on the results of a phenomenological model based on current understanding of the various processed operating in these cells.

  9. Direct methanol/air fuel cells: Systems considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Successful operation of a direct methanol/air fuel cell system depends upon appropriate integration of the fuel cell components and accommodation of the need for heat and mass transfer within the system. The features of the system that must be considered separately and in an interactive fashion are: (1) the physical state of the fuel feed stream, (2) electrode characteristics, (3) characteristics of the electrolyte, (4) product water removal, (5) heat transfer into our out of the stack, and (6) methanol loss modes. The operating temperature and pressure will be determined, to a large extent, by these features. An understanding of the component features and their interactions is necessary for initial system considerations for direct methanol/air fuel cells.

  10. On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gottesfield, S.

    1996-04-01

    Research on direct oxidation methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is discussed. Systems considered for transportation applications are addressed. The use of platinum/ruthenium anode electrocatalysts and platinum cathode electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte DMFCs has resulted in significant performance enhancements.

  11. On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xiaoming; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1995-09-01

    Power densities in electrolyte Direct Methanol Fuel Cells have been achieved which are only three times lower than those achieved with similar reformate/air fuel cells. Remaining issues are: improved anode catalyst activity, demonstrated long-term stable performance, and high fuel efficiencies.

  12. Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Pem Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells using various types of Nafion membranes as the solid polymer electrolyte have been studied. The rate of fuel crossover and electrical performance has been measured for cells with Nafion membranes of various thicknesses and equivalent weights. The crossover rate is found to decrease with increasing thickness and applied current. The dependence of crossover rate on current density can be understood in terms of a simple linear diffusion model which suggests that the crossover rate can be influenced by the electrode structure in addition to the membrane. The studies suggest that Nafion EW 1500 is a very promising alternate to Nafion EW 1100 for direct methanol fuel cells.

  13. Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Pem Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells using various types of Nafion membranes as the solid polymer electrolyte have been studied. The rate of fuel crossover and electrical performance has been measured for cells with Nafion membranes of various thicknesses and equivalent weights. The crossover rate is found to decrease with increasing thickness and applied current. The dependence of crossover rate on current density can be understood in terms of a simple linear diffusion model which suggests that the crossover rate can be influenced by the electrode structure in addition to the membrane. The studies suggest that Nafion EW 1500 is a very promising alternate to Nafion EW 1100 for direct methanol fuel cells.

  14. Performance of direct methanol polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dong Ryul; Jung, Doo Hwan; Lee, Chang Hyeong; Chun, Young Gab

    1996-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) using polymer electrolyte membrane are promising candidate for application of portable power sources and transportation applications because they do not require any fuel processing equipment and can be operated at low temperature of 60{degrees}C - 130{degrees}C. Elimination of the fuel processor results in simpler design, higher operation reliability, lower weight volume, and lower capital and operating cost. However, methanol as a fuel is relatively electrochemical inert, so that kinetics of the methanol oxidation is too slow. Platinum and Pt-based binary alloy electrodes have been extensively studied for methanol electro-oxidation in acid electrolyte at ambient and elevated temperatures. Particularly, unsupported carbon Pt-Ru catalyst was found to be superior to the anode of DMFC using a proton exchange membrane electrolyte (Nafion). The objective of this study is to develop the high performance DNTC. This paper summarizes the results from half cell and single cell tests, which focus on the electrode manufacturing process, catalyst selection, and operating conditions of single cell such as methanol concentration, temperature and pressure.

  15. Low Crossover Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, G. K. Surya; Smart, Marshall; Atti, Anthony R.; Olah, George A.; Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T.; Surampudi, S.

    1996-01-01

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC's) using polymer electrolyte membranes are promising power sources for portable and vehicular applications. State of the art technology using Nafion(R) 117 membranes (Dupont) are limited by high methanol permeability and cost, resulting in reduced fuel cell efficiencies and impractical commercialization. Therefore, much research in the fuel cell field is focused on the preparation and testing of low crossover and cost efficient polymer electrolyte membranes. The University of Southern California in cooperation with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is focused on development of such materials. Interpenetrating polymer networks are an effective method used to blend polymer systems without forming chemical links. They provide the ability to modify physical and chemical properties of polymers by optimizing blend compositions. We have developed a novel interpenetrating polymer network based on poly (vinyl - difluoride)/cross-linked polystyrenesulfonic acid polymer composites (PVDF PSSA). Sulfonation of polystyrene accounts for protonic conductivity while the non-polar, PVDF backbone provides structural integrity in addition to methanol rejection. Precursor materials were prepared and analyzed to characterize membrane crystallinity, stability and degree of interpenetration. USC JPL PVDF-PSSA membranes were also characterized to determine methanol permeability, protonic conductivity and sulfur distribution. Membranes were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) and tested for single cell performance. Tests include cell performance over a wide range of temperatures (20 C - 90 C) and cathode conditions (ambient Air/O2). Methanol crossover values are measured in situ using an in-line CO2 analyzer.

  16. Selective anaerobic oxidation of methane enables direct synthesis of methanol.

    PubMed

    Sushkevich, Vitaly L; Palagin, Dennis; Ranocchiari, Marco; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2017-05-05

    Direct functionalization of methane in natural gas remains a key challenge. We present a direct stepwise method for converting methane into methanol with high selectivity (~97%) over a copper-containing zeolite, based on partial oxidation with water. The activation in helium at 673 kelvin (K), followed by consecutive catalyst exposures to 7 bars of methane and then water at 473 K, consistently produced 0.204 mole of CH3OH per mole of copper in zeolite. Isotopic labeling confirmed water as the source of oxygen to regenerate the zeolite active centers and renders methanol desorption energetically favorable. On the basis of in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations, we propose a mechanism involving methane oxidation at Cu(II) oxide active centers, followed by Cu(I) reoxidation by water with concurrent formation of hydrogen. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Performance, methanol tolerance and stability of Fe-aminobenzimidazole derived catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastián, David; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Aricò, Antonino S.; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2016-07-01

    Highly active and durable non-platinum group metals (non-PGM) catalyst based on iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) derived from pyrolyzed Fe-aminobenzimidazole (Fe-ABZIM) was synthesized by sacrificial support method (SSM), and characterized by several physical-chemical techniques: scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In half-cell electrochemical configuration, the Fe-ABZIM catalyst presented a significant improvement of ORR activity with respect to a recently reported non-PGM formulation based on Fe-aminoantipyrine, with an enhancement of half-wave potential of about 85 mV in O2-saturated sulfuric acid solution. To the moment, the gap with respect to a benchmark Pt/C catalyst was about 90 mV. The Fe-ABZIM catalyst showed a remarkably high tolerance to methanol, resulting in superior ORR performance compared to Pt/C at methanol concentrations higher than 0.02 M. In direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) good performances were also obtained. A durability test (100 h) at 90 °C, feeding 5 M methanol, was carried out. A certain decrease of performance was recorded, amounting to -0.20 mW cm-2 h-1 at the very beginning of test and -0.05 mW cm-2 h-1 at the end. However, the Fe-ABZIM is more adequate than previously reported formulations in terms of both ORR activity and stability.

  18. Direct methanol feed fuel cell with reduced catalyst loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Improvements to direct feed methanol fuel cells include new protocols for component formation. Catalyst-water repellent material is applied in formation of electrodes and sintered before application of ionomer. A membrane used in formation of an electrode assembly is specially pre-treated to improve bonding between catalyst and membrane. The improved electrode and the pre-treated membrane are assembled into a membrane electrode assembly.

  19. Recent advances in high-performance direct methanol fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, S.R.; Chun, W.; Valdez, T.I.

    1996-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications have been advanced significantly under DARPA- and ARO-sponsored programs over the last five years. A liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell developed under these programs, employs a proton exchange membrane as electrolyte and operates on aqueous solutions of methanol with air or oxygen as the oxidant. Power densities as high as 320 mW/cm{sup 2} have been demonstrated. Demonstration of five-cell stack based on the liquid-feed concept have been successfully performed by Giner Inc. and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Over 2000 hours of life-testing have been completed on these stacks. These fuel cells have been also been demonstrated by USC to operate on alternate fuels such as trimethoxymethane, dimethoxymethane and trioxane. Reduction in the parasitic loss of fuel across the fuel cell, a phenomenon termed as {open_quotes}fuel crossover{close_quotes} has been achieved using polymer membranes developed at USC. As a result efficiencies as high as 40% is considered attainable with this type of fuel cell. The state-of-development has reached a point where it is now been actively considered for stationary, portable and transportation applications. The research and development issues have been the subject of several previous articles and the present article is an attempt to summarize the key advances in this technology.

  20. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, John C.; Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  1. Novel anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Basri, S; Kamarudin, S K; Daud, W R W; Yaakob, Z; Kadhum, A A H

    2014-01-01

    PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe). Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA) tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2-5 nm) PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g(-1) catalyst.

  2. Ultrasonic radiation to enable improvement of direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaoqun; Wu, Jiang; Luo, Hao; Wang, Sanwu; Chen, Tao

    2016-03-01

    To improve DMFC (direct methanol fuel cell) performance, a new method using ultrasonic radiation is proposed and a novel DMFC structure is designed and fabricated in the present paper. Three ultrasonic transducers (piezoelectric transducer, PZT) are integrated in the flow field plate to form the ultrasonic field in the liquid fuel. Ultrasonic frequency, acoustic power, and methanol concentration have been considered as variables in the experiments. With the help of ultrasonic radiation, the maximum output power and limiting current of cell can be independently increased by 30.73% and 40.54%, respectively. The best performance of DMFC is obtained at the condition of ultrasonic radiation (30 kHz and 4 W) fed with 2M methanol solution, because both its limiting current and output power reach their maximum value simultaneously (222 mA and 33.6 mW, respectively) under this condition. These results conclude that ultrasonic can be an alternative choice for improving the cell performance, and can facilitate a guideline for the optimization of DMFC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Basri, S.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Daud, W. R. W.; Yaakob, Z.; Kadhum, A. A. H.

    2014-01-01

    PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe). Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA) tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2–5 nm) PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g−1 catalyst. PMID:24883406

  4. New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, Radoslav

    1998-08-01

    A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- sr¡pported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

  5. Mass balance research for high electrochemical performance direct methanol fuel cells with reduced methanol crossover at various operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Kang, SangKyun; Sauk, Jun-Ho; Song, Inseob

    Mass balance research in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) provides a more practical method in characterizing the mass transport phenomena in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA). This method can be used to measure methanol utilization efficiency, water transport coefficient (WTC), and methanol to electricity conversion rate of a MEA in DMFCs. First, the vital design parameters of a MEA are recognized for achieving high methanol utilization efficiency with increased power density. In particular, the structural adjustment of anode diffusion layer by adding microporous layer (MPL) is a very effective way to decrease WTC with reduced methanol crossover due to the mass transfer limitation in the anode. On the other hand, the cathode MPL in the MEA design can contribute in decreasing methanol crossover. The change of structure of cathode diffusion layer is also found to be a very effective way in improving power density. In contrast, the WTC of DMFC MEAs remains virtually constant in the range of 3.4 and 3.6 irrespective of the change of the cathode GDL. The influence of operating condition on the methanol utilization efficiency, WTC, and methanol to electricity conversion rate is also presented and it is found that these mass balance properties are strongly affected by temperature, current density, methanol concentration, and the stoichiometry of fuel and air.

  6. Bifunctional activation of a direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikovsky, A. A.; Schmitz, H.; Wippermann, K.; Mergel, J.; Fricke, B.; Sanders, T.; Sauer, D. U.

    We report a novel method for performance recovery of direct methanol fuel cells. Lowering of air flow rate below a critical value turns the cell into bifunctional regime, when the oxygen-rich part of the cell generates current while the rest part works in electrolysis mode (electrolytic domain). Upon restoring the normal (super-critical) air flow rate, the galvanic performance of the electrolytic domain increases. This recovery effect is presumably attributed to Pt surface cleaning on the cathode with the simultaneous increase in catalyst utilization on the anode.

  7. An algebraic model on the performance of a direct methanol fuel cell with consideration of methanol crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ken-Ming

    An algebraic one-dimensional model on the membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is proposed. Non-linear regression procedure was imposed on the model to retrieve important parameters: solid polymer electrolyte conductivity κ m, exchange current density of methanol electro-oxidation at anode catalyst surface i oM,ref, and mass diffusivity of methanol in aqueous phase within the porous electrode D a that correspond to the experimentally measured polarization curves. Although numerical iteration is required for a complete solution, the explicit relationships of methanol concentration, methanol crossover rate, oxygen concentration and cell discharge current density do provide a clear picture of the mass transport and electrochemical kinetics within the various porous media in the MEA. It is shown the cathode mixed potential induced by the parallel reactions of oxygen reduction and oxidation of crossover methanol elucidates the potential drop of the cathode and the decrease of the cell open circuit voltage (OCV). Methanol transport in the membrane is described by the diffusion, electro-osmosis, and pressure induced convection. Detailed accounts of the effects of anode methanol and cathode oxygen feed concentrations on the cell discharge performance are given with correlation to the physical structure and chemical compositions of the catalyst layers (CLs).

  8. Methanol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methanol ; CASRN 67 - 56 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in IRIS only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data by U.S . EPA health scientists from several program offices , regional offices , and the Office of Research and Development . Sections I ( H

  9. Improved Anode for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    A modified chemical composition has been devised to improve the performance of the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell. The main feature of the modified composition is the incorporation of hydrous ruthenium oxide into the anode structure. This modification can reduce the internal electrical resistance of the cell and increase the degree of utilization of the anode catalyst. As a result, a higher anode current density can be sustained with a smaller amount of anode catalyst. These improvements can translate into a smaller fuel-cell system and higher efficiency of conversion. Some background information is helpful for understanding the benefit afforded by the addition of hydrous ruthenium oxide. The anode of a direct methanol fuel cell sustains the electro-oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide in the reaction CH3OH + H2O--->CO2 + 6H(+) + 6e(-). An electrocatalyst is needed to enable this reaction to occur. The catalyst that offers the highest activity is an alloy of approximately equal numbers of atoms of the noble metals platinum and ruthenium. The anode is made of a composite material that includes high-surface-area Pt/Ru alloy particles and a proton-conducting ionomeric material. This composite is usually deposited onto a polymer-electrolyte (proton-conducting) membrane and onto an anode gas-diffusion/current-collector sheet that is subsequently bonded to the proton-conducting membrane by hot pressing. Heretofore, the areal density of noble-metal catalyst typically needed for high performance has been about 8 mg/cm2. However, not all of the catalyst has been utilized in the catalyzed electro-oxidation reaction. Increasing the degree of utilization of the catalyst would make it possible to improve the performance of the cell for a given catalyst loading and/or reduce the catalyst loading (thereby reducing the cost of the cell). The use of carbon and possibly other electronic conductors in the catalyst layer has been proposed for increasing the utilization of the

  10. Laser direct marking applied to rasterizing miniature Data Matrix Code on aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia-Shuang; He, Wei-Ping; Lei, Lei; Wang, Jian; Guo, Gai-Fang; Zhang, Teng-Yun; Yue, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Precise miniaturization of 2D Data Matrix (DM) Codes on Aluminum alloy formed by raster mode laser direct part marking is demonstrated. The characteristic edge over-burn effects, which render vector mode laser direct part marking inadequate for producing precise and readable miniature codes, are minimized with raster mode laser marking. To obtain the control mechanism for the contrast and print growth of miniature DM code by raster laser marking process, the temperature field model of long pulse laser interaction with material is established. From the experimental results, laser average power and Q frequency have an important effect on the contrast and print growth of miniature DM code, and the threshold of laser average power and Q frequency for an identifiable miniature DM code are respectively 3.6 W and 110 kHz, which matches the model well within normal operating conditions. In addition, the empirical model of correlation occurring between laser marking parameters and module size is also obtained, and the optimal processing parameter values for an identifiable miniature DM code of different but certain data size are given. It is also found that an increase of the repeat scanning number effectively improves the surface finish of bore, the appearance consistency of modules, which has benefit to reading. The reading quality of miniature DM code is greatly improved using ultrasonic cleaning in water by avoiding the interference of color speckles surrounding modules.

  11. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

    2009-07-07

    This report is the final technical report for DOE Program DE-FC36-04GO14301 titled “Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications”. Due to the public nature of this report some of the content reported in confidential reports and meetings to the DOE is not covered in detail in this report and some of the content has been normalized to not show actual values. There is a comparison of the projects accomplishments with the objectives, an overview of some of the key subsystem work, and a review of the three levels of prototypes demonstrated during the program. There is also a description of the eventual commercial product and market this work is leading towards. The work completed under this program has significantly increased the understanding of how Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) can be deployed successfully to power consumer electronic devices. The prototype testing has demonstrated the benefits a direct methanol fuel cell system has over batteries typically used for powering consumer electronic devices. Three generations of prototypes have been developed and tested for performance, robustness and life. The technologies researched and utilized in the fuel cell stack and related subsystems for these prototypes are leveraged from advances in other industries such as the hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell industry. The work under this program advanced the state of the art of direct methanol fuel cells. The system developed by MTI micro fuel cells aided by this program differs significantly from conventional DMFC designs and offers compelling advantages in the areas of performance, life, size, and simplicity. The program has progressed as planned resulting in the completion of the scope of work and available funding in December 2008. All 18 of the final P3 prototypes builds have been tested and the results showed significant improvements over P2 prototypes in build yield, initial performance, and durability. The systems have

  12. Thin Film Catalyst Layers for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witham, C. K.; Chun, W.; Ruiz, R.; Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary obstacles to the widespread use of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of the catalyst. Therefore, reducing the catalyst loading well below the current level of 8-12 mg/cm 2 would be important to commercialization. The current methods for preparation of catalyst layers consisting of catalyst, ionomer and sometimes a hydrophobic additive are applied by either painting, spraying, decal transfer or screen printing processes. Sputter deposition is a coating technique widely used in manufacturing and therefore particularly attractive. In this study we have begun to explore sputtering as a method for catalyst deposition. Present experiments focus on Pt-Ru catalyst layers for the anode.

  13. Performance evaluation of direct methanol fuel cells for portable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, R.; Dincer, I.; Naterer, G. F.; Berg, P.

    This study examines the feasibility of powering a range of portable devices with a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The analysis includes a comparison between a Li-ion battery and DMFC to supply the power for a laptop, camcorder and a cell phone. A parametric study of the systems for an operational period of 4 years is performed. Under the assumptions made for both the Li-ion battery and DMFC system, the battery cost is lower than the DMFC during the first year of operation. However, by the end of 4 years of operational time, the DMFC system would cost less. The weight and cost comparisons show that the fuel cell system occupies less space than the battery to store a higher amount of energy. The weight of both systems is almost identical. Finally, the CO 2 emissions can be decreased by a higher exergetic efficiency of the DMFC, which leads to improved sustainability.

  14. Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been

  15. A miniaturized adaptive microphone array under directional constraint utilizing aggregated microphones.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a miniaturized microphone array using the Directionally Constrained Minimization of Power (DCMP) method, which utilizes the transfer functions of microphones located at the same place, namely aggregated microphones. The phased microphone array realizes a noise reduction and direction of arrival (DOA) estimation system according to differences in the arrival time, phase shift, and/or the level of the sound wave for each microphone. Hence it is difficult to miniaturize the microphone array. The objective of our research is to miniaturize the system size using aggregated microphones. In this paper, we first show that the phased microphone array system and the proposed aggregated microphone system can be described within the same framework. We then apply a microphone array under directional constraint to the aggregated microphones and compare the proposed method with the microphone array. We show the directional pattern of the aggregated microphones. We also show the experimental results regarding DOA estimation.

  16. Effect of pervaporation plate thickness on the rate of methanol evaporation in a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzi, N. F. I.; Hasran, U. A.; Kamarudin, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    In a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), methanol vapor is typically obtained using a pervaporation plate in a process by which liquid methanol contained in the fuel reservoir undergoes a phase change to vapor in the anodic vapor chamber. This work investigates the effect of pervaporation plate thickness on the rate of methanol evaporation using a three-dimensional simulation model developed by varying the plate thickness. A. The rate of methanol evaporation was measured using Darcy's law. The rate of methanol evaporation was found to be inversely proportional to the plate thickness, where the decrease in thickness inevitably lowers the resistance along the plate and consequently increases the methanol transport through the plate. This shows that the plate thickness has a significant influence on the rate of methanol evaporation and thereby plays an important role in improving the performance of the passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell.

  17. A Critical Assessment of the Direct Catalytic Oxidation of Methane to Methanol.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Manoj; Ranocchiari, Marco; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2017-06-23

    Despite the emerging number of disparate approaches for the direct selective partial oxidation of methane, none of them has translated into an industrial process. The oxidation of methane to methanol is a difficult yet intriguing and rewarding task as it has the potential to eliminate the prevalent natural gas flaring by providing novel routes to its valorisation. This review considers the synthesis of methanol and methanol derivatives from methane by homogeneous and heterogeneous pathways. In establishing the severe limitations related to the direct catalytic synthesis of methanol from methane, we highlight the vastly superior performance of systems, which produce methanol derivatives or incorporate specific measures such as the use of multi-component catalysts to stabilise methanol. We thereby identify methanol protection as being indispensable in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis with regard to future research on this topic. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Nano-Engineered Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myung, Nosang; Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Wiberg, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Nano-engineered catalysts, and a method of fabricating them, have been developed in a continuing effort to improve the performances of direct methanol fuel cells as candidate power sources to supplant primary and secondary batteries in a variety of portable electronic products. In order to realize the potential for high energy densities (as much as 1.5 W h/g) of direct methanol fuel cells, it will be necessary to optimize the chemical compositions and geometric configurations of catalyst layers and electrode structures. High performance can be achieved when catalyst particles and electrode structures have the necessary small feature sizes (typically of the order of nanometers), large surface areas, optimal metal compositions, high porosity, and hydrophobicity. The present method involves electrodeposition of one or more catalytic metal(s) or a catalytic-metal/polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite on an alumina nanotemplate. The alumina nanotemplate is then dissolved, leaving the desired metal or metal/polytetrafluoroethylene-composite catalyst layer. Unlike some prior methods of making fine metal catalysts, this method does not involve processing at elevated temperature; all processing can be done at room temperature. In addition, this method involves fewer steps and is more amenable to scaling up for mass production. Alumina nanotemplates are porous alumina membranes that have been fabricated, variously, by anodizing either pure aluminum or aluminum that has been deposited on silicon by electronbeam evaporation. The diameters of the pores (7 to 300 nm), areal densities of pores (as much as 7 x 10(exp 10)sq cm), and lengths of pores (up to about 100 nm) can be tailored by selection of fabrication conditions. In a given case, the catalytic metal, catalytic metal alloy, or catalytic metal/ polytetrafluoroethylene composite is electrodeposited in the pores of the alumina nanotemplate. The dimensions of the pores, together with the electrodeposition conditions

  19. A passive fuel delivery system for portable direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Cao, Y.

    A passive device is utilized for transferring methanol into water through a wick material. The wick material preferentially has a higher wicking capability with respect to methanol than water, and operates in a siphon fashion with the intake end in contact with methanol and the discharge end in contact with water. Due to the difference of wicking capabilities, a net amount of methanol is pumped into water. The device described above is used as a fuel delivery component for a liquid-feed fuel cell system, such as a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), which directly utilizes a liquid fuel without an intermediate reforming process. In the present experimental study, methanol and water are stored separately in two containers and a wick is positioned between the containers as a siphon, with the aqueous methanol solution communicating with the anode of the DMFC. Methanol is siphoned from the methanol container to the water container in situ when the methanol in the water is consumed during the operation of the fuel cell. Through a proper selection of the wick and the containers, the methanol concentration near the anode of the DMFC was maintained within a preferred range.

  20. Capillary siphons and their application in the fuel delivery system of direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhen

    The objective of the work is to develop a fuel delivery system for potable direct methanol fuel cell. Currently, one of the most fundamental limitations of direct methanol fuel cells is that the fuel supplied to the anode of the DMFC must be a very dilute aqueous methanol solution (usually 0.5˜1.5 M). If a DMFC is filled with a dilute aqueous methanol solution, the fuel cell operation time per refuel would be very short, which would considerably diminish the advantage of a DMFC over a conventional battery. To overcome this difficulty, a complex fuel delivery system based on the modern micro system technology was proposed by the author. The proposed fuel delivery system would include micro-pumps, a methanol sensor, and a control unit. The fuel delivery system adds considerable costs to the fuel cell system and consume considerable amount of electricity from the fuel cell, which in turn significantly reduces the net power output of the fuel cell. As a result, the DMFC would have tremendous difficulty to compete with the conventional battery technology in terms of costs and power output. This work presents a novel passive fuel delivery system for direct methanol fuel cells. In this particular system, a methanol fuel and an aqueous methanol solution are stored separately in two containers and a wick is disposed between the two containers in a siphon fashion, with the container of the aqueous methanol solution communicating with the anode of the DMFC. Methanol is siphoned from the methanol container to the aqueous solution container in-situ when the methanol in the aqueous methanol solution is consumed during the operation of the fuel cell. Through a proper selection of the wick and the containers, the methanol concentration near the anode of the DMFC could be maintained within a preferable range.

  1. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2012-09-12

    While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

  2. Wire mesh current collectors for passive direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Naveen K.; Thombre, Shashikant B.; Motghare, Ramani V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of the stainless steel wire mesh as current collector in the passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFCs-W). A novel single cell fixture is designed and fabricated. The cell performance is evaluated and compared with five different wire mesh current collectors. The supporting plates are optimized for every mesh. The performance of DMFCs-W is compared with the conventional passive DMFC which uses perforated metal plate as current collector (DMFC-P). The polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are performed to investigate the different aspects of the cell performance. The results reveal that the DMFCs-W yield better performance than the DMFC-P. Also, more uniform fuel distribution at catalyst layer and higher cell temperature is achieved with wire mesh current collectors. It is found that the wire mesh geometry has significant effect on the cell performance and the mesh made of relatively thick wires gives better cell performance. This study identifies the stainless steel wire mesh as promising material to be used as current collector and potential substitute to the perforated plate current collectors in the passive DMFC.

  3. Direct Analysis of Organic Compounds in Liquid Using a Miniature Photoionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer with Pulsed Carrier-Gas Capillary Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinqiong; Yu, Quan; Zhang, Qian; Ni, Kai; Qian, Xiang; Tang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohao

    2017-08-01

    A miniature ion trap mass spectrometer with capillary direct sampling and vacuum ultraviolet photoionization source was developed to conduct trace analysis of organic compounds in liquids. Self-aspiration sampling is available where the samples are drawn into the vacuum chamber through a capillary with an extremely low flow rate (less than 1 μL/min), which minimizes sample consumption in each analysis to tens of micrograms. A pulsed gas-assisted inlet was designed and optimized to promote sample transmission in the tube and facilitate the cooling of ions, thereby improving instrument sensitivity. A limit of detection of 2 ppb could be achieved for 2,4-dimethylaniline in a methanol solution. The sampling system described in the present study is specifically suitable for a miniature photoionization ion trap mass spectrometer that can perform rapid and online analysis for liquid samples.

  4. A monolayer graphene - Nafion sandwich membrane for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. H.; Wu, Ruizhe; Xu, J. B.; Luo, Zhengtang; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    Methanol crossover due to the low selectivity of proton exchange membranes is a long-standing issue in direct methanol fuel cell technology. Here we attempt to address this issue by designing a composite membrane fabricated by sandwiching a monolayer graphene between two thin Nafion membranes to take advantage of monolayer graphene's selective permeability to only protons. The methanol permeability of the present membrane is demonstrated to have a 68.6% decrease in comparison to that of the pristine Nafion membrane. The test in a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) shows that the designed membrane retains high proton conductivity while substantially suppressing methanol crossover. As a result, the present membrane enables the passive DMFC to exhibit a decent performance even at a methanol concentration as high as 10.0 M.

  5. Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Ferrin, Peter A.; Tritsaris, Georgios A.; Nilekar, Anand U.; Koh, Shirlaine; Bae, Sang Eun; Brankovic, Stanko R.; Strasser, Peter; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2012-06-13

    Using the binding energy of OH* and CO* on close-packed surfaces as reactivity descriptors, we screen bulk and surface alloy catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation activity. Using these two descriptors, we illustrate that a good methanol electro-oxidation catalyst must have three key properties: (1) the ability to activate methanol, (2) the ability to activate water, and (3) the ability to react off surface intermediates (such as CO* and OH*). Based on this analysis, an alloy catalyst made up of Cu and Pt should have a synergistic effect facilitating the activity towards methanol electro-oxidation. Using these two reactivity descriptors, a surface PtCu3 alloy is proposed to have the best catalytic properties of the Pt–Cu model catalysts tested, similar to those of a Pt–Ru bulk alloy. To validate the model, experiments on a Pt(111) surface modified with different amounts of Cu adatoms are performed. Adding Cu to a Pt(111) surface increases the methanol oxidation current by more than a factor of three, supporting our theoretical predictions for improved electrocatalysts.

  6. Miniature Flow-Direction/Pitot-Static Pressure Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Coombs, David S.; Eves, John W.; Price, Howard E.; Vasquez, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Precision flow-direction/pitot-static pressure probes, ranging from 0.035 to 0.090 inch (0.89 to 2.29 mm) in outside diameter, successfully fabricated and calibrated for use in Langley 20-inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Probes simultaneously measure flow direction and static and pitot pressures in flow fields about configurations in hypersonic flow at temperatures up to 500 degree F (260 degree C).

  7. Miniature Flow-Direction/Pitot-Static Pressure Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Coombs, David S.; Eves, John W.; Price, Howard E.; Vasquez, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Precision flow-direction/pitot-static pressure probes, ranging from 0.035 to 0.090 inch (0.89 to 2.29 mm) in outside diameter, successfully fabricated and calibrated for use in Langley 20-inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Probes simultaneously measure flow direction and static and pitot pressures in flow fields about configurations in hypersonic flow at temperatures up to 500 degree F (260 degree C).

  8. Bio-Inspired Miniature Direction Finding Acoustic Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wilmott, Daniel; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2016-01-01

    A narrowband MEMS direction finding sensor has been developed based on the mechanically coupled ears of the Ormia Ochracea fly. The sensor consists of two wings coupled at the middle and attached to a substrate using two legs. The sensor operates at its bending resonance frequency and has cosine directional characteristics similar to that of a pressure gradient microphone. Thus, the directional response of the sensor is symmetric about the normal axis making the determination of the direction ambiguous. To overcome this shortcoming two sensors were assembled with a canted angle similar to that employed in radar bearing locators. The outputs of two sensors were processed together allowing direction finding with no requirement of knowing the incident sound pressure level. At the bending resonant frequency of the sensors (1.69 kHz) an output voltage of about 25 V/Pa was measured. The angle uncertainty of the bearing of sound ranged from less than 0.3° close to the normal axis (0°) to 3.4° at the limits of coverage (±60°) based on the 30° canted angle used. These findings indicate the great potential to use dual MEMS direction finding sensor assemblies to locate sound sources with high accuracy. PMID:27440657

  9. Bio-Inspired Miniature Direction Finding Acoustic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Wilmott, Daniel; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2016-07-21

    A narrowband MEMS direction finding sensor has been developed based on the mechanically coupled ears of the Ormia Ochracea fly. The sensor consists of two wings coupled at the middle and attached to a substrate using two legs. The sensor operates at its bending resonance frequency and has cosine directional characteristics similar to that of a pressure gradient microphone. Thus, the directional response of the sensor is symmetric about the normal axis making the determination of the direction ambiguous. To overcome this shortcoming two sensors were assembled with a canted angle similar to that employed in radar bearing locators. The outputs of two sensors were processed together allowing direction finding with no requirement of knowing the incident sound pressure level. At the bending resonant frequency of the sensors (1.69 kHz) an output voltage of about 25 V/Pa was measured. The angle uncertainty of the bearing of sound ranged from less than 0.3° close to the normal axis (0°) to 3.4° at the limits of coverage (±60°) based on the 30° canted angle used. These findings indicate the great potential to use dual MEMS direction finding sensor assemblies to locate sound sources with high accuracy.

  10. Bio-Inspired Miniature Direction Finding Acoustic Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmott, Daniel; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2016-07-01

    A narrowband MEMS direction finding sensor has been developed based on the mechanically coupled ears of the Ormia Ochracea fly. The sensor consists of two wings coupled at the middle and attached to a substrate using two legs. The sensor operates at its bending resonance frequency and has cosine directional characteristics similar to that of a pressure gradient microphone. Thus, the directional response of the sensor is symmetric about the normal axis making the determination of the direction ambiguous. To overcome this shortcoming two sensors were assembled with a canted angle similar to that employed in radar bearing locators. The outputs of two sensors were processed together allowing direction finding with no requirement of knowing the incident sound pressure level. At the bending resonant frequency of the sensors (1.69 kHz) an output voltage of about 25 V/Pa was measured. The angle uncertainty of the bearing of sound ranged from less than 0.3° close to the normal axis (0°) to 3.4° at the limits of coverage (±60°) based on the 30° canted angle used. These findings indicate the great potential to use dual MEMS direction finding sensor assemblies to locate sound sources with high accuracy.

  11. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:26578100

  12. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells.

  13. Materials and Manufacturing Challenges of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-27

    conditions. The oxygen reduction reaction is a common process for both DMFCs and proton exchange membrane fuel cells ( PEMFCs ) operating with hydrogen fuel...However, the much slower oxidation of methanol in DMFCs, compared to that of hydrogen in PEMFCs , together with a poisoning of the cathode Pt...electrocatalyst† results in a low operating voltage for a DMFC compared to that of a PEMFC . Although Pt is used for the oxidation of hydrogen fuel in a PEMFC

  14. Laser-induced forward transfer direct-write of miniature sensor and microbattery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pique, Alberto; Arnold, Craig B.; Wartena, Ryan C.; Weir, David W.; Pratap, Bhanu; Swider-Lyons, Karen E.; Kant, Richard A.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2003-02-01

    Direct-Write techniques have the potential to revolutionize the way miniature sensor devices and microbattery systems are designed and fabricated. The Naval Research Laboratory has developed an advanced laser-based forward transfer process for direct writing novel structures and devices comprising of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites under ambient conditions on both ceramic and plastic substrates. Using this forward transfer technique, we have demonstrated the ability to rapidly prototype various types of physical and chemical sensor devices, and microbatteries. The laser forward transfer process is computer controlled which allows the design of the devices to be easily modified and adapted to any specific application. Furthermore, the same process enables the fabrication of complete sensor or power-source systems by incorporating the passive electronic components required for sensor readout or power management. Examples are provided of various types of miniature sensors, and prototype alkaline and Li-ion microbatteries fabricated using this technique.

  15. Design and fabrication of a magnetic fluid micropump for applications in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shi-Min; Kuan, Yean-Der; Sung, Min-Feng

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are widely considered to have great potential for portable electric applications, and the power requirements for many of them are only a few watts. Therefore, a low power liquid pump is especially desirable for driving the methanol solution fuel for an active direct methanol fuel. The main objective of this paper is to design and fabricate a magnetic fluid micropump that has characteristics of low operation voltage and current and is suitable for use in DMFCs. Two prototypes were developed and tested. The magnetic fluid micropumps are successfully applied to drive the fuel to a DMFC, and measurements of the cell performance are also conducted.

  16. A small mono-polar direct methanol fuel cell stack with passive operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. H.; Zhao, T. S.; Chen, R.; Xu, C.

    A passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) stack that consists of six unit cells was designed, fabricated, and tested. The stack was tested with different methanol concentrations under ambient conditions. It was found that the stack performance increased when the methanol concentration inside the fuel tank was increased from 2.0 to 6.0 M. The improved performance is primarily due to the increased cell temperature as a result of the exothermic reaction between the permeated methanol and oxygen on the cathode. Moreover, the increased cell temperature enhanced the water evaporation rate on the air-breathing cathode, which significantly reduced water flooding on the cathode and further improved the stack performance. This passive DMFC stack, providing 350 mW at 1.8 V, was successfully applied to power a seagull display kit. The seagull display kit can continuously run for about 4 h on a single charge of 25 cm 3 4.0-M methanol solution.

  17. A simple preparation of very high methanol tolerant cathode electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cell based on polymer-coated carbon nanotube/platinum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zehui; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The development of a durable and methanol tolerant electrocatalyst with a high oxygen reduction reaction activity is highly important for the cathode side of direct methanol fuel cells. Here, we describe a simple and novel methodology to fabricate a practically applicable electrocatalyst with a high methanol tolerance based on poly[2,2′-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5′-bibenzimidazole]-wrapped multi-walled carbon nanotubes, on which Pt nanoparticles have been deposited, then coated with poly(vinylphosphonic acid) (PVPA). The polymer coated electrocatalyst showed an ~3.3 times higher oxygen reduction reaction activity compared to that of the commercial CB/Pt and methanol tolerance in the presence of methanol to the electrolyte due to a 50% decreased methanol adsorption on the Pt after coating with the PVPA. Meanwhile, the peroxide generation of the PVPA coated electrocatalyst was as low as 0.8% with 2 M methanol added to the electrolyte, which was much lower than those of the non-PVPA-coated electrocatalyst (7.5%) and conventional CB/Pt (20.5%). Such a high methanol tolerance is very important for the design of a direct methanol fuel cell cathode electrocatalyst with a high performance. PMID:26192397

  18. Review on utilization of the pervaporation membrane for passive vapor feed direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzi, N. F. I.; Hasran, U. A.; Kamarudin, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) is a promising portable power source for mobile electronic devices because of its advantages including easy fuel storage, high energy density, low temperature operation and compact structure. In DMFC, methanol is used as a fuel source where it can be fed in liquid or vapor phase. However, the vapor feed DMFC has an advantage over the liquid feed system as it has the potential to have a higher operating temperature to increase the reaction rates and power outputs, to enhance the mass transfers, to reduce methanol crossover, reliable for high methanol concentration and it can increase the fuel cell performance. Methanol vapor can be delivered to the anode by using a pervaporation membrane, heating the liquid methanol or another method that compatible. Therefore, this paper is a review on vapor feed DMFC as a better energy source than liquid feed DMFC, the pervaporation membrane used to vaporize methanol feed from the reservoir and its applications in vapor feed DMFC.

  19. Froghopper-inspired direction-changing concept for miniature jumping robots.

    PubMed

    Jung, Gwang-Pil; Cho, Kyu-Jin

    2016-09-14

    To improve the maneuverability and agility of jumping robots, several researchers have studied steerable jumping mechanisms. This steering ability enables robots to reach a particular target by controlling their jumping direction. To this end, we propose a novel direction-changing concept for miniature jumping robots. The proposed concept allows robots to be steerable while exerting minimal effects on jumping performance. The key design principles were adopted from the froghopper's power-producing hind legs and the moment cancellation accomplished by synchronized leg operation. These principles were applied via a pair of symmetrically positioned legs and conventional gears, which were modeled on the froghopper's anatomy. Each leg has its own thrusting energy, which improves jumping performance by allowing the mechanism to thrust itself with both power-producing legs. Conventional gears were utilized to simultaneously operate the legs and cancel out the moments that they induce, which minimizes body spin. A prototype to verify the concept was built and tested by varying the initial jumping posture. Three jumping postures (synchronous, asynchronous, and single-legged) were tested to investigate how synchronization and moment cancelling affect jumping performance. The results show that synchronous jumping allows the mechanism to change direction from -40° to 40°, with an improved take-off speed. The proposed concept can only be steered in a limited range of directions, but it has potential for use in miniature jumping robots that can change jumping direction with a minimal drop in jumping performance.

  20. Sulfonated polyphosphazene-based membranes for use in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Roy Lee

    Novel crosslinked and sulfonated poly[bis(3-methylphenoxy)phosphazene] blended proton exchange membranes were fabricated for use as the solid polymer electrolyte in a direct methanol fuel cell. Three polymers, polybenzimidazole, polyacrylonitrile and polyvinylidene fluoride-co-polyhexafluoropropylene were found to be compatible for blending with sulfonated polyphosphazene. A combination of blending and crosslinking was shown to be an effective method of producing durable, low water swelling films with acceptable proton conductivity. A novel tracer-diffusion 1H NMR method was developed and used to measure the mutual diffusion of methanol in non-crosslinked and crosslinked membranes composed of sulfonated polyphosphazene. The technique measures the growth of a solute NMR signal in the bulk (external) solution as it diffuses out of a thin film membrane. The transient increase in methanol peak height during analyte (methanol) desorption was fitted to a simple theoretical diffusion model using the methanol diffusion coefficient as an adjustable parameter. This method was found to be fast, reproducible, and accurate to within about +/-20%. Diffusion coefficients at 25°C were in the range of 1.0 x 10-8 cm2/s to 4.0 x 10-7 cm2/s for methanol concentrations of 1.0--5.0 M and were significantly smaller than those reported for a NafionRTM perfluorosulfonic acid membrane. Direct liquid methanol fuel cell tests were performed with membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) fabricated with polyphosphazene-based proton-exchange membranes. MEAs worked best when high ion-exchange capacity (high conductivity) polyphosphazene membrane contacted the electrodes, in which case the fuel cell power output was nearly the same as that with Nafion 117 (for current densities ≤0.15 A/cm2), but the methanol crossover was three times lower than that of Nafion. The electrochemical performance of single-membrane MEAs with low conductivity S-POP/PAN films was poor, although the methanol crossover was

  1. Polymeric nanocomposite proton exchange membranes prepared by radiation-induced polymerization for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Seok; Seo, Kwang-Seok; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The vinyl group-modified montmorillonite clay (F-MMT), vinyl group-modified graphene oxide (F-GO), and vinyl group-modified multi-walled carbon nanotube (F-MWNT) were first prepared by ion exchange reaction of 1-[(4-ethylphenyl)methyl]-3-butyl-imidazolium chloride in order to use the materials for protection against methanol cross-over in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) membrane. Then polymeric nanocomposite membranes with F-MMT, F-GO, and F-MWNT were prepared by the solvent casting method after radiation-induced polymerization of vinyl monomers in water-methanol mixture solvents. The proton conductivity, water uptake, ion-exchange capacity, methanol permeability, and DMFC performance of the polymeric nanocomposite membranes with F-MMT, F-GO, and F-MWNT were evaluated.

  2. A miniature condensed-phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS) probe for direct and on-line measurements of pharmaceuticals and contaminants in small, complex samples.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Kyle D; Willis, Megan D; Krogh, Erik T; Gill, Christopher G

    2013-06-15

    High-throughput, automated analytical measurements are desirable in many analytical scenarios, as are rapid sample pre-screening techniques to identify 'positive' samples for subsequent measurements using more time-consuming conventional methodologies (e.g., liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS)). A miniature condensed-phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS) probe for the direct and continuous, on-line measurement of pharmaceuticals and environmental contaminants in small, complex samples is presented. A miniature polydimethylsiloxane hollow fibre membrane (PDMS-HFM) probe is coupled with an electrospray ionization (ESI) triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Analytes are transported from the probe to the ESI source by a methanol acceptor phase. The probe can be autosampler mounted and directly inserted in small samples (≥400 μL) allowing continuous and simultaneous pptr-ppb level detection of target analytes (chlorophenols, triclosan, gemfibrozil, nonylphenol) in complex samples (artificial urine, beer, natural water, waste water, plant tissue). The probe has been characterized and optimized for acceptor phase flow rate, sample mixing and probe washing. Signal response times, detection limits and calibration data are given for selected ion monitoring (SIM) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) measurements of target analytes at trace levels. Comparisons with flow cell type CP-MIMS systems are given. Analyte depletion effects are evaluated for small samples (≥400 μL). On-line measurements in small volumes of complex samples, temporally resolved reaction monitoring and in situ/in vivo demonstrations are presented. The miniature CP-MIMS probe developed was successfully used for the direct, on-line detection of target analytes in small volumes (40 mL to 400 μL) of complex samples at pptr to low ppb levels. The probe can be readily automated as well as deployed for in situ/in vivo monitoring, including reaction monitoring, small sample

  3. Electrode and interconnect for miniature fuel cells using direct methanol feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Clara, Filiberto (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An improved system for interconnects in a fuel cell. In one embodiment, the membranes are located in parallel with one another, and current flow between them is facilitated by interconnects. In another embodiment, all of the current flow is through the interconnects which are located on the membranes. The interconnects are located between two electrodes.

  4. Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in Phase 2 of the program. Progress in these areas is described.

  5. Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, June 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in phase II of the program.

  6. Sol-gel based silica electrodes for inorganic membrane direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyea; Kohl, Paul A.

    Inorganic glass electrodes are of interest for use with inorganic proton exchange membranes for direct methanol fuel cells. Platinum-ruthenium glass electrodes (PtRu/C-SiO 2) have been prepared by incorporating the PtRu/C nanoparticles into a silica-based matrix. The SiO 2 matrix was synthesized through the sol-gel reaction of 3-(trihydroxysilyl)-1-propanesulfonic acid (3TPS) and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The distribution of the PtRu/C particles can be controlled by changing the properties of the gel matrix. The effect of gelation time, mole fraction of reactants within the sol, curing temperature, and glass ionomer content were investigated. The adhesion of the catalyst layer on the membrane, catalytic activity for methanol oxidation, and inhibition of methanol permeation through the membrane have been characterized and optimized. The electroless deposition of PtRu onto the PtRu/C nanoparticles was performed to increase the sheet conductivity of the electrode. It was found that the electrolessly deposited metal improved the catalytic activity for methanol oxidation and decreased the methanol cross-over. The methanol fuel cell performance using the inorganic membrane electrode assembly was 236 μA cm -2 at 0.4 V and was stable for more than 10 days.

  7. Behavioral pattern of a monopolar passive direct methanol fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Bae, Byungchan; Scibioh, M. Aulice; Cho, EunAe; Ha, Heung Yong

    A passive, air-breathing, monopolar, liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) stack consisting of six unit cells with no external pump, fan or auxiliary devices to feed the reactants has been designed and fabricated for its possible employment as a portable power source. The configurations of the stack of monopolar passive feed DMFCs are different from those of bipolar active feed DMFCs and therefore its operational characteristics completely vary from the active ones. Our present investigation primarily focuses on understanding the unique behavioral patterns of monopolar stack under the influence of certain operating conditions, such as temperature, methanol concentration and reactants feeding methods. With passive reactants supply, the temperature of the stack and open circuit voltage (OCV) undergo changes over time due to a decrease in concentration of methanol in the reservoir as the reaction proceeds. Variations in performance and temperature of the stack are mainly influenced by the concentration of methanol. Continuous operation of the passive stack is influenced by the supply of methanol rather than air supply or water accumulation at the cathode. The monopolar stack made up of six unit cells exhibits a total power of 1000 mW (37 mW cm -2) with 4 M methanol under ambient conditions.

  8. Predicting methanol clearance during hemodialysis when direct measurement is not available.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Margo; Carty, Diane; Toffelmire, Edwin B

    2002-01-01

    The appropriate treatment of a patient with methanol intoxication includes the use of a competitive inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase (ethanol, p.o. or i.v., or fomepizole) to prevent the metabolism of methanol to formaldehyde and formic acid. Where available, dialysis can be added to this therapy, since methanol is cleared well by hemodialysis. The ability to predict the time course of methanol elimination in any given patient is an essential factor in planning his or her care. Where the availability of ethanol, bicarbonate, nursing time, or dialysis machines is limited, such predictions can be used to allocate these resources quite accurately within a couple of hours of starting treatment. Even when direct measurement of methanol by gas chromatography is not readily available, its level can be estimated indirectly by a quick and easy method, using available laboratory values. The length of time necessary to clear the methanol below a toxic level can be predicted accurately. Careful interpretation of laboratory values can result in early treatment, correct treatment time, and a positive patient outcome.

