Science.gov

Sample records for miniature infrared waveguides

  1. [Optical Design of Miniature Infrared Gratings Spectrometer Based on Planar Waveguide].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang-yu; Fang, Yong-hua; Li, Da-cheng; Liu, Yang

    2015-03-01

    In order to miniaturize an infrared spectrometer, we analyze the current optical design of miniature spectrometers and propose a method for designing a miniature infrared gratings spectrometer based on planar waveguide. Common miniature spectrometer uses miniature optical elements to reduce the size of system, which also shrinks the effective aperture. So the performance of spectrometer has dropped. Miniaturization principle of planar waveguide spectrometer is different from the principle of common miniature spectrometer. In planar waveguide spectrometer, the propagation of light is limited in a thin planar waveguide, which looks like the whole optical system is squashed flat. In the direction parallel to the planar waveguide, the light through the slit is collimated, dispersed and focused. And a spectral image is formed in the detector plane. This propagation of light is similar to the light in common miniature spectrometer. In the direction perpendicular to the planar waveguide, light is multiple reflected by the upper and lower surfaces of the planar waveguide and propagates in the waveguide. So the size of corresponding optical element could be very small in the vertical direction, which can reduce the size of the optical system. And the performance of the spectrometer is still good. The design method of the planar waveguide spectrometer can be separated into two parts, Czerny-Turner structure design and planar waveguide structure design. First, by using aberration theory an aberration-corrected (spherical aberration, coma, focal curve) Czerny-Turner structure is obtained. The operation wavelength range and spectral resolution are also fixed. Then, by using geometrical optics theory a planar waveguide structure is designed for reducing the system size and correcting the astigmatism. The planar waveguide structure includes a planar waveguide and two cylindrical lenses. Finally, they are modeled together in optical design software and are optimized as a whole. An

  2. Vibrational spectra of individual millimeter-size membrane patches using miniature infrared waveguides.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, S E; Jonas, R E; Braiman, M S

    1997-10-01

    We have used miniature planar IR waveguides, consisting of Ge strips 30-50 microm thick and 2 mm wide, as evanescent-wave sensors to detect the mid-(IR) evanescent-wave absorbance spectra of small areas of biomolecular monolayers and multilayers. Examples include picomolar quantities of an integral transmembrane protein (bacteriorhodopsin) and lipid (dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine). IR bands due to the protein and lipid components of the plasma membrane of individual 1.5-mm-diameter devitellinized Xenopus laevis oocytes, submerged in buffer and sticking to the waveguide surface, were also detected. A significant improvement in sensitivity was observed, as compared to previous sizes and geometries of evanescent-wave sensors (e.g., commercially available internal reflection elements or tapered optical fibers). These measurements suggest the feasibility of using such miniature supported planar IR waveguides to observe structural changes in transmembrane proteins functioning in vivo in single cells.

  3. Miniature, Low-Power, Waveguide Based Infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer for Spacecraft Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewagama, TIlak; Aslam, Shahid; Talabac, Stephen; Allen, John E., Jr.; Annen, John N.; Jennings, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier transform spectrometers have a venerable heritage as flight instruments. However, obtaining an accurate spectrum exacts a penalty in instrument mass and power requirements. Recent advances in a broad class of non-scanning Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) devices, generally called spatial heterodyne spectrometers, offer distinct advantages as flight optimized systems. We are developing a miniaturized system that employs photonics lightwave circuit principles and functions as an FTS operating in the 7-14 micrometer spectral region. The inteferogram is constructed from an ensemble of Mach-Zehnder interferometers with path length differences calibrated to mimic scan mirror sample positions of a classic Michelson type FTS. One potential long-term application of this technology in low cost planetary missions is the concept of a self-contained sensor system. We are developing a systems architecture concept for wide area in situ and remote monitoring of characteristic properties that are of scientific interest. The system will be based on wavelength- and resolution-independent spectroscopic sensors for studying atmospheric and surface chemistry, physics, and mineralogy. The self-contained sensor network is based on our concept of an Addressable Photonics Cube (APC) which has real-time flexibility and broad science applications. It is envisaged that a spatially distributed autonomous sensor web concept that integrates multiple APCs will be reactive and dynamically driven. The network is designed to respond in an event- or model-driven manner or reconfigured as needed.

  4. Recent advances in miniaturization of infrared spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, James T.; Johnson, Edward A.; Bodkin, W. Andrew; Stevenson, William A.; White, David A.

    2000-03-01

    In the past ten years, a number of miniature spectrometers covering the visible and near infrared wavelengths out to 2.5 microns wavelength have been developed and are now commercially available. These small but high performance instruments have taken advantage of continuing advances in high sensitivity detectors--both CCD's and diode arrays, improvements in holographic gratings, and the availability of low-loss optical materials both in bulk and fiber form that transmit at these wavelengths and that can readily be formed into monolithic shapes for complex optical structures. More recently, a number of researchers have addressed the more intractable problems of extending these miniaturization innovations to spectrometers capable of operation in the mid-infrared wavelengths from 3 microns to 12 microns and beyond. Key enabling technologies for this effort include the recent development of high D*, uncooled thermopile and micro-bolometer detector arrays, new low- mass, high-efficiency pulsed infrared sources, and the design and fabrication of novel monolithic optical structures and waveguides using high index infrared optical materials. This paper reviews the development of these innovative infrared spectrometers and, in particular, the development of the `wedge' spectrometer by Foster-Miller, Inc. and the MicroSpecTM, a MEMS-based solid state spectrograph, by Ion Optics, Inc.

  5. Miniaturized Mid-Infrared Sensor Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Young, C; Mizaikoff, B

    2007-08-16

    Fundamental vibrational and rotational modes associated with most inorganic and organic molecules are spectroscopically accessible within the mid-infrared (MIR; 3-20 {micro}m) regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. The interaction between MIR photons and organic molecules provides particularly sharp transitions, which - despite the wide variety of organic molecules - provide unique MIR absorption spectra reflecting the molecularly characteristic arrangement of chemical bonds within the probed molecules via the frequency position of the associated vibrational and rotational transitions. Given the inherent molecular selectivity and achievable sensitivity, MIR spectroscopy provides an ideal platform for optical sensing applications. Despite this potential, early MIR sensing applications were limited to localized applications due to the size of the involved instrumentation, and limited availability of appropriately compact MIR optical components including light sources, detectors, waveguides, and spectrometers. During the last decades, engineering advances in photonics and optical engineering have facilitated the translation of benchtop-style MIR spectroscopy into miniaturized optical sensing schemes providing a footprint compatible with portable instrumentation requirements for field deployable analytical tools. In this trend article, we will discuss recent advances and future strategies for miniaturizing MIR sensor technology. The Beer-Lambert law implies that achievable limit of detection (LOD) for any optical sensor system improves by increasing the interaction length between photons and target analyte species such as e.g., folding the optical path multiple times as in multi-pass gas phase sensing; however, this governing paradigm naturally leads to an increase in system dimensions. Hence, miniaturization of optical sensing system requires scaling down of each optical component, yet improving the performance of each optical element within a smaller form factor for

  6. Miniature infrared data acquisition and telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. H.; Ward, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    The Miniature Infrared Data Acquisition and Telemetry (MIRDAT) Phase 1 study was performed to determine the technical and commercial feasibility of producing a miniaturized electro-optical telemetry system. This system acquires and transmits experimental data from aircraft scale models for realtime monitoring in wind tunnels. During the Phase 1 study, miniature prototype MIRDAT telemetry devices were constructed, successfully tested in the laboratory and delivered to the user for wind tunnel testing. A search was conducted for commercially available components and advanced hybrid techniques to further miniaturize the system during Phase 2 development. A design specification was generated from laboratory testing, user requirements and discussions with component manufacturers. Finally, a preliminary design of the proposed MIRDAT system was documented for Phase 2 development.

  7. Chalcogenide Glass Optical Waveguides for Infrared Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Anne, Marie-Laure; Keirsse, Julie; Nazabal, Virginie; Hyodo, Koji; Inoue, Satoru; Boussard-Pledel, Catherine; Lhermite, Hervé; Charrier, Joël; Yanakata, Kiyoyuki; Loreal, Olivier; Le Person, Jenny; Colas, Florent; Compère, Chantal; Bureau, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Due to the remarkable properties of chalcogenide (Chg) glasses, Chg optical waveguides should play a significant role in the development of optical biosensors. This paper describes the fabrication and properties of chalcogenide fibres and planar waveguides. Using optical fibre transparent in the mid-infrared spectral range we have developed a biosensor that can collect information on whole metabolism alterations, rapidly and in situ. Thanks to this sensor it is possible to collect infrared spectra by remote spectroscopy, by simple contact with the sample. In this way, we tried to determine spectral modifications due, on the one hand, to cerebral metabolism alterations caused by a transient focal ischemia in the rat brain and, in the other hand, starvation in the mouse liver. We also applied a microdialysis method, a well known technique for in vivo brain metabolism studies, as reference. In the field of integrated microsensors, reactive ion etching was used to pattern rib waveguides between 2 and 300 μm wide. This technique was used to fabricate Y optical junctions for optical interconnections on chalcogenide amorphous films, which can potentially increase the sensitivity and stability of an optical micro-sensor. The first tests were also carried out to functionalise the Chg planar waveguides with the aim of using them as (bio)sensors. PMID:22423209

  8. Volume integrated phase modulator based on funnel waveguides for reconfigurable miniaturized optical circuits.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, J; Martínez Lorente, R; Di Mei, F; Pierangeli, D; Agranat, A J; DelRe, E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate the integration of a miniaturized 30(x)  μm×30(y)  μm×2.7(z)  mm electro-optic phase modulator operating in the near-IR (λ=980  nm) based on the electro-activation of a funnel waveguide inside a paraelectric sample of photorefractive potassium lithium tantalate niobate. The modulator forms a basic tassel in the realization of miniaturized reconfigurable optical circuits embedded in a single solid-state three-dimensional chip.

  9. The Development of Miniaturization Infrared Exhaust Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongyan; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Wenzhen

    In order to solve the environmental pollution caused by motor vehicle exhaust, this article designed and developed a miniaturized infrared exhaust gas sensor, can effectively detect the concentration of CO2, CO, hydrocarbons, solves the existing sensor of large volume, slow response, etc.

  10. Infrared spectroscopy via substrate-integrated hollow waveguides: a powerful tool in catalysis research.

    PubMed

    Kokoric, V; Widmann, D; Wittmann, M; Behm, R J; Mizaikoff, B

    2016-10-17

    Substrate-integrated hollow waveguides (iHWG) represent an innovative generation of photon conduits, which can simultaneously serve as highly miniaturized gas cells with low sample volume. In this communication, we introduce a novel concept for analyzing the performance of catalysts via infrared gas phase analysis based on iHWGs. Due to rapid gas exchange and sample transient times within the iHWG, compositional changes of a continuous gas stream after interaction with a catalyst assembly can be monitored with high time resolution.

  11. Chalcogenide waveguide structure for dispersion in mid-infrared wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, Nandam; Lak Lee, Yeung; Shin, WooJin

    2017-03-01

    We present a waveguide design with low dispersion in mid-infrared wavelengths. The design consists of slot-strip-slot structures horizontally, the strip structure is considered with high index and slot is considered with low index material. We show a dispersion of 0–350 ps/(km·nm) over a band width of 1375 nm, and the structure shows zero dispersions at 2512 and 3887 nm wavelength. The magnitude of dispersion can be fine-tuned by varying the waveguide parameters. Such a waveguide structure with low dispersion at mid-infrared wavelengths has a great potential for supercontinuum generation application. Apart this, we have also proposed dispersion compensation structure, the structure shows a high negative dispersion at 1510 nm wavelength. The structure should find application in the design of an integrated optic dispersion compensator for optical telecommunication and ultrafast waveguide lasers.

  12. Hollow Waveguide Gas Sensor for Mid-Infrared Trace Gas Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Young, C; Chan, J; Carter, C; Mizaikoff, B

    2007-07-12

    A hollow waveguide mid-infrared gas sensor operating from 1000 cm{sup -1} to 4000 cm{sup -1} has been developed, optimized, and its performance characterized by combining a FT-IR spectrometer with Ag/Ag-halide hollow core optical fibers. The hollow core waveguide simultaneously serves as a light guide and miniature gas cell. CH{sub 4} was used as test analyte during exponential dilution experiments for accurate determination of the achievable limit of detection (LOD). It is shown that the optimized integration of an optical gas sensor module with FT-IR spectroscopy provides trace sensitivity at the few hundreds of parts-per-billion concentration range (ppb, v/v) for CH{sub 4}.

  13. MIRIADS: miniature infrared imaging applications development system description and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Christopher R.; Massie, Mark A.; McCarley, Paul L.; Couture, Michael E.

    2001-10-01

    A cooperative effort between the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Nova Research, Inc., the Raytheon Infrared Operations (RIO) and Optics 1, Inc. has successfully produced a miniature infrared camera system that offers significant real-time signal and image processing capabilities by virtue of its modular design. This paper will present an operational overview of the system as well as results from initial testing of the 'Modular Infrared Imaging Applications Development System' (MIRIADS) configured as a missile early-warning detection system. The MIRIADS device can operate virtually any infrared focal plane array (FPA) that currently exists. Programmable on-board logic applies user-defined processing functions to the real-time digital image data for a variety of functions. Daughterboards may be plugged onto the system to expand the digital and analog processing capabilities of the system. A unique full hemispherical infrared fisheye optical system designed and produced by Optics 1, Inc. is utilized by the MIRIADS in a missile warning application to demonstrate the flexibility of the overall system to be applied to a variety of current and future AFRL missions.

  14. Miniature high-performance infrared spectrometer for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruzelecky, Roman V.; Haddad, Emile; Wong, Brian; Lafrance, Denis; Jamroz, Wes; Ghosh, Asoke K.; Zheng, Wanping; Phong, Linh

    2004-06-01

    Infrared spectroscopy probes the characteristic vibrational and rotational modes of chemical bonds in molecules to provide information about both the chemical composition and the bonding configuration of a sample. The significant advantage of the Infrared spectral technique is that it can be used with minimal consumables to simultaneously detect a large variety of chemical and biochemical species with high chemical specificity. To date, relatively large Fourier Transform (FT-IR) spectrometers employing variations of the Michelson interferometer have been successfully employed in space for various IR spectroscopy applications. However, FT-IR systems are mechanically complex, bulky (> 15 kg), and require considerable processing. This paper discusses the use of advanced integrated optics and smart optical coding techniques to significantly extend the performance of miniature IR spectrometers by several orders of magnitude in sensitivity. This can provide the next-generation of compact, high-performance IR spectrometers with monolithically integrated optical systems for robust optical alignment. The entire module can weigh under 3 kg to minimize the mass penalty for space applications. Miniaturized IR spectrometers are versatile and very convenient for small and micro satellite based missions. They can be dedicated to the monitoring of the CO2 in an Earth Observation mission, to Mars exobiology exploration, as well as to vital life support in manned space system; such as the cabin air quality and the quality of the recycled water supply.

  15. Nanoscale dielectric-graphene-dielectric tunable infrared waveguide with ultrahigh refractive indices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bofeng; Ren, Guobin; Zheng, Siwen; Lin, Zhen; Jian, Shuisheng

    2013-07-15

    We propose in this paper a dielectric-graphene-dielectric tunable infrared waveguide based on multilayer metamaterials with ultrahigh refractive indices. The waveguide modes with different orders are systematically analyzed with numerical simulations based on both multilayer structures and effective medium approach. The waveguide shows hyperbolic dispersion properties from mid-infrared to far-infrared wavelength, which means the modes with ultrahigh mode indices could be supported in the waveguide. Furthermore, the optical properties of the waveguide modes could be tuned by the biased voltages on graphene layers. The waveguide may have various promising applications in the quantum cascade lasers and bio-sensing.

  16. Mid-infrared silicon pillar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Neetesh; Hudson, Darren D.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2015-12-01

    In this work silicon pillar waveguides have been proposed to exploit the entire transparent window of silicon. These geometries posses a broad and at dispersion (from 2 to 6 μm) with four zero dispersion wavelengths. We calculate supercontinuum generation spanning over two octaves (2 to >8 μm) with long wavelengths interacting weakly with the lossy substrate. These structures have higher mode confinement in the silicon - away from the substrate, which makes them substrate independent and are promising for exploring new nonlinear phenomena and highly sensitive molecular sensing over the entire silicon's transparency range

  17. InGaAs Detectors for Miniature Infrared Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabach, T. N.; Staller, C.; Dejewski, S.; Cunningham, T.; Herring, M.; Fossum, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    In the past year, there has been substantial impetus for NASA to consider missions that are of relatively low cost as a trade off for a higher new mission launch rate. To maintain low mission cost, these missions will be of short duration and will use smaller launch vehicles (e.g. Pegasus). Consequently, very low volume, very low mass instrument (a.k.a. miniature instrument) payloads will be required. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the number of instruments flown on a particular mission will also be highly constrained; consequently increased instrument capability will also be desired. In the case of infrared instruments, focal planes typically require cooling to ensure high performance of the detectors, especially in the case of spectrometers where high D* is necessary. In this paper, we discuss the InGaAs detector technology and its potential.

  18. Incorporation of wavelength selective devices into waveguides with applications to a miniature spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B. R.; Kaushik, S.; Hadley, G. R.; Fritz, I. J.; Howard, A. J.; Vawter, G. A.; Wendt, J. R.; Corless, R

    1996-02-01

    This report pertains to a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project which was funded for FY94 and FY95. The goal was to develop building blocks for small, cheap sensors that use optical spectroscopy as a means of detecting chemical analytes. Such sensors can have an impact on a wide variety of technologies, such as: industrial process control, environmental monitors, chemical analysis in medicine, and automotive monitors. We describe work in fabricating and demonstrating a waveguide/grating device that can serve as the wavelength dispersive component in a miniature spectrometer. Also, we describe the invention and modeling of a new way to construct an array of optical interference filters using sub-wavelength lithography to tune the index of refraction of a fixed Fabry-Perot cavity. Next we describe progress in more efficiently calculating the fields in grating devices. Finally we present the invention of a new type of near field optical probe, applicable to scanning microscopy or optical data storage, which is based on a circular grating constructed in a waveguide. This result diverges from the original goal of the project but is quite significant in that it promises to increase the data storage capacity of CD-ROMs by 10 times.

  19. Miniaturized Hollow-Waveguide Gas Correlation Radiometer (GCR) for Trace Gas Detection in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, E. M.; Melroy, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Here, we present a miniaturized and simplified version of this instrument capable of mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR instrument has been achieved by implementing a lightweight, 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fiber (hollow waveguide) for the gas correlation cell. Based on a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 gas correlation instrument, replacement of the 10 meter mUltipass cell with hollow waveguide of equivalent pathlength reduces the cell mass from approx 150 kg to approx 0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately I meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of >99%). This modular instrument technique can be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance.

  20. Waveguide infrared spectrometer platform for point and standoff chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadha, Suneet; Henning, Pat; Landers, Frank; Weling, Ani

    2004-03-01

    Advanced autonomous detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals has long been a major military concern. At present, our capability to rapidly assess the immediate environment is severely limited and our domestic infrastructure is burdened by the meticulous procedures required to rule out false threats. While significant advances have recently been accomplished in remote spectral sensing using rugged FTIRs and point detectors, efforts towards low cost chemical discrimination have been lacking. Foster-Miller has developed a unique waveguide spectrometer which is a paradigm shift from the conventional FTIR approach. The spectrometer provides spectral discrimination over the 3-14 μm range and will be the spectrometer platform for both active and passive detection. Foster-Miller has leveraged its innovations in infrared fiber-optic probes and the recent development of a waveguide spectrometer to build a novel infrared sensor platform for both point and stand-off chemical sensing. A monolithic wedge-grating optic provides the spectral dispersion with low cost thermopile point or array detectors picking off the diffracted wavelengths from the optic. The integrated optic provides spectral discrimination between 3-12 μm with resolution at 16 cm-1 or better and overall optical throughput approaching 35%. The device has a fixed cylindrical grating bonded to the edge of a ZnSe conditioning "wedge". The conditioning optic overcomes limitations of concave gratings as it accepts high angle (large FOV) light at the narrow end of the wedge and progressively conditions it to be near normal to the grating. On return, the diffracted wavelengths are concentrated on the discrete or array detector (pixel) elements by the wedge, providing throughput comparable to that of an FTIR. The waveguide spectrometer coupled to ATR probes, flow through liquid cells or multipass gas cells provides significant cost advantage over conventional sampling methodologies. We will

  1. MULTICAM: a miniature cryogenic camera for infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druart, Guillaume; Guérineau, Nicolas; Haïdar, Riad; Lambert, Eric; Tauvy, Michel; Thétas, Sophie; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Primot, Jérôme; Deschamps, Joël

    2008-04-01

    There is an emerging demand for compact infrared instruments, imagers and/or spectrometers, integrated on ground or air vehicles for spatial and spectral data collection. To reach this goal, technological barriers have already been overcome, leading to the development of infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) for high-performance applications (megapixel format, bispectral technology) but also for low-cost and high-volume manufacturing (technology of uncooled micro-bolometers). The next step is to reduce the optics and make it compatible with the successful IRFPAs fabrication technology. This paper presents MULTICAM, a small cryogenic infrared camera. This optical system is composed of multi-level arrays of microlenses integrated in the cryostat and inspired from invertebrate compound eyes. First experimental results will be presented.

  2. Miniaturized multi channel infrared optical gas sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöllenstein, Jürgen; Eberhardt, Andre; Rademacher, Sven; Schmitt, Katrin

    2011-06-01

    Infrared spectroscopy uses the characteristic absorption of the molecules in the mid infrared and allows the determination of the gases and their concentration. Especially by the absorption at longer wavelengths between 8 μm and 12 μm, the so called "fingerprint" region, the molecules can be measured with highest selectivity. We present an infrared optical filter photometer for the analytical determination of trace gases in the air. The challenge in developing the filter photometer was the construction of a multi-channel system using a novel filter wheel concept - which acts as a chopper too- in order to measure simultaneously four gases: carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and ammonia. The system consists of a broadband infrared emitter, a long path cell with 1.7m optical path length, a filter wheel and analogue and digital signal processing. Multi channel filter photometers normally need one filter and one detector per target gas. There are small detection units with one, two or more detectors with integrated filters available on the market. One filter is normally used as reference at a wavelength without any cross-sensitivities to possible interfering gases (e.g. at 3.95 μm is an "atmospheric window" - a small spectral band without absorbing gases in the atmosphere). The advantage of a filter-wheel set-up is that a single IR-detector can be used, which reduces the signal drift enormously. Pyroelectric and thermopile detectors are often integrated in these kinds of spectrometers. For both detector types a modulation of the light is required and can be done - without an additional chopper - with the filter wheel.

  3. Miniature Uncooled Infrared Sensitive Detectors for in Vivo Biomedical Imaging Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P. G.; Demos, S. G.; Rajic, S.

    1998-06-01

    Broadband infrared (OR) radiation detectors have been developed using miniature, inexpensive, mass produced microcantilevers capable of detecting temperature differences as small as lea(-6) K. Microcantilevers made out of semiconductor materials can be used either as uncurled photon or thermal detectors. Mounted on a probe mm in diameter a number of microcantilevers can be accommodated in the working channel of existing endoscopes for in vivo proximity focus measurements inside the human body.

  4. Use of a miniature infrared COTS sensor in a several military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewa, Joseph; Meyer, William H.; Terre, William A.; Laband, Stanley; Newsome, Gwendolyn W.

    2002-08-01

    The proliferation of small infrared cameras in high-volume commercial applications (e.g. firefighting, law-enforcement, and automotive) presents a tremendous opportunity for truly low-cost military micro-sensors. Indigo Systems Corporation's UL3 OmegaTM camera is a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) thermal imager that offers ultra-small size, light weight, and low power. It employs a 164×120 microbolometer focal plane array (FPA) and is currently entering full-scale production. Furthermore, a 324×240 upgrade is in development. While aimed primarily at the commercial market, small size and low-power consumption make UL3 well-suited for other applications, including miniature unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) weapon-sights, and unattended ground sensors (UGS). This paper focuses on the key features of the UL3 family of miniature IR cameras and their utility in soldier systems.

  5. waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauters, Jared F.; Adleman, James R.; Heck, Martijn J. R.; Bowers, John E.

    2014-08-01

    Planar waveguides with ultra-low propagation loss are necessary for integrating optoelectronic systems that require long optical time delay or narrowband optical filters. In this paper, we review an ultra-low loss planar waveguide platform that uses thin (<150 nm) Si3N4 cores and thick (>8 μm) SiO2 cladding layers. In particular, we discuss the performance of arrayed waveguide gratings (AWGs) fabricated with the platform. We propose the use of a practical design method that takes the statistical nature of worst-case crosstalk into account. We also demonstrate the measurement of amplitude and phase error distributions in an AWG using an optical backscatter reflectometer. We show that the waveguides have phase errors small enough to achieve AWG crosstalk below -30 dB, while crosstalk below -40 dB should also be possible with optimization of the component design.

  6. Hollow glass waveguide for mid-infrared applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabii, Christopher Daniel

    This study is an effort to characterize the optical and mechanical properties of hollow glass waveguides (HGWs) with inner metallic and dielectric layers. The theoretical base behind the light-guiding principle of a hollow metallic waveguide has been extended to address the optical properties of dielectric-coated hollow metallic waveguides in both straight and bent configurations. The dependencies of attenuation on bore- size, bend radius, and transmitted mode are predicted by this analysis. HGWs with silver metallic layers and silver iodide dielectric films have been fabricated in bore sizes ranging from 250 /mu m to 1000 /mu m. The spectral response has been measured, and can be arbitrarily tailored lo show minimum loss at any wavelength between 2 and 11 /mu m. Spectroscopic analysis has been used to determine the uniformity and thickness variation in the dielectric layer. Process modifications have reduced this variation from 14% to approximately 1%. The effect of laser coupling condition has been modeled, and optimum coupling occurs for spot-size to bore-size ratios between 0.55 and 0.64. These theoretical predictions have been verified using laser loss measurements on 530, 700 and 1000 /mu m bore waveguides, with the largest bore showing the least sensitivity to launch condition. Continuous CO2 laser power has been transmitted through HGWs with 250, 320, 530, and 700 /mu m bore. The 250 and 320 /mu m sizes transmitted 35 and 50 W of input power respectively, while both larger sizes successfully transmitted 85 W. Similarly, the larger scores showed the ability to transmit high pulsed energy, up to 80 J. Laser loss has been shown to be sensitive to input laser beam quality, with most sensitivity observed for small bore waveguides. The preservation of low loss and spatial purity has been achieved by increasing the wall thickness of the substrate tubing. Losses above the theoretically predicted minimum values have been attributed to scattering from film roughness

  7. Evaluation of Miniaturized Infrared Sensors for Process Control of the Palladium Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lascola, R. J.; Howard, D. W.

    2005-07-31

    We have tested the suitability of a miniaturized infrared sensor for measurements of CO and H{sub 2}O in the inlet stream to the Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR). We demonstrated that both analytes can be measured with absolute accuracies of 2-4% at the process inlet conditions of 120-140 C and approximately 1 atm of each gas. This accuracy must be improved to 1-1.5% for effective PMR process control. The use of a reference detector and independent temperature and pressure measurements to correct the raw signals will improve the accuracy to a level that will approach, if not meet, this goal. With appropriate bandpass filters, the infrared sensors may be used for other gas analysis applications.

  8. Heuristic modelling of laser written mid-infrared LiNbO3 stressed-cladding waveguides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huu-Dat; Ródenas, Airán; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Martínez, Javier; Chen, Feng; Aguiló, Magdalena; Pujol, Maria Cinta; Díaz, Francesc

    2016-04-04

    Mid-infrared lithium niobate cladding waveguides have great potential in low-loss on-chip non-linear optical instruments such as mid-infrared spectrometers and frequency converters, but their three-dimensional femtosecond-laser fabrication is currently not well understood due to the complex interplay between achievable depressed index values and the stress-optic refractive index changes arising as a function of both laser fabrication parameters, and cladding arrangement. Moreover, both the stress-field anisotropy and the asymmetric shape of low-index tracks yield highly birefringent waveguides not useful for most applications where controlling and manipulating the polarization state of a light beam is crucial. To achieve true high performance devices a fundamental understanding on how these waveguides behave and how they can be ultimately optimized is required. In this work we employ a heuristic modelling approach based on the use of standard optical characterization data along with standard computational numerical methods to obtain a satisfactory approximate solution to the problem of designing realistic laser-written circuit building-blocks, such as straight waveguides, bends and evanescent splitters. We infer basic waveguide design parameters such as the complex index of refraction of laser-written tracks at 3.68 µm mid-infrared wavelengths, as well as the cross-sectional stress-optic index maps, obtaining an overall waveguide simulation that closely matches the measured mid-infrared waveguide properties in terms of anisotropy, mode field distributions and propagation losses. We then explore experimentally feasible waveguide designs in the search of a single-mode low-loss behaviour for both ordinary and extraordinary polarizations. We evaluate the overall losses of s-bend components unveiling the expected radiation bend losses of this type of waveguides, and finally showcase a prototype design of a low-loss evanescent splitter. Developing a realistic waveguide

  9. Optimized design of substrate-integrated hollow waveguides for mid-infrared gas analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Paula Regina; Flávio da Silveira Petruci, João; Wilk, Andreas; Alves Cardoso, Arnaldo; Milton Raimundo, Ivo, Jr.; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-09-01

    Design and analytical performance studies are presented for optimizing a new generation of hollow waveguides suitable for quantitative gas sensing—the so-called substrate-integrated hollow waveguide (iHWG). Taking advantage of a particularly compact Fourier transform infrared spectrometer optimized iHWG geometries are investigated toward the development of a multi-constituent breath analysis tool compatible for usage, e.g., in exhaled mouse breath analysis. Three different iHWG geometries were compared, i.e., straight, meandering one-turn and meandering two-turn waveguide channels aiming at maximizing the related analytical figures-of-merit including the achievable limits of detection for selected exemplary analytes. In addition, efficient coupling of infrared (IR) radiation into straight iHWGs was investigated using integrated optical funnel structures. Calibration functions of butane in nitrogen serving as IR-transparent matrix gas were established and compared for the various iHWG geometries. Given the tidal volume of exhaled breath (EB) samples ranging from a few hundreds of milliliters (human, swine) to a few hundreds of microliters (mouse), it is essential for any given analysis to select an appropriate waveguide geometry and volume yet maintaining (i) a compact footprint ensuring hand-held instrumentation, (ii) modular exchange of the iHWG according to the analysis requirement yet with constant device format, and (iii) enabling inline/online measurement capabilities toward continuous EB diagnostics.