  9. Low-Pt-Content Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Whitacre, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Combinatorial experiments have led to the discovery that a nanophase alloy of Pt, Ru, Ni, and Zr is effective as an anode catalyst material for direct methanol fuel cells. This discovery has practical significance in that the electronic current densities achievable by use of this alloy are comparable or larger than those obtained by use of prior Pt/Ru catalyst alloys containing greater amounts of Pt. Heretofore, the high cost of Pt has impeded the commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells. By making it possible to obtain a given level of performance at reduced Pt content (and, hence, lower cost), the discovery may lead to reduction of the economic impediment to commercialization.

  10. Optimizing membrane electrode assembly of direct methanol fuel cells for portable power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuqiang

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) for portable power applications require high power density, high-energy conversion efficiency and compactness. These requirements translate to fundamental properties of high methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction kinetics, as well as low methanol and water crossover. In this thesis a novel membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for direct methanol fuel cells has been developed, aiming to improve these fundamental properties. Firstly, methanol oxidation kinetics has been enhanced and methanol crossover has been minimized by proper control of ionomer crystallinity and its swelling in the anode catalyst layer through heat-treatment. Heat-treatment has a major impact on anode characteristics. The short-cured anode has low ionomer crystallinity, and thus swells easily when in contact with methanol solution to create a much denser anode structure, giving rise to higher methanol transport resistance than the long-cured anode. Variations in interfacial properties in the anode catalyst layer (CL) during cell conditioning were also characterized, and enhanced kinetics of methanol oxidation and severe limiting current phenomenon were found to be caused by a combination of interfacial property variations and swelling of ionomer over time. Secondly, much effort has been expended to develop a cathode CL suitable for operation under low air stoichiometry. The effects of fabrication procedure, ionomer content, and porosity distribution on the microstructure and cathode performance under low air stoichiometry are investigated using electrochemical and surface morphology characterizations to reveal the correlation between microstructure and electrochemical behavior. At the same time, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of DMFC cathodes have been developed to theoretically interpret the experimental results, to investigate two-phase transport, and to elucidate mechanism of cathode mixed potential due to methanol crossover. Thirdly, a MEA with low

  11. Reduction of methanol crossover by thin cracked metal barriers at the interface between membrane and electrode in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungjun; Jang, Segeun; Kim, Sang Moon; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Hwang, Wonchan; Cho, Yong-Hun; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Mansoo

    2017-09-01

    This work reports the successful reduction in methanol crossover by creating a thin cracked metal barrier at the interface between a Nafion® membrane and an electrode in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The cracks are generated by simple mechanical stretching of a metal deposited Nafion® membrane as a result of the elastic mismatch between the two attached surfaces. The cracked metal barriers with varying strains (∼0.5 and ∼1.0) are investigated and successfully incorporated into the DMFC. Remarkably, the membrane electrode assembly with the thin metal crack exhibits comparable ohmic resistance as well as reduction of methanol crossover, which enhanced the device performance.

  12. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cells Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a detailed review of the Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack and investigates the Ruthenium that was found at the exit of the stack. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) Pathways for Cell Degradation; 3) Cell Duration Testing; 4) Duration Testing, MEA Analysis; and 5) Stack Degradation Analysis.

  13. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cells Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a detailed review of the Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack and investigates the Ruthenium that was found at the exit of the stack. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) Pathways for Cell Degradation; 3) Cell Duration Testing; 4) Duration Testing, MEA Analysis; and 5) Stack Degradation Analysis.

  14. In situ synthesis of nanocomposite membranes: comprehensive improvement strategy for direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Rao, Siyuan; Xiu, Ruijie; Si, Jiangju; Lu, Shanfu; Yang, Meng; Xiang, Yan

    2014-03-01

    In situ synthesis is a powerful approach to control nanoparticle formation and consequently confers extraordinary properties upon composite membranes relative to conventional doping methods. Herein, uniform nanoparticles of cesium hydrogen salts of phosphotungstic acid (CsPW) are controllably synthesized in situ in Nafion to form CsPW–Nafion nanocomposite membranes with both improved proton conductivity and methanol-crossover suppression. A 101.3% increase of maximum power density has been achieved relative to pristine Nafion in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), indicating a potential pathway for large-scale fabrication of DMFC alternative membranes.

  15. Performance and modelling of a direct methanol solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, K.; Taama, W.; Cruickshank, J.

    The performance and modelling of a direct methanol fuel cell based on a solid polymer electrolyte membrane (SPE) is reported. Two sizes of cell are used: a small cell with an area of 9 cm 2 and a large single cell with an area of 250 cm 2. The fuel cell utilises a vapourised methanol fuel at a porous carbon/Pt-Ru catalyst electrode. The performance of the fuel cell is affected by the cross-over of methanol from the anode to the cathode through the polymer membrane and this behaviour is modelled. To evaluate cell performance, mathematical models are constructed which describe mass transport in the porous electrode structures and the potential and concentration distributions in the electrode regions. These models are used to predict the cell voltage and current density response of the fuel cell.

  16. Polymer electrolyte direct methanol fuel cells: an option for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gottesfeld, S.; Cleghorn, S.J.C.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, T.A.

    1996-10-01

    PEFCs most frequently considered for electric vehicles have been based on either hydrogen carried aboard, or steam-reforming of methanol on board to produce H2 + CO2. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), which use a liquid methanol fuel feed, completely avoid the complexity and weight penalties of the reformer, but have not been considered a serious option until recently, because of much lower power densities. Recent advances in DMFCs have been dramatic, however, with the DMFC reaching power densities which are significant fractions of those provided by reformate/air fuel cells. Use of established Pt-Ru anode electrocatalysts and Pt cathode electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte DMFCs has resulted in enhanced DMFC performance, particularly when operated above 100 C and when catalyst layer composition and structure are optimized. The higher DMFC power densities recently achieved provide a new basis for considering DMFCs for transportation applications.

  17. A review of polymer electrolyte membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neburchilov, Vladimir; Martin, Jonathan; Wang, Haijiang; Zhang, Jiujun

    This review describes the polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) that are both under development and commercialized for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). Unlike the membranes for hydrogen fuelled PEM fuel cells, among which perfluorosulfonic acid based membranes show complete domination, the membranes for DMFC have numerous variations, each has its advantages and disadvantages. No single membrane is emerging as absolutely superior to others. This review outlines the prospects of the currently known membranes for DMFC. The membranes are evaluated according to various properties, including: methanol crossover, proton conductivity, durability, thermal stability and maximum power density. Hydrocarbon and composite fluorinated membranes currently show the most potential for low cost membranes with low methanol permeability and high durability. Some of these membranes are already beginning to impact the portable fuel cell market.

  18. Three-dimensional anode engineering for the direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Oloman, C. W.; Gyenge, E. L.

    Catalyzed graphite felt three-dimensional anodes were investigated in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operated with sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte. With a conventional serpentine channel flow field the preferred anode thickness was 100 μm, while a novel flow-by anode showed the best performance with a thickness of 200-300 μm. The effects of altering the methanol concentration, anolyte flow rate and operating temperature on the fuel cell superficial power density were studied by full (2 3 + 1) factorial experiments on a cell with anode area of 5 cm 2 and excess oxidant O 2 at 200 kPa(abs). For operation in the flow-by mode with 2 M methanol at 2 cm 3 min -1 and 353 K the peak power density was 2380 W m -2 with a PtRuMo anode catalyst, while a PtRu catalyst yielded 2240 W m -2 under the same conditions.

  19. High-temperature passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with concentrated fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuxin; Yuan, Wenxiang; Wu, Qixing; Sun, Hongyuan; Luo, Zhongkuan; Fu, Huide

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) are fed with diluted methanol solutions and can hardly be operated at elevated temperatures (>120 °C) because the ionic conductivity of Nafion-type proton exchange membranes depends strongly on water content. Such a system design would limit its energy density and power density in mobile applications. In this communication, a passive vapor feed DMFC capable of operating with concentrated fuels at high temperatures is reported. The passive DMFC proposed in this work consists of a fuel reservoir, a perforated silicone sheet, a vapor chamber, two current collectors and a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) based on a phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The experimental results reveal that the methanol crossover through a PBI membrane is substantially low when compared with the Nafion membranes and the PBI-based passive DMFC can yield a peak power density of 37.2 mW cm-2 and 22.1 mW cm-2 at 180 °C when 16 M methanol solutions and neat methanol are used respectively. In addition, the 132 h discharge test indicates that the performance of this new DMFC is quite stable and no obvious performance degradation is observed after activation, showing its promising applications in portable power sources.

  20. On the actual cathode mixed potential in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, M.; Bisello, A.; Baricci, A.; Rabissi, C.; Brightman, E.; Hinds, G.; Casalegno, A.

    2016-09-01

    Methanol crossover is one of the most critical issues hindering commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells since it leads to waste of fuel and significantly affects cathode potential, forming a so-called mixed potential. Unfortunately, due to the sluggish anode kinetics, it is not possible to obtain a reliable estimation of cathode potential by simply measuring the cell voltage. In this work we address this limitation, quantifying the mixed potential by means of innovative open circuit voltage (OCV) tests with a methanol-hydrogen mixture fed to the anode. Over a wide range of operating conditions, the resulting cathode overpotential is between 250 and 430 mV and is strongly influenced by methanol crossover. We show using combined experimental and modelling analysis of cathode impedance that the methanol oxidation at the cathode mainly follows an electrochemical pathway. Finally, reference electrode measurements at both cathode inlet and outlet provide a local measurement of cathode potential, confirming the reliability of the innovative OCV tests and permitting the evaluation of cathode potential up to typical operating current. At 0.25 A cm-2 the operating cathode potential is around 0.85 V and the Ohmic drop through the catalyst layer is almost 50 mV, which is comparable to that in the membrane.

  1. Carbon-Supported Pd and PdFe Alloy Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Cathodes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera Gavidia, Luis M.; Sebastián, David; Pastor, Elena; Aricò, Antonino S.; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are electrochemical devices that efficiently produce electricity and are characterized by a large flexibility for portable applications and high energy density. Methanol crossover is one of the main obstacles for DMFC commercialization, forcing the search for highly electro-active and methanol tolerant cathodes. In the present work, carbon-supported Pd and PdFe catalysts were synthesized using a sodium borohydride reduction method and physico-chemically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray techniques such as photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). The catalysts were investigated as DMFC cathodes operating at different methanol concentrations (up to 10 M) and temperatures (60 °C and 90 °C). The cell based on PdFe/C cathode presented the best performance, achieving a maximum power density of 37.5 mW·cm−2 at 90 °C with 10 M methanol, higher than supported Pd and Pt commercial catalysts, demonstrating that Fe addition yields structural changes to Pd crystal lattice that reduce the crossover effects in DMFC operation. PMID:28772937

  2. Carbon-Supported Pd and PdFe Alloy Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Rivera Gavidia, Luis M; Sebastián, David; Pastor, Elena; Aricò, Antonino S; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2017-05-25

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are electrochemical devices that efficiently produce electricity and are characterized by a large flexibility for portable applications and high energy density. Methanol crossover is one of the main obstacles for DMFC commercialization, forcing the search for highly electro-active and methanol tolerant cathodes. In the present work, carbon-supported Pd and PdFe catalysts were synthesized using a sodium borohydride reduction method and physico-chemically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray techniques such as photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). The catalysts were investigated as DMFC cathodes operating at different methanol concentrations (up to 10 M) and temperatures (60 °C and 90 °C). The cell based on PdFe/C cathode presented the best performance, achieving a maximum power density of 37.5 mW·cm(-2) at 90 °C with 10 M methanol, higher than supported Pd and Pt commercial catalysts, demonstrating that Fe addition yields structural changes to Pd crystal lattice that reduce the crossover effects in DMFC operation.

  3. Effect of the impurities in crude bio-methanol on the performance of the direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Furukawa, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Nobuyoshi

    As an environmental friendly and economical methanol for the fuel of a DMFC, we focused on a crude bio-methanol from woody biomass without refining. The effects of the impurities, i.e., ethanol, 1-butanol, methyl formate and diisopropyl ether, contained in the crude bio-methanol on the DMFC performance were investigated. Methyl formate and diisopropyl ether hardly or only slightly affected the DMFC performance, while ethanol and 1-butanol caused a significant degradation in the performance. When multiple impurities are present in the fuel as well as the crude bio-methanol, the degradation was somewhat lower than that of the single impurity, 1-butanol, which was the most harmful component of the multiple impurities. When using the crude bio-methanol as a DMFC fuel, removal of the harmful impurities, such as ethanol and 1-butanol, is necessary, otherwise a novel catalyst, which is also active for the oxidation of these impurities, required.

  4. Dieselzymes: development of a stable and methanol tolerant lipase for biodiesel production by directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biodiesels are methyl esters of fatty acids that are usually produced by base catalyzed transesterification of triacylglyerol with methanol. Some lipase enzymes are effective catalysts for biodiesel synthesis and have many potential advantages over traditional base or acid catalyzed transesterification. Natural lipases are often rapidly inactivated by the high methanol concentrations used for biodiesel synthesis, however, limiting their practical use. The lipase from Proteus mirabilis is a particularly promising catalyst for biodiesel synthesis as it produces high yields of methyl esters even in the presence of large amounts of water and expresses very well in Escherichia coli. However, since the Proteus mirabilis lipase is only moderately stable and methanol tolerant, these properties need to be improved before the enzyme can be used industrially. Results We employed directed evolution, resulting in a Proteus mirabilis lipase variant with 13 mutations, which we call Dieselzyme 4. Dieselzyme 4 has greatly improved thermal stability, with a 30-fold increase in the half-inactivation time at 50°C relative to the wild-type enzyme. The evolved enzyme also has dramatically increased methanol tolerance, showing a 50-fold longer half-inactivation time in 50% aqueous methanol. The immobilized Dieselzyme 4 enzyme retains the ability to synthesize biodiesel and has improved longevity over wild-type or the industrially used Brukholderia cepacia lipase during many cycles of biodiesel synthesis. A crystal structure of Dieselzyme 4 reveals additional hydrogen bonds and salt bridges in Dieselzyme 4 compared to the wild-type enzyme, suggesting that polar interactions may become particularly stabilizing in the reduced dielectric environment of the oil and methanol mixture used for biodiesel synthesis. Conclusions Directed evolution was used to produce a stable lipase, Dieselzyme 4, which could be immobilized and re-used for biodiesel synthesis. Dieselzyme 4 outperforms

  5. Methanol-Tolerant Platinum-Palladium Catalyst Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber for High Concentration Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyoung; Jang, Jin-Sung; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Byungrok; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Jung, Doo-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Pt-Pd catalyst supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (N-CNF) was prepared and evaluated as a cathode electrode of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The N-CNF, which was directly synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition from acetonitrile at 640 °C, was verified as having a change of electrochemical surface properties such as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities and the electrochemical double layer compared with common carbon black (CB). To attain the competitive oxygen reduction reaction activity with methanol tolerance, the Pt and Pd metals were supported on the CB or the N-CNF. The physical and electrochemical characteristics of the N-CNF–supported Pt-Pd catalyst were examined and compared with catalyst supported on the CB. In addition, DMFC single cells using these catalysts as the cathode electrode were applied to obtain I-V polarization curves and constant current operating performances with high-concentration methanol as the fuel. Pt-Pd catalysts had obvious ORR activity even in the presence of methanol. The higher power density was obtained at all the methanol concentrations when it applied to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of the DMFC. When the N-CNF is used as the catalyst support material, a better performance with high-concentration methanol is expected. PMID:28335275

  6. Methanol-Tolerant Platinum-Palladium Catalyst Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber for High Concentration Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Jang, Jin-Sung; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Byungrok; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Jung, Doo-Hwan

    2016-08-15

    Pt-Pd catalyst supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (N-CNF) was prepared and evaluated as a cathode electrode of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The N-CNF, which was directly synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition from acetonitrile at 640 °C, was verified as having a change of electrochemical surface properties such as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities and the electrochemical double layer compared with common carbon black (CB). To attain the competitive oxygen reduction reaction activity with methanol tolerance, the Pt and Pd metals were supported on the CB or the N-CNF. The physical and electrochemical characteristics of the N-CNF-supported Pt-Pd catalyst were examined and compared with catalyst supported on the CB. In addition, DMFC single cells using these catalysts as the cathode electrode were applied to obtain I-V polarization curves and constant current operating performances with high-concentration methanol as the fuel. Pt-Pd catalysts had obvious ORR activity even in the presence of methanol. The higher power density was obtained at all the methanol concentrations when it applied to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of the DMFC. When the N-CNF is used as the catalyst support material, a better performance with high-concentration methanol is expected.

  7. Direct Measurement of Atmospheric Ammonia from an Airborne Miniature Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (miniCIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casados, K.; Schill, S.; Freeman, S.; Zoerb, M.; Bertram, T. H.; Lefer, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia is emitted into the atmosphere from a variety of sources such as trees, ocean, diary fields, biomass burning, and fuel emissions. Previous studies have investigated the environmental impacts of atmospheric ammonia which can include chemical reactivity, nucleation of fine particulate matter 2.5 (PM 2.5 ), and implications for human health, but its chemical nature and relatively short lifetime make direct measurement of atmospheric ammonia difficult. During the 2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) an airborne miniature Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (miniCIMS) was deployed on the NASA DC-8 flying laboratory in the Southern California region. The spatial and temporal variability of measured atmospheric ammonia concentrations will be discussed.

  8. Dentinogenic responses after direct pulp capping of miniature swine teeth with Biodentine.

    PubMed

    Tziafa, Christina; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Papadimitriou, Serafim; Tziafas, Dimitrios

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pulpal responses after experimental direct pulp capping of mechanically exposed teeth with a new calcium silicate-based dentin replacement material. Thirty-four anterior and posterior teeth of 3 miniature swine were used. Class V or I cavities were prepared on the buccal or occlusal surfaces, respectively. Pulpal exposures were further performed using a round carbide bur 0.8 mm in diameter. Exposures were treated with white MTA Angelus (Angelus, Londrina, PR, Brazil) or Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France), and the cavities were further restored with Biodentine. The pulpal tissue responses were histologically assessed at postoperative periods of 3 and 8 weeks. Data were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U tests. Inflammatory infiltration or pulp tissue necrosis was not found in any of the specimens. All teeth showed mineralized matrix formation in the form of a complete hard tissue bridge composed of osteodentin or osteodentin followed by a discontinuous or continuous reparative dentin zone. A significantly higher thickness of the hard tissue bridge was found in the group of teeth treated with Biodentine at both 3 and 8 weeks. A number of teeth, which were under root development at the onset of the experimental procedures, exhibited ectopic pulp calcification. The application of both calcium silicate-based materials in direct contact with the mechanically exposed pulp of healthy miniature swine teeth led to pulp repair with complete hard tissue bridge formation. The thickness of hard tissue bridges was significantly higher after pulp capping with Biodentine. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comprehensive one-dimensional, semi-analytical, mathematical model for liquid-feed polymer electrolyte membrane direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareemulla, D.; Jayanti, S.

    Polymer electrolyte membrane direct methanol fuel cells (PEM-DMFCs) have several advantages over hydrogen-fuelled PEM fuel cells; but sluggish methanol electrochemical oxidation and methanol crossover from the anode to the cathode through the PEM are two major problems with these cells. In the present work, a comprehensive one-dimensional, single phase, isothermal mathematical model is developed for a liquid-feed PEM-DMFC, taking into account all the necessary mass transport and electrochemical phenomena. Diffusion and convective effects are considered for methanol transport on the anode side and in the PEM, whereas only diffusional transport of species is considered on the cathode side. A multi-step reaction mechanism is used to describe the electrochemical oxidation of methanol at the anode. Stefan-Maxwell equations are used to describe multi-component diffusion on the cathode side and Tafel type of kinetics is used to describe the simultaneous methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions at the cathode. The model fully accounts for the mixed potential effect caused by methanol crossover at the cathode. It shows excellent agreement with literature data of the limiting current density for different low methanol feed concentrations at different operating temperatures. At high methanol feed concentrations, oxygen depletion on the cathode side, due to excessive methanol crossover, results in mass-transport limitations. The model can be used to optimize the geometric and physical parameters with a view to extracting the highest current density while still keeping a tolerably low methanol crossover.

  10. Anionic-cationic bi-cell design for direct methanol fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyea; Ünlü, Murat; Zhou, Junfeng; Anestis-Richard, Irene; Kohl, Paul A.

    A new fuel cell stack design is described using an anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cell and a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell in series with a single fuel tank servicing both anodes in a passive direct methanol fuel cell configuration. The anionic-cationic bi-cell stack has alkaline and acid fuel cells in series (twice the voltage), one fuel tank, and simplified water management. The series connection between the two cells involves shorting the cathode of the anionic cell to the anode of the acidic cell. It is shown that these two electrodes are at essentially the same potential which avoids an undesired potential difference and resulting loss in current between the two electrodes. Further, the complimentary direction of water transport in the two kinds of fuel cells simplifies water management at both the anodes and cathodes. The effect of ionomer content on the AEM electrode potential and the activity of methanol oxidation were investigated. The individual performance of AEM and PEM fuel cells were evaluated. The effect of ion-exchange capacity in the alkaline electrodes was studied. A fuel wicking material in the methanol fuel tank was used to provide orientation-independent operation. The open circuit potential of the bi-cell was 1.36 V with 2.0 M methanol fuel and air at room temperature.

  11. Performance of PEM Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol-Air Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A direct methanol-air fuel cell operating at near atmospheric pressure, low-flow rate air, and at temperatures close to 60oC would tremendously enlarge the scope of potential applications. While earlier studies have reported performance with oxygen, the present study focuses on characterizing the performance of a PEM liquid feed direct methanol-air cell consisting of components developed in house. These cells employ Pt-Ru catalyst in the anode, Pt at the cathode and Nafion 117 as the PEM. The effect of pressure, flow rate of air and temperature on cell performance has been studied. With air, the performance level is as high as 0.437 V at 300 mA/cm2 (90oC, 20 psig, and excess air flow) has been attained. Even more significant is the performance level at 60oC, 1 atm and low flow rates of air (3-5 times stoichiometric), which is 0.4 V at 150 mA/cm2. Individual electrode potentials for the methanol and air electrode have been separated and analyzed. Fuel crossover rates and the impact of fuel crossover on the performance of the air electrode have also been measured. The study identifies issues specific to the methanol-air fuel cell and provides a basis for improvement strategies.

  12. Performance of PEM Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol-Air Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A direct methanol-air fuel cell operating at near atmospheric pressure, low-flow rate air, and at temperatures close to 60oC would tremendously enlarge the scope of potential applications. While earlier studies have reported performance with oxygen, the present study focuses on characterizing the performance of a PEM liquid feed direct methanol-air cell consisting of components developed in house. These cells employ Pt-Ru catalyst in the anode, Pt at the cathode and Nafion 117 as the PEM. The effect of pressure, flow rate of air and temperature on cell performance has been studied. With air, the performance level is as high as 0.437 V at 300 mA/cm2 (90oC, 20 psig, and excess air flow) has been attained. Even more significant is the performance level at 60oC, 1 atm and low flow rates of air (3-5 times stoichiometric), which is 0.4 V at 150 mA/cm2. Individual electrode potentials for the methanol and air electrode have been separated and analyzed. Fuel crossover rates and the impact of fuel crossover on the performance of the air electrode have also been measured. The study identifies issues specific to the methanol-air fuel cell and provides a basis for improvement strategies.

  13. Modelling of solid polymer and direct methanol fuel cells: Phenomenological equations and analytical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauranen, P. S.

    1993-04-01

    In the solid state concept of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), methanol is directly oxidized at the anode of a solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell (SPEFC). Mathematical modelling of the transport and reaction phenomena within the electrodes and the electrolyte membrane is needed in order to get a closer insight into the operation of the fuel cell. In the work, macro-homogenous porous electrode and dilute solution theories are used to derive the phenomenological equations describing the transport and reaction mechanisms in a SPEFC single cell. The equations are first derived for a conventional H2/air SPEFC, and then extended for a DMFC. The basic model is derived in a one dimensional form in which it is assumed that species transport take place only in the direction crossing the cell sandwich. In addition, two dimensional descriptions of the catalyst layer are reviewed.

  14. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate on copper catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Disselkamp, Robert S.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Campbell, C. T.

    2010-10-14

    We have attempted to hydrogenate adsorbed formate species on copper catalysts to probe the importance of this postulated mechanistic step in methanol synthesis. Surface formate coverages up to 0.25 were produced at temperatures between 413K and 453K on supported (Cu/SiO2) copper and unsupported copper catalysts. The adlayers were produced by various methods including (1) steady state catalytic conditions in CO2-H2 (3:1, 6 bar) atmospheres, and (2) by exposure of the catalysts to formic acid. As reported in earlier work, the catalytic surface at steady state contains bidentate formate species with coverages up to saturation levels of ~ 0.25 at the low temperatures of this study. The reactivity of these formate adlayers was investigated at relevant reaction temperatures in atmospheres containing up to 6 bar H2 partial pressure by simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy measurements. The yield of methanol during the attempted hydrogenation (“titration”) of these adlayers was insignificant (<0.2 mol % of the formate adlayer) even in dry hydrogen partial pressures up to 6 bar. Hydrogen titration of formate species produced from formic acid also failed to produce significant quantities of methanol, and attempted titration in gases consisting of CO-hydrogen mixtures or dry CO2 were also unproductive. The formate decomposition kinetics, measured by IR, were also unaffected by these changes in the gas composition. Similar experiments on unsupported copper also failed to show any methanol. From these results, we conclude that methanol synthesis on copper cannot result from the direct hydrogenation of (bidentate) formate species in simple steps involving adsorbed H species alone. Furthermore, experiments performed on both supported (Cu/SiO2) and unsupported copper catalysts gave similar results implying that the methanol synthesis reaction mechanism only involves metal surface chemistry. Pre-exposure of the bidentate formate adlayer to oxidation

  15. 3D anodes for direct methanol fuel cells: Science and synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takmeel, Qanit

    The high specific energy density of methanol in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) makes them particularly suitable for portable applications. However, a typical DMFC membrane electrode assembly (MEA) delivers an order of magnitude less power density compared to a hydrogen fuel cell MEA. Conventional DMFCs are operated at dilute methanol concentrations to counter problems arising from the methanol crossover issue. A breakthrough in power density can be achieved if the MEA structure is fundamentally altered to enable supply of more concentrated methanol than in current DMFCs. It has been shown that the current anode designs are limited by mass transport resulting in low current density. [1] An anode, with manifold increase in surface area, for catalysis would increase the limiting current density (jL), as a result of which the power density of the fuel cell would increase. In this work, the role of layering of Pt on Ru was studied and this lay the foundation towards understanding catalytic behavior in the fuel cell anode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), in conjunction with copper underpotential deposition (Cu-UPD) and 15 kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), showed that by adjusting the thickness of Pt on a Ru substrate, the Fermi energy (EF) of the surface can be tailored to yield more efficient methanol electro-oxidizing catalysts. In order to increase the effective catalysis surface area, three-dimensional (3D) carbon based hierarchical structures were fabricated on which Pt-Ru catalyst was grown using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), with image processing, was used to determine the surface coverage of the carbon surfaces. CV showed that as much as hundred times the current density (j) can be achieved with such a structure as compared to a flat surface. Subsequently, mass transport limitations were studied via chronoamperometry (CA) performed in different methanol concentrations. The studies were also used to extract the rate order of

  16. Effect of the cathode open ratios on the water management of a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell fed with neat methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianglin; Faghri, Amir

    2011-08-01

    A novel approach has been proposed to improve the water management of a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) fed with neat methanol without increasing its volume or weight. By adopting perforated covers with different open ratios at the cathode, the water management has been significantly improved in a DMFC fed with neat methanol. An optimized cathode open ratio could ensure both the sufficient supply of oxygen and low water loss. While changing the open ratio of anode vaporizer can adjust the methanol crossover rate in a DMFC. Furthermore, the gas mixing layer, added between the anode vaporizer and the anode current collector to increase the mass transfer resistance, can improve the cell performance, decrease the methanol crossover, and increase the fuel efficiency. For the case of a DMFC fed with neat methanol, an anode vaporizer with the open ratio of 12% and a cathode open ratio of 20% produced the highest peak power density, 22.7 mW cm-2, and high fuel efficiency, 70.1%, at room temperature of 25 ± 1 °C and ambient humidity of 25-50%.

  17. X-ray absorption and electrochemical studies of direct methanol fuel cell catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zurawski, D.J.; Aldykiewicz, A.J. Jr.; Baxter, S.F.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-12-31

    In order for polymer electrolyte fuel cells to operate directly on methanol instead of hydrogen, a distinct advantage for portable applications, methanol oxidation must be catalyzed effectively in the acidic environment of the cell. Platinum-ruthenium and platinum-ruthenium oxide are generally considered to be the most active catalysts for this purpose. The presence of ruthenium significantly enhances the activity of platinum in these catalysts, for reasons not yet fully understood. We are using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and electrochemical techniques to evaluate the mechanisms proposed to account for this enhancement in order to further improve the catalyst`s activity. We are considering three enhancement mechanisms. An intermediate in the oxidation of methanol on platinum is carbon monoxide and its oxidation is the rate-determining step in the overall oxidation mechanism. It has been proposed that ruthenium facilitates the removal of carbon monoxide from the platinum surface. First, it has been proposed that ruthenium decreases the strength of the platinum-carbon monoxide bond. Carbon monoxide bonds to the catalyst by interacting with the d-band of platinum, therefore a change in the d-band occupancy of platinum as a result of alloying may influence the bond strength of carbon monoxide. Another proposed enhancement mechanism involves lowering of the potential for the formation of the CO-oxidizing species. Finally, the binary catalysts may have a structure which is more conducive to the methanol dehydrogenation and carbon monoxide reactions. Based on these three proposed enhancement mechanisms, a goal of this study is to correlate catalyst electronic properties, structure, and oxidation state with the performance of proton-exchange membrane (Nafion) direct methanol fuel cells.

  18. Selective electrocatalysts toward a prototype of the membraneless direct methanol fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan; Yang, Jinhua; Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanomaterials enables control of their properties to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design and fabrication of Pt-based nanomaterials with enhanced catalytic activity and superior selectivity toward the reactions in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) upon the deep understanding of the mechanisms of these electrochemical reactions. In particular, the ternary Au@Ag2S-Pt nanocomposites display superior methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) selectivity due to the electronic coupling effect among different domains of the nanocomposites, while the cage-bell structured Pt-Ru nanoparticles exhibit excellent methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode because of the differential diffusion of methanol and oxygen in the porous Ru shell of the cage-bell nanoparticles. The good catalytic selectivity of these Pt-based nanomaterials via structural construction enables a DMFC to be built without a proton exchange membrane between the fuel electrode and the oxygen electrode. PMID:24448514

  19. Analysis on the design and property of flow field plates of innovative direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jung; Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Chin-Guo; Lee, Kuang-Ying

    2014-10-01

    The paper uses technology of lithography process to etch flow fields on single side of a printed circuit board (PCB), and combines flow field plate with collector plate to make innovative anode flow field plates and cathode flow field plates required in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), and meanwhile makes membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and methanol fuel plate. The flow field plates are designed to be in the form of serpentine flow field. The paper measured the assembled DMFC to achieve the overall efficiency of DMFC under the conditions of different screw torques and different concentration, flow rate and temperature of methanol. Experimental results show that when the flow field width of flow field plate is 1 mm, the screw torque is 16 kgf/cm, and the concentration, flow rate and temperature of methanol-water are 1 M, 180 ml/h and 50 degrees C respectively, the prepared DMFC can have better power density of 5.5 mW/cm2, 5.4 mW/cm2, 11.2 mW/cm2 and 11.8 mW/cm2. Besides, the volume of the DMFC designed and assembled by the study is smaller than the generally existing DMFC by 40%.

  20. Development of Anodic Flux and Temperature Controlling System for Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. M.; Liu, C.; Liang, J. S.; Wu, C. B.; Xu, Z.

    2006-10-01

    Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (μDMFC) is a kind of newly developed power sources, which effective apparatus for its performance evaluation is still in urgent need at present. In this study, a testing system was established for the purpose of testing the continuous working performance such as micro flux and temperature of μDMFC. In view of the temperature controlling for micro-flux liquid fuel, a heating block with labyrinth-like single pass channel inside for heating up the methanol solution was fabricated. A semiconductorrefrigerating chip was utilized to heat and cool the liquid flow during testing procedures. On the other hand, the two channels of a high accuracy double-channel syringe pump that can suck and pump in turn so as to transport methanol solution continuously was adopted. Based on the requirements of wide-ranged temperature and micro flux controlling, the solenoid valves and the correlative component were used. A hydraulic circuit, which can circulate the fed methanol cold to hot in turn, has also been constructed to test the fatigue life of the μDMFC. The automatic control was actualized by software module written with Visual C++. Experimental results show that the system is perfect in stability and it may provide an important and advanced evaluation apparatus to satisfy the needs for real time performance testing of μDMFC.

  1. Poly(1-vinylimidazole)/Pd-impregnated Nafion for direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ai Hua; Kim, Ji-Young; Shi, Jin Yi; Kim, Keon

    Nafion is modified by incorporating poly(1-vinylimidazole)/Pd composites into the ion cluster channels of the membrane. The poly(1-vinylimidazole)/Pd-impregnated (PVI/Pd-impregnated) membranes is characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), proton conductivity and methanol permeability measurements and compared with those of the untreated Nafion. The dependence of the membrane proton conductivity and methanol permeability on the poly(1-vinylimidazole) (PVI) and palladium contents in the PVI/Pd-impregnated Nafion is studied. The performance of the cells employing the PVI/Pd-impregnated Nafion is evaluated using a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) unit cell. It is found that the best cell performance is obtained when Nafion is impregnated with the PVI/Pd composite solution for 20 h. This result suggests that there exists an optimum content of palladium and PVI in the modified membrane to obtain a high-proton conductivity and low-methanol permeability that result in a high-cell performance.

  2. Self-Activated Micro Direct-Methanol Fuel Cell (muDMFC) at Near Room Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    control of multiphase flows at the microscale is crucial to micro-DMFC development. Through micro channel experiments we showed that wettability ...channel experiments study the effects of wettability (hydrophilic/hydrophobic) as well as the presence of impurities in the fuel on the operating...and gas are flowing into square cross-sectional microchannels. The optimal wettability properties for Micro-Direct Methanol Fuel Cells are hydrophilic

  3. TiO2 Nanotube-Carbon (TNT-C) as Support for Pt-based Catalyst for High Methanol Oxidation Reaction in Direct Methanol Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, M; Kamarudin, S K; Shyuan, L K

    2016-12-01

    In this study, TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs) were synthesized via a hydrothermal method using highly concentrated NaOH solutions varying from 6 to 12 M at 180 °C for 48 h. The effects of the NaOH concentration and the TNT crystal structure on the performance for methanol oxidation were investigated to determine the best catalyst support for Pt-based catalysts. The results showed that TNTs produced with 10 M NaOH exhibited a length and a diameter of 550 and 70 nm, respectively; these TNTs showed the best nanotube structure and were further used as catalyst supports for a Pt-based catalyst in a direct methanol fuel cell. The synthesized TNT and Pt-based catalysts were analysed by FESEM, TEM, BET, EDX, XRD and FTIR. The electrochemical performance of the catalysts was investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometric (CA) analysis to further understand the methanol oxidation in the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Finally, the result proves that Pt-Ru/TNT-C catalyst shows high performance in methanol oxidation as the highest current density achieved at 3.3 mA/cm(2) (normalised by electrochemically active surface area) and high catalyst tolerance towards poisoning species was established.

  4. TiO2 Nanotube-Carbon (TNT-C) as Support for Pt-based Catalyst for High Methanol Oxidation Reaction in Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Shyuan, L. K.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs) were synthesized via a hydrothermal method using highly concentrated NaOH solutions varying from 6 to 12 M at 180 °C for 48 h. The effects of the NaOH concentration and the TNT crystal structure on the performance for methanol oxidation were investigated to determine the best catalyst support for Pt-based catalysts. The results showed that TNTs produced with 10 M NaOH exhibited a length and a diameter of 550 and 70 nm, respectively; these TNTs showed the best nanotube structure and were further used as catalyst supports for a Pt-based catalyst in a direct methanol fuel cell. The synthesized TNT and Pt-based catalysts were analysed by FESEM, TEM, BET, EDX, XRD and FTIR. The electrochemical performance of the catalysts was investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometric (CA) analysis to further understand the methanol oxidation in the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Finally, the result proves that Pt-Ru/TNT-C catalyst shows high performance in methanol oxidation as the highest current density achieved at 3.3 mA/cm2 (normalised by electrochemically active surface area) and high catalyst tolerance towards poisoning species was established.

  5. Proton exchange membrane materials for the advancement of direct methanol fuel-cell technology

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Christopher J.

    2006-04-04

    A new class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials, and methods of synthesis, that can be used as a proton exchange membrane in a direct methanol fuel cell. In contrast with Nafion.RTM. PEM materials, which have random sulfonation, the new class of materials have ordered sulfonation achieved through self-assembly of alternating polyimide segments of different molecular weights comprising, for example, highly sulfonated hydrophilic PDA-DASA polyimide segment alternating with an unsulfonated hydrophobic 6FDA-DAS polyimide segment. An inorganic phase, e.g., 0.5 5 wt % TEOS, can be incorporated in the sulfonated polyimide copolymer to further improve its properties. The new materials exhibit reduced swelling when exposed to water, increased thermal stability, and decreased O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 gas permeability, while retaining proton conductivities similar to Nafion.RTM.. These improved properties may allow direct methanol fuel cells to operate at higher temperatures and with higher efficiencies due to reduced methanol crossover.

  6. Development of cesium phosphotungstate salt and chitosan composite membrane for direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yanxin; Xiang, Yan; Xiu, Ruijie; Lu, Shanfu

    2013-10-15

    A novel composite membrane has been developed by doping cesium phosphotungstate salt (CsxH3-xPW12O40 (0≤x≤3), Csx-PTA) into chitosan (CTS/Csx-PTA) for application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Uniform distribution of Csx-PTA nanoparticles has been achieved in the chitosan matrix. The proton conductivity of the composite membrane is significantly affected by the Csx-PTA content in the composite membrane as well as the Cs substitution in PTA. The highest proton conductivity for the CTS/Csx-PTA membranes was obtained with x=2 and Cs2-PTA content of 5 wt%. The value is 6×10(-3) S cm(-1) and 1.75×10(-2) S cm(-1) at 298 K and 353 K, respectively. The methanol permeability of CTS/Cs2-PTA membrane is about 5.6×10(-7), 90% lower than that of Nafion-212 membrane. The highest selectivity factor (φ) was obtained on CTS/Cs2-PTA-5 wt% composite membrane, 1.1×10(4)/Scm(-3)s. The present study indicates the promising potential of CTS/Csx-PTA composite membrane as alternative proton exchange membranes in direct methanol fuel cells.

  7. Biodiesel synthesis by direct transesterification of microalga Botryococcus braunii with continuous methanol reflux.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Pamela; Ciudad, Gustavo; Schober, Sigurd; Mittelbach, Martin; Navia, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    Direct transesterification of Botryococcus braunii with continuous acyl acceptor reflux was evaluated. This method combines in one step lipid extraction and esterification/transesterification. Fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) synthesis by direct conversion of microalgal biomass was carried out using sulfuric acid as catalyst and methanol as acyl acceptor. In this system, once lipids are extracted, they are contacted with the catalyst and methanol reaching 82%wt of FAME yield. To optimize the reaction conditions, a factorial design using surface response methodology was applied. The effects of catalyst concentration and co-solvent concentration were studied. Hexane was used as co-solvent for increasing lipid extraction performance. The incorporation of hexane in the reaction provoked an increase in FAME yield from 82% (pure methanol) to 95% when a 47%v/v of hexane was incorporated in the reaction. However, the selectivity towards non-saponifiable lipids such as sterols was increased, negatively affecting biodiesel quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improvement of water management in a vapor feed direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masdar, M. Shahbudin; Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Nakagawa, Nobuyoshi

    Water transport in a vapor feed direct methanol fuel cell was improved by fixing a hydrophobic air filter (HAF) at the cathode. Effects of the HAF properties and the fixed positions, i.e., just on the cathode surface or by providing a certain space from the surface, of the HAF on the water transport as well as the power generation performance were investigated. The water transport was evaluated by measuring the partial pressure of water, PH2O , and methanol, PCH3OH , at the anode gas layer using in situ mass spectrometry with a capillary probe and also the water and methanol fluxes across the electrode structure using a conventional method. The HAF with the highest hydrophobicity and the highest flow resistance had the strongest effect on increasing the water back diffusion from the cathode to the anode through the membrane and increasing the current density. It was noted that the HAF fixation by providing a space from the cathode surface was more effective in increasing JWCO and the current density than that of the direct placement on the cathode surface. There was an optimum distance for the HAF placement depending on the humidity of the outside air.

  9. A direct methanol fuel cell system to power a humanoid robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Han-Ik; Ha, Tae Jung; Hwang, Sang Youp; Kim, Jong-Ho; Chae, Seung-Hoon; Cho, Jae Hyung; Prabhuram, Joghee; Kim, Soo-Kil; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Cho, Baek-Kyu; Oh, Jun-Ho; Moon, Sang Heup; Ha, Heung Yong

    In this study, a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) system, which is the first of its kind, has been developed to power a humanoid robot. The DMFC system consists of a stack, a balance of plant (BOP), a power management unit (PMU), and a back-up battery. The stack has 42 unit cells and is able to produce about 400 W at 19.3 V. The robot is 125 cm tall, weighs 56 kg, and consumes 210 W during normal operation. The robot is integrated with the DMFC system that powers the robot in a stable manner for more than 2 h. The power consumption by the robot during various motions is studied, and load sharing between the fuel cell and the back-up battery is also observed. The loss of methanol feed due to crossover and evaporation amounts to 32.0% and the efficiency of the DMFC system in terms of net electric power is 22.0%.

  10. The performance analysis of direct methanol fuel cells with different hydrophobic anode channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hung-Chun; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Luo, Win-Jet; Jiang, Jia-You; Kuan, Yean-Der; Lin, Xin-Quan

    In order to enhance the performance of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), the product of CO 2 bubble has to be efficiently removed from the anode channel during the electrochemical reaction. In this study, the materials of Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) with hydrophilic property and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with hydrophobic property are used to form the anode cannel. The channel is fabricated through a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) manufacture process of the DMFCs. In addition, some particles with high hydrophobic properties are added into the PDMS materials in order to further reduce the hydro-resistance in the anode channel. The performance of the DMFCs is investigated under the influence of operation conditions, including operation temperature, flow rate, and methanol concentration. It is found that the performance of the DMFC, which is made of PDMS with high hydrophobic particles, can be greatly enhanced and the hydrophobic property of the particles can be unaffected by different operation conditions.

  11. Direct Conversion of Methane to Methanol under Mild Conditions over Cu-Zeolites and beyond.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Patrick; Ranocchiari, Marco; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2017-02-21

    In the recent years methane has become increasingly abundant. However, transportation costs are high and methane recovered as side product is often flared rather than valorized. The chemical utilization of methane is highly challenging and currently mainly based on the cost-intensive production of synthesis gas and its conversion. Alternative routes have been discovered in academia, though high temperatures are mostly required. However, the direct conversion of methane to methanol is an exception. It can already be carried out at comparably low temperatures. It is challenging that methanol is more prone to oxidation than methane, which makes high selectivities at moderate conversions difficult to reach. Decades of research for the direct reaction of methane and oxygen did not yield a satisfactory solution for the direct partial oxidation toward methanol. When changing the oxidant from oxygen to hydrogen peroxide, high selectivities can be reached at rather low conversions, but the cost of hydrogen peroxide is comparably high. However, major advancements in the field were introduced by converting methane to a more stable methanol precursor. Most notable is the conversion of methane to methyl bisulfate in the presence of a platinum catalyst. The reaction is carried out in 102% sulfuric acid using SO3 as the oxidant. This allows for oxidation of the platinum catalyst and prevents the in situ hydrolysis of methyl bisulfate toward the less stable methanol. With a slightly different motif, the stepped conversion of methane to methanol over copper-zeolites was developed a decade ago. The copper-zeolite is first activated in oxygen at 450 °C, and then cooled to 200 °C and reacts with methane in the absence of oxygen, thus protecting a methanol precursor from overoxidation. Subsequently methanol can be extracted with water. Several active copper-zeolites were found, and the active sites were identified and discussed. For a long time, the process was almost unchanged

  12. Direct inkjet printing of miniaturized luminescent YAG:Er3+ from sol-gel precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yuzhe; Chen, Zhaoxi; Trofimov, Artem A.; Lei, Jincheng; Chen, Jie; Yuan, Lei; Zhu, Wenge; Xiao, Hai; Xu, Dong; Jacobsohn, Luiz G.; Kornev, Konstantin G.; Bordia, Rajendra K.; Peng, Fei

    2017-06-01

    This work focuses on demonstrating the fabrication of miniaturized scintillators based on rare earth activated YAG ceramics using the direct inkjet printing method. Erbium was chosen as the activator, and YAG sol-gel precursor inks were prepared under precise hydrolysis and polycondensation reactions. The precursors showed excellent control over rheology and surface tension, resulting in good printability. One of the most important challenges of inkjet printing of lines is the stability of lines. Line stability during printing is highly dependent on the printing frequency, drop spacing and substrate temperature. When a line was printed drop by drop, bulges were always observed during printing at 25 °C. This instability was significantly suppressed when the substrates were slightly heated. Adding polyvinylpyrrolidone to the precursor helped eliminate pores and cracks during firing. Crack-free YAG lines with ∼200 nm thickness were obtained after firing. The photoluminescence of YAG:Er heat-treated at 1200 °C for 1 h was optimized for an Er concentration of 2 wt%. X-ray induced radioluminescence was dominated by emission lines at 398 and 567 nm.

  13. Direct measurement of nutrient concentrations in freshwaters with a miniaturized analytical probe: evaluation and validation.

    PubMed

    Copetti, D; Valsecchi, L; Capodaglio, A G; Tartari, G

    2017-04-01

    This work deals with the evaluation of the aqueous concentrations of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP), total phosphorus (TP), and ammonium nitrogen (N-NH4) in surface water by means of direct online instrumentation. A portable, submersible, and automated analyzer designed to measure dissolved and total nutrient concentrations characterized by miniaturization of the entire analytical process was tested against laboratory methods. A total number of 36 water samples of different origin (i.e., rain, river, lake, and sewage waters) were analyzed and used in the comparison of DRP, TP, and N-NH4 data. Raw data were distributed in a broad range of concentrations: 5-299 μg P/L for DRP, 7-97 μg P/L for TP, and 11-332 μg N/L for N-NH4. Regression analysis underlined a high significant correlation between the measures of the probe and those of the laboratory (0.6 < R (2) < 0.9; p < 0.001) and pointed out the effectiveness of the new instrument in representing a broad range of nutrient concentrations.

  14. Model-based analysis of water management in alkaline direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, C.; Krewer, U.

    2014-12-01

    Mathematical modelling is used to analyse water management in Alkaline Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (ADMFCs) with an anion exchange membrane as electrolyte. Cathodic water supply is identified as one of the main challenges and investigated at different operation conditions. Two extreme case scenarios are modelled to study the feasible conditions for sufficient water supply. Scenario 1 reveals that water supply by cathodic inlet is insufficient and, thus, water transport through membrane is essential for ADMFC operation. The second scenario is used to analyse requirements on water transport through the membrane for different operation conditions. These requirements are influenced by current density, evaporation rate, methanol cross-over and electro-osmotic drag of water. Simulations indicate that water supply is mainly challenging for high current densities and demands on high water diffusion are intensified by water drag. Thus, current density might be limited by water transport through membrane. The presented results help to identify important effects and processes in ADMFCs with a polymer electrolyte membrane and to understand these processes. Furthermore, the requirements identified by modelling show the importance of considering water transport through membrane besides conductivity and methanol cross-over especially for designing new membrane materials.