  10. Real-time monitoring of ozone in air using substrate-integrated hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensors

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira Petruci, João Flávio; Fortes, Paula Regina; Kokoric, Vjekoslav; Wilk, Andreas; Raimundo, Ivo Milton; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Ozone is a strong oxidant that is globally used as disinfection agent for many purposes including indoor building air cleaning, during food preparation procedures, and for control and killing of bacteria such as E. coli and S. aureus. However, it has been shown that effective ozone concentrations for controlling e.g., microbial growth need to be higher than 5 ppm, thereby exceeding the recommended U.S. EPA threshold more than 10 times. Consequently, real-time monitoring of such ozone concentration levels is essential. Here, we describe the first online gas sensing system combining a compact Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with a new generation of gas cells, a so-called substrate-integrated hollow waveguide (iHWG). The sensor was calibrated using an UV lamp for the controlled generation of ozone in synthetic air. A calibration function was established in the concentration range of 0.3–5.4 mmol m−3 enabling a calculated limit of detection (LOD) at 0.14 mmol m−3 (3.5 ppm) of ozone. Given the adaptability of the developed IR sensing device toward a series of relevant air pollutants, and considering the potential for miniaturization e.g., in combination with tunable quantum cascade lasers in lieu of the FTIR spectrometer, a wide range of sensing and monitoring applications of beyond ozone analysis are anticipated. PMID:24213678

  11. Real-time monitoring of ozone in air using substrate-integrated hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira Petruci, João Flávio; Fortes, Paula Regina; Kokoric, Vjekoslav; Wilk, Andreas; Raimundo, Ivo Milton; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Ozone is a strong oxidant that is globally used as disinfection agent for many purposes including indoor building air cleaning, during food preparation procedures, and for control and killing of bacteria such as E. coli and S. aureus. However, it has been shown that effective ozone concentrations for controlling e.g., microbial growth need to be higher than 5 ppm, thereby exceeding the recommended U.S. EPA threshold more than 10 times. Consequently, real-time monitoring of such ozone concentration levels is essential. Here, we describe the first online gas sensing system combining a compact Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with a new generation of gas cells, a so-called substrate-integrated hollow waveguide (iHWG). The sensor was calibrated using an UV lamp for the controlled generation of ozone in synthetic air. A calibration function was established in the concentration range of 0.3-5.4 mmol m-3 enabling a calculated limit of detection (LOD) at 0.14 mmol m-3 (3.5 ppm) of ozone. Given the adaptability of the developed IR sensing device toward a series of relevant air pollutants, and considering the potential for miniaturization e.g., in combination with tunable quantum cascade lasers in lieu of the FTIR spectrometer, a wide range of sensing and monitoring applications of beyond ozone analysis are anticipated.

  12. Plasmon-enhanced waveguide for dispersion compensation in mid-infrared quantum cascade laser frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Bidaux, Yves; Sergachev, Ilia; Wuester, Wolf; Maulini, Richard; Gresch, Tobias; Bismuto, Alfredo; Blaser, Stéphane; Muller, Antoine; Faist, Jérôme

    2017-04-15

    We demonstrate dispersion compensation in mid-infrared quantum cascade laser frequency combs (FCs) emitting at 7.8 μm using the coupling of a dielectric waveguide to a plasmonic resonance in the top cladding layer of the latter. Devices with group velocity dispersion lower than 110  fs2/mm were fabricated, and narrow beatnotes with FWHM linewidths below 1 kHz were measured on the entire operation range. At -20°C, the optical output power reaches 275 mW, and the optical spectrum spans 60  cm-1. The multi-heterodyne beating spectrum of two devices was measured and spans 46  cm-1, demonstrating the potential of dispersion-engineered waveguides for the fabrication of highly stable and reliable quantum cascade laser FCs with high output power across the mid-infrared.

  13. Visible and near-infrared planar waveguide structure of polycrystalline zinc sulfide from C ions implantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Lian; Zhou, Yu-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Jin-Hua; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2013-02-25

    We report the fabrication of a planar waveguide in polycrystalline zinc sulfide by 6.0 MeV C ions implantation with a fluence of 5 × 10¹⁴ ion/cm² at room temperature. The near-field light intensity profiles in the visible and near-infrared bands are measured by the end-face coupling method with different laser sources. Investigation of the Raman spectra demonstrates that the microstructure of the polycrystalline zinc sulfide has no significant change after C ion implantation. The absorption spectra show that the implantation processes have no influence on the visible and infrared bands.

  14. Silicon-on-nitride structures for mid-infrared gap-plasmon waveguiding

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Jianwei E-mail: soref@rcn.com; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Michel, Jurgen; Soref, Richard E-mail: soref@rcn.com

    2014-01-20

    Silicon-on-nitride (SON) is a convenient, low-loss platform for mid-infrared group IV plasmonics and photonics. We have designed 5-layer SON channel-waveguides and slab-waveguides for the 2.0 to 5.4 μm wavelength range and have simulated the resulting three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) SON gap-plasmon modes. Our simulations show propagation lengths of ∼60 μm for 3D gap-strip modes having a 0.003 λ{sup 2} cross-section. Because the ∼50-nm SON (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) mode region is also a gate insulator between silver (Ag) and n-doped Silicon (Si), metal-oxide-semiconductor accumulation gating is available for electro-optical loss modulation of the gap-confined mode.

  15. Simulation of octave spanning mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in dispersion-varying planar waveguides.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongyu; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Wenbo; Dutta, Niloy K

    2015-04-10

    A dispersion-varying tapered planar waveguide is designed to generate supercontinuum efficiently in the mid-infrared region. The rib waveguide of lead-silicate glass on silica is 1.8 cm long, consisting of a segment with longitudinally increasing etch depth. The mechanism involves nonlinear soliton dynamics. The dispersion profile is shifted along the propagation distance, leading to continuous modification of the phase-matching condition for dispersive wave (DW) emission and enhancement of energy transfer efficiency between solitons and DWs. With low input pulse energy of 45 pJ, simulation demonstrates the generation of both broadband and flat near-octave spectrum spanning 1.3-2.5 μm at the -20  dB level.

  16. Silicon photomultipliers for improved detection of low light levels in miniature near-infrared spectroscopy instruments

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, R.; Braun, F.; Achtnich, T.; Lambercy, O.; Gassert, R.; Wolf, M.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers are novel solid state photodetectors that recently became commercially available. The goal of this paper was to investigate their suitability for low light level detection in miniaturized functional near-infrared spectroscopy instruments. Two measurement modules with a footprint of 26×26 mm2 were built, and the signal-to-noise ratio was assessed for variable source-detector separations between 25 and 65 mm on phantoms with similar optical properties to those of a human head. These measurements revealed that the signal-to-noise ratio of the raw signal was superior to an empirically derived design requirement for source-detector separations up to 50 mm. An arterial arm occlusion was also performed on one of the authors in vivo, to induce reproducible hemodynamic changes which confirmed the validity of the measured signals. The proposed use of silicon photomultipliers in functional near-infrared spectroscopy bears large potential for future development of precise, yet compact and modular instruments, and affords improvements of the source-detector separation by 67% compared to the commonly used 30 mm. PMID:23667783

  17. An octave-spanning mid-infrared frequency comb generated in a silicon nanophotonic wire waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kuyken, Bart; Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Van Campenhout, Joris; Verheyen, Peter; Coen, Stéphane; Leo, Francois; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Gunther; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Laser frequency combs, sources with a spectrum consisting of hundred thousands evenly spaced narrow lines, have an exhilarating potential for new approaches to molecular spectroscopy and sensing in the mid-infrared region. The generation of such broadband coherent sources is presently under active exploration. Technical challenges have slowed down such developments. Identifying a versatile highly nonlinear medium for significantly broadening a mid-infrared comb spectrum remains challenging. Here we take a different approach to spectral broadening of mid-infrared frequency combs and investigate CMOS-compatible highly nonlinear dispersion-engineered silicon nanophotonic waveguides on a silicon-on-insulator chip. We record octave-spanning (1,500–3,300 nm) spectra with a coupled input pulse energy as low as 16 pJ. We demonstrate phase-coherent comb spectra broadened on a room-temperature-operating CMOS-compatible chip. PMID:25697764

  18. An octave-spanning mid-infrared frequency comb generated in a silicon nanophotonic wire waveguide.

    PubMed

    Kuyken, Bart; Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W; Van Campenhout, Joris; Verheyen, Peter; Coen, Stéphane; Leo, Francois; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Gunther; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-02-20

    Laser frequency combs, sources with a spectrum consisting of hundred thousands evenly spaced narrow lines, have an exhilarating potential for new approaches to molecular spectroscopy and sensing in the mid-infrared region. The generation of such broadband coherent sources is presently under active exploration. Technical challenges have slowed down such developments. Identifying a versatile highly nonlinear medium for significantly broadening a mid-infrared comb spectrum remains challenging. Here we take a different approach to spectral broadening of mid-infrared frequency combs and investigate CMOS-compatible highly nonlinear dispersion-engineered silicon nanophotonic waveguides on a silicon-on-insulator chip. We record octave-spanning (1,500-3,300 nm) spectra with a coupled input pulse energy as low as 16 pJ. We demonstrate phase-coherent comb spectra broadened on a room-temperature-operating CMOS-compatible chip.

  19. Infrared radiometry using a dielectric-silver-coated hollow glass waveguide for polymer processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendada, A.; Cole, K.; Lamontagne, M.; Simard, Y.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a novel on-line infrared method for remote sensing of the surface and the bulk temperatures of a polymer film during injection molding. The method may also be applied to other polymer forming processes such as extrusion and blow molding. The key feature of the new method is the use of a hollow waveguide that is incorporated into the injection mold to transmit the thermal radiation from the target to the sensor. The main characteristic of the hollow waveguide is that it exhibits low transmission loss of the thermal energy in the mid and far infrared, and no end reflection. This allows measurement of quite low temperatures, as low as near room temperature. Conventional optical fiber thermometers can neither measure such low temperature ranges nor measure the polymer surface temperature. In this article, we present the first on-line results of critical tests of the new device. A Husky injection molding press was used for the experiments. Good correlation was found between the radiometric results and those obtained with a thermal sensor inserted near the polymer mold interface, and with infrared imaging after the polymer part was ejected from the injection mold.

  20. Partial loss compensation in dielectric-loaded plasmonic waveguides at near infra-red wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Garcia, C; Coello, V; Han, Z; Radko, I P; Bozhevolnyi, S I

    2012-03-26

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of straight dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polaritons waveguides doped with lead-sulfide quantum dots as a near infra-red gain medium. A loss compensation of ~33% (an optical gain of ~143 cm⁻¹) was observed in the guided mode. The mode propagation, coupling efficiency and stimulated emission were characterized using leakage radiation microscopy. The guided mode signature was separated using spatial filters in the Fourier plane of the microscope for quantitative measurements of stimulated emission.

  1. Suspended mid-infrared fiber-to-chip grating couplers for SiGe waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favreau, Julien; Durantin, Cédric; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Boutami, Salim; Duan, Guang-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Silicon photonics has taken great importance owing to the applications in optical communications, ranging from short reach to long haul. Originally dedicated to telecom wavelengths, silicon photonics is heading toward circuits handling with a broader spectrum, especially in the short and mid-infrared (MIR) range. This trend is due to potential applications in chemical sensing, spectroscopy and defense in the 2-10 μm range. We previously reported the development of a MIR photonic platform based on buried SiGe/Si waveguide with propagation losses between 1 and 2 dB/cm. However the low index contrast of the platform makes the design of efficient grating couplers very challenging. In order to achieve a high fiber-to-chip efficiency, we propose a novel grating coupler structure, in which the grating is locally suspended in air. The grating has been designed with a FDTD software. To achieve high efficiency, suspended structure thicknesses have been jointly optimized with the grating parameters, namely the fill factor, the period and the grating etch depth. Using the Efficient Global Optimization (EGO) method we obtained a configuration where the fiber-to-waveguide efficiency is above 57 %. Moreover the optical transition between the suspended and the buried SiGe waveguide has been carefully designed by using an Eigenmode Expansion software. Transition efficiency as high as 86 % is achieved.

  2. Chip-scale Mid-Infrared chemical sensors using air-clad pedestal silicon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao Tai; Singh, Vivek; Hu, Juejun; Richardson, Kathleen; Musgraves, J David; Luzinov, Igor; Hensley, Joel; Kimerling, Lionel C; Agarwal, Anu

    2013-06-07

    Towards a future lab-on-a-chip spectrometer, we demonstrate a compact chip-scale air-clad silicon pedestal waveguide as a Mid-Infrared (Mid-IR) sensor capable of in situ monitoring of organic solvents. The sensor is a planar crystalline silicon waveguide, which is highly transparent, between λ = 1.3 and 6.5 μm, so that its operational spectral range covers most characteristic chemical absorption bands due to bonds such as C-H, N-H, O-H, C-C, N-O, C=O, and C≡N, as opposed to conventional UV, Vis, Near-IR sensors, which use weaker overtones of these fundamental bands. To extend light transmission beyond λ = 3.7 μm, a spectral region where a typical silicon dioxide under-clad is absorbing, we fabricate a unique air-clad silicon pedestal waveguide. The sensing mechanism of our Mid-IR waveguide sensor is based on evanescent wave absorption by functional groups of the surrounding chemical molecules, which selectively absorb specific wavelengths in the mid-IR, depending on the nature of their chemical bonds. From a measurement of the waveguide mode intensities, we demonstrate in situ identification of chemical compositions and concentrations of organic solvents. For instance, we show that when testing at λ = 3.55 μm, the Mid-IR sensor can distinguish hexane from the rest of the tested analytes (methanol, toluene, carbon tetrachloride, ethanol and acetone), since hexane has a strong absorption from the aliphatic C-H stretch at λ = 3.55 μm. Analogously, applying the same technique at λ = 3.3 μm, the Mid-IR sensor is able to determine the concentration of toluene dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, because toluene has a strong absorption at λ = 3.3 μm from the aromatic C-H stretch. With our demonstration of an air-clad silicon pedestal waveguide sensor, we move closer towards the ultimate goal of an ultra-compact portable spectrometer-on-a-chip.

  3. Modelling Miniature Incandescent Light Bulbs for Thermal Infrared `THz Torch' Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangjing; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2015-04-01

    The ` THz Torch' concept is an emerging technology that was recently introduced by the authors for implementing secure wireless communications over short distances within the thermal infrared (20-100 THz, 15 μm to 3 μm). In order to predict the band-limited output radiated power from ` THz Torch' transmitters, for the first time, this paper reports on a detailed investigation into the radiation mechanisms associated with the basic thermal transducer. We demonstrate how both primary and secondary sources of radiation emitted from miniature incandescent light bulbs contribute to the total band-limited output power. The former is generated by the heated tungsten filament within the bulb, while the latter is due to the increased temperature of its glass envelope. Using analytical thermodynamic modelling, the band-limited output radiated power is calculated, showing good agreement with experimental results. Finally, the output radiated power to input DC power conversion efficiency for this transducer is determined, as a function of bias current and operation within different spectral ranges. This modelling approach can serve as an invaluable tool for engineering solutions that can achieve optimal performances with both single and multi-channel ` THz Torch' systems.

  4. Miniaturized visible near-infrared hyperspectral imager for remote-sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Christopher P.; Even, Detlev; Pfister, William; Nakanishi, Keith; Velasco, Arleen; Breitwieser, David; Yee, Selwyn; Naungayan, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    A new approach for the design and fabrication of a miniaturized hyperspectral imager is described. A unique and compact instrument has been developed by taking advantage of light propagation within bonded solid blocks of optically transmitting glass. The resulting series of micro-hyperspectral imaging (microHSI™) spectrometer has been developed, patented, and built as a visible near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral sensor capable of operating in the 400- to 1000-nm wavelength range. The spectrometer employs a blazed, convex diffraction grating in Offner configuration embedded within the optical blocks for ruggedized operation. This, in combination with fast spectrometer operation at f/2.0, results in high optical throughput. The resulting microHSI™VNIR spectrometer weighs 0.54 kg, including foreoptics and camera, which results in a 2× decrease in spectrometer volume compared with current air-spaced Offner spectrometers. These instruments can accommodate custom, ruggedized foreoptics to adapt to a wide range of field-of-view requirements. These fast, telecentric foreoptics are chromatically corrected for wideband spectral applications. Results of field and laboratory testing of the microHSI™ spectrometers are presented and show that the sensor consistently meets technical performance predictions.

  5. Evolution of miniature detectors and focal plane arrays for infrared sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    Sensors that are sensitive in the infrared spectral region have been under continuous development since the WW2 era. A quest for the military advantage of 'seeing in the dark' has pushed thermal imaging technology toward high spatial and temporal resolution for night vision equipment, fire control, search track, and seeker 'homing' guidance sensing devices. Similarly, scientific applications have pushed spectral resolution for chemical analysis, remote sensing of earth resources, and astronomical exploration applications. As a result of these developments, focal plane arrays (FPA) are now available with sufficient sensitivity for both high spatial and narrow bandwidth spectral resolution imaging over large fields of view. Such devices combined with emerging opto-electronic developments in integrated FPA data processing techniques can yield miniature sensors capable of imaging reflected sunlight in the near IR and emitted thermal energy in the Mid-wave (MWIR) and longwave (LWIR) IR spectral regions. Robotic space sensors equipped with advanced versions of these FPA's will provide high resolution 'pictures' of their surroundings, perform remote analysis of solid, liquid, and gas matter, or selectively look for 'signatures' of specific objects. Evolutionary trends and projections of future low power micro detector FPA developments for day/night operation or use in adverse viewing conditions are presented in the following test.

  6. Technology Development of Miniaturized Far-Infrared Sources for Biomolecular Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a purely solid-state based, thus miniaturized, far-infrared (FIR) (also known as terahertz (THz)) wave source using III-V semiconductor nanostructures for biomolecular detection and sensing. Many biomolecules, such as DNA and proteins, have distinct spectroscopic features in the FIR wavelength range as a result of vibration-rotation-tunneling motions and various inter- and intra-molecule collective motions. Spectroscopic characterization of such molecules requires narrow linewidth, sufficiently high power, tunable (in wavelength), and coherent FIR sources. Unfortunately, the FIR frequency is one of the least technologically developed ranges in the electromagnetic spectrum. Currently available FIR sources based on non-solid state technology are bulky, inefficient, and very often incoherent. In this project we investigated antimonide based compound semiconductor (ABCS) nanostructures as the active medium to generate FIR radiation. The final goal of this project was to demonstrate a semiconductor THz source integrated with a pumping diode laser module to achieve a compact system for biomolecular applications.

  7. Evolution of miniature detectors and focal plane arrays for infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Louis A.

    1993-06-01

    Sensors that are sensitive in the infrared spectral region have been under continuous development since the WW2 era. A quest for the military advantage of 'seeing in the dark' has pushed thermal imaging technology toward high spatial and temporal resolution for night vision equipment, fire control, search track, and seeker 'homing' guidance sensing devices. Similarly, scientific applications have pushed spectral resolution for chemical analysis, remote sensing of earth resources, and astronomical exploration applications. As a result of these developments, focal plane arrays (FPA) are now available with sufficient sensitivity for both high spatial and narrow bandwidth spectral resolution imaging over large fields of view. Such devices combined with emerging opto-electronic developments in integrated FPA data processing techniques can yield miniature sensors capable of imaging reflected sunlight in the near IR and emitted thermal energy in the Mid-wave (MWIR) and longwave (LWIR) IR spectral regions. Robotic space sensors equipped with advanced versions of these FPA's will provide high resolution 'pictures' of their surroundings, perform remote analysis of solid, liquid, and gas matter, or selectively look for 'signatures' of specific objects. Evolutionary trends and projections of future low power micro detector FPA developments for day/night operation or use in adverse viewing conditions are presented in the following test.

  8. Absolutely nondestructive discrimination of Huoshan Dendrobium nobile species with miniature near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer engine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tian; Yang, Hai-Long; Tang, Qing; Zhang, Hui; Nie, Lei; Li, Lian; Wang, Jin-Feng; Liu, Dong-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Fei; Zang, Heng-Chang

    2014-10-01

    As one very precious traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Huoshan Dendrobium has not only high price, but also significant pharmaceutical efficacy. However, different species of Huoshan Dendrobium exhibit considerable difference in pharmaceutical efficacy, so rapid and absolutely non-destructive discrimination of Huoshan Dendrobium nobile according to different species is crucial to quality control and pharmaceutical effect. In this study, as one type of miniature near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer, MicroNIR 1700 was used for absolutely nondestructive determination of NIR spectra of 90 batches of Dendrobium from five species of differ- ent commodity grades. The samples were intact and not smashed. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) pattern recognition based on principal component analysis (PCA) was used to classify and recognize different species of Dendrobium samples. The results indicated that the SIMCA qualitative models established with pretreatment method of standard normal variate transformation (SNV) in the spectra range selected by Qs method had 100% recognition rates and 100% rejection rates. This study demonstrated that a rapid and absolutely non-destructive analytical technique based on MicroNIR 1700 spectrometer was developed for successful discrimination of five different species of Huoshan Dendrobium with acceptable accuracy.

  9. Germanium-on-silicon nitride waveguides for mid-infrared integrated photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Anantha, P.; Bao, Shuyu; Lee, Kwang Hong; Guo, Xin; Hu, Ting; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Hong; Soref, Richard; Tan, Chuan Seng

    2016-12-01

    A germanium-based platform with a large core-clad index contrast, germanium-on-silicon nitride waveguide, is demonstrated at mid-infrared wavelength. Simulations are performed to verify the feasibility of this structure. This structure is realized by first bonding a silicon-nitride-deposited germanium-on-silicon donor wafer onto a silicon substrate wafer, followed by the layer transfer approach to obtain germanium-on-silicon nitride structure, which is scalable to all wafer sizes. The misfit dislocations which initially form along the interface between germanium/silicon can be removed by chemical mechanical polishing after layer transfer process resulting in a high-quality germanium layer. At the mid-infrared wavelength of 3.8 μm, the germanium-on-silicon nitride waveguide has a propagation loss of 3.35 ± 0.5 dB/cm and a bend loss of 0.14 ± 0.01 dB/bend for a radius of 5 μm for the transverse-electric mode.

  10. Cooperative upconversion as the gain-limiting factor in Er doped miniature Al2O3 optical waveguide amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kik, P. G.; Polman, A.

    2003-05-01

    Erbium doped Al2O3 waveguide amplifiers were fabricated using two different doping methods, namely Er ion implantation into sputter deposited Al2O3, and co-sputtering from an Er2O3/Al2O3 target. Although the Er concentration in both materials is almost identical (0.28 and 0.31 at. %), the amplifiers show a completely different behavior. Upon pumping with 1.48 μm, the co-sputtered waveguide shows a strong green luminescence from the 4S3/2 level, indicating efficient cooperative upconversion in this material. This is confirmed by pump power dependent measurements of the optical transmission at 1.53 μm and the spontaneous emission at 1.53 and 0.98 μm. All measurements can be accurately modeled using a set of rate equations that include first order and second order cooperative upconversion. The first order cooperative upconversion coefficient C24 is found to be 3.5×10-16 cm3 s-1 in the co-sputtered material, two orders of magnitude higher than the value obtained in Er implanted Al2O3 of 4.1×10-18 cm3 s-1. It is concluded that the co-sputtering process results in a strongly inhomogeneous atomic scale spatial distribution of the Er ions. As a result, the co-sputtered waveguides do not show optical gain, while the implanted waveguides do.

  11. Development of a Miniaturized Hollow-Waveguide Gas Correlation Radiometer for Trace Gas Measurements in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, E. M.; Blalock, G. W.; Marx, C. T.; Heaps, W. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary results in the development of a miniaturized gas correlation radiometer (GCR) for column trace gas measurements in the Martian atmosphere. The GCR is designed as an orbiting instrument capable of mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface.

  12. MIMA, a miniaturized infrared spectrometer for Mars ground exploration: Part III. Thermomechanical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggin, B.; Alberti, E.; Comolli, L.; Tarabini, M.; Bellucci, G.; Fonti, S.

    2007-10-01

    The Mars Infrared MApper (MIMA) is a FT-IR miniaturized spectrometer which is being developed for ESA ExoMars Pasteur mission. MIMA will be mounted on the rover mast and so it must be compact and light-weight. The scientific goals and its optical design are presented in two companion papers [1] [2]; the focus of this work is on the thermomechanical design and testing. The instrument design faces challenging constraints both from the expected environment and the allocated resources. The temperatures during operation are expected to be from -120 °C to +30 °C with the presence of a low density but thermally effective atmosphere. Severe dynamic loads are foreseen during launch and moreover at landing on Mars. The overall size is limited to an envelope of 140 mm x 140 mm x 120 mm and the mass to less than 1 kg. The expected performances of this instrument should be comparable with those of much heavier ones built in the past. An instrument compliant with these constraints has been conceived, introducing many innovative solution with respect to the past experiences and making use of intensive modeling and testing to prove the survival to the harsh environment. Among the most challenging problems the mounting of the brittle KBr optics and the matching of its thermal expansion coefficient with that of the supporting aluminium structure, in a temperature interval of more than 200 °C. Most of the components have undergone thermovacuum tests in the low temperature range because none of them was expected to be used in the -100 °C range.

  13. Miniature near-infrared spectrometer for point-of-use chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Donald M.; Hulse, Charles A.; von Gunten, Marc; Williamson, Eric P.; Pederson, Christopher G.; O'Brien, Nada A.

    2014-03-01

    Point-of-use chemical analysis holds tremendous promise for a number of industries, including agriculture, recycling, pharmaceuticals and homeland security. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is an excellent candidate for these applications, with minimal sample preparation for real-time decision-making. We will detail the development of a golf ball-sized NIR spectrometer developed specifically for this purpose. The instrument is based upon a thin-film dispersive element that is very stable over time and temperature, with less than 2 nm change expected over the operating temperature range and lifetime of the instrument. This filter is coupled with an uncooled InGaAs detector array in a small, rugged, environmentally stable optical bench ideally suited to unpredictable environments. The resulting instrument weighs less than 60 grams, includes onboard illumination and collection optics for diffuse reflectance applications in the 900-1700 nm wavelength range, and is USB-powered. It can be driven in the field by a laptop, tablet or even a smartphone. The software design includes the potential for both on-board and cloud-based storage, analysis and decision-making. The key attributes of the instrument and the underlying design tradeoffs will be discussed, focusing on miniaturization, ruggedization, power consumption and cost. The optical performance of the instrument, as well as its fit-for purpose will be detailed. Finally, we will show that our manufacturing process has enabled us to build instruments with excellent unit-to-unit reproducibility. We will show that this is a key enabler for instrumentindependent chemical analysis models, a requirement for mass point-of-use deployment.

  14. Coupling mid-infrared light from a photonic crystal waveguide to metallic transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea E-mail: r.hillenbrand@nanogune.eu; Garcia-Adeva, Angel; Zubia, Joseba

    2014-01-06

    We propose and theoretically study a hybrid structure consisting of a photonic crystal waveguide (PhC-wg) and a two-wire metallic transmission line (TL), engineered for efficient transfer of mid-infrared (mid-IR) light between them. An efficiency of 32% is obtained for the coupling from the transverse magnetic (TM) photonic mode to the symmetric mode of the TL, with a predicted intensity enhancement factor of 53 at the transmission line surface. The strong coupling is explained by the small phase velocity mismatch and sufficient spatial overlapping between the modes. This hybrid structure could find applications in highly integrated mid-IR photonic-plasmonic devices for biological and gas sensing, among others.

  15. Mid-infrared Raman amplification and wavelength conversion in dispersion engineered silicon-on-sapphire waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaolu; Liu, Hongjun; Huang, Nan; Sun, Qibing; Li, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Raman amplification based on stimulated Stokes Raman scattering (SSRS) and wavelength conversion based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) are theoretically investigated in silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) waveguides in the mid-infrared (IR) region. When the linear phase mismatch Δk is close to zero, the Stokes gain and conversion efficiency drop down quickly due to the effect of parametric gain suppression when the Stokes-pump input ratio is sufficiently large. The Stokes gain increases with the increase of Δk, whereas efficient wavelength conversion needs appropriate Δk under different pump intensities. The conversion efficiency at exact linear phase matching (Δk = 0) is smaller than that at optimal linear phase mismatch by a factor of about 28 dB when the pump intensity is 2 GW cm-2.

  16. Mid-infrared laser emission from Cr:ZnS channel waveguide fabricated by femtosecond laser helical writing

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ya-Pei; Zou, Xiao; Bai, Zhengyuan; Leng, Yuxin; Jiang, Benxue; Jiang, Xiongwei; Zhang, Long

    2015-01-01

    The operation of a mid-infrared laser at 2244 nm in a Cr:ZnS polycrystalline channel waveguide fabricated using direct femtosecond laser writing with a helical movement technique is demonstrated. A maximum power output of 78 mW and an optical-to-optical slope efficiency of 8.6% are achieved. The compact waveguide structure with 2 mm length was obtained through direct femtosecond laser writing, which was moved on a helical trajectory along the laser medium axis and parallel to the writing direction. PMID:26692268

  17. Design of a hybrid As₂S₃-Ti:LiNbO₃ optical waveguide for phase-matched difference frequency generation at mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Madsen, Christi K

    2014-11-03

    Based on arsenic tri-sulfide films on titanium-diffused lithium niobate, we designed a hybrid optical waveguide for efficient mid-infrared emission by phase-matched difference frequency generation (DFG). The hybrid waveguide structure possesses a low-index magnesium fluoride buffer layer sandwiched between two high-index As(2)S(3) slabs, so that pump and signal waves are tightly confined by titanium-diffused waveguide while the DFG output idler wave at mid-infrared is confined by the whole hybrid waveguide structure. On a 1 mm-long hybrid waveguide pumped at 50 mW powers, a normalized power conversion efficiency of 20.52%W(-1)cm(-2) was theoretically predicted, which is the highest record for mid-infrared DFG waveguides based on lithium niobate crystal, to the best of our knowledge. Using a tunable near-infrared pump laser at 1.38-1.47 µm or a tunable signal laser at 1.95-2.15 µm, a broad mid-infrared tuning range from 4.0 µm to 4.9 µm can be achieved. Such hybrid optical waveguides are feasible for mid-infrared emission with mW powers and sub-nanometer linewidths.

  18. Low loss optical channel waveguides for the infrared range using niobium based hybrid sol-gel material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorin, A.; Copperwhite, R.; Boothman, C.; O'Sullivan, M.; McDonagh, C.; Oubaha, M.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of single-mode Nb2O5 based hybrid sol-gel channel waveguides. Nb2O5 based hybrid sol-gel material has been deposited by spin-coating on silicon substrate and channel waveguides have been fabricated by a UV direct laser writing process. Optical guided modes have been observed to confirm single-mode conditions and optical propagation loss measurements have been performed using the cut-back technique. Optical propagation losses were measured to be 0.8 dB/cm and 2.4 dB/cm at 1.31 μm and 1.55 μm respectively. These experimental results demonstrate low loss optical waveguiding within the infrared range and are very promising in view of material choice for the development of integrated optical devices for telecommunication.

  19. Ray model for transmission of infrared radiation through multibent cylindrical waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Morhaim, O.; Mendlovic, D.; Gennot, I.; Dror, J.; Croitoru, N. )

    1991-12-01

    An improved ray model for simulating the transmission of laser radiation through a metallic or metallic-dielectric multibent hollow cylindrical waveguide has been developed. It calculates the power transmission and the power density at any point along the curved waveguide, as a function of geometrical dimensions of the waveguide, coupling lens at the entrance, polarization (random, vertical, or perpendicular), and the 3-D trajectory of the waveguide. In this paper, the theoretical calculations are compared with the experimental results.

  20. Near-infrared lasers and self-frequency-doubling in Nd:YCOB cladding waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yingying; Chen, Feng; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R

    2013-05-06

    A design of cladding waveguides in Nd:YCOB nonlinear crystals is demonstrated in this work. Compact Fabry-Perot oscillation cavities are employed for waveguide laser generation at 1062 nm and self-frequency-doubling at 531 nm, under optical pump at 810 nm. The waveguide laser shows slope efficiency as high as 55% at 1062 nm. The SFD green waveguide laser emits at 531 nm with a maximum power of 100 μW.

  1. Integration of optical waveguides and microfluidics in a miniaturized antibody micro-array system for life detection in the NASA/ESA ExoMars mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prak, A.; Leeuwis, H.; Heideman, R. G.; Leinse, A.; Borst, G.

    2011-02-01

    Novel developments in antibody micro-array technology allow the development of very sensitive instrument that is capable of detecting a wide variety of different biomarkers from a sample liquid. An international consortium led by the UK is currently developing the Life Marker Chip as an analytical instrument for the ExoMars mission in 2018 based on the use of immunoassay technique. In this paper it will be discussed how micro/nano system hardware has been designed and the connected fabrication technology has been developed, compatible with the requirements of a Mars mission instrument and allowing a seamless integration in the instrument. A microfluidic fused silica chip integrates all the relevant components for the analysis/assay procedure (except the pumping, which is performed by a syringe-type bellows pump). The fluidic chip therefore contains an entries for intake of the pretreated sample, chambers for the solution of preloaded reagents and the hybridization reaction, liquid front sensors, inputs and output ports for the selector valve and a channel structure connecting these components. Moreover, the design has three parallel fluidic pathways in order to allow for three different classes of assays. The whole fluidic design is driven by the requirement that the dead volumes and the total liquid volume are as small as possible. It appeared that a miniaturized and integrated selector valve has far better properties than a system with numerous integrated and externally, often pneumatically actuated on-off valves. Next to this, the connected volume and mass of the whole fluid management system is lower. An optical array chip incorporates integrated waveguides, which allow for excitation of the fluorescent labels by the evanescent field of the guided light wave. The system had to be designed in such a way that the light of a single fibercoupled lightsource is distributed over all the spots (10 x 10) of the array. The LioniX proprietary waveguide technology Tri

  2. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy Platform Based on GaAs/AlGaAs Thin-Film Waveguides and Quantum Cascade Lasers.

    PubMed

    Sieger, Markus; Haas, Julian; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter; Godejohann, Matthias; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-03-01

    The performance and versatility of GaAs/AlGaAs thin-film waveguide technology in combination with quantum cascade lasers for mid-infrared spectroscopy in comparison to conventional FTIR spectroscopy is presented. Infrared radiation is provided by a quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectrometer comprising four tunable QCLs providing a wavelength range of 5-11 μm (1925-885 cm(-1)) within a single collimated beam. Epitaxially grown GaAs slab waveguides serve as optical transducer for tailored evanescent field absorption analysis. A modular waveguide mounting accessory specifically designed for on-chip thin-film GaAs waveguides is presented serving as a flexible analytical platform in lieu of conventional attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystals uniquely facilitating macroscopic handling and alignment of such microscopic waveguide structures in real-world application scenarios.

  3. Theoretical and experimental investigations of loss behavior in the infrared in quartz hollow waveguides with rough inner surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatani, Kunihiro; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    1995-07-01

    Transmission losses in quartz hollow waveguides with rough inner surfaces have been measured, and an anomalous loss decrease has been observed just beyond the resonance wavelength at the infrared. Detailed analyses have been conducted to check the applicability of available theories in the prediction of additional loss increases or decreases in wide infrared-wavelength regions. A new theory based on a thin-film-coating model has also been presented for the first time, to our knowledge, to describe the additional loss behavior.

  4. Hollow core and other infrared waveguides for instrumentation in intense radiation environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this LDRD was to study the effect of steady-state neutron and gamma irradiation on the transmission of waveguides designed to operate well in the near- or mid-IR region of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this context, near-IR refers to the region between 1.3 {mu}m and about 2.4 {mu}m, and mid-IR between 3.0 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m. Such radiation environments could exist in nuclear power plants or nuclear weapons. Pulsed and steady-state radiation effects had been extensively studied on silica-based optical fibers because they have been the most readily available, most widely used in communications and sensing, and the least expensive. However, silica-based fibers do not transmit well beyond about 1.8 {mu}m and they are virtually opaque in the mid-IR. The mid-IR, as defined above, and beyond, is where vibrational spectroscopy is carried out. This type of sensing is one important application of infrared optical fibers.

  5. Emerging liquid crystal waveguide technology for low SWaP active short-wave infrared imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Sean D.; Uyeno, Gerald P.; Lynch, Ted; Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Pino, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Raytheon's innovative active short wave infrared (SWIR) imager uses Vescent Photonic's emerging liquid crystal waveguide (LCWG) technology to continuously steer the illumination laser beam over the imager field of view (FOV). This approach instantly illuminates a very small fraction of the FOV, which significantly reduces the laser power compared to flash illumination. This reduced laser power directly leads to a reduction in the size, weight and power (SWaP) of the laser. The reduction in laser power reduces the input power and thermal rejection, which leads to additional reduction in the SWaP of the power supplies and thermal control. The high-speed steering capability of the LCWG enables the imager's SWaP reduction. The SWaP reduction is possible using either global or rolling shutter detectors. In both cases, the LCWG steers the laser beam over the entire FOV while the detector is integrating. For a rolling shutter detector, the LCWG synchronizes the steering with the rolling shutter to illuminate only regions currently integrating. Raytheon's approach enables low SWaP active SWIR imagers without compromising image quality. This paper presents the results of Raytheon's active SWIR imager demonstration including steering control and synchronization with the detector integration.

  6. Probe And Enhancement Of SBS Based Phonons In Infrared Fibers Using Waveguide Coupled External Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chung; Chong, Yat C.; Fong, Chee K.

    1989-06-01

    Interaction of GHz and MHz radiation with CO2 laser propagation in a silver halide fiber using sBs based phonon coupling is furthet investigated. The external signal serves to both probe and enhance laser generated sBs phonons in the fiber. Efficient coupling of microwave radiation into the fiber is accomplished by placing the fiber in a hollow metallic waveguide, designed and constructed to transmit the dominant mode in the 0.9-2.0 GHz band. MHz radiation is conveniently coupled into the fiber using the guided microwave radiation as carrier. Phonon emissions from the fiber under CO2 laser pumping are first established on a spectrum analyzer; low frequency generators ale then tuned to match these frequencies and their maximum interaction recorded. Such interactions are systematically studied by monitoring the amplitude and waveform of the reflected and transmitted laser pulse at various power levels and frequencies of the externally coupled radiation. A plot of reflected laser power versus incident laser power reveals a distinct sBs generated phonon threshold. Variouslaunch directions of the GHz and MHz radiation with respect to the direction of laser propagation are realized to verify theory governing sBs interactions. The MHz radiation and its associated phonons in the fiber are convenient tools for probing sBs related phenomenon in infrared fibers.

  7. Visible and near-infrared waveguides formed by double-energy proton implantation in magneto-optical glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Shen, Xiao-Liang; Zheng, Rui-Lin; Guo, Hai-Tao; Li, Wei-Nan; Wei, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Ion implantation is one of the most competitive methods for the fabrication of optical waveguide structures in optoelectronic materials. Tb3+-doped aluminum borosilicate glass has been demonstrated to be a type of magneto-optical glass with high Verdet constant. In this work, the proton implantation technique with energies of (500 + 550) keV and fluences of (1.0 + 2.0) × 1016 ions/cm2 is performed to form planar waveguides in the Tb3+-doped aluminum borosilicate glass. The guiding modes of the fabricated waveguide were measured by the prism-coupling method at wavelengths of 632.8 and 1539 nm. The near-field light intensity distribution was measured by the end-face coupling method at the wavelength of 632.8 nm and calculated by the finite-difference beam propagation method at both 632.8 and 1539 nm. The optical properties of the double-energy proton-implanted magneto-optical glass waveguides show promise for use as multi-functional integrated optical devices in the visible and near-infrared bands.

  8. Diamonds are a spectroscopist's best friend: thin-film diamond mid-infrared waveguides for advanced chemical sensors/biosensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Karlsson, Mikael; Forsberg, Pontus; Sieger, Markus; Nikolajeff, Fredrik; Österlund, Lars; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-08-19

    The first combination of mid-infrared (MIR) tunable quantum cascade lasers (tQCLs) with thin-film diamond strip waveguides (DSWGs) suitable for advanced chemical sensing/biosensing is demonstrated. The sensing system is composed of thin diamond films grown on surface-passivated Si wafers via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and microstructured using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching, serving as photonic waveguides for radiation emitted by a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser (tQCL) in the spectral regime of 5.78-6.35 μm (1570-1730 cm(-1)). The characterization of the free-standing diamond waveguides reveals excellent transmission properties across a broad MIR band. As a proof of concept, the detection of acetone in D2O via evanescent field absorption is demonstrated achieving a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 200 pL, which indicates a significant sensitivity improvement compared to conventional MIR slab/strip waveguides reported to date. Providing characteristic absorption features within the tuning range of the tQCL, studies using anisaldehyde as an analyte further corroborate the potential of tQCL-DSWG-based chemical sensors/biosensors.

  9. Characterization of silver halide fiber optics and hollow silica waveguides for use in the construction of a mid-infrared attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy probe.

    PubMed

    Damin, Craig A; Sommer, André J

    2013-11-01

    Advances in fiber optic materials have allowed for the construction of fibers and waveguides capable of transmitting infrared radiation. An investigation of the transmission characteristics associated with two commonly used types of infrared-transmitting fibers/waveguides for prospective use in a fiber/waveguide-coupled attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) probe was performed. Characterization of silver halide polycrystalline fiber optics and hollow silica waveguides was done on the basis of the transmission of infrared light using a conventional fiber optic coupling accessory and an infrared microscope. Using the fiber optic coupling accessory, the average percent transmission for three silver halide fibers was 18.1 ± 6.1% relative to a benchtop reflection accessory. The average transmission for two hollow waveguides (HWGs) using the coupling accessory was 8.0 ± 0.3%. (Uncertainties in the relative percent transmission represent the standard deviations.) Reduced transmission observed for the HWGs was attributed to the high numerical aperture of the coupling accessory. Characterization of the fibers/waveguides using a zinc selenide lens objective on an infrared microscope indicated 24.1 ± 7.2% of the initial light input into the silver halide fibers was transmitted. Percent transmission obtained for the HWGs was 98.7 ± 0.1%. Increased transmission using the HWGs resulted from the absence or minimization of insertion and scattering losses due to the hollow air core and a better-matched numerical aperture. The effect of bending on the transmission characteristics of the fibers/waveguides was also investigated. Significant deviations in the transmission of infrared light by the solid-core silver halide fibers were observed for various bending angles. Percent transmission greater than 98% was consistently observed for the HWGs at the bending angles. The combined benefits of high percent transmission, reproducible instrument responses, and increased bending

  10. Near-infrared characterization of gallium nitride photonic-crystal waveguides and cavities.

    PubMed

    Dharanipathy, U; Vico Triviño, N; Yan, C; Diao, Z; Carlin, J-F; Grandjean, N; Houdré, R

    2012-11-15

    We report the design and optical characterization of fully suspended wire waveguides and photonic crystal (PhC) membranes fabricated on a gallium nitride layer grown on silicon substrate operating at 1.5 μm. W1-type PhC waveguides are coupled with suspended wires and are investigated using a standard end-fire setup. The experimental and theoretical dispersion properties of the propagating modes in the wires and photonic-crystal waveguides are shown. Modified L3 cavities with quality factors of up to 2200 and heterostructure cavities with quality factors of up to 5400 are experimentally demonstrated.

  11. Hollow core waveguide as mid-infrared laser modal beam filter

    SciTech Connect

    Patimisco, P.; Giglio, M.; Spagnolo, V.; Sampaolo, A.; Kriesel, J. M.; Tittel, F. K.

    2015-09-21

    A novel method for mid-IR laser beam mode cleaning employing hollow core waveguide as a modal filter element is reported. The influence of the input laser beam quality on fiber optical losses and output beam profile using a hollow core waveguide with 200 μm-bore size was investigated. Our results demonstrate that even when using a laser with a poor spatial profile, there will exist a minimum fiber length that allows transmission of only the Gaussian-like fundamental waveguide mode from the fiber, filtering out all the higher order modes. This essentially single mode output is preserved also when the waveguide is bent to a radius of curvature of 7.5 cm, which demonstrates that laser mode filtering can be realized even if a curved light path is required.

  12. High resolution TE&TM near infrared compact spectrometer based on waveguide grating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Thomas, F.; Heidmann, S.; de Mengin, M.; Courjal, N.; Ulliac, G.; Morand, A.; Benech, P.; Kern, P.; Le Coarer, E...

    2015-05-01

    Integrated optics spectrometers can be essentially classified into two main families: based on Fourier transform or dispersed modes. In the first case, an interferogram generated inside an optical waveguide is sampled using nanodetectors, these scatter light into the detector that is in contact with the waveguide. A dedicated FFT processing is needed in order to recover the spectrum with high resolution but limited spectral range. Another way is to extract the optical signal confined in a waveguide using a surface grating and directly obtain the spectrum by means of a relay optics that generates the spectrum on the Fourier plane of the lens, where the detector is placed. Following this second approach, we present a high-resolution compact dispersive spectrometer (δλ =1.5nm at λ=1050nm) based on guided optics technology. The propagating signal is dispersed out of a waveguide thanks to a surface grating that lays along it. Focused Ion Beam technique is used to etch nano-grooves that act as individual scattering centers and constitute the surface grating along the waveguide. The waveguide is realized using X-cut, Ypropagating Lithium Niobate substrate, where the effective index for TE and TM guided modes is different. This results in a strong angular separation of TE and TM diffracted modes, allowing simultaneous detection of spectra for both polarizations. A simple relay optics, with limited optical aberrations, reimages the diffracted signal on the focal plane array, leading to a robust, easy to align instrument.

  13. As₂S₃-silica double-nanospike waveguide for mid-infrared supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shangran; Tani, Francesco; Travers, John C; Uebel, Patrick; Caillaud, Celine; Troles, Johann; Schmidt, Markus A; Russell, Philip St J

    2014-09-01

    A double-nanospike As2S3-silica hybrid waveguide structure is reported. The structure comprises nanotapers at input and output ends of a step-index waveguide with a subwavelength core (1 μm in diameter), with the aim of increasing the in-coupling and out-coupling efficiency. The design of the input nanospike is numerically optimized to match both the diameter and divergence of the input beam, resulting in efficient excitation of the fundamental mode of the waveguide. The output nanospike is introduced to reduce the output beam divergence and the strong endface Fresnel reflection. The insertion loss of the waveguide is measured to be ∼2  dB at 1550 nm in the case of free-space in-coupling, which is ∼7  dB lower than the previously reported single-nanospike waveguide. By pumping a 3-mm-long waveguide at 1550 nm using a 60-fs fiber laser, an octave-spanning supercontinuum (from 0.8 to beyond 2.5 μm) is generated at 38 pJ input energy.

  14. Miniature Earthmover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    International Machinery Corporation (IMC) developed a miniature earthmover, the 1/8 scale Caterpillar D11N Track-type Tractor, with trademark product approval and manufacturing/marketing license from Caterpillar, Inc. Through Marshall Space Flight Center assistance, the company has acquired infrared remote control technology, originally developed for space exploration. The technology is necessary for exports because of varying restrictions on radio frequency in foreign countries. The Cat D11N weighs only 340 pounds and has the world's first miniature industrial internal combustion engine. The earthmover's uses include mining, construction and demolition work, and hazardous environment work. IMC also has designs of various products for military use and other Caterpillar replicas.

  15. Fourier transform infrared detection in miniaturized total analysis systems for sucrose analysis.

    PubMed

    Lendl, B; Schindler, R; Frank, J; Kellner, R; Drott, J; Laurell, T

    1997-08-01

    In this work, a flow system containing a micromachined lamella-type porous silicon reactor and a novel mid-IR fiber-optic flow cell were used for the enzymatic determination of sucrose in aqueous solution. The method relies on the enzymatic hydrolysis of sucrose to fructose and glucose catalyzed by β-fructosidase and on the acquisition of FT-IR spectra before and after complete reaction. β-Fructosidase was covalently bound to the porous silicon surface of the channels in the microreactor. The porous silicon was achieved by anodization of the silicon reactor in a HF/ethanol mixture. For the measurement of small amounts of aqueous solution, a miniaturized flow cell was developed which consisted of two AgCl(x)Br(1)(-)(x) fiber tips (diameter, 0.75 mm) coaxially mounted in a PTFE block at a distance of 23 μm. The flowing stream was directed through the gap of the two fiber tips which served to define the optical path length and to bring the focused mid-IR radiation to the place of measurement. Using this construction, a probed volume of ∼10 nL was obtained. The calibration curve was linear between 10 and 100 mmol/L sucrose. Furthermore, the potential of this method was demonstrated by the analysis of binary sucrose/glucose mixtures showing no interference from glucose and by the successful determination of sucrose in real samples.

  16. Fabrication of far infrared rib waveguides based on Te-Ge-Ga films deposited by co-thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Stéphanie; Barthelemy, Eleonore; Vigreux, Caroline; Pradel, Annie; Barillot, Marc

    2008-09-01

    In the present paper we focus on the fabrication of rib waveguides being able to work in the large infrared window [6-20μm], compatible with the Darwin mission requirements. The rib waveguides to be realized are based on etched thick films of telluride materials deposited on telluride glass. The choice of the Te75Ge15Ga10 material as the substrate is justified by its excellent transmission in the infrared region and its thermal stability. Films of the ternary system made of Te, Ge and Ga were investigated as the core layer and the superstrate. Details are provided on the film deposition and etching technologies: (i) Te-Ge-Ga films are prepared by co-thermal evaporation from the pure elements Te, Ge and Ga; (ii) the geometry of the as-obtained films is modified by reactive ion etching under an atmosphere of CHF3 + O2 or CH4 + H2. First results concerning Te-Ge binary films are particularly interesting.

  17. Low-loss Ge-rich Si0.2Ge0.8 waveguides for mid-infrared photonics.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Joan Manel; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Gilles, Clement; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ballabio, Andrea; Chaisakul, Papichaya; Roux, Xavier Le; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos; Maisons, Gregory; Vivien, Laurent; Carras, Mathieu; Isella, Giovanni; Marris-Morini, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate low-loss Ge-rich Si0.2Ge0.8 waveguides on Si1-xGex (x from 0 to 0.79) graded substrates operating in the mid-infrared wavelength range at λ=4.6  μm. Propagation losses as low as (1.5±0.5)dB/cm and (2±0.5)dB/cm were measured for the quasi-TE and quasi-TM polarizations, respectively. A total coupling loss (input/output) of only 10 dB was found for waveguide widths larger than 7 μm due to a good fiber-waveguide mode matching. Near-field optical mode profiles measured at the output waveguide facet allowed us to inspect the optical mode and precisely measure the modal effective area of each waveguide providing a good correlation between experiments and simulations. These results put forward the potential of low-index-contrast Si1-xGex waveguides with high Ge concentration as fundamental blocks for mid-infrared photonic integrated circuits.

  18. Widely tunable short-infrared thulium and holmium doped fluorozirconate waveguide chip lasers.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, D G; Gross, S; Withford, M J; Monro, T M

    2014-10-20

    We report widely tunable (≈ 260 nm) Tm(3+) and Ho(3+) doped fluorozirconate (ZBLAN) glass waveguide extended cavity lasers with close to diffraction limited beam quality (M(2) ≈ 1.3). The waveguides are based on ultrafast laser inscribed depressed claddings. A Ti:sapphire laser pumped Tm(3+)-doped chip laser continuously tunes from 1725 nm to 1975 nm, and a Tm(3+)-sensitized Tm(3+):Ho(3+) chip laser displays tuning across both ions evidenced by a red enhanced tuning range of 1810 to 2053 nm. We also demonstrate a compact 790 nm diode laser pumped Tm(3+)-doped chip laser which tunes from 1750 nm to 1998 nm at a 14% incident slope efficiency, and a beam quality of M(2) ≈ 1.2 for a large mode-area waveguide with 70 µm core diameter.

  19. Low-loss hollow waveguide fibers for mid-infrared quantum cascade laser sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Patimisco, Pietro; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Vitiello, Miriam S; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Bledt, Carlos M; Harrington, James A

    2013-01-21

    We report on single mode optical transmission of hollow core glass waveguides (HWG) coupled with an external cavity mid-IR quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). The QCL mode results perfectly matched to the hybrid HE(11) waveguide mode and the higher losses TE-like modes have efficiently suppressed by the deposited inner dielectric coating. Optical losses down to 0.44 dB/m and output beam divergence of ~5 mrad were measured. Using a HGW fiber with internal core size of 300 µm we obtained single mode laser transmission at 10.54 µm and successful employed it in a quartz enhanced photoacoustic gas sensor setup.

  20. Shaping of looped miniaturized chalcogenide fiber sensing heads for mid-infrared sensing.

    PubMed

    Houizot, Patrick; Anne, Marie-Laure; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Loréal, Olivier; Tariel, Hugues; Lucas, Jacques; Bureau, Bruno

    2014-09-26

    Chalcogenide glass fibers are promising photonic tools to develop Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS) optical sensors working in the mid-infrared region. Numerous pioneering works have already been carried out showing their efficiency, especially for bio-medical applications. Nevertheless, this technology remains confined to academic studies at the laboratory scale because chalcogenide glass fibers are difficult to shape to produce reliable, sensitive and compact sensors. In this paper, a new method for designing and fabricating a compact and robust sensing head with a selenide glass fiber is described. Compact looped sensing heads with diameter equal to 2 mm were thus shaped. This represents an outstanding achievement considering the brittleness of such uncoated fibers. FEWS experiments were implemented using alcoholic solutions as target samples showing that the sensitivity is higher than with the routinely used classical fiber. It is also shown that the best compromise in term of sensitivity is to fabricate a sensing head including two full loops. From a mechanical point of view, the breaking loads of the loop shaped head are also much higher than with classical fiber. Finally, this achievement paves the way for the use of mid-infrared technology during in situ and even in vivo medical operations. Indeed, is is now possible to slide a chalcogenide glass fiber in the operating channel of a standard 2.8 mm diameter catheter.

  1. A miniature infrared sight for both weapon-mounted and handheld security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewa, Joseph; Terre, William A.; Frank, Jeff; Malmberg, Roy; Switzer, Larry; Antesberger, Wayne; Newsome, Gwendolyn

    2004-08-01

    Thermal weapon sights have been used by the U.S. military for decades. More recently, there has been a growing interest in infrared imagers for paramilitary and civilian applications such as law-enforcement and homeland defense. However, traditional weapon sights are not always ideal products for these applications because they do not typically have form-factor or features allowing them to be readily employed as general-purpose imagers off the weapon. Simply stated, most law-enforcement agencies cannot afford a dedicated sniper scope. Instead, this market demands a thermal imager that can be employed in a variety of situations, both weapon-mounted and handheld. Described herein is a new infrared sight that provides this multi-use capability. Based around the Omega imaging core developed by Indigo Systems, this lightweight system employs a unique housing design that mounts to a weapon rail or tripod or is held comfortably in one hand for use as a short-range "pocket scope". Key aspects of the design are discussed, with particular focus on ergonomics, human factors, and advanced features that enhance its utility in a multi-use role.

  2. Shaping of Looped Miniaturized Chalcogenide Fiber Sensing Heads for Mid-Infrared Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Houizot, Patrick; Anne, Marie-Laure; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Loréal, Olivier; Tariel, Hugues; Lucas, Jacques; Bureau, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Chalcogenide glass fibers are promising photonic tools to develop Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS) optical sensors working in the mid-infrared region. Numerous pioneering works have already been carried out showing their efficiency, especially for bio-medical applications. Nevertheless, this technology remains confined to academic studies at the laboratory scale because chalcogenide glass fibers are difficult to shape to produce reliable, sensitive and compact sensors. In this paper, a new method for designing and fabricating a compact and robust sensing head with a selenide glass fiber is described. Compact looped sensing heads with diameter equal to 2 mm were thus shaped. This represents an outstanding achievement considering the brittleness of such uncoated fibers. FEWS experiments were implemented using alcoholic solutions as target samples showing that the sensitivity is higher than with the routinely used classical fiber. It is also shown that the best compromise in term of sensitivity is to fabricate a sensing head including two full loops. From a mechanical point of view, the breaking loads of the loop shaped head are also much higher than with classical fiber. Finally, this achievement paves the way for the use of mid-infrared technology during in situ and even in vivo medical operations. Indeed, is is now possible to slide a chalcogenide glass fiber in the operating channel of a standard 2.8 mm diameter catheter. PMID:25264953

  3. Integrated and miniaturized endoscopic devices for use during high power infrared fiber laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher Ryan

    rates comparable to those of the 100-mum-core traditional fiber used in TFL lithotripsy while providing an additional safety feature for initial fiber insertion through the ureteroscope working channel. Working channel flow rates were explored in regards to diameter and geometry. Illumination sources and configurations were explored in regards to optimized wavelength selection as well as physical geometry of the ureteroscope tip. Ureteroscope designs were devised, modeled, fabricated, and tested, implementing a reduced working channel, and optimized illumination geometry, culminating in an integrated, miniaturized ureteroscope for use in TFL lithotripsy. This final device, coupled with the proven TFL and optimized laser parameters may establish the TFL as a viable replacement to the conventional Ho:YAG laser for treatment of kidney stones.

  4. Spectra Transfer Between a Fourier Transform Near-Infrared Laboratory and a Miniaturized Handheld Near-Infrared Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Uwe; Pfeifer, Frank; Hsuing, Chang; Siesler, Heinz W

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this contribution is to demonstrate the transfer of spectra that have been measured on two different laboratory Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectrometers to the format of a handheld instrument by measuring only a few samples with both spectrometer types. Thus, despite the extreme differences in spectral range and resolution, spectral data sets that have been collected and quantitative as well as qualitative calibrations that have been developed thereof, respectively, over a long period on a laboratory instrument can be conveniently transferred to the handheld system. Thus, the necessity to prepare completely new calibration samples and the effort required to develop calibration models when changing hardware platforms is minimized. The enabling procedure is based on piecewise direct standardization (PDS) and will be described for the data sets of a quantitative and a qualitative application case study. For this purpose the spectra measured on the FT-NIR laboratory spectrometers were used as "master" data and transferred to the "target" format of the handheld instrument. The quantitative test study refers to transmission spectra of three-component liquid solvent mixtures whereas the qualitative application example encompasses diffuse reflection spectra of six different current polymers. To prove the performance of the transfer procedure for quantitative applications, partial least squares (PLS-1) calibrations were developed for the individual components of the solvent mixtures with spectra transferred from the master to the target instrument and the cross-validation parameters were compared with the corresponding parameters obtained for spectra measured on the master and target instruments, respectively. To test the retention of the discrimination ability of the transferred polymer spectra sets principal component analyses (PCAs) were applied exemplarily for three of the six investigated polymers and their identification was demonstrated by

  5. Low-Loss Hollow Waveguide Fibers for Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Laser Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Patimisco, Pietro; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, James A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on single mode optical transmission of hollow core glass waveguides (HWG) coupled with an external cavity mid-IR quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). The QCL mode results perfectly matched to the hybrid HE11 waveguide mode and the higher losses TE-like modes have efficiently suppressed by the deposited inner dielectric coating. Optical losses down to 0.44 dB/m and output beam divergence of ∼5 mrad were measured. Using a HGW fiber with internal core size of 300 μm we obtained single mode laser transmission at 10.54 μm and successful employed it in a quartz enhanced photoacoustic gas sensor setup. PMID:23337336

  6. Mid-infrared silicon-on-sapphire waveguide coupled photonic crystal microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yi E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com Chen, Ray T. E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com; Chakravarty, Swapnajit E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com

    2015-08-24

    We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal (PC) microcavity side coupled to a W1.05 photonic crystal waveguide fabricated in silicon-on-sapphire working in mid-IR regime at 3.43 μm. Using a fixed wavelength laser source, propagation characteristics of PC waveguides without microcavity are characterized as a function of lattice constant to determine the light line position, stop gap, and guided mode transmission behavior. The resonance of an L21 PC microcavity coupled to the W1.05 PCW in the guided mode transmission region is then measured by thermal tuning of the cavity resonance across the source wavelength. Resonance quality factor ∼3500 is measured from the temperature dependency curve.

  7. Visible-to-near-infrared octave spanning supercontinuum generation in a silicon nitride waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haolan; Kuyken, Bart; Clemmen, Stéphane; Leo, François; Subramanian, Ananth; Dhakal, Ashim; Helin, Philippe; Severi, Simone; Brainis, Edouard; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel

    2015-05-15

    The generation of an octave spanning supercontinuum covering 488-978 nm (at -30  dB) is demonstrated for the first time on-chip. This result is achieved by dispersion engineering a 1-cm-long Si3N4 waveguide and pumping it with an 100-fs Ti:Sapphire laser emitting at 795 nm. This work offers a bright broadband source for biophotonic applications and frequency metrology.

  8. Surface-modified ZnSe waveguides for label-free infrared attenuated total reflection detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Carla S; Hess, Dennis W; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2011-12-07

    This communication presents a novel label-free biosensing method to monitor DNA hybridization via infrared attenuated total reflection (IR-ATR) spectroscopy using surface-modified ZnSe waveguides. Well-defined carboxyl-terminated monolayers were formed at H-terminated ZnSe by direct photochemical activation. Chemical activation of the acidic function was obtained by using succinimide/carbodiimide linkers. The sequential surface modification reactions were characterized by XPS and IR-ATR spectroscopy. Finally, a single stranded DNA probe with a C6-NH(2) 5' modifier was coupled to the ester-terminated surface via peptide bonding, and the hybridization of the immobilized DNA sequence with its complementary strand was directly evaluated by IR-ATR spectroscopy in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral regime (3-20 μm) without requiring an additional label. A shift of the vibrational modes corresponding to the phosphodiester and deoxyribose structures of the DNA backbone was observed. Hence, this approach substantiates a novel strategy for label-free DNA detection utilizing mid-infrared spectroscopy as the optical sensing platform.

  9. A customizable commercial miniaturized 320×256 indium gallium arsenide shortwave infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Che; O'Grady, Matthew; Groppe, Joseph V.; Ettenberg, Martin H.; Brubaker, Robert M.

    2004-10-01

    The design and performance of a commercial short-wave-infrared (SWIR) InGaAs microcamera engine is presented. The 0.9-to-1.7 micron SWIR imaging system consists of a room-temperature-TEC-stabilized, 320x256 (25 μm pitch) InGaAs focal plane array (FPA) and a high-performance, highly customizable image-processing set of electronics. The detectivity, D*, of the system is greater than 1013 cm-√Hz/W at 1.55 μm, and this sensitivity may be adjusted in real-time over 100 dB. It features snapshot-mode integration with a minimum exposure time of 130 μs. The digital video processor provides real time pixel-to-pixel, 2-point dark-current subtraction and non-uniformity compensation along with defective-pixel substitution. Other features include automatic gain control (AGC), gamma correction, 7 preset configurations, adjustable exposure time, external triggering, and windowing. The windowing feature is highly flexible; the region of interest (ROI) may be placed anywhere on the imager and can be varied at will. Windowing allows for high-speed readout enabling such applications as target acquisition and tracking; for example, a 32x32 ROI window may be read out at over 3500 frames per second (fps). Output video is provided as EIA170-compatible analog, or as 12-bit CameraLink-compatible digital. All the above features are accomplished in a small volume < 28 cm3, weight < 70 g, and with low power consumption < 1.3 W at room temperature using this new microcamera engine. Video processing is based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) platform with a soft-embedded processor that allows for ease of integration/addition of customer-specific algorithms, processes, or design requirements. The camera was developed with the high-performance, space-restricted, power-conscious application in mind, such as robotic or UAV deployment.