  15. The effect of operation and design parameters on the performance of the direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, S.F.; Cisar, A.; Franaszczuk, K.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell technology continues to receive considerable attention as a potential replacement for fossil fuels as a primary source of terrestrial power. Ideally, such power systems would operate at relatively low temperatures (< 100{degrees}C) which suggests strongly the use of cell technology based upon the proton exchange membrane (PEM). Without question, hydrogen is a very desirable fuel choice for these types of systems, because of its high energy density. However, the difficulties associated with the production and routine handling of hydrogen limit severely its commercial use at present. The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is a particularly attractive alternative to the use of the hydrogen/oxygen cell. Although not as high as hydrogen, the energy density of methanol is the highest among the organic fuels. Furthermore, because of the similarity in liquid handling requirements between methanol and gasoline, a significant portion of the infrastructure necessary for the marketing and distribution of the fuel is already in place. Other inherent attributes of the DMFC which include rapid start-up and operation with little or no emission or noise signature have led to an intense DMFC research effort over the past twenty years and, indeed, the DMFC has even been referred to as {open_quotes}the electrochemist`s dream{close_quotes}.

  16. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  17. A spontaneous and passive waste-management device (PWMD) for a micro direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yun-Ju; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Pan, Chin; Luo, Shih-Jin; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2007-05-01

    This paper introduces a passive waste-management device (PWMD) for a micro direct methanol fuel cell to exhale CO2 gas and to gather and transport water and methanol residue during operation. It passively employs condensation, temperature gradient, surface tension gradient and droplet coalescence to accumulate liquid, separate liquid and gas, and transport droplets without the need of external power. CO2 gas can be breathed out through hydrophobic micro holes with the assistance of buoyancy force while water/methanol vapor is condensing into droplets, coalescing with smaller droplets and is transported toward a cooler and more hydrophilic waste tank through wettability gradient. The wettability gradient is prepared by diffusion-controlled silanization with a gradient from 117° to 28° and is radial toward the outer boundary, which can drive droplets down to 1 µl with a speed of up to 20 mm s-1. With the assistance of coalescence along with the wettability gradient, the condensed water droplets can reach a double speed of 40 mm s-1. The maximum water removal rate of the PWMD can approach 6.134 µl s-1 cm-2, which is at least one order of magnitude higher than the demand of a standard µDMFC with power generation ability of 100 mW cm-2.

  18. Radiation-grafted membranes based on polyethylene for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherazi, Tauqir A.; Guiver, Michael D.; Kingston, David; Ahmad, Shujaat; Kashmiri, M. Akram; Xue, Xinzhong

    Styrene was grafted onto ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene powder (UHMWPE) by gamma irradiation using a 60Co source. Compression moulded films of selected pre-irradiated styrene-grafted ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE-g-PS) were post-sulfonated to the sulfonic acid derivative (UHMWPE-g-PSSA) for use as proton exchange membranes (PEMs). The sulfonation was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The melting and flow properties of UHMWPE and UHMWPE-g-PS are conducive to forming homogeneous pore-free membranes. Both the ion conductivity and methanol permeability coefficient increased with degree of grafting, but the grafted membranes showed comparable or higher ion conductivity and lower methanol permeability than Nafion ® 117 membrane. One UHMWPE-g-PS membrane was fabricated into a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) and tested as a single cell direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Low membrane cost and acceptable fuel cell performance indicate that UHMWPE-g-PSSA membranes could offer an alternative approach to perfluorosulfonic acid-type membranes for DMFC.

  19. Coupled electrochemical and heat/mass transport characteristics in passive direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong

    methanol concentrations are obtained. It was further revealed that the improved performance with higher methanol concentrations is due primarily to the increased operating temperature resulting from the exothermic reaction between the permeated methanol and oxygen on the cathode. In addition, to further reflect the effect of two-phase heat and mass transport on the performance of the passive DMFC, we then developed a two-phase two-dimensional thermal model. With this model, the effects of methanol concentration, open ratio and channel and rib width on cell performance were investigated. It was found that although the larger open ratio and smaller channel and rib width exhibit the lower cell operating temperature as a result of the lower heat generation rate, the cell performance is still higher as a result of the increased mass transfer rate on both the anode and cathode. Keywords: Passive Direct Methanol Fuel Cell; Cell Performance; Thermal Effect; Open-circuit Condition; Methanol Concentration; Cell Orientation; Metal Foam, Effective Thermal Conductivity; Oxygen Transport; Mass Transfer Resistance; Two-phase Transport; Open Ratio; Channel and Rib Width.

  20. Developing Low-Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells for Direct Conversion of Methane to Methanol Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Torabi, A.; Barton, J.; Willman, C.; Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Li, N.; Poozhikunnath, A.; Maric, R.; Marina, O. A.

    2016-04-26

    The objective of this project is development of a durable, low-cost, and high performance Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LT-SOFC) for direct conversion of methane to methanol and other liquids, characterized by: a) operating temperature < 500oC, b) current density of > 100 mA/cm2 in liquid hydrocarbon production mode, c) continuous operation of > 100 h, d) cell area >100 cm2, e) cell cost per rate of product output < 100,000/bpd, f) process intensity of > 0.1 bpd/ft3, g) product yield and carbon efficiency > 50%, and h) volumetric output per cell > 30 L/day.

  1. Effects of Nafion loading in anode catalyst inks on the miniature direct formic acid fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Robert D.; Haan, John L.; Masel, Richard I.

    Nafion, within the anode and cathode catalyst layers, plays a large role in the performance of fuel cells, especially during the operation of the direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC). Nafion affects the proton transfer in the catalyst layers of the fuel cell, and studies presented here show the effects of three different Nafion loadings, 10 wt.%, 30 wt.% and 50 wt.%. Short term voltage-current measurements using the three different loadings show that 30 wt.% Nafion loading in the anode shows the best performance in the miniature, passive DFAFC. Nafion also serves as a binder to help hold the catalyst nanoparticles onto the proton exchange membrane (PEM). The DFAFC anode temporarily needs to be regenerated by raising the anode potential to around 0.8 V vs. RHE to oxidize CO bound to the surface, but the Pourbaix diagram predicts that Pd will corrode at these potentials. We found that an anode loading of 30 wt.% Nafion showed the best stability, of the three Nafion loadings chosen, for reducing the amount of loss of electrochemically active area due to high regeneration potentials. Only 58% of the area was lost after 600 potential cycles in formic acid compared to 96 and 99% for 10 wt.% and 50 wt.% loadings, respectively. Lastly we present cyclic voltammetry data that suggest that the Nafion adds to the production of CO during oxidation of formic acid for 12 h at 0.3 V vs. RHE. The resulting data showed that an increase in CO coverage was observed with increasing Nafion content in the anode catalyst layer.

  2. A hydrophilic-hydrophobic dual-layer microporous layer enabling the improved water management of direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. H.; Zhao, T. S.; Zhao, G.; An, L.; Zhou, X. L.

    2015-10-01

    Passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operating with neat methanol can achieve the maximum system energy density. However, the anodic methanol oxidation reaction requires reactant water, which is completely supplied by water generated at the cathode, causing the system to experience a critical issue known as water starvation. A solution to this problem involves increasing the water recovery flux to meet the rate of water consumption of the anodic reaction, and increase the local water concentration as high as possible at the anode catalyst layer (CL) to improve the anodic kinetics. In the present work, a new microporous layer (MPL) consisting of a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer is proposed. The purposes of these two layers are to, respectively, trap and retain water and to create capillary pressure to prevent water loss. Our experiments have shown that the use of this novel MPL at the anode and cathode can increase the rate of water recovery and water retention, resulting in an increase in the local water concentration. As a result, the use of this dual-layer MPL to either electrode of a passive DMFC operating with neat methanol leads to a significant performance boost.

  3. Graphene-derived Fe/Co-N-C catalyst in direct methanol fuel cells: Effects of the methanol concentration and ionomer content on cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Cheol; Choi, Chang Hyuck

    2017-08-01

    Non-precious metal catalysts (typically Fe(Co)-N-C catalysts) have been widely investigated for use as cost-effective cathode materials in low temperature fuel cells. Despite the high oxygen reduction activity and methanol-tolerance of graphene-based Fe(Co)-N-C catalysts in an acidic medium, their use in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) has not yet been successfully implemented, and only a few studies have investigated this topic. Herein, we synthesized a nano-sized graphene-derived Fe/Co-N-C catalyst by physical ball-milling and a subsequent chemical modification of the graphene oxide. Twelve membrane-electrode-assemblies are fabricated with various cathode compositions to determine the effects of the methanol concentration, ionomer (i.e. Nafion) content, and catalyst loading on the DMFC performance. The results show that a graphene-based catalyst is capable of tolerating a highly-concentrated methanol feed up to 10.0 M. The optimized electrode composition has an ionomer content and catalyst loading of 66.7 wt% and 5.0 mg cm-2, respectively. The highest maximum power density is ca. 32 mW cm-2 with a relatively low PtRu content (2 mgPtRu cm-2). This study overcomes the drawbacks of conventional graphene-based electrodes using a nano-sized graphene-based catalyst and further shows the feasibility of their potential applications in DMFC systems.

  4. High Performance and Cost-Effective Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Fe-N-C Methanol-Tolerant Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, David; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Gordon, Jonathan; Atanassov, Plamen; Aricò, Antonino S; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2016-08-09

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) offer great advantages for the supply of power with high efficiency and large energy density. The search for a cost-effective, active, stable and methanol-tolerant catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is still a great challenge. In this work, platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) catalysts based on Fe-N-C are investigated in acidic medium. Post-treatment of the catalyst improves the ORR activity compared with previously published PGM-free formulations and shows an excellent tolerance to the presence of methanol. The feasibility for application in DMFC under a wide range of operating conditions is demonstrated, with a maximum power density of approximately 50 mW cm(-2) and a negligible methanol crossover effect on the performance. A review of the most recent PGM-free cathode formulations for DMFC indicates that this formulation leads to the highest performance at a low membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) cost. Moreover, a 100 h durability test in DMFC shows suitable applicability, with a similar performance-time behavior compared to common MEAs based on Pt cathodes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Three-dimensional multiscale analysis of degradation of nano- and micro-structure in direct methanol fuel cell electrodes after methanol starvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzeband, Christian; Arlt, Tobias; Wippermann, Klaus; Lehnert, Werner; Manke, Ingo

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the ageing effects on the microstructure of the anode catalyst layer of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) after complete methanol starvation. To this end the samples of two methanol-depleted membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) have been compared with a pristine reference sample. A three-dimensional characterization of the anode catalyst layer (ACL) structure on a nanometer scale has been conducted by focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscope (SEM) tomography. The FIB/SEM tomography allows for a detailed analysis of statistic parameters of micro-structured materials, such as porosity, tortuosity and pore size distributions. Furthermore, the SEM images displayed a high material contrast between the heavy catalyst metals (Pt/Ru) and the relatively light carbon support, which made it possible to map the catalyst distribution in the acquired FIB/SEM tomographies. Additional synchrotron X-ray tomographies have been conducted in order to obtain an overview of the structural changes of all the components of a section of the MEAs after methanol depletion.

  6. Characterization of Polyethylene-Graft-Sulfonated Polyarylsulfone Proton Exchange Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Zhang, Gang; Nam, Changwoo; Chung, T.C. Mike

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines polymer film morphology and several important properties of polyethylene-graft-sulfonated polyarylene ether sulfone (PE-g-s-PAES) proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for direct methanol fuel cell applications. Due to the extreme surface energy differences between a semi-crystalline and hydrophobic PE backbone and several amorphous and hydrophilic s-PAES side chains, the PE-g-s-PAES membrane self-assembles into a unique morphology, with many proton conductive s-PAES channels embedded in the stable and tough PE matrix and a thin hydrophobic PE layer spontaneously formed on the membrane surfaces. In the bulk, these membranes show good mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa, Young’s modulus >1400 MPa) and low water swelling (λ < 15) even with high IEC >3 mmol/g in the s-PAES domains. On the surface, the thin hydrophobic and semi-crystalline PE layer shows some unusual barrier (protective) properties. In addition to exhibiting higher through-plane conductivity (up to 160 mS/cm) than in-plane conductivity, the PE surface layer minimizes methanol cross-over from anode to cathode with reduced fuel loss, and stops the HO• and HO2• radicals, originally formed at the anode, entering into PEM matrix. Evidently, the thin PE surface layer provides a highly desirable protecting layer for PEMs to reduce fuel loss and increase chemical stability. Overall, the newly developed PE-g-s-PAES membranes offer a desirable set of PEM properties, including conductivity, selectivity, mechanical strength, stability, and cost-effectiveness for direct methanol fuel cell applications. PMID:26690232

  7. Characterization of Polyethylene-Graft-Sulfonated Polyarylsulfone Proton Exchange Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Zhang, Gang; Nam, Changwoo; Chung, T C Mike

    2015-12-04

    This paper examines polymer film morphology and several important properties of polyethylene-graft-sulfonated polyarylene ether sulfone (PE-g-s-PAES) proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for direct methanol fuel cell applications. Due to the extreme surface energy differences between a semi-crystalline and hydrophobic PE backbone and several amorphous and hydrophilic s-PAES side chains, the PE-g-s-PAES membrane self-assembles into a unique morphology, with many proton conductive s-PAES channels embedded in the stable and tough PE matrix and a thin hydrophobic PE layer spontaneously formed on the membrane surfaces. In the bulk, these membranes show good mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa, Young's modulus >1400 MPa) and low water swelling (λ < 15) even with high IEC >3 mmol/g in the s-PAES domains. On the surface, the thin hydrophobic and semi-crystalline PE layer shows some unusual barrier (protective) properties. In addition to exhibiting higher through-plane conductivity (up to 160 mS/cm) than in-plane conductivity, the PE surface layer minimizes methanol cross-over from anode to cathode with reduced fuel loss, and stops the HO• and HO₂• radicals, originally formed at the anode, entering into PEM matrix. Evidently, the thin PE surface layer provides a highly desirable protecting layer for PEMs to reduce fuel loss and increase chemical stability. Overall, the newly developed PE-g-s-PAES membranes offer a desirable set of PEM properties, including conductivity, selectivity, mechanical strength, stability, and cost-effectiveness for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  8. Polymer electrolytes based on sulfonated polysulfone for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lufrano, F.; Baglio, V.; Staiti, P.; Arico', A. S.; Antonucci, V.

    This paper reports the development and characterization of sulfonated polysulfone (SPSf) polymer electrolytes for direct methanol fuel cells. The synthesis of sulfonated polysulfone was performed by a post sulfonation method using trimethyl silyl chlorosulfonate as a mild sulfonating agent. Bare polysulfone membranes were prepared with two different sulfonation levels (60%, SPSf-60 and 70%, SPSf-70), whereas, a composite membrane of SPSf-60 was prepared with 5 wt% silica filler. These membranes were investigated in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operating at low (30-40 °C) and high temperatures (100-120 °C). DMFC power densities were about 140 mW cm -2 at 100 °C with the bare SPSf-60 membrane and 180 mW cm -2 at 120 °C with the SPSf-60-SiO2 composite membrane. The best performance achieved at ambient temperature using a membrane with high degree of sulfonation (70%, SPSf-70) was 20 mW cm -2 at atmospheric pressure. This makes the polysulfone-based DMFC suitable for application in portable devices.

  9. Characterization of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications with H 2SO 4 modified chitosan membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osifo, Peter O.; Masala, Aluwani

    Chitosan (Chs) flakes were prepared from chitin materials that were extracted from the exoskeleton of Cape rock lobsters in South Africa. The Chs flakes were prepared into membranes and the Chs membranes were modified by cross-linking with H 2SO 4. The cross-linked Chs membranes were characterized for the application in direct methanol fuel cells. The Chs membrane characteristics such as water uptake, thermal stability, proton resistance and methanol permeability were compared to that of high performance conventional Nafion 117 membranes. Under the temperature range studied 20-60 °C, the membrane water uptake for Chs was found to be higher than that of Nafion. Thermal analysis revealed that Chs membranes could withstand temperature as high as 230 °C whereas Nafion 117 membranes were stable to 320 °C under nitrogen. Nafion 117 membranes were found to exhibit high proton resistance of 284 s cm -1 than Chs membranes of 204 s cm -1. The proton fluxes across the membranes were 2.73 mol cm -2 s -1 for Chs- and 1.12 mol cm -2 s -1 Nafion membranes. Methanol (MeOH) permeability through Chs membrane was less, 1.4 × 10 -6 cm 2 s -1 for Chs membranes and 3.9 × 10 -6 cm 2 s -1 for Nafion 117 membranes at 20 °C. Chs and Nafion membranes were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MAE) and their performances measure in a free-breathing commercial single cell DMFC. The Nafion membranes showed a better performance as the power density determined for Nafion membranes of 0.0075 W cm -2 was 2.7 times higher than in the case of Chs MEA.

  10. Thermally stable polybenzimidazole/carbon nano-tube composites for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jung-Fen; Lo, Chieh-Fang; Li, Long-Yun; Li, Hsieh-Yu; Chang, Chia-Ming; Liao, Kuo-Sung; Hu, Chien-Chieh; Liu, Ying-Ling; Lue, Shingjiang Jessie

    2014-01-01

    Nanocomposites of thermally stable polybenzimidazole (PBI) containing small amounts (<1%) of functionalized multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (CNT) are prepared using solution casting methods. These PBI and PBI/CNT composites are doped with potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution to prepare hydroxide-conducting electrolytes for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell (ADMFC) applications. The CNT-containing composites exhibit higher fractional free volumes and higher water diffusivities. CNT also promotes ionic conductivity of electrolytes and improves the fuel cell performance. Gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs) without polytetrafluoroethene (PTFE) treatment give superior cell power density compared to commercial E-tek GDEs, which contain hydrophobic PTFE layers. When the fuel cell is fed with 2 M methanol in 6 M KOH (as the anode fuel) and humidified oxygen (as the cathode oxidant), the system achieves a maximum power density of 104.7 mW cm-2 at 90 °C. These KOH-doped PBI/CNT composites have the potential to be used in high temperature alkaline fuel cell applications.

  11. Artificial Intelligence Techniques for the Estimation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasiloglu, Abdulsamet; Aras, Ömür; Bayramoglu, Mahmut

    2016-04-01

    Artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy inference systems are well known artificial intelligence techniques used for black-box modelling of complex systems. In this study, Feed-forward artificial neural networks (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) are used for modelling the performance of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Current density (I), fuel cell temperature (T), methanol concentration (C), liquid flow-rate (q) and air flow-rate (Q) are selected as input variables to predict the cell voltage. Polarization curves are obtained for 35 different operating conditions according to a statistically designed experimental plan. In modelling study, various subsets of input variables and various types of membership function are considered. A feed -forward architecture with one hidden layer is used in ANN modelling. The optimum performance is obtained with the input set (I, T, C, q) using twelve hidden neurons and sigmoidal activation function. On the other hand, first order Sugeno inference system is applied in ANFIS modelling and the optimum performance is obtained with the input set (I, T, C, q) using sixteen fuzzy rules and triangular membership function. The test results show that ANN model estimates the polarization curve of DMFC more accurately than ANFIS model.

  12. Highly active nitrogen-doped nanocarbon electrocatalysts for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruusenberg, Ivar; Ratso, Sander; Vikkisk, Merilin; Kanninen, Petri; Kallio, Tanja; Kannan, Arunachala M.; Tammeveski, Kaido

    2015-05-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells are assembled and evaluated using Fumatech FAA3 alkaline anion exchange membrane. Two novel metal-free cathode catalysts are synthesised, investigated and compared with the commercial Pt-based catalyst. In this work nitrogen-doped few-layer graphene/multi-walled carbon nanotube (N-FLG/MWCNT) composite and nitrogen-doped MWCNT (N-MWCNT) catalyst are prepared by pyrolysing the mixture of dicyandiamide (DCDA) and carbon nanomaterials at 800 °C. The resulting cathode catalyst material shows a remarkable electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M KOH solution employing the rotating disk electrode (RDE) method. Fuel cell tests are performed by using 1 M methanol as anode and pure oxygen gas cathode feed. The maximum power density obtained with the N-FLG/MWCNT material (0.72 mW cm-2) is similar to that of the Pt/C catalyst (0.72 mW cm-2), whereas the N-MWCNT material shows higher peak power density (0.92 mW cm-2) than the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  13. Crosslinked sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) proton exchange membranes for direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shuangling; Cui, Xuejun; Cai, Hongli; Fu, Tiezhu; Zhao, Chengji; Na, Hui

    In the present study, a series of the crosslinked sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) proton exchange membranes were prepared. The photochemical crosslinking of the SPEEK membranes was carried out by dissolving benzophenone and triethylamine photo-initiator system in the membrane casting solution and then exposing the resulting membranes after solvent evaporation to UV light. The physical and transport properties of crosslinked membranes were investigated. The membrane performance can be controlled by adjusting the photoirradiation time. The experimental results showed that the crosslinked SPEEK membranes with photoirradiation 10 min had the optimum performance for proton exchange membranes (PEMs). Compared with the non-crosslinked SPEEK membranes, the crosslinked SPEEK membranes with photoirradiation 10 min markedly improved thermal stabilities and mechanical properties as well as hydrolytic and oxidative stabilities, greatly reduced water uptake and methanol diffusion coefficients with only slight sacrifice in proton conductivities. Therefore, the crosslinked SPEEK membranes with photoirradiation 10 min were particularly promising as proton exchange membranes for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications.

  14. New anodic diffusive layer for passive micro-direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ting; Zou, Zhiqing; Chen, Mei; Li, Zhilin; Xia, Baojia; Yang, Hui

    The addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into anodic micro-porous layer (MPL) of the membrane electrode assembly significantly improves the performance of the passive micro-direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The maximum power density of ca. 32.2 mW cm -2 at a temperature of ca. 25 °C and under air-breathing mode is achieved with pure CNTs as anode MPL material. Impedance analysis and cyclic voltammetric measurements of the anodes indicate that the increased performance of the passive DMFC with the addition of CNTs into anodic MPLs could be attributed to the decrease in charge transfer resistance of the anode reaction and to the improvement in catalyst utilization. Scanning electron microscopy measurements show the network formation within the MPL due to the one-dimensional structure of CNTs, which could be beneficial to the methanol mass transfer and to the improvement in catalyst utilization. Furthermore, the durability test of a passive DMFC after 300 h operation demonstrates that the passive DMFC with CNTs as anode MPL materials exhibits very good stability.

  15. Microwave synthesis of polymer-embedded Pt-Ru catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Bensebaa, Farid; Farah, Abdiaziz A; Wang, Dashan; Bock, Christina; Du, Xiaomei; Kung, Judy; Le Page, Yvon

    2005-08-18

    Platinum-ruthenium nanoparticles stabilized within a conductive polymer matrix are prepared using microwave heating. Polypyrrole di(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, or PPyDEHS, has been chosen for its known electrical conductivity, thermal stability, and solubility in polar organic solvents. A scalable and quick two-step process is proposed to fabricate alloyed nanoparticles dispersed in PPyDEHS. First a mixture of PPyDEHS and metallic precursors is heated in a microwave under reflux conditions. Then the nanoparticles are extracted by centrifugation. Physical characterization by TEM shows that crystalline and monodisperse alloyed nanoparticles with an average size of 2.8 nm are obtained. Diffraction data show that crystallite size is around 2.0 nm. Methanol electro-oxidation data allow us to propose these novel materials as potential candidates for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) application. The observed decrease in sulfur content in the polymer upon incorporation of PtRu nanoparticles may have adversely affected the measured catalytic activity by decreasing the conductivity of PPyDEHS. Higher concentration of polymer leads to lower catalyst activity. Design and synthesis of novel conductive polymers is needed at this point to enhance the catalytic properties of these hybrid materials.

  16. Stable operation of air-blowing direct methanol fuel cells with high performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Kim, Jirae; Han, Sangil; Song, Inseob

    A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) that is a combination of a catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) for the anode and a catalyst-coated substrate (CCS) for the cathode is studied under air-blower conditions for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Compared with MEAs prepared by only the CCS method, the performance of DMFC MEAs employing the combination method is significantly improved by 30% with less methanol crossover. This feature can be attributed to an enhanced electrode|membrane interface in the anode side and significantly higher catalyst efficiency. Furthermore, DMFC MEAs designed by the combination method retain high power density without any degradation, while the CCM-type cell shows a downward tendency in electrochemical performance under air-blower conditions. This may be due to MEAs with CCM have a much more difficult structure of catalytic active sites in the cathode to eliminate the water produced by electrochemical reaction. In addition, DMFCs produced via combination methods exhibit a lower water crossover flux than CCS alternatives, due to the comparatively dense structure of the CCM anode. Hence, DMFCs with a combination MEA structure demonstrate the feasibility of a small fuel cell system employing the low noise of a fan, instead of a noisy and large capacity air pump, for portable electronic devices.

  17. The electrolyte challenge for a direct methanol-air polymer electrolyte fuel cell operating at temperatures up to 200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savinell, Robert; Yeager, Ernest; Tryk, Donald; Landau, Uziel; Wainright, Jesse; Gervasio, Dominic; Cahan, Boris; Litt, Morton; Rogers, Charles; Scherson, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Novel polymer electrolytes are being evaluated for use in a direct methanol-air fuel cell operating at temperatures in excess of 100 C. The evaluation includes tests of thermal stability, ionic conductivity, and vapor transport characteristics. The preliminary results obtained to date indicate that a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell is feasible. For example, Nafion 117 when equilibrated with phosphoric acid has a conductivity of at least 0.4 Omega(exp -1)cm(exp -1) at temperatures up to 200 C in the presence of 400 torr of water vapor and methanol vapor cross over equivalent to 1 mA/cm(exp 2) under a one atmosphere methanol pressure differential at 135 C. Novel polymers are also showing similar encouraging results. The flexibility to modify and optimize the properties by custom synthesis of these novel polymers presents an exciting opportunity to develop an efficient and compact methanol fuel cell.

  18. Platinum-antimony doped tin oxide nanoparticles supported on carbon black as anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chengqiang; Li, Yingzhi; Ma, Yuehui; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Qinghua

    2011-08-01

    Antimony doped tin oxide supported on carbon black (ATO/C) has been synthesized using an in situ co-precipitation method, and platinum-ATO/C nanoparticles have been prepared using a consecutive polyol process to enhance the catalyst activity for the methanol oxidation reaction. The Pt-ATO/C electrocatalyst is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microcopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and cyclic voltammetry. The Pt-ATO/C catalyst exhibits a relatively high activity for the methanol oxidation reaction compared to Pt-SnO2/C or commercial Pt/C catalyst. This activity can be attributed to the high electrical conductivities of the Sb-doped SnO2, which induces the electronic effects with Pt catalysts. Pt-ATO/C is a promising methanol oxidation catalyst with high activity for the reaction in direct methanol fuel cells.

  19. Polybenzimidazole membranes for direct methanol fuel cell: Acid-doped or alkali-doped?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long-Yun; Yu, Bor-Chern; Shih, Chao-Ming; Lue, Shingjiang Jessie

    2015-08-01

    Polybenzimidazole (PBI) films immersed in 2 M phosphoric acid (H3PO4) or 6 M potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution form electrolytes for conducting proton or hydroxide, respectively. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) with the alkali-KOH doped PBI gives 117.9 mW cm-2 of power output which is more than 2 times greater than the power density of 46.5 mW cm-2 with the H3PO4-doped PBI (vs.) when both of the DMFCs use a micro porous layer (MPL) in a gas-fed cathode and a MPL-free anode and are operated at 90 °C. When the MPL-free anode and cathode are used and the fuel flow rate is tripled, the peak power density of alkaline DMFC reaches 158.9 mW cm-2.

  20. A monolithic integrated micro direct methanol fuel cell based on sulfo functionalized porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Lu, Y. X.; Liu, L. T.; Wang, X. H.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a monolithic integrated micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) for the first time. The monolithic integrated μDMFC combines proton exchange membrane (PEM) and Pt nanocatalysts, in which PEM is achieved by the functionalized porous silicon membrane and 3D Pt nanoflowers being synthesized in situ on it as catalysts. Sulfo groups functionalized porous silicon membrane serves as a PEM and a catalyst support simultaneously. The μDMFC prototype achieves an open circuit voltage of 0.3 V, a maximum power density of 5.5 mW/cm2. The monolithic integrated μDMFC offers several desirable features such as compatibility with micro fabrication techniques, an undeformable solid PEM and the convenience of assembly.

  1. Catalyst inks and method of application for direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Davey, John; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon; Thomas, Sharon C.

    2004-02-24

    Inks are formulated for forming anode and cathode catalyst layers and applied to anode and cathode sides of a membrane for a direct methanol fuel cell. The inks comprise a Pt catalyst for the cathode and a Pt--Ru catalyst for the anode, purified water in an amount 4 to 20 times that of the catalyst by weight, and a perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer in an amount effective to provide an ionomer content in the anode and cathode surfaces of 20% to 80% by volume. The inks are prepared in a two-step process while cooling and agitating the solutions. The final solution is placed in a cooler and continuously agitated while spraying the solution over the anode or cathode surface of the membrane as determined by the catalyst content.

  2. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANO-CATALYSTS: TOWARD DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2010-06-16

    A series of bimetallic core-shell-alloy type Au-Pt nanomaterials with various morphologies, aspect ratios and compositions, were produced in a heterogenous epitaxial fashion. Gold nanoparticles with well-controlled particle size and shape, e.g. spheres, rods and cubes, were used as 'seeds' for platinum growth in the presence of a mild reducing agent, ascorbic acid and a cationic surfactant cethyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The reactions take place in air and water, and are quick, economical and amenable for scaling up. The synthesized nanocatalysts were characterized by electron microscopy techniques and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Nafion membranes were embedded with the Au-Pt nanomaterials and analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for their potential in direct methanol fuel cells applications.

  3. Direct methane conversion to methanol. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.D.; Falconer, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    We proposed to demonstrate the effectiveness of a catalytic membrane reactor (a ceramic membrane combined with a catalyst) to selectively produce methanol by partial oxidation of methane. Methanol is used as a chemical feedstock, gasoline additive, and turbine fuel. Methane partial oxidation using a catalytic membrane reactor has been determined as one of the promising approaches for methanol synthesis from methane. In the original proposal, the membrane was used to selectively remove methanol from the reaction zone before carbon oxides form, thus increasing the methanol yield. Methanol synthesis and separation in one step would also make methane more valuable for producing chemicals and fuels. However, all the membranes tested in this laboratory lost their selectivity under the reaction conditions. A modified non-isothermal, non-permselective membrane reactor then was built and satisfactory results were obtained. The conversion and selectivity data obtained in this laboratory were better than that of the most published studies.

  4. Directed assembly of nanomaterials for miniaturized sensors by dip-pen nanolithography using precursor inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming

    The advent of nanomaterials with enhanced properties and the means to pattern them in a controlled fashion have paved the way to construct miniaturized sensors for improved detection. However it remains a challenge for the traditional methods to create such sensors and sensor arrays. Dip pen nanolithography (DPN) can form nanostructures on a substrate by controlling the transfer of molecule inks. However, previous DPN can not pattern solid materials on insulating surfaces, which are necessary to form functional electronic devices. In the dissertation, the concept of reactive precursor inks for DPN is developed for the generation of solid functional nanostructures of the following materials: organic molecule, sol-gel material, and conducting polymer. First, the covalent bonding is unnecessary for DPN as shown in the colored ink DPN; therefore the numbers of molecules that can be patterned is extended beyond thiol or thiolated molecules. Subsequently, a reactive precursor strategy (sol) is developed to pattern inorganic or organic/inorganic composite nanostructures on silicon based substrates. The method works by hydrolysis of metal precursors in the water meniscus and allows the preparation of solid structures with controlled geometry beyond the individual molecule level. Then the SnO 2 nanostructures patterned between the gaps of electrodes are tested as gas sensors. Proof-of-concept experiments are demonstrated on miniaturized sensors that show fast response and recovery to certain gases. Furthermore, an eight-unit sensor array is fabricated on a chip using SnO2 sols that are doped with different metals. The multiplexed device can recognize different gases by comparing the response patterns with the reference patterns of known gases generated on the same array. At last, the idea of precursor ink for DPN is extended to construct conducting polymer based devices. By using an acid promoted polymerization approach, conducting polymers are patterned on silicon dioxide

  5. Recent advances in direct methanol fuel cells at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Zelenay, Piotr; Thomas, Sharon; Davey, John; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    This paper describes recent advances in the science and technology of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) made at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The effort on DMFCs at LANL includes work devoted to portable power applications, funded by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), and work devoted to potential transport applications, funded by the US DOE. We describe recent results with a new type of DMFC stack hardware that allows to lower the pitch per cell to 2 mm while allowing low air flow and air pressure drops. Such stack technology lends itself to both portable power and potential transport applications. Power densities of 300 W/l and 1 kW/l seem achievable under conditions applicable to portable power and transport applications, respectively. DMFC power system analysis based on the performance of this stack, under conditions applying to transport applications (joint effort with U.C. Davis), has shown that, in terms of overall system efficiency and system packaging requirements, a power source for a passenger vehicle based on a DMFC could compete favorably with a hydrogen-fueled fuel cell system, as well as with fuel cell systems based on fuel processing on board. As part of more fundamental studies performed, we describe optimization of anode catalyst layers in terms of PtRu catalyst nature, loading and catalyst layer composition and structure. We specifically show that, optimized content of recast ionic conductor added to the catalyst layer is a sensitive function of the nature of the catalyst. Other elements of membrane/electrode assembly (MEA) optimization efforts are also described, highlighting our ability to resolve, to a large degree, a well-documented problem of polymer electrolyte DMFCs, namely "methanol crossover". This was achieved by appropriate cell design, enabling fuel utilization as high as 90% in highly performing DMFCs.

  6. Study of catalysis for solid oxide fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xirong

    Fuel cells offer the enticing promise of cleaner electricity with lower environmental impact than traditional energy conversion technologies. Driven by the interest in power sources for portable electronics, and distributed generation and automotive propulsion markets, active development efforts in the technologies of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) devices have achieved significant progress. However, current catalysts for fuel cells are either of low catalytic activity or extremely expensive, presenting a key barrier toward the widespread commercialization of fuel cell devices. In this thesis work, atomic layer deposition (ALD), a novel thin film deposition technique, was employed to apply catalytic Pt to SOFC, and investigate both Pt skin catalysts and Pt-Ru catalysts for methanol oxidation, a very important reaction for DMFC, to increase the activity and utilization levels of the catalysts while simultaneously reducing the catalyst loading. For SOFCs, we explored the use of ALD for the fabrication of electrode components, including an ultra-thin Pt film for use as the electrocatalyst, and a Pt mesh structure for a current collector for SOFCs, aiming for precise control over the catalyst loading and catalyst geometry, and enhancement in the current collect efficiency. We choose Pt since it has high chemical stability and excellent catalytic activity for the O2 reduction reaction and the H2 oxidation reaction even at low operating temperatures. Working SOFC fuel cells were fabricated with ALD-deposited Pt thin films as an electrode/catalyst layer. The measured fuel cell performance reveals that comparable peak power densities were achieved for ALD-deposited Pt anodes with only one-fifth of the Pt loading relative to a DC-sputtered counterpart. In addition to the continuous electrocatalyst layer, a micro-patterned Pt structure was developed via the technique of area selective ALD. By coating yttria-stabilized zirconia, a

  7. Optimization for microwave-assisted direct liquefaction of bamboo residue in glycerol/methanol mixtures

    Treesearch

    Jiulong Xie; Jinqiu Qi; Chungyun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2015-01-01

    Bamboo residues were liquefied in a mixture of glycerol and methanol in the presence of sulfuric acid using microwave energy. We investigated the effects of liquefaction conditions, including glycerol/methanol ratio, liquefaction temperature, and reaction time on the conversion yield. The optimal liquefaction conditions were under the temperature of 120

  8. Direct observation of hexamethylbenzenium radical cations generated during zeolite methanol-to-olefin catalysis: an ESR study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Jung; Jang, Hoi-Gu; Lee, Jun Kyu; Min, Hyung-Ki; Hong, Suk Bong; Seo, Gon

    2011-09-07

    The generation of hexamethylbenzenium radical cations as the key reaction intermediate in chabazite-type molecular sieve acids (i.e., H-SAPO-34 and H-SSZ-13) during the methanol-to-olefin process has been directly evidenced by ESR spectroscopy.

  9. Enhanced performance of a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell (DMAFC) using a polyvinyl alcohol/fumed silica/KOH electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Shingjiang Jessie; Wang, Wei-Ting; Mahesh, K. P. O.; Yang, Chun-Chen

    A novel polymer-inorganic composite electrolyte for direct methanol alkaline fuel cells (DMAFCs) is prepared by physically blending fumed silica (FS) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to suppress the methanol permeability of the resulting nano-composites. Methanol permeability is suppressed in the PVA/FS composite when comparing with the pristine PVA membrane. The PVA membrane and the PVA/FS composite are immersed in KOH solutions to prepare the hydroxide-conducting electrolytes. The ionic conductivity, cell voltage and power density are studied as a function of temperature, FS content, KOH concentration and methanol concentration. The PVA/FS/KOH electrolyte exhibits higher ionic conductivity and higher peak power density than the PVA/KOH electrolyte. In addition, the concentration of KOH in the PVA/FS/KOH electrolytes plays a major role in achieving higher ionic conductivity and improves fuel cell performance. An open-circuit voltage of 1.0 V and a maximum power density of 39 mW cm -2 are achieved using the PVA/(20%)FS/KOH electrolyte at 60 °C with 2 M methanol and 6 M KOH as the anode fuel feed and with humidified oxygen at the cathode. The resulting maximum power density is higher than the literature data reported for DMAFCs prepared with hydroxide-conducting electrolytes and anion-exchange membranes. The long-term cell performance is sustained during a 100-h continuous operation.

  10. Self-assembled platinum nanoparticles on sulfonic acid-grafted graphene as effective electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jinlin; Li, Yanhong; Li, Shengli; Jiang, San Ping

    2016-02-01

    In this article, sulfonic acid-grafted reduced graphene oxide (S-rGO) were synthesized using a one-pot method under mild conditions, and used as Pt catalyst supports to prepare Pt/S-rGO electrocatalysts through a self-assembly route. The structure, morphologies and physicochemical properties of S-rGO were examined in detail by techniques such as atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The S-rGO nanosheets show excellent solubility and stability in water and the average particle size of Pt nanoparticles supported on S-rGO is ~3.8 nm with symmetrical and uniform distribution. The electrocatalytic properties of Pt/S-rGO were investigated for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). In comparison to Pt supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/VC) and Pt/rGO, the Pt/S-rGO electrocatalyst exhibits a much higher electrocatalytic activity, faster reaction kinetics and a better stability. The results indicate that Pt/S-rGO is a promising and effective electrocatalyst for MOR of DMFCs.

  11. Self-assembled platinum nanoparticles on sulfonic acid-grafted graphene as effective electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation in direct methanol fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jinlin; Li, Yanhong; Li, Shengli; Jiang, San Ping

    2016-01-01

    In this article, sulfonic acid-grafted reduced graphene oxide (S-rGO) were synthesized using a one-pot method under mild conditions, and used as Pt catalyst supports to prepare Pt/S-rGO electrocatalysts through a self-assembly route. The structure, morphologies and physicochemical properties of S-rGO were examined in detail by techniques such as atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The S-rGO nanosheets show excellent solubility and stability in water and the average particle size of Pt nanoparticles supported on S-rGO is ~3.8 nm with symmetrical and uniform distribution. The electrocatalytic properties of Pt/S-rGO were investigated for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). In comparison to Pt supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/VC) and Pt/rGO, the Pt/S-rGO electrocatalyst exhibits a much higher electrocatalytic activity, faster reaction kinetics and a better stability. The results indicate that Pt/S-rGO is a promising and effective electrocatalyst for MOR of DMFCs. PMID:26876468

  12. Fabrication of low-methanol-permeability sulfonated poly(phenylene oxide) membranes with hollow glass microspheres for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kisang; Kim, Myeongjin; Kim, Kiho; Ju, Hyun; Oh, Ilgeun; Kim, Jooheon

    2015-02-01

    Organic/inorganic composite membranes, based on sulfonated poly(phenylene oxide) (SPPO) and hollow glass microspheres (HGMs), with various compositions are prepared for use as proton exchange membranes in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Reaction time between chlorosulfonic acid solution and PPO is controlled to improve proton conductivity of the SPPO membrane. As a result, SPPO at 38.2% sulfonation is selected as the optimum degree of sulfonation. Afterwards, SPPO is successfully introduced onto the surfaces of HGMs to increase their dispersion in the SPPO matrix. The ion exchange capacities (IEC) and proton conductivities of the membranes decrease with increasing amounts of the SPPO-HGMs, because of the decrease of ionic sites with increasing HGM content. The SPPO-HGM composite membranes exhibit proton conductivities ranging from 0.0350 to 0.0212 S cm-1 and low methanol permeability ranging from 1.02 × 10-6 to 3.41 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 at 20 °C. Furthermore, the SPPO-HGM 9 wt%/SPPO membrane presents a maximum power density of 81.5 mW cm-2 and open circuit voltage of 0.70 V.

  13. Real-time monitoring of methanol concentration using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor for direct methanol fuel cell without reference liquid measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Kyosuke; Nozawa, Takuya; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing demand for sensors that continuously measure liquid concentrations and detect abnormalities in liquid environments. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied for the continuous monitoring of liquid concentrations. As the SH-SAW sensor functions using the relative measurement method, it normally needs a reference at each measurement. However, if the sensor is installed in a liquid flow cell, it is difficult to measure a reference liquid. Therefore, it is important to establish an estimation method for liquid concentrations using the SH-SAW sensor without requiring a reference measurement. In this study, the SH-SAW sensor is installed in a direct methanol fuel cell to monitor the methanol concentration. The estimated concentration is compared with a conventional density meter. Moreover, the effect of formic acid is examined. When the fuel temperature is higher than 70 °C, it is necessary to consider the influence of liquid conductivity. Here, an estimation method for these cases is also proposed.

  14. High throughput evaluation of perovskite-based anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Kishori; Mukasyan, Alexander; Varma, Arvind

    Liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) are promising candidates for portable power applications. However, owing to the problems associated with expensive Pt-based catalysts, viz., CO poisoning, a promising approach is to use complex oxides of the type ABO 3 (A = Sr, Ce, La, etc. and B = Co, Fe, Ni, Pt, Ru, etc.). In the current work, a variety of ABO 3 and A 2BO 4 type non-noble and partially substituted noble metal high surface area compounds were synthesized by an effective and rapid aqueous combustion synthesis (CS). Their catalytic activity was evaluated by using "High Throughput Screening Unit"-NuVant System, which compares up to 25 compositions simultaneously under DMFC conditions. It was found that the Sr-based perovskites showed performance comparable with the standard Pt-Ru catalyst. Further, it was observed that the method of doping SrRuO 3 with Pt influenced the activity. Specifically, platinum added during aqueous CS yielded better catalyst than when added externally at the ink preparation stage. Finally, it was also demonstrated that the presence of SrRuO 3 significantly enhanced the catalytic properties of Pt, leading to superior performance even at lower noble metal loadings.

  15. Biodiesel production from Spirulina microalgae feedstock using direct transesterification near supercritical methanol condition.

    PubMed

    Mohamadzadeh Shirazi, Hamed; Karimi-Sabet, Javad; Ghotbi, Cyrus

    2017-09-01

    Microalgae as a candidate for production of biodiesel, possesses a hard cell wall that prevents intracellular lipids leaving out from the cells. Direct or in situ supercritical transesterification has the potential for destruction of microalgae hard cell wall and conversion of extracted lipids to biodiesel that consequently reduces the total energy consumption. Response surface methodology combined with central composite design was applied to investigate process parameters including: Temperature, Time, Methanol-to-dry algae, Hexane-to-dry algae, and Moisture content. Thirty-two experiments were designed and performed in a batch reactor, and biodiesel efficiency between 0.44% and 99.32% was obtained. According to fatty acid methyl ester yields, a quadratic experimental model was adjusted and the significance of parameters was evaluated using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Effects of single and interaction parameters were also interpreted. In addition, the effect of supercritical process on the ultrastructure of microalgae cell wall using scanning electron spectrometry (SEM) was surveyed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel mesoporous carbon ceramics composites as electrodes for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Jean Marcel R.; Gatti, Giorgio; Graizzaro, Alessandro; Marchese, Leonardo; Pastore, Heloise O.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, a new family of materials for electrodes of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is presented. Mesoporous carbon ceramics (MCCs) are obtained by the addition of commercial graphite into the synthesis gel of SBA-15 mesoporous silica with SiO2/C weight ratios of 1/1 and 1/3. X-ray diffraction confirms both the formation of organized silica and the presence of graphite, and nitrogen physisorption measurements show that the presence of a graphitic phase does not interfere in the silica pore diameter although it diminishes the surface area. The MCCs modified with Pt or PtRu are tested as DMFC electrodes and compared with the commercial support Vulcan XC-72R. When used as cathode, the system using MCC-SBA-15 with SiO2/C weight ratios of 1/1 presents a negligible performance, while the MCC-SBA-15 with SiO2/C weight ratios of 1/3 is 2.9 times less active than the commercial support. On the other side, when used as anode, the MCC-SBA-15 with SiO2/C weight ratios of 1/3 displays performances comparable to Vulcan XC-72R.

  17. Quantitative study of ruthenium cross-over in direct methanol fuel cells during early operation hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoekel, A.; Melke, J.; Bruns, M.; Wippermann, K.; Kuppler, F.; Roth, C.

    2016-01-01

    In direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), ruthenium cross-over is an important degradation phenomenon. The loss of ruthenium from the anode, its transport through the membrane and its deposition onto the cathode are detrimental to the fuel cell performance and limit the fuel cell's lifetime. Here we present a quantitative study on the fraction of ruthenium being transferred from the anode to the cathode during early operation hours (0-100 h) of a DMFC. Already during fabrication of the MEA ruthenium is transferred to the cathode. In our pristine MEAs about 0.024 wt% Ru could be found in the cathode catalyst. The cell potential during operation seems to have only a minor influence on the dissolution process. In contrast, the operation time appears to be much more important. Our data hint at two dissolution processes: a fast process dominating the first hours of operation and a slower process, which is responsible for the ongoing ruthenium transfer during the fuel cell lifetime. After 2 h held at open circuit conditions the Ru content of the cathode side was 10 times higher than in the pristine MEA. In contrast, the slower process increased that amount only by a factor of two over the course of another 100 h.

  18. Passive cathodic water/air management device for micro-direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hsien-Chih; Chen, Po-Hon; Chen, Hung-Wen; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Pan, Chin; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    A high efficient passive water/air management device (WAMD) is proposed and successfully demonstrated in this paper. The apparatus consists of cornered micro-channels and air-breathing windows with hydrophobicity arrangement to regulate liquids and gases to flow on their predetermined pathways. A high performance water/air separation with water removal rate of about 5.1 μl s -1 cm -2 is demonstrated. The performance of the proposed WAMD is sufficient to manage a cathode-generated water flux of 0.26 μl s -1 cm -2 in the micro-direct methanol fuel cells (μDMFCs) which are operated at 100 mW cm -2 or 400 mA cm -2. Furthermore, the condensed vapors can also be collected and recirculated with the existing micro-channels which act as a passive water recycling system for μDMFCs. The durability testing shows that the fuel cells equipped with WAMD exhibit improved stability and higher current density.

  19. Non-syngas direct steam reforming of methanol to hydrogen and carbon dioxide at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai Man Kerry; Tong, Weiyi; West, Adam; Cheung, Kevin; Li, Tong; Smith, George; Guo, Yanglong; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2012-01-01

    A non-syngas direct steam reforming route is investigated for the conversion of methanol to hydrogen and carbon dioxide over a CuZnGaO(x) catalyst at 150-200 °C. This route is in marked contrast with the conventional complex route involving steam reformation to syngas (CO/H2) at high temperature, followed by water gas shift and CO cleanup stages for hydrogen production. Here we report that high quality hydrogen and carbon dioxide can be produced in a single-step reaction over the catalyst, with no detectable CO (below detection limit of 1 ppm). This can be used to supply proton exchange membrane fuel cells for mobile applications without invoking any CO shift and cleanup stages. The working catalyst contains, on average, 3-4 nm copper particles, alongside extremely small size of copper clusters stabilized on a defective ZnGa2O4 spinel oxide surface, providing hydrogen productivity of 393.6 ml g(-1)-cat h(-1) at 150 °C.

  20. Reliability and availability analysis of low power portable direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisworahardjo, N. S.; Alam, M. S.; Aydinli, G.

    This paper presents a methodology for modeling and calculating the reliability and availability of low power portable direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). System reliability and availability are critical factors for improving market acceptance and for determining the competitiveness of the low power DMFC. Two techniques have been used for analyzing the system reliability and availability requirements for various system components. Reliability block diagram (RBD) is formed based on the failure rates of irreparable system components. A state-space method is developed to calculate system availability using the Markov model (MM). The state-space method incorporates three different states-operational, derated, and fully faulted states. Since most system components spend their lifetime in performing normal functional task, this research is focused mainly on this operational period. The failure and repair rates for repairable DMFC systems are estimated on the basis of a homogeneous Poisson process (HPP) and exponential distribution. Extensive analytical modeling and simulation study has been performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  1. Molecular simulation of polyphosphazenes as gas separation and direct methanol fuel cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Naiping

    in the crystalline supercell to a higher-energy, lower-ordered structure in the mesophase. In the study of PBMP as potential direct methanol fuel cell membranes, the structures, equilibrium water swelling, methanol and water self-diffusion coefficients, and proton conductivity of sulfonated PBMP (crosslinked and non-crosslinked) have been simulated by molecular dynamics methods using a modified COMPASS force field. Both the equilibrium water swelling and the densities obtained for hydrated PBMP cells agree with the experimental values. In addition, the results of self-diffusion coefficients showed that methanol self-diffusion is only affected by the extent of crosslinking but self-diffusion of the hydronium ion is not affected. The results of proton conductivity suggest that at low hydration levels, proton and hydronium ion diffusion coefficients are both very low and the polymer is non-conducting; however increasing water content results in both greater hydronium ion diffusion and higher proton conductivity.

  2. Direct identification of prohibited substances in cosmetics and foodstuffs using ambient ionization on a miniature mass spectrometry system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiang; Bai, Hua; Li, Wentao; Wang, Chao; Li, Xinshi; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2016-03-17

    Significantly simplified work flows were developed for rapid analysis of various types of cosmetic and foodstuff samples by employing a miniature mass spectrometry system and ambient ionization methods. A desktop Mini 12 ion trap mass spectrometer was coupled with paper spray ionization, extraction spray ionization and slug-flow microextraction for direct analysis of Sudan Reds, parabens, antibiotics, steroids, bisphenol and plasticizer from raw samples with complex matrices. Limits of detection as low as 5 μg/kg were obtained for target analytes. On-line derivatization was also implemented for analysis of steroid in cosmetics. The developed methods provide potential analytical possibility for outside-the-lab screening of cosmetics and foodstuff products for the presence of illegal substances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Autonomous electrochemical biosensors: A new vision to direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sales, M Goreti F; Brandão, Lúcia

    2017-12-15

    A new approach to biosensing devices is demonstrated aiming an easier and simpler application in routine health care systems. Our methodology considered a new concept for the biosensor transducing event that allows to obtain, simultaneously, an equipment-free, user-friendly, cheap electrical biosensor. The use of the anode triple-phase boundary (TPB) layer of a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) as biosensor transducer is herein proposed. For that, the ionomer present in the anode catalytic layer of the DMFC is partially replaced by an ionomer with molecular recognition capability working as the biorecognition element of the biosensor. In this approach, fuel cell anode catalysts are modified with a molecularly imprinted polymer (plastic antibody) capable of protein recognition (ferritin is used as model protein), inserted in a suitable membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and tested, as initial proof-of-concept, in a non-passive fuel cell operation environment. The anchoring of the ionomer-based plastic antibody on the catalyst surface follows a simple one-step grafting from approach through radical polymerization. Such modification increases fuel cell performance due to the proton conductivity and macroporosity characteristics of the polymer on the TPB. Finally, the response and selectivity of the bioreceptor inside the fuel cell showed a clear and selective signal from the biosensor. Moreover, such pioneering transducing approach allowed amplification of the electrochemical response and increased biosensor sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude when compared to a 3-electrodes configuration system. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of green chemistry techniques to prepare electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kenichi; Wang, Joanna S; Wai, Chien M

    2010-03-25

    A series of green techniques for synthesizing carbon nanotube-supported platinum nanoparticles and their high electrocatalytic activity toward methanol fuel cell applications are reported. The techniques utilize either the supercritical fluid carbon dioxide or water as a medium for depositing platinum nanoparticles on surfaces of multiwalled or single-walled carbon nanotubes. The catalytic properties of the carbon nanotubes-supported Pt nanoparticle catalysts prepared by four different techniques are compared for anodic oxidation of methanol and cathodic reduction of oxygen using cyclic voltammetry. One technique using galvanic exchange of Pt(2+) in water with zerovalent iron present on the surfaces of as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes produces a Pt catalyst that shows an unusually high catalytic activity for reduction of oxygen but a negligible activity for oxidation of methanol. This fuel-selective catalyst may have a unique application as a cathode catalyst in methanol fuel cells to alleviate the problems caused by crossover of methanol through the polymer electrolyte membrane.

  5. Facile synthesis of Pt-Pd@Silicon nanostructure as an advanced electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Jafari-Asl, M.; Rezaei, B.; Abarghoui, M. Mokhtari; Farrokhpour, H.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, platinum-palladium (Pt-Pd) is assembled in-situ on the surface of porous silicon flour (PSiF) through chemical reduction of PtCl62-/PdCl42- and oxidation of the precursor solution SiF64-. The components and the morphological properties of the Pt-Pd on PSiF is investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction techniques. In the next stage, screen printed graphene electrode (SPGE) is prepared by electro-reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide at the surface of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), which is subsequently characterized by FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, FE-SEM, and electrochemical methods. Finally, a combination of Pt-Pd@PSi nanostructure and SPGE is used for the electro-oxidation of methanol in direct methanol fuel cell. The electrochemical results demonstrate that the Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE exhibits an excellent electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation. In addition, the electron transfer kinetic of methanol oxidation on Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that the surface of Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE is not affected (poisoned) by intermediate products such as CO.

  6. In and ex situ characterization of an anion-exchange membrane for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell (ADMFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santasalo-Aarnio, Annukka; Hietala, Sami; Rauhala, Taina; Kallio, Tanja

    2011-08-01

    Anion exchange membrane fumasep® FAA-2 was characterized with ex and in situ methods in order to estimate the membranes' suitability as an electrolyte for an alkaline direct methanol fuel cell (ADMFC). The interactions of this membrane with water, hydroxyl ions and methanol were studied with both calorimetry and NMR and compared with the widely used proton exchange membrane Nafion® 115. The results indicate that FAA-2 has a tighter structure and more homogeneous distribution of ionic groups in contrast to the clustered structure of Nafion, moreover, the diffusion of OH- ions through this membrane is clearly slower compared to water molecules. The permeability of methanol through the FAA-2 membrane was found to be an order of magnitude lower than for Nafion. Fuel cell experiments in 1 mol dm-3 methanol with FAA-2 resulted in OCV of 0.58 V and maximum power density of 0.32 mW cm-2. However, even higher current densities were obtained with highly concentrated fuels. This implies that less water is needed for fuel dilution, thereby decreasing the mass of the fuel cell system. In addition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for the ADMFC was used to determine ohmic resistance of the cell facilitating the further membrane development.

  7. Surface tailored single walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireeti, Kota V. M. K.; Jha, Neetu

    2017-10-01

    A strategy for tuning the surface property of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) for enhanced methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) along with methanol tolerance is presented. The surface functionality is tailored using controlled acid and base treatment. Acid treatment leads to the attachment of carboxylic carbon (CC) fragments to SWNT making it hydrophilic (P3-SWNT). Base treatment of P3-SWNT with 0.05 M NaOH reduces the CCs and makes it hydrophobic (P33-SWNT). Pt catalyst supported on the P3-SWNT possesses enhanced MOR whereas that supported on P33-SWNT not only enhances ORR kinetics but also possess good tolerance towards methanol oxidation as verified by the electrochemical technique.

  8. Ni2P Makes Application of the PtRu Catalyst Much Stronger in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jinfa; Feng, Ligang; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei

    2015-10-12

    PtRu is regarded as the best catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells, but the performance decay resulting from the loss of Ru seriously hinders commercial applications. Herein, we demonstrated that the presence of Ni2 P largely reduces Ru loss, which thus makes the application of PtRu much stronger in direct methanol fuel cells. Outstanding catalytic activity and stability were observed by cyclic voltammetry. Upon integrating the catalyst material into a practical direct methanol fuel cell, the highest maximum power density was achieved on the PtRu-Ni2P/C catalyst among the reference catalysts at different temperatures. A maximum power density of 69.9 mW cm(-2) at 30 °C was obtained on PtRu-Ni2P/C, which is even higher than the power density of the state-of-the-art commercial PtRu catalyst at 70 °C (63.1 mW cm(-2)). Moreover, decay in the performance resulting from Ru loss was greatly reduced owing to the presence of Ni2 P, which is indicative of very promising applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Direct methane conversion to methanol. Final report, July 19, 1990--May 18, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    One objective of this project was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a catalytic membrane reactor (a ceramic membrane combined with a catalyst) to selectively produce methanol by partial oxidation of methane. Methanol is used as a chemical feed stock, gasoline additive, and turbine fuel. Methane partial oxidation using a catalytic membrane reactor has been determined as one of the promising approaches for methanol synthesis from methane. Methanol synthesis and separation in one step would also make methane valuable for producing chemicals and fuels. Another valuable fuel product is H{sub 2}. Its separation from other gasification products would make it very valuable as a chemical feedstock and clean fuel for fuel cells. Gasification of coal or other organic fuels as a source of H{sub 2} produces compounds (CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O) that require high temperature (1000-1500{degrees}F) and high pressure (600-1000 psia) separations. A zeolite membrane layer on a mechanically stable ceramic or stainless steel support would have ideal applications for this type of separation. Separations using zeolite membrane was also evaluated for use in the production in the above fuels. 20 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Direct methane conversion to methanol. Final report, April 13, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.D.; Falconer, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    We proposed to demonstrate the effectiveness of a catalytic membrane reactor (a ceramic membrane combined with a catalyst) to selectively produce methanol by partial oxidation of methane. Methanol is used as a chemical feed stock, gasoline additive, and turbine fuel. Methane partial oxidation using a catalytic membrane reactor has been determined as one of the promising approaches for methanol synthesis from methane. Methanol synthesis and separation in one step would also make methane more valuable for producing chemicals and fuels. Another valuable fuel product is H{sub 2}. Its separation from other gasification products would make it very valuable as a chemical feedstock and clean fuel for fuel cells. Gasification of coal or other organic fuels as a source of H{sub 2} produces compounds (CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O) that require high temperature (1000-1500 degrees F) and high pressure (600-1000 psia) separations. A zeolite membrane layer on a mechanically stable ceramic or stainless steel support would have ideal applications for this type of separation.

  11. A miniature class V flextensional cymbal transducer with directional beam patterns: the double-driver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Hladky-Hennion, A C; Hughes, W J; Newnham, R E

    2001-03-01

    The "double-driver" cymbal, a directional class V flextensional transducer, is described in this paper. Its basic structure is a bilaminar piezoelectric disk with metal caps as mechanical transformers and amplifiers. The directivity was accomplished by exciting the double-driver in a combined flexural and bending mode causing the sound pressure to add in one direction and cancel in the opposite direction. The cardioid beam pattern predicted by finite element modeling agreed well with the experimental measurements. A 3 x 3 double-driver array was constructed to demonstrate that under optimal conditions the array can provide a directional beam pattern with a front-to-back ratio of more than 20 dB.

  12. Direct-Write Printing on Three-Dimensional Geometries for Miniaturized Detector and Electronic Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paquette, Beth; Samuels, Margaret; Chen, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Direct-write printing techniques will enable new detector assemblies that were not previously possible with traditional assembly processes. Detector concepts were manufactured using this technology to validate repeatability. Additional detector applications and printed wires on a 3-dimensional magnetometer bobbin will be designed for print. This effort focuses on evaluating performance for direct-write manufacturing techniques on 3-dimensional surfaces. Direct-write manufacturing has the potential to reduce mass and volume for fabrication and assembly of advanced detector concepts by reducing trace widths down to 10 microns, printing on complex geometries, allowing new electronic concept production, and reduced production times of complex those electronics.

  13. Bimetallic Nickel/Ruthenium Catalysts Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Temperature Direct Methanol Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heonjae; Kim, Jun Woo; Park, Joonsuk; An, Jihwan; Lee, Tonghun; Prinz, Fritz B; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-11-09

    Nickel and ruthenium bimetallic catalysts were heterogeneously synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD) for use as the anode of direct methanol solid oxide fuel cells (DMSOFCs) operating in a low-temperature range. The presence of highly dispersed ALD Ru islands over a porous Ni mesh was confirmed, and the Ni/ALD Ru anode microstructure was observed. Fuel cell tests were conducted using Ni-only and Ni/ALD Ru anodes with approximately 350 μm thick gadolinium-doped ceria electrolytes and platinum cathodes. The performance of fuel cells was assessed using pure methanol at operating temperatures of 300-400 °C. Micromorphological changes of the anode after cell operation were investigated, and the content of adsorbed carbon on the anode side of the operated samples was measured. The difference in the maximum power density between samples utilizing Ni/ALD Ru and Pt/ALD Ru, the latter being the best catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells, was observed to be less than 7% at 300 °C and 30% at 350 °C. The improved electrochemical activity of the Ni/ALD Ru anode compared to that of the Ni-only anode, along with the reduction of the number of catalytically active sites due to agglomeration of Ni and carbon formation on the Ni surface as compared to Pt, explains this decent performance.

  14. Analysis of the electrochemical characteristics of a direct methanol fuel cell based on a Pt-Ru/C anode catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Arico, A.S.; Creti, P.; Mantegna, R.

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with a vapour-feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) based on a Nafion 117{reg_sign} solid polymer electrolyte. Pt-Ru/C and Pt/C catalysts were employed for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction, respectively. Structure and surface chemistry of catalysts were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Membrane/electrode assembly (M&E) was prepared by using a {open_quotes}paste process{close_quotes} method. Electrical power densities of about 150 mW cm{sup -2} were obtained at 95{degrees} C with Pt loadings of 0.8 and 0.5 mg cm{sup -2} at anode and cathode respectively.

  15. Highly dispersed Pt-Ni nanoparticles on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for application in direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shujuan; Ma, Yanwen; Tao, Haisheng; Jian, Guoqiang; Wang, Xizhang; Fan, Yining; Zhu, Jianmin; Hu, Zheng

    2010-06-01

    Binary Pt-Ni alloyed nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) have been facilely constructed without pre-modification by making use of the active sites in NCNTs due to the N-participation. So-obtained binary Pt-Ni alloyed nanoparticles have been highly dispersed on the outer surface of the support with the size of about 3-4 nm. The electrochemical properties of the catalysts for methanol oxidation have been systematically evaluated. Binary Pt-Ni alloyed composites with molar ratio (Pt:Ni) of 3:2 and 3:1 present enhanced electrocatalytic activities and improved tolerance to CO poisoning as well as the similar stability, in comparison with the commercial Pt/C catalyst and the monometallic Pt/NCNTs catalysts. These results imply that so-constructed nanocomposite catalysts have the potential for applications in direct methanol fuel cells.

  16. Polyphosphazene-Based Proton-Exchange Membranes for Direct Liquid Methanol Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-04

    sulfonic acid site), as shown in Figure 9 and (ii) the neutralization of some sulfonic acid groups in SPOP due to complexation with PBI (see Figure 10...polybenzimidazole (for acid -base complexation crosslinking) prior to membrane casting. Some of the films containing poly[bis(3- methylphenoxy)phosphazene...sulfonated poly[bis(phenoxy)phosphazene] (SPOP) and polybenzimidazole ( PBI ) worked particularly well in a DMFC (at 60oC 1.0 M methanol, and ambient

  17. Performance of composite Nafion/PVA membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollá, Sergio; Compañ, Vicente

    2011-03-01

    This work has been focused on the characterization of the methanol permeability and fuel cell performance of composite Nafion/PVA membranes in function of their thickness, which ranged from 19 to 97 μm. The composite membranes were made up of Nafion® polymer deposited between polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers. The resistance to methanol permeation of the Nafion/PVA membranes shows a linear variation with the thickness. The separation between apparent and true permeability permits to give an estimated value of 4.0 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 for the intrinsic or true permeability of the bulk phase at the composite membranes. The incorporation of PVA nanofibers causes a remarkable reduction of one order of magnitude in the methanol permeability as compared with pristine Nafion® membranes. The DMFC performances of membrane-electrode assemblies prepared from Nafion/PVA and pristine Nafion® membranes were tested at 45, 70 and 95 °C under various methanol concentrations, i.e., 1, 2 and 3 M. The nanocomposite membranes with thicknesses of 19 μm and 47 μm reached power densities of 211 mW cm-2 and 184 mW cm-2 at 95 °C and 2 M methanol concentration. These results are comparable to those found for Nafion® membranes with similar thickness at the same conditions, which were 210 mW cm-2 and 204 mW cm-2 respectively. Due to the lower amount of Nafion® polymer present within the composite membranes, it is suggested a high degree of utilization of Nafion® as proton conductive material within the Nafion/PVA membranes, and therefore, significant savings in the consumed amount of Nafion® are potentially able to be achieved. In addition, the reinforcement effect caused by the PVA nanofibers offers the possibility of preparing membranes with very low thickness and good mechanical properties, while on the other hand, pristine Nafion® membranes are unpractical below a thickness of 50 μm.

  18. Highly stable ionic-covalent cross-linked sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Linfeng; Zhu, Xingye; Xu, Jianfeng; Qian, Huidong; Zou, Zhiqing; Yang, Hui

    2017-05-01

    A novel ionic cross-linked sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) containing equal content of sulfonic acid and pendant tertiary amine groups (TA-SPEEK) has been initially synthesized for the application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). By adjusting the ratio of p-xylene dibromide to tertiary amine groups of TA-SPEEK, a series of ionic-covalent cross-linked membranes (C-SPEEK-x) with tunable degree of cross-linking are prepared. Compared with the pristine membrane, the ionic and ionic-covalent cross-linked proton exchange membranes (PEMs) exhibit reduced methanol permeability and improved mechanical properties, dimensional and oxidative stability. The proton conductivity and methanol selectivity of protonated TA-SPEEK and C-SPEEK-x at 25 °C is up to 0.109 S cm-1 and 3.88 × 105 S s cm-3, respectively, which are higher than that of Nafion 115. The DMFC incorporating C-SPEEK-25 exhibits a maximum power density as high as 35.3 mW cm-2 with 4 M MeOH at 25 °C (31.8 mW cm-2 for Nafion 115). Due to the highly oxidative stability of the membrane, no obvious performance degradation of the DMFC is observed after more than 400 h operation, indicating such cost-effective ionic-covalent cross-linked membranes have substantial potential as alternative PEMs for DMFC applications.

  19. Position dependent analysis of membrane electrode assembly degradation of a direct methanol fuel cell via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Zamel, Nada; Gerteisen, Dietmar

    2013-11-01

    The performance of a direct methanol fuel cell MEA degraded during an operational period of more than 3000 h in a stack is locally examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Therefore, after disassembling the MEA is cut into small pieces and analyzed in a 1 cm2 test cell. Using a reference electrode, we were capable of measuring the anode and cathode spectra separately. The spectra of the segments at different positions do not follow a specified trend from methanol inlet to outlet of the stack flow field. The anode spectra were analyzed with an equivalent circuit simulation. The conductance of the charge transfer was found to increase with current density up to a point where a raising limitation process of the complex methanol oxidation dominates, which is not a bottleneck at low current density. Further, an increase of the double layer capacitance with current density was observed. The diffusion resistance was calculated as an effective diffusion coefficient in the order of 10-10 m2 s-1; implying that the diffusion limitation is not the bulk diffusion in the backing layer. Finally, the degree of poisoning of the catalysts by carbon monoxide was measured as a pseudo inductive arc and decreases with increasing current.

  20. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/carbon fiber paper composite to support Pt nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Yi, Xi-bin; Liu, Shuo; Fan, Hui-Li; Ju, Wei; Wang, Qi-Chun; Ma, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is introduced as a catalyst support material for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Well dispersed Pt nanoparticles on VACNTs surface are prepared by impregnation-reduction method. The VACNTs on CFP possess well-maintained alignment, large surface area and good electrical conductivity, which leading to the formation of Pt particles with a smaller size and enhance the Pt utilization rate. The structure and nature of resulting Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalysts for methanol oxidation are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). With the aid of VACNTs, well-dispersed Pt catalysts enable the reversibly rapid redox kinetic since electron transport efficiently passes through a one-dimensional pathway, which leads to enhance the catalytic activity and Pt utilization rate. Compared with the Pt/XC-72/CFP electrode, the electrochemical measurements results display that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalyst shows much higher electrocatalytic activity and better stability for methanol oxidation. In addition, the oxidation current from 200 to 1200 s decayed more slowly for the Pt/VACNTs/CFP than that of the Pt/XC-72/CFP catalysts, indicating less accumulation of adsorbed CO species. All those results imply that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP has a great potential for applications in DMFCs.

  1. Peripheral tissue oxygenation during standard CPB and miniaturized CPB (direct oxymetric tissue perfusion monitoring study).

    PubMed

    Mandak, Jiri; Brzek, Vladimir; Svitek, Vladimir; Dergel, Martin; Lago Chek, James; Volt, Martin; Horak, Miroslav; Kubicek, Jaroslav; Lonsky, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the impact of standard cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with mini CPB on peripheral tissue perfusion. 24 patients with ischemic heart disease scheduled for CPB were randomised to two groups: Group A (12 patients, standard CPB) and Group B (12 patients, mini CPB). Oxygen tension was measured with an optical multiparametric sensor inserted into the patient's deltoid muscle. Lower priming in Group B (870 ± 221 mL) vs. Group A (1502 ± 48 mL) and significantly reduced hemodilution during mini CPB (Group B 25.3 ± 1.1% vs. Group A 30.1 ± 2.3%) were recorded. Higher and continuous blood flow during perfusion was analysed in Group A (4.58 ± 0.34 L.min(-1)) and lower than calculated blood flow was found in Group B (3.49 ± 0.51 L.min(-1) vs. 4.66 ± 0.38 L.min(-1)). There was a direct correlation between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and ptO2 in Group A during CPB and a direct correlation between pump blood flow and MAP during CPB in Group B. Higher levels of ptO2 during CPB and surgery after CPB in comparison with initial levels were found in Group B. Decreased ptO2 levels after surgery were found in both groups. Mini CPB enables perfusion with a relatively low flow. The results of this study suggest that a flow decrease in mini CPB is well tolerated by the organism.

  2. High-Performance Alkaline Direct Methanol Fuel Cell using a Nitrogen-Postdoped Anode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    methanol strip - ping voltammetry {MSV) technique.rm Notably, CO stripping curves could not be obtained for either the N-doped PtRu/C or the undoped...rate of 5 mV s-1 at 25 oc. The ECSA of the cathode was measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The cathode of the MEA was fed with 2M NaOH for 30 min at...terfacial structure, and hence performance, the study em- ployed very high catalyst loadings for both the anode (PtRu black 8 mgcm-2) and cathode {Pt

  3. Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol by Direct Injection of Electrons into Immobilized Enzymes on a Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Schlager, Stefanie; Dumitru, Liviu Mihai; Haberbauer, Marianne; Fuchsbauer, Anita; Neugebauer, Helmut; Hiemetsberger, Daniela; Wagner, Annika; Portenkirchner, Engelbert; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2016-03-21

    We present results for direct bio-electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 to C1 products using electrodes with immobilized enzymes. Enzymatic reduction reactions are well known from biological systems where CO2 is selectively reduced to formate, formaldehyde, or methanol at room temperature and ambient pressure. In the past, the use of such enzymatic reductions for CO2 was limited due to the necessity of a sacrificial co-enzyme, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), to supply electrons and the hydrogen equivalent. The method reported here in this paper operates without the co-enzyme NADH by directly injecting electrons from electrodes into immobilized enzymes. We demonstrate the immobilization of formate, formaldehyde, and alcohol dehydrogenases on one-and-the-same electrode for direct CO2 reduction. Carbon felt is used as working electrode material. An alginate-silicate hybrid gel matrix is used for the immobilization of the enzymes on the electrode. Generation of methanol is observed for the six-electron reduction with Faradaic efficiencies of around 10%. This method of immobilization of enzymes on electrodes offers the opportunity for electrochemical application of enzymatic electrodes to many reactions in which a substitution of the expensive sacrificial co-enzyme NADH is desired.

  4. Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol by Direct Injection of Electrons into Immobilized Enzymes on a Modified Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Dumitru, Liviu Mihai; Haberbauer, Marianne; Fuchsbauer, Anita; Neugebauer, Helmut; Hiemetsberger, Daniela; Wagner, Annika; Portenkirchner, Engelbert; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We present results for direct bio‐electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 to C1 products using electrodes with immobilized enzymes. Enzymatic reduction reactions are well known from biological systems where CO2 is selectively reduced to formate, formaldehyde, or methanol at room temperature and ambient pressure. In the past, the use of such enzymatic reductions for CO2 was limited due to the necessity of a sacrificial co‐enzyme, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), to supply electrons and the hydrogen equivalent. The method reported here in this paper operates without the co‐enzyme NADH by directly injecting electrons from electrodes into immobilized enzymes. We demonstrate the immobilization of formate, formaldehyde, and alcohol dehydrogenases on one‐and‐the‐same electrode for direct CO2 reduction. Carbon felt is used as working electrode material. An alginate–silicate hybrid gel matrix is used for the immobilization of the enzymes on the electrode. Generation of methanol is observed for the six‐electron reduction with Faradaic efficiencies of around 10 %. This method of immobilization of enzymes on electrodes offers the opportunity for electrochemical application of enzymatic electrodes to many reactions in which a substitution of the expensive sacrificial co‐enzyme NADH is desired. PMID:26890322

  5. Polypyrrole layered SPEES/TPA proton exchange membrane for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelakandan, S.; Kanagaraj, P.; Sabarathinam, R. M.; Nagendran, A.

    2015-12-01

    Hybrid membranes based on sulfonated poly(1,4-phenylene ether ether sulfone) (SPEES)/tungstophosphoric acid (TPA) were prepared. SPEES/TPA membrane surfaces were modified with polypyrrole (Ppy) by in situ polymerization method to reduce the TPA leaching. The morphology and electrochemical property of the surface coated membranes were studied by SEM, AFM, water uptake, ion exchange capacity, proton conductivity, methanol permeability and tensile strength. The water uptake and the swelling ratio of the surface coated membranes decreased with increasing the Ppy layer. The surface roughness of the hybrid membrane was decreased with an increase in Ppy layer on the membrane surface. The methanol permeability of SPEES/TPA-Ppy4 hybrid membrane was significantly suppressed and found to be 2.1 × 10-7 cm2 s-1, which is 1.9 times lower than pristine SPEES membrane. The SPEES/TPA-Ppy4 membrane exhibits highest relative selectivity (2.86 × 104 S cm-3 s) than the other membrane with low TPA leaching. The tensile strength of hybrid membranes was improved with the introduction of Ppy layer. Combining their lower swelling ratio, high thermal stability and selectivity, SPEES/TPA-Ppy4 membranes could be a promising material as PEM for DMFC applications.

  6. Design rules for electrode arrangement in an air-breathing alkaline direct methanol laminar flow fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorson, Michael R.; Brushett, Fikile R.; Timberg, Chris J.; Kenis, Paul J. A.

    2012-11-01

    The influence of electrode length on performance is investigated in an air-breathing alkaline direct methanol laminar flow fuel cell (LFFC). Depletion of methanol at the electrode surface along the direction of flow hinders reaction kinetics and consequently also cell performance. Reducing the electrode length can decrease the influence of boundary layer depletion, and thereby, improve both the current and power densities. Here, the effect of boundary layer depletion was found to play a significant effect on performance within the first 18 mm of an electrode length. To further utilize the increased power densities provided by shorter electrode lengths, alternative electrode aspect ratios (electrode length-to-width) and electrode arrangements were explored experimentally. Furthermore, by fitting an empirical model based on experimentally obtained data, we demonstrate that a configuration comprised of a series of short electrodes and operated at low flow rates can achieve higher current and power outputs. The analysis of optimal electrode aspect ratio and electrode arrangements can also be applied to other microfluidic reactor designs in which reaction depletion boundary layers occur due to surface reactions.

  7. Development of molecular and solid catalysts for the direct low-temperature oxidation of methane to methanol.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Regina; von Malotki, Christian; Baumgarten, Martin; Müllen, Klaus; Baltes, Christian; Antonietti, Markus; Kuhn, Pierre; Weber, Jens; Thomas, Arne; Schüth, Ferdi

    2010-02-22

    The direct low-temperature oxidation of methane to methanol is demonstrated on a highly active homogeneous molecular catalyst system and on heterogeneous molecular catalysts based on polymeric materials possessing ligand motifs within the material structure. The N-(2-methylpropyl)-4,5-diazacarbazolyl-dichloro-platinum(II) complex reaches significantly higher activity compared to the well-known Periana system and allows first conclusions on electronic and structural requirements for high catalytic activity in this reaction. Interestingly, comparable activities could be achieved utilizing a platinum modified poly(benzimidazole) material, which demonstrates for the first time a solid catalyst with superior activity compared to the Periana system. Although the material shows platinum leaching, improved activity and altered electronic properties, compared to the conventional Periana system, support the proposed conclusions on structure-activity relationships. In comparison, platinum modified triazine-based catalysts show lower catalytic activity, but rather stable platinum coordination even after several catalytic cycles. Based on these systems, further development of improved solid catalysts for the direct low-temperature oxidation of methane to methanol is feasible.

  8. Platinum supported on functionalized ordered mesoporous carbon as electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvillo, L.; Lázaro, M. J.; García-Bordejé, E.; Moliner, R.; Cabot, P. L.; Esparbé, I.; Pastor, E.; Quintana, J. J.

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) with a specific area of 570 m 2 g -1 was synthesised using mesoporous silica SBA-15 as template. OMC was used as platinum catalyst support using the method of reduction with NaBH 4. Before deposition of platinum, the texture and surface chemistry of the support were modified by oxidation treatments in liquid phase using nitric acid as oxidative agent. During the oxidation process, oxygen surface groups were created, whereas ordered porous structure was maintained, as temperature programmed desorption and transmission electronic microscopy showed, respectively. Platinum supported materials were well dispersed over the mesoporous support and its catalytic performance towards methanol oxidation improved when compared with commercial carbon (Vulcan XC-72).

  9. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Power Supply For All-Day True Wireless Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Wells

    2008-11-30

    PolyFuel has developed state-of-the-art portable fuel cell technology for the portable computing market. A novel approach to passive water recycling within the MEA has led to significant system simplification and size reduction. Miniature stack technology with very high area utilization and minimalist seals has been developed. A highly integrated balance of plant with very low parasitic losses has been constructed around the new stack design. Demonstration prototype systems integrated with laptop computers have been shown in recent months to leading OEM computer manufacturers. PolyFuel intends to provide this technology to its customers as a reference design as a means of accelerating the commercialization of portable fuel cell technology. The primary goal of the project was to match the energy density of a commercial lithium ion battery for laptop computers. PolyFuel made large strides against this goal and has now demonstrated 270 Wh/liter compared with lithium ion energy densities of 300 Wh/liter. Further, more incremental, improvements in energy density are envisioned with an additional 20-30% gains possible in each of the next two years given further research and development.

  10. The influence of methanol on the chemical state of PtRu anodes in a high-temperature direct methanol fuel cell studied in situ by synchrotron-based near-ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saveleva, Viktoriia A.; Daletou, Maria K.; Savinova, Elena R.

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based near-ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) has recently become a powerful tool for the investigation of interfacial phenomena in electrochemical power sources such as batteries and fuel cells. Here we present an in situ NAP-XPS study of the anode of a high-temperature direct methanol fuel cell with a phosphoric acid-doped hydrocarbon membrane, which reveals an enhanced flooding of the Pt3Ru anode with phosphoric acid in the presence of methanol. An analysis of the electrode surface composition depending on the cell voltage and on the presence of methanol reveals the strong influence of the latter on the extent of Pt oxidation and on the transformation of Ru into Ru (IV) hydroxide.

  11. Kinetic analysis of carbon monoxide and methanol oxidation on high performance carbon-supported Pt-Ru electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez-Palenzuela, Amado; Centellas, Francesc; Garrido, José Antonio; Arias, Conchita; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Brillas, Enric; Cabot, Pere-Lluís

    The kinetic parameters of carbon monoxide and methanol oxidation reactions on a high performance carbon-supported Pt-Ru electrocatalyst (HP 20% 1:1 Pt-Ru alloy on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black) have been studied using cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode (RDE) techniques in 0.50 M H 2SO 4 and H 2SO 4 (0.06-0.92 M) + CH 3OH (0.10-1.00 M) solutions at 25.0-45.0 °C. CO oxidation showed an irreversible behaviour with an adsorption control giving an exchange current density of 2.3 × 10 -6 A cm -2 and a Tafel slope of 113 mV dec -1 (α = 0.52) at 25.0 °C. Methanol oxidation behaved as an irreversible mixed-controlled reaction, probably with generation of a soluble intermediate (such as HCHO or HCOOH), showing an exchange current density of 7.4 × 10 -6 A cm -2 and a Tafel slope of 199 mV dec -1 (α = 0.30) at 25.0 °C. Reaction orders of 0.5 for methanol and -0.5 for proton were found, which are compatible with the consideration of the reaction between Pt-CO and Ru-OH species as the rate-determining step, being the initial methanol adsorption adjustable to a Temkin isotherm. The activation energy calculated through Arrhenius plots was 58 kJ mol -1, practically independent of the applied potential. Methanol oxidation on carbon-supported Pt-Ru electrocatalyst was improved by multiple potential cycles, indicating the generation of hydrous ruthenium oxide, RuO xH y, which enhances the process.

  12. Proton electrolyte membrane properties and direct methanol fuel cell performance. II. Fuel cell performance and membrane properties effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, V. S.; Schirmer, J.; Reissner, R.; Ruffmann, B.; Silva, H.; Mendes, A.; Madeira, L. M.; Nunes, S. P.

    In order to study the relationship between the properties of proton electrolyte membranes (PEMs), obtained through standard characterization methods, and the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) performance, inorganic-organic hybrid membranes, modified via in situ hydrolysis, were used in a membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) for DMFC application. The membranes, the characterization of which was performed in the previous paper of this series, were based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) with a sulfonation degree (SD) of 87% and were loaded with different amounts of zirconium oxide (5.0, 7.5, 10.0, 12.5 wt.%). The standard characterization methods applied were impedance spectroscopy (proton conductivity), water uptake, and pervaporation (permeability to methanol). The MEAs were characterized investigating the DMFC current-voltage polarization curves, constant voltage current (CV, 35 mV), and open-circuit voltage (OCV). The fuel cell ohmic resistance (null phase angle impedance, NPAI) and CO 2 concentration in the cathode outlet were also measured. The characterization results show that the incorporation of the inorganic oxide in the polymer network decreases the DMFC current density for CV experiments, CO 2 concentration in the cathode outlet for both OCV and CV experiments and, finally, the maximum power density output. The opposite effect was verified in terms of the NPAI (ohmic resistance) for both OCV and CV experiments. A good agreement was found between the studied DMFC performance parameters and the characterization results evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, water uptake and pervaporation experiments.

  13. Controlled synthesis of Pt/CS/PW12-GNs composite as an anodic electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongshui; Lei, Fengling; Ye, Lingting; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Lin, Shen

    2015-04-01

    Controlled assembly in aqueous solution was used to synthesize the well-organized Pt/CS/PW12-GNs composite. By the aid of linear cationic polysaccharide chitosan, 2-D distribution worm-like Pt nanoparticles with their length and width of 15-20 and 3-4 nm, respectively, were formed on the surface of CS/PW12-GNs using HCOOH as a reducing agent at room temperature. The introduction of CS leads to well dispersion of worm-like Pt nanoparticles, the electroactivity of H3PW12O40 (PW12) alleviates CO poisoning toward Pt particles, and graphene nanosheets (GNs) ensure excellent electrical conductivity of the composites. The combined action among different components results in significantly enhanced catalytic activity of Pt/CS/PW12-GNs toward methanol oxidation and better tolerance of CO. The as-synthesized Pt/CS/PW12-GNs exhibit the forward peak current density of 445 mA mg-1, which is much higher than that (220 mA mg-1) for Pt/C-JM (the commercially available Johnson Matthey Hispec4000 catalyst, simplified as Pt/C-JM) and some recently reported Pt/graphene-based nanomaterials. The construction of 2-D distribution worm-like Pt nanoparticles and facile wet chemical synthesis strategy provide a promising way to develop superior performance electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells applications.

  14. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    Dissolution of ruthenium was observed in the 80-cell stack. Duration testing was performed in single cell MEAs to determine the pathway of cell degradation. EDAX analysis on each of the single cell MEAs has shown that the Johnson Matthey commercial catalyst is stable in DMFC operation for 250 hours, no ruthenium dissolution was observed. Changes in the hydrophobicity of the cathode backing papers was minimum. Electrode polarization analysis revealed that the MEA performance loss is attributed to changes in the cathode catalyst layer. Ruthenium migration does not seem to occur during cell operation but can occur when methanol is absent from the anode compartment, the cathode compartment has access to air, and the cells in the stack are electrically connected to a load (Shunt Currents). The open-to-air cathode stack design allowed for: a) The MEAs to have continual access to oxygen; and b) The stack to sustain shunt currents. Ruthenium dissolution in a DMFC stack can be prevented by: a) Developing an internally manifolded stacks that seal reactant compartments when not in operation; b) Bringing the cell voltages to zero quickly when not in operation; and c) Limiting the total number of cells to 25 in an effort to limit shunt currents.

  15. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    Dissolution of ruthenium was observed in the 80-cell stack. Duration testing was performed in single cell MEAs to determine the pathway of cell degradation. EDAX analysis on each of the single cell MEAs has shown that the Johnson Matthey commercial catalyst is stable in DMFC operation for 250 hours, no ruthenium dissolution was observed. Changes in the hydrophobicity of the cathode backing papers was minimum. Electrode polarization analysis revealed that the MEA performance loss is attributed to changes in the cathode catalyst layer. Ruthenium migration does not seem to occur during cell operation but can occur when methanol is absent from the anode compartment, the cathode compartment has access to air, and the cells in the stack are electrically connected to a load (Shunt Currents). The open-to-air cathode stack design allowed for: a) The MEAs to have continual access to oxygen; and b) The stack to sustain shunt currents. Ruthenium dissolution in a DMFC stack can be prevented by: a) Developing an internally manifolded stacks that seal reactant compartments when not in operation; b) Bringing the cell voltages to zero quickly when not in operation; and c) Limiting the total number of cells to 25 in an effort to limit shunt currents.

  16. Planar polyphthalocyanine cobalt absorbed on carbon black as stable electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guofeng; Li, Zhongfang; Wang, Suwen; Yu, Xianjin

    In this work, a novel catalyst is prepared by dispersing planar polyphthalocyanine cobalt (PPcCo) synthesized by polymerizing cobalt (II)-4, 4‧,4″,4‴-phthalocyanine tetracarboxylic acid (TcPcCo) using a high surface area carbon powder (Vulcan XC 72), and then heat-treated in argon (Ar) atmosphere. The polymer and PPcCo/C catalysts are characterized systematically by a variety of methods, such as ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Results show that the PPcCo obtained is stable below 600 °C. The active site of PPcCo/C is CoN 4 in phthalocyanine ring, and the PPcCo is dispersed homogeneously on the surface of XC 72. Electrocatalytic properties and electrochemical stability of the catalysts in 0.5 mol L -1 H 2SO 4 are evaluated by RDE measurements. The initial potential for O 2 reduction in O 2-saturated H 2SO 4 is 0.81 V and it catalyzed O 2 reduction mainly through a four-electron process. Almost no performance degradation is observed over continuous cyclic voltammetry (CV) at 10,000 cycles (4 days). Polarization curves obtained by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) at 200 cycles also show no change. PPcCo/C catalysts display significant electrocatalytic performance for O 2 reduction, tolerance towards methanol, and long-term stability.

  17. Mixed conducting catalyst support materials for the direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasch, K.; Hayn, G.; Jörissen, L.; Garche, J.; Besenhardt, O.

    Finely dispersed Pt- and Pt/Ru-particles have been deposited on high surface-area ruthenium dioxide (RuO 2) using the Petrow and Allen method [U.S. Patent No. 4,044,193 (23 August 1977)]. RuO 2 has been synthesized according to different preparation methods. It turned out that the product showing the highest surface area could be produced by a simple fast precipitation method. The electrocatalytic activities of catalysts on different ruthenium oxide supports have been investigated in half-cell experiments by stationary current voltage measurements. Pt/Ru-catalysts deposited on a Vulcan XC-72 carbon black have been used for comparison. X-ray analysis methods (XRD, EDX) have been used to characterize the composition and crystallinity of the materials and their geometric surface areas have been determined by the BET method. It turned out that the electric conductivity of the RuO 2 materials was comparable to that observed for Vulcan XC-72. Furthermore, RuO 2 materials having a BET surface area above 125 m 2/g could be synthesized. (Vulcan XC-71: ˜250 m 2/g). Surprisingly, no significant electrochemical activity was found when Pt/Ru was deposited on freshly precipitated hydrous RuO 2. Deposition of noble metals on calcined RuO 2 resulted in electrochemical activities comparable to the ones obtained for the Vulcan XC-72 support. Thus, no extraordinary enhancement of catalytic activity for the methanol has been observed when RuO 2 oxide was used as a mixed conducting catalyst support.

  18. Poly (vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)/polybenzimidazole blend nanofiber supported Nafion membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shih-Hua; Lin, Hsiu-Li

    2014-07-01

    This article presents preparation of poly (vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-co-HFP) and polybenzimidazole (PBI) blend electrospun nanofiber (PVFP-BI) films from N,N‧-dimethyl acetamide (DMAc)/acetone mixture solutions. Using the PVFP-BI nanofiber film (thickness ∼13-15 μm) as a supporting material for impregnating Nafion resin solution, Nafion/PVFP-BI composite membranes (thickness ∼50 μm) are prepared and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) tests are performed. Better DMFC performance of the Nafion/PVFP-BI composite membrane than the commercial Nafion-117 (thickness ∼175 μm) and Nafion-212 (thickness ∼50 μm) membranes when blending with 5-10 wt.% of PBI in the PVFP-BI nanofiber support film is demonstrated.

  19. Investigation of methanol oxidation on a highly active and stable Pt–Sn electrocatalyst supported on carbon–polyaniline composite for application in a passive direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Amani, Mitra; Kazemeini, Mohammad; Hamedanian, Mahboobeh; Pahlavanzadeh, Hassan; Gharibi, Hussein

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • PtSn/C-PANI performed superior in the MOR compared with a commercial PtRu/C. • Catalytic activity of PtRu/C was highly reduced during the accelerated durability test. • Anode of the PtSn/C-PANI in a passive DMFC lowered methanol crossover by 30%. - Abstract: Polyaniline fiber (PANI) was synthesized and utilized to fabricate a vulcan–polyaniline (C-PANI) composite. Pt/C-PANI and PtSn/C-PANI electro-catalysts with different Pt:Sn atomic ratios were prepared by the impregnation method. These electro-catalysts, along with commercial PtRu/C (Electrochem), were characterized with respect to their structural and electrochemical properties in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). PtSn(70:30)/C-PANI showed excellent performance in MOR, the obtained maximum current density being about 40% and 50% higher than that for PtRu/C and Pt/C-PANI, respectively. It was also found that the CO tolerance and stability of PtSn(70:30)/C-PANI was considerably higher than that of PtRu/C. Finally, the performance of these two materials was compared in a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The DMFC test results demonstrated that the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) prepared using PtSn(70:30)/C-PANI anode catalyst performed more satisfactorily in terms of maximum power density and lower methanol crossover.

  20. One-step synthesis of antimony-doped tin oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites: a promising support for platinum catalysts in a direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Pei-Pei; Guo, Dao-Jun; Cui, Shu-Kun; Xiang, Dong-Xue; Peng, Ya-Fang; Qi, Fu-Juan

    2014-10-01

    Antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes as new supports for Pt catalyst (Pt-ATO/MWCNT) has been directly synthesized by hydrothermal method using mixed Sb/Sn hydroxide solution as precursor. The structure of Pt-ATO/MWCNT catalyst is characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The electrocatalytic properties of Pt-ATO/MWCNT catalyst for methanol and CO electrooxidation are investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric experiments in acidic medium. The catalytic activity for methanol electrooxidation reaction shows that high CO tolerance and good stability of Pt-ATO/MWCNT catalyst compared with Pt-SnO2/MWCNT and commercial Pt/C (E-TEK) are observed. These results imply that Pt-ATO/MWCNT catalyst has promising potential applications in direct methanol fuel cells.

  1. The Methanol Economy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, George; Prakash, G. K.

    2014-02-01

    The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO2 capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO2 and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO2 and H2, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields.

  2. Undoped and boron doped diamond nanoparticles as platinum and platinum-ruthenium catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Torre Riveros, Lyda

    electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis (EDX), infrared spectroscopy (IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to demonstrate the utility of the catalyst obtained, the samples were tested in an electrochemical cell using methanol as a probe solution. As was performed with the undoped DNPs and BDDNPs, the ink paste method was used to prepare the electrodes with Pt/DNP, Pt-Ru/DNP, Pt/BDDNP and Pt-Ru/BDDNP catalytic systems, to perform the electrochemical experiments. The Pt and Pt-Ru modified diamond electrodes were tested with cyclic voltammetry in 0.5 M H2SO4 as electrolyte support showing hydrogen adsorption/desorption at platinum surfaces. CO gas adsorption/desorption experiments were also performed to determine the active surface area of Pt when Ru is present. Methanol oxidation current peaks were obtained when the electrodes were tested in a 1.0 M methanol/0.5 M H2SO4 solution. The experimental results demonstrated that diamond nanoparticles are useful as an electrode material. A fuel cell is a device which transforms the chemical energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy. As previously mentioned, the aim of this research is to demonstrate the utility of undoped DNPs and BDDNPs as catalytic supports, which was performed by testing the catalytic systems obtained in a single fuel cell station at different temperatures to observe the cell performance.

  3. A review on durability issues and restoration techniques in long-term operations of direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Asad; Scibioh, M. Aulice; Prabhuram, Joghee; An, Myung-Gi; Ha, Heung Yong

    2015-11-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) remain attractive among advanced energy conversion technologies due to their high energy density and simple system configuration. Although they made an early market entry but failed to attain a large-scale commercialization mainly because of their inferior performance sustainment in lifetime operations and high production costs. There have been lots of R&D efforts made to upgrade the long-term durability of DMFCs to a commercially acceptable standard. These rigorous efforts have been useful in gaining insights about various degradation mechanisms and their origins. This review first briefly describes the recent progress in lifetime enhancement of DMFC technology reported by various groups in academia and industry. Then, it is followed by comprehensive discussions on the major performance degradation routes and associated physico-chemical origins, and influence of operational parameters, together with the methods which have been employed to alleviate and restore the performance losses. Finally, a brief summary of the presented literature survey is provided in conjunction with some possible future research directions.