  10. Efficient waveguide coupler based on metal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenjun; Yang, Junbo; Chang, Shengli; Zhang, Jingjing; Lu, Huanyu

    2015-10-01

    Because of the diffraction limit of light, the scale of optical element stays in the order of wavelength, which makes the interface optics and nano-electronic components cannot be directly matched, thus the development of photonics technology encounters a bottleneck. In order to solve the problem that coupling of light into the subwavelength waveguide, this paper proposes a model of coupler based on metal materials. By using Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) wave, incident light can be efficiently coupled into waveguide of diameter less than 100 nm. This paper mainly aims at near infrared wave band, and tests a variety of the combination of metal materials, and by changing the structural parameters to get the maximum coupling efficiency. This structure splits the plane incident light with wavelength of 864 nm, the width of 600 nm into two uniform beams, and separately coupled into the waveguide layer whose width is only about 80 nm, and the highest coupling efficiency can reach above 95%. Using SPPs structure will be an effective method to break through the diffraction limit and implement photonics device high-performance miniaturization. We can further compress the light into small scale fiber or waveguide by using the metal coupler, and to save the space to hold more fiber or waveguide layer, so that we can greatly improve the capacity of optical communication. In addition, high-performance miniaturization of the optical transmission medium can improve the integration of optical devices, also provide a feasible solution for the photon computer research and development in the future.

  11. Raman, mid-infrared, near-infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy of PDMS silicone rubber for characterization of polymer optical waveguide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dengke; Neyer, Andreas; Kuckuk, Rüdiger; Heise, H. Michael

    2010-07-01

    Special siloxane polymers have been produced via an addition reaction from commercially available two-component addition materials by thermal curing. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based polymers have already been used in the optical communication field, where passive polymer multimode waveguides are required for short-distance datacom optical applications. For such purpose, materials with low intrinsic absorption losses within the spectral region of 600-900 nm wavelengths are essential. For vibrational absorption band assignments, especially in the visible and short-wave near-infrared region, the mid-infrared and Raman spectra were investigated for fundamental vibrations of the siloxane materials, shedding light onto the chemistry before and after material polymerization. Within the near-infrared and long-wave visible spectral range, vibrational C sbnd H stretching overtone and combination bands dominate the spectra, rendering an optical characterization of core and clad materials. Such knowledge also provides information for the synthesis and optical characterization, e.g., of deuterated derivatives with less intrinsic absorption losses from molecular vibrations compared to the siloxane materials studied.

  12. FY 2005 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Bradley M.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong; Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions. During FY 2005, PNNL’s Infrared Photonics research team made measurable progress exploiting the extraordinary optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to develop miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. We investigated sulfur purification methods that will eventually lead to routine production of optical quality chalcogenide glass. We also discovered a glass degradation phenomenon and our investigation uncovered the underlying surface chemistry mechanism and developed mitigation actions. Key research was performed to understand and control the photomodification properties. This research was then used to demonstrate several essential infrared photonic devices, including LWIR single-mode waveguide devices and

  13. Silver/cyclic olefin copolymer hollow glass waveguides for infrared laser delivery.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Jeffrey E; Harrington, James A

    2015-11-10

    Metal/dielectric-coated hollow glass waveguides (HGWs) have been studied extensively for the efficient transmission of radiation over a broad spectral range. In this study, a low-absorption optical polymer, cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), is investigated as a dielectric material for HGWs designed for the delivery of various IR lasers. Using established silver (Ag) plating techniques and a newly optimized polymer-coating procedure, Ag/COC HGWs with low attenuation coefficients are fabricated for operation at the following three wavelengths: 808 nm, 1.064 μm, and 2.94 μm. The spectral responses of the HGW designs are used to develop a film thickness dependency of the COC layer formation based on the concentration of the solution used in the polymer deposition procedure. Further, the attenuation coefficients of the HGWs are measured using the cutback method at the three wavelengths as a function of the curvature of the waveguide. In order of increasing operation, the attenuation coefficients are measured to be 0.549, 0.095, and 0.298  dB/m for the HGWs in the straight configuration. These experimental values for the straight attenuation coefficients are compared to theoretical values calculated using a ray transfer matrix approach and are found to be in good agreement.

  14. Coherent ultra-violet to near-infrared generation in silica ridge waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon Oh, Dong; Yang, Ki Youl; Fredrick, Connor; Ycas, Gabriel; Diddams, Scott A.; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2017-01-01

    Short duration, intense pulses of light can experience dramatic spectral broadening when propagating through lengths of optical fibre. This continuum generation process is caused by a combination of nonlinear optical effects including the formation of dispersive waves. Optical analogues of Cherenkov radiation, these waves allow a pulse to radiate power into a distant spectral region. In this work, efficient and coherent dispersive wave generation of visible to ultraviolet light is demonstrated in silica waveguides on a silicon chip. Unlike fibre broadeners, the arrays provide a wide range of emission wavelength choices on a single, compact chip. This new capability is used to simplify offset frequency measurements of a mode-locked frequency comb. The arrays can also enable mode-locked lasers to attain unprecedented tunable spectral reach for spectroscopy, bioimaging, tomography and metrology.

  15. Mid-infrared generation and spectroscopy with a PPLN ridge waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denzer, W.; Hancock, G.; Hutchinson, A.; Munday, M.; Peverall, R.; Ritchie, G. A. D.

    2007-02-01

    We have utilised a periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal with a waveguide structure to produce up to 146 μW of mid-IR radiation around 2976 cm-1 by difference frequency mixing of 1064 nm pump radiation with 1558 nm signal radiation. A conversion efficiency of 45% W-1 is achieved within a crystal of length 50 mm, and temperature tuning curves are reported. The resultant idler radiation is exploited for high resolution absorption studies of both methane and methanethiol. The absorption cross-sections for methanethiol in the region of 2979 cm-1 are measured and found to be ˜10-19 cm2, the relevance of these results to breath and headspace analysis of clinical samples containing volatile sulphur compounds is briefly discussed.

  16. Coherent ultra-violet to near-infrared generation in silica ridge waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Yoon Oh, Dong; Yang, Ki Youl; Fredrick, Connor; Ycas, Gabriel; Diddams, Scott A.; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2017-01-01

    Short duration, intense pulses of light can experience dramatic spectral broadening when propagating through lengths of optical fibre. This continuum generation process is caused by a combination of nonlinear optical effects including the formation of dispersive waves. Optical analogues of Cherenkov radiation, these waves allow a pulse to radiate power into a distant spectral region. In this work, efficient and coherent dispersive wave generation of visible to ultraviolet light is demonstrated in silica waveguides on a silicon chip. Unlike fibre broadeners, the arrays provide a wide range of emission wavelength choices on a single, compact chip. This new capability is used to simplify offset frequency measurements of a mode-locked frequency comb. The arrays can also enable mode-locked lasers to attain unprecedented tunable spectral reach for spectroscopy, bioimaging, tomography and metrology. PMID:28067233

  17. Anomalous angular dispersion in lithium niobate one-dimensional waveguide array in the near-infrared wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apetrei, Alin Marian; Rambu, Alicia Petronela; Minot, Christophe; Moison, Jean-Marie; Belabas, Nadia; Tascu, Sorin

    2017-02-01

    Knowing the dispersion properties of a device is important in many applications (e.g., wavelength separation). For an isolated waveguide, besides the material dispersion, one must consider the waveguide influence as well, through waveguide dispersion and mode dispersion. For a waveguide array, one must consider the influence of evanescent coupling between adjacent waveguides as well. We investigate by the Finite Element Method the angular dispersion of a LiNbO3 waveguide array using two techniques. The first one assumes the Coupled Mode Theory in a 2-waveguide system. The other one uses the actual diffraction curve determined in a 7-waveguide system. In both approaches, we find that by decreasing the array period, one passes from normal angular dispersion by an achromatic point to anomalous angular dispersion. We then illustrate the wavelength separation by the waveguide array by doing Runge-Kutta light propagation simulations. As all the values of parameters are technologically feasible, this opens new possibilities for optical data processing, such as WDM and dispersion compensation.

  18. Engineering of phase matching for mid-infrared coherent anti-Stokes Raman wavelength conversion with orthogonally polarized pump and Stokes waves in silicon-on-sapphire waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaolu; Liu, Hongjun; Huang, Nan; Sun, Qibing; Li, Xuefeng

    2013-11-20

    The conversion efficiency of mid-infrared wavelength conversion based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering with TE-polarized pump and TM-polarized Stokes waves is theoretically investigated in silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) waveguides. The peak conversion efficiency of -10  dB is obtained when the linear propagation loss is 1  dB/cm at Δk=0; however, it is reduced to -13.6  dB when the linear propagation loss is 2  dB/cm. The phase matching for wavelength conversion with orthogonally polarized pump and Stokes waves can be realized by engineering the birefringence in SOS waveguides, because proper phase mismatch induced by birefringence together with material dispersion-induced phase mismatch can counteract the large phase mismatch induced by waveguide dispersion. Moreover, compared with the phase matching for identically polarized pump and Stokes waves, the phase matching for orthogonally polarized pump and Stokes waves can be realized in a SOS waveguide with much smaller cross section, which reduces the power requirement for optical systems.

  19. Efficient blue upconversion emission due to confined radiative energy transfer in Tm 3+-Nd 3+ co-doped Ta 2O 5 waveguides under infrared-laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoz, F.; Shepherd, D. P.; Wilkinson, J. S.; Hassan, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Intense blue upconversion emission at 480 nm has been obtained at room temperature in Tm 3+-Nd 3+ co-doped Ta 2O 5 channel waveguides fabricated on a Si substrate, when the sample is excited with an infrared laser at 793 nm. The upconversion mechanism is based on the radiative relaxation of the Nd 3+ ions ( 4F 3/2 → 4I 11/2) at about 1064 nm followed by the absorption of the emitted photons by Tm 3+ ions in the 3H 4 excited state. A coefficient of energy transfer rate as high as 3 × 10 -16 cm 3/s has been deduced using a rate equation analysis, which is the highest reported for Tm-Nd co-doped systems. The confinement of the 1064 nm emitted radiation in the waveguide structure is the main reason of the high energy transfer probability between Nd 3+ and Tm 3+ ions.

  20. Waveguide-integrated photonic crystal spectrometer with camera readout

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Fan; Shiue, Ren-Jye; Li, Luozhou; Nie, Jing; Harris, Nicholas C.; Chen, Edward H.; Schröder, Tim; Englund, Dirk; Wan, Noel; Pervez, Nadia; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate an infrared spectrometer based on waveguide-coupled nanocavity filters in a planar photonic crystal structure. The input light is coupled into the waveguide, from which spectral components are dropped into the cavities and radiated off-chip for detection on a commercial InGaAs camera. The spectrometer has a footprint of only 60 μm by 8 μm. The spectral resolution is about 1 nm in the operation bandwidth of 1522–1545 nm. By substituting the membrane material and structure parameters, this design can be easily extended into the visible regime and developed for a variety of highly efficient, miniature photonic applications.

  1. Visible to near-infrared supercontinuum generation in yttrium orthosilicate bulk crystal and ion implanted planar waveguide.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Bingxi; Ren, Xikui; Ruan, Shuangchen; Wang, Lei; Yan, Peiguang; Han, Huangpu; Wang, Meng; Yin, Jinde

    2016-08-16

    This paper reports on the supercontinuum generation in yttrium orthosilicate bulk crystal and 6-mm-long ion implanted planar waveguide. The waveguide is fabricated by 6 MeV oxygen ions implantation with fluence of 5 × 10(14) ions/cm(2) at room temperature. The yttrium orthosilicate bulk crystal and waveguide are pumped using a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser with a center wavelength of 800 nm. The generated broadest supercontinuum spans 720 nm (at -30 dB points) from 380 to 1100 nm in bulk crystal and 510 nm (at -30 dB points) from 490 to 1000 nm in ion implanted waveguide, respectively. Compared to the bulk crystal, the ion implanted waveguide requires almost three orders of magnitude lower pump power to achieve a similar level of broadening. The supercontinuum is generated in the normal dispersion regime and exhibits a relatively smooth spectral shape. Our research findings indicate that ion implantation is an efficient method to produce waveguide in yttrium orthosilicate crystal for low-threshold supercontinuum generation.

  2. Visible to near-infrared supercontinuum generation in yttrium orthosilicate bulk crystal and ion implanted planar waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Bingxi; Ren, Xikui; Ruan, Shuangchen; Wang, Lei; Yan, Peiguang; Han, Huangpu; Wang, Meng; Yin, Jinde

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports on the supercontinuum generation in yttrium orthosilicate bulk crystal and 6-mm-long ion implanted planar waveguide. The waveguide is fabricated by 6 MeV oxygen ions implantation with fluence of 5 × 1014 ions/cm2 at room temperature. The yttrium orthosilicate bulk crystal and waveguide are pumped using a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser with a center wavelength of 800 nm. The generated broadest supercontinuum spans 720 nm (at ‑30 dB points) from 380 to 1100 nm in bulk crystal and 510 nm (at ‑30 dB points) from 490 to 1000 nm in ion implanted waveguide, respectively. Compared to the bulk crystal, the ion implanted waveguide requires almost three orders of magnitude lower pump power to achieve a similar level of broadening. The supercontinuum is generated in the normal dispersion regime and exhibits a relatively smooth spectral shape. Our research findings indicate that ion implantation is an efficient method to produce waveguide in yttrium orthosilicate crystal for low-threshold supercontinuum generation.

  3. Visible to near-infrared supercontinuum generation in yttrium orthosilicate bulk crystal and ion implanted planar waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Bingxi; Ren, Xikui; Ruan, Shuangchen; Wang, Lei; Yan, Peiguang; Han, Huangpu; Wang, Meng; Yin, Jinde

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the supercontinuum generation in yttrium orthosilicate bulk crystal and 6-mm-long ion implanted planar waveguide. The waveguide is fabricated by 6 MeV oxygen ions implantation with fluence of 5 × 1014 ions/cm2 at room temperature. The yttrium orthosilicate bulk crystal and waveguide are pumped using a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser with a center wavelength of 800 nm. The generated broadest supercontinuum spans 720 nm (at −30 dB points) from 380 to 1100 nm in bulk crystal and 510 nm (at −30 dB points) from 490 to 1000 nm in ion implanted waveguide, respectively. Compared to the bulk crystal, the ion implanted waveguide requires almost three orders of magnitude lower pump power to achieve a similar level of broadening. The supercontinuum is generated in the normal dispersion regime and exhibits a relatively smooth spectral shape. Our research findings indicate that ion implantation is an efficient method to produce waveguide in yttrium orthosilicate crystal for low-threshold supercontinuum generation. PMID:27527662

  4. Mechanisms for optical loss in SOI waveguides for mid-infrared wavelengths around 2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, David E.; Knights, Andrew P.

    2017-02-01

    We report the measurement of optical loss in submicron silicon-on-insulator waveguides at a wavelength of 2.02 μm for the fundamental TE mode. Devices were fabricated at IMEC and at A⋆STAR's Institute of Microelectronics (IME) and thus these measurements are applicable to studies which require fabrication using standard foundry technology. Propagation loss for strip and rib waveguides of 3.3 ± 0.5 and 1.9 ± 0.2 dB cm-1 were measured. Waveguide bending loss in strip and rib waveguides was measured to be 0.36 and 0.68 dB per 90° bend for a radius of 3 μm. Doped waveguide loss in rib waveguides was measured for both n-type and p-type species at two doping densities for each doping type. Measured results from propagation, bending, and free-carrier loss were found to be in good agreement with analytical or numerical models. Loss due to lattice defects introduced by ion-implantation is found to be underestimated by a previously proposed empirical model. The thermal annealing of the lattice defects is consistent with removal of the silicon divacancy.

  5. Dispersion engineering of a As2Se3-based strip/slot hybrid waveguide for mid-infrared broadband wavelength conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zhanqiang; Zhang, Lingxuan; Wang, Leiran; Zhang, Wenfu

    2016-10-01

    An arsenic tri-selenide-based strip/slot hybrid waveguide with a single horizontal silica slot is proposed to achieve an extremely low and flat dispersion with three zero dispersion wavelengths. By adjusting the geometrical structural parameters of the hybrid waveguide, dispersion tailoring is fully obtained. The flat group velocity dispersion varying between ±0.08 ps2/(m) is obtained over a 1253 nm bandwidth. The parameters of effective area, nonlinear coefficient, and third-order dispersion are all investigated. Moreover, a compact on-chip all-optical wavelength converter is designed based on degenerate four-wave mixing in this waveguide. The dependencies of conversion efficiency and conversion bandwidth on the pump wavelength are discussed. The impact of pump power and signal power on the conversion efficiency is also investigated. The results show that a maximal conversion efficiency of -0.46 dB, and a 3-dB conversion bandwidth of 830 nm in the mid-infrared is achieved.

  6. Pharmaceutical Raw Material Identification Using Miniature Near-Infrared (MicroNIR) Spectroscopy and Supervised Pattern Recognition Using Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, Chang; Pederson, Christopher G.; Zou, Peng; Smith, Valton; von Gunten, Marc; O’Brien, Nada A.

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy as a rapid and non-destructive analytical technique offers great advantages for pharmaceutical raw material identification (RMID) to fulfill the quality and safety requirements in pharmaceutical industry. In this study, we demonstrated the use of portable miniature near-infrared (MicroNIR) spectrometers for NIR-based pharmaceutical RMID and solved two challenges in this area, model transferability and large-scale classification, with the aid of support vector machine (SVM) modeling. We used a set of 19 pharmaceutical compounds including various active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and excipients and six MicroNIR spectrometers to test model transferability. For the test of large-scale classification, we used another set of 253 pharmaceutical compounds comprised of both chemically and physically different APIs and excipients. We compared SVM with conventional chemometric modeling techniques, including soft independent modeling of class analogy, partial least squares discriminant analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and quadratic discriminant analysis. Support vector machine modeling using a linear kernel, especially when combined with a hierarchical scheme, exhibited excellent performance in both model transferability and large-scale classification. Hence, ultra-compact, portable and robust MicroNIR spectrometers coupled with SVM modeling can make on-site and in situ pharmaceutical RMID for large-volume applications highly achievable. PMID:27029624

  7. Towards an Imaging Mid-Infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewagama, T.; Aslam, S.; Jones, H.; Kostiuk, T.; Villanueva, G.; Roman, P.; Shaw, G. B.; Livengood, T.; Allen, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a concept for a compact, low-mass, low-power, mid-infrared (MIR; 5- 12 microns) imaging heterodyne spectrometer that incorporates fiber optic coupling, Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) local oscillator, photomixer array, and Radio Frequency Software Defined Readout (RFSDR) for spectral analysis. Planetary Decadal Surveys have highlighted the need for miniaturized, robust, low-mass, and minimal power remote sensing technologies for flight missions. The drive for miniaturization of remote sensing spectroscopy and radiometry techniques has been a continuing process. The advent of MIR fibers, and MEMS techniques for producing waveguides has proven to be an important recent advancement for miniaturization of infrared spectrometers. In conjunction with well-established photonics techniques, the miniaturization of spectrometers is transitioning from classic free space optical systems to waveguide/fiber-based structures for light transport and producing interference effects. By their very nature, these new devices are compact and lightweight. Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) and Quantum Well Infrared Photodiodes (QWIP) arrays for heterodyne applications are also being developed. Bulky electronics is another barrier that precluded the extension of heterodyne systems into imaging applications, and our RFSDR will address this aspect.

  8. A near-infrared acetylene detection system based on a 1.534 μm tunable diode laser and a miniature gas chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qixin; Zheng, Chuantao; Liu, Huifang; Li, Bin; Wang, Yiding; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-03-01

    A near-infrared (NIR) dual-channel differential acetylene (C2H2) detection system was experimentally demonstrated based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) technique. A distributed feedback (DFB) laser modulated by a self-developed driver around 1.534 μm is used as light source. A miniature gas chamber with 15 cm path length is adopted as absorption pool, and an orthogonal lock-in amplifier is developed to extract the second harmonic (2f) signal. Sufficient standard C2H2 samples with different concentrations were prepared, and detailed measurements were carried out to study the detection performance. A good linear relationship is observed between the amplitude of the 2f signal and C2H2 concentration within the range of 200-10,000 ppm, and the relative measurement error is less than 5% within the whole range. A long-term monitoring lasting for 20 h on a 1000 ppm C2H2 sample was carried out, and the maximum concentration fluctuation is less than 2%. Due to the capability of using long-distance and low-loss optical fiber, the gas-cell can be placed in the filed for remote monitoring, which enables the system to have good prospects in industrial field.

  9. 3D laser-written silica glass step-index high-contrast waveguides for the 3.5 μm mid-infrared range.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Javier; Ródenas, Airán; Fernandez, Toney; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Thomson, Robert R; Aguiló, Magdalena; Kar, Ajoy K; Solis, Javier; Díaz, Francesc

    2015-12-15

    We report on the direct laser fabrication of step-index waveguides in fused silica substrates for operation in the 3.5 μm mid-infrared wavelength range. We demonstrate core-cladding index contrasts of 0.7% at 3.39 μm and propagation losses of 1.3 (6.5) dB/cm at 3.39 (3.68) μm, close to the intrinsic losses of the glass. We also report on the existence of three different laser modified SiO₂ glass volumes, their different micro-Raman spectra, and their different temperature-dependent populations of color centers, tentatively clarifying the SiO₂ lattice changes that are related to the large index changes.

  10. Waveguide sensor for detection of HNS degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. Kathleen; Martin, Laura; Beechem, Thomas E.; Schmitt, Randal L.; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2009-08-01

    Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) is a secondary explosive widely used in a variety of commercial and military applications, due in part to its high heat resistivity. Degradation of HNS is known to occur through exposure to a variety of sources including heat, UV radiation, and certain chemical compounds, all of which may lead to reduced performance. Detecting the degradation of HNS within a device, however, has required destructive analyses of the entire device while probing the HNS in only an indirect fashion. Specifically, the common methods of investigating this degradation include wet chemical, surface area and performance testing of the devices incorporating HNS rather than a direct interrogation of the material itself. For example, chemical tests frequently utilized, such as volatility, conductivity, and contaminant trapping, provide information on contaminants present in the system rather than the chemical stability of the HNS. To instead probe the material directly, we have pursued the use of optical methods, in particular infrared (IR) spectroscopy, in order to assess changes within the HNS itself. In addition, by successfully implementing miniature silicon (Si) waveguides fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories to facilitate this spectroscopic approach, we have demonstrated that HNS degradation monitoring may take place in a non-destructive, in-situ fashion. Furthermore, as these waveguides may be manufactured in a variety of configurations, this direct, non-destructive, approach holds promise for incorporation into a variety of devices.

  11. Theoretical demonstration of Brillouin lasing effect in racetrack resonators based on germanium waveguides in the mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Troia, Benedetto; Soref, Richard A; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2016-01-15

    In this Letter, we present a theoretical investigation of integrated racetrack Brillouin lasers based on germanium waveguides that are buried in silicon nitride and operate at a wavelength of 4 μm. General design equations in a steady-state regime have been carried out to determine the threshold power and the emitted Stokes power as a function of the resonance mismatch and coupling factor. The pulling effect as induced by the Brillouin gain dispersion and the pushing effects originated by SPM and XPM effects have been accurately investigated to predict the lasing frequency.

  12. Changes induced in a ZnS:Cr-based electroluminescent waveguide structure by intrinsic near-infrared laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasenko, N. A. Oleksenko, P. F.; Mukhlyo, M. A.; Veligura, L. I.

    2013-08-15

    The causes of changes that occur in a thin-film electroluminescent metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal waveguide structure based on ZnS:Cr (Cr concentration of {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) upon lasing ({lambda} Almost-Equal-To 2.6 {mu}m) and that induce lasing cessation are studied. It is established that lasing ceases because of light-scattering inhomogeneities formed in the structure and, hence, optical losses enhance. The origin of the inhomogeneities and the causes of their formation are clarified by studying the surface topology and the crystal structure of constituent layers of the samples before and after lasing. The studies are performed by means of atomic force microscopy and X-ray radiography. It is shown that a substantial increase in the sizes of grains on the surface of the structure is the manifestation of changes induced in the ZnS:Cr film by recrystallization. Recrystallization is initiated by local heating by absorbed laser radiation in existing Cr clusters and quickened by a strong electric field (>1 MV cm{sup -1}). The changes observed in the ZnS:Cr film are as follows: the textured growth of ZnS crystallites, an increase in the content of Cr clusters, and the appearance of some CrS and a rather high ZnO content. Some ways for improving the stability of lasing in the ZnS:Cr-based waveguide structures are proposed.

  13. Quantum Frequency Conversion between Infrared and Ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rütz, Helge; Luo, Kai-Hong; Suche, Hubertus; Silberhorn, Christine

    2017-02-01

    We report on the implementation of quantum frequency conversion between infrared and ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths by using single-stage up-conversion in a periodically poled potassium-titanyl-phosphate waveguide. Because of the monolithic waveguide design, we manage to transfer a telecommunication-band input photon to the wavelength of the ionic dipole transition of Yb+ at 369.5 nm. The external (internal) conversion efficiency is around 5% (10%). The high-energy pump used in this converter introduces a spontaneous parametric down-conversion process, which is a cause for noise in the UV mode. Using this process, we show that the converter preserves nonclassical correlations in the up-conversion process, rendering this miniaturized interface a source for quantum states of light in the UV.

  14. Coherent octave-spanning mid-infrared supercontinuum generated in As2S3-silica double-nanospike waveguide pumped by femtosecond Cr:ZnS laser.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shangran; Tolstik, Nikolai; Travers, John C; Sorokin, Evgeni; Caillaud, Celine; Troles, Johann; Russell, Philip St J; Sorokina, Irina T

    2016-05-30

    A more than 1.5 octave-spanning mid-infrared supercontinuum (1.2 to 3.6 μm) is generated by pumping a As2S3-silica "double-nanospike" waveguide via a femtosecond Cr:ZnS laser at 2.35 μm. The combination of the optimized group velocity dispersion and extremely high nonlinearity provided by the As2S3-silica hybrid waveguide enables a ~100 pJ level pump pulse energy threshold for octave-spanning spectral broadening at a repetition rate of 90 MHz. Numerical simulations show that the generated supercontinuum is highly coherent over the entire spanning wavelength range. The results are important for realization of a high repetition rate octave-spanning frequency comb in the mid-infrared spectral region.

  15. Miniature snapshot multispectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neelam; Ashe, Philip R.; Tan, Songsheng

    2011-03-01

    We present a miniature snapshot multispectral imager based on using a monolithic filter array that operates in the short wavelength infrared spectral region and has a number of defense and commercial applications. The system is low-weight, portable with a miniature platform, and requires low power. The imager uses a 4×4 Fabry-Pérot filter array operating from 1487 to 1769 nm with a spectral bandpass ~10 nm. The design of the filters is based on using a shadow mask technique to fabricate an array of Fabry-Pérot etalons with two multilayer dielectric mirrors. The filter array is installed in a commercial handheld InGaAs camera, replacing the imaging lens with a custom designed 4×4 microlens assembly with telecentric imaging performance in each of the 16 subimaging channels. We imaged several indoor and outdoor scenes. The microlens assembly and filter design is quite flexible and can be tailored for any wavelength region from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared, and the spectral bandpass can also be customized to meet sensing requirements. In this paper we discuss the design and characterization of the filter array, the microlens optical assembly, and imager and present imaging results.

  16. On-chip plasmonic waveguide optical waveplate

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Linfei; Huo, Yijie; Zang, Kai; Paik, Seonghyun; Chen, Yusi; Harris, James S.; Zhou, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Polarization manipulation is essential in almost every photonic system ranging from telecommunications to bio-sensing to quantum information. This is traditionally achieved using bulk waveplates. With the developing trend of photonic systems towards integration and miniaturization, the need for an on-chip waveguide type waveplate becomes extremely urgent. However, this is very challenging using conventional dielectric waveguides, which usually require complex 3D geometries to alter the waveguide symmetry and are also difficult to create an arbitrary optical axis. Recently, a waveguide waveplate was realized using femtosecond laser writing, but the device length is in millimeter range. Here, for the first time we propose and experimentally demonstrate an ultracompact, on-chip waveplate using an asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguide to create an arbitrary optical axis. The device is only in several microns length and produced in a flexible integratable IC compatible format, thus opening up the potential for integration into a broad range of systems. PMID:26507563

  17. Comparative Variable Temperature Studies of Polyamide II with a Benchtop Fourier Transform and a Miniature Handheld Near-Infrared Spectrometer Using 2D-COS and PCMW-2D Analysis.

    PubMed

    Unger, Miriam; Pfeifer, Frank; Siesler, Heinz W

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this communication is to compare the performance of a miniaturized handheld near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer with a benchtop Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectrometer. Generally, NIR spectroscopy is an extremely powerful analytical tool to study hydrogen-bonding changes of amide functionalities in solid and liquid materials and therefore variable temperature NIR measurements of polyamide II (PAII) have been selected as a case study. The information content of the measurement data has been further enhanced by exploiting the potential of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and the perturbation correlation moving window two-dimensional (PCMW2D) evaluation technique. The data provide valuable insights not only into the changes of the hydrogen-bonding structure and the recrystallization of the hydrocarbon segments of the investigated PAII but also in their sequential order. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the 2D-COS and PCMW2D results derived from the spectra measured with the miniaturized NIR instrument are equivalent to the information extracted from the data obtained with the high-performance FT-NIR instrument.

  18. Green up-conversion and near-infrared luminescence of femtosecond-laser-written waveguides in Er3+, MgO co-doped nearly stoichiometric LiNbO3 crystal.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jinman; Hao, Xiaotao; Chen, Feng

    2016-10-31

    We report on the green up-conversion and near-infrared (NIR) emission in Er3+, MgO co-doped nearly stoichiometric LiNbO3 waveguides fabricated by femtosecond laser writing. The waveguides with so-called Type I geometry by laser writing support nearly single-mode propagation of light at NIR wavelength of 1.55 μm. In addition, it has been found that the guidance is only along the vertical (i.e., TM) polarization, which is due to the laser-induced positive changes of extraordinary index in the guiding core. The green up-conversion at 550 nm and 528 nm, corresponding to the transitions of 4S3/24I15/2, 2H11/24I15/2, as well as the NIR luminescence emission at C-band centered at 1550 nm under 4I13/24I15/2 transition have been realized in the waveguides, respectively. Our results have shown that the intensities of the guided-wave green up-conversion and NIR emissions are higher than those obtained from the bulk, which may be owing to the enhanced intracavity optical intensities of the waveguide with respect to the bulk.

  19. Low-loss 3D-laser-written mid-infrared LiNbO3 depressed-index cladding waveguides for both TE and TM polarizations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huu-Dat; Ródenas, Airán; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Martín, Guillermo; Martínez, Javier; Aguiló, Magdalena; Pujol, Maria Cinta; Díaz, Francesc

    2017-02-20

    We report mid-infrared LiNbO3 depressed-index microstructured cladding waveguides fabricated by three-dimensional laser writing showing low propagation losses (~1.5 dB/cm) at 3.68 µm wavelength for both the transverse electric and magnetic polarized modes, a feature previously unachieved due to the strong anisotropic properties of this type of laser microstructured waveguides and which is of fundamental importance for many photonic applications. Using a heuristic modeling-testing iteration design approach which takes into account cladding induced stress-optic index changes, the fabricated cladding microstructure provides low-loss single mode operation for the mid-IR for both orthogonal polarizations. The dependence of the localized refractive index changes within the cladding microstructure with post-fabrication thermal annealing processes was also investigated, revealing its complex dependence of the laser induced refractive index changes on laser fabrication conditions and thermal post-processing steps. The waveguide modes properties and their dependence on thermal post-processing were numerically modeled and fitted to the experimental values by systematically varying three fundamental parameters of this type of waveguides: depressed refractive index values at sub-micron laser-written tracks, track size changes, and piezo-optic induced refractive index changes.

  20. Metallic waveguide mirrors in polymer film waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S.; Giehl, A. R.; Renno, M.; Fouckhardt, H.

    2001-10-01

    A technology for the fabrication of metallic waveguide mirrors is developed. Plane and curved waveguide mirrors, the latter acting in the same way as cylindrical lenses, are realized in benzocyclobutene (BCB) film waveguides. The waveguide mirror structure is dry-etched into the BCB film waveguide. To enhance the reflectivity of the waveguide mirrors, the waveguide edge is metallized. The BCB film waveguide mirrors are characterized with respect to waveguide attenuation and mirror reflectivity. The waveguide attenuation of the processed BCB waveguide is 0.5 dB/cm. Ag-coated BCB waveguide mirrors show a reflectivity of 71%. The efficiency of total internal reflection (TIR, i.e. in the case without metallization) at the dry-etched waveguide edge is 74%. As an application of the BCB waveguide mirrors a hybrid integrated optical module for Fourier-optical transverse mode selection in broad area lasers (BAL) is proposed.

  1. Integrated Miniature Arrays of Optical Biomolecule Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute; Lin, Ying; Le, Thanh

    2009-01-01

    Integrated miniature planar arrays of optical sensors for detecting specific biochemicals in extremely small quantities have been proposed. An array of this type would have an area of about 1 cm2. Each element of the array would include an optical microresonator that would have a high value of the resonance quality factor (Q . 107). The surface of each microresonator would be derivatized to make it bind molecules of a species of interest, and such binding would introduce a measurable change in the optical properties of the microresonator. Because each microresonator could be derivatized for detection of a specific biochemical different from those of the other microresonators, it would be possible to detect multiple specific biochemicals by simultaneous or sequential interrogation of all the elements in the array. Moreover, the derivatization would make it unnecessary to prepare samples by chemical tagging. Such interrogation would be effected by means of a grid of row and column polymer-based optical waveguides that would be integral parts of a chip on which the array would be fabricated. The row and column polymer-based optical waveguides would intersect at the elements of the array (see figure). At each intersection, the row and column waveguides would be optically coupled to one of the microresonators. The polymer-based waveguides would be connected via optical fibers to external light sources and photodetectors. One set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the row waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the sources to the resonators; the other set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the column waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the microresonators to the photodetectors. Each microresonator could be addressed individually by row and column for measurement of its optical transmission. Optionally, the chip could be fabricated so that each microresonator would lie inside a microwell, into which a microscopic liquid sample could be dispensed.

  2. LOADED WAVEGUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Mullett, L.B.; Loach, B.G.; Adams, G.L.

    1958-06-24

    >Loaded waveguides are described for the propagation of electromagnetic waves with reduced phase velocities. A rectangular waveguide is dimensioned so as to cut-off the simple H/sub 01/ mode at the operating frequency. The waveguide is capacitance loaded, so as to reduce the phase velocity of the transmitted wave, by connecting an electrical conductor between directly opposite points in the major median plane on the narrower pair of waveguide walls. This conductor may take a corrugated shape or be an aperature member, the important factor being that the electrical length of the conductor is greater than one-half wavelength at the operating frequency. Prepared for the Second U.N. International ConferThe importance of nuclear standards is duscussed. A brief review of the international callaboration in this field is given. The proposal is made to let the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) coordinate the efforts from other groups. (W.D.M.)

  3. FY 2006 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2006-12-28

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniature spherical retroreflectors using the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to reduce both performance limiting spherical aberrations. The optimized optical performance will provide efficient signal retroreflection that enables a broad range of remote detection scenarios for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. Miniature spherical retroreflectors can be developed to aid in the detection of signatures of nuclear proliferation or other chemical vapor or radiation signatures. Miniature spherical retroreflectors are not only well suited to traditional LIDAR methods for chemical plume detection and identification, but could enable remote detection of difficult semi-volatile chemical materials or low level radiation sources.

  4. FY 2005 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Riley, Brian J.; Sliger, William A.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniature spherical retroreflectors using the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to reduce both performance limiting spherical and chromatic aberrations. The optimized optical performance will provide efficient signal retroreflection that enables a broad range of remote detection scenarios for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. Miniature spherical retroreflectors can be developed to aid in the detection of signatures of nuclear proliferation or other chemical vapor or radiation signatures. Miniature spherical retroreflectors are not only well suited to traditional bistatic LIDAR methods for chemical plume detection and identification, but could enable remote detection of difficult semi-volatile chemical materials or low level radiation sources.

  5. Flattened dispersion in silicon slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yue, Yang; Beausoleil, Raymond G; Willner, Alan E

    2010-09-13

    We propose a silicon strip/slot hybrid waveguide that produces flattened dispersion of 0 ± 16 ps/(nm∙km), over a 553-nm wavelength range, which is 20 times flatter than previous results. Different from previously reported slot waveguides, the strip/slot hybrid waveguide employs the mode transition from a strip mode to a slot mode to introduce unique waveguide dispersion. The flat dispersion profile is featured by three zero-dispersion wavelengths, which is obtained for the first time in on-chip silicon waveguides, to the best of our knowledge. The waveguide exhibits flattened dispersion from 1562-nm to 2115-nm wavelength, which is potentially useful for both telecom and mid-infrared applications.

  6. Advances in miniature spectrometer and sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Jouko; Rissanen, Anna; Saari, Heikki; Karioja, Pentti; Karppinen, Mikko; Aalto, Timo; Tukkiniemi, Kari

    2014-05-01

    Miniaturization and cost reduction of spectrometer and sensor technologies has great potential to open up new applications areas and business opportunities for analytical technology in hand held, mobile and on-line applications. Advances in microfabrication have resulted in high-performance MEMS and MOEMS devices for spectrometer applications. Many other enabling technologies are useful for miniature analytical solutions, such as silicon photonics, nanoimprint lithography (NIL), system-on-chip, system-on-package techniques for integration of electronics and photonics, 3D printing, powerful embedded computing platforms, networked solutions as well as advances in chemometrics modeling. This paper will summarize recent work on spectrometer and sensor miniaturization at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) tunable filter technology has been developed in two technical versions: Piezoactuated FPIs have been applied in miniature hyperspectral imaging needs in light weight UAV and nanosatellite applications, chemical imaging as well as medical applications. Microfabricated MOEMS FPIs have been developed as cost-effective sensor platforms for visible, NIR and IR applications. Further examples of sensor miniaturization will be discussed, including system-on-package sensor head for mid-IR gas analyzer, roll-to-roll printed Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technology as well as UV imprinted waveguide sensor for formaldehyde detection.

  7. Miniaturization of Chip-Scale Photonic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamek, Steve

    Chip-scale photonic circuits promise to alleviate some fundamental physical barriers encountered in many areas of the life sciences and information technologies. This work investigates routes to miniaturization of chip-scale optical devices. Two new techniques and devices based thereon are introduced for the first time. One technique makes use of integrated metallic mirrors to construct reflectors which are by an order of magnitude smaller than their counterparts. Another technique is based on folding of chip-scale devices to fit long structures into small area on a chip. Although both techniques are demonstrated on some specific examples, the developed toolkit is applicable to a wide range of chip-scale devices including modulators, filters, channel add-drop multiplexers, detectors, and others. The major part of this Thesis focuses on miniaturization of waveguide reflectors and the devices based thereon. Fitting long waveguide Bragg gratings into a small area on a chip is demonstrated based on curved waveguide Bragg gratings; theory and analytical model of such structures is developed. In the second part of the Thesis, integrated metallic mirrors are proposed as reflectors with properties complementary to Bragg gratings - low polarization sensitivity, high reflectivity for different transverse modes, and good manufacturability. The feasibility of the proposed ideas is tested in both simulations and experiments. The demonstrated devices including biochemical sensors, micro-resonators, and inline filters are promising for applications in the life sciences and information technologies.

  8. Miniaturized autonomous robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Hidenori; Fukuda, Toshio

    1998-01-01

    Many projects developing the miniaturized autonomous robot have been carried out in the whole world. This paper deals with our challenges developing a miniaturized autonomous robot. The miniaturized autonomous robot is defined as the miniaturized closed-loop system with micro processor, microactuators and microsensors. We have developed the micro autonomous robotic system (MARS) consisting of the microprocessor, microsensors, microactuators, communication units and batteries. The MARS controls itself by the downloaded program supplied through the IR communication system. In this paper, we demonstrate several performance of the MARS, and discuss the properties of the miniaturized autonomous robot.

  9. Portable open-path optical remote sensing (ORS) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) instrumentation miniaturization and software for point and click real-time analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemek, Peter G.; Plowman, Steven V.

    2010-04-01

    Advances in hardware have miniaturized the emissions spectrometer and associated optics, rendering them easily deployed in the field. Such systems are also suitable for vehicle mounting, and can provide high quality data and concentration information in minutes. Advances in software have accompanied this hardware evolution, enabling the development of portable point-and-click OP-FTIR systems that weigh less than 16 lbs. These systems are ideal for first-responders, military, law enforcement, forensics, and screening applications using optical remote sensing (ORS) methodologies. With canned methods and interchangeable detectors, the new generation of OP-FTIR technology is coupled to the latest forward reference-type model software to provide point-and-click technology. These software models have been established for some time. However, refined user-friendly models that use active, passive, and solar occultation methodologies now allow the user to quickly field-screen and quantify plumes, fence-lines, and combustion incident scenarios in high-temporal-resolution. Synthetic background generation is now redundant as the models use highly accurate instrument line shape (ILS) convolutions and several other parameters, in conjunction with radiative transfer model databases to model a single calibration spectrum to collected sample spectra. Data retrievals are performed directly on single beam spectra using non-linear classical least squares (NLCLS). Typically, the Hitran line database is used to generate the initial calibration spectrum contained within the software.

  10. Miniature propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John G.

    1992-07-01

    Miniature solenoid valves, check valves and a hydrazine gas generator typify the miniaturization used in the liquid propulsion system for the Army Light Weight Exo-Atmospheric Projectile (LEAP). The pressure control subsystem uses a solenoid valve weighing 24 grams to control flow of helium to pressurize the propellant tanks. The attitude control subsystem uses a gas generator weighing 71 grams to produce decomposed hydrazine as the gaseous propellant for miniature 1 lbf ACS thrusters weighing 5.4 grams. The successful use of these miniature components in development tests and a hover test of the LEAP is described.

  11. Mid-infrared spectroscopy for protein analysis: potential and challenges.

    PubMed

    López-Lorente, Ángela I; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy investigates the interaction of MIR photons with both organic and inorganic molecules via the excitation of vibrational and rotational modes, providing inherent molecular selectivity. In general, infrared (IR) spectroscopy is particularly sensitive to protein structure and structural changes via vibrational resonances originating from the polypeptide backbone or side chains; hence information on the secondary structure of proteins can be obtained in a label-free fashion. In this review, the challenges for IR spectroscopy for protein analysis are discussed as are the potential and limitations of different IR spectroscopic techniques enabling protein analysis. In particular, the amide I spectral range has been widely used to study protein secondary structure, conformational changes, protein aggregation, protein adsorption, and the formation of amyloid fibrils. In addition to representative examples of the potential of IR spectroscopy in various fields related to protein analysis, the potential of protein analysis taking advantage of miniaturized MIR systems, including waveguide-enhanced MIR sensors, is detailed.

  12. First fringes with an integrated-optics beam combiner at 10 μm. A new step towards instrument miniaturization for mid-infrared interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadie, L.; Martín, G.; Anheier, N. C.; Arezki, B.; Qiao, H. A.; Bernacki, B.; Kern, P.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Observations of milliarcsecond-resolution scales and high dynamic range hold a central place in the exploration of distant planetary systems in order to achieve, for instance, the spectroscopic characterization of exo-Earths or the detailed mapping of their protoplanetary disc birthplace. Multi-aperture infrared interferometry, either from the ground or from space, is a very powerful technique to tackle these goals. However, significant technical efforts still need to be undertaken to achieve a simplification of these instruments if we wish to recombine the light from a large number of telescopes. Integrated-optics concepts appear to be a suitable alternative to the current conventional designs, especially if their use can be extended to a higher number of astronomical bands. Aims: This article reports, for the first time to our knowledge, the experimental demonstration of the feasibility of an integrated-optics approach to mid-infrared beam combination for single-mode stellar interferometry. Methods: We fabricated a two-telescope beam combiner prototype integrated on a substrate of chalcogenide glass, a material transparent from ~1 μm to ~14 μm. We developed laboratory tools to characterize in the mid-infrared the modal properties and the interferometric capabilities of our device. Results: We obtain interferometric fringes at 10 μm and measure a mean contrast V = 0.981 ± 0.001 with high repeatability over one week and high stability over a time-period of ~5 h. We show experimentally - as well as on the basis of modeling considerations - that the component has a single-mode behavior at this wavelength, which is essential to achieve high-accuracy interferometry. From previous studies, the propagation losses are estimated to be 0.5 dB/cm for this type of component. We also discuss possible issues that may impact the interferometric contrast. Conclusions: The IO beam combiner performs well at the tested wavelength. We also anticipate the requirement of a

  13. Development of high-resolution arrayed waveguide grating spectrometers for astronomical applications: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatkine, Pradip; Veilleux, Sylvain; Hu, Yiwen; Zhu, Tiecheng; Meng, Yang; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Dagenais, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Astrophotonics is the next-generation approach that provides the means to miniaturize near-infrared (NIR) spectrometers for upcoming large telescopes and make them more robust and inexpensive. The target requirements for our spectrograph are: a resolving power of 3000, wide spectral range (J and H bands), free spectral range of about 30 nm, high on-chip throughput of about 80% (-1dB) and low crosstalk (high contrast ratio) between adjacent on-chip wavelength channels of less than 1% (-20 dB). A promising photonic technology to achieve these requirements is Arrayed Waveguide Gratings (AWGs). We have developed our first generation of AWG devices using a silica-on-silicon substrate with a very thin layer of Si3N4 in the core of our waveguides. The waveguide bending losses are minimized by optimizing the geometry of the waveguides. Our first generation of AWG devices are designed for H band have a resolving power of 1500 and free spectral range of 10 nm around a central wavelength of 1600 nm. The devices have a footprint of only 12 mm × 6 mm. They are broadband (1450-1650 nm), have a peak on-chip throughput of about 80% ( -1 dB) and contrast ratio of about 1.5% (-18 dB). These results confirm the robustness of our design, fabrication and simulation methods. Currently, the devices are designed for Transverse Electric (TE) polarization and all the results are for TE mode. We are developing separate J- and H-band AWGs with higher resolving power, higher throughput and lower crosstalk over a wider free spectral range to make them better suited for astronomical applications.

  14. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  15. Whispering-mode waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnit, N. A.

    Properties of a relatively new type of waveguide structure of potential use of confining infrared radiation to a small mode volume over long path lengths are reviewed. A single guiding surface with curvature radius rho and band radius R allows propagation of a near-grazing incidence whispering mode of transverse width approximately (lambda square root of rho R/pi) sup 1/2 and radial width approximately 1/2 (sq lambda R)/sup 1/3. For sufficiently large rho, the loss per revolution for TE mode propagation is approximately pi A/sub N/, where A/sub N/ is the normal-incidence reflection loss. Results on a number of prototype structures in general agreement with these considerations are described.

  16. Hollow glass waveguides: New variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Daniel Joseph

    This study is an effort to develop new variations on the infrared silver-silver iodide hollow glass waveguide (HGW) with application specific properties. Four variations are presented: a HGW with a long, gradual taper, a HGW with a rectangular cross-section, curved HGW tips and a new all-dielectric hollow waveguide based on photonic bandgap guidance principles. A hollow glass waveguide tapered over its entire length offers ease of coupling at the proximal end and excellent flexibility at the distal end. Waveguides tapered from 1000 to 500 mum and 700 to 500 mum over 1.5 m were fabricated in this study. Compared to similarly sized non-tapered waveguides, laser losses for the tapered guides were high but decreased when bent. This behavior is contrary to that of non-tapered guides and an iterative ray tracing model was also developed to explain the observed loss characteristics of tapered hollow waveguides. Hollow glass waveguides with round profiles do not maintain the polarization state of the delivered radiation to any appreciable degree. HGWs with large- and small-aspect ratio rectangular cross sections were developed and shown to preserve polarization up to 96%, even when bent. The large aspect ratio guide was able to effectively rotate the transmitted polarization when twisted along its axis. Curved distal tips for medical and dental laser applications were developed by removing the low-OH silica fiber from commercially available stainless steel dental tips, and inserting HGWs of various sizes. The optical performances and heating profiles of the various configurations indicate the tips are suitable for certain medical applications, but the minimum bending radius is limited by the mechanical properties of the glass substrate. A small radii bending loss study confirms that propagating modes periodically couple as the radius of curvature is reduced. Through the application of the photonic bandgap (PBG) guidance, hollow waveguides can be made entirely from

  17. Compact waveguide circular polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-08-16

    A multi-port waveguide is provided having a rectangular waveguide that includes a Y-shape structure with first top arm having a first rectangular waveguide port, a second top arm with second rectangular waveguide port, and a base arm with a third rectangular waveguide port for supporting a TE.sub.10 mode and a TE.sub.20 mode, where the end of the third rectangular waveguide port includes rounded edges that are parallel to a z-axis of the waveguide, a circular waveguide having a circular waveguide port for supporting a left hand and a right hand circular polarization TE.sub.11 mode and is coupled to a base arm broad wall, and a matching feature disposed on the base arm broad wall opposite of the circular waveguide for terminating the third rectangular waveguide port, where the first rectangular waveguide port, the second rectangular waveguide port and the circular waveguide port are capable of supporting 4-modes of operation.

  18. Enhancing Sensitivity of a Miniature Spectrometer Using a Real-Time Image Processing Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, Sabarish; Avrutsky, Ivan

    2016-05-01

    A real-time image processing algorithm is developed to enhance the sensitivity of a planar single-mode waveguide miniature spectrometer with integrated waveguide gratings. A novel approach of averaging along the arcs in a curved coordinate system is introduced which allows for collecting more light, thereby enhancing the sensitivity. The algorithm is tested using CdSeS/ZnS quantum dots drop casted on the surface of a single-mode waveguide. Measurements indicate that a monolayer of quantum dots is expected to produce guided mode attenuation approximately 11 times above the noise level.

  19. Multi-resolution waveguide image slicer for the PEPSI instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckert, Erik; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Woche, Manfred; Harnisch, Gerd; Hornaff, Marcel; Weber, Michael; Barnes, Stuart

    2016-07-01

    A waveguide image slicer with resolutions up to 270.000 (planned: 300.000) for the fiber fed PEPSI echelle spectrograph at the LBT and single waveguide thicknesses of down to 70 μm has been manufactured and tested. The waveguides were macroscopically prepared, stacked up to an order of seven and thinned back to square stack cross sections. A high filling ratio was achieved by realizing homogenous adhesive gaps of 3.6 μm, using index matching adhesives for TIR within the waveguides. The image slicer stacks are used in immersion mode and are miniaturized to enable implementation in a set of 2x8. The overall efficiency is between 92 % and 96 %.

  20. Waveguide image-slicers for ultrahigh resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckert, Erik; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Woche, Manfred; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, Andreas; Andersen, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Waveguide image-slicer prototypes with resolutions up to 310.000 for the fiber fed PEPSI echelle spectrograph at the LBT and single waveguide thicknesses of down to 30 μm have been manufactured. The waveguides were macroscopically prepared, stacked up to an order of 7 and thinned back to square stack cross sections. A high filling ratio was achieved by realizing homogenous adhesive gaps of 4.6 μm, using index matching adhesives for TIR within the waveguides. The image-slicer stacks can be used in immersion mode and are miniaturized to be implemented in a set of four, measurements indicate an overall efficiency of above 80% for them.

  1. Characterization of bending loss in hollow flexible terahertz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Doradla, Pallavi; Joseph, Cecil S; Kumar, Jayant; Giles, Robert H

    2012-08-13

    Attenuation characteristics of hollow, flexible, metal and metal/dielectric coated polycarbonate waveguides were investigated using an optically pumped far infrared (FIR) laser at 215 µm. The bending loss of silver coated polycarbonate waveguides were measured as a function of various bending angles, bending radii, and bore diameters. Minimal propagation losses of 1.77, 0.96 dB/m were achieved by coupling the lowest loss TE11 mode into the silver or gold coated waveguide, and HE11 mode into the silver/polystyrene coated waveguides respectively. The maximal bending loss was found to be less than 1 dB/m for waveguides of 2 to 4.1 mm bore diameters, with a 6.4 cm bend radius, and up to 150° bending angle. The investigation shows the preservation of single laser mode in smaller bore waveguides even at greater bending angles.

  2. Nonlinear optical localization in embedded chalcogenide waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mingshan; Huang, Sheng; Wang, Qingqing; Chen, Kevin P.; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-05-15

    We report the nonlinear optical localization in an embedded waveguide array fabricated in chalcogenide glass. The array, which consists of seven waveguides with circularly symmetric cross sections, is realized by ultrafast laser writing. Light propagation in the chalcogenide waveguide array is studied with near infrared laser pulses centered at 1040 nm. The peak intensity required for nonlinear localization for the 1-cm long waveguide array was 35.1 GW/cm{sup 2}, using 10-nJ pulses with 300-fs pulse width, which is 70 times lower than that reported in fused silica waveguide arrays and with over 7 times shorter interaction distance. Results reported in this paper demonstrated that ultrafast laser writing is a viable tool to produce 3D all-optical switching waveguide circuits in chalcogenide glass.

  3. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  4. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W.

    1981-04-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  5. Dielectric THz waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Alexandre

    In this thesis we have explored a wide variety of dielectric waveguides that rely on many different waveguiding mechanisms to guide THz (far-infrared) radiation. We have explored both theoretically and experimentally a large number of waveguide designs with the aim of reducing propagation and bending losses. The different waveguides can be classified into two fundamentally different strategies for reducing the propagation loss: small-core single-mode evanescent-field fibers or large hollow-core multi-mode tubes. Our focus was first set on exploring the small-core evanescent-field fiber strategy for reducing propagation losses. Following initial theoretical work in our group, much effort was spent on the fabrication and measurement of evanescent porous subwavelength diameter plastic fibers, in an attempt to further reduce the propagation losses. The fabrication of such fibers is a challenge and many novel techniques were devised to enable fiber drawing without hole collapse. The first method sealed the holes of an assembly of polymer tubes and lead to fibers of relatively low porosity (˜25% air within the core) due to reduction in hole size during fiber drawing. The second method was a novel sacrificial polymer technique whereby drawing a completely solid fiber prevented any hole collapse and the subsequent dissolution of the sacrificial polymer revealed the holes in the fiber. The third method was a combination of preform casting using glass molds and drawing with pressurized air within the holes. This led to fibers of record porosity (86% air). The measurement of these porous fibers began with a collaboration with a group from the university of Sherbrooke. At the time, the only available detector was a frequency integrating liquid-helium-cooled bolometer (powermeter). A novel directional coupler method for measuring the losses of subwavelength fibers was developed whereby an evanescent coupler is formed by bringing a probe fiber in proximity to the sample fiber

  6. Evanescent field sensors and the implementation of waveguiding nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Boerner, Sandra; Orghici, Rozalia; Waldvogel, Siegfried R.; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    Conventional fiber optic evanescent-field gas sensors are based on a high number of total reflections while the gas is passing the active bare core fiber and of course a suitable laser light source. The use of miniaturized laser sources for sensitive detection of CO2 in gaseous and water-dissolved phase for environmental monitoring are studied for signal enhancing purposes. Additionally, the fiber optic sensor, consisting of a coiled bare multimode fiber core, was sensitized by an active polymer coating for the detection of explosive TNT. The implementation of ZnO waveguiding nanowires is discussed for surface and sensitivity enhancing coating of waveguiding elements, considering computational and experimental results.

  7. Offset Waveguide Transmission Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin

    1997-01-01

    This report describes measurements to determine transmission losses in S-band (2.60-3.95 GHz) waveguide sections due to misalignment of the sections relative to each other. The experiments were performed in support of the Hydrostar program to determine the feasibility of using deployable waveguide sections in a large space radiometer. The waveguide sections would possibly be hinged and folded for launch, then deployed in space to form long sections of waveguide. Since very low losses are required for radiometer applications, the effects of potential misalignment after deployment of the waveguide sections may be significant. These measurements were performed in the Electromagnetic Properties Measurement Laboratory in the Electromagnetics Research Branch.

  8. Highly dispersive slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yue, Yang; Xiao-Li, Yinying; Beausoleil, Raymond G; Willner, Alan E

    2009-04-27

    We propose a slot-waveguide with high dispersion, in which a slot waveguide is coupled to a strip waveguide. A negative dispersion of up to -181520 ps/nm/km is obtained due to a strong interaction of the slot and strip modes. A flat and large dispersion is achievable by cascading the dispersive slot-waveguides with varied waveguide thickness or width for dispersion compensation and signal processing applications. We show - 31300 ps/nm/km dispersion over 147-nm bandwidth with <1% variance.

  9. Polarization rotation and coupling between silicon waveguide and hybrid plasmonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangsik; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    We present a polarization rotation and coupling scheme that rotates a TE0 mode in a silicon waveguide and simultaneously couples the rotated mode to a hybrid plasmonic (HP0) waveguide mode. Such a polarization rotation can be realized with a partially etched asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguide consisting of a silicon strip waveguide, a thin oxide spacer, and a metal cap made from copper, gold, silver or aluminum. Two implementations, one with and one without the tapering of the metal cap are presented, and different taper shapes (linear and exponential) are also analyzed. The devices have large 3 dB conversion bandwidths (over 200 nm at near infrared) and short length (< 5 μm), and achieve a maximum coupling factor of ∼ 78% with a linearly tapered silver metal cap. PMID:25969038

  10. Hybrid grapheme plasmonic waveguide modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansell, D.; Thackray, B. D.; Aznakayeva, D. E.; Thomas, P.; Auton, G. H.; Marshall, O. P.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Radko, I. P.; Han, Z.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    The unique optical and electronic properties of graphene allow one to realize active optical devices. While several types of graphene-based photonic modulators have already been demonstrated, the potential of combining the versatility of graphene with sub-wavelength field confinement of plasmonic/metallic structures is not fully realized. Here we report fabrication and study of hybrid graphene-plasmonic modulators. We consider several types of modulators and identify the most promising one for light modulation at telecom and near-infrared. Our proof-of-concept results pave the way towards on-chip realization of efficient graphene-based active plasmonic waveguide devices for optical communications.

  11. Chemistry "en Miniature"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesky, Herbert W.

    1997-04-01

    By using the video camera projector system we are improving the techniques which are employed in various schools. This is an important reason for employing "Chemistry en Miniature", as this method provides a new means of demonstrating chemical experiments in a lecture hall.

  12. Electro-optic switching based on a waveguide-ring resonator made of dielectric-loaded graphene plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhe; Zhu, Zhi Hong; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Jian Fa; Cai Guo, Chu; Liu, Ken; Yuan, Xiao Dong; Qiao Qin, Shi

    2016-09-01

    We numerically demonstrate that electro-optic switching in the mid-infrared range can be realized using a waveguide-ring resonator made of dielectric-loaded graphene plasmon waveguides (DLGPWs). The numerical results are in good agreement with the results of physical analysis. The switching mechanism is based on dynamic modification of the resonant wavelengths of the ring resonator, achieved by varying the Fermi energy of a graphene sheet. The results reveal that a switching ratio of ∼24 dB can be achieved with only a 0.01 eV change in the Fermi energy. Such electrically controlled switching operation may find use in actively tunable integrated photonic circuits.

  13. Interconnect Between a Waveguide and a Dielectric Waveguide Comprising an Impedance Matched Dielectric Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decrossas, Emmanuel (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Chahat, Nacer (Inventor); Tang, Adrian J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A lens for interconnecting a metallic waveguide with a dielectric waveguide is provided. The lens may be coupled a metallic waveguide and a dielectric waveguide, and minimize a signal loss between the metallic waveguide and the dielectric waveguide.

  14. Silicon nitride grating waveguide based directional coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jijun; Li, Anyuan; Akimoto, Ryoichi; Zeng, Heping

    2016-10-01

    Silicon nitride is a promising wave-guiding material for integrated photonics applications with a wide transparency bandwidth from visible to mid-infrared, with a superior performance in fiber-coupling and propagation losses, more tolerant fabrication process to the structure parameters variation and compatible with the CMOS technology. Directional coupler (DC) is very popular for realizing beam splitter because of its structural simplicity and no excess loss intrinsically. Here, a conventional silicon nitride directional coupler, three-dimensional vertical coupler, and grating waveguide assisted coupler are designed and fabricated, and compared with each other. A grating waveguide based coupler with a period of 300 nm and coupling length of 26 um, can realize a wideband 3-dB splitter for the wavelength in the range from 1540 to 1620 nm, for a transverse electric (TE) polarized wave. With further optimization of the grating period and duty cycle, the device performance can be further improved with a wider bandwidth.

  15. Non linear effects in LiNbO3 Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, M. D.; Papuchon, M.

    1985-09-01

    Waveguides and waveguide resonators are very useful devices for nonlinear interactions. Indeed, they permit having a very high density of energy and quite long interaction lengths, and lead to devices with high conversion efficiency for low pumping power [1, 2] . In the visible and the near infrared, the most convenient material for nonlinear effects is Lithium Niobate in which we are able to realize good waveguides by Titanium Indiffusion (TI). In this paper we shall discuss the new waveguide fabrication process that we developped in Nice : Titanium Indiffusion Proton Exchange (TIPE), and we show by the example of Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) the new possibilities of these waveguides which enables us to design very interesting parametric devices.

  16. Miniaturized Environmental Monitoring Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Freidhoff

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the Mass Spectrograph on a Chip (MSOC) program is the development of a miniature, multi-species gas sensor fabricated using silicon micromachining technology which will be orders of magnitude smaller and lower power consumption than a conventional mass spectrometer. The sensing and discrimination of this gas sensor are based on an ionic mass spectrograph, using magnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The fields cause a spatial separation of the ions according to their respective mass-to-charge ratio. The fabrication of this device involves the combination of microelectronics with micromechanically built sensors and, ultimately, vacuum pumps. The prototype of a chemical sensor would revolutionize the method of performing environmental monitoring for both commercial and government applications. The portable unit decided upon was the miniaturized gas chromatograph with a mass spectrometer detector, referred to as a GC/MS in the analytical marketplace.

  17. Miniaturization in Biocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    The use of biocatalysts for the production of both consumer goods and building blocks for chemical synthesis is consistently gaining relevance. A significant contribution for recent advances towards further implementation of enzymes and whole cells is related to the developments in miniature reactor technology and insights into flow behavior. Due to the high level of parallelization and reduced requirements of chemicals, intensive screening of biocatalysts and process variables has become more feasible and reproducibility of the bioconversion processes has been substantially improved. The present work aims to provide an overview of the applications of miniaturized reactors in bioconversion processes, considering multi-well plates and microfluidic devices, update information on the engineering characterization of the hardware used, and present perspective developments in this area of research. PMID:20479988

  18. Waveguide disturbance detection method

    DOEpatents

    Korneev, Valeri A.; Nihei, Kurt T.; Myer, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detection of a disturbance in a waveguide comprising transmitting a wavefield having symmetric and antisymmetric components from a horizontally and/or vertically polarized source and/or pressure source disposed symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal central axis of the waveguide at one end of the waveguide, recording the horizontal and/or vertical component or a pressure of the wavefield with a vertical array of receivers disposed at the opposite end of the waveguide, separating the wavenumber transform of the wavefield into the symmetric and antisymmetric components, integrating the symmetric and antisymmetric components over a broad frequency range, and comparing the magnitude of the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components to an expected magnitude for the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components for a waveguide of uniform thickness and properties thereby determining whether or not a disturbance is present inside the waveguide.

  19. Miniaturized photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Robinson, Alex; Nielson, Gregory N.; Resnick, Paul J.