  4. Short term changes in methanol emission and pectin methylesterase activity are not directly affected by light in Lycopersicon esculentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Li, L.; Timko, M. P.; Mak, J. E.; Lerdau, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    Plants are an important source of atmospheric methanol (MeOH), the second most abundant organic gas after methane. Factors regulating phytogenic MeOH production are not well constrained in current MeOH emission models. Previous studies have indicated that light may have a direct influence on MeOH production. As light is known to regulate cell wall expansion, it was predicted that light would stimulate MeOH production through the pectin methylesterase (PME) pathway. MeOH emissions normalized for stomatal conductance (gs) did not, however, increase with light over short time scales (20-30 min). After experimentally controlling for gs and temperature, no light activation of PME activity or MeOH emission was observed. The results clearly demonstrate that light does not directly influence short-term changes in MeOH production and emission. Our data suggest that substrate limitation may be important in regulating MeOH production over short time scales. Future investigation of the long-term impacts of light on MeOH production may increase understanding of MeOH emission dynamics at the seasonal time scale.

  5. Short term changes in methanol emission and pectin methylesterase activity are not directly affected by light in Lycopersicon esculentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Li, L.; Timko, M. P.; Mak, J. E.; Lerdau, M. T.

    2011-04-01

    Plants are an important source of atmospheric methanol (MeOH), the second most abundant organic gas after methane. Factors regulating phytogenic MeOH production are not well constrained in current MeOH emission models. Previous studies have indicated that light may have a direct influence on MeOH production. As light is known to regulate cell wall expansion, it was predicted that light would stimulate MeOH production through the pectin methylesterase (PME) pathway. MeOH emissions normalized for stomatal conductance (gs) did not, however, increase with light over short time scales (20-30 min). After experimentally controlling for gs and temperature, no light activation of PME activity or MeOH emission was observed. The results clearly demonstrate that light does not directly influence short-term changes in MeOH production and emission. Our data suggest that substrate limitation may be important in regulating MeOH production over short time scales. Future investigation of the long-term impacts of light on MeOH production may increase understanding of MeOH emission dynamics at the seasonal time scale.

  6. Miniature Earthmover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    International Machinery Corporation (IMC) developed a miniature earthmover, the 1/8 scale Caterpillar D11N Track-type Tractor, with trademark product approval and manufacturing/marketing license from Caterpillar, Inc. Through Marshall Space Flight Center assistance, the company has acquired infrared remote control technology, originally developed for space exploration. The technology is necessary for exports because of varying restrictions on radio frequency in foreign countries. The Cat D11N weighs only 340 pounds and has the world's first miniature industrial internal combustion engine. The earthmover's uses include mining, construction and demolition work, and hazardous environment work. IMC also has designs of various products for military use and other Caterpillar replicas.

  7. Study on the electronic properties and molecule adsorption of W18O49 nanowires as a catalyst support in the cathodes of direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, N. A.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Shyuan, L. K.; Yaakob, Z.; Daud, W. R. W.; Kadhum, A. A. H.

    2015-08-01

    Catalyst supports have been used to increase the catalytic activity of reactions in the cathode of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs). The properties of tungsten oxide (W18O49) nanowires were studied, and their adsorption capability was evaluated using density functional theory. The electronic properties of the bulk material and two different diameter nanowires were calculated. Moreover, the molecules involved in adsorption were carbon monoxide, methanol, oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The results showed that the high adsorption energy produced is primarily the result of the adsorption of methanol, followed by that of hydrogen peroxide, carbon monoxide and oxygen. The negative adsorption energies obtained showed that the adsorption reactions were exothermic, and only oxygen was stable. Therefore, a new surface model was described where cobalt atoms were adsorbed on tungsten atoms on the surface of a 12 Å nanowire. In this new nanowire doped with cobalt atoms, the adsorption energy was reduced.

  8. Molecular modeling of the morphology and transport properties of two direct methanol fuel cell membranes: phenylated sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) versus Nafion

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Dupuis, Michel

    2012-08-14

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine membrane morphology and the transport of water, methanol and hydronium in phenylated sulfonated poly ether ether ketone ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) and Nafion membranes at 360 K for a range of hydration levels. At comparable hydration levels, the pore diameter is smaller, the sulfonate groups are more closely packed, the hydronium ions are more strongly bound to sulfonate groups, and the diffusion of water and hydronium is slower in Ph-SPEEKK relative to the corresponding properties in Nafion. The aromatic carbon backbone of Ph-SPEEKK is less hydrophobic than the fluorocarbon backbone of Nafion. Water network percolation occurs at a hydration level ({lambda}) of {approx}8 H{sub 2}O/SO{sub 3}{sup -}. At {lambda} = 20, water, methanol and hydronium diffusion coefficients were 1.4 x 10{sup -5}, 0.6 x 10{sup -5} and 0.2 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The pore network in Ph-SPEEKK evolves dynamically and develops wide pores for {lambda} > 20, which leads to a jump in methanol crossover and ion transport. This study demonstrates the potential of aromatic membranes as low-cost challengers to Nafion for direct methanol fuel cell applications and the need to develop innovative strategies to combat methanol crossover at high hydration levels.

  9. Direct methanol fuel cells: The effect of electrode fabrication procedure on MEAs structural properties and cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S. Q.; Liang, Z. X.; Zhou, W. J.; Sun, G. Q.; Xin, Q.; Stergiopoulos, V.; Tsiakaras, P.

    In the present paper, the effect of electrode preparation procedure on the structural properties of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and consequently on the performance of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) was investigated. Commercial PtRu black anode catalyst and Pt black cathode catalyst were characterized by XRD in their initial form and in their intermediate and final states after each step involved in catalyst-coated membrane electrode preparation procedure by a decal transfer method (DTM). XRD results demonstrated that the DTM process has a significant effect on the catalyst structural properties, especially on the particle size of Pt black cathode catalyst. It is also discussed that among all the steps involved in the electrode fabrication procedure, catalyst ink preparation and high temperature transfer process are key factors affecting the particle size of Pt black catalyst. Furthermore, it was found that the maximum power density of the single DMFC using a MEA fabricated by the DTM, when air is used as oxidant, is more than two times greater than that of the cell using conventionally prepared MEA, and more than three times greater when pure oxygen is used as oxidant. This could be attributed to the easier mass transportation due to the thinner catalyst layer and the better contact between the catalyst layer and the electrolyte membrane in the former case, even if, according to in situ CO stripping voltammetry results in the fuel cell anode environment, the surface composition of PtRu anode has been changed.

  10. Effect of the thickness of the anode electrode catalyst layers on the performance in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Dean E.; Olah, George A.; Prakash, G. K. Surya

    2017-06-01

    For the large scale fuel cell manufacture, the catalyst loading and layer thickness are critical factors affecting the performance and cost of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The influence of catalyst layer thicknesses at the anode of a PEM based direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) has been investigated. Catalysts were applied with the drawdown method with varied thicknesses ranging from 1 mil to 8 mils (1 mil = 25.4 μm) with a Pt/Ru anode loading of 0.25 mg cm-2 to 2.0 mg cm-2. The MEAs with the thicker individual layers (8 mils and 4 mils) performed better overall compared to the those with the thinner layers (1 mil and painted). The peak power densities for the different loading levels followed an exponential decrease of Pt/Ru utilization at the higher loading levels. The highest power density achieved was 49 mW cm-2 with the 4 mil layers at 2.0 mg cm-2 catalyst loading whereas the highest normalized power density was 116 mW mg-1 with the 8 mil layers at 0.25 mg cm-2 loading. The 8 mil drawdowns displayed a 50% and 23% increase in normalized power density compared to the 1 mil drawdowns at 0.25 mg cm-2 and 0.5 mg cm-2 loadings, respectively.

  11. Efficient anodic and direct phenol-arene C,C cross-coupling: the benign role of water or methanol.

    PubMed

    Kirste, Axel; Elsler, Bernd; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2012-02-22

    C,C cross-coupling reactions for the synthesis of nonsymmetrical biaryls represent one of the most significant transformations in contemporary organic chemistry. A variety of useful synthetic methods have been developed in recent decades, since nonsymmetrical biaryls play an evident role in natural product synthesis, as ligand systems in homogeneous catalysis and materials science. Transformation of simple arenes by direct C,H activation belongs to the cutting-edge strategies for creating biaryls; in particular the 2-fold C,H activation is of significant interest. However, in most examples very costly noble metal catalysts, ligand systems, and significant amount of waste-producing oxidants are required. Electrochemical procedures are considered as inherently "green" methods, because only electrons are required and therefore, no reagent waste is produced. Here, we report a metal-free electrochemical method for cross-coupling between phenols and arenes using boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes in fluorinated media. Our sustainable approach requires no leaving functionalities. Employing water or methanol as mediator represents the key improvement for achieving nonsymmetrical biaryls with superb selectivity and synthetic attractive yields.

  12. Human Pulp Response to Direct Pulp Capping and Miniature Pulpotomy with MTA after Application of Topical Dexamethasone: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Amir; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Shahnaseri, Shirin; Paymanpour, Payam; Kinoshita, Jun-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to compare the histologic pulp tissue response to one-step direct pulp capping (DPC) and miniature pulpotomy (MP) with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) after application of dexamethasone in healthy human premolars. Methods and Materials: Forty intact premolars from 10 orthodontic patients, were randomly chosen for DPC (n=20) or MP (n=20). In 10 teeth from each group, after exposure of the buccal pulp horn, topical dexamethasone was applied over the pulp. In all teeth the exposed/miniaturely resected pulp tissue was covered with MTA and cavities were restored with glass ionomer. Teeth vitality was evaluated during the next 7, 21, 42, and 60 days. Signs and/or symptoms of irreversible pulpitis or pulp necrosis were considered as failure. According to the orthodontic schedule, after 60 days the teeth were extracted and submitted for histological examination. The Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher’s exact tests were used for statistical analysis of the data (P=0.05). Results: Although dexamethasone specimens showed less inflammation, calcified bridge, pulpal blood vasculature, collagen fibers and granulation tissue formation were not significantly different between the groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: Topical dexamethasone did not hindered pulp healing but reduced the amount of underlying pulpal tissue inflammation after DPC and MP in healthy human premolars. PMID:27141213

  13. Measurement of the current distribution in a direct methanol fuel cell-Confirmation of parallel galvanic and electrolytic operation within one cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Dirk Uwe; Sanders, Tilman; Fricke, Birger; Baumhöfer, Thorsten; Wippermann, Klaus; Kulikovsky, Andrei A.; Schmitz, Heinz; Mergel, Jürgen

    Current production in fuel cells is typically unequally distributed along the cell surface due to inhomogeneous concentration of reactants and temperature. The inhomogeneities in fuel cells can result in reduced output power and accelerated ageing. To quantify the inhomogeneities a measurement system has been developed which allows measuring the local distribution of current and temperature in hydrogen and direct methanol fuel cells. With this system we are able to directly observe the coexistence of galvanic and electrolytic domains in a single channel direct methanol fuel cell (the electrolytic domain is the domain where electrolysis occurs in contrast to the galvanic domain where the fuel cell process takes place). The measurement device also allows for the measurement locally resolved impedance spectra.

  14. Platinum and palladium nano-structured catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Thi, Cao Minh; Yong, Yang; Nogami, Masayuki; Ohtaki, Michitaka

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we present the synthesis and characterization of Pt, Pd, Pt based bimetallic and multi-metallic nanoparticles with mixture, alloy and core-shell structure for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, and fuel cells. Here, Pt and Pd nanoparticles with modified nanostructures can be controllably synthesized via chemistry and physics for their uses as electro-catalysts. The cheap base metal catalysts can be studied in the relationship of crystal structure, size, morphology, shape, and composition for new catalysts with low cost. Thus, Pt based alloy and core-shell catalysts can be prepared with the thin Pt and Pt-Pd shell, which are proposed in low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). We also present the survey of the preparation of Pt and Pd based catalysts for the better catalytic activity, high durability, and stability. The structural transformations, quantum-size effects, and characterization of Pt and Pd based catalysts in the size ranges of 30 nm (1-30 nm) are presented in electro-catalysis. In the size range of 10 nm (1-10 nm), the pure Pt catalyst shows very large surface area for electro-catalysis. To achieve homogeneous size distribution, the shaped synthesis of the polyhedral Pt nanoparticles is presented. The new concept of shaping specific shapes and morphologies in the entire nano-scale from nano to micro, such as polyhedral, cube, octahedra, tetrahedra, bar, rod, and others of the nanoparticles is proposed, especially for noble and cheap metals. The uniform Pt based nanosystems of surface structure, internal structure, shape, and morphology in the nanosized ranges are very crucial to next fuel cells. Finally, the modifications of Pt and Pd based catalysts of alloy, core-shell, and mixture structures lead to find high catalytic activity, durability, and stability for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, fuel cells, especially the next large-scale commercialization of next

  15. Effects of piston surface treatments on performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct injection, stratified charge engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, B.; Green, J. B.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of thermal barrier coatings and/or surface treatments on the performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct-injection, stratified-charge (DISC) engine. A Ricardo Hydra Mark III engine was used for this work and in previous experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary focus of the study was to examine the effects of various piston insert surface treatments on hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) emissions. Previous studies have shown that engines of this class have a tendency to perform poorly at low loads and have high unburned fuel emissions. A blank aluminum piston was modified to employ removable piston bowl inserts. Four different inserts were tested in the experiment: aluminum, stainless steel with a 1.27-mm (0.050-in.) air gap (to act as a thermal barrier), and two stainless steel/air-gap inserts with coatings. Two stainless steel inserts were dimensionally modified to account for the coating thickness (1.27-mm) and coated identically with partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). One of the coated inserts then had an additional seal-coat applied. The coated inserts were otherwise identical to the stainless steel/air-gap insert (i.e., they employed the same 1.27-mm air gap). Thermal barrier coatings were employed in an attempt to increase combustion chamber surface temperatures, thereby reducing wall quenching and promoting more complete combustion of the fuel in the quench zone. The seal-coat was applied to the zirconia to reduce the surface porosity; previous research suggested that despite the possibly higher surface temperatures obtainable with a ceramic coating, the high surface area of a plasma-sprayed coating may actually allow fuel to adhere to the surface and increase the unburned fuel emissions and fuel consumption.

  16. Effects of piston surface treatments on performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct injection, stratified charge engine

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.; Green, J.B.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of thermal barrier coatings and/or surface treatments on the performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct-injection, stratified-charge (DISC) engine. A Ricardo Hydra Mark III engine was used for this work and in previous experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary focus of the study was to examine the effects of various piston insert surface treatments on hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions. Previous studies have shown that engines of this class have a tendency to perform poorly at low loads and have high unburned fuel emissions. A blank aluminum piston was modified to employ removable piston bowl inserts. Four different inserts were tested in the experiment: aluminum, stainless steel with a 1.27-mm (0.050-in.) air gap (to act as a thermal barrier), and two stainless steel/air-gap inserts with coatings. Two stainless steel inserts were dimensionally modified to account for the coating thickness (1.27-mm) and coated identically with partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). One of the coated inserts then had an additional seal-coat applied. The coated inserts were otherwise identical to the stainless steel/air-gap insert (i.e., they employed the same 1.27-mm air gap). Thermal barrier coatings were employed in an attempt to increase combustion chamber surface temperatures, thereby reducing wall quenching and promoting more complete combustion of the fuel in the quench zone. The seal-coat was applied to the zirconia to reduce the surface porosity; previous research suggested that despite the possibly higher surface temperatures obtainable with a ceramic coating, the high surface area of a plasma-sprayed coating may actually allow fuel to adhere to the surface and increase the unburned fuel emissions and fuel consumption.

  17. Comparison of Pt-based binary and ternary alloy anode catalysts for polymer electrolyte direct methanol fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.; Ley, K.L.; Pu, C.

    1996-12-31

    As an anode catalyst, Pt is highly active for the adsorption and dehydrogenation of methanol, however, the surface is poisoned by CO. To oxidize CO to CO{sub 2}, a second oxygen atom is required from an adjacent adsorbed water molecule. Bifunctional alloys composed of Pt and a second metal M, able to activate H{sub 2}O (forming -OH{sub ads}) at low potentials, are candidate materials for methanol electro-oxidation catalysts A proposed mechanism is: Figure 2 shows that metals which enhance methanol oxidation activity when alloyed with Pt have similar M-O bond strengths (see bold print), suggesting that the best binary alloy catalysts have second metals that are optimized with respect to the ability to oxidatively adsorb water. and the ability to dissociate M-O bonds to yield CO{sub 2}.

  18. Miniaturizing RFID for magnamosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Chen, Shijie; Kish, Shad; Loh, Lokkee; Zhang, Junmin; Zhang, Xiaorong; Kwiat, Dillon; Harrison, Michael; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Anastomosis is a common surgical procedure using staples or sutures in an open or laparoscopic surgery. A more effective and much less invasive alternative is to apply the mechanical pressure on the tissue over a few days [1]. Since the pressure is produced by the attractive force between two permanent magnets, the procedure is called magnamosis[1]. To ensure the two magnets are perfectly aligned during the surgery, a miniaturized batteryless Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) tag is developed to wirelessly telemeter the status of a pressure sensitive mechanical switch. Using the multi-layer circular spiral coil design, the diameter of the RFID tag is shrunk to 10, 15, 19 and 27 mm to support the magnamosis for children as well as adults. With the impedance matching network, the operating distance of these four RFID tags are longer than 10 cm in a 20 × 22 cm(2) area, even when the tag's normal direction is 45° off the antenna's normal direction. Measurement results also indicate that there is no noticeable degradation on the operating distance when the tag is immersed in saline or placed next to the rare-earth magnet. The miniaturized RFID tag presented in this paper is able to support the magnamosis and other medical applications that require the miniaturized RFID tag.

  19. Layer-by-layer self-assembly of PDDA/PWA-Nafion composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Lu, Shanfu; Lu, Jinlin; Jiang, San Ping; Xiang, Yan

    2010-03-07

    A novel PDDA/PWA-Nafion composite electrolyte membrane with enhanced proton conductivity (sigma) to methanol permeability (P) ratio, sigma/P, was fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of negatively charged water soluble PWA and positively charged polyelectrolyte PDDA.

  20. Office Chromatography: Precise printing of sample solutions on miniaturized thin-layer phases and utilization for scanning Direct Analysis in Real Time mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Häbe, Tim T; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2015-09-25

    Office Chromatography combines achievements in office technologies with miniaturized planar chromatography. In the life sciences, printing of materials became an accepted technique, whereas in separation science, the use of printers for chromatography is at its infancy. A bubble-jet printer was modified for exact application on miniaturized plates. Technical modifications included the removal of all unnecessary parts and the improvement of the positioning system, purge unit and sample supply system. Evaluation was performed via a slide scanner and image evaluation software. Printing of a food dye mixture solution (n=5) led to a calculated mean deposition volume of 13±1nL/mm(2) per print-cycle. A mean determination coefficient (R(2); n=5) of 0.9990 was obtained for application of increasing volumes, executed via increasing band widths of 50-200μm (corresponding to 2-8nL). Using larger band widths and multiple print jobs, deposition volumes of up to the microliter scale represented an alternative to cost-intensive standard equipment. After print, separation, detection and digital evaluation of five food dyes, mean R(2) (n=5) were obtained between 0.9977 and 0.9995. The accuracy of printing was proven by mean recovery rates of 101-105% with repeatabilities of 3-7% (%RSD, n=5). The transfer to nanostructured ultrathin-layer plates proved the synergetic potential of these fields of research. First, this modified printer was suited for printing of finely graduated scales of three preservatives for determination of the spatial resolution of scanning Direct Analysis in Real Time mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of environmental factors on corrosion behaviors of metal-fiber porous components in a simulated direct methanol fuel cell environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Zhao-chun; Deng, Jun

    2014-09-01

    To enable the use of metallic components in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), issues related to corrosion resistance must be considered because of an acid environment induced by the solid electrolyte. In this study, we report the electrochemical behaviors of metal-fiber-based porous sintered components in a simulated corrosive environment of DMFCs. Three materials were evaluated: pure copper, AISI304, and AISI316L. The environmental factors and related mechanisms affecting the corrosion behaviors were analyzed. The results demonstrated that AISI316L exhibits the best performance. A higher SO{4/2-} concentration increases the risk of material corrosion, whereas an increase in methanol concentration inhibits corrosion. The morphological features of the corroded samples were also characterized in this study.

  2. An in-situ nano-scale swelling-filling strategy to improve overall performance of Nafion membrane for direct methanol fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Fan, Kun; Cai, Weiwei; Ma, Liying; Xu, Guoxiao; Xu, Sen; Ma, Liang; Cheng, Hansong

    2016-11-01

    A novel in-situ nano-scale swelling-filling (SF) strategy is proposed to modify commercial Nafion membranes for performance enhancement of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). A Nafion membrane was filled in-situ with proton conductive macromolecules (PCMs) in the swelling process of a Nafion membrane in a PCM solution. As a result, both proton conductivity and methanol-permeation resistivity of the SF-treated Naifion membrane was substantially improved with the selectivity nearly doubled compared to the original Nafion membrane. The mechanical strength of the optimal SF treated Nafion membrane was also enforced due to the strong interaction between the PCM fillers and the Nafion molecular chains. As a result, a DMFC equipped with the SF-treated membrane yielded a 33% higher maximum power density than that offered by the DMFC with the original Nafion membrane.

  3. Pt loaded two-dimensional TaC-nanosheet/graphene hybrid as an efficient and durable electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chunyong; Tao, Juzhou

    2016-08-01

    Poor electrocatalytic activity, insufficient operation durability and low carbon monoxide (CO) tolerance of the Pt-based catalysts are key challenges facing the direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) as promising electrochemical energy conversion device. We here present a new effort to catalyst designed by depositing Pt nanoparticles on two-dimensional (2D) TaC-nanosheet/graphene hybird (Pt/TaC-G) to obtain notable improvement in electrocatalytic performance over the commercial Pt/C. Experiment results from both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) support that a strong synergetic chemical coupling interaction between the Pt nanoparticles and the 2D TaC-G significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). This process can improve the CO tolerance as well as durability of MOR catalysts simultaneously, making it a promising general approach to design and optimize the next generation electrocatalysts in DMFCs.

  4. Facile and one-pot synthesis of uniform PtRu nanoparticles on polydopamine-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes for direct methanol fuel cell application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fengxia; Ren, Junkai; He, Qian; Liu, Jun; Song, Rui

    2017-07-01

    A facile, environment-friendly and one-pot synthesis method for the preparation of high performance PtRu electrocatalysts on the multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is reported. Herein, bimetallic PtRu electrocatalysts are deposited onto polydopamine (Pdop) - functionalized MWCNTs by mildly stirring at room temperature. Without the use of expensive chemicals or corrosive acids, this noncovalent functionalization of MWCNTs by Pdop is simple, facile and eco-friendly, and thus preserving the integrity and electronic structure of MWCNTs. Due to the well improved dispersion and the decreased size of alloy nanoparticles, the PtRu electrocatalysts on Pdop-functionalized MWCNTs show much better dispersion, higher electrochemically active surface area, and higher electrocatalytic activity for the electrooxidation of methanol in direct methanol fuel cells, compared with the conventional acid-treated MWCNTs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Operating characteristics of direct methanol fuel cell using a platinum-ruthenium catalyst supported on porous carbon prepared from mesophase pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kidon; Jung, Doohwan; Kim, Sang-Kyung; Peck, Donghyun; Ryu, Seungkon

    The characteristics of a platinum-ruthenium catalyst supported on porous carbon (PC) are analysed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and chemisorption techniques. Single-cell tests are carried out in order to compare the performance of these catalysts as an anode in a direct methanol fuel cell with respect to that of a commercial-grade catalyst. The methanol oxidation rate on a Pt-Ru catalyst supported on PC with a pore size of 20 nm is about 35% higher than that on a commercial E-TEK catalyst. The catalyst (Pt-Ru/K20) in the single-cell test gives a power density of 90 and 126 mW cm -2 under air and oxygen at 60 °C, respectively. These values are 15-16% higher than those obtained with a commercial E-TEK catalyst.

  6. Novel method for the synthesis of hydrophobic Pt-Ru nanoparticles and its application to preparing a Nafion-free anode for the direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hung-Chi; Wang, Wen-Lin; Wan, Chi-Chao; Wang, Yung-Yun

    2006-08-17

    Pt-Ru alloy is a bimetallic catalyst most commonly used in the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). In this paper, a new process to synthesize an unsupported Pt-Ru colloid has been introduced. The characteristics of synthesized nanoparticles were identified by XRD, TEM/EDX, and SEM, and it shows that Ru atoms are incorporated into the Pt fcc structure and the well-dispersed particles (diameter approximately 4 nm) possess a Pt-rich feature. This catalyst shows a hydrophobic characteristic which can adsorb very well on the hydrophobic-treated carbon paper or carbon cloth without the need of Nafion. Accordingly, this method can avoid particle agglomeration, and the synthesized catalyst demonstrates strong adsorption with carbon paper. In addition, this colloid-type Nafion-free catalyst was measured via linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and exhibited electrochemical activity for methanol oxidation comparable to the commercial one with Nafion binding.

  7. Direct quantitative gas chromatographic separation of C2-C6 fatty acids, methanol, and ethyl alcohol in aqueous microbial fermentation media.

    PubMed

    Rogosa, M; Love, L L

    1968-02-01

    A method is described for the direct quantitative gas chromatographic separation of C(2)-C(6) lower fatty acid homologues, methanol, and ethyl alcohol in aqueous microbial fermentation media. A hydrogen flame detector and a single-phase solid column packing, comprising beads of a polyaromatic resin (polystyrene cross-linked with divinyl benzene), were employed. Direct injections of 1 to 10 muliters of aqueous culture supernatant fluids were made. Quantitative recoveries of C(2)-C(6) acids added to culture supernatant fluids were obtained.

  8. Direct Quantitative Gas Chromatographic Separation of C2-C6 Fatty Acids, Methanol, and Ethyl Alcohol in Aqueous Microbial Fermentation Media

    PubMed Central

    Rogosa, M.; Love, L. L.

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for the direct quantitative gas chromatographic separation of C2-C6 lower fatty acid homologues, methanol, and ethyl alcohol in aqueous microbial fermentation media. A hydrogen flame detector and a single-phase solid column packing, comprising beads of a polyaromatic resin (polystyrene cross-linked with divinyl benzene), were employed. Direct injections of 1 to 10 μliters of aqueous culture supernatant fluids were made. Quantitative recoveries of C2-C6 acids added to culture supernatant fluids were obtained. PMID:5645415

  9. Direct growth of NiCo2O4 nanostructures on conductive substrates with enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Lei; Gu, Li; Yang, Li; Yuan, Hongyan; Xiao, Dan

    2013-07-01

    In this report, NiCo2O4 nanostructures with different morphologies were directly grown on conductive substrates (stainless steel and ITO) by a facile electrodeposition method in addition to a post-annealing process. The morphology changes on different conductive substrates are discussed in detail. The NiCo2O4 on stainless steel (SS) had a high surface area (119 m2 g-1) and was successfully used in the electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol. The electrocatalytic performance was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Impressively, the NiCo2O4 showed much higher electrocatalytic activity, lower overpotential and greater stability compared to that of only NiO or Co3O4 synthesized by the same method. The higher electrocatalytic activity is due to the high electron conductivity, large surface area of NiCo2O4 and the fast ion/electron transport in the electrode and at the electrolyte-electrode interface. This is important for further development of high performance non-platinum electrocatalysts for application in direct methanol fuel cells.In this report, NiCo2O4 nanostructures with different morphologies were directly grown on conductive substrates (stainless steel and ITO) by a facile electrodeposition method in addition to a post-annealing process. The morphology changes on different conductive substrates are discussed in detail. The NiCo2O4 on stainless steel (SS) had a high surface area (119 m2 g-1) and was successfully used in the electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol. The electrocatalytic performance was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Impressively, the NiCo2O4 showed much higher electrocatalytic activity, lower overpotential and greater stability compared to that of only NiO or Co3O4 synthesized by the same method. The higher electrocatalytic activity is due to the high electron conductivity

  10. Gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry: analysis of methanol, ethanol and acetic acid by direct injection of aqueous alcoholic and acetic acid samples.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guomin; Sun, Tong; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2014-08-15

    Methanol, ethanol, and acetic acid are not easily extracted from aqueous samples and are susceptible to isotope fractionation in gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) analysis. Developing a direct dilution GC/IRMS method for aqueous samples, by adjusting the sample concentrations in common solvents to be similar to each other and using a fixed GC split ratio, is very convenient and important because any linearity effects caused by amount-dependent isotope fractionation can be avoided. The suitability of acetonitrile and acetone solvents for the GC/IRMS analysis of pure methanol, ethanol and acetic acid, and commercial liquor and vinegar samples was evaluated using n-hexane and water as control solvents. All the solvents including water were separated from the analyte on a HP-INNOWAX column and were diverted away from the combustion interface. The influence of liquor matrix on the ethanol GC/IRMS analyses was evaluated by adding pure ethanol to liquor samples. Acetonitrile and acetone gave similar δ(13) C values for pure ethanol and pure acetic acid to those obtained in water and n-hexane, and also gave similar δ(13) C values of ethanol in liquor and acetic acid in white vinegar to that obtained in water. For methanol analysis, acetonitrile and refined acetone gave similar δ(13) C values to that obtained in water, but n-hexane was not a suitable solvent. In addition, isotopic fractionation caused by solvent and solute interactions was observed. We recommend using acetonitrile for the GC/IRMS analysis of aqueous alcoholic samples, and acetone for the analysis of aqueous acetic acid samples. This direct dilution method can provide high accurate and precise GC/IRMS analysis of the relative changes in δ(13) C values of methanol, ethanol, and acetic acid. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Application Of Metal Coated Carbon Nanotubes To Direct Methanol Fuel Cells And For The Formation Of Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frackowiak, E.; Lota, G.; Lota, K.; Béguin, F.

    2004-09-01

    Homogeneously distributed particles of Pt, Ru or their alloys were electrochemically deposited on catalytic and template multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The catalysts supported on the entangled or straight CNTs network with open mesopores have been tested for the reaction of methanol oxidation (1M) in acidic medium (1M H2SO4) by potentiodynamic and galvanostatic methods. The high current densities (500 mA/g) for methanol oxidation proved that such a composite enables a good accessibility of the reagent molecules to the electrode interface. Contrarily, continuous layers of such metals as nickel, copper and silver were chemically and/or electrochemically deposited on carbon nanotubes. These novel materials of nanometer size can be adapted for some electronic application, e.g. nanowires.

  12. TiO2/bi A-SPAES(Ds 1.0) composite membranes for proton exchange membrane in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ni; Zhong, Chuanqing; Xie, Bing; Liu, Huiling; Wang, Xingzu

    2014-09-01

    A series of TiO2/bi A-SPAES(Ds 1.0) composite membranes with various contents of nano-sized TiO2 particles were prepared through sol-gel method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated the TiO2 particles were well dispersed within polymer matrix. These membranes were used for proton exchange membrane (PEM) for performance evaluation in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). These composite membranes showed good thermal stability and mechanical strength. It was found that the water uptake of these membranes enhanced with the TiO2 amount increasing in these composite membranes. Meanwhile, the introduction of TiO2 particles increased the proton conductivity and reduced the methanol permeability. The proton conductivities of these composite membranes with 8% TiO2 particles (0.120 S/cm and 0.128 S/cm) were higher than those of Nafion 117 membrane (0.114 S/cm and 0.117 S/cm) at 80 degrees C and 100 degrees C. Specially, the methanol diffusion coefficient (1.2 x 10(-7) cm2/s) of the composite membrane with 8% TiO2 content was much lower than that of Nafion 117 membrane (2.1 x 10(-6) cm2/s). As a result, the TiO2/bi A-SPAES composite membrane was considered as a promising material for PEM in DMFC.

  13. Application of Mössbauer spectroscopy in industrial heterogeneous catalysis: effect of oxidant on FePO4 material phase transformations in direct methanol synthesis from methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasireddy, Venkata D. B. C.; Khan, Faiza B.; Hanzel, Darko; Bharuth-Ram, Krish; Likozar, Blaž

    2017-11-01

    The effect of the FePO4 material phase transformation in the direct selective oxidation of methane to methanol was studied using various oxidants, i.e. O2, H2O and N2O. The phases of the heterogeneous catalyst applied, before and after the reactions, were characterized by M¨ossbauer spectroscopy. The main reaction products were methanol, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, whereas formaldehyde was produced in rather minute amounts. The Mössbauer spectra showed the change of the initial catalyst material, FePO4 (tridymite-like phase (tdm)), to the reduced metal form, iron(II) pyrophosphate, Fe2P2O7, and thereafter, the material phase change was governed by the oxidation with individual oxidizing species.Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements applied along with X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies on fresh, reduced and spent catalytic materials demonstrated a transformation of the catalyst to a mixture of phases which depended on operating process conditions. Generally, activity was low and should be a subject of further material optimization and engineering, while the selectivity towards methanol at low temperatures applied was adequate. The proceeding redox mechanism should thus play a key role in catalytic material design, while the advantage of iron-based heterogeneous catalysts primarily lies in them being comparably inexpensive and comprising non-critical raw materials only.

  14. A miniature origami biofuel cell based on a consumed cathode.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Han, Yujie; Lou, Baohua; Zhang, Lingling; Han, Lei; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-11-10

    Considerable interest has been focused on miniature biofuel cells (BFCs) because of their portability and possibility to be implantable. Origami devices with hollow channels will provide novel insight into the assembly methods of miniature BFCs. Herein a miniature origami BFC has been fabricated from a MnO2-graphite flake consumed solid-state cathode. For further practical applications, miniature origami BFCs can directly generate energy from soft drinks.

  15. Direct analysis of formate in human plasma, serum and whole blood by in-line coupling of microdialysis to capillary electrophoresis for rapid diagnosis of methanol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kubáň, Pavel; Boček, Petr

    2013-03-20

    A simple method using direct injection of human blood samples and quantitative analysis of formate was developed for rapid diagnosis of methanol poisoning. A sample pretreatment device including a 500Da molecular weight cut-off dialysis membrane was in-line coupled to capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4)D). 50μL of 1:9 diluted blood samples and 50μL of DI water were filled into the donor and the acceptor chamber, respectively, and small ionic species in blood samples were electrokinetically injected across the dialysis membrane directly into the separation capillary. Matrix components, such as red blood cells, proteins, lipids and other high molecular weight compounds, were retained by the dialysis membrane and did not interfere with subsequent CE separation. Formate was separated from other small anions in an optimized background electrolyte solution consisting of 20mM l-histidine and 25mM l-glutamic acid at pH 4.8. The method showed excellent analytical parameters in terms of repeatability and linearity; RSD values for migration times and peak areas at a formate concentration typical for methanol poisoning were below 0.3% and 7.4%, respectively, and linear calibration curves with correlation coefficients better than 0.999 were obtained. Limit of detection and limit of quantification were 15 and 50μM formate in original (undiluted) blood samples, respectively. The method was applied to determination of formate in serum samples of a patient diagnosed with acute methanol poisoning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. NiO/CeO2-ZnO nano-catalysts for direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki Hyuk; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Dong Baek; Jang, Boknam; Song, In Kyu

    2014-11-01

    XNiO/CeO2(0.7)-ZnO(0.3) (X = 0, 1, 5, 10, and 15) nano-catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method with a variation of NiO content (X, wt%). The prepared catalysts were then applied to the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide. Successful formation of XNiO/CeO2(0.7)-ZnO(0.3) nano-catalysts was confirmed by XRD and ICP-AES analyses. Acidity and basicity of XNiO/CeO2-ZnO were measured by NH3-TPD (temperature-programmed desorption) and CO2-TPD experiments, respectively, with an aim of elucidating the effect of acidity and basicity of the catalysts on the catalytic performance in the reaction. It was revealed that the catalytic activity of XNiO/CeO2(0.7)-ZnO(0.3) was closely related to both acidity and basicity of the catalysts. The amount of dimethyl carbonate produced over XNiO/CeO2(0.7)-ZnO(0.3) increased with increasing acidity and basicity of the catalysts. Thus, both acidity and basicity of the catalysts played important roles in determining the catalytic performance in the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide.

  17. Direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide over CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) nano-catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki Hyuk; Joe, Wangrae; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Mieock; Kim, Dong Baek; Jang, Boknam; Song, In Kyu

    2013-12-01

    CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) (X = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and 1.0) nano-catalysts were prepared by a co-precipitation method with a variation of CeO2 content (X, mol%), and they were applied to the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide. Successful formation of CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) nano-catalysts was well confirmed by XRD analysis. The amount of DMC produced over CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) catalysts exhibited a volcano-shaped curve with respect to CeO2 content. Acidity and basicity of CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) nano-catalysts were measured by NH3-TPD and CO2-TPD experiments, respectively, to elucidate the effect of acidity and basicity on the catalytic performance in the reaction. It was revealed that the catalytic performance of CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) nano-catalysts was closely related to the acidity and basicity of the catalysts. Amount of dimethyl carbonate increased with increasing both acidity and basicity of the catalysts. Among the catalysts tested, CeO2(0.7)-ZnO(0.3) with the largest acidity and basicity showed the best catalytic performance in the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide.

  18. Direct growth of NiCo2O4 nanostructures on conductive substrates with enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability for methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lei; Gu, Li; Yang, Li; Yuan, Hongyan; Xiao, Dan

    2013-08-21

    In this report, NiCo2O4 nanostructures with different morphologies were directly grown on conductive substrates (stainless steel and ITO) by a facile electrodeposition method in addition to a post-annealing process. The morphology changes on different conductive substrates are discussed in detail. The NiCo2O4 on stainless steel (SS) had a high surface area (119 m(2) g(-1)) and was successfully used in the electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol. The electrocatalytic performance was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Impressively, the NiCo2O4 showed much higher electrocatalytic activity, lower overpotential and greater stability compared to that of only NiO or Co3O4 synthesized by the same method. The higher electrocatalytic activity is due to the high electron conductivity, large surface area of NiCo2O4 and the fast ion/electron transport in the electrode and at the electrolyte-electrode interface. This is important for further development of high performance non-platinum electrocatalysts for application in direct methanol fuel cells.

  19. Novel method for investigation of two-phase flow in liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells using an aqueous H 2O 2 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewer, T.; Beckmann, T.; Dohle, H.; Mergel, J.; Stolten, D.

    One major issue in the development of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) is the management of the evolving CO 2 gas bubbles in the flow fields. These bubbles influence the flow distribution and therefore the power density of a cell. In this paper, a novel method for in situ production of bubbles in a test cell made of perspex is presented. The method is based on the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide solution (H 2O 2) to oxygen and water in aqueous media at the presence of a catalyst. By using an appropriate H 2O 2-concentration, the gas evolution rate can be set to same order of magnitude as in real direct methanol fuel cells. This approach allows the simulation of the flow distribution in DMFC by simple low-cost hardware. As no current conducting parts are needed, the whole dummy cell can be made of perspex to ensure a complete visibility of the flow. In a perspex flow cell with an active area of 600 cm 2, the flow homogeneity as a function of gas evolution rate, flow field and manifold design was investigated. Experiments show that splayed manifolds have a superior performance concerning flow uniformity compared to other designs. The use of grid structures as a flow field gives good bubble transport at all investigated current densities.

  20. Activity and stability studies of titanates and titanate-carbon nanotubes supported Ag anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Mokhtar; Khairy, M.; Eid, Salah

    2016-02-01

    Titanate-SWCNT; synthesized via exploiting the interaction between TiO2 anatase with oxygen functionalized SWCNT, supported Ag nanoparticles and Ag/titanate are characterized using XRD, TEM-EDX-SAED, N2 adsorption, Photoluminescence, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. These samples are tested for methanol electrooxidation via using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance measurements. It is shown that Ag/titanate nanotubes exhibited superior electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation (4.2 mA cm-2) than titanate-SWCNT, Ag/titanate-SWCNT and titanate. This study reveals the existence of a strong metal-support interaction in Ag/titanate as explored via formation of Ti-O-Ag bond at 896 cm-1 and increasing surface area and pore volume (103 m2 g-1, 0.21 cm3 g-1) compared to Ag/titanate-SWCNT (71 m2 g-1, 0.175 cm3 g-1) that suffers perturbation and defects following incorporation of SWCNT and Ag. Embedding Ag preferably in SWCNT rather than titanate in Ag/titanate-SWCNT disturbs the electron transfer compared to Ag/titanate. Charge transfer resistance depicted from Nyquist impedance plots is found in the order of titanate > Ag/titanate-SWCNT > titanate-SWCNT > Ag/titanate. Accordingly, Ag/titanate indicates a slower current degradation over time compared to rest of catalysts. Conductivity measurements indicate that it follows the order Ag/titanate > Ag/titanate-SWCNT > titanate > titanate-SWCNT declaring that SWCNT affects seriously the conductivity of Ag(titanate) due to perturbations caused in titanate and sinking of electrons committed by Ago through SWCNT.

  1. Sn-doped TiO2 modified carbon to support Pt anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yabei; Liu, Chuntao; Liu, Yanying; Feng, Bo; Li, Li; Pan, Hengyu; Kellogg, Williams; Higgins, Drew; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-01

    Catalyst supports are known to play important role in governing overall catalyst activity and durability. Here, a new type of SnO2-TiO2 solid solution (TixSn1-xO2) support was prepared via a solvothermal method with substitution of Ti4+ by Sn4+ in the TiO2 lattice. Furthermore, the TixSn1-xO2 was combined with conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72) to prepare a hybrid support (TixSn1-xO2-C) for depositing Pt nanoparticles. The ratios of Sn vs. Ti in the solid-solution and TixSn1-xO2vs. XC-72 were systematically optimized in terms of their performance as supports for methanol oxidation. Compared to Pt/TiO2-C and commercial Pt/C catalysts, the best performing Pt/Ti0.9Sn0.1O2-C catalyst exhibited the highest activity, evidenced by methanol oxidation and CO stripping experiments. The well-dispersed Pt nanoparticles (2-3 nm) are mostly deposited on the boundaries of Ti0.9Sn0.1O2 and carbon blacks. Formation of the special triple junction structure can play an important role in improving Pt utilization with increased electrochemical active surface areas (ESA) of Pt. In addition, the enhanced activity for Pt supported on Ti0.9Sn0.1O2-C is due to high content of OH group on Ti0.9Sn0.1O2 along with the strengthened metal-supports interactions. Both promote the oxidation of poisoning CO absorbed on Pt active sites.

  2. Miniaturized autonomous robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Hidenori; Fukuda, Toshio

    1998-01-01

    Many projects developing the miniaturized autonomous robot have been carried out in the whole world. This paper deals with our challenges developing a miniaturized autonomous robot. The miniaturized autonomous robot is defined as the miniaturized closed-loop system with micro processor, microactuators and microsensors. We have developed the micro autonomous robotic system (MARS) consisting of the microprocessor, microsensors, microactuators, communication units and batteries. The MARS controls itself by the downloaded program supplied through the IR communication system. In this paper, we demonstrate several performance of the MARS, and discuss the properties of the miniaturized autonomous robot.

  3. Fluorescence-based high throughput screening for noble metal-free and platinum-poor anode catalysts for the direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Welsch, F G; Stöwe, K; Maier, W F

    2011-09-12

    We describe here the results of a high throughput screening study for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) anode catalysts consisting of new elemental combinations with an optical high-throughput screening method, which allows the quantitative evaluation of the electrochemical activity of catalysts. The method is based on the fluorescence of protonated quinine generated during electrooxidation of methanol. The high-throughput screening included noble-metal free binary and ternary mixed oxides of the elements Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Ta, Ti, Zn, and Zr in the oxidized form as well as after prior reduction in hydrogen. In addition 318 ternary and quaternary Pt-containing materials composed out of the mixed oxides of Bi, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ge, In, La, Mn, Mo, Nb, Nd, Ni, Pr, Sb, Sn, Ta, Te, Ti, V, Zn, and Zr with a molar Pt-ratio of 10% and 30% were screened. Validation and long time experiments of the hits were performed by cyclovoltammetry (CV). The microstructural stability of the electrode preparations of the lead compositions was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern analysis.

  4. Considerations of the Effects of Naphthalene Moieties on the Design of Proton-Conductive Poly(arylene ether ketone) Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baolong; Hong, Lihua; Li, Yunfeng; Zhao, Liang; Wei, Yuxue; Zhao, Chengji; Na, Hui

    2016-09-14

    Novel sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketones) (SDN-PAEK-x), consisting of dual naphthalene and flexible sulfoalkyl groups, were prepared via polycondensation, demethylation, and sulfobutylation grafting reaction. Among them, SDN-PAEK-1.94 membrane with the highest ion exchange capacity (IEC = 2.46 mequiv·g(-1)) exhibited the highest proton conductivity, which was 0.147 S· cm(-1) at 25 °C and 0.271 S·cm(-1) at 80 °C, respectively. The introduction of dual naphthalene moieties is expected to achieve much enhanced properties compared to those of sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketones) (SNPAEK-x), consisting of single naphthalene and flexible sulfoalkyl groups. Compared with SNPAEK-1.60 with a similar IEC, SDN-PAEK-1.74 membrane showed higher proton conductivity, higher IEC normalized conductivity, and higher effective proton mobility, although it had lower analytical acid concentration. The SDN-PAEK-x membranes with IECs higher than 1.96 mequiv·g(-1) also exhibited higher proton conductivity than that of recast Nafion membrane. Furthermore, SDN-PAEK-1.94 displayed a better single cell performance with a maximum power density of 60 mW·cm(-2) at 80 °C. Considering its high proton conductivity, excellent single cell performance, good mechanical stabilities, low membrane swelling, and methanol permeability, SDN-PAEK-x membranes are promising candidates as alternative polymer electrolyte membranes to Nafion for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  5. Synthesis of PtRu nanoparticles from the hydrosilylation reaction and application as catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junchao; Liu, Zhaolin; He, Chaobin; Gan, Leong Ming

    2005-09-08

    Nanosized Pt, PtRu, and Ru particles were prepared by a novel process, the hydrosilylation reaction. The hydrosilylation reaction is an effective method of preparation not only for Pt particles but also for other metal colloids, such as Ru. Vulcan XC-72 was selected as catalyst support for Pt, PtRu, and Ru colloids, and TEM investigations showed nanoscale particles and narrow size distribution for both supported and unsupported metals. All Pt and Pt-rich catalysts showed the X-ray diffraction pattern of a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure, whereas the Ru and Ru-rich alloys were more typical of a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure. As evidenced by XPS, most Pt and Ru atoms in the nanoparticles were zerovalent, except a trace of oxidation-state metals. The electrooxidation of liquid methanol on these catalysts was investigated at room temperature by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The results concluded that some alloy catalysts showed higher catalytic activities and better CO tolerance than the Pt-only catalyst; Pt56Ru44/C have displayed the best electrocatalytic performance among all carbon-supported catalysts.