    2016-08-09

    A low-power miniaturized photoacoustic sensor uses an optical microphone made by semiconductor fabrication techniques, and optionally allows for all-optical communication to and from the sensor. This allows integration of the photoacoustic sensor into systems with special requirements, such as those that would be reactive in an electrical discharge condition. The photoacoustic sensor can also be operated in various other modes with wide application flexibility.

  20. Miniature ceramic fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.; Zuppero, Anthony C.

    1997-06-24

    A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

  1. Miniature Airflow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kershner, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    Miniature flow-angle and airspeed sensor quickly mounted on light aircraft wing with two-sided tape since conventional sensors are restricted to large aircraft. Sensor operates as free-trailing wind vane selfalineing in airstream through two independent axes. Vane attached to wing surface through hollow mounting boom that fits on mounting plate attached to wing with two-sided neoprene-foam tape. Method shown strong enough for loads of low-speed flight.

  2. Miniaturizing RFID for magnamosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Chen, Shijie; Kish, Shad; Loh, Lokkee; Zhang, Junmin; Zhang, Xiaorong; Kwiat, Dillon; Harrison, Michael; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Anastomosis is a common surgical procedure using staples or sutures in an open or laparoscopic surgery. A more effective and much less invasive alternative is to apply the mechanical pressure on the tissue over a few days [1]. Since the pressure is produced by the attractive force between two permanent magnets, the procedure is called magnamosis[1]. To ensure the two magnets are perfectly aligned during the surgery, a miniaturized batteryless Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) tag is developed to wirelessly telemeter the status of a pressure sensitive mechanical switch. Using the multi-layer circular spiral coil design, the diameter of the RFID tag is shrunk to 10, 15, 19 and 27 mm to support the magnamosis for children as well as adults. With the impedance matching network, the operating distance of these four RFID tags are longer than 10 cm in a 20 × 22 cm(2) area, even when the tag's normal direction is 45° off the antenna's normal direction. Measurement results also indicate that there is no noticeable degradation on the operating distance when the tag is immersed in saline or placed next to the rare-earth magnet. The miniaturized RFID tag presented in this paper is able to support the magnamosis and other medical applications that require the miniaturized RFID tag.

  3. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  4. Enhanced Transmissions Through Three-dimensional Cascade Sharp Waveguide Bends Using C-slit Diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui; Hu, Bowei; Zhang, Aofang; Gao, Dongxing; Wang, Hui; Shi, Ayuan; Lei, Zhenya; Yang, Pei

    2017-03-01

    Transmission properties through sharp rectangular waveguide bends are investigated to determine the cut-off bending angles of the wave propagation. We show that a simple metallic diaphragm at the bending corner with properly devised sub-wavelength defect apertures of C-slits would be readily to turn on the transmissions with scarce reflections of the propagating modes, while preserving the integrity of the transmitting fields soon after the bends. In particularly, our design also demonstrates the capability of eliminating all the unwanted cavity resonant transmissions that exist in the three-dimensional cascade sharp waveguide bends, and solely let the desired signals travel along the whole passage of the waveguide. The present approach, using C-slit diaphragms to support the sharp bending behaviors of the guided waves with greatly enhanced transmissions, would be especially effective in constructing novel waveguides and pave the way for the development of more compact and miniaturized electromagnetic systems that exploit these waveguide bends.

  5. Enhanced Transmissions Through Three-dimensional Cascade Sharp Waveguide Bends Using C-slit Diaphragms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Hu, Bowei; Zhang, Aofang; Gao, Dongxing; Wang, Hui; Shi, Ayuan; Lei, Zhenya; Yang, Pei

    2017-03-21

    Transmission properties through sharp rectangular waveguide bends are investigated to determine the cut-off bending angles of the wave propagation. We show that a simple metallic diaphragm at the bending corner with properly devised sub-wavelength defect apertures of C-slits would be readily to turn on the transmissions with scarce reflections of the propagating modes, while preserving the integrity of the transmitting fields soon after the bends. In particularly, our design also demonstrates the capability of eliminating all the unwanted cavity resonant transmissions that exist in the three-dimensional cascade sharp waveguide bends, and solely let the desired signals travel along the whole passage of the waveguide. The present approach, using C-slit diaphragms to support the sharp bending behaviors of the guided waves with greatly enhanced transmissions, would be especially effective in constructing novel waveguides and pave the way for the development of more compact and miniaturized electromagnetic systems that exploit these waveguide bends.

  6. Enhanced Transmissions Through Three-dimensional Cascade Sharp Waveguide Bends Using C-slit Diaphragms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Hu, Bowei; Zhang, Aofang; Gao, Dongxing; Wang, Hui; Shi, Ayuan; Lei, Zhenya; Yang, Pei

    2017-01-01

    Transmission properties through sharp rectangular waveguide bends are investigated to determine the cut-off bending angles of the wave propagation. We show that a simple metallic diaphragm at the bending corner with properly devised sub-wavelength defect apertures of C-slits would be readily to turn on the transmissions with scarce reflections of the propagating modes, while preserving the integrity of the transmitting fields soon after the bends. In particularly, our design also demonstrates the capability of eliminating all the unwanted cavity resonant transmissions that exist in the three-dimensional cascade sharp waveguide bends, and solely let the desired signals travel along the whole passage of the waveguide. The present approach, using C-slit diaphragms to support the sharp bending behaviors of the guided waves with greatly enhanced transmissions, would be especially effective in constructing novel waveguides and pave the way for the development of more compact and miniaturized electromagnetic systems that exploit these waveguide bends. PMID:28322344

  7. Hollow waveguide delivery systems for laser technological application [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínková, Helena; Němec, Michal; Šulc, Jan; Černý, Pavel; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    Hollow waveguides with internal coatings can be an attractive alternative to solid-core fibers. This paper reviews the results with the cyclic olefin polymer coated metal hollow glass waveguides which can be used as a delivery instrument in a wide band of wavelengths-from the visible up to the infrared. These waveguides have been shown to be capable of transmissions up to the 1.36 GW of Nd:YAG peak power and 5.8 W or 5.1 W of alexandrite or Er:YAG mean power, respectively. They can be utilized in many branches of medical or industrial applications.

  8. Waveguide arrangements based on adiabatic elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Suchowski, Haim; Mrejen, Michael; Wu, Chihhui; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-09-13

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to nanophotonics. In one aspect, an arrangement of waveguides includes a substrate and three waveguides. Each of the three waveguides may be a linear waveguide. A second waveguide is positioned between a first waveguide and a third waveguide. The dimensions and positions of the first, the second, and the third waveguides are specified to substantially eliminate coupling between the first waveguide and the third waveguide over a distance of about 1 millimeter to 2 millimeters along lengths of the first waveguide, the second waveguide, and the third waveguide.

  9. Birefringent corrugated waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Moeller, Charles P.

    1990-01-01

    A corrugated waveguide having a circular bore and noncircularly symmetric corrugations, and preferably elliptical corrugations, provides birefringence for rotation of polarization in the HE.sub.11 mode. The corrugated waveguide may be fabricated by cutting circular grooves on a lathe in a cylindrical tube or rod of aluminum of a diameter suitable for the bore of the waveguide, and then cutting an approximation to ellipses for the corrugations using a cutting radius R.sub.0 from the bore axis that is greater than the bore radius, and then making two circular cuts using a radius R.sub.1 less than R.sub.0 at centers +b and -b from the axis of the waveguide bore. Alternatively, stock for the mandrel may be formed with an elliptical transverse cross section, and then only the circular grooves need be cut on a lathe, leaving elliptical corrugations between the grooves. In either case, the mandrel is first electroplated and then dissolved leaving a corrugated waveguide with noncircularly symmetric corrugations. A transition waveguide is used that gradually varies from circular to elliptical corrugations to couple a circularly corrugated waveguide to an elliptically corrugated waveguide.

  10. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Second-harmonic generation in single-mode integrated waveguides based on mode-shape modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ashutosh; Chiles, Jeff; Khan, Saeed; Toroghi, Seyfollah; Malinowski, Marcin; Camacho-González, Guillermo Fernando; Fathpour, Sasan

    2017-03-01

    Second-harmonic generation is demonstrated using grating-assisted quasi-phase matching, based on waveguide-width modulation or mode-shape modulation. Applicable to any thin-film integrated second-order nonlinear waveguide, the technique is demonstrated in compact lithium niobate ridge waveguides. Fabricated devices are characterized with pulsed-pumping in the near-infrared, showing second-harmonic generation at a signal wavelength of 784 nm and propagation loss of 1 dB/cm.

  12. Mars Miniature Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Hayati, Samad; Lavery, David; McBrid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    For robotic Mars missions, all the science information is gathered through on-board miniature instruments that have been developed through many years of R&D. Compared to laboratory counterparts, the rover instruments require miniaturization, such as low mass (1-2 kg), low power (> 10 W) and compact (1-2 liter), yet with comparable sensitivity. Since early 1990's, NASA recognized the need for the miniature instruments and launched several instrument R&D programs, e.g., PIDDP (Planetary Instrument Definition and Development). However, until 1998, most of the instrument R&D programs supported only up to a breadboard level (TRL 3, 4) and there is a need to carry such instruments to flight qualifiable status (TU 5, 6) to respond to flight AOs (Announcement of Opportunity). Most of flight AOs have only limited time and financial resources, and can not afford such instrument development processes. To bridge the gap between instrument R&D programs and the flight instrument needs, NASA's Mars Technology Program (MTP) created advanced instrumentation program, Mars Instrument Development Project (MIDP). MIDP candidate instruments are selected through NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process [l]. For example, MIDP 161998-2000) selected and developed 10 instruments, MIDP II (2003-2005) 16 instruments, and MIDP III (2004-2006) II instruments.Working with PIs, JPL has been managing the MIDP tasks since September 1998. All the instruments being developed under MIDP have been selected through a highly competitive NRA process, and employ state-of-the-art technology. So far, four MIDP funded instruments have been selected by two Mars missions (these instruments have further been discussed in this paper).

  13. Miniature Laser Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert; Brown, Andy

    2011-01-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a miniature laser magnetometer (MLM) that will measure the scalar magnitude and vector components of near-Earth magnetic fields. The MLM incorporates a number of technical innovations to achieve high-accuracy and high-resolution performance while significantly reducing the size of the laser-pumped helium magnetometer for use on small satellites and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). and electronics sections that has the capability of measuring both the scalar magnetic field magnitude and the vector magnetic field components. Further more, the high-accuracy scalar measurements are used to calibrate and correct the vector component measurements in order to achieve superior vector accuracy and stability. The correction algorithm applied to the vector components for calibration and the same cell for vector and scalar measurements are major innovations. The separate sensor and electronics section of the MLM instrument allow the sensor to be installed on a boom or otherwise located away from electronics and other noisy magnetic components. The MLM s miniaturization will be accomplished through the use of advanced miniaturized components and packaging methods for the MLM sensor and electronics. The MLM conceptual design includes three key innovations. The first is a new non-magnetic laser package that will allow the placement of the laser pump source near the helium cell sensing elements. The second innovation is the design of compact, nested, triaxial Braunbek coils used in the vector measurements that reduce the coil size by a factor of two compared to existing Helmholtz coils with similar field-generation performance. The third innovation is a compact sensor design that reduces the sensor volume by a factor of eight compared to MLM s predecessor.

  14. Miniature electrical connector

    DOEpatents

    Casper, Robert F.

    1976-01-01

    A miniature coaxial cable electrical connector includes an annular compressible gasket in a receptacle member, the gasket having a generally triangular cross section resiliently engaging and encircling a conically tapered outer surface of a plug member to create an elongated current leakage path at their interface; means for preventing rotation of the plug relative to the receptacle; a metal sleeve forming a portion of the receptacle and encircling the plug member when interconnected; and a split ring in the plug having outwardly and rearwardly projecting fingers spaced from and encircling a portion of a coaxial cable and engageable with the metal sleeve to interlock the receptacle and plug.

  15. Miniaturized optical wavelength sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Helen Ling-Ning

    Recently semiconductor processing technology has been applied to the miniaturization of optical wavelength sensors. Compact sensors enable new applications such as integrated diode-laser wavelength monitors and frequency lockers, portable chemical and biological detection, and portable and adaptive hyperspectral imaging arrays. Small sensing systems have trade-offs between resolution, operating range, throughput, multiplexing and complexity. We have developed a new wavelength sensing architecture that balances these parameters for applications involving hyperspectral imaging spectrometer arrays. In this thesis we discuss and demonstrate two new wavelength-sensing architectures whose single-pixel designs can easily be extended into spectrometer arrays. The first class of devices is based on sampling a standing wave. These devices are based on measuring the wavelength-dependent period of optical standing waves formed by the interference of forward and reflected waves at a mirror. We fabricated two different devices based on this principle. The first device is a wavelength monitor, which measures the wavelength and power of a monochromatic source. The second device is a spectrometer that can also act as a selective spectral coherence sensor. The spectrometer contains a large displacement piston-motion MEMS mirror and a thin GaAs photodiode flip-chip bonded to a quartz substrate. The performance of this spectrometer is similar to that of a Michelson in resolution, operating range, throughput and multiplexing but with the added advantages of fewer components and one-dimensional architecture. The second class of devices is based on the Talbot self-imaging effect. The Talbot effect occurs when a periodic object is illuminated with a spatially coherent wave. Periodically spaced self-images are formed behind the object. The spacing of the self-images is proportional to wavelength of the incident light. We discuss and demonstrate how this effect can be used for spectroscopy

  16. Miniature cold gas thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzibziak, R. J., Sr.

    1992-07-01

    Cold gas thrusters provide a safe, inexpensive, lightweight and reliable means of propulsive control for small satellites, projectiles and maneuvering control systems. Moog Inc. has designed and developed a family of miniature cold gas thrusters for use on Strategic Defense Iniative flight simulation experiments, sounding rockets, small satellite applications, astronaut control systems, and close proximity maneuvering systems for Space System. Construction features such as coil assembly, core assembly, armature assembly, external housing and valve body are discussed. The design approach, performance characteristics and functional description of cold gas thrusters designed for various applications are presented.

  17. Miniaturized radiation chirper

    DOEpatents

    Umbarger, C. John; Wolf, Michael A.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

  18. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  19. Zero-mode waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Levene, Michael J.; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen W.; Craighead, Harold G.; Webb, Watt W.

    2007-02-20

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode waveguide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  20. InP-based 1.55 μm waveguide-integrated photodetectors for high-speed applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beling, A.

    2006-02-01

    The paper reviews key characteristics of ultra fast evanescently coupled waveguide-integrated p-i-n photodetectors for 1.55μm wavelength. In detail, a highly efficient 100 GHz photodetector module and a low-capacitance miniaturized photodiode with 120 GHz bandwidth employing an optical matching layer for enhanced responsivity are reported. Furthermore, recent results on monolithically integrated traveling wave photodetectors based on discrete miniaturized photodiodes with parallel optical feed are presented.

  1. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  2. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. R.; MacConochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr.

    1980-10-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  3. Miniature drag force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilevered beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like that of a second order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  4. Miniature, ruggedized data collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Scott; Calcutt, Wade; Knobler, Ron; Jones, Barry; Klug, Robert

    2009-05-01

    McQ has developed a miniaturized, programmable, ruggedized data collector intended for use in weapon testing or data collection exercises that impose severe stresses on devices under test. The recorder is designed to survive these stresses which include acceleration and shock levels up to 100,000 G. The collector acquires and stores up to four channels of signal data to nonvolatile memory for later retrieval by a user. It is small (< 7 in3), light weight (< 1 lb), and can operate from various battery chemistries. A built-in menuing system, accessible via a USB interface, allows the user to configure parameters of the recorder operation, such as channel gain, filtering, and signal offsets, and also to retrieve recorded data for analysis. An overview of the collector, its features, performance, and potential uses, is presented.

  5. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. R.; Macconochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  6. Miniaturized fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Flynn, John T.; Pratisto, Hans S.; Niederer, Peter F.

    2003-07-01

    We present a miniaturized version of a fundus camera. The camera is designed for the use in screening for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). There, but also in other applications a small, light weight, digital camera system can be extremely useful. We present a small wide angle digital camera system. The handpiece is significantly smaller and lighter then in all other systems. The electronics is truly portable fitting in a standard boardcase. The camera is designed to be offered at a compatible price. Data from tests on young rabbits' eyes is presented. The development of the camera system is part of a telemedicine project screening for ROP. Telemedical applications are a perfect application for this camera system using both advantages: the portability as well as the digital image.

  7. Compact grating coupler between vertically stacked silicon-on-insulator waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Po; Kirk, Andrew G.

    2004-07-01

    The area of integrated optical circuits has been undergoing rapid development due to the important applications of fiber communication systems and optical interconnects. A significant challenge of photonic circuits is to increase circuit density and to miniaturize these devices. The vertical integration of stacked waveguides for photonic circuits onto a single substrate is a promising configuration to enable the dense monolithic integration of three-dimensional photonic devices. Application of high-index-contrast waveguides, such as silicon-on-insulator waveguides, is another important way to increase the density of optical circuits due to their small sizes. These waveguides produce high confinement in the guiding layers and have the advantages of compactness and immunity of cross-talk between different waveguides. It is thus expected that efficient coupling of light between vertically integrated waveguides where no direct field-overlap of guided modes exists is a key issue. We propose a compact double-grating coupler to realize efficient coupling through radiation modes between two vertically stacked SOI waveguides. The grating is strong enough to be considered as a onedimensional photonic bandgap structure which facilitates a very short coupling length. Simulations suggest that a 22% efficiency is achievable in coupling light from one waveguide to another with a 12.9μm long grating. We find that the coupling efficiency is enhanced by Fabry-Perot resonance between two gratings. Coupling efficiency can be dramatically increased by incorporating a reflective under-layer structure or using blazed grating.

  8. Miniature Latching Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. David; Benson, Glendon M.

    2008-01-01

    A miniature latching valve has been invented to satisfy a need for an electrically controllable on/off pneumatic valve that is lightweight and compact and remains in the most recently commanded open or closed state when power is not supplied. The valve includes a poppet that is moved into or out of contact with a seat to effect closure or opening, respectively, of the flow path. Motion of the poppet is initiated by electrical heating of one of two opposing pairs of nickel/titanium shape-memory alloy (SMA) wires above their transition temperature: heated wires contract to their remembered length, applying tension to pull the poppet toward or away from the seat. A latch consisting mainly of a bistable Belleville washer (a conical spring) made of a hardened stainless steel operates between two stable positions corresponding to the fully closed or fully open state, holding the poppet in one of these positions when power is not applied to either pair of SMA wires. To obtain maximum actuation force and displacement, the SMA wires must be kept in tension. The mounting fixtures at the ends of the wires must support large tensile stresses without creating stress concentrations that would limit the fatigue lives of the wires. An earlier design provided for each wire to be crimped in a conical opening with a conical steel ferrule that was swaged into the opening to produce a large, uniformly distributed holding force. In a subsequent design, the conical ferrule was replaced with a larger crimped cylindrical ferrule depicted in the figure. A major problem in designing the valve was to protect the SMA wires from a bake-out temperature of 300 C. The problem was solved by incorporating the SMA wires into an actuator module that is inserted into a barrel of the valve body and is held in place by miniature clip rings.

  9. Microfabricated bragg waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2004-10-19

    A microfabricated Bragg waveguide of semiconductor-compatible material having a hollow core and a multilayer dielectric cladding can be fabricated by integrated circuit technologies. The microfabricated Bragg waveguide can comprise a hollow channel waveguide or a hollow fiber. The Bragg fiber can be fabricated by coating a sacrificial mandrel or mold with alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index dielectric materials and then removing the mandrel or mold to leave a hollow tube with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The Bragg channel waveguide can be fabricated by forming a trench embedded in a substrate and coating the inner wall of the trench with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The thicknesses of the alternating layers can be selected to satisfy the condition for minimum radiation loss of the guided wave.

  10. Omnidirectional optical waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-08-02

    In one embodiment, a system includes a scintillator material; a detector coupled to the scintillator material; and an omnidirectional waveguide coupled to the scintillator material, the omnidirectional waveguide comprising: a plurality of first layers comprising one or more materials having a refractive index in a first range; and a plurality of second layers comprising one or more materials having a refractive index in a second range, the second range being lower than the first range, a plurality of interfaces being defined between alternating ones of the first and second layers. In another embodiment, a method includes depositing alternating layers of a material having a relatively high refractive index and a material having a relatively low refractive index on a substrate to form an omnidirectional waveguide; and coupling the omnidirectional waveguide to at least one surface of a scintillator material.

  11. Calculate waveguide aperture susceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.-K.; Ishii, T. K.

    1982-12-01

    A method is developed for calculating aperture susceptance which makes use of the distribution of an aperture's local fields. This method can be applied to the computation of the aperture susceptance of irises, as well as the calculation of the susceptances of waveguide filters, aperture antennas, waveguide cavity coupling, waveguide junctions, and heterogeneous boundaries such as inputs to ferrite or dielectric loaded waveguides. This method assumes a local field determined by transverse components of the incident wave in the local surface of the cross section in the discontinuity plane which lies at the aperture. The aperture susceptance is calculated by the use of the local fields, the law of energy conservation, and the principles of continuity of the fields. This method requires that the thickness of the aperture structure be zero, but this does not limit the practical usefulness of this local-field method.

  12. Axially Modulated Plasma Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Layer, B. D.; York, A. G.; Varma, S.; Chen, Y.-H.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2009-01-22

    We demonstrate two techniques for making periodically modulated plasma waveguides-one with sharp, stable voids as short as 50 {mu}m with a period as small as 200 {mu}m, and another which modulates the waveguide diameter with a corrugation period as short as 35 {mu}m[1]. These features persist as the plasma expands for the full lifetime of the waveguide (>6 ns). The waveguides were made using the hydrodynamic shock method in a cluster jet using hydrogen, nitrogen, and argon. We demonstrate guided propagation at intensities up to 2x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, limited by our laser energy currently available. This technique is useful for quasi-phase matching to allow efficient coupling of laser energy to acceleration of relativistic electrons or generation of coherent electromagnetic radiation at selected frequencies.

  13. Octave-spanning supercontinuum generation in a silicon-rich nitride waveguide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Pu, Minhao; Zhou, Binbin; Krückel, Clemens J; Fülöp, Attila; Torres-Company, Victor; Bache, Morten

    2016-06-15

    We experimentally show octave-spanning supercontinuum generation in a nonstoichiometric silicon-rich nitride waveguide when pumped by femtosecond pulses from an erbium fiber laser. The pulse energy and bandwidth are comparable to results achieved in stoichiometric silicon nitride waveguides, but our material platform is simpler to manufacture. We also observe wave-breaking supercontinuum generation by using orthogonal pumping in the same waveguide. Additional analysis reveals that the waveguide height is a powerful tuning parameter for generating mid-infrared dispersive waves while keeping the pump in the telecom band.

  14. Octave-spanning supercontinuum generation in a silicon-rich nitride waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing; Pu, Minhao; Zhou, Binbin; Krückel, Clemens J.; Fülöp, Attila; Torres-Company, Victor; Bache, Morten

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally show octave-spanning supercontinuum generation in a non-stoichiometric silicon-rich nitride waveguide when pumped by femtosecond pulses from an erbium fiber laser. The pulse energy and bandwidth are comparable to results achieved in stoichiometric silicon nitride waveguides, but our material platform is simpler to manufacture. We also observe wave-breaking supercontinuum generation by using orthogonal pumping in the same waveguide. Additional analysis reveals that the waveguide height is a powerful tuning parameter for generating mid-infrared dispersive waves while keeping the pump in the telecom band.

  15. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

    1982-06-16

    A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  16. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, John R.; Ruzic, David N.; Moore, Richard L.; Cohen, Samuel A.; Manos, Dennis M.

    1983-01-01

    A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  17. Split-Block Waveguide Polarization Twist for 220 to 325 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, John; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2008-01-01

    A split-block waveguide circuit that rotates polarization by 90 has been designed with WR-3 input and output waveguides, which are rectangular waveguides used for a nominal frequency range of 220 to 325 GHz. Heretofore, twisted rectangular waveguides equipped with flanges at the input and output have been the standard means of rotating the polarizations of guided microwave signals. However, the fabrication and assembly of such components become difficult at high frequency due to decreasing wavelength, such that twisted rectangular waveguides become impractical at frequencies above a few hundred gigahertz. Conventional twisted rectangular waveguides are also not amenable to integration into highly miniaturized subassemblies of advanced millimeter- and submillimeter-wave detector arrays now undergoing development. In contrast, the present polarization- rotating waveguide can readily be incorporated into complex integrated waveguide circuits such as miniaturized detector arrays fabricated by either conventional end milling of metal blocks or by deep reactive ion etching of silicon blocks. Moreover, the present split-block design can be scaled up in frequency to at least 5 THz. The main step in fabricating a splitblock polarization-rotating waveguide of the present design is to cut channels having special asymmetrically shaped steps into mating upper and lower blocks (see Figure 1). The dimensions of the steps are chosen to be consistent with the WR-3 waveguide cross section, which is 0.864 by 0.432 mm. The channels are characterized by varying widths with constant depths of 0.432, 0.324, and 0.216 mm and by relatively large corner radii to facilitate fabrication. The steps effect both a geometric transition and the corresponding impedance-matched electromagnetic-polarization transition between (1) a WR-3 rectangular waveguide oriented with the electric field vector normal to the block mating surfaces and (2) a corresponding WR-3 waveguide oriented with its electric

  18. Quantitative study of rectangular waveguide behavior in the THz.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowen, Adam M.; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wanke, Michael Clement

    2009-10-01

    This report describes our efforts to quantify the behavior of micro-fabricated THz rectangular waveguides on a configurable, robust semiconductor-based platform. These waveguides are an enabling technology for coupling THz radiation directly from or to lasers, mixers, detectors, antennas, and other devices. Traditional waveguides fabricated on semiconductor platforms such as dielectric guides in the infrared or co-planar waveguides in the microwave regions, suffer high absorption and radiative losses in the THz. The former leads to very short propagation lengths, while the latter will lead to unwanted radiation modes and/or crosstalk in integrated devices. This project exploited the initial developments of THz micro-machined rectangular waveguides developed under the THz Grand Challenge Program, but instead of focusing on THz transceiver integration, this project focused on exploring the propagation loss and far-field radiation patterns of the waveguides. During the 9 month duration of this project we were able to reproduce the waveguide loss per unit of length in the waveguides and started to explore how the loss depended on wavelength. We also explored the far-field beam patterns emitted by H-plane horn antennas attached to the waveguides. In the process we learned that the method of measuring the beam patterns has a significant impact on what is actually measured, and this may have an effect on most of the beam patterns of THz that have been reported to date. The beam pattern measurements improved significantly throughout the project, but more refinements of the measurement are required before a definitive determination of the beam-pattern can be made.

  19. Fabrication of polarization-independent waveguides deeply buried in lithium niobate crystal using aberration-corrected femtosecond laser direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Qi, Jia; Liu, Zhengming; Liao, Yang; Chu, Wei; Cheng, Ya

    2017-01-01

    Writing optical waveguides with femtosecond laser pulses provides the capability of forming three-dimensional photonic circuits for manipulating light fields in both linear and nonlinear manners. To fully explore this potential, large depths of the buried waveguides in transparent substrates are often desirable to facilitate achieving vertical integration of waveguides in a multi-layer configuration, which, however, is hampered by rapidly degraded axial resolution caused by optical aberration. Here, we show that with the correction of the spherical aberration, polarization-independent waveguides can be inscribed in a nonlinear optical crystal lithium niobate (LN) at depths up to 1400 μm, which is more than one order of magnitude deeper than the waveguides written with aberration uncorrected femtosecond laser pulses. Our technique is beneficial for applications ranging from miniaturized nonlinear light sources to quantum information processing.

  20. Fabrication of polarization-independent waveguides deeply buried in lithium niobate crystal using aberration-corrected femtosecond laser direct writing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Qi, Jia; Liu, Zhengming; Liao, Yang; Chu, Wei; Cheng, Ya

    2017-01-01

    Writing optical waveguides with femtosecond laser pulses provides the capability of forming three-dimensional photonic circuits for manipulating light fields in both linear and nonlinear manners. To fully explore this potential, large depths of the buried waveguides in transparent substrates are often desirable to facilitate achieving vertical integration of waveguides in a multi-layer configuration, which, however, is hampered by rapidly degraded axial resolution caused by optical aberration. Here, we show that with the correction of the spherical aberration, polarization-independent waveguides can be inscribed in a nonlinear optical crystal lithium niobate (LN) at depths up to 1400 μm, which is more than one order of magnitude deeper than the waveguides written with aberration uncorrected femtosecond laser pulses. Our technique is beneficial for applications ranging from miniaturized nonlinear light sources to quantum information processing. PMID:28112246

  1. Fabrication of polarization-independent waveguides deeply buried in lithium niobate crystal using aberration-corrected femtosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Qi, Jia; Liu, Zhengming; Liao, Yang; Chu, Wei; Cheng, Ya

    2017-01-23

    Writing optical waveguides with femtosecond laser pulses provides the capability of forming three-dimensional photonic circuits for manipulating light fields in both linear and nonlinear manners. To fully explore this potential, large depths of the buried waveguides in transparent substrates are often desirable to facilitate achieving vertical integration of waveguides in a multi-layer configuration, which, however, is hampered by rapidly degraded axial resolution caused by optical aberration. Here, we show that with the correction of the spherical aberration, polarization-independent waveguides can be inscribed in a nonlinear optical crystal lithium niobate (LN) at depths up to 1400 μm, which is more than one order of magnitude deeper than the waveguides written with aberration uncorrected femtosecond laser pulses. Our technique is beneficial for applications ranging from miniaturized nonlinear light sources to quantum information processing.

  2. The Whole new world of miniature technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-07-01

    In the past ten years, miniaturization of both electrical and mechanical parts has significantly increased. Documentation of the design and production capabilities of miniaturization in the electronics industry is well-defined. Literature on the subject of miniaturization of metal piece parts, however, is hard to find. Some of the current capabilities in the manufacture of miniature metal piece parts or miniature features in larger piece parts are discussed.

  3. Miniature Chemical Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew C. R. Pipino

    2004-12-13

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages.

  4. Fixed-Tuned Submillimeter Waveguide Multipliers Using MMIC Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruston, J.; Kim, M.; Martin, S. C.; Pease, A.; Smith, R. P.; Siegel, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    In preparation for the insturment ammouncement of opportunity for the Far Infrared and Submillimeter Space Telescope, and ESA/NASA space astrophysics observatory mission, local oscillator sources at high frequencies (1200 GHz) are being developed. As part of a multiplier chain beginning at 100 GHz we are developing single and multiple diode waveguide circuits up to 640 GHz.

  5. A Simple Optical Waveguide Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, J.; Sambles, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a thin film rectangular dielectric waveguide and its laboratory use. Discusses the theory of uniaxial thin film waveguides with mathematical expressions and the laboratory procedures for a classroom experiment with diagrams. (Author/YP)

  6. Fluorometer with a quartz-rod waveguide-integrating sphere configuration to measure evanescent-field luminescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fluorometer was designed to measure evanescent-field luminescence. A quartz-rod waveguide (d = 2 mm) was installed coaxally inside a cylindrical flow-through cell (id = 2.3 mm, od = 6.3 mm, l = 116 mm). An excitation beam from a UV LED or a miniature xenon flashlamp was focused by a ball lens and ...

  7. Design of a miniaturized integrated spectrometer for spectral tissue sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belay, Gebirie Yizengaw; Hoving, Willem; Ottevaere, Heidi; van der Put, Arthur; Weltjens, Wim; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    Minimally-invasive image-guided procedures become increasingly used by physicians to obtain real-time characterization feedback from the tissue at the tip of their interventional device (needle, catheter, endoscopic or laparoscopic probes, etc…) which can significantly improve the outcome of diagnosis and treatment, and ultimately reduce cost of the medical treatment. Spectral tissue sensing using compact photonic probes has the potential to be a valuable tool for screening and diagnostic purposes, e.g. for discriminating between healthy and tumorous tissue. However, this technique requires a low-cost broadband miniature spectrometer so that it is commercially viable for screening at point-of-care locations such as physicians' offices and outpatient centers. Our goal is therefore to develop a miniaturized spectrometer based on diffractive optics that combines the functionalities of a visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR) spectrometer in one very compact housing. A second goal is that the hardware can be produced in high volume at low cost without expensive time consuming alignment and calibration steps. We have designed a miniaturized spectrometer which operates both in the visible/near-infrared and shortwave-infrared wavelength regions ranging from 400 nm to 1700 nm. The visible/near-infrared part of the spectrometer is designed for wavelengths from 400 nm to 800 nm whereas the shortwave-infrared segment ranges from 850 nm to 1700 nm. The spectrometer has a resolution of 6 nm in the visible/near-infrared wavelength region and 10 nm in the shortwave-infrared. The minimum SNR of the spectrometer for the intended application is about 151 in the VIS/NIR range and 6000 for SWIR. In this paper, the modelling and design, and power budget analysis of the miniaturized spectrometer are presented. Our work opens a door for future affordable micro- spectrometers which can be integrated with smartphones and tablets, and used for point

  8. Nanoscale light–matter interactions in atomic cladding waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Liron; Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    Alkali vapours, such as rubidium, are being used extensively in several important fields of research such as slow and stored light nonlinear optics quantum computation, atomic clocks and magnetometers. Recently, there is a growing effort towards miniaturizing traditional centimetre-size vapour cells. Owing to the significant reduction in device dimensions, light–matter interactions are greatly enhanced, enabling new functionalities due to the low power threshold needed for nonlinear interactions. Here, taking advantage of the mature platform of silicon photonics, we construct an efficient and flexible platform for tailored light–vapour interactions on a chip. Specifically, we demonstrate light–matter interactions in an atomic cladding waveguide, consisting of a silicon nitride nano-waveguide core with a rubidium vapour cladding. We observe the efficient interaction of the electromagnetic guided mode with the rubidium cladding and show that due to the high confinement of the optical mode, the rubidium absorption saturates at powers in the nanowatt regime. PMID:23462991

  9. Nanoscale light-matter interactions in atomic cladding waveguides.

    PubMed

    Stern, Liron; Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    Alkali vapours, such as rubidium, are being used extensively in several important fields of research such as slow and stored light nonlinear optics quantum computation, atomic clocks and magnetometers. Recently, there is a growing effort towards miniaturizing traditional centimetre-size vapour cells. Owing to the significant reduction in device dimensions, light-matter interactions are greatly enhanced, enabling new functionalities due to the low power threshold needed for nonlinear interactions. Here, taking advantage of the mature platform of silicon photonics, we construct an efficient and flexible platform for tailored light-vapour interactions on a chip. Specifically, we demonstrate light-matter interactions in an atomic cladding waveguide, consisting of a silicon nitride nano-waveguide core with a rubidium vapour cladding. We observe the efficient interaction of the electromagnetic guided mode with the rubidium cladding and show that due to the high confinement of the optical mode, the rubidium absorption saturates at powers in the nanowatt regime.

  10. Integration of waveguides for optical detection in microfabricated analytical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Joerg P.; Mogensen, Klaus B.; Friis, Peter; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Petersen, Nickolaj J.; Telleman, Pieter; Huebner, Joerg

    2000-08-01

    Buried optical channel waveguides integrated with a fluidic channel network on a planar microdevice are presented. The waveguides were fabricated using silica-on-silicon technology with the goal to replace bulk optical elements and facilitate various optical detection techniques for miniaturized total analysis systems or lab-on-a-chip systems. Waveguide structures with core layers doped with germanium were employed for fluorescence measurements, while waveguides with nitrogen- only doped core layers were used for absorbance measurements. By the elimination of germanium oxygen deficiency centers transmission of light down to 210nm was possible, allowing absorance measurements in the mid and far UV region (210 to 280nm), which is the region where a large number of different molecules absorb light. Robust, alignment-free microdevices, which can easily be hooked up to a number of light sources and detectors were used for fluorescence measurements of two dyes, fluorescein and Bodipy, and absorbance measurements of a stres-reducing drug, propranolol. The lowest detected concentrations were 250pM for fluorescein, 100nM for Bodipy and 12(mu) M for propranolol.

  11. PDMS-based waveguides with surface relief Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goraus, Matej; Pudis, Dusan; Jandura, Daniel; Berezina, Sofia

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we present fabrication process of waveguides with surface relief Bragg grating (SR-BG) embossed in poly dimethyl diphenyl siloxane (PDMDPS). Generally, the Bragg grating causes spectral selectivity of propagated light in optical fibers and optical waveguides. We prepared the original concept of fabrication of novel optical waveguides with SR-BG using the laser interference lithography in combination with embossing process of liquid polymer. We used laser interference lithography in Mach-Zehnder configuration to create a grating with period of 21 μm in thin photoresist layer. In this manner, we created an array of D-shaped waveguides of 10 μm wide and app. 2.5 μm high. SR-BG was created in the next step, where the one dimensional surface Bragg grating with period 1.64 μm was prepared by interference lithography. This period was designed to reflect narrow spectral band close the telecommunication wavelength of 1.55 μm. Quality of the prepared waveguides and SR-BG was confirmed from atomic force microscope analysis. Transmission and coupling properties of the prepared SR-BG waveguides were finally measured by spectral measurements in infrared spectral region.

  12. Actively coupled optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeeva, N. V.; Barashenkov, I. V.; Rayanov, K.; Flach, S.

    2014-01-01

    We consider light propagation through a pair of nonlinear optical waveguides with absorption, placed in a medium with power gain. The active medium boosts the in-phase component of the overlapping evanescent fields of the guides, while the nonlinearity of the guides couples it to the damped out-of-phase component creating a feedback loop. As a result, the structure exhibits stable stationary and oscillatory regimes in a wide range of gain-loss ratios. We show that the pair of actively coupled (AC) waveguides can act as a stationary or integrate-and-fire comparator sensitive to tiny differences in their input powers.

  13. Miniaturized Airborne Imaging Central Server System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiuhong

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, some remote-sensing applications require advanced airborne multi-sensor systems to provide high performance reflective and emissive spectral imaging measurement rapidly over large areas. The key or unique problem of characteristics is associated with a black box back-end system that operates a suite of cutting-edge imaging sensors to collect simultaneously the high throughput reflective and emissive spectral imaging data with precision georeference. This back-end system needs to be portable, easy-to-use, and reliable with advanced onboard processing. The innovation of the black box backend is a miniaturized airborne imaging central server system (MAICSS). MAICSS integrates a complex embedded system of systems with dedicated power and signal electronic circuits inside to serve a suite of configurable cutting-edge electro- optical (EO), long-wave infrared (LWIR), and medium-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras, a hyperspectral imaging scanner, and a GPS and inertial measurement unit (IMU) for atmospheric and surface remote sensing. Its compatible sensor packages include NASA s 1,024 1,024 pixel LWIR quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) imager; a 60.5 megapixel BuckEye EO camera; and a fast (e.g. 200+ scanlines/s) and wide swath-width (e.g., 1,920+ pixels) CCD/InGaAs imager-based visible/near infrared reflectance (VNIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrometer. MAICSS records continuous precision georeferenced and time-tagged multisensor throughputs to mass storage devices at a high aggregate rate, typically 60 MB/s for its LWIR/EO payload. MAICSS is a complete stand-alone imaging server instrument with an easy-to-use software package for either autonomous data collection or interactive airborne operation. Advanced multisensor data acquisition and onboard processing software features have been implemented for MAICSS. With the onboard processing for real time image development, correction, histogram-equalization, compression, georeference, and

  14. Miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator concept demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, R. E.; Rauschenbach, H. S.

    High concentration ratio photovoltaic systems for space applications have generally been considered impractical because of perceived difficulties in controlling solar cell temperatures to reasonably low values. A miniaturized concentrator system is now under development which surmounts this objection by providing acceptable solar cell temperatures using purely passive cell cooling methods. An array of identical miniaturized, rigid Cassegrainian optical systems having a low f-number with resulting short dimensions along their optical axes are rigidly mounted into a frame to form a relatively thin concentrator solar array panel. A number of such panels, approximately 1.5 centimeters thick, are wired as an array and are folded against one another for launch in a stowed configuration. Deployment on orbit is similar to the deployment of conventional planar honeycomb panel arrays or flexible blanket arrays. The miniaturized concept was conceived and studied in the 1978-80 time frame. Progress in the feasibility demonstration to date is reported.

  15. Miniature spectroscopic instrumentation: Applications to biology and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Christina P.; Mattley, Yvette; DeFrece, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Spectroscopy is a fundamental analytical tool utilized throughout all of the sciences. For chemistry and biology alone, there are thousands of applications. In the past two decades there have been monumental advances in the miniaturization of components used in spectrophotometric systems. The key components include detector arrays, laser diodes, and fiber optics. Currently, there are numerous commercially available miniature spectrometer systems as well as discrete components that are used by researchers in designing their own systems. A comprehensive summary of current instrumentation available for the design and development of miniaturized spectroscopy applications is described, including detectors, wavelength discriminating components, light sources, and sampling assemblies. Recommendations are made for designing spectrometer systems for specific applications. Current literature is reviewed for chemical and biological applications specifically using miniaturized spectrometer systems with the focus being on ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectrometers. The applications include laboratory applications, environmental sensing, on-site industrial analyses, botany and ecology applications, and finally clinical and biochemical studies. Additionally, microspectrometers, two-dimensional arrays, and photonics crystals are discussed in regards to their future role in chemistry and biology applications.

  16. Nonlinear characterization of GeSbS chalcogenide glass waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ju Won; Han, Zhaohong; Sohn, Byoung-Uk; Chen, George F. R.; Smith, Charmayne; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Richardson, Kathleen A.; Agarwal, Anuradha M.; Tan, Dawn T. H.

    2016-01-01

    GeSbS ridge waveguides have recently been demonstrated as a promising mid – infrared platform for integrated waveguide – based chemical sensing and photodetection. To date, their nonlinear optical properties remain relatively unexplored. In this paper, we characterize the nonlinear optical properties of GeSbS glasses, and show negligible nonlinear losses at 1.55 μm. Using self – phase modulation experiments, we characterize a waveguide nonlinear parameter of 7 W−1/m and nonlinear refractive index of 3.71 × 10−18 m2/W. GeSbS waveguides are used to generate supercontinuum from 1280 nm to 2120 nm at the −30 dB level. The spectrum expands along the red shifted side of the spectrum faster than on the blue shifted side, facilitated by cascaded stimulated Raman scattering arising from the large Raman gain of chalcogenides. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements show that these glasses are optically transparent up to 25 μm, making them useful for short – wave to long – wave infrared applications in both linear and nonlinear optics. PMID:28000725

  17. Nonlinear characterization of GeSbS chalcogenide glass waveguides.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ju Won; Han, Zhaohong; Sohn, Byoung-Uk; Chen, George F R; Smith, Charmayne; Kimerling, Lionel C; Richardson, Kathleen A; Agarwal, Anuradha M; Tan, Dawn T H

    2016-12-21

    GeSbS ridge waveguides have recently been demonstrated as a promising mid - infrared platform for integrated waveguide - based chemical sensing and photodetection. To date, their nonlinear optical properties remain relatively unexplored. In this paper, we characterize the nonlinear optical properties of GeSbS glasses, and show negligible nonlinear losses at 1.55 μm. Using self - phase modulation experiments, we characterize a waveguide nonlinear parameter of 7 W(-1)/m and nonlinear refractive index of 3.71 × 10(-18) m(2)/W. GeSbS waveguides are used to generate supercontinuum from 1280 nm to 2120 nm at the -30 dB level. The spectrum expands along the red shifted side of the spectrum faster than on the blue shifted side, facilitated by cascaded stimulated Raman scattering arising from the large Raman gain of chalcogenides. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements show that these glasses are optically transparent up to 25 μm, making them useful for short - wave to long - wave infrared applications in both linear and nonlinear optics.

  18. Supercontinuum generation in silicon waveguides relying on wave-breaking.

    PubMed

    Castelló-Lurbe, David; Silvestre, Enrique

    2015-10-05

    Four-wave-mixing processes enabled during optical wave-breaking (OWB) are exploited in this paper for supercontinuum generation. Unlike conventional approaches based on OWB, phase-matching is achieved here for these nonlinear interactions, and, consequently, new frequency production becomes more efficient. We take advantage of this kind of pulse propagation to obtain numerically a coherent octave-spanning mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in a silicon waveguide pumping at telecom wavelengths in the normal dispersion regime. This scheme shows a feasible path to overcome limits imposed by two-photon absorption on spectral broadening in silicon waveguides.

  19. Tunable waveguide bends with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhao-xian; Chen, Ze-guo; Ming, Yang; Wu, Ying; Lu, Yan-qing

    2016-02-01

    We design tunable waveguide bends filled with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials to achieve a nearly perfect bending effect. The anisotropic properties of the metamaterials can be described by the effective medium theory. The nearly perfect bending effect is demonstrated by finite element simulations of various structures with different bending curvatures and shapes. This effect is attributed to zero effective permittivity along the direction of propagation and matched effective impedance at the interfaces between the bending part and the dielectric waveguides. We envisage that the design will be applicable in the far-infrared and terahertz frequency ranges owing to the tunable dielectric responses of graphene.

  20. Periodically structured plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saj, W. M.; Foteinopoulou, S.; Kafesaki, M.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Economou, E. N.

    2008-04-01

    We study surface plasmon polariton (SPP) guiding structures, which are a modification of the Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) waveguide. The designs are constructed by introducing a periodic modulation in a MIM waveguide, with a glass core and silver claddings. This periodic modulation is created either by causing periodic indentations in the silver slabs encompassing the glass core, or by increasing the glass spacer material in certain periodic locations. Our objective is to achieve long range sub-wavelength waveguiding with vast dispersion engineering capabilities. We employ the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD) with the Auxiliary Differential Equation method (ADE) for the calculation of the dispersion relation of the guided modes, as well as the real time propagation suggests that the guiding mechnism in the examined structures is based on the electromagnetic (EM) couping between the slit plasmon modes. These - depending on the design - exist in the grooves between the silver plates or in the larger areas of the glass core spacer. Put it different, the guiding mechanism in the examined SPP waveguide designs is analogous to the EM energy transfer along metallic nanoparticle chains.

  1. Gratings in polymeric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishakov, G.; Sokolov, V.; Kocabas, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2007-04-01

    Laser-induced formation of polymer Bragg grating filters for Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) applications is discussed. Acrylate monomers halogenated with both fluorine and chlorine, which possess absorption losses less than 0.25 dB/cm and wide choice of refractive indices (from 1.3 to 1.5) in the 1.5 μm telecom wavelength region were used. The monomers are highly intermixable thus permitting to adjust the refractive index of the composition within +/-0.0001. Moreover they are photocurable under UV exposure and exhibit high contrast in polymerization. These properties make halogenated acrylates very promising for fabricating polymeric waveguides and photonic circuits. Single-mode polymer waveguides were fabricated on silicon wafers using resistless contact lithography. Submicron index gratings have been written in polymer waveguides using holographic exposure with He-Cd laser beam (325 nm) through a phase mask. Both uniform and apodized gratings have been fabricated. The gratings are stable and are not erased by uniform UV exposure. The waveguide gratings possess narrowband reflection spectra in the 1.5 μm wavelength region of 0.4 nm width, nearly rectangular shape of the stopband and reflectivity R > 99%. The fabricated Bragg grating filters can be used for multiplexing/demultiplexing optical signals in high-speed DWDM optical fiber networks.

  2. Miniature information displays: primary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvelda, Phillip; Lewis, Nancy D.

    1998-04-01

    Positioned to replace current liquid crystal display technology in many applications, miniature information displays have evolved to provide several truly portable platforms for the world's growing personal computing and communication needs. The technology and functionality of handheld computer and communicator systems has finally surpassed many of the standards that were originally established for desktop systems. In these new consumer electronics, performance, display size, packaging, power consumption, and cost have always been limiting factors for fabricating genuinely portable devices. The rapidly growing miniature information display manufacturing industry is making it possible to bring a wide range of highly anticipated new products to new markets.

  3. Experimental investigation of plasmofluidic waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Bonwoo; Kwon, Min-Suk; Shin, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-16

    Plasmofluidic waveguides are based on guiding light which is strongly confined in fluid with the assistance of a surface plasmon polariton. To realize plasmofluidic waveguides, metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal (MISIM) waveguides, which are hybrid plasmonic waveguides fabricated using standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, are employed. The insulator of the MISIM waveguide is removed to form 30-nm-wide channels, and they are filled with fluid. The plasmofluidic waveguide has a subwavelength-scale mode area since its mode is strongly confined in the fluid. The waveguides are experimentally characterized for different fluids. When the refractive index of the fluid is 1.440, the plasmofluidic waveguide with 190-nm-wide silicon has propagation loss of 0.46 dB/μm; the coupling loss between it and an ordinary silicon photonic waveguide is 1.79 dB. The propagation and coupling losses may be reduced if a few fabrication-induced imperfections are removed. The plasmofluidic waveguide may pave the way to a dynamically phase-tunable ultracompact device.

  4. Gap plasmon excitation in plasmonic waveguide using Si waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Koji; Kamada, Shun; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Haraguchi, Masanobu

    2016-08-01

    Plasmonic waveguides have attracted considerable attention for application in highly integrated optical circuits since they can confine light to areas smaller than the diffraction limit. In this context, in order to realize a highly integrated optical circuit, we fabricate and evaluate the optical characteristics of a poly(methyl methacrylate) junction positioned between Si and plasmonic waveguides. For the plasmonic waveguide, we employ a gap plasmonic waveguide in which the energy of the plasmonic wave can be confined in order to reduce the scattering loss at the junction. By experimental measurement, we determine the coupling efficiency between the Si and gap plasmonic waveguides and the propagation length at the gap plasmonic waveguide to be 52.4% and 11.1 µm, respectively. These values agree with those obtained by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation. We believe that our findings can significantly contribute to the development of highly integrated optical circuits.

  5. Visual thread quality for precision miniature mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1981-04-01

    Threaded features have eight visual appearance factors which can affect their function in precision miniature mechanisms. The Bendix practice in deburring, finishing, and accepting these conditions on miniature threads is described as is their impact in assemblies of precision miniature electromechanical assemblies.

  6. Omnidirectional optical attractor in structured gap-surface plasmon waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Chong; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Genov, Dentcho A.

    2016-01-01

    An optical attractor based on a simple and easy to fabricate structured metal-dielectric-metal (SMDM) waveguide is proposed. The structured waveguide has a variable thickness in the vicinity of an embedded microsphere and allow for adiabatic nano-focusing of gap-surface plasmon polaritons (GSPPs). We show that the proposed system acts as an omnidirectional absorber across a broad spectral range. The geometrical optics approximation is used to provide a description of the ray trajectories in the system and identify the singularity of the deflection angle at the photon sphere. The analytical theory is validated by full-wave numerical simulations demonstrating adiabatic, deep sub-wavelength focusing of GSPPs and high local field enhancement. The proposed structured waveguide is an ideal candidate for the demonstration of reflection free omnidirectional absorption of GSPP in the optical and infrared frequency ranges. PMID:27001451

  7. FY 2008 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors – Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Rodriguez, Carmen P.

    2009-02-01

    Through the duration of the NNSA Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22) Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors lifecycle project, our research team focused on developing solutions to the fabrication bottleneck that has inhibited development and deployment of wide-angle optically interrogated chemical and radiological remote sensing technology. Our team advanced the concept of step-index clad retroreflectors to approximate an optimized, but yet unrealized spherical gradient index design. An intensive numerical simulation effort was undertaken that resulted in optimized step-index optical designs for mid-infrared applications. Geometric optics ray trace modeling was performed to better understand the geometrical dependencies of the miniature spherical retroreflector application. We adopted and advanced the concept of optical cross section, a metric that provides relative performance comparisons between different retroreflector designs and our cross-section analysis demonstrated that our step-index design provided 90% of the range capacity of the ideal spherical index design.

  8. Planar waveguide yields mm-wave monopulse comparators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syrigos, H.; Crossland, D.; van Wyck, B.

    1984-03-01

    The miniature monopulse comparator assemblies are machined from small split blocks of aluminum 3.000 in. in diameter and 0.375 in. thick at 94 GHz; at 35 GHz, the dimensions are 3.500 in. and 0.750 in., respectively. A computerized milling machine ensures very close control of the machining tolerances. The feed distribution lines are designed on the top of the comparator block without introducing waveguide runs. This allows the four balanced output ports to be distributed from their wide separation inside the comparator to a small cluster for proper feedhorn excitation. It is noted that these signals are then coupled to a unique multimode scalar feed horn through a sensitive resonant cavity. The horn throat of this feed is circular and sufficiently large to accommodate the HE(11) mode for the sum and HE(01) and HE(21) for the difference modes. It is pointed out that miniature monopulse comparators for 35 and 94 GHz employ planar waveguide technology to give a performance that is equivalent to much larger designs.

  9. Miniaturized spectral imager for Aalto-1 nanosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannila, Rami; Näsilä, Antti; Praks, Jaan; Saari, Heikki; Antila, Jarkko

    2011-11-01

    The Aalto-1 is a 3U-cubesat project coordinated by Aalto University. The satellite, Aalto-1, will be mainly built by students as project assignments and thesis works. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland will develop the main Earth observation payload, a miniaturized spectral imager, for the satellite. It is a novel highly miniaturized tunable filter type spectral imager. Mass of the spectral imager will be less than 400 grams, and dimensions will be approximately 80 mm x 80 mm x 45 mm. The spectral imager is based on a tunable Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) accompanied by an RGB CMOS image sensor. The FPI consists of two highly reflective surfaces separated by a tunable air gap and it is based either on a microelectromechanical (MEMS) or piezo-actuated structure. The MEMS FPI is a monolithic device, i.e. it is made entirely on one substrate in a batch process, without assembling separate pieces together. The gap is adjusted by moving the upper mirror with electrostatic force. Benefits of the MEMS FPI are low mass and small size. However, large aperture (2-10 mm) MEMS FPIs are currently under development, thus it is not yet known if their performance is adequate. The piezo-actuated FPI uses three piezo-actuators and is controlled in a closed capacitive feedback loop. The drawback of the piezo-actuated FPI is its higher mass. However, it has a large aperture which enables a shorter exposure times. Selection of the FPI type will be done after thorough evaluation. Depending on the selected FPI type, the spectral resolution of the imager will be 5 - 10 nm at full width at half maximum and it will operate in the visible and/or near infrared range.

  10. Femtosecond laser-written lithium niobate waveguide laser operating at 1085 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yang; de Aldana, Javier R. Vázquez; Chen, Feng

    2014-10-01

    We report on the channel waveguide lasers at 1085 nm in femtosecond laser written Type II waveguides in an Nd:MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. The waveguide was constructed in a typical dual-line approach. In the geometry, we found that four vicinal regions of the track pair could guide light propagation. In addition, these guiding cores support polarization-dependent-guided modes. The propagation losses of the waveguides were measured to be as low as 1 dB/cm. Under an optical pump at 808 nm, the continuous-wave waveguide lasing at 1085 nm was generated, reaching a slope efficiency of 27% and maximum output power of 8 mW. The lasing threshold was 71 mW. Our results show that with the femtosecond laser written Nd:MgO:LiNbO3 waveguide as the miniature light source, it was possible to construct all-LiNbO3-based integrated devices for diverse photonic applications.

  11. Phonon waveguides for electromechanical circuits.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, D; Mahboob, I; Onomitsu, K; Yamaguchi, H

    2014-07-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), utilizing localized mechanical vibrations, have found application in sensors, signal processors and in the study of macroscopic quantum mechanics. The integration of multiple mechanical elements via electrical or optical means remains a challenge in the realization of NEMS circuits. Here, we develop a phonon waveguide using a one-dimensional array of suspended membranes that offers purely mechanical means to integrate isolated NEMS resonators. We demonstrate that the phonon waveguide can support and guide mechanical vibrations and that the periodic membrane arrangement also creates a phonon bandgap that enables control of the phonon propagation velocity. Furthermore, embedding a phonon cavity into the phonon waveguide allows mobile mechanical vibrations to be dynamically switched or transferred from the waveguide to the cavity, thereby illustrating the viability of waveguide-resonator coupling. These highly functional traits of the phonon waveguide architecture exhibit all the components necessary to permit the realization of all-phononic NEMS circuits.

  12. MEOS Microsatellite Earth Observation using Miniature Integrated-Optic IR Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruzelecky, Roman

    ±0.1 kPa from measurements of the 0.76 mm O2 A band with 0.02 nm resolution and will contain an imager for surface observations at 25×40 m2 resolution within a 100×160 km2 view. This will assist with cloud detection, measurement geolocation and determination of land-cover status. The MEOS payload encompasses groundbreaking innovation in miniaturized infrared (IR) spectrometers based on MPBC's patented technologies (US 7,034,935 B1) for high performance guided-wave spectrometers. The guided-wave spectrometer integration provides an order of magnitude reduction in the mass and volume relative to traditional bulk-optic spectrometers, with a net mass under 2 kg, while also providing significant performance advantages; including an optically immersed master grating for minimal aberrations, robust optical alignment using a low-loss dielectric IR waveguide, and simultaneous broad-band spectral acquisition. Output integrated optics facilitate miniaturization of the detector pixels for high measurement sensitivity. Patented, binary-coded smart signal processing of IR detector arrays iteratively compensates for both random and non-random noise to yield over 60 dB of signal dynamic range. The following paper discusses the breadboarding of the miniature high-resolution FP-IOSPEC spectrometer in support of the MEOS payload requirements. This innovatively combines a tunable Fabry-Perot filter with a guided-wave spectrometer to simultaneously provide multiple microchannels with a spectral resolution to below 0.03 nm FWHM, broad spectral range of operation from 1500 to 2450 nm, and a large optical input aperture. The spectrometer miniaturization is a significant and original advance that facilitates the use of multiple dedicated spectrometers on the same microsat platform to allow simultaneous and coordinated measurements as described above. Acknowledgements The financial assistance of the Canadian Space Agency is greatly appreciated. The constructive suggestions of Guennadi

  13. Waveguide Harmonic Generator for the SIM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Daniel; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Mulder, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    A second-harmonic generator (SHG) serves as the source of the visible laser beam in an onboard calibration scheme for NASA's planned Space Interferometry Mission (SIM), which requires an infrared laser beam and a visible laser beam coherent with the infrared laser beam. The SHG includes quasi-phase-matched waveguides made of MgO-doped, periodically poled lithium niobate, pigtailed with polarization- maintaining optical fibers. Frequency doubling by use of such waveguides affords the required combination of coherence and sufficient conversion efficiency for the intended application. The spatial period of the poling is designed to obtain quasi-phase- matching at a nominal middle excitation wavelength of 1,319.28 nm. The SHG is designed to operate at a warm bias (ambient temperature between 20 and 25 C) that would be maintained in its cooler environment by use of electric heaters; the heater power would be adjusted to regulate the temperature precisely and thereby maintain the required precision of the spatial period. At the state of development at the time of this reporting, the SHG had been packaged and subjected to most of its planned space-qualification tests.

  14. Microwave waveguide manifold and method

    DOEpatents

    Staehlin, John H.

    1987-12-01

    A controllably electrically coupled, physically intersecting plural waveguide manifold assembly wherein the intersecting waveguide elements are fabricated in integral unitary relationship from a single piece of metal in order to avoid the inaccuracies and difficult-to-control fabrication steps associated with uniting separate waveguide elements into a unitary structure. An X-band aluminum airborne radar manifold example is disclosed, along with a fabrication sequence for the manifold and the electrical energy communicating apertures joining the manifold elements.

  15. Microwave waveguide manifold and method

    DOEpatents

    Staehlin, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A controllably electrically coupled, physically intersecting plural waveguide manifold assembly wherein the intersecting waveguide elements are fabricated in integral unitary relationship from a single piece of metal in order to avoid the inaccuracies and difficult-to-control fabrication steps associated with uniting separate waveguide elements into a unitary structure. An X-band aluminum airborne radar manifold example is disclosed, along with a fabrication sequence for the manifold and the electrical energy communicating apertures joining the manifold elements.

  16. Midinfrared sensors meet nanotechnology: Trace gas sensing with quantum cascade lasers inside photonic band-gap hollow waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, Christy; Temelkuran, Burak; Dellemann, Gregor; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2005-05-01

    An integrated midinfrared sensing system for trace level (ppb) gas analysis combining a quantum cascade laser with an emission frequency of 10.3μm with a frequency matched photonic band-gap hollow core waveguide has been developed, demonstrating the sensing application of photonic band-gap fibers. The photonic band-gap fiber simultaneously acts as a wavelength selective waveguide and miniaturized gas cell. The laser emission wavelength corresponds to the vibrational C-H stretch band of ethyl chloride gas. This sensing system enabled the detection of ethyl chloride at concentration levels of 30ppb (v/v) with a response time of 8s probing a sample volume of only 1.5mL in a transmission absorption measurement within the photonic band-gap hollow core waveguide, which corresponds to a sensitivity improvement by three orders of magnitude compared to previously reported results obtained with conventional hollow waveguides.

  17. Analysis of Helical Waveguide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-23

    tube Efficiency Helix structure Backward wave oscillation Gain 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identofy by block number) The...4,vailabilitY CCdes -vai aidIorDist spec a ." iii "- -. .5- S.. . ANALYSIS OF HELICAL WAVEGUIDE I. INTRODUCTION High power (- 10 kW) and broadband ...sys- tems. The frequency range of interest is 60-100 GHz. In this frequency range, the conventional slow wave circuits such as klystrons and TWTs have

  18. Investigation of Truncated Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourie, Nathan P.; Chuss, David T.; Henry, Ross M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance of truncated circular and square waveguide cross-sections are presented. An emphasis is placed upon numerical and experimental validation of simple analytical formulae that describe the propagation properties of these structures. A test component, a 90-degree phase shifter, was fabricated and tested at 30 GHz. The concepts explored can be directly applied in the design, synthesis and optimization of components in the microwave to sub-millimeter wavebands.

  19. Photonic Waveguide Choke Joint with Absorptive Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Chuss, David T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A photonic waveguide choke includes a first waveguide flange member having periodic metal tiling pillars, a dissipative dielectric material positioned within an area between the periodic metal tiling pillars and a second waveguide flange member disposed to be coupled with the first waveguide flange member and in spaced-apart relationship separated by a gap. The first waveguide flange member has a substantially smooth surface, and the second waveguide flange member has an array of two-dimensional pillar structures formed therein.

  20. Folded waveguide coupler

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-03-01

    A resonant cavity waveguide coupler for ICRH of a magnetically confined plasma. The coupler consists of a series of inter-leaved metallic vanes disposed withn an enclosure analogous to a very wide, simple rectangular waveguide that has been "folded" several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a polarizing plate is provided which has coupling apertures aligned with selected folds of the waveguide through which rf waves are launched with magnetic fields of the waves aligned in parallel with the magnetic fields confining the plasma being heated to provide coupling to the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma in the frequency usage of from about 50-200 mHz. A shorting plate terminates the back of the cavity at a distance approximately equal to one-half the guide wavelength from the mouth of the coupler to ensure that the electric field of the waves launched through the polarizing plate apertures are small while the magnetic field is near a maximum. Power is fed into the coupler folded cavity by means of an input coaxial line feed arrangement at a point which provides an impedance match between the cavity and the coaxial input line.