  6. Lamellar crystals as proton conductors to enhance the performance of proton exchange membrane for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuning; Jiang, Zhongyi; Xiao, Lulu; Xu, Tao; Wu, Hong

    2011-08-01

    Zirconium glyphosate (ZrG) is a solid proton conductor with layered crystal structure. The inorganic veneer sheets of ZrG are covalently intercalated by glyphosate molecules with carboxylic acid end groups (-COOH). The existence of abundant -COOH groups both inside and on the surface of ZrG provides additional proton-conducting channels facilitating the proton conduction through and around the inorganic crystals. ZrG is incorporated into the sulfonated polyether ether ketone (SPEEK) matrices to prepare proton-conducting hybrid membranes. The conductivity of the hybrid membranes is higher than the pristine SPEEK membrane, and increases with increasing ZrG content. Furthermore, the enhancement of the proton conductivity is more obvious at elevated temperatures. At 25 °C, the proton conductivity of the hybrid membrane with 16 wt% ZrG is 1.4 times higher than that of the pristine membrane. When the temperature increases to 55 °C, the conductivity of the hybrid membrane with 8 wt% ZrG is more than twice that of the pristine SPEEK membrane. The prolonged and tortuous pathways originated from the incorporation of inorganic crystals lead to reduced methanol permeability. The selectivity of the hybrid membrane is increased by as much as 72% compared to the pristine SPEEK membrane.

  7. Miniaturization of a Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Jamie D.; Jones, Evan O.; Dagle, Robert A.; Xia, Gordon; Cao, Chunshe; Wang, Yong

    2005-09-01

    The development of a miniaturized hydrogen plant is discussed. The micro-scale system is capable of producing 1-5 sccm hydrogen that could be used as a fuel supply in a small fuel cell to produce <1 W power. The paper describes the developmental approach, significant unit operations, material selection, and reactor design. The final microscale fuel processing system is composed of a catalytic combustor, catalytic methanol reformer, selective methanation reactor, and the necessary vaporizers and heat exchangers. The fuel processing system is less than 0.3 cm3 and less than 1 gram mass. Thermal efficiencies as high as 33% for hydrogen production were achieved. When a methanation reactor was incorporated into the system, a carbon monoxide level of less than 100 ppm was reached, but at a reduced system efficiency. Further development work includes increasing efficiency through improved system integration.

  8. Miniature drag force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilevered beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like that of a second order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  9. The use of a dynamic hydrogen electrode as an electrochemical tool to evaluate plasma activated carbon as electrocatalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Carmo, Marcelo Roepke, Thorsten; Scheiba, Frieder; Roth, Christina; Moeller, Stephan; Fuess, Hartmut; Poco, Joao G.R.; Linardi, Marcelo

    2009-01-08

    The objectives of this study were to functionalize the carbon black surface by chemically introducing oxygenated groups using plasma technology. This should enable a better interaction of the carbon support with the metallic catalyst nanoparticles, hindering posterior support particle agglomeration and preventing loss of active surface. PtRu/C nanoparticles were anchored on the carbon supports by the impregnation method and direct reduction with hydrazine. Physical characterization of the materials was carried out using energy dispersive X-ray analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The screen printing technique was used to produce membrane electrode assemblies for single cell tests in methanol/air (DMFC). Tests were carried out using the dynamic hydrogen electrode as an electrochemical tool to evaluate the anode and cathode behavior separately.

  10. Enhanced oxygen reduction reaction activity of iron-containing nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratso, Sander; Kruusenberg, Ivar; Sarapuu, Ave; Rauwel, Protima; Saar, Rando; Joost, Urmas; Aruväli, Jaan; Kanninen, Petri; Kallio, Tanja; Tammeveski, Kaido

    2016-11-01

    Non-precious metal catalysts for electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction are synthesised by pyrolysis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the presence of nitrogen and iron precursors. For the physico-chemical characterisation of the catalysts transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction are used. The electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts for oxygen reduction is studied in 0.1 M KOH solution using the rotating disk electrode method. The Fe-containing nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes exhibit an enhanced electrocatalytic performance as compared to metal-free counterparts and their electrocatalytic activity is comparable to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. Alkaline direct methanol fuel cell tests also show performance close to Pt/C. Thus, these materials can be considered as promising cathode catalysts for application in alkaline fuel cells.

  11. New approaches towards novel composite and multilayer membranes for intermediate temperature-polymer electrolyte fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Carolina Musse; Sharma, Surbhi; de Camargo Forte, Maria Madalena; Steinberger-Wilckens, Robert

    2016-06-01

    This review analyses the current and existing literature on novel composite and multilayer membranes for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell applications, including intermediate temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (IT-PEFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) systems. It provides a concise scrutiny of the vast body of literature available on organic and inorganic filler based polymer membranes and links it to the new emerging trend towards novel combinations of multilayered polymer membranes for applications in DMFC and IT-PEFC. The paper carefully explores the advantages and disadvantages of the most common preparation techniques reported for multilayered membranes such as hot-pressing, casting and dip-coating and also summarises various other fresh and unique techniques employed for multilayer membrane preparation.

  12. A novel multimodal CARS miniaturized microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Brett; Naji, Majid; Murugkar, Sangeeta; Brideau, Craig; Stys, Peter; Anis, Hanan

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate the operation of a novel portable, fibre delivery miniaturized multimodal microscope (exoscope) for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging using a single Ti:sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser. This microscope features a large mode area photonic crystal fibre for light delivery, as well as biaxial scanning microelectromechanical system mirrors and custom miniaturized optics corrected for chromatic aberration. We demonstrate imaging of polystyrene beads, two photon excitation fluorescence beads in both forward and backward (epi) directions. This miniaturized exoscope will enable in-vivo imaging of rat spinal cord.

  13. Miniature propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John G.

    1992-07-01

    Miniature solenoid valves, check valves and a hydrazine gas generator typify the miniaturization used in the liquid propulsion system for the Army Light Weight Exo-Atmospheric Projectile (LEAP). The pressure control subsystem uses a solenoid valve weighing 24 grams to control flow of helium to pressurize the propellant tanks. The attitude control subsystem uses a gas generator weighing 71 grams to produce decomposed hydrazine as the gaseous propellant for miniature 1 lbf ACS thrusters weighing 5.4 grams. The successful use of these miniature components in development tests and a hover test of the LEAP is described.

  14. Reduction of carbon dioxide gas formation at the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell using chemically enhanced solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Michael D.; McCready, Mark J.

    The production of CO 2 gas at the DMFC anode leads to dramatic increases in pumping power requirements and reduced power output because of mass transfer limitations as bubble trains form in the channels of larger stacks. Experimental observations taken in a 5 cm 2 DMFC test cell operated at 60 °C, 1 atm, and with a methanol/water fuel flow rates of 5-10 cm 3 min -1 indicate that the rate of bubble formation can be reduced by increasing the fuel flow because more liquid is available for the CO 2 to dissolve in. Further observations indicate that KOH and LiOH added to the fuel eliminates CO 2 gas formation in situ at low concentrations because of the greatly increased solubility that results. A mathematical model for the volumetric rate of CO 2 gas production that includes effects of temperature and solubility is developed and extended to include the effects of hydroxide ions in solution. The model is used to predict the onset location of gas formation in the flow field as well as the void fraction at any point in the flow field. Predictions from the model agree very well with our experiments. Model predictions explain differences in the initial location of bubble formation for fuel solutions pre-saturated with CO 2 as opposed to CO 2-free solutions. Experiments with KOH and LiOH added to fuel solutions confirm the validity of the model extension that includes solubility that is enhanced by chemical reaction. Experiments with LiOH, KOH, and ammonium hydroxide show that the long-term durability of standard Pt-Ru/Nafion ®/Pt membrane electrode assemblies is compromised because of the presence of lithium, potassium, and ammonium cations that interact with the Nafion ® membrane and result in increasing the ohmic limitations of the polymer electrolyte membrane. Experiments with Ca(OH) 2, while reducing gas formation, precipitate the product CaCO 3 out of solution too rapidly for downstream filtering, blocking channels in the flow field.

  15. Miniature Radioisotope Power Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, Artur B.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed miniature power source generates electricity for years from heat developed in small radioisotope unit without addition of fuel or dependence on sunlight. Called powerstick, is relatively inexpensive, lightweight, and rugged. Supplies power to small vehicles or scientific instruments in remote locations on Earth or in outer space. Envisioned uses include Mars miniature rovers and monitoring equipment for toxic or nuclear storage sites.

  16. Miniature robots can assist in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Oleynikov, D; Rentschler, M; Hadzialic, A; Dumpert, J; Platt, S R; Farritor, S

    2005-04-01

    Laparoscopy reduces patient trauma but eliminates the surgeon's ability to directly view and touch the surgical environment. Although current robot-assisted laparoscopy improves the surgeon's ability to manipulate and visualize the target organs, the instruments and cameras remain constrained by the entry incision. This limits tool tip orientation and optimal camera placement. This article focuses on developing miniature in vivo robots to assist surgeons during laparoscopic surgery by providing an enhanced field of view from multiple angles and dexterous manipulators not constrained by the abdominal wall fulcrum effect. Miniature camera robots were inserted through a small incision into the insufflated abdominal cavity of an anesthetized pig. Trocar insertion and other laparoscopic tool placements were then viewed with these robotic cameras. The miniature robots provided additional camera angles that improved surgical visualization during a cholecystectomy. These successful prototype trials have demonstrated that miniature in vivo robots can provide surgeons with additional visual information that can increase procedural safety.

  17. Investigating the direct and indirect influences of light on short-term changes in methanol production and emission in Lycopersicon esculentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P.; Li, L.; Timko, M.; Mak, J. E.; Lerdau, M.

    2010-12-01

    Plant-produced methanol (MeOH) is the largest source of MeOH to the atmosphere where it is the second most abundant organic gas after methane. Current MeOH emission models are limited by their inability to predict changes in MeOH production in plants, a process still not well understood. Previous modeling studies indicated that light may have a direct influence on phytogenic MeOH production. As light is known to regulate cell wall expansion, we predicted light to stimulate MeOH production through the pectin methylesterase (PME) pathway. After normalizing MeOH emissions for stomatal conductance, we were unable to detect a MeOH emission response to light over short time scales (20-30min). After experimentally controlling for stomatal conductance and temperature, no light activation of PME activity or MeOH emission was observed. Our results clearly demonstrate the lack of a direct influence of light on short-term changes in MeOH production and emission. Future investigation of the long-term impacts of light on MeOH production is needed as light history may be an important factor for predicting MeOH emission over diurnal and seasonal time scales.

  18. Method for making methanol

    DOEpatents

    Mednick, R. Lawrence; Blum, David B.

    1986-01-01

    Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  19. Method for making methanol

    DOEpatents

    Mednick, R. Lawrence; Blum, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  20. Method of steam reforming methanol to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Beshty, Bahjat S.

    1990-01-01

    The production of hydrogen by the catalyzed steam reforming of methanol is accomplished using a reformer of greatly reduced size and cost wherein a mixture of water and methanol is superheated to the gaseous state at temperatures of about 800.degree. to about 1,100.degree. F. and then fed to a reformer in direct contact with the catalyst bed contained therein, whereby the heat for the endothermic steam reforming reaction is derived directly from the superheated steam/methanol mixture.

  1. Two new methanol converters

    SciTech Connect

    Westerterp, K.R.; Bodewes, T.N.; Vrijiand, M.S.A.; Kuczynski, M. )

    1988-11-01

    Two novel converter systems were developed for the manufacture of methanol from synthesis gas: the Gas-Solid-Solid Trickle Flow Reactor (GSSTFR) and the Reactor System with Interstage Product Removal (RSIPR). In the GSSTFR version, the product formed at the catalyst surface is directly removed from the reaction zone by means of a solid adsorbent. This adsorbent continuously trickles over the catalyst bed. High reactant conversions up to 100% can be achieved in a single pass so that the usual recycle loop for the unconverted reactants is absent or greatly reduced in size. In the RSIPR version, high conversions per pass are achieved in a series of adiabatic or isothermal fixed bed reactors with selective product removal in absorbers between the reactor stages. The feasibility and economics of the two systems are discussed on the basis of 1,000 tpd methanol plants compared with a low-pressure Lurgi system.

  2. Miniature TV Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Originally devised to observe Saturn stage separation during Apollo flights, Marshall Space Flight Center's Miniature Television Camera, measuring only 4 x 3 x 1 1/2 inches, quickly made its way to the commercial telecommunications market.

  3. Miniature oxygen resuscitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G.; Teegen, J. T.; Waddell, H.

    1969-01-01

    Miniature, portable resuscitation system is used during evacuation of patients to medical facilities. A carrying case contains a modified resuscitator head, cylinder of oxygen, two-stage oxygen regulator, low pressure tube, and a mask for mouth and nose.

  4. Enhance performance of micro direct methanol fuel cell by in situ CO2 removal using novel anode flow field with superhydrophobic degassing channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junsheng; Luo, Ying; Zheng, Sheng; Wang, Dazhi

    2017-05-01

    Capillary blocking caused by CO2 bubbles in anode flow field (AFF) is one of the bottlenecks for performance improvement of a micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC). In this work, we present a novel AFF structure with nested layout of hydrophilic fuel channels and superhydrophobic degassing channels which can remove most of CO2 from AFF before it is released to the fuel channels. The new AFFs are fabricated on Ti substrates by using micro photochemical etching combined with anodization and fluorination treatments. Performance of the μDMFCs with and without superhydrophobic degassing channels in their AFF is comparatively studied. Results show that the superhydrophobic degassing channels can significantly speed up the exhaust of CO2 from the AFF. CO2 clogging is not observed in the new AFFs even when their comparison AFFs have been seriously blocked by CO2 slugs under the same operating conditions. 55% and 60% of total CO2 produced in μDMFCs with N-serpentine and N-spiral AFF can be respectively removed by the superhydrophobic degassing channels. The power densities of the μDMFCs equipped with new serpentine and spiral AFFs are respectively improved by 30% and 90% compared with those using conventional AFFs. This means that the new AFFs developed in this work can effectively prevent CO2-induced capillary blocking in the fuel channels, and finally significantly improve the performance of the μDMFCs.

  5. Handheld interface for miniature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sunny; Samson, Scott A.; Farmer, Andrew; Smith, Matthew C.; Fries, David; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2005-02-01

    Miniaturization of laboratory sensors has been enabled by continued evolution of technology. Field portable systems are often desired, because they reduce sample handling, provide rapid feedback capability, and enhance convenience. Fieldable sensor systems should include a method for initiating the analysis, storing and displaying the results, while consuming minimal power and being compact and portable. Low cost will allow widespread usage of these systems. In this paper, we discuss a reconfigurable Personal Data Assistant (PDA) based control and data collection system for use with miniature sensors. The system is based on the Handspring visor PDA and a custom designed motherboard, which connects directly to the PDA microprocessor. The PDA provides a convenient and low cost graphical user interface, moderate processing capability, and integrated battery power. The low power motherboard provides the voltage levels, data collection, and input/output (I/O) capabilities required by many MEMS and miniature sensors. These capabilities are relayed to connectors, where an application specific daughterboard is attached. In this paper, two applications are demonstrated. First, a handheld nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) detection sensor consisting of a heated and optical fluorescence detection system is discussed. Second, an electrostatically actuated MEMS micro mirror controller is realized.

  6. Development of tunable miniature piezoelectric-based scanners validated by the combination of two scanners in a direct image relay technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadfan, Adam Harbi; Pawlowski, Michal Emanuel; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2016-01-01

    Miniature piezoelectric actuators are commonly used as a compact means to relay images for numerous endoscopic applications. These scanners normally consist of an electrically driven lead zirconate titanate (PZT) tube that oscillates an optical fiber at its resonant frequency. The diameter and length of the PZT and fiber, the attachment of the fiber to the PZT, as well as the driving signal determine the main characteristics of the scan-frequency and amplitude of vibration. We present a new, robust, and repeatable method for producing miniature PZT actuators. The described technology allows for continuous tuning of the scanner mechanical properties during the assembly stage, enabling adjustment of resonant frequency and subsequent amplitude of vibration without a priori knowledge of the fiber's mechanical properties. The method consists of manufacturing high-precision fiber-holding plastic inserts with diamond turning lathes that allow for the fiber length to be quickly varied and locked during operation in order to meet the preferred performance. This concept of tuned PZTs was demonstrated with an imaging technique that combined two scanners oscillating in unison at the ends of a single optical fiber to relay images without the need to correlate the driving signal with a detector.

  7. Development of tunable miniature piezoelectric-based scanners validated by the combination of two scanners in a direct image relay technique

    PubMed Central

    Shadfan, Adam Harbi; Pawlowski, Michal Emanuel; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2016-01-01

    Miniature piezoelectric actuators are commonly used as a compact means to relay images for numerous endoscopic applications. These scanners normally consist of an electrically driven lead zirconate titanate (PZT) tube that oscillates an optical fiber at its resonant frequency. The diameter and length of the PZT and fiber, the attachment of the fiber to the PZT, as well as the driving signal determine the main characteristics of the scan—frequency and amplitude of vibration. We present a new, robust, and repeatable method for producing miniature PZT actuators. The described technology allows for continuous tuning of the scanner mechanical properties during the assembly stage, enabling adjustment of resonant frequency and subsequent amplitude of vibration without a priori knowledge of the fiber’s mechanical properties. The method consists of manufacturing high-precision fiber-holding plastic inserts with diamond turning lathes that allow for the fiber length to be quickly varied and locked during operation in order to meet the preferred performance. This concept of tuned PZTs was demonstrated with an imaging technique that combined two scanners oscillating in unison at the ends of a single optical fiber to relay images without the need to correlate the driving signal with a detector. PMID:28579655

  8. Miniature spinning as a fiber quality assessment tool

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Miniature spinning has long been used to assess cotton varieties in a timely manner. It has been an accepted fact that the quality of miniature spinning is less than optimal, but that it allows a direct comparison between cottons during varietal studies. Recently, researchers have made processing ...

  9. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Chludzinski, Paul J.; Dantowitz, Philip; McElroy, James F.

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  10. Methanol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... with has an exposure, call your local emergency number (such as 911), or your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States.

  11. Trade-offs in miniature quadrupole designs.

    PubMed

    Boumsellek, S; Ferran, R J

    2001-06-01

    Pressing needs for miniature mass spectrometers became apparent during the last decade in process monitoring and control, space exploration, and environmental screening. Besides the small footprint, common requirements include low cost, low power consumption, field portability, reliability, autonomy, and ease-of-use. Design concepts and construction technologies of miniaturized quadrupole sensors were guided by cost reduction requirements without sacrifice of performance. The first miniature and complete quadrupole mass spectrometer system was introduced as the Micropole sensor. The concept featured a novel technique to assemble and operate multiple miniature quadrupoles in parallel. The short analyzer length offers a significant advantage by enabling direct mass filtering at pressures up in the 10(-2) torr range. High voltages at higher frequencies (10-20 MHz) are required for acceptable mass resolving powers. Additional trade-offs were uncovered in miniature sensors leading to designs optimized for each class of applications. Real time ray tracing of ions injected and filtered in the quadrupole field is used early in the design stage to predict the performance and reliability of the device.

  12. Superamphiphobic miniature boat fabricated by laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kai; Dong, Xinran; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Cong; Duan, Ji'an

    2017-03-01

    We fabricated a superamphiphobic miniature boat with marked drag reduction and excellent loading capacity using femtosecond laser direct writing technology. The as-prepared superamphiphobic surface of the boat exhibited apparent contact angles larger than 150° toward both water and oil. Miniature boats with the superamphiphobic surface slid effortlessly on both water and oil-polluted water surfaces, with an increase in sliding distance by up to 52% and load increase of up to 27% compared with those of a boat with an untreated surface. A potential mechanism that explains the excellent performance of the superamphiphobic miniature boat was also discussed. This work provides a simple and economically viable strategy to obtain advanced surfaces for use in microfluidics and marine engineering.

  13. Chemistry "en Miniature"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesky, Herbert W.

    1997-04-01

    By using the video camera projector system we are improving the techniques which are employed in various schools. This is an important reason for employing "Chemistry en Miniature", as this method provides a new means of demonstrating chemical experiments in a lecture hall.

  14. Miniature multimode monolithic flextensional transducers.

    PubMed

    Hladky-Hennion, Anne-Christine; Uzgur, A Erman; Markley, Douglas C; Safari, Ahmad; Cochran, Joe K; Newnham, Robert E

    2007-10-01

    Traditional flextensional transducers classified in seven groups based on their designs have been used extensively in 1-100 kHz range for mine hunting, fish finding, oil explorations, and biomedical applications. In this study, a new family of small, low cost underwater, and biomedical transducers has been developed. After the fabrication of transducers, finite-elements analysis (FEA) was used extensively in order to optimize these miniature versions of high-power, low-frequency flextensional transducer designs to achieve broad bandwidth for both transmitting and receiving, engineered vibration modes, and optimized acoustic directivity patterns. Transducer topologies with various shapes, cross sections, and symmetries can be fabricated through high-volume, low-cost ceramic and metal extrusion processes. Miniaturized transducers posses resonance frequencies in the range of above 1 MHz to below 10 kHz. Symmetry and design of the transducer, polling patterns, driving and receiving electrode geometries, and driving conditions have a strong effect on the vibration modes, resonance frequencies, and radiation patterns. This paper is devoted to small, multimode flextensional transducers with active shells, which combine the advantages of small size and low-cost manufacturing with control of the shape of the acoustic radiation/receive pattern. The performance of the transducers is emphasized.

  15. Miniaturization in Biocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    The use of biocatalysts for the production of both consumer goods and building blocks for chemical synthesis is consistently gaining relevance. A significant contribution for recent advances towards further implementation of enzymes and whole cells is related to the developments in miniature reactor technology and insights into flow behavior. Due to the high level of parallelization and reduced requirements of chemicals, intensive screening of biocatalysts and process variables has become more feasible and reproducibility of the bioconversion processes has been substantially improved. The present work aims to provide an overview of the applications of miniaturized reactors in bioconversion processes, considering multi-well plates and microfluidic devices, update information on the engineering characterization of the hardware used, and present perspective developments in this area of research. PMID:20479988

  16. Miniaturized Environmental Monitoring Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Freidhoff

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the Mass Spectrograph on a Chip (MSOC) program is the development of a miniature, multi-species gas sensor fabricated using silicon micromachining technology which will be orders of magnitude smaller and lower power consumption than a conventional mass spectrometer. The sensing and discrimination of this gas sensor are based on an ionic mass spectrograph, using magnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The fields cause a spatial separation of the ions according to their respective mass-to-charge ratio. The fabrication of this device involves the combination of microelectronics with micromechanically built sensors and, ultimately, vacuum pumps. The prototype of a chemical sensor would revolutionize the method of performing environmental monitoring for both commercial and government applications. The portable unit decided upon was the miniaturized gas chromatograph with a mass spectrometer detector, referred to as a GC/MS in the analytical marketplace.

  17. Miniature ceramic fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.; Zuppero, Anthony C.

    1997-06-24

    A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

  18. Miniaturized photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Robinson, Alex; Nielson, Gregory N.; Resnick, Paul J.

    2016-08-09

    A low-power miniaturized photoacoustic sensor uses an optical microphone made by semiconductor fabrication techniques, and optionally allows for all-optical communication to and from the sensor. This allows integration of the photoacoustic sensor into systems with special requirements, such as those that would be reactive in an electrical discharge condition. The photoacoustic sensor can also be operated in various other modes with wide application flexibility.

  19. Miniature Airflow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kershner, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    Miniature flow-angle and airspeed sensor quickly mounted on light aircraft wing with two-sided tape since conventional sensors are restricted to large aircraft. Sensor operates as free-trailing wind vane selfalineing in airstream through two independent axes. Vane attached to wing surface through hollow mounting boom that fits on mounting plate attached to wing with two-sided neoprene-foam tape. Method shown strong enough for loads of low-speed flight.

  20. Miniature multichannel biotelemeter system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carraway, J. B.; Sumida, J. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A miniature multichannel biotelemeter system is described. The system includes a transmitter where signals from different sources are sampled to produce a wavetrain of pulses. The transmitter also separates signals by sync pulses. The pulses amplitude modulate a radio frequency carrier which is received at a receiver unit. There the sync pulses are detected by a demultiplexer which routes the pulses from each different source to a separate output channel where the pulses are used to reconstruct the signals from the particular source.

  1. Pd and Pt-Ru anode electrocatalysts supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their use in passive and active direct alcohol fuel cells with an anion-exchange membrane (alcohol = methanol, ethanol, glycerol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambagioni, Valentina; Bianchini, Claudio; Marchionni, Andrea; Filippi, Jonathan; Vizza, Francesco; Teddy, Jacques; Serp, Philippe; Zhiani, Mohammad

    Palladium and platinum-ruthenium nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are prepared by the impregnation-reduction procedure. The materials obtained, Pd/ MWCNT and Pt-Ru/ MWCNT, are characterized by TEM, ICP-AES and XRPD. Electrodes coated with Pd/ MWCNT are scrutinized for the oxidation of methanol, ethanol or glycerol in 2 M KOH solution in half cells. The catalyst is very active for the oxidation of all alcohols, with glycerol providing the best performance in terms of specific current density and ethanol showing the lowest onset potential. Membrane-electrode assemblies have been fabricated using Pd/ MWCNT anodes, commercial cathodes and anion-exchange membrane and evaluated in both single passive and active direct alcohol fuel cells fed with aqueous solutions of 10 wt.% methanol, 10 wt.% ethanol or 5 wt.% glycerol. Pd/ MWCNT exhibits unrivalled activity as anode electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation. The analysis of the anode exhausts shows that ethanol is selectively oxidized to acetic acid, detected as acetate ion in the alkaline media of the reaction, while methanol yields carbonate and formate. A much wider product distribution, including glycolate, glycerate, tartronate, oxalate, formate and carbonate, is obtained from the oxidation of glycerol. The results obtained with Pt-Ru/ MWCNT anodes in acid media are largely inferior to those provided by Pd/ MWCNT electrodes in alkaline media.

  2. Compact Fuel-Cell System Would Consume Neat Methanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Kindler, Andrew; Valdez, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In a proposed direct methanol fuel-cell electric-power-generating system, the fuel cells would consume neat methanol, in contradistinction to the dilute aqueous methanol solutions consumed in prior direct methanol fuel-cell systems. The design concept of the proposed fuel-cell system takes advantage of (1) electro-osmotic drag and diffusion processes to manage the flows of hydrogen and water between the anode and the cathode and (2) evaporative cooling for regulating temperature. The design concept provides for supplying enough water to the anodes to enable the use of neat methanol while ensuring conservation of water for the whole fuel-cell system.

  3. Miniature drag-force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag-force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilever beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain-gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like those of a second-order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  4. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

  5. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  6. Equipment for drilling miniature holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L K

    1981-04-01

    Miniature holes are produced on 16 different types of mechanical drilling equipment. Each equipment type has significant advantages for a specific type of part. The basic capabilities vary greatly between equipment types. Some produce very precise holes and others produce very high volumes of commercial tolerance holes. At the present time machines are available for mechanicaly drilling up to 100,000 miniature holes per hour. Lasers currently are drilling as many as 15,000,000 ultra-miniature holes per hour.

  7. Imidazolium-functionalized poly(ether ether ketone) as membrane and electrode ionomer for low-temperature alkaline membrane direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaoming; Gu, Shuang; He, Gaohong; Wu, Xuemei; Benziger, Jay

    2014-03-01

    A series of imidazolium-functionalized poly(ether ether ketone)s (PEEK-ImOHs) were successfully synthesized by a two-step chloromethylation-Menshutkin reaction followed by hydroxide exchange. PEEK-ImOH membranes with ion exchange capacity (IEC) ranging from 1.56 to 2.24 mmol g-1 were prepared by solution casting. PEEK-ImOHs show selective solubility in aqueous solutions of acetone and tetrahydrofuran, but are insoluble in lower alcohols. PEEK-ImOH membranes with IEC of 2.03 mmol g-1 have high hydroxide conductivity (52 mS cm-1 at 20 °C), acceptable water swelling ratio (51% at 60 °C), and great tensile strength (78 MPa), and surprising flexibility (elongation-to-break of 168%), and high thermal stability (Decomposition temperature: 193 °C). In addition, PEEK-ImOH membranes show low methanol permeability (1.3-6.9 × 10-7 cm2 s-1). PEEK-ImOH membrane was tested in methanol/O2 fuel cell as both the HEM and the ionomer impregnated into the catalyst layer; the open circuit voltage is 0.84 V and the peak power density is 31 mW cm-2.

  8. Preparation of main-chain-type and side-chain-type sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membranes for direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Jie-Cheng; Lin, Chien-Kung

    Novel main-chain-type and side-chain-type sulphonated poly(ether ether ketone)s (MS-SPEEKs) are synthesised by reacting the sulphonic acid groups of pristine SPEEKs with 2-aminoethanesulphonic acid to improve the nano-phase separated morphology of the material. 1H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy are employed to determine the structure and composition of main-chain-type and side-chain-type sulphonated polymers. Flexible and tough membranes with reasonable thermal properties are obtained. The MS-SPEEKs show good hydrolytic stability, and water uptake values ranging from 15% to 30% are observed. Compared to Nafion 117 ®, the methanol permeability of the MS-SPEEKs is dramatically reduced to 8.83 × 10 -8 cm 2 s -1 to 3.31 × 10 -7 cm 2 s -1. The proton conductivity increases with increasing temperature, reaching 0.013-0.182 S cm -1. A maximum power density and open circuit voltage of 115 mW cm -2 and 0.830 V are obtained at 80 °C, respectively, which is significantly greater than the values generated with Nafion 117 ®. The introduction of pendent side-chain-type sulphonic acid groups increases the single-cell performance by more than approximately 20%; thus, the lower water diffusivity, methanol permeability, electro-osmotic drag coefficient and high cell performance indicated that MS-SPEEK is a promising candidate for DMFC applications.

  9. Miniature Laser Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert; Brown, Andy

    2011-01-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a miniature laser magnetometer (MLM) that will measure the scalar magnitude and vector components of near-Earth magnetic fields. The MLM incorporates a number of technical innovations to achieve high-accuracy and high-resolution performance while significantly reducing the size of the laser-pumped helium magnetometer for use on small satellites and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). and electronics sections that has the capability of measuring both the scalar magnetic field magnitude and the vector magnetic field components. Further more, the high-accuracy scalar measurements are used to calibrate and correct the vector component measurements in order to achieve superior vector accuracy and stability. The correction algorithm applied to the vector components for calibration and the same cell for vector and scalar measurements are major innovations. The separate sensor and electronics section of the MLM instrument allow the sensor to be installed on a boom or otherwise located away from electronics and other noisy magnetic components. The MLM s miniaturization will be accomplished through the use of advanced miniaturized components and packaging methods for the MLM sensor and electronics. The MLM conceptual design includes three key innovations. The first is a new non-magnetic laser package that will allow the placement of the laser pump source near the helium cell sensing elements. The second innovation is the design of compact, nested, triaxial Braunbek coils used in the vector measurements that reduce the coil size by a factor of two compared to existing Helmholtz coils with similar field-generation performance. The third innovation is a compact sensor design that reduces the sensor volume by a factor of eight compared to MLM s predecessor.

  10. Mars Miniature Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Hayati, Samad; Lavery, David; McBrid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    For robotic Mars missions, all the science information is gathered through on-board miniature instruments that have been developed through many years of R&D. Compared to laboratory counterparts, the rover instruments require miniaturization, such as low mass (1-2 kg), low power (> 10 W) and compact (1-2 liter), yet with comparable sensitivity. Since early 1990's, NASA recognized the need for the miniature instruments and launched several instrument R&D programs, e.g., PIDDP (Planetary Instrument Definition and Development). However, until 1998, most of the instrument R&D programs supported only up to a breadboard level (TRL 3, 4) and there is a need to carry such instruments to flight qualifiable status (TU 5, 6) to respond to flight AOs (Announcement of Opportunity). Most of flight AOs have only limited time and financial resources, and can not afford such instrument development processes. To bridge the gap between instrument R&D programs and the flight instrument needs, NASA's Mars Technology Program (MTP) created advanced instrumentation program, Mars Instrument Development Project (MIDP). MIDP candidate instruments are selected through NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process [l]. For example, MIDP 161998-2000) selected and developed 10 instruments, MIDP II (2003-2005) 16 instruments, and MIDP III (2004-2006) II instruments.Working with PIs, JPL has been managing the MIDP tasks since September 1998. All the instruments being developed under MIDP have been selected through a highly competitive NRA process, and employ state-of-the-art technology. So far, four MIDP funded instruments have been selected by two Mars missions (these instruments have further been discussed in this paper).

  11. Mars Miniature Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Hayati, Samad; Lavery, David; McBrid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    For robotic Mars missions, all the science information is gathered through on-board miniature instruments that have been developed through many years of R&D. Compared to laboratory counterparts, the rover instruments require miniaturization, such as low mass (1-2 kg), low power (> 10 W) and compact (1-2 liter), yet with comparable sensitivity. Since early 1990's, NASA recognized the need for the miniature instruments and launched several instrument R&D programs, e.g., PIDDP (Planetary Instrument Definition and Development). However, until 1998, most of the instrument R&D programs supported only up to a breadboard level (TRL 3, 4) and there is a need to carry such instruments to flight qualifiable status (TU 5, 6) to respond to flight AOs (Announcement of Opportunity). Most of flight AOs have only limited time and financial resources, and can not afford such instrument development processes. To bridge the gap between instrument R&D programs and the flight instrument needs, NASA's Mars Technology Program (MTP) created advanced instrumentation program, Mars Instrument Development Project (MIDP). MIDP candidate instruments are selected through NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process [l]. For example, MIDP 161998-2000) selected and developed 10 instruments, MIDP II (2003-2005) 16 instruments, and MIDP III (2004-2006) II instruments.Working with PIs, JPL has been managing the MIDP tasks since September 1998. All the instruments being developed under MIDP have been selected through a highly competitive NRA process, and employ state-of-the-art technology. So far, four MIDP funded instruments have been selected by two Mars missions (these instruments have further been discussed in this paper).

  12. Miniature electrical connector

    DOEpatents

    Casper, Robert F.

    1976-01-01

    A miniature coaxial cable electrical connector includes an annular compressible gasket in a receptacle member, the gasket having a generally triangular cross section resiliently engaging and encircling a conically tapered outer surface of a plug member to create an elongated current leakage path at their interface; means for preventing rotation of the plug relative to the receptacle; a metal sleeve forming a portion of the receptacle and encircling the plug member when interconnected; and a split ring in the plug having outwardly and rearwardly projecting fingers spaced from and encircling a portion of a coaxial cable and engageable with the metal sleeve to interlock the receptacle and plug.

  13. Miniaturized optical wavelength sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Helen Ling-Ning

    Recently semiconductor processing technology has been applied to the miniaturization of optical wavelength sensors. Compact sensors enable new applications such as integrated diode-laser wavelength monitors and frequency lockers, portable chemical and biological detection, and portable and adaptive hyperspectral imaging arrays. Small sensing systems have trade-offs between resolution, operating range, throughput, multiplexing and complexity. We have developed a new wavelength sensing architecture that balances these parameters for applications involving hyperspectral imaging spectrometer arrays. In this thesis we discuss and demonstrate two new wavelength-sensing architectures whose single-pixel designs can easily be extended into spectrometer arrays. The first class of devices is based on sampling a standing wave. These devices are based on measuring the wavelength-dependent period of optical standing waves formed by the interference of forward and reflected waves at a mirror. We fabricated two different devices based on this principle. The first device is a wavelength monitor, which measures the wavelength and power of a monochromatic source. The second device is a spectrometer that can also act as a selective spectral coherence sensor. The spectrometer contains a large displacement piston-motion MEMS mirror and a thin GaAs photodiode flip-chip bonded to a quartz substrate. The performance of this spectrometer is similar to that of a Michelson in resolution, operating range, throughput and multiplexing but with the added advantages of fewer components and one-dimensional architecture. The second class of devices is based on the Talbot self-imaging effect. The Talbot effect occurs when a periodic object is illuminated with a spatially coherent wave. Periodically spaced self-images are formed behind the object. The spacing of the self-images is proportional to wavelength of the incident light. We discuss and demonstrate how this effect can be used for spectroscopy

  14. Miniaturized radiation chirper

    DOEpatents

    Umbarger, C. John; Wolf, Michael A.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

  15. Miniature cold gas thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzibziak, R. J., Sr.

    1992-07-01

    Cold gas thrusters provide a safe, inexpensive, lightweight and reliable means of propulsive control for small satellites, projectiles and maneuvering control systems. Moog Inc. has designed and developed a family of miniature cold gas thrusters for use on Strategic Defense Iniative flight simulation experiments, sounding rockets, small satellite applications, astronaut control systems, and close proximity maneuvering systems for Space System. Construction features such as coil assembly, core assembly, armature assembly, external housing and valve body are discussed. The design approach, performance characteristics and functional description of cold gas thrusters designed for various applications are presented.

  16. Miniature Reversal Electron-Attachment Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara

    1994-01-01

    Miniature reversal electron-attachment detector (miniREAD) enables direct injection of air or vapor at atmospheric pressure from monitored area into mass-spectrometric instrument to detect explosives, narcotics, or other substances, vapors of which suspected of being present in low concentrations. In comparison with older reversal electron-attachment detector, miniREAD simpler in design; more rugged; and easier to build, repair, and maintain. In addition, probably more sensitive.

  17. Computer-Aided High Precision Verification Of Miniature Spring Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bow, Sing T.; Wang, Da-hao; Chen, Tsung-sheng; Newell, Darrell E.

    1990-01-01

    A system is proposed for the high precision on-line verification of the minia-ture spring structure, including overall height, diameters of various coils as well as pitches between neighboring coils of the miniature conical springs. High preci-sion measurements without physical contact and short processing time are achieved. Deformations of any kind on the conical springs can be identified even from the worst viewing direction.

  18. Global methanol overcapacity will get worse

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.V.

    1983-06-20

    The world methanol situation, characterized by an excess of 21% over demand in 1983, is expected to worsen by 1985 when a 29% excess is anticipated. Canada will suffer the most for its overly optimistic projections of methanol's use in fuel. The areas of greatest supply surplus, the US (at least until 1988), Canada, Mexico, Eastern Europe, and the Africa-Middle East region, are expected to compete fiercely for business in the biggest deficit areas of the Pacific Basin, Southeast Asia, and Western Europe. Several factors could turn the grim situation around: financial incentives for using methanol and sucess of the new method of converting methenol directly to gasoline. 3 figures.

  19. Miniature snapshot multispectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neelam; Ashe, Philip R.; Tan, Songsheng

    2011-03-01

    We present a miniature snapshot multispectral imager based on using a monolithic filter array that operates in the short wavelength infrared spectral region and has a number of defense and commercial applications. The system is low-weight, portable with a miniature platform, and requires low power. The imager uses a 4×4 Fabry-Pérot filter array operating from 1487 to 1769 nm with a spectral bandpass ~10 nm. The design of the filters is based on using a shadow mask technique to fabricate an array of Fabry-Pérot etalons with two multilayer dielectric mirrors. The filter array is installed in a commercial handheld InGaAs camera, replacing the imaging lens with a custom designed 4×4 microlens assembly with telecentric imaging performance in each of the 16 subimaging channels. We imaged several indoor and outdoor scenes. The microlens assembly and filter design is quite flexible and can be tailored for any wavelength region from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared, and the spectral bandpass can also be customized to meet sensing requirements. In this paper we discuss the design and characterization of the filter array, the microlens optical assembly, and imager and present imaging results.

  20. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Pulse sonication effect on transesterification of waste vegetable oil was studied. • Effects of ethanol, methanol, and alcohol mixtures on FAMEs yield were evaluated. • Effect of ultrasonic intensity, power density, and its output rates were evaluated. • Alcohol mixtures resulted in higher biodiesel yields due to better solubility. - Abstract: This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol–methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1–2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol–methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  1. Miniature electrically operated diaphragm valve

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Spletzer, Barry L.; Wong, Chungnin C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Fischer, Gary J.; Hesketh, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a miniature electrically operated valve that can stand off significant pressures, that can be inexpensively produced, and that can be made to operate without continuous electrical power. A valve according to the present invention comprises a housing and a beam mounted with the housing. A diaphragm mounted with the housing forms a sealed fluid volume. An electromagnetic energy source, such as an electromagnetic coil, mounts with the housing and when energized urges the beam in one direction. The beam can be urged in the opposing direction by passive means or by reversing the polarity of the electromagnetic energy source or by a second electromagnetic energy source. Two fluid ports mount with the housing. A first fluid port mounts so that, as the beam is urged in one direction or the opposite, the beam urges the diaphragm to move between engaging and substantially sealing the fluid port and disengaging and not substantially sealing the fluid port. A seat can be mounted with the diaphragm to aid in sealing the fluid port. Latching mechanisms such as permanent magnets can be mounted so that the valve remains in the open or closed positions without continuous electrical power input. Fluid can flow through the housing between the two fluid ports when the diaphragm does not seal the first fluid port, but can be prevented from flowing by urging the beam so that the diaphragm seals the first fluid port. Various embodiments accommodate various latching mechanisms, electromagnetic energy sources, number of fluid ports, and diaphragm design considerations.

  2. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  3. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  4. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  5. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  6. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  7. Fast-Track, One-Step E. coli Detection: A Miniaturized Hydrogel Array Permits Specific Direct PCR and DNA Hybridization while Amplification.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Antje; Pollok, Sibyll; Rudloff, Anne; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    A timesaving and convenient method for bacterial detection based on one-step, one-tube deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization on hydrogel array while target gene amplification is described. The hydrogel array is generated by a fast one-pot synthesis, where N,N'-dimethylacrylamide/polyethyleneglycol(PEG1900 )-bisacrylamide mixture polymerizes via radical photoinitiation by visible light within 20 min concomitant with in situ capture probe immobilization. These DNA-functionalized hydrogel droplets arrayed on a planar glass surface are placed in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mixture during the thermal amplification cycles. The bacterial cells can be implemented in a direct PCR reaction, omitting the need for prior template DNA extraction. The resulting fluorescence signal is immediately detectable after the end of the PCR (1 h) following one short washing step by microscopy. Therefore a valid signal can be reached within 1.5 h including 10 min for pipetting and placement of the tubes and chips. The performance of this novel hydrogel DNA array was successfully proven with varying cell numbers down to a limit of 10(1) Escherichia coli cells.

  8. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. R.; Macconochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  9. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. R.; MacConochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr.

    1980-10-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  10. Miniature, ruggedized data collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Scott; Calcutt, Wade; Knobler, Ron; Jones, Barry; Klug, Robert

    2009-05-01

    McQ has developed a miniaturized, programmable, ruggedized data collector intended for use in weapon testing or data collection exercises that impose severe stresses on devices under test. The recorder is designed to survive these stresses which include acceleration and shock levels up to 100,000 G. The collector acquires and stores up to four channels of signal data to nonvolatile memory for later retrieval by a user. It is small (< 7 in3), light weight (< 1 lb), and can operate from various battery chemistries. A built-in menuing system, accessible via a USB interface, allows the user to configure parameters of the recorder operation, such as channel gain, filtering, and signal offsets, and also to retrieve recorded data for analysis. An overview of the collector, its features, performance, and potential uses, is presented.

  11. Miniature Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Small Business Innovation Research contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center to Thermacore Inc. have fostered the company work on devices tagged "heat pipes" for space application. To control the extreme temperature ranges in space, heat pipes are important to spacecraft. The problem was to maintain an 8-watt central processing unit (CPU) at less than 90 C in a notebook computer using no power, with very little space available and without using forced convection. Thermacore's answer was in the design of a powder metal wick that transfers CPU heat from a tightly confined spot to an area near available air flow. The heat pipe technology permits a notebook computer to be operated in any position without loss of performance. Miniature heat pipe technology has successfully been applied, such as in Pentium Processor notebook computers. The company expects its heat pipes to accommodate desktop computers as well. Cellular phones, camcorders, and other hand-held electronics are forsible applications for heat pipes.

  12. Miniaturized fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Flynn, John T.; Pratisto, Hans S.; Niederer, Peter F.

    2003-07-01

    We present a miniaturized version of a fundus camera. The camera is designed for the use in screening for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). There, but also in other applications a small, light weight, digital camera system can be extremely useful. We present a small wide angle digital camera system. The handpiece is significantly smaller and lighter then in all other systems. The electronics is truly portable fitting in a standard boardcase. The camera is designed to be offered at a compatible price. Data from tests on young rabbits' eyes is presented. The development of the camera system is part of a telemedicine project screening for ROP. Telemedical applications are a perfect application for this camera system using both advantages: the portability as well as the digital image.

  13. Miniature Latching Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. David; Benson, Glendon M.

    2008-01-01

    A miniature latching valve has been invented to satisfy a need for an electrically controllable on/off pneumatic valve that is lightweight and compact and remains in the most recently commanded open or closed state when power is not supplied. The valve includes a poppet that is moved into or out of contact with a seat to effect closure or opening, respectively, of the flow path. Motion of the poppet is initiated by electrical heating of one of two opposing pairs of nickel/titanium shape-memory alloy (SMA) wires above their transition temperature: heated wires contract to their remembered length, applying tension to pull the poppet toward or away from the seat. A latch consisting mainly of a bistable Belleville washer (a conical spring) made of a hardened stainless steel operates between two stable positions corresponding to the fully closed or fully open state, holding the poppet in one of these positions when power is not applied to either pair of SMA wires. To obtain maximum actuation force and displacement, the SMA wires must be kept in tension. The mounting fixtures at the ends of the wires must support large tensile stresses without creating stress concentrations that would limit the fatigue lives of the wires. An earlier design provided for each wire to be crimped in a conical opening with a conical steel ferrule that was swaged into the opening to produce a large, uniformly distributed holding force. In a subsequent design, the conical ferrule was replaced with a larger crimped cylindrical ferrule depicted in the figure. A major problem in designing the valve was to protect the SMA wires from a bake-out temperature of 300 C. The problem was solved by incorporating the SMA wires into an actuator module that is inserted into a barrel of the valve body and is held in place by miniature clip rings.

  14. Dietary methanol and autism.

    PubMed

    Walton, Ralph G; Monte, Woodrow C

    2015-10-01

    The authors sought to establish whether maternal dietary methanol during pregnancy was a factor in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders. A seven item questionnaire was given to women who had given birth to at least one child after 1984. The subjects were solicited from a large primary care practice and several internet sites and separated into two groups - mothers who had given birth to a child with autism and those who had not. Average weekly methanol consumption was calculated based on questionnaire responses. 550 questionnaires were completed by women who gave birth to a non-autistic child. On average these women consumed 66.71mg. of methanol weekly. 161 questionnaires were completed by women who had given birth to an autistic child. The average estimated weekly methanol consumption for this group was 142.31mg. Based on the results of the Wilcoxon rank sum-test, we see a significant difference between the reported methanol consumption rates of the two groups. This study suggests that women who have given birth to an autistic child are likely to have had higher intake of dietary sources of methanol than women who have not. Further investigation of a possible link of dietary methanol to autism is clearly warranted.

  15. Preparation and characterization of nanocomposite membranes made of poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) and montmorillonite for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasani-Sadrabadi, Mohammad Mahdi; Emami, Shahriar Hojjati; Moaddel, Homayoun

    Partially sulfonated poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (sulfonated PPO) with various degrees of sulfonation were prepared. The solutions were mixed with organically modified montmorillonite (MMT) to prepare membranes by solvent casting. By increasing the sulfonation degree up to 40% for membranes without MMT, ion exchange capacity, water uptake and proton conductivity reached 2.59 mequiv. g -1, 21% and 0.0182 S cm -1, respectively. The Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) analysis of sulfonated membranes revealed absorption bands at 1060 and 1100-1300 cm -1 for sulfur-oxygen S dbnd O bonds. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the exfoliated structure of clay in polymeric matrices. A sulfonated PPO/MMT membrane with 27% sulfonation and 2.0 wt% MMT loading showed a membrane selectivity of approximately 63,500 compared to 40,500 for Nafion ® 117, and also a higher power density (125 mW cm -2) than Nafion ® 117 (108 mW cm -2) for single cell DMFC in a 5 M methanol feed.

  16. Multi-functional reactively-sputtered copper oxide electrodes for supercapacitor and electro-catalyst in direct methanol fuel cell applications

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Sambhaji M.; Kim, Jongmin; Inamdar, Akbar I.; Woo, Hyeonseok; Jo, Yongcheol; Pawar, Bharati S.; Cho, Sangeun; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the concurrent electrochemical energy storage and conversion characteristics of granular copper oxide electrode films prepared using reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature under different oxygen environments. The obtained films are characterized in terms of their structural, morphological, and compositional properties. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope studies reveal that granular, single-phase Cu2O and CuO can be obtained by controlling the oxygen flow rate. The electrochemical energy storage properties of the films are investigated by carrying out cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. The electrochemical analysis reveals that the Cu2O and CuO electrodes have high specific capacitances of 215 and 272 F/g in 6 M KOH solution with a capacity retention of about 80% and 85% after 3000 cycles, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry are used to study the electrochemical energy conversion properties of the films via methanol electro-oxidation. The results show that the Cu2O and CuO electrodes are electro-catalytically active and highly stable. PMID:26888077

  17. High performance and durable nanostructured TiN supported Pt50-Ru50 anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Jampani, Prashanth H.; Hong, Daeho; Poston, James A.; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2015-10-01

    The design of high performance and durable electro-catalyst has been of particular interest for DMFC anodes. Pt(Ru) has been considered the most active DMFC anode catalyst. In this work, the reaction kinetics of Pt(Ru) electro-catalyst has been improved by synthesizing high active surface area Pt50(Ru50) catalyst supported on highly conductive nanostructured titanium nitride, TiN. The Pt(Ru)/TiN has been synthesized by a complexed sol-gel (CSG) process using non-halide precursors of Pt and Ru. High surface area Pt(Ru)/TiN shows promising electrochemical performance for methanol oxidation, showing ∼52% improved catalytic activity at ∼0.65 V (vs NHE) and stability/durability in comparison with commercial JM-Pt(Ru). Single cell DMFC performance shows 56% improved maximum power density and superior electrochemical stability for CSG-Pt(Ru)/TiN compared to that of commercial JM-Pt(Ru). This is attributed to the uniform dispersion of Pt(Ru) achieved on the nanostructured TiN (support) yielding higher electrochemical active surface area and lower charge transfer resistance than commercial JM-Pt(Ru). Thus, the present study demonstrates the potential of nanostructured TiN as a support for Pt(Ru) based anode electro-catalyst for DMFC applications.

  18. Multi-functional reactively-sputtered copper oxide electrodes for supercapacitor and electro-catalyst in direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Sambhaji M.; Kim, Jongmin; Inamdar, Akbar I.; Woo, Hyeonseok; Jo, Yongcheol; Pawar, Bharati S.; Cho, Sangeun; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-02-01

    This work reports on the concurrent electrochemical energy storage and conversion characteristics of granular copper oxide electrode films prepared using reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature under different oxygen environments. The obtained films are characterized in terms of their structural, morphological, and compositional properties. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope studies reveal that granular, single-phase Cu2O and CuO can be obtained by controlling the oxygen flow rate. The electrochemical energy storage properties of the films are investigated by carrying out cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. The electrochemical analysis reveals that the Cu2O and CuO electrodes have high specific capacitances of 215 and 272 F/g in 6 M KOH solution with a capacity retention of about 80% and 85% after 3000 cycles, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry are used to study the electrochemical energy conversion properties of the films via methanol electro-oxidation. The results show that the Cu2O and CuO electrodes are electro-catalytically active and highly stable.

  19. Associated species in vaporized methanol-formaldehyde solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.C.; Freeman, J.J.

    1983-07-01

    Analysis of vaporized methanolic formaldehyde (50 mol % methanol) by gas chromatography revealed a sum of mole percents of formaldehyde, water, and methanol greater than 100%. This inconsistency was not found with vaporized solutions containing 1 or 10 mol % methanol. Direct evidence for an adduct of methanol and formaldehyde (CH/sub 3/OCH/sub 2/OH) in the vapor phase was found by use of infrared spectroscopy. The spectrum exhibited an absorption at 1140 cm/sup -1/ corresponding to a C-O-C stretch. Reasonable agreement was found between the C-O-C mole percent estimated from infrared spectroscopy, the increased amount of material detected by gas chromatography, and the estimated equilibrium mole percent of the adduct CH/sub 3/OCH/sub 2/OH. These results confirm that in completely vaporized methanolic formaldehyde at 373 to 423 K, one type of adduct predominates. It contains one molecule each of formaldehyde and methanol.

  20. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1991-02-12

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  1. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  2. The Methanol Multibeam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James A.; Cohen, R. J.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Diamond, P. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M.; Walsh, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.; Cox, J.

    2007-03-01

    A new 7-beam methanol multibeam receiver is being used to survey the Galaxy for newly forming massive stars, that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6.668 GHz. The receiver, jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), was successfully commissioned at Parkes in January 2006. The Parkes-Jodrell survey of the Milky Way for methanol masers is two orders of magnitude faster than previous systematic surveys using 30-m class dishes, and is the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane. The first 53 days of observations with the Parkes telescope have yielded 518 methanol sources, of which 218 are new discoveries. We present the survey methodology as well as preliminary results and analysis.

  3. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  4. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  5. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol-methanol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-01

    This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol-methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol-methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1-2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol-methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  6. The Asian methanol market

    SciTech Connect

    Nagase, Hideki

    1995-12-31

    For the purpose of this presentation, Asia has been broadly defined as a total of 15 countries, namely Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Myanmar, India, Vietnam, Australia and New Zealand. In 1994 and the first half of 1995, the methanol industry and its derivative industries experienced hard time, because of extraordinarily high methanol prices. In spite of this circumstance, methanol demand in Asian countries has been growing steadily and remarkably, following Asian high economic growth. Most of this growth in demand has been and will continue to be met by outside supply. However, even with increased import of methanol from outside of Asia, as a result of this growth, Asian trade volume will be much larger in the coming years. Asian countries must turn their collective attention to making logistics and transportation for methanol and its derivatives more efficient in the Asian region to make better use of existing supply resources. The author reviews current economic growth as his main topic, and explains the forecast of the growth of methanol demand and supply in Asian countries in the near future.

  7. The Whole new world of miniature technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-07-01

    In the past ten years, miniaturization of both electrical and mechanical parts has significantly increased. Documentation of the design and production capabilities of miniaturization in the electronics industry is well-defined. Literature on the subject of miniaturization of metal piece parts, however, is hard to find. Some of the current capabilities in the manufacture of miniature metal piece parts or miniature features in larger piece parts are discussed.

  8. Miniature Chemical Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew C. R. Pipino

    2004-12-13

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages.

  9. Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure presents a concept of a bipolar miniature electrostatic ion thruster for maneuvering a small spacecraft. The ionization device in the proposed thruster would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several mega-volts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. In a thruster-based on this concept, one or more propellant gases would be introduced into such a membrane ionizer. Unlike in larger prior ion thrusters, all of the propellant molecules would be ionized. This thruster would be capable of bipolar operation. There would be two accelerator grids - one located forward and one located aft of the membrane ionizer. In one mode of operation, which one could denote the forward mode, positive ions leaving the ionizer on the backside would be accelerated to high momentum by an electric field between the ionizer and an accelerator grid. Electrons leaving the ionizer on the front side would be ejected into free space by a smaller accelerating field. The equality of the ion and electron currents would eliminate the need for an additional electron- or ion-emitting device to keep the spacecraft charge-neutral. In another mode of operation, which could denote the reverse mode, the polarities of the voltages applied to the accelerator grids and to the electrodes of the membrane ionizer would be the reverse of those of the forward mode. The reversal of electric fields would cause the ion and electrons to be ejected in the reverse of their forward mode directions, thereby giving rise to thrust in the direction opposite that of the forward mode.

  10. Miniature Intelligent Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Russell S.

    2007-01-01

    An electronic unit denoted the Miniature Intelligent Sensor Module performs sensor-signal-conditioning functions and local processing of sensor data. The unit includes four channels of analog input/output circuitry, a processor, volatile and nonvolatile memory, and two Ethernet communication ports, all housed in a weathertight enclosure. The unit accepts AC or DC power. The analog inputs provide programmable gain, offset, and filtering as well as shunt calibration and auto-zeroing. Analog outputs include sine, square, and triangular waves having programmable frequencies and amplitudes, as well as programmable amplitude DC. One innovative aspect of the design of this unit is the integration of a relatively powerful processor and large amount of memory along with the sensor-signalconditioning circuitry so that sophisticated computer programs can be used to acquire and analyze sensor data and estimate and track the health of the overall sensor-data-acquisition system of which the unit is a part. The unit includes calibration, zeroing, and signalfeedback circuitry to facilitate health monitoring. The processor is also integrated with programmable logic circuitry in such a manner as to simplify and enhance acquisition of data and generation of analog outputs. A notable unique feature of the unit is a cold-junction compensation circuit in the back shell of a sensor connector. This circuit makes it possible to use Ktype thermocouples without compromising a housing seal. Replicas of this unit may prove useful in industrial and manufacturing settings - especially in such large outdoor facilities as refineries. Two features can be expected to simplify installation: the weathertight housings should make it possible to mount the units near sensors, and the Ethernet communication capability of the units should facilitate establishment of communication connections for the units.

  11. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  12. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  13. World methanol situation poses challenge in process design

    SciTech Connect

    Haggin, J.

    1984-07-16

    A review is presented of the technology and economics of methanol production processes. Synthesis gas production based on methane or coal are compared. Since methane-based synthesis gas is hydrogen rich and coal-based synthesis gas is carbon rich, the combination of both processes, as suggested by the M.W. Kellogg Co., should be economically attractive. A liquid-phase synthesis in the developmental stages and two reactor configurations under consideration for its use are discussed. The Wentworth system of catalytic processing, a Lurgi process using coal and methane for methanol, a Lurgi process for utilizing methanol in a variation of the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline process, and another Lurgi process to produce a methanol fuel mixture for direct use as a motor fuel, consisting of methanol and oxygenates, are also discussed.

  14. Miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator concept demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, R. E.; Rauschenbach, H. S.

    High concentration ratio photovoltaic systems for space applications have generally been considered impractical because of perceived difficulties in controlling solar cell temperatures to reasonably low values. A miniaturized concentrator system is now under development which surmounts this objection by providing acceptable solar cell temperatures using purely passive cell cooling methods. An array of identical miniaturized, rigid Cassegrainian optical systems having a low f-number with resulting short dimensions along their optical axes are rigidly mounted into a frame to form a relatively thin concentrator solar array panel. A number of such panels, approximately 1.5 centimeters thick, are wired as an array and are folded against one another for launch in a stowed configuration. Deployment on orbit is similar to the deployment of conventional planar honeycomb panel arrays or flexible blanket arrays. The miniaturized concept was conceived and studied in the 1978-80 time frame. Progress in the feasibility demonstration to date is reported.

  15. Methanol fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Thrasher, D.A.; Greiner, L.; Cooper, G.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a fuel composition. It comprises: a major portion of fuel comprising 85 to 95% by volume of methanol; demineralized water, from 3 to 15% of the fuel; a fluorosurfactant for increasing the lubricity of the fuel, comprising approximately 0.01 to 0.05 weight percent of the fuel.

  16. Methanol from coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Economic feasibility of methanol or methyl fuel produced from coal using existing technology is discussed. Other factors considered include environmental, safety, toxicity, transportation, so storage, ease of burning, and retrofitting of present boilers. Demonstrations of its uses as a boiler fuel and as a turbine fuel are cited.

  17. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid on PtRu and PtAu for direct liquid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-Ho; Jeong, Kyoung-Jin; Dong, Yujung; Han, Jonghee; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Jae-Suk; Sung, Yung-Eun

    The use of a PtAu catalyst as an anode catalyst for the oxidation of formic acid in direct formic acid fuel cells is described. Catalytic activities of PtAu and PtRu anodes were studied using a linear sweep voltammetry technique in a single cell configuration. PtAu showed a lower on-set potential and a larger current density than that of PtRu in formic acid oxidation. In addition, the maximum power densities at 30 °C for PtAu and PtRu were 94 and 74 mW cm -2, respectively. In order to evaluate long-term durability, the single cells were operated for hundreds of hours with a 6 M aqueous formic acid solution at 60 °C under 100 mA cm -2. The difference in performance between PtAu and PtRu after 500 h reached ca. 90 mV in direct formic acid fuel cells.

  18. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  19. Miniature information displays: primary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvelda, Phillip; Lewis, Nancy D.

    1998-04-01

    Positioned to replace current liquid crystal display technology in many applications, miniature information displays have evolved to provide several truly portable platforms for the world's growing personal computing and communication needs. The technology and functionality of handheld computer and communicator systems has finally surpassed many of the standards that were originally established for desktop systems. In these new consumer electronics, performance, display size, packaging, power consumption, and cost have always been limiting factors for fabricating genuinely portable devices. The rapidly growing miniature information display manufacturing industry is making it possible to bring a wide range of highly anticipated new products to new markets.

  20. Neat methanol fuel cell power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abens, S.; Farooque, M.

    1985-12-01

    Attention is given to a fuel cell development effort which has been directed, by ease-of-supply, low weight, and low volume criteria toward the use of undiluted methanol. Partial oxidation and internal water recovery concepts are incorporated, allowing the onboard dilution of methanol fuel through mixing with exhaust-recovered water. This scheme is successfully demonstrated for the case of a 3 kW unit employing commercial cross flow heat exchangers, as well as for a 5 kW reformer flue exhaust water recovery design with U.S. Air force baseload stationary applications. The USAF powerplant has an overall thermal efficiency of 32 percent at rated load.

  1. Maximizing strain in miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosset, Samuel; Araromi, Oluwaseun; Shea, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical model to optimise the unidirectional motion of a rigid object bonded to a miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), a configuration found for example in AMI's haptic feedback devices, or in our tuneable RF phase shifter. Recent work has shown that unidirectional motion is maximized when the membrane is both anistropically prestretched and subjected to a dead load in the direction of actuation. However, the use of dead weights for miniaturized devices is clearly highly impractical. Consequently smaller devices use the membrane itself to generate the opposing force. Since the membrane covers the entire frame, one has the same prestretch condition in the active (actuated) and passive zones. Because the passive zone contracts when the active zone expands, it does not provide a constant restoring force, reducing the maximum achievable actuation strain. We have determined the optimal ratio between the size of the electrode (active zone) and the passive zone, as well as the optimal prestretch in both in-plane directions, in order to maximize the absolute displacement of the rigid object placed at the active/passive border. Our model and experiments show that the ideal active ratio is 50%, with a displacement twice smaller than what can be obtained with a dead load. We expand our fabrication process to also show how DEAs can be laser-post-processed to remove carefully chosen regions of the passive elastomer membrane, thereby increasing the actuation strain of the device.

  2. Preclinical evaluation of a miniaturized Deep Brain Stimulation electrode lead.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B; McNeill, Peter M; Allison, Rachel K; Bibari, Olivier; Williams, Chris E; McDermott, Hugh J

    2015-01-01

    The effect of miniaturizing the electrode lead for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy was investigated in this work. A direct comparison was made between a miniature lead (0.65 mm diameter) and a lead of standard size (1.3 mm). Acute in vivo implantation in two cat brains was performed to evaluate surgical trauma and confirm capacity to target thalamic nuclei. Insertion into a homogeneous gel model of neural tissue was used to compare insertion forces while visualizing the process. The standard size cannula, used first to guide lead insertion, required substantially higher insertion force compared with the miniature version and produced a significantly larger region of tissue disruption. The characteristic hemorrhage and edema extended 119-352 μm from the implanted track surface of the miniature lead and cannula, while these extended 311-571 μm for the standard size lead and cannula. A miniature DBS implant can reduce the extent of trauma and could potentially help improve neural function preservation after functional neurosurgery.

  3. The Development of Methanol Industry and Methanol Fuel in China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.Y.; Li, Z.; Xie, K.C.

    2009-07-01

    In 2007, China firmly established itself as the driver of the global methanol industry. The country became the world's largest methanol producer and consumer. The development of the methanol industry and methanol fuel in China is reviewed in this article. China is rich in coal but is short on oil and natural gas; unfortunately, transportation development will need more and more oil to provide the fuel. Methanol is becoming a dominant alternative fuel. China is showing the rest of the world how cleaner transportation fuels can be made from coal.

  4. Biotechnological production of methanol from waste biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.; Morris, D.

    1995-12-01

    The production of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) from waste biomass is possible through the use of genetically modified bacteria. The biomass to methanol conversion process makes use of a naturally occurring, direct aerobic enzymatic system referred to as oxidative demethylation. Methoxy groups are stripped off of lignin and lignin like plant substances (approximately fifty percent of all plant biomass) and hydrolyzed to form methanol. Since the biotech process is stoichiometric, potentially every methoxy group in the lignin feedstock can be converted to methanol fuel. Approximately 30-35% of lignin is a methoxy compound that can be converted. Biotechnological conversion could produce up to 100 gallons/ton or 20 billion gallons a year of methanol from waste biomass. Current work has focused on the genetic modification of the enzymatic conversion process to reach commercial production. The goals of this research are; increase product yields, implement an operon {open_quotes}switch{close_quotes} mechanism to exploit multiple feedstocks, and produce environmentally safe by-products. Progress on these topics will be reported.

  5. Miniature Blimps for Surveillance and Collection of Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Miniature blimps are under development as robots for use in exploring the thick, cold, nitrogen atmosphere of Saturn's moon, Titan. Similar blimps can also be used for surveillance and collection of biochemical samples in buildings, caves, subways, and other, similar structures on Earth. The widely perceived need for means to thwart attacks on buildings and to mitigate the effects of such attacks has prompted consideration of the use of robots. Relative to rover-type (wheeled) robots that have been considered for such uses, miniature blimps offer the advantage of ability to move through the air in any direction and, hence, to perform tasks that are difficult or impossible for wheeled robots, including climbing stairs and looking through windows. In addition, miniature blimps are expected to have greater range and to cost less, relative to wheeled robots.

  6. Visual thread quality for precision miniature mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1981-04-01

    Threaded features have eight visual appearance factors which can affect their function in precision miniature mechanisms. The Bendix practice in deburring, finishing, and accepting these conditions on miniature threads is described as is their impact in assemblies of precision miniature electromechanical assemblies.

  7. Two 3D structured Co-Ni bimetallic oxides as cathode catalysts for high-performance alkaline direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Shu, Chengyong; Fang, Yuan; Chen, Yuanzhen; Liu, Yongning

    2017-09-01

    Two NiCo2O4 bimetallic oxides were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method. SEM and TEM observations show that these materials have three-dimensional (3D) dandelion-like (DL) and flower-like (FL) morphologies. Their large specific surface areas (90.68 and 19.8 m2·g-1) and porous structures provide many active sites and effective transport pathways for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Electrochemical measurements with a rotating ring-disc electrode (RRDE) indicate that the electron transfer numbers of the NiCo2O4-DL and NiCo2O4-FL catalysts for ORR in an alkaline solution are 3.97 and 3.91, respectively. Fuel cells were assembled with the bimetallic oxides, PtRu/C and a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) as cathode catalysts, anode catalyst and electrolyte film, respectively. For NiCo2O4-DL, the peak power density reaches up to 73.5 mW·cm-2 at 26 °C, which is the highest room-temperature value reported to date. The high catalytic activity of NiCo2O4 is mainly attributed to the presence of many Co3+ cations that directly donate electrons to O2 to reduce it via a more efficient and effective route. Furthermore, the catalytic performance of NiCo2O4-DL is superior to that of NiCo2O4-FL because it has a higher specific surface area and is less crystalline.

  8. Direct spectroscopic observation of singlet oxygen quenching and kinetic studies of physical and chemical singlet oxygen quenching rate constants of synthetic antioxidants (BHA, BHT, and TBHQ) in methanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hyun; Jung, Mun Yhung

    2010-08-01

    Singlet oxygen quenching by synthetic antioxidants (BHA, BHT, and TBHQ) was directly observed by spectroscopic monitoring of luminescence at 1268 nm. The luminescence data showed unambiguous evidence of singlet oxygen quenching by synthetic phenolic antioxidants with the highest activity for TBHQ, followed by BHA and BHT. The protective activities of these synthetic antioxidants on alpha-terpinene oxidation with chemically-induced singlet oxygen under dark further confirmed their singlet oxygen quenching abilities. Total singlet oxygen quenching rate constants (k(r) + k(q)) of BHA, BHT, and TBHQ were determined in a system containing alpha-terpinene (as a singlet oxygen trap) and methylene blue (as a sensitizer) during light irradiation, and the values were 5.14 x 10(7), 3.41 x 10(6), and 1.99 x 10(8) M(-1)s(-1), respectively. After the k(r) value of alpha-terpinene was first determined, the k(r) values of the synthetic antioxidants were calculated by measuring their relative reaction rates with singlet oxygen to that of alpha-terpinene under the identical conditions. The k(r) values of the BHA, BHT, and TBHQ were 3.90 x 10(5), 1.23 x 10(5), and 2.93 x 10(6), M(-1)s(-1). The percent partition of chemical quenching over total singlet oxygen quenching (k(r) x 100)/(k(r) + k(q)) for BHA, BHT, and TBHQ were 0.76%, 3.61%, and 1.47%, respectively. The results showed that the synthetic antioxidants quench singlet oxygen almost exclusively through the mechanism of physical quenching. This represents the first report on the singlet oxygen quenching mechanism of these synthetic antioxidants. Practical Application: The synthetic antioxidants, especially TBHQ, have been found to have a strong singlet oxygen quenching ability. This article also clearly showed that singlet oxygen quenching by synthetic antioxidants was mainly by the physical quenching mechanism. The results suggested that these synthetic antioxidants, especially TBHQ, could be used practically for the protection

  9. Eucomic acid methanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Yao-Lan; Wang, Guo-Cai; Liang, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound [systematic name: 2-hy­droxy-2-(4-hy­droxy­benz­yl)butane­dioic acid methanol monosolvate], C11H12O6·CH3OH, the dihedral angles between the planes of the carboxyl groups and the benzene ring are 51.23 (9) and 87.97 (9)°. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the hy­droxy and carb­oxy­lic acid groups and the methanol solvent mol­ecule give a three-dimensional structure. PMID:22091200

  10. High-level direct-dynamics variational transition state theory calculations including multidimensional tunneling of the thermal rate constants, branching ratios, and kinetic isotope effects of the hydrogen abstraction reactions from methanol by atomic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Truhlar, Donald G; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio

    2011-03-07

    We report a detailed theoretical study of the hydrogen abstraction reaction from methanol by atomic hydrogen. The study includes the analysis of thermal rate constants, branching ratios, and kinetic isotope effects. Specifically, we have performed high-level computations at the MC3BB level together with direct dynamics calculations by canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with the microcanonically optimized multidimensional tunneling (μOMT) transmission coefficient (CVT/μOMT) to study both the CH(3)OH+H→CH(2)OH+H(2) (R1) reaction and the CH(3)OH+H→CH(3)O+H(2) (R2) reaction. The CVT/μOMT calculations show that reaction R1 dominates in the whole range 298≤T (K)≤2500 and that anharmonic effects on the torsional mode about the C-O bond are important, mainly at high temperatures. The activation energy for the total reaction sum of R1 and R2 reactions changes substantially with temperature and, therefore, the use of straight-line Arrhenius plots is not valid. We recommend the use of new expressions for the total R1 + R2 reaction and for the R1 and R2 individual reactions. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  11. A novel organic/inorganic polymer membrane based on poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid/3-glycidyloxypropyl trimethoxysilane polymer electrolyte membrane for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chen; Lue, Shingjiang Jessie; Shih, Jeng-Ywan

    2011-05-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (PAMPS)/3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (PVA/PAMPS/GPTMS) organic/inorganic proton-conducting polymer membranes are prepared by a solution casting method. PAMPS is a polymeric acid commonly used as a primary proton donor, while 3-(glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPTMS) is an inorganic precursor forming a semi-interpenetrating network (SIPN). Varying amounts of sulfosuccinic acid (SSA) are used as the cross-linker and secondary proton source. The characteristic properties of PVA/PAMPS/GPTMS composite membranes are investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy and the AC impedance method. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) made of PVA/PAMPS/GPTMS composite membranes are assembled and examined. Experimental results indicate that DMFCs employing an inexpensive, non-perfluorinated, organic/inorganic SIPN membrane achieve good electrochemical performance. The highest peak power density of a DMFC using PVA/PAMPS/GPTMS composite membrane with 2 M CH3OH solution fuel at ambient temperature is 23.63 mW cm-2. The proposed organic/inorganic proton-conducting membrane based on PVA/PAMPS/GPTMS appears to be a viable candidate for future DMFC applications.

  12. Formation and spectra of clathrate hydrates of methanol and methanol-ether mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kenneth Dixon; Devlin, J. Paul

    1997-10-01

    Infrared spectra of mixed clathrate hydrates, with either ethylene oxide (EO) or tetrahydrofuran (THF) and methanol molecules as the guest species, have been obtained from thin films prepared by vapor deposition of D 2O mixtures in the 115-130 K range. Although methanol acts as a suppressant to the direct vapor deposition of a type I clathrate with EO, nearly complete conversion of 115 K amorphous codeposits, to the crystalline mixed clathrate, occurs upon warming near 150 K. By contrast, the type II clathrate of THF shows an increased crystalline quality when methanol is included in the vapor deposits of the mixed clathrate hydrate at 130 K. The observation of the OD stretch-mode band of weakly bonded CD 3OD near 2575 cm -1 is part of the evidence that the methanol molecules are encaged. However, as shown theoretically by Tanaka, the clathrate hydrates of methanol, even when mixed with an ether help gas, are not stable structures but form at low temperatures because of kinetic factors, only to decompose in the 140-160 K range. Attempts to prepare a simple type I or type II clathrate hydrate of methanol have produced mixed results. Limited amounts of clathrate hydrate form during deposition but annealing does not result in complete conversion to crystalline clathrates, particularly for host : guest ratios of 17 : 1.

  13. The toxicity of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tephly, T.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Methanol toxicity in humans and monkeys is characterized by a latent period of many hours followed by a metabolic acidosis and ocular toxicity. This is not observed in most lower animals. The metabolic acidosis and blindness is apparently due to formic acid accumulation in humans and monkeys, a feature not seen in lower animals. The accumulation of formate is due to a deficiency in formate metabolism which is, in turn, related, in part, to low hepatic tetrahydrofolate (H{sub 4}folate). An excellent correlation between hepatic H{sub 4} folate and formate oxidation rates has been shown within and across species. Thus, humans and monkeys possess low hepatic H{sub 4}folate levels, low rates of formate oxidation and accumulation of formate after methanol. Formate, itself, produces blindness in monkeys in the absence of metabolic acidosis. In addition to low hepatic H{sub 4}folate concentrations, monkeys and humans also have low hepatic 10-formyl H{sub 4}folate dehydrogenase levels, the enzyme which is the ultimate catalyst for conversion of formate to carbon dioxide. This review presents the basis for the role of folic acid-dependent reactions in the regulation of methanol toxicity.

  14. Evidence of anomalous behavior of intermolecular interactions at low concentration of methanol in ethanol-methanol binary system.

    PubMed

    Nilavarasi, K; Kartha, Thejus R; Madhurima, V

    2018-01-05

    At low concentrations of methanol in a binary system of ethanol and methanol, uniquely complex molecular interactions are reported here. Previous studies indicate that ethanol molecules form aggregates held together by hydrogen bonding (O-H-O) and also dispersive forces. Addition of small amount of methanol tends to break the hydrogen bond network of ethanol due to the larger polarity of methanol. This leads to the ethanol molecules becoming somewhat isolated from each other within a scaffolding network of methanol molecules, as seen from the present molecular dynamics simulations. This is an indication of a repulsive force that dominates among the two different alcohols. At higher molar concentration of methanol (Xm > 0.3817), the strength and extent (number) of formation of hydrogen bonds between ethanol and methanol increase. The geometry of molecular structure at high concentration favors the fitting of component molecules with each other. Intermolecular interactions in the ethanol-methanol binary system over the entire concentration range were investigated in detail using broadband dielectric spectroscopy, FTIR, surface tension and refractive index studies. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the hydrogen bond density is a direct function of the number of methanol molecules present, as the ethanol aggregates are not strictly hydrogen-bond constructed which is in agreement with the experimental results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. California methanol assessment. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    Energy feedstock sources for methanol; methanol and other synfuels; transport, storage, and distribution; air quality impact of methanol use in vehicles, chemical methanol production and use; methanol utilization in vehicles; methanol utilization in stationary applications; and environmental and regulatory constraints are discussed.

  16. Miniature Free-Space Electrostatic Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Stephens, James B.

    2006-01-01

    A miniature electrostatic ion thruster is proposed for maneuvering small spacecraft. In a thruster based on this concept, one or more propellant gases would be introduced into an ionizer based on the same principles as those of the device described in an earlier article, "Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster". On the front side, positive ions leaving an ionizer element would be accelerated to high momentum by an electric field between the ionizer and an accelerator grid around the periphery of the concave laminate structure. On the front side, electrons leaving an ionizer element would be ejected into free space by a smaller accelerating field. The equality of the ion and electron currents would eliminate the need for an additional electron- or ion-emitting device to keep the spacecraft charge-neutral. In a thruster design consisting of multiple membrane ionizers in a thin laminate structure with a peripheral accelerator grid, the direction of thrust could then be controlled (without need for moving parts in the thruster) by regulating the supply of gas to specific ionizer.

  17. Neuromuscular Functions on Experimental Acute Methanol Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Moral, Ali Reşat; Çankayalı, İlkin; Sergin, Demet; Boyacılar, Özden

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of accidental or suicidal ingestion of methyl alcohol is high and methyl alcohol intoxication has high mortality. Methyl alcohol intoxication causes severe neurological sequelae and appears to be a significant problem. Methyl alcohol causes acute metabolic acidosis, optic neuropathy leading to permanent blindness, respiratory failure, circulatory failure and death. It is metabolised in the liver, and its metabolite formic acid has direct toxic effects, causing oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and increased lipid peroxidation associated with the mechanism of neurotoxicity. Methanol is known to cause acute toxicity of the central nervous system; however, the effects on peripheral neuromuscular transmission are unknown. In our study, we aimed to investigate the electrophysiological effects of experimentally induced acute methanol intoxication on neuromuscular transmission in the early period (first 24 h). Methods After approval by the Animal Experiment Ethics Committee of Ege University, the study was carried out on 10 Wistar rats, each weighing about 200 g. During electrophysiological recordings and orogastric tube insertion, the rats were anaesthetised using intra-peritoneal (IP) injection of ketamine 100 mg kg−1 and IP injection of xylazine 10 mg kg−1. The rats were given 3 g kg−1 methyl alcohol by the orogastric tube. Electrophysiological measurements from the gastrocnemius muscle were compared with baseline. Results Latency measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 0.81±0.11 ms and 0.76±0.12 ms, respectively. CMAP amplitude measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.85±0.98 mV and 9.99±0.40 mV, respectively. CMAP duration measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.86±0.03 ms and 9.86±0.045 ms, respectively. Conclusion It was concluded that experimental methanol intoxication in the acute phase (first 24 h) did not affect neuromuscular function. PMID:27366524

  18. Aerosol feed direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements to fuel cells include introduction of the fuel as an aerosol of liquid fuel droplets suspended in a gas. The particle size of the liquid fuel droplets may be controlled for optimal fuel cell performance by selection of different aerosol generators or by separating droplets based upon size using a particle size conditioner.

  19. Portable direct methanol fuel cell systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.

    2002-01-01

    This article includes discussion of the specific power and power density requirements for various portable system applications, the status of stack technology, progress in the implementation of balance-of-plant designs, and a summary of the characteristics of various DMFC portable power source demonstrations.

  20. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  1. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  2. Toward a miniaturized fundus camera.

    PubMed

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie; Flynn, John T; Pratisto, Hans; Niederer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) describes a pathological development of the retina in prematurely born children. In order to prevent severe permanent damage to the eye and enable timely treatment, the fundus of the eye in such children has to be examined according to established procedures. For these examinations, our miniaturized fundus camera is intended to allow the acquisition of wide-angle digital pictures of the fundus for on-line or off-line diagnosis and documentation. We designed two prototypes of a miniaturized fundus camera, one with graded refractive index (GRIN)-based optics, the other with conventional optics. Two different modes of illumination were compared: transscleral and transpupillary. In both systems, the size and weight of the camera were minimized. The prototypes were tested on young rabbits. The experiments led to the conclusion that the combination of conventional optics with transpupillary illumination yields the best results in terms of overall image quality.

  3. Organic photodiodes for biosensor miniaturization.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Jason R; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C; Yamaguchi, Mariko Y; Füreder, Erwin; Pieler, Roland; Schamesberger, Martin; Winder, Christoph; Prall, Hans Jürgen; Sonnleitner, Max; Ligler, Frances S

    2009-05-01

    Biosensors have successfully demonstrated the capability to detect multiple pathogens simultaneously at very low levels. Miniaturization of biosensors is essential for use in the field or at the point of care. While microfluidic systems reduce the footprint for biochemical processing devices and electronic components are continually becoming smaller, optical components suitable for integration--such as LEDs and CMOS chips--are generally still too expensive for disposable components. This paper describes the integration of polymer diodes onto a biosensor chip to create a disposable device that includes both the detector and the sensing surface coated with immobilized capture antibody. We performed a chemiluminescence immunoassay on the OPD substrate and measured the results using a hand-held reader attached to a laptop computer. The miniaturized biosensor with the disposable slide including the organic photodiode detected Staphylococcal enterotoxin B at concentrations as low as 0.5 ng/mL.

  4. Organic Photodiodes for Biosensor Miniaturization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    1 pW/mm2. Using this system, sandwich immunoassays were performed on the OPD substrate for detection of Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Results...demonstrated the capability to detect multiple pathogens simultaneously at very low levels. Miniaturization of biosensors is essential for use in the field or...the sensing surface coated with immobilized capture antibody. We performed a chemiluminescence immunoassay on the OPD substrate and measured the results

  5. Miniaturized pressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Swink, Don G.

    1991-01-01

    The invention uses a fluid stored at a low pressure and provides the fluid at a high pressure. The invention allows the low pressure fluid to flow to a fluid bore of a differential pump and from the pump to a fluid pressure regulator. After flowing through the regulator the fluid is converted to a gas which is directed to a gas bore of the differential pump. By controlling the flow of gas entering and being exhausted from the gas bore, the invention provides pressure to the fluid. By setting the regulator, the high pressure fluid can be set at predetermined values. Because the invention only needs a low pressure fluid, the inventive apparatus has a low mass, and therefore would be useful in rocket propulsion systems.

  6. Formaldehyde, methanol and hydrocarbon emissions from methanol-fueled cars

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.L.; Lipari, F.; Potter, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Exhaust and evaporative emissions tests were conducted on several methanol- and gasoline-fueled vehicles. Separate samples for chromatographic analysis of formaldehyde, methanol, and individual hydrocarbons were collected in each of the three phases of the driving cycle and in each of the two portions of the evaporative emissions test. One vehicle, equipped with an experimental variable-fuel engine, was tested using methanol/gasoline fuel mixtures of 100, 85, 50, 15, and 0 percent methanol. Combustion-generated hydrocarbons were lowest using methanol fuel, and increased several-fold as the gasoline fraction was increased. Gasoline components in the exhaust increased from zero as the gasoline fraction of the fuel was increased. On the other hand, formaldehyde emissions were several times higher using methanol fuel than they were using gasoline. A dedicated methanol car and the variable-fuel car gave similar emissions patterns when they both were tested using methanol fuel. The organic-carbon composition of the exhaust was 85-90 percent methanol, 5-7 percent formaldehyde, and 3-9 percent hydrocarbons. Several cars that were tested using gasoline emitted similar distributions of hydrocarbons, even through the vehicles represented a broad range of current and developmental engine families and emissions control systems.

  7. Methanol-Air Batteries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    Cells charged with 120 ml of anolyte , consisting of 6 M methanol in 11 M KOH, have operated for 2,230 hours under cyclic load drains of 50 mA for 13...minutes and 2 A for 1 second. One cell operated for more than 8,000 hours with periodic refilling of fresh anolyte , demonstrating the long serviceable...life of the electrode components. Fuel utilization efficiencies as high as 84% have been obtained from cells charged with an anolyte solution of

  8. Environmental controls over methanol emission from leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, P.; Greenberg, J.; Niinemets, É.; Guenther, A.

    2007-12-01

    Methanol is found throughout the troposphere, with average concentrations second only to methane among atmospheric hydrocarbons. Proposed global methanol budgets are highly uncertain, but all agree that at least 60% of the total source arises from the terrestrial biosphere and primary emissions from plants. However, the magnitude of these emissions is also highly uncertain, and the environmental factors which control them require further elucidation. Using a temperature-controlled leaf enclosure, we measured methanol emissions from leaves of six plant species by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, with simultaneous measurements of leaf evapotranspiration and stomatal conductance. Rates of emission at 30°C varied from 0.2 to 38 μg g (dry mass)-1 h-1, with higher rates measured on young leaves, consistent with the production of methanol via pectin demethylation in expanding foliage. On average, emissions increased by a factor of 2.3 for each 10°C increase in leaf temperature. At constant temperature, emissions were also correlated with co-varying incident photosynthetic photon flux density and rates of stomatal conductance. The data were analyzed using the emission model developed by Niinemets and Reichstein (2003a, b), with the incorporation of a methanol production term that increased exponentially with temperature. It was concluded that control of emissions, during daytime, was shared by leaf temperature and stomatal conductance, although rates of production may also vary diurnally in response to variations in leaf growth rate in expanding leaves. The model, which generally provided reasonable simulations of the measured data during the day, significantly overestimated emissions on two sets of measurements made through the night, suggesting that production rates of methanol were reduced at night, perhaps because leaf growth was reduced or possibly through a direct effect of light on production. Although the short-term dynamics of methanol emissions can

  9. Miniaturized pressurization system

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.C.; Swink, D.G.

    1990-12-31

    This invention relates to pressurization systems and liquid rocket propulsion systems, and particularly to those used to attitude control or maneuvering of small space vehicles or airborne vehicles where the requirement for thrust is intermittent rather than continuous, and must be available rapidly upon demand. This invention also relates to increasing performance of such propulsion systems, by way of eliminating inert mass from the propulsion system. The invention uses a fluid stored at a low pressure and provides the fluid at a high pressure. The invention allows the low pressure fluid to flow to a fluid bore of a differential pump and from the pump to a fluid pressure regulator. After flowing through the regulator the fluid is converted to a gas which is directed to a gas bore of the differential pump. By controlling the flow of gas entering and being exhausted from the gas bore, the invention provides pressure to the fluid. By setting the regulator, the high pressure fluid can be set at predetermined values. Because the invention only needs a low pressure fluid, the inventive apparatus has a low mass, and therefore would be useful in rocket propulsion systems.

  10. Miniature Laser Tracker

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2003-09-09

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  11. Transport of methanol by pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    This report examines and evaluates the problems and considerations that could affect the feasibility of transporting methanol by pipeline. The following are the major conclusions: Though technical problems, such as methanol water contamination and materials incompatibility, remain to be solved, none appears insolvable. Methanol appears to be less toxic, and therefore to represent less of a health hazard, than gasoline, the fuel for which methanol is expected to substitute. The primary safety hazards of methanol, fire and explosion, are no worse than those of gasoline. The environmental hazards that can be associated with methanol are not as significant as those of petroleum. Provided quantities of throughput sufficient to justify pipeline transport are available, there appear to be no economic impediments to the transport of methanol by pipeline. Based on these, it appears that it can be concluded that the pipelining of methanol, whether via an existing petroleum pipeline or a new methanol-dedicated pipeline, is indeed feasible. 66 refs., 3 figs., 27 tabs.

  12. Methanol-reinforced kraft pulping

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, E.; Olm, L.; Teder, A. )

    1993-03-01

    The addition of methanol to a high-sulfidity kraft cook on Scandinavian softwood chips was studied under different process conditions. Delignification and the degradation of carbohydrates were accelerated, but the effect on delignification was greater. Thus, methanol addition improved selectivity. The positive effect of methanol could also be observed for modified kraft cooks having a leveled out alkali concentration and lower concentration of sodium ions and dissolved lignin at the end of the cook. Methanol addition had no discernible effect on pulp strength or on pulp bleachability.

  13. Portable, miniaturized, fibre delivered, multimodal CARS exoscope.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brett; Naji, Majid; Murugkar, Sangeeta; Alarcon, Emilio; Brideau, Craig; Stys, Peter; Anis, Hanan

    2013-07-15

    We demonstrate for the first time, a portable multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope (exoscope) for minimally invasive in-vivo imaging of tissues. This device is based around a micro-electromechanical system scanning mirror and miniaturized optics with light delivery accomplished by a photonic crystal fibre. A single Ti:sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser is used as the light source to produce CARS, two photon excitation fluorescence and second harmonic generation images. The high resolution and distortion-free images obtained from various resolution and bio-samples, particularly in backward direction (epi) successfully demonstrate proof of concept, and pave the path towards future non or minimally-invasive in vivo imaging.

  14. Affordable miniaturized SAR for tactical UAV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, George R.; Dubbert, Dale F.

    2004-08-01

    Sandia"s fielded and experimental SAR systems are well known for their real time, high resolution imagery. Previous designs, such as the Lynx radar, have been successfully demonstrated on medium-payload UAVs, including Predator and Fire Scout. However, fielding a high performance SAR sensor on even smaller (sub-50 pound payload) UAVs will require at least a 5x reduction in size, weight, and cost. This paper gives an overview of Sandia"s system concept and roadmap for near-term SAR miniaturization. Specifically, the "miniSAR" program, which plans to demonstrate a 25 pound system with 4 inch resolution in early 2005, is detailed. Accordingly, the conceptual approach, current status, design tradeoffs, and key facilitating technologies are reviewed. Lastly, future enhancements and directions are described, such as the follow-on demonstration of a sub-20 pound version with multi-mode (SAR/GMTI) capability.

  15. Methanol and acetaldehyde fluxes over ryegrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Thomas; Schade, Gunnar

    2007-09-01

    Oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) play an active role in tropospheric chemistry but our knowledge concerning their release and ultimate fate is limited. However, the recent introduction of Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTRMS) has improved our capability to make direct field observations of OVOC mixing ratios and fluxes. We used PTRMS in an eddy covariance setup to measure selected OVOC exchange rates above a well-characterized agricultural plot in Northern Germany. In fall 2003, mixing ratios of methanol and acetaldehyde 2 m above the field ranged from 1 to 10 and 0.4 to 2.1 ppb, respectively, well correlated with one another. Fluxes of both gases were followed for growing Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) over a significant portion of its life cycle. Diurnally fluctuating emissions of methanol and very small acetaldehyde fluxes were observed up to the cutting and removal of the grass. Methanol emissions were exponentially related to ambient temperatures and appeared to be higher during the grass' rapid leaf area expansion and after a rain event. Acetaldehyde exchanges averaged over the whole period indicated very slow deposition. Our measurements confirm previous, similar results, as well as presumptions that grasses are comparatively low methanol emitters compared to non-grass species.

  16. Miniaturization of flight deflection measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodale, Robert (Inventor); Hampton, Herbert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A flight deflection measurement system is disclosed including a hybrid microchip of a receiver/decoder. The hybrid microchip decoder is mounted piggy back on the miniaturized receiver and forms an integral unit therewith. The flight deflection measurement system employing the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be used in a wind tunnel. In particular, the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be employed in a spin measurement system due to its small size and can retain already established control surface actuation functions.

  17. Miniaturization in x ray and gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Wang, Yuzhong J.; Bradley, James G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents advances in two new sensor technologies and a miniaturized associated electronics technology which, when combined, can allow for very significant miniaturization and for the reduction of weight and power consumption in x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems: (1) Mercuric iodide (HgI2) x-ray technology, which allows for the first time the construction of truly portable, high-energy resolution, non-cryogenic x-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental analyzer systems, with parameters approaching those of laboratory quality cryogenic instruments; (2) the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD), which is a solid-state light sensitive device with internal amplification, capable of uniquely replacing the vacuum photomultiplier tube in scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer applications, and offering substantial improvements in size, ruggedness, low power operation and energy resolution; and (3) miniaturized (hybridized) low noise, low power amplification and processing electronics, which take full advantage of the favorable properties of these new sensors and allow for the design and fabrication of advanced, highly miniaturized x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems. The paper also presents experimental results and examples of spectrometric systems currently under construction. The directions for future developments are discussed.

  18. Effects of methanol on a methanol-tolerant bacterial lipase.

    PubMed

    Santambrogio, Carlo; Sasso, Francesco; Natalello, Antonino; Brocca, Stefania; Grandori, Rita; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Lotti, Marina

    2013-10-01

    Methanol is often employed in biocatalysis with the purpose of increasing substrates solubility or as the acyl acceptor in transesterification reactions, but inhibitory effects are observed in several cases. We have studied the influence of methanol on the catalytic activity and on the conformation of the lipase from Burkholderia glumae, which is reported to be highly methanol tolerant if compared with other lipases. We detected highest activity in the presence of 50-70 % methanol. Under these conditions, however, the enzyme stability is perturbed, leading to gradual protein unfolding and finally to aggregation. These results surmise that, for this lipase, methanol-induced deactivation does not depend on inhibition of catalytic activity but rather on negative effects on the conformational stability of the catalyst.

  19. Microbattery technologies for miniaturized implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Menachem

    2010-06-01

    Implanted medical devices (IMDs), in particular neuro-stimulators, drug delivery chips and cochlear implants are undergoing miniaturization. Some of these miniaturized IMDs are "active" in the sense that they require a power source for operation. In most cases, the ideal power source needs to be an implanted battery of dimensions similar to that of the device. The state-of-the-art of battery miniaturization is reviewed with emphasis on novel Li and Li-ion two- and three-dimensional thin-film microbatteries. It is shown that three-dimensional thin-film batteries may provide a solution to the power requirements of miniaturized IMDs.

  20. Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle (MARV)

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Spletzer, B.L.; Weber, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has recently developed a 16 cm{sup 3} (1 in{sup 3}) autonomous robotic vehicle which is capable of tracking a single conducting wire carrying a 96 kHz signal. This vehicle was developed to assess the limiting factors in using commercial technology to build miniature autonomous vehicles. Particular attention was paid to the design of the control system to search out the wire, track it, and recover if the wire was lost. This paper describes the test vehicle and the control analysis. Presented in the paper are the vehicle model, control laws, a stability analysis, simulation studies and experimental results.

  1. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  2. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  3. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H.

    1981-11-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  4. OTEC energy via methanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, W.H.; Richards, D.; Niemeyer, W.G.; Shoemaker, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The conceptual design of an 160 MW/sub e/ OTEC plantship has been documented; it is designed to produce 1000 tonne/day of fuel-grade methanol from coal slurry shipped to the plantship, using oxygen and hydrogen from the on-board electrolysis of water. Data and components are used that were derived by Brown and Root Development, Inc. (BARDI) in designing a barge-mounted plant to make methanol from natural gas for Litton Industries and in the design and construction of a coal-to-ammonia demonstration plant in operation at Muscle Shoals, Alabama, for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The OTEC-methanol plant design is based on the use of the Texaco gasifier and Lurgi synthesis units. The sale price of OTEC methanol delivered to port from this first-of-a-kind plant is estimated to be marginally competitive with methanol from other sources at current market prices.

  5. Scaffoldless engineered enzyme assembly for enhanced methanol utilization

    DOE PAGES

    Price, J. Vincent; Chen, Long; Whitaker, W. Brian; ...