  1. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  2. Waveguide mutually pumped phase conjugators.

    PubMed

    James, S W; Youden, K E; Jeffrey, P M; Eason, R W; Chandler, P J; Zhang, L; Townsend, P D

    1993-09-20

    The operation of the bridge mutually pumped phase conjugator is reported in a planar waveguide structure in photorefractive BaTiO(3). The waveguide was fabricated by the technique of ion implantation, using 1.5-MeVH(+) ions at a dose of 10(16) ions/cm(2). An order of magnitude decrease in response time is observed in the waveguide as compared with typical values obtained in bulk crystals, probably as a result of a combination of the optical confinement within the waveguide and possible modification of the charge-transport properties induced by the implantation process.

  3. Optical lattice-like cladding waveguides by direct laser writing: fabrication, luminescence, and lasing.

    PubMed

    Nie, Weijie; He, Ruiyun; Cheng, Chen; Rocha, Uéslen; Rodríguez Vázquez de Aldana, Javier; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2016-05-15

    We report on the fabrication of optical lattice-like waveguide structures in an Nd:YAP laser crystal by using direct femtosecond laser writing. With periodically arrayed laser-induced tracks, the waveguiding cores can be located in either the regions between the neighbored tracks or the central zone surrounded by a number of tracks as outer cladding. The polarization of the femtosecond laser pulses for the inscription has been found to play a critical role in the anisotropic guiding behaviors of the structures. The confocal photoluminescence investigations reveal different stress-induced modifications of the structures inscribed by different polarization of the femtosecond laser beam, which are considered to be responsible for the refractive index changes of the structures. Under optical pump at 808 nm, efficient waveguide lasing at ∼1  μm wavelength has been realized from the optical lattice-like structure, which exhibits potential applications as novel miniature light sources.

  4. Silver and potassium ion-exchanged waveguides in glasses doped with PbS semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auxier, Jason M.; Honkanen, Seppo; Schülzgen, Axel; Morrell, Michael M.; Leigh, Matthew A.; Sen, Sabyasachi; Borrelli, Nicholas F.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2006-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis of potassium-sodium and silver-sodium ion-exchange processes for fabricating waveguides in glass doped with PbS semiconductor quantum dots. We compare the propagation losses of these waveguides, and we discuss the sources of these losses. In addition, we demonstrate a fourfold reduction in the propagation loss previously reported for potassium-sodium ion-exchanged waveguides and show that waveguides can be produced at additional quantum-dot resonances using both methods. We show that the near-infrared optical properties of these quantum dots remain intact by comparing the waveguide and bulk (unguided) luminescence spectra. Measurements of the near-field mode profiles show a high level of field confinement, which make these waveguides ideal for nonlinear optical (high-intensity) applications.

  5. Fluorescence imaging of lattice re-distribution on step-index direct laser written Nd:YAG waveguide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez de Mendívil, Jon; Pérez Delgado, Alberto; Lifante, Ginés; Jaque, Daniel; Ródenas, Airán; Benayas, Antonio; Aguiló, Magdalena; Diaz, Francesc; Kar, Ajoy K.

    2015-01-14

    The laser performance and crystalline micro-structural properties of near-infrared step-index channel waveguides fabricated inside Neodymium doped YAG laser ceramics by means of three-dimensional sub-picosecond pulse laser direct writing are reported. Fluorescence micro-mapping of the waveguide cross-sections reveals that an essential crystal lattice re-distribution has been induced after short pulse irradiation. Such lattice re-distribution is evidenced at the waveguide core corresponding to the laser written refractive index increased volume. The waveguides core surroundings also present diverse changes including slight lattice disorder and bi-axial strain fields. The step-index waveguide laser performance is compared with previous laser fabricated waveguides with a stress-optic guiding mechanism in absence of laser induced lattice re-distribution.

  6. Phase shift multiplication effect of all-optical analog to electromagnetically induced transparency in two micro-cavities side coupled to a waveguide system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Boyun; Wang, Tao Tang, Jian; Li, Xiaoming; Dong, Chuanbo

    2014-01-14

    We propose phase shift multiplication effect of all-optical analog to electromagnetically induced transparency in two photonic crystal micro-cavities side coupled to a waveguide system through external optical pump beams. With dynamically tuning the propagation phase of the line waveguide, the phase shift of the transmission spectrum in two micro-cavities side coupled to a waveguide system is doubled along with the phase shift of the line waveguide. π-phase shift and 2π-phase shift of the transmission spectrum are obtained when the propagation phase of the line waveguide is tuned to 0.5π-phase shift and π-phase shift, respectively. All observed schemes are analyzed rigorously through finite-difference time-domain simulations and the coupled-mode formalism. These results show a new direction to the miniaturization and the low power consumption of microstructure integration photonic devices in optical communication and quantum information processing.

  7. Group IV mid-infrared photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashanovich, G. Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Soler Penades, J.; Mitchell, C. J.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Littlejohns, C. J.; Stankovic, S.; Troia, B.; Wang, Y.; Reynolds, S.; Passaro, V. M. N.; Shen, L.; Healy, N.; Peacock, A. C.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Rowe, D. J.; Wilkinson, J. S.; Cheben, P.; Ackert, J. J.; Knights, A. P.; Thomson, D. J.; Gardes, F. Y.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we present SOI, suspended Si, and Ge-on-Si photonic platforms and devices for the mid-infrared. We demonstrate low loss strip and slot waveguides in SOI and show efficient strip-slot couplers. A Vernier configuration based on racetrack resonators in SOI has been also investigated. Mid-infrared detection using defect engineered silicon waveguides is reported at the wavelength of 2-2.5 μm. In order to extend transparency of Si waveguides, the bottom oxide cladding needs to be removed. We report a novel suspended Si design based on subwavelength structures that is more robust than previously reported suspended designs. We have fabricated record low loss Ge-on-Si waveguides, as well as several other passive devices in this platform. All optical modulation in Ge is also analyzed.

  8. Development of Proton Exchange Technology in the ISSP—Optical Waveguides in Electro-Optical Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuneva, Mariana

    2010-01-01

    The contribution of the team working in the field of integrated optics in the Institute of Solid State Physics to the development of proton exchange technology is discussed. Some modifications of its parameters (new proton sources) and steps (two-step exchange separated by annealing, for example) are pointed out in respect of their effect on the waveguide properties of proton-exchanged layers. The spectroscopic methods used for phase content characterization of waveguides obtained are also described. These include infrared absorption and reflection spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, mode spectroscopy and micro & waveguide Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Optical characterization of femtosecond laser induced active channel waveguides in lithium fluoride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiamenti, I.; Bonfigli, F.; Gomes, A. S. L.; Michelotti, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Kalinowski, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    We successfully realized broad-band light-emitting color center waveguides buried in LiF crystals by using femtosecond laser pulses. The characterization of the waveguides was performed by optical microscopy, photoluminescence spectra, loss measurements and near-field profiling. The experimental results show that the direct-writing fabrication process induces low-index contrast active channel waveguides: their wavelength-dependent refractive index changes, estimated from 10-3 to 10-4 depending on the writing conditions, allow supporting few modes at visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  10. Optical characterization of femtosecond laser induced active channel waveguides in lithium fluoride crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chiamenti, I.; Kalinowski, H. J.; Bonfigli, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Gomes, A. S. L.; Michelotti, F.

    2014-01-14

    We successfully realized broad-band light-emitting color center waveguides buried in LiF crystals by using femtosecond laser pulses. The characterization of the waveguides was performed by optical microscopy, photoluminescence spectra, loss measurements and near-field profiling. The experimental results show that the direct-writing fabrication process induces low-index contrast active channel waveguides: their wavelength-dependent refractive index changes, estimated from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup −4} depending on the writing conditions, allow supporting few modes at visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  11. Toward a miniaturized fundus camera.

    PubMed

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie; Flynn, John T; Pratisto, Hans; Niederer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) describes a pathological development of the retina in prematurely born children. In order to prevent severe permanent damage to the eye and enable timely treatment, the fundus of the eye in such children has to be examined according to established procedures. For these examinations, our miniaturized fundus camera is intended to allow the acquisition of wide-angle digital pictures of the fundus for on-line or off-line diagnosis and documentation. We designed two prototypes of a miniaturized fundus camera, one with graded refractive index (GRIN)-based optics, the other with conventional optics. Two different modes of illumination were compared: transscleral and transpupillary. In both systems, the size and weight of the camera were minimized. The prototypes were tested on young rabbits. The experiments led to the conclusion that the combination of conventional optics with transpupillary illumination yields the best results in terms of overall image quality.

  12. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  13. Organic photodiodes for biosensor miniaturization.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Jason R; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C; Yamaguchi, Mariko Y; Füreder, Erwin; Pieler, Roland; Schamesberger, Martin; Winder, Christoph; Prall, Hans Jürgen; Sonnleitner, Max; Ligler, Frances S

    2009-05-01

    Biosensors have successfully demonstrated the capability to detect multiple pathogens simultaneously at very low levels. Miniaturization of biosensors is essential for use in the field or at the point of care. While microfluidic systems reduce the footprint for biochemical processing devices and electronic components are continually becoming smaller, optical components suitable for integration--such as LEDs and CMOS chips--are generally still too expensive for disposable components. This paper describes the integration of polymer diodes onto a biosensor chip to create a disposable device that includes both the detector and the sensing surface coated with immobilized capture antibody. We performed a chemiluminescence immunoassay on the OPD substrate and measured the results using a hand-held reader attached to a laptop computer. The miniaturized biosensor with the disposable slide including the organic photodiode detected Staphylococcal enterotoxin B at concentrations as low as 0.5 ng/mL.

  14. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  15. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Rockstad, Howard K. (Inventor); Reynolds, Joseph K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane which would otherwise change deflection depending upon incident infrared radiation. The resulting infrared sensor will meet or exceed the performance of all other broadband, uncooled, infrared sensors and can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. The technology is readily implemented as a small-format linear array suitable for commercial and spacecraft applications.

  16. Organic Photodiodes for Biosensor Miniaturization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    1 pW/mm2. Using this system, sandwich immunoassays were performed on the OPD substrate for detection of Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Results...demonstrated the capability to detect multiple pathogens simultaneously at very low levels. Miniaturization of biosensors is essential for use in the field or...the sensing surface coated with immobilized capture antibody. We performed a chemiluminescence immunoassay on the OPD substrate and measured the results

  17. Handheld interface for miniature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sunny; Samson, Scott A.; Farmer, Andrew; Smith, Matthew C.; Fries, David; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2005-02-01

    Miniaturization of laboratory sensors has been enabled by continued evolution of technology. Field portable systems are often desired, because they reduce sample handling, provide rapid feedback capability, and enhance convenience. Fieldable sensor systems should include a method for initiating the analysis, storing and displaying the results, while consuming minimal power and being compact and portable. Low cost will allow widespread usage of these systems. In this paper, we discuss a reconfigurable Personal Data Assistant (PDA) based control and data collection system for use with miniature sensors. The system is based on the Handspring visor PDA and a custom designed motherboard, which connects directly to the PDA microprocessor. The PDA provides a convenient and low cost graphical user interface, moderate processing capability, and integrated battery power. The low power motherboard provides the voltage levels, data collection, and input/output (I/O) capabilities required by many MEMS and miniature sensors. These capabilities are relayed to connectors, where an application specific daughterboard is attached. In this paper, two applications are demonstrated. First, a handheld nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) detection sensor consisting of a heated and optical fluorescence detection system is discussed. Second, an electrostatically actuated MEMS micro mirror controller is realized.

  18. Mid-IR acoustooptic interaction in planar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriugin, L. N.; Anikin, V. I.; Gudzenko, A. I.; Dneprovskii, V. G.; Terichev, V. F.

    1980-04-01

    The interaction of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and surface optical waves in planar infrared waveguides has been studied experimentally at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, corresponding to the output wavelength of a CO2 laser. In the planar waveguide used, the supporting layer was a film of As-Se chalcogenide glass deposited by thermal evaporation on a substrate of a high-resistivity cadmium sulfide single crystal. Diffraction efficiency vs acoustic power and diffraction efficiency vs SAW frequency plots are presented. The maximum intensity of the diffracted light was observed when the infrared light was incident on the acoustic column at an angle of 1 deg 59 min, which is in good agreement with the calculated value.

  19. Integration of quantum cascade lasers and passive waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Juan; Wang, Christine; Goyal, Anish; Creedon, Kevin; Connors, Michael; Daulton, Jeffrey; Donnelly, Joseph; Missaggia, Leo; Aleshire, Chris; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio; Herzog, William

    2015-07-01

    We report on monolithic integration of active quantum cascade laser (QCL) materials with passive waveguides formed by using proton implantation. Proton implantation reduces the electron concentration in the QCL layers by creating deep levels that trap carriers. This strongly reduces the intersubband absorption and the free-carrier absorption in the gain region and surrounding layers, thus significantly reducing optical loss. We have measured loss as low as α = 0.33 cm-1 in λ = 9.6 μm wavelength proton-implanted QCL material. We have also demonstrated lasing in active-passive integrated waveguides. This simple integration technique is anticipated to enable low-cost fabrication in infrared photonic integrated circuits in the mid-infrared (λ ˜ 3-16 μm).

  20. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  1. Cavity-resonator-integrated guided-mode resonance filter for aperture miniaturization.

    PubMed

    Kintaka, Kenji; Majima, Tatsuya; Inoue, Junichi; Hatanaka, Koji; Nishii, Junji; Ura, Shogo

    2012-01-16

    A guided-mode resonance filter integrated in a waveguide cavity resonator constructed by two distributed Bragg reflectors is designed and fabricated for miniaturization of aperture size. Reflection efficiency of >90% and wavelength selectivity of 0.4 nm are predicted in the designed SiO(2)-based filter with 50-μm aperture by a numerical calculation using the finite-difference time-domain method. A maximum reflectance of 67% with 0.5-nm bandwidth is experimentally demonstrated by the fabricated device at around 850-nm wavelength.

  2. Seismic Waveguide of Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Das, Mukunda P.

    We developed a new method of an earthquake-resistant design to support conventional aseismic system using acoustic metamaterials. The device is an attenuator of a seismic wave that reduces the amplitude of the wave exponentially. Constructing a cylindrical shell-type waveguide composed of many Helmholtz resonators that creates a stop-band for the seismic frequency range, we convert the seismic wave into an attenuated one without touching the building that we want to protect. It is a mechanical way to convert the seismic energy into sound and heat.

  3. FY 2007 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2008-02-20

    Miniature spherical retroreflectors, less than 8 millimeters in diameter, are currently being developed to enhance remote optical detection of nuclear proliferation activities. These retroreflecting spheres resemble small, sand-colored marbles that have the unique optical property of providing a strong reflection directly back to the source (i.e., retroreflecting) when illuminated with a laser. The addition of specific coatings, sensitive to specific chemicals or radioactive decay in the environment, can be applied to the surface of these retroreflectors to provide remote detection of nuclear proliferation activities. The presence of radioactive decay (e.g., alpha, gamma, neutron) or specific chemicals in the environment (e.g., TBP, acids) will change the optical properties of the spheres in a predictable fashion, thus indicating the presence or absence of the target materials. One possible scenario might employ an airborne infrared laser system (e.g., quantum-cascade lasers) to illuminate a section of ground littered with these retroreflective spheres. Depending on the coating and the presence of a specific chemical or radioisotope in the environment, the return signal would be modified in some predictable fashion because of fluorescence, frequency shifting, intensity attenuation/enhancement, or change in polarization. Research conducted in FY 2007 focused on developing novel optical fabrication processes and exploiting the unique material properties of chalcogenide infrared-transparent glass (germanium-arsenic-sulfur-tellurium compounds) to produce highly efficient retroreflectors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s approach provides comparable performance to the ideal graded index sphere concept, developed by R. K. Luneburg in 1944 (Luneburg 1944), while greatly reducing the complexity in fabrication by utilizing chalcogenide glass materials and compression-molding processes.

  4. Miniaturization of flight deflection measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodale, Robert (Inventor); Hampton, Herbert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A flight deflection measurement system is disclosed including a hybrid microchip of a receiver/decoder. The hybrid microchip decoder is mounted piggy back on the miniaturized receiver and forms an integral unit therewith. The flight deflection measurement system employing the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be used in a wind tunnel. In particular, the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be employed in a spin measurement system due to its small size and can retain already established control surface actuation functions.

  5. Integrated planar optical waveguide interferometer biosensors: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Peter; Kehl, Florian; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Stamm, Christoph; Bier, Frank F

    2014-08-15

    Integrated planar optical waveguide interferometer biosensors are advantageous combinations of evanescent field sensing and optical phase difference measurement methods. By probing the near surface region of a sensor area with the evanescent field, any change of the refractive index of the probed volume induces a phase shift of the guided mode compared to a reference field typically of a mode propagating through the reference arm of the same waveguide structure. The interfering fields of these modes produce an interference signal detected at the sensor׳s output, whose alteration is proportional to the refractive index change. This signal can be recorded, processed and related to e.g. the concentration of an analyte in the solution of interest. Although this sensing principle is relatively simple, studies about integrated planar optical waveguide interferometer biosensors can mostly be found in the literature covering the past twenty years. During these two decades, several members of this sensor family have been introduced, which have remarkably advantageous properties. These entail label-free and non-destructive detection, outstandingly good sensitivity and detection limit, cost-effective and simple production, ability of multiplexing and miniaturization. Furthermore, these properties lead to low reagent consumption, short analysis time and open prospects for point-of-care applications. The present review collects the most relevant developments of the past twenty years categorizing them into two main groups, such as common- and double path waveguide interferometers. In addition, it tries to maintain the historical order as it is possible and it compares the diverse sensor designs in order to reveal not only the development of this field in time, but to contrast the advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches and sensor families, as well.

  6. Near-field observation of light propagation in nanocoax waveguides.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Juan M; Ye, Fan; Rizal, Binod; Burns, Michael J; Naughton, Michael J

    2014-06-16

    We report the observation of propagating modes of visible and near infrared light in nanoscale coaxial (metal-dielectric-metal) structures, using near-field scanning optical microscopy. Together with numerical calculations, we show that the propagated modes have different nature depending on the excitation wavelength, i.e., plasmonic TE11 and TE21 modes in the near infrared and photonic TE31, TE41 and TM11 modes in the visible. Far field transmission out of the nanocoaxes is dominated by the superposition of Fabry-Perot cavity modes resonating in the structures, consistent with theory. Such coaxial optical waveguides may be useful for future nanoscale photonic systems.

  7. CO2 laser waveguiding in proton implanted GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkinson, H. A.; Larson, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Surface layers capable of supporting optical modes at 10.6 microns have been produced in n-type GaAs wafers through 300 keV proton implantation. The dominant mechanism for this effect appears to be free carrier compensation. Characterization of the implanted layers by analysis of infrared reflectivity spectra and synchronous coupling at 10.6 microns produced results in good agreement with elementary models. These results of sample characterization by infrared reflectivity and by CO2 laser waveguiding as implanted are presented and evaluated.

  8. Integrated optic waveguide devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramer, O. G.

    1980-01-01

    Integrated optic waveguide circuits with a phase bias and modulator on the same chip were designed, fabricated, and tested for use in a fiber-optic rotation sensor (gyro) under development. Single mode fiber-optic pigtails were permanently coupled to the four ports of the chip. The switch format was based on coherent coupling between waveguides formed in Z-cut LiNbO3. The control of the coupling was achieved by electro-optically varying the phase propagation constants of each guide. Fiber-to-chip interfacing required the development of appropriate fixturing and manipulation techniques to achieve the close tolerance needed for high coupling efficiency between a fiber with an approximately 5 micron m core and a channel guide with a roughly 2 micron m by 5 micron m cross section. Switch and chip performance at 0.85 micron m is discussed as well as potential improvements related to insertion loss reduction, switching voltages, and suppression of Li2O out-diffusion.

  9. Broadband nanophotonic waveguides and resonators based on epitaxial GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bruch, Alexander W.; Xiong, Chi; Leung, Benjamin; Poot, Menno; Han, Jung; Tang, Hong X.

    2015-10-05

    We demonstrate broadband, low loss optical waveguiding in single crystalline GaN grown epitaxially on c-plane sapphire wafers through a buffered metal-organic chemical vapor phase deposition process. High Q optical microring resonators are realized in near infrared, infrared, and near visible regimes with intrinsic quality factors exceeding 50 000 at all the wavelengths we studied. TEM analysis of etched waveguide reveals growth and etch-induced defects. Reduction of these defects through improved material and device processing could lead to even lower optical losses and enable a wideband photonic platform based on GaN-on-sapphire material system.

  10. Ultrahigh refractive index chalcogenide based copolymers for infrared optics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Laura E.; Namnabat, Soha; Char, Kookheon; Glass, Richard; Norwood, Robert A.; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    Current trends in technology development demand increased miniaturization and higher level integration of electronic and photonic components. Such needs arise in emerging imaging systems, optoelectronic devices, optical interconnects and photonic integrated circuits. Compact, integrated photonics requires high refractive index materials, which primarily comprise crystalline and amorphous semiconductors, as well as chalcogenide glasses, which can possess refractive indices higher than 4 and good infrared transparency. There is currently no high refractive index (n 2 or above) that has the low cost production and ease of processing available in optical polymers. Such polymers would potentially cover applications that are not convenient or possible with crystalline and vitreous semiconductors. Examples of such applications include micro lens arrays for image sensors, optical adhesives for bonding and antireflection coatings, and high contrast optical waveguides. While much of the focus has been in the telecommunications transparency regions, significant new opportunities exist for a polymer which is capable of transmitting efficiently in the MWIR region. While there are polymers that have been synthesized with refractive indices as high as 1.75, these polymers are generally conjugated and incorporate heteroatoms such as sulfur or metals, and generally have complex and expensive syntheses. Here we report on new chalcogenide based copolymers with very high refractive index (n 2) that also have good optical transmission properties in the near-, short- and mid-wave infrared up to 5µm. These polymers are rich in sulfur, have low hydrogen content and were made using inverse vulcanization.

  11. Monolithically integrated mid-infrared lab-on-a-chip using plasmonics and quantum cascade structures

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Benedikt; Reininger, Peter; Ristanić, Daniela; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    The increasing demand of rapid sensing and diagnosis in remote areas requires the development of compact and cost-effective mid-infrared sensing devices. So far, all miniaturization concepts have been demonstrated with discrete optical components. Here we present a monolithically integrated sensor based on mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy. A bi-functional quantum cascade laser/detector is used, where, by changing the applied bias, the device switches between laser and detector operation. The interaction with chemicals in a liquid is resolved via a dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguide. The thin dielectric layer enhances the confinement and enables efficient end-fire coupling from and to the laser and detector. The unamplified detector signal shows a slope of 1.8–7 μV per p.p.m., which demonstrates the capability to reach p.p.m. accuracy over a wide range of concentrations (0–60%). Without any hybrid integration or subwavelength patterning, our approach allows a straightforward and cost-saving fabrication. PMID:24905443

  12. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  13. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H.

    1981-11-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  14. Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle (MARV)

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Spletzer, B.L.; Weber, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has recently developed a 16 cm{sup 3} (1 in{sup 3}) autonomous robotic vehicle which is capable of tracking a single conducting wire carrying a 96 kHz signal. This vehicle was developed to assess the limiting factors in using commercial technology to build miniature autonomous vehicles. Particular attention was paid to the design of the control system to search out the wire, track it, and recover if the wire was lost. This paper describes the test vehicle and the control analysis. Presented in the paper are the vehicle model, control laws, a stability analysis, simulation studies and experimental results.

  15. Enhanced absorption in silicon metamaterials waveguide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouche, Houria; Shabat, Mohammed M.

    2016-07-01

    Metamaterial waveguide structures for silicon solar cells are a novel approach to antireflection coating structures that can be used for the achievement of high absorption in silicon solar cells. This paper investigates numerically the possibility of improving the performance of a planar waveguide silicon solar cell by incorporating a pair of silicon nitride/metamaterial layer between a semi-infinite glass cover layer and a semi-infinite silicon substrate layer. The optimized layer thicknesses of the pair are determined under the solar spectrum AM1.5 by the effective average reflectance method. The transmission and reflection coefficients are derived by the transfer matrix method for values of metamaterial's refractive index in visible and near-infrared radiation. In addition, the absorption coefficient is examined for several angles of incidence of the transverse electric polarized (TE), transverse magnetic polarized (TM) and the total (TE&TM) guided waves. Numerical results provide an extremely high absorption. The absorptivity of the structure achieves greater than 98 %.

  16. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  17. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  18. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  19. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  20. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  1. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  2. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  3. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  4. FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Qiao, Hong; Schultz, John F.

    2006-12-28

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics and optical fiber processing methods for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

  5. Lightweight, Miniature Inertial Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Liang; Crassidis, Agamemnon

    2012-01-01

    A miniature, lighter-weight, and highly accurate inertial navigation system (INS) is coupled with GPS receivers to provide stable and highly accurate positioning, attitude, and inertial measurements while being subjected to highly dynamic maneuvers. In contrast to conventional methods that use extensive, groundbased, real-time tracking and control units that are expensive, large, and require excessive amounts of power to operate, this method focuses on the development of an estimator that makes use of a low-cost, miniature accelerometer array fused with traditional measurement systems and GPS. Through the use of a position tracking estimation algorithm, onboard accelerometers are numerically integrated and transformed using attitude information to obtain an estimate of position in the inertial frame. Position and velocity estimates are subject to drift due to accelerometer sensor bias and high vibration over time, and so require the integration with GPS information using a Kalman filter to provide highly accurate and reliable inertial tracking estimations. The method implemented here uses the local gravitational field vector. Upon determining the location of the local gravitational field vector relative to two consecutive sensors, the orientation of the device may then be estimated, and the attitude determined. Improved attitude estimates further enhance the inertial position estimates. The device can be powered either by batteries, or by the power source onboard its target platforms. A DB9 port provides the I/O to external systems, and the device is designed to be mounted in a waterproof case for all-weather conditions.

  6. Miniaturized neural interfaces and implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Boretius, Tim; Ordonez, Juan; Hassler, Christina; Henle, Christian; Meier, Wolfgang; Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Schuettler, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Neural prostheses are technical systems that interface nerves to treat the symptoms of neurological diseases and to restore sensory of motor functions of the body. Success stories have been written with the cochlear implant to restore hearing, with spinal cord stimulators to treat chronic pain as well as urge incontinence, and with deep brain stimulators in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Highly complex neural implants for novel medical applications can be miniaturized either by means of precision mechanics technologies using known and established materials for electrodes, cables, and hermetic packages or by applying microsystems technologies. Examples for both approaches will be introduced and discussed. Electrode arrays for recording of electrocorticograms during presurgical epilepsy diagnosis have been manufactured using approved materials and a marking laser to achieve an integration density that is adequate in the context of brain machine interfaces, e.g. on the motor cortex. Microtechnologies have to be used for further miniaturization to develop polymer-based flexible and light weighted electrode arrays to interface the peripheral and central nervous system. Polyimide as substrate and insulation material will be discussed as well as several application examples for nerve interfaces like cuffs, filament like electrodes and large arrays for subdural implantation.

  7. Low-loss CMOS copper plasmonic waveguides at the nanoscale (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Y.; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I.; Kirtaev, Roman V.; Volkov, Valentyn S.

    2016-05-01

    Implementation of optical components in microprocessors can increase their performance by orders of magnitude. However, the size of optical elements is fundamentally limited by diffraction, while miniaturization is one of the essential concepts in the development of high-speed and energy-efficient electronic chips. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are widely considered to be promising candidates for the next generation of chip-scale technology thanks to the ability to break down the fundamental diffraction limit and manipulate optical signals at the truly nometer scale. In the past years, a variety of deep-subwavelength plasmonic structures have been proposed and investigated, including dielectric-loaded SPP waveguides, V-groove waveguides, hybrid plasmonic waveguides and metal nanowires. At the same time, for practical application, such waveguide structures must be integrated on a silicon chip and be fabricated using CMOS fabrication process. However, to date, acceptable characteristics have been demonstrated only with noble metals (gold and silver), which are not compatible with industry-standard manufacturing technologies. On the other hand, alternative materials introduce enormous propagation losses due absorption in the metal. This prevents plasmonic components from implementation in on-chip nanophotonic circuits. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time that copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a CMOS compatible process can outperform gold waveguides showing the same level of mode confinement and lower propagation losses. At telecommunication wavelengths, the fabricated ultralow-loss deep-subwavelength hybrid plasmonic waveguides ensure a relatively long propagation length of more than 50 um along with strong mode confinement with the mode size down to lambda^2/70, which is confirmed by direct scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) measurements. These results create the backbone for design and development of high

  8. Complete power concentration into a single waveguide in large-scale waveguide array lenses

    PubMed Central

    Catrysse, Peter B.; Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    Waveguide array lenses are waveguide arrays that focus light incident on all waveguides at the input side into a small number of waveguides at the output side. Ideal waveguide array lenses provide complete (100%) power concentration of incident light into a single waveguide. While of great interest for several applications, ideal waveguide array lenses have not been demonstrated for practical arrays with large numbers of waveguides. The only waveguide arrays that have sufficient degrees of freedom to allow for the design of an ideal waveguide array lens are those where both the propagation constants of the individual waveguides and the coupling constants between the waveguides vary as a function of space. Here, we use state-of-the-art numerical methods to demonstrate complete power transfer into a single waveguide for waveguide array lenses with large numbers of waveguides. We verify this capability for more than a thousand waveguides using a spatial coupled mode theory. We hereby extend the state-of-art by more than two orders of magnitude. We also demonstrate for the first time a physical design for an ideal waveguide array lens. The design is based on an aperiodic metallic waveguide array and focuses ~100% of the incident light into a deep-subwavelength focal spot. PMID:25319203

  9. Coplanar waveguide supercomponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Mike

    The application of coplanar-waveguide (CPWG) technology to develop rugged compact high-performance electronic components for use in military receivers and similar equipment is described and illustrated with diagrams and photographs of typical CPWG implementations. The operating principles and characteristics of CPWGs are reviewed; the advantages and limitations of stripline, microstrip, and CPWG technologies are listed in a table and compared; and the inherently good isolation, the ease of making series and shunt connections, and the flexibility of ground-plane spacing of CPWGs are emphasized. The CPWG-based components shown include a Ku-band dual downconverter with 17 different functional circuits, an antenna switching unit with switches, driver, couplers, and ferrite devices; and two mixed-media multifunction hybrid components.

  10. Nonlinear Waves in Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leble, Sergei B.

    S.B. Leble's book deals with nonlinear waves and their propagation in metallic and dielectric waveguides and media with stratification. The underlying nonlinear evolution equations (NEEs) are derived giving also their solutions for specific situations. The reader will find new elements to the traditional approach. Various dispersion and relaxation laws for different guides are considered as well as the explicit form of projection operators, NEEs, quasi-solitons and of Darboux transforms. Special points relate to: 1. the development of a universal asymptotic method of deriving NEEs for guide propagation; 2. applications to the cases of stratified liquids, gases, solids and plasmas with various nonlinearities and dispersion laws; 3. connections between the basic problem and soliton- like solutions of the corresponding NEEs; 4. discussion of details of simple solutions in higher- order nonsingular perturbation theory.

  11. Environmental study of miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radnik, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    Investigation studied the long term operation of miniature slip ring assembles in high vacuum of space and included the influence of ring, brush, and insulator materials on electrical noise and mechanical wear. Results show that soft metal vapor plating and niobium diselenide miniature slip rings are beneficial.

  12. Anthrax vaccine associated deaths in miniature horses.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, Bruce K

    2015-04-01

    During a widespread