    2016-10-24

    Methanol is an important feedstock derived from natural gas and can be chemically converted into commodity and specialty chemicals at high pressure and temperature. Although biological conversion of methanol can proceed at ambient conditions, there is a dearth of engineered microorganisms that use methanol to produce metabolites. In nature, methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh), which converts methanol to formaldehyde, highly favors the reverse reaction. Thus, efficient coupling with the irreversible sequestration of formaldehyde by 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloseisomerase (Phi) serves as the key driving force to pull the pathway equilibrium toward central metabolism. An emerging strategy to promote efficient substrate channelingmore » is to spatially organize pathway enzymes in an engineered assembly to provide kinetic driving forces that promote carbon flux in a desirable direction. Here, we report a scaffoldless, self-assembly strategy to organize Mdh, Hps, and Phi into an engineered supramolecular enzyme complex using an SH3–ligand interaction pair, which enhances methanol conversion to fructose-6-phosphate (F6P). To increase methanol consumption, an “NADH Sink” was created using Escherichia coli lactate dehydrogenase as an NADH scavenger, thereby preventing reversible formaldehyde reduction. Combination of the two strategies improved in vitro F6P production by 97-fold compared with unassembled enzymes. The beneficial effect of supramolecular enzyme assembly was also realized in vivo as the engineered enzyme assembly improved whole-cell methanol consumption rate by ninefold. This approach will ultimately allow direct coupling of enhanced F6P synthesis with other metabolic engineering strategies for the production of many desired metabolites from methanol.« less

  6. Scaffoldless engineered enzyme assembly for enhanced methanol utilization.

    PubMed

    Price, J Vincent; Chen, Long; Whitaker, W Brian; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios; Chen, Wilfred

    2016-10-24

    Methanol is an important feedstock derived from natural gas and can be chemically converted into commodity and specialty chemicals at high pressure and temperature. Although biological conversion of methanol can proceed at ambient conditions, there is a dearth of engineered microorganisms that use methanol to produce metabolites. In nature, methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh), which converts methanol to formaldehyde, highly favors the reverse reaction. Thus, efficient coupling with the irreversible sequestration of formaldehyde by 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloseisomerase (Phi) serves as the key driving force to pull the pathway equilibrium toward central metabolism. An emerging strategy to promote efficient substrate channeling is to spatially organize pathway enzymes in an engineered assembly to provide kinetic driving forces that promote carbon flux in a desirable direction. Here, we report a scaffoldless, self-assembly strategy to organize Mdh, Hps, and Phi into an engineered supramolecular enzyme complex using an SH3-ligand interaction pair, which enhances methanol conversion to fructose-6-phosphate (F6P). To increase methanol consumption, an "NADH Sink" was created using Escherichia coli lactate dehydrogenase as an NADH scavenger, thereby preventing reversible formaldehyde reduction. Combination of the two strategies improved in vitro F6P production by 97-fold compared with unassembled enzymes. The beneficial effect of supramolecular enzyme assembly was also realized in vivo as the engineered enzyme assembly improved whole-cell methanol consumption rate by ninefold. This approach will ultimately allow direct coupling of enhanced F6P synthesis with other metabolic engineering strategies for the production of many desired metabolites from methanol.

  7. California methanol assessment. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    The near term methanol industry, the competitive environment, long term methanol market, the transition period, air quality impacts of methanol, roles of the public and private sectors are considered.

  8. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  9. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  10. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  11. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  12. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  13. Regulation of intracellular formaldehyde toxicity during methanol metabolism of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia methanolica.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Keishi; Yamaguchi, Sakiko; Takeuchi, Akihito; Mizumura, Tasuku; Ozawa, Shotaro; Tomizuka, Noboru; Hayakawa, Takashi; Nakagawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-11-01

    In this study we found that the methylotrophic yeast Pichia methanolica showed impaired growth on high methanol medium (>5%, or 1.56 M, methanol). In contrast, P. methanolica grew well on glucose medium containing 5% methanol, but the growth defects reappeared on glucose medium supplemented with 5 mM formaldehyde. During methanol growth of P. methanolica, formaldehyde accumulated in the medium up to 0.3 mM before it was consumed rapidly based on cell growth. These findings indicate that the growth defect of P. methanolica on high methanol media is not caused directly by methanol toxicity, but rather by formaldehyde, which is a key toxic intermediate of methanol metabolism. Moreover, during methanol growth of P. methanolica, expression of enzymes in the methanol-oxidation pathway were induced before the alcohol oxidase isozymes Mod1p and Mod2p, and Mod1p expression was induced before Mod2p. These results suggest that to avoid excess accumulation of formaldehyde-the toxic intermediate of methanol metabolism-P. methanolica grown on methanol strictly regulates the order in which methanol-metabolizing enzymes are expressed.

  14. Miniature Telerobots in Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venema, S. C.; Hannaford, B.

    1995-01-01

    Ground controlled telerobots can be used to reduce astronaut workload while retaining much of the human capabilities of planning, execution, and error recovery for specific tasks. Miniature robots can be used for delicate and time consuming tasks such as biological experiment servicing without incurring the significant mass and power penalties associated with larger robot systems. However, questions remain regarding the technical and economic effectiveness of such mini-telerobotic systems. This paper address some of these open issues and the details of two projects which will provide some of the needed answers. The Microtrex project is a joint University of Washington/NASA project which plans on flying a miniature robot as a Space Shuttle experiment to evaluate the effects of microgravity on ground-controlled manipulation while subject to variable time-delay communications. A related project involving the University of Washington and Boeing Defense and Space will evaluate the effectiveness f using a minirobot to service biological experiments in a space station experiment 'glove-box' rack mock-up, again while subject to realistic communications constraints.

  15. Miniaturized neural interfaces and implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Boretius, Tim; Ordonez, Juan; Hassler, Christina; Henle, Christian; Meier, Wolfgang; Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Schuettler, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Neural prostheses are technical systems that interface nerves to treat the symptoms of neurological diseases and to restore sensory of motor functions of the body. Success stories have been written with the cochlear implant to restore hearing, with spinal cord stimulators to treat chronic pain as well as urge incontinence, and with deep brain stimulators in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Highly complex neural implants for novel medical applications can be miniaturized either by means of precision mechanics technologies using known and established materials for electrodes, cables, and hermetic packages or by applying microsystems technologies. Examples for both approaches will be introduced and discussed. Electrode arrays for recording of electrocorticograms during presurgical epilepsy diagnosis have been manufactured using approved materials and a marking laser to achieve an integration density that is adequate in the context of brain machine interfaces, e.g. on the motor cortex. Microtechnologies have to be used for further miniaturization to develop polymer-based flexible and light weighted electrode arrays to interface the peripheral and central nervous system. Polyimide as substrate and insulation material will be discussed as well as several application examples for nerve interfaces like cuffs, filament like electrodes and large arrays for subdural implantation.

  16. Lightweight, Miniature Inertial Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Liang; Crassidis, Agamemnon

    2012-01-01

    A miniature, lighter-weight, and highly accurate inertial navigation system (INS) is coupled with GPS receivers to provide stable and highly accurate positioning, attitude, and inertial measurements while being subjected to highly dynamic maneuvers. In contrast to conventional methods that use extensive, groundbased, real-time tracking and control units that are expensive, large, and require excessive amounts of power to operate, this method focuses on the development of an estimator that makes use of a low-cost, miniature accelerometer array fused with traditional measurement systems and GPS. Through the use of a position tracking estimation algorithm, onboard accelerometers are numerically integrated and transformed using attitude information to obtain an estimate of position in the inertial frame. Position and velocity estimates are subject to drift due to accelerometer sensor bias and high vibration over time, and so require the integration with GPS information using a Kalman filter to provide highly accurate and reliable inertial tracking estimations. The method implemented here uses the local gravitational field vector. Upon determining the location of the local gravitational field vector relative to two consecutive sensors, the orientation of the device may then be estimated, and the attitude determined. Improved attitude estimates further enhance the inertial position estimates. The device can be powered either by batteries, or by the power source onboard its target platforms. A DB9 port provides the I/O to external systems, and the device is designed to be mounted in a waterproof case for all-weather conditions.

  17. Methanol Uptake by Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Essin, A. M.; Golden, D. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global methanol budget is currently unbalanced, with source terms significantly larger than the sinks terms. To evaluate possible losses of gaseous methanol to sulfate aerosols, the solubility and reactivity of methanol in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols is under investigation. Methanol will partition into sulfate aerosols according to its Henry's law solubility. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, for cold (196 - 220 K) solutions ranging between 45 and 70 wt % H2SO4. We have found that methanol solubility ranges from approx. 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) M/atm for UT/LS conditions. Solubility increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. Although methanol is slightly more soluble than are acetone and formaldehyde, current data indicate that uptake by clean aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and any rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H is not significant over our experimental time scale for solutions below 80 wt % H2SO4. To confirm this directly, results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique will also be presented.

  18. Atmospheric deposition of methanol over the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingxi; Nightingale, Philip D; Beale, Rachael; Liss, Peter S; Blomquist, Byron; Fairall, Christopher

    2013-12-10

    In the troposphere, methanol (CH3OH) is present ubiquitously and second in abundance among organic gases after methane. In the surface ocean, methanol represents a supply of energy and carbon for marine microbes. Here we report direct measurements of air-sea methanol transfer along a ∼10,000-km north-south transect of the Atlantic. The flux of methanol was consistently from the atmosphere to the ocean. Constrained by the aerodynamic limit and measured rate of air-sea sensible heat exchange, methanol transfer resembles a one-way depositional process, which suggests dissolved methanol concentrations near the water surface that are lower than what were measured at ∼5 m depth, for reasons currently unknown. We estimate the global oceanic uptake of methanol and examine the lifetimes of this compound in the lower atmosphere and upper ocean with respect to gas exchange. We also constrain the molecular diffusional resistance above the ocean surface-an important term for improving air-sea gas exchange models.

  19. Atmospheric deposition of methanol over the Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingxi; Nightingale, Philip D.; Beale, Rachael; Liss, Peter S.; Blomquist, Byron; Fairall, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In the troposphere, methanol (CH3OH) is present ubiquitously and second in abundance among organic gases after methane. In the surface ocean, methanol represents a supply of energy and carbon for marine microbes. Here we report direct measurements of air–sea methanol transfer along a ∼10,000-km north–south transect of the Atlantic. The flux of methanol was consistently from the atmosphere to the ocean. Constrained by the aerodynamic limit and measured rate of air–sea sensible heat exchange, methanol transfer resembles a one-way depositional process, which suggests dissolved methanol concentrations near the water surface that are lower than what were measured at ∼5 m depth, for reasons currently unknown. We estimate the global oceanic uptake of methanol and examine the lifetimes of this compound in the lower atmosphere and upper ocean with respect to gas exchange. We also constrain the molecular diffusional resistance above the ocean surface—an important term for improving air–sea gas exchange models. PMID:24277830

  20. Environmental study of miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radnik, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    Investigation studied the long term operation of miniature slip ring assembles in high vacuum of space and included the influence of ring, brush, and insulator materials on electrical noise and mechanical wear. Results show that soft metal vapor plating and niobium diselenide miniature slip rings are beneficial.

  1. Anthrax vaccine associated deaths in miniature horses.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, Bruce K

    2015-04-01

    During a widespread anthrax outbreak in Canada, miniature horses were vaccinated using a live spore anthrax vaccine. Several of these horses died from an apparent immune-mediated vasculitis temporally associated with this vaccination. During the course of the outbreak, other miniature horses from different regions with a similar vaccination history, clinical signs, and necropsy findings were found.

  2. Miniaturized high-performance MEMS accelerometer detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonseth, Stephan; Rudolf, Felix; Eichenberger, Christoph; Durrant, Dick; Airey, Phil

    2015-06-01

    In the framework of the demonstration of European capabilities for future space exploration mission, a high-performance miniaturized MEMS accelerometer detector is developed by Colibrys for incorporation into a compact inertial measurement unit (IMU). The envisaged missions where a miniaturized IMU is under development by SEA should cover: Aerobraking;

  3. Miniature reaction chamber and devices incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2000-10-17

    The present invention generally relates to miniaturized devices for carrying out and controlling chemical reactions and analyses. In particular, the present invention provides devices which have miniature temperature controlled reaction chambers for carrying out a variety of synthetic and diagnostic applications, such as PCR amplification, nucleic acid hybridization, chemical labeling, nucleic acid fragmentation and the like.

  4. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; ...

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activitymore » 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.« less

  5. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activity 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.

  6. Advances in Miniaturized Instruments for Genomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of demonstrations of the miniaturized instruments were reported for genomic applications. They provided the advantages of miniaturization, automation, sensitivity, and specificity for the development of point-of-care diagnostics. The aim of this paper is to report on recent developments on miniaturized instruments for genomic applications. Based on the mature development of microfabrication, microfluidic systems have been demonstrated for various genomic detections. Since one of the objectives of miniaturized instruments is for the development of point-of-care device, impedimetric detection is found to be a promising technique for this purpose. An in-depth discussion of the impedimetric circuits and systems will be included to provide total consideration of the miniaturized instruments and their potential application towards real-time portable imaging in the “-omics” era. The current excellent demonstrations suggest a solid foundation for the development of practical and widespread point-of-care genomic diagnostic devices. PMID:25114919

  7. Biological conversion of biogas to methanol using methanotrophs isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yueh-Fen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate methanotrophs (methane oxidizing bacteria) that can directly convert biogas produced at a commercial anaerobic digestion (AD) facility to methanol. A methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate. The isolate had characteristics comparable to obligate methanotrophs from the genus Methylocaldum. This newly isolated methanotroph grew on biogas or purified CH4 and successfully converted biogas from AD to methanol. Methanol production was achieved using several methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) inhibitors and formate as an electron donor. The isolate also produced methanol using phosphate with no electron donor or using formate with no MDH inhibitor. The maximum methanol concentration (0.43±0.00gL(-1)) and 48-h CH4 to methanol conversion (25.5±1.1%) were achieved using biogas as substrate and a growth medium containing 50mM phosphate and 80mM formate.

  8. Entry and retention of methanol fuel in engine oil

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.; Smolenski, D.J.; Clark, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    To ensure that vehicles do not suffer adverse consequences when high-methanol-content fuel (M100 or M85) is used, it is important to understand the ways that the use of this fuel affects various vehicle systems. For that reason, some of the changes which occur in the engine oil when using methanol fuel were investigated. During a single cold start with an extended cranking time, as much as six percent fuel entered the engine oil. Over a 15-minute period, the lubricating medium changed from engine oil to an oil-methanol-water emulsion. With multiple cold starts followed by a five-minute trip and ambient temperatures near freezing, the oil contained 19 percent volatile contamination. In addition, the oil contained elevated levels of water, lead, iron, chromium, and aluminum. Efforts need to be directed toward reducing the adverse consequences of methanol fuel.

  9. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-10-21

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations is disclosed, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components. 2 figs.

  10. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, Jr., David N.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components.

  11. Miniature laser ignited bellows motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renfro, Steven L.; Beckman, Tom M.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature optically ignited actuation device has been demonstrated using a laser diode as an ignition source. This pyrotechnic driven motor provides between 4 and 6 lbs of linear force across a 0.090 inch diameter surface. The physical envelope of the device is 1/2 inch long and 1/8 inch diameter. This unique application of optical energy can be used as a mechanical link in optical arming systems or other applications where low shock actuation is desired and space is limited. An analysis was performed to determine pyrotechnic materials suitable to actuate a bellows device constructed of aluminum or stainless steel. The aluminum bellows was chosen for further development and several candidate pyrotechnics were evaluated. The velocity profile and delivered force were quantified using an non-intrusive optical motion sensor.

  12. Overview of the miniaturization technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrington, Robert O., Jr.

    1995-09-01

    This overview paper will cover the miniaturization technologies as applied to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) or micromanufacturing. Technologies reviewed will include bulk and surface micromachining of silicon, the high-aspect ratio technologies including deep X-ray lithography (LIGA) and photo sensitive polyimide, and the complementary processes which include micro-drilling, milling, turning, and electrical discharge machining, laser based micromachining and focussed ion beam micromachining. Examples of each of the process technologies will be given and a capabilities comparison among the technologies will be presented. A historical comparison of MEMS with the vlsi industry will be made and the current status and market forecast for these technologies will be presented. A brief comparison of US research with current research in Japan and Europe will be made along with comments about the status of US research, including current research projects at the Institute for Micromanufacturing.

  13. Miniature mechanical transfer optical coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Philip; Watterson, Carl

    2011-02-15

    A miniature mechanical transfer (MT) optical coupler ("MMTOC") for optically connecting a first plurality of optical fibers with at least one other plurality of optical fibers. The MMTOC may comprise a beam splitting element, a plurality of collimating lenses, and a plurality of alignment elements. The MMTOC may optically couple a first plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a first MT connector with a second plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a second MT connector and a third plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a third MT connector. The beam splitting element may allow a portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to pass through to the second plurality of fibers and simultaneously reflect another portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to the third plurality of fibers.

  14. Torsion-rotation intensities in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John

    Methanol exists in numerous kinds of astronomical objects featuring a wide range of local conditions. The light nature of the molecule coupled with the internal rotation of the methyl group with respect to the hydroxyl group results in a rich, strong spectrum that spans the entire far-infrared region. As a result, any modest size observational window will have a number of strong methanol transitions. This has made it the gas of choice for testing THz receivers and to extract the local physical conditions from observations covering small frequency windows. The latter has caused methanol to be dubbed the Swiss army knife of astrophysics. Methanol has been increasingly used in this capacity and will be used even more for subsequent investigations into the Herschel archive, and with SOFIA and ALMA. Interpreting physical conditions on the basis of a few methanol lines requires that the molecular data, line positions, intensities, and collision rates, be complete, consistent and accurate to a much higher level than previously required for astrophysics. The need for highly reliable data is even more critical for modeling the two classes of widespread maser action and many examples of optical pumping through the torsional bands. Observation of the torsional bands in the infrared will be a unique opportunity to directly connect JWST observations with those of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. The theory for the intensities of torsion-rotation transitions in a molecule featuring a single internally rotating methyl group is well developed after 70 years of research. However, other than a recent very preliminary and not completely satisfactory investigation of a few CH3OH torsional bands, this theory has never been experimentally tested for any C3V internal rotor. More alarming is a set of recent intensity calibrated microwave measurements that showed deviations relative to calculations of up to 50% in some ground state rotational transitions commonly used by astronomers to extract

  15. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  16. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  17. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  18. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  19. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, G; Amelynck, C; Ammann, C; Arneth, A; Bamberger, I; Goldstein, A H; Gu, L; Guenther, A; Hansel, A; Heinesch, B; Holst, T; Hörtnagl, L; Karl, T; Laffineur, Q; Neftel, A; McKinney, K; Munger, J W; Pallardy, S G; Schade, G W; Seco, R; Schoon, N

    2015-01-27

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  20. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; ...

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis ofmore » the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be

  1. A rapid procedure for the in situ assay of periplasmic, PQQ-dependent methanol dehydrogenase in intact single bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Vemuluri, Venkata Ramana; Shaw, Shreya; Autenrieth, Caroline; Ghosh, Robin

    2017-03-23

    Mechanistic details of methanol oxidation catalyzed by the periplasmically-located pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent methanol dehydrogenase of methylotrophs can be elucidated using site-directed mutants. Here, we present an in situ colony assay of methanol dehydrogenase, which allows robotic screening of large populations of intact small colonies, and regrowth of colonies for subsequent analysis.

  2. Miniaturization of planar horn motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-04-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of a stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2×2×2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of 3 × 3 × 0.2 cm.

  3. Miniaturization of Planar Horn Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2x2x2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of3 x 3x 0.2 cm.

  4. Miniaturization of Planar Horn Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2x2x2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of3 x 3x 0.2 cm.

  5. Methanol unity frays, discounting returns

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1997-02-05

    This article reviews the price variation in methanol for February 1997 and how the company Methanex compares to other producers. The discrepancy between posting prices and transaction prices is noted.

  6. Determining mechanical behavior of solid materials using miniature specimens

    DOEpatents

    Manahan, Michael P.; Argon, Ali S.; Harling, Otto K.

    1986-01-01

    A Miniaturized Bend Test (MBT) capable of extracting and determining mechanical behavior information from specimens only so large as to have at least a volume or smallest dimension sufficient to satisfy continuum behavior in all directions. The mechanical behavior of the material is determined from the measurements taken during the bending of the specimen and is processed according to the principles of linear or nonlinear material mechanics or both. In a preferred embodiment the determination is carried out by a code which is constructed according to the finite element method, and the specimen used for the determinations is a miniature disk simply supported for central loading at the axis on the center of the disk.

  7. Miniaturized digital holography sensor for distal three-dimensional endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kolenovic, Ervin; Osten, Wolfgang; Klattenhoff, Reiner; Lai, Songcan; von Kopylow, Christoph; Jüptner, Werner

    2003-09-01

    A miniaturized sensor head for endoscopic measurements based on digital holography is described. The system was developed to measure the shape and the three-dimensional deformation of objects located at places to which there is no access by common measurement systems. A miniaturized optical sensor, including a complete digital holographic interferometer with a CCD camera, is placed at the end of a flexible endoscope. The diameter of the head is smaller than 10 mm. The system enables interferometric measurements to be made at speeds of as many as five reconstructions per second, and it can be used outside the laboratory under normal environmental conditions. Shape measurements are performed with two wavelengths for contouring, and the deformation is measured by digital holographic interferometry. To obtain full three-dimensional data in displacement measurements we illuminate the object sequentially from three different illumination directions. To increase the lateral resolution we use temporal phase shifting.

  8. Determining mechanical behavior of solid materials using miniature specimens

    DOEpatents

    Manahan, M.P.; Argon, A.S.; Harling, O.K.

    1986-02-04

    A Miniaturized Bend Test (MBT) capable of extracting and determining mechanical behavior information from specimens only so large as to have at least a volume or smallest dimension sufficient to satisfy continuum behavior in all directions is disclosed. The mechanical behavior of the material is determined from the measurements taken during the bending of the specimen and is processed according to the principles of linear or nonlinear material mechanics or both. In a preferred embodiment the determination is carried out by a code which is constructed according to the finite element method, and the specimen used for the determinations is a miniature disk simply supported for central loading at the axis on the center of the disk. 51 figs.

  9. Challenges in miniaturized automotive long-range lidar system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fersch, Thomas; Weigel, Robert; Koelpin, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    This paper discusses the current technical limitations posed on endeavors to miniaturize lidar systems for use in automotive applications and how to possibly extend those limits. The focus is set on long-range scanning direct time of flight LiDAR systems using APD photodetectors. Miniaturization evokes severe problems in ensuring absolute laser safety while maintaining the systems' performance in terms of maximum range, signal-to-noise ratio, detection probability, pixel density, or frame rate. Based on hypothetical but realistic specifications for an exemplary system the complete lidar signal path is calculated. The maximum range of the system is used as a general performance indicator. It is determined with the minimum signal-to-noise ratio required to detect an object. Various system parameters are varied to find their impact on the system's range. The reduction of the laser's pulse width and the right choice for the transimpedance amplifier's amplification have shown to be practicable measures to double the system's range.

  10. The Responsivity of a Miniaturized Passive Implantable Wireless Pressure Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; Lan, Di; Goldman, Ken; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Shahnasser, Hamid; Roy, Shuvo

    2011-01-01

    A miniature batteryless implantable wireless pressure sensor that can be used deep inside the body is desired by the medical community. MEMS technology makes it possible to achieve high responsivity that directly determines the operating distance between a miniature implanted sensor and the external RF probe, while providing the read-out. In this paper, for the first time, an analytical expression of the system responsivity versus the sensor design is derived using an equivalent circuit model. Also, the integration of micro-coil inductors and pressure sensitive capacitors on a single silicon chip using MEMS fabrication techniques is demonstrated. Further, the derived analytical design theory is validated by the measured responsivity of these sensors. PMID:25309965

  11. Miniaturized accelerometer made with ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sangho; Kim, Jeong Woong; Kim, Hyun Chan; Yun, Youngmin; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-04-01

    Miniaturized accelerometer is required in many applications, such as, robotics, haptic devices, gyroscopes, simulators and mobile devices. ZnO is an essential semiconductor material with wide direct band gap, thermal stability and piezoelectricity. Especially, well aligned ZnO nanowire is appropriate for piezoelectric applications since it can produce high electrical signal under mechanical load. To miniaturize accelerometer, an aligned ZnO nanowire is adopted to implement active piezoelectric layer of the accelerometer and copper is chosen for the head mass. To grow ZnO nanowire on the copper head mass, hydrothermal synthesis is conducted and the effect of ZnO nanowire length on the accelerometer performance is investigated. Refresh hydrothermal synthesis can increase the length of ZnO nanowire. The performance of the fabricated ZnO accelerometers is compared with a commercial accelerometer. Sensitivity and linearity of the fabricated accelerometers are investigated.

  12. Development of a miniaturized deformable mirror controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendek, Eduardo; Lynch, Dana; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Belikov, Ruslan; Klamm, Benjamin; Hyde, Elizabeth; Mumm, Katherine

    2016-07-01

    High-Performance Adaptive Optics systems are rapidly spreading as useful applications in the fields of astronomy, ophthalmology, and telecommunications. This technology is critical to enable coronagraphic direct imaging of exoplanets utilized in ground-based telescopes and future space missions such as WFIRST, EXO-C, HabEx, and LUVOIR. We have developed a miniaturized Deformable Mirror controller to enable active optics on small space imaging mission. The system is based on the Boston Micromachines Corporation Kilo-DM, which is one of the most widespread DMs on the market. The system has three main components: The Deformable Mirror, the Driving Electronics, and the Mechanical and Heat management. The system is designed to be extremely compact and have lowpower consumption to enable its use not only on exoplanet missions, but also in a wide-range of applications that require precision optical systems, such as direct line-of-sight laser communications, and guidance systems. The controller is capable of handling 1,024 actuators with 220V maximum dynamic range, 16bit resolution, and 14bit accuracy, and operating at up to 1kHz frequency. The system fits in a 10x10x5cm volume, weighs less than 0.5kg, and consumes less than 8W. We have developed a turnkey solution reducing the risk for currently planned as well as future missions, lowering their cost by significantly reducing volume, weight and power consumption of the wavefront control hardware.

  13. Acute methanol toxicity in minipigs

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, D.C.; Dye, J.A.; Nassise, M.P.; Ekuta, J.; Bolon, B.

    1993-01-01

    The pig has been proposed as a potential animal model for methanol-induced neuro-ocular toxicosis in humans because of its low liver tetrahydrofolate levels and slower rate of formate metabolism compared to those of humans. To examine the validity of this animal model, 12 4-month-old female minipigs (minipig YU) were given a single oral dose of water or methanol at 1.0, 2.5, or 5.0 g/kg body wt by gavage (n = 3 pigs/dose). Dose-dependent signs of acute methanol intoxication, which included mild CNS depression, tremors, ataxia, and recumbency, developed within 0.5 to 2.0 hr, and resolved by 52 hr. Methanol- and formate-dosed pigs did not develop optic nerve lesions, toxicologically significant formate accumulation, or metabolic acidosis. Based on results following a single dose, female minipigs do not appear to be overtly sensitive to methanol and thus may not be a suitable animal model for acute methanol-induced neuroocular toxicosis.

  14. Indonesia to build methanol plant

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-08-05

    P.T. Kaltim Methanol Industri (Jakarta), a company set up to build a new methanol plant in Indonesia, expects to award contracts for the construction of a new plant, Indonesia's second methanol unit, by the end of this year. P.T. Kaltim Methanol is a private company owned by P.T. Humpuss, an industrial group active in transport, airlines, and shipping of LNG and methanol. The 2,000-m.t./day plant will be built at Bontang, Kalimantan Island, close to the fertilizer producer P.T. Pupuk Kaltim and near the country's largest natural gas reserves. The site is also a deepsea port, handy for transportation of ready product. Three groups are in discussions with the investor on plant supply as well as methanol offtake deals. They are H G/Kockner; John Brown/Davy/Lucky Goldstar, offering the ICI process independently; and Lurgi/Metallgesellschaft (MG), proposing the Lurgi process. At least 60% of the output is expected to be exported, and both ICI and MG are understood to be interested in selling product from the future plant. Japan, Southeast Asia, and the US are targeted.

  15. Liquid methanol under a static electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Cassone, Giuseppe; Giaquinta, Paolo V.; Saija, Franz; Saitta, A. Marco

    2015-02-07

    We report on an ab initio molecular dynamics study of liquid methanol under the effect of a static electric field. We found that the hydrogen-bond structure of methanol is more robust and persistent for field intensities below the molecular dissociation threshold whose value (≈0.31 V/Å) turns out to be moderately larger than the corresponding estimate obtained for liquid water. A sustained ionic current, with ohmic current-voltage behavior, flows in this material for field intensities above 0.36 V/Å, as is also the case of water, but the resulting ionic conductivity (≈0.40 S cm{sup −1}) is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of water, a circumstance that evidences a lower efficiency of proton transfer processes. We surmise that this study may be relevant for the understanding of the properties and functioning of technological materials which exploit ionic conduction, such as direct-methanol fuel cells and Nafion membranes.

  16. Liquid-Feed Methanol Fuel Cell With Membrane Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao; Narayanan, S. R.; Halpert, Gerald; Frank, Harvey; Vamos, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    Fuel cell generates electricity from direct liquid feed stream of methanol/water solution circulated in contact with anode, plus direct gaseous feed stream of air or oxygen in contact with cathode. Advantages include relative simplicity and elimination of corrosive electrolytic solutions. Offers potential for reductions in size, weight, and complexity, and for increases in safety of fuel-cell systems.

  17. Liquid-Feed Methanol Fuel Cell With Membrane Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao; Narayanan, S. R.; Halpert, Gerald; Frank, Harvey; Vamos, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    Fuel cell generates electricity from direct liquid feed stream of methanol/water solution circulated in contact with anode, plus direct gaseous feed stream of air or oxygen in contact with cathode. Advantages include relative simplicity and elimination of corrosive electrolytic solutions. Offers potential for reductions in size, weight, and complexity, and for increases in safety of fuel-cell systems.

  18. Unusual case of methanol poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, L.; Henderson, M. . Dept. of Chemical Pathology); Madi, S.; Mellor, L. . Dept. of Medicine, and Pharmacy)

    1993-01-09

    A 31-year-old man with a history of alcohol abuse presented to the accident and emergency department complaining of blurred vision. 4 h previously he had drunk 300 mL de-icer fluid. Electrolytes, urea, creatinine, glucose, and blood-gas analysis were normal. Measured osmolality, however, was 368 mosmol/kg with a calculated osmolality of 300 mosmol/kg, which indicated a greatly increased osmolar gap. He was therefore given 150 mL whisky and admitted. Methanol was later reported as 200 mg/dL. Ethylene glycol was not detected, but another glycol, propylene glycol, was present at 47 mg/dL. 10 h after ingestion an intravenous infusion of ethanol was started and he was hemodialysed for 7 h. After dialysis he was given a further 100 mL whisky and the rate of ethanol infusion was reduced to 11 g per h. Methanol and ethanol were measured twice daily until methanol was under 10/mg/dL: The recommendation is that blood ethanol be maintained between 100 and 200 mg/dL during treatment of methanol poisoning. This concentration was not achieved, presumably because of the high rate of ethanol metabolism often found in alcoholics. Antifreeze solutions commonly contain methanol and ethylene glycol. Sometimes propylene glycol is substituted because it has properties similar to those of ethylene glycol but is less toxic. The authors postulate that propylene glycol inhibited the metabolism of methanol in the patient, thus sparing him from the toxic effects of methanol.

  19. Scanning Miniature Microscopes without Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts some alternative designs of proposed compact, lightweight optoelectronic microscopes that would contain no lenses and would generate magnified video images of specimens. Microscopes of this type were described previously in Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO - 20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43 and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO 20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 1999), page 6a. To recapitulate: In the design and construction of a microscope of this type, the focusing optics of a conventional microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. Elimination of focusing optics reduces the size and weight of the instrument and eliminates the need for the time-consuming focusing operation. The microscopes described in the cited prior articles contained two-dimensional CCDs registered with two-dimensional arrays of microchannels and, as such, were designed to produce full two-dimensional images, without need for scanning. The microscopes of the present proposal would contain one-dimensional (line image) CCDs registered with linear arrays of microchannels. In the operation of such a microscope, one would scan a specimen along a line perpendicular to the array axis (in other words, one would scan in pushbroom fashion). One could then synthesize a full two-dimensional image of the specimen from the line-image data acquired at one-pixel increments of position along the scan. In one of the proposed microscopes, a beam of unpolarized light for illuminating the specimen would enter from the side. This light would be reflected down onto the specimen by a nonpolarizing beam splitter attached to the microchannels at their lower ends. A portion of the light incident on the specimen would be reflected upward, through the beam splitter and along the microchannels, to form an image on the CCD. If the

  20. Investigation of the In-Situ Oxidation of Methanol in Fuel Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    ability of the catalyst to tolerate carbon monoxide. Finally, a performance curve was obtained for the anodic oxidation of methanol : CH3OH ... CH3OH + H20 •» C02 + 3H2 In present methanol -air fuel cell power plants , the steam reforming process is usually carried out in a unit which is...KCY YIO"(CS (Continue on reverse ride it neeessnry and identity ay block number) Fuel Cell Platinum Catalysts Methanol Direct Oxidation Internal

  1. Using Miniature Landforms in Teaching Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, James F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper explores the uses of true landform miniatures and small-scale analogues and suggests ways to teach geomorphological concepts using small-scale relief features as illustrative examples. (JDH)

  2. Contact stresses calculated for miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, F. G.; Domerest, K. E.; Horton, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Using mathematical formulations to plot the graphs of the contact preload versus the Hertzian load, calculations of unit loading of the preloaded brushes on slip rings can be made. This optimizes the design of contact brushes and miniature slip rings.

  3. Miniature infrared data acquisition and telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. H.; Ward, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    The Miniature Infrared Data Acquisition and Telemetry (MIRDAT) Phase 1 study was performed to determine the technical and commercial feasibility of producing a miniaturized electro-optical telemetry system. This system acquires and transmits experimental data from aircraft scale models for realtime monitoring in wind tunnels. During the Phase 1 study, miniature prototype MIRDAT telemetry devices were constructed, successfully tested in the laboratory and delivered to the user for wind tunnel testing. A search was conducted for commercially available components and advanced hybrid techniques to further miniaturize the system during Phase 2 development. A design specification was generated from laboratory testing, user requirements and discussions with component manufacturers. Finally, a preliminary design of the proposed MIRDAT system was documented for Phase 2 development.

  4. Using Miniature Landforms in Teaching Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, James F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper explores the uses of true landform miniatures and small-scale analogues and suggests ways to teach geomorphological concepts using small-scale relief features as illustrative examples. (JDH)

  5. Miniature osmotic actuators for controlled maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Hsien; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2010-06-01

    We have successfully demonstrated miniature actuators that are capable of converting chemical potential directly into steady mechanical movements for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis. Pistons and diaphragms powered by osmosis are employed to provide the desired linear and volumetric displacements for bone distraction and potentially the release of bone morphogenetic proteins, respectively. The cylindrical-shaped miniature actuators are composed of polymeric materials and fabricated by molding and assembly processes. In the prototype demonstration, vapor-permeable thermoplastic polyurethane was employed as the semi-permeable material. 3 cm long actuators with piston and diaphragm radii of 1 mm and 500 µm, respectively, were fabricated and characterized. The maximum distraction force from the piston-type actuator is found to be 6 N while the piston travels at a constant velocity of 32 µm h-1 (or 0.77 mm/day) for about 1 week. Meanwhile, the release rate from the diaphragm-type actuator is measured to be constant, 0.15 µl h-1 (or 3.6 µl/day), throughout the experiment. Moreover, the sizes and output characteristics of the self-regulating actuators could readily be tailored to realize optimal distraction rate, rhythm and osteogenic activity. As such, the demonstrated miniature osmotic actuators could potentially serve as versatile apparatuses for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis and fulfill the needs of a variety of implantable and biomedical applications.

  6. Engineering electromagnetic metamaterials and methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Tajen

    2005-07-01

    Electromagnetic metamaterials represent a group of artificial structures, whose dimensions are smaller than subwavelength. Due to electromagnetic metamaterials' collective response to the applied fields, they can exhibit unprecedented properties to fascinate researchers' eyes. For instance, artificial magnetism above terahertz frequencies and beyond, negative magnetic response, and artificial plasma lower than ultraviolet and visible frequencies. Our goal is to engineer those novel properties aforementioned at interested frequency regions and further optimize their performance. To fulfill this task, we developed exclusive micro/nano fabrication techniques to construct magnetic metamaterials (i.e., split-ring resonators and L-shaped resonators) and electric metamaterials (i.e., plasmonic wires) and also employed Taguchi method to study the optimal design of electromagnetic metamaterials. Moreover, by integrating magnetic and electric metamaterials, we have been pursuing to fabricate so-called negative index media---the Holy Grail enables not only to reverse conventional optical rules such as Snell's law, Doppler shift, and Cerenkov radiation, but also to smash the diffraction limit to realize the superlensing effect. In addition to electromagnetic metamaterials, in this dissertation we also successfully miniaturize silicon-based methanol fuel cells by means of micro-electrical-mechanical-system technique, which promise to provide an integrated micro power source with excellent performance. Our demonstrated power density and energy density are one of the highest in reported documents. Finally, based on the results of metamaterials and micro fuel cells, we intend to supply building blocks to complete an omnipotent device---a system with sensing, communication, computing, power, control, and actuation functions.

  7. A Miniature Controllable Flapping Wing Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabagi, Veaceslav Gheorghe

    The agility and miniature size of nature's flapping wing fliers has long baffled researchers, inspiring biological studies, aerodynamic simulations, and attempts to engineer their robotic replicas. Flapping wing flight is characterized by complex reciprocating wing kinematics, transient aerodynamic effects, and very small body lengths. These characteristics render robotic flapping wing aerial vehicles ideal for surveillance and defense applications, search and rescue missions, and environment monitoring, where their ability to hover and high maneuverability is immensely beneficial. One of the many difficulties in creating flapping wing based miniature robotic aerial vehicles lies in generating a proper wing trajectory that would result in sufficient lift forces for hovering and maneuvering. Since design of a flapping wing system is a balance between overall weight and the number of actuated inputs, we take the approach of having minimal controlled inputs, allowing passive behavior wherever possible. Hence, we propose a completely passive wing pitch reversal design that relies on wing inertial dynamics, an elastic energy storage mechanism, and low Reynolds number aerodynamic effects. Theoretical models, compiling previous research on piezoelectric actuators, four-bar transmissions, and aerodynamics effects, are developed and used as basis for a complete numerical simulation. Limitations of the model are discussed in comparison to experimental results obtained from a working prototype of the proposed passive pitch reversal flapping wing mechanism. Given that the mechanism is under-actuated, methods to control lift force generation by actively varying system parameters are proposed, discussed, and tested experimentally. A dual wing aerial platform is developed based on the passive pitch reversal wing concept. Design considerations are presented, favoring controllability and structural rigidity of the final platform. Finite element analysis and experimental

  8. Design considerations for miniaturized optical neural probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudmann, Linda; Ordonez, Juan S.; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Neural probes are designed to selectively record from or stimulate nerve cells. In optogenetics it is desirable to build miniaturized and long-term stable optical neural probes, in which the light sources can be directly and chronically implanted into the animals to allow free movement and behavior. Because of the size and the beam shape of the available light sources, it is difficult to target single cells as well as spatially localized networks. We therefore investigated design considerations for packages, which encapsulate the light source hermetically and have integrated hemispherical lens structures that enable to focus the light onto the desired region, by optical simulations. Integration of a biconvex lens into the package lid (diameter = 300 μm, material: silicon carbide) increased the averaged absolute irradiance ηA by 298 % compared to a system without a lens and had a spot size of around 120 μm. Solely integrating a plano-convex lens (same diameter and material) results in an ηA of up to 227 %.

  9. Metamaterials for Miniaturization of Optical Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0226 METAMATERIALS FOR MINIATURIZATION OF OPTICAL COMPONENTS Aleksandr Figotin UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA IRVINE Final Report 09/24...8-98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 10/09/2014 Final 30/06/2011-30/06/2014 METAMATERIALS FOR MINIATURIZATION OF OPTICAL COMPONENTS FA9550-11-1...relativistic and spinorial aspects of our neoclassical electromagnetic theory. Metamaterials , fundamentals of electromagnetic theory, dissipation, magnetic

  10. Miniature Electrostatic Ion Thruster With Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A miniature electrostatic ion thruster is proposed that, with one exception, would be based on the same principles as those of the device described in the previous article, "Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster". The exceptional feature of this thruster would be that, in addition to using electric fields for linear acceleration of ions and electrons, it would use a magnetic field to rotationally accelerate slow electrons into the ion stream to neutralize the ions.

  11. Miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention documents the efforts on the research and development of a miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system. A miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system is presented; Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI) based alignment algorithm for space applications is discussed. Two navigation cameras are also included to measure the range and range rate which can be integrated into the GPS/MEMS IMU system to enhance the navigation solution.

  12. Miniaturized Plasma and Neutral Diagnostics for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McHarg, M. G.; Enloe, C. L.; Krause, L. A.; Herrero, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a miniaturized suite of instruments which provides both bulk energy resolved plasma properties and coarse neutral mass spectroscopy suitable for measurements on the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). The suite is comprised of two instruments; the Miniaturized Electro-Static Analyzer (MESA), and the Flat Plasma Spectrometer (FLAPS), designed to measure the near earth environment on the Air Force Academy small satellite missions Falconsat-2 and 3.

  13. Miniaturized Plasma and Neutral Diagnostics for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McHarg, M. G.; Enloe, C. L.; Krause, L. A.; Herrero, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a miniaturized suite of instruments which provides both bulk energy resolved plasma properties and coarse neutral mass spectroscopy suitable for measurements on the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). The suite is comprised of two instruments; the Miniaturized Electro-Static Analyzer (MESA), and the Flat Plasma Spectrometer (FLAPS), designed to measure the near earth environment on the Air Force Academy small satellite missions Falconsat-2 and 3.

  14. Methanol conversion to higher hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Several indirect options exist for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, or biomass. All involve an initial conversion step to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}). Presently, there are two commercial technologies for converting syngas to liquids: Fischer-Tropsch, which yields a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons with molecular weights determined by Schulz-Flory kinetics, and methanol synthesis. Mobil`s diversity of technology for methanol conversion gives the methanol synthesis route flexibility for production of either gasoline, distillate or chemicals. Mobil`s ZSM-5 catalyst is the key in several processes for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from methanol: MTO for light olefins, MTG for gasoline, MOGD for distillates. The MTG process has been commercialized in New Zealand since 1985, producing one-third of the country`s gasoline supply, while MTO and MOGD have been developed and demonstrated at greater than 100 BPD scale. This paper will discuss recent work in understanding methanol conversion chemistry and the various options for its use.

  15. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-04

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories.

  16. Miniature Ion-Array Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A figure is shown that depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would share many features of design and operation of the instrument described in another article. The main differences between that instrument and this one would lie in the configuration and mode of operation of the filter and detector electrodes. A filter electrode and detector electrodes would be located along the sides of a drift tube downstream from the accelerator electrode. These electrodes would apply a combination of (1) a transverse AC electric field that would effect differential transverse dispersal of ions and (2) a transverse DC electric field that would drive the dispersed ions toward the detector electrodes at different distances along the drift tube. The electric current collected by each detector electrode would be a measure of the current, and thus of the abundance of the species of ions impinging on that electrode. The currents collected by all the detector electrodes could be measured simultaneously to obtain continuous readings of abundances of species. The downstream momentum of accelerated ions would be maintained through neutralization on the electrodes; the momentum of the resulting neutral atoms would serve to expel gases from spectrometer, without need for a pump.

  17. Conceptual learning by miniature brains

    PubMed Central

    Avarguès-Weber, Aurore; Giurfa, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Concepts act as a cornerstone of human cognition. Humans and non-human primates learn conceptual relationships such as ‘same’, ‘different’, ‘larger than’, ‘better than’, among others. In all cases, the relationships have to be encoded by the brain independently of the physical nature of objects linked by the relation. Consequently, concepts are associated with high levels of cognitive sophistication and are not expected in an insect brain. Yet, various works have shown that the miniature brain of honeybees rapidly learns conceptual relationships involving visual stimuli. Concepts such as ‘same’, ‘different’, ‘above/below of’ or ‘left/right are well mastered by bees. We review here evidence about concept learning in honeybees and discuss both its potential adaptive advantage and its possible neural substrates. The results reviewed here challenge the traditional view attributing supremacy to larger brains when it comes to the elaboration of concepts and have wide implications for understanding how brains can form conceptual relations. PMID:24107530

  18. The Revised Version of Class I Methanol Maser Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, G. M.; Litovchenko, I. D.; Val'tts, I. E.; Alakoz, A. V.

    2011-05-01

    The revised version of the class I methanol maser catalog is presented. It contains 198 sources in total. New class I methanol masers detected in the direction of EGOs (38 sources) were added to the previous list containing ˜ 160 sources (the list have been published in the first version of this catalog - see reference in the text). Electronic version of the catalog has been generated in the form of html file - http://www.asc.rssi.ru/MMI. A statistical analysis was carried out within 2' around a maser position to find an identification of class I methanol masers with any objects typical for star-forming regions - UCHII regions, IRAS sources, dark clouds, bipolar outflows, CS lines as of dense gas tracer, and other masers (class II methanol masers, OH and H_2O). Class I methanol masers identification was made with short-wave infrared objects EGO (extended green objects), which are tracers of bipolar outflows in young stellar objects. It was shown that in the new version of catalog more than 50% of class I methanol masers are identified with bipolar outflow - given EGOs as bipolar outflows (compared with the result of 22% in the first version of the catalog that contains no information about EGO). This result is a strong evidence in favor of the fact that EGOs are indeed active bipolar outflows. At the same time it is important to note, that none of the bipolar outflow, already registered in the direction of class I methanol maser, did not coincide with EGO (with the exception of G45.47+0.07). The results are submitted in a form of a diagram.

  19. Photoionization of methanol and formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warneck, P.

    1971-01-01

    Photoions produced in methanol and formaldehyde by radiation in the spectral region 450-1150 A were analyzed mass spectrometrically, and their relative yields were determined as a function of wavelength. First ionization potentials were determined, and the ion yield curves were interpreted in terms of ionization processes in conjunction with other data. Fragment ions were detected on mass numbers of 31, 30, 29, 15, and 14 for methanol, and 29, 2, and 1 for formaldehyde. The associated appearance potentials were determined and were used to calculate heats of formation of the ions CH2OH(+) and HCO(+), and the radicals CH3, CH2, and HCO.

  20. Highly methanol-tolerant platinum electrocatalyst derived from poly(vinylpoyrrolidone) coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zehui; Ling, Ying; Zhang, Yunfeng; Yang, Ming

    2017-02-01

    The design and fabrication of a methanol-tolerant electrocatalyst is still one of the most important issues in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Here, we focus on the design of a cathodic electrocatalyst in DMFCs and describe a new methanol-tolerant electrocatalyst fabricated from poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) coating on platinum nanoparticles assisted by hydrogen bonding between PVP and polybenzimidazole (PBI). The PVP layer has a negligible effect on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity, while the methanol oxidation reaction is retarded by the PVP layer. The PVP-coated electrocatalyst shows higher ORR activity under various methanol concentrations in the electrolyte, suggesting that the PVP-coated electrocatalyst has a higher methanol tolerance. Also, the PVP-coated electrocatalyst loses only 14% of the electrochemical surface area after 5000 potential cycles from 0.6-1.0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, indicating better Pt stability than non-coated (27%) and commercial (38%) electrocatalysts due to the unique sandwich structure formed by the PVP and PBI. The power density of the PVP-coated electrocatalyst is four to five times higher compared to non-coated and commercial electrocatalysts with 12 M methanol feeding to the anode side, respectively. PVP coating is important for the enhancement of Pt stability and methanol tolerance. This study offers a new method for preparing a low-cost and high-methanol-tolerant Pt electrocatalyst, and useful information for real DMFC application to eliminate the methanol crossover problem in the cathode side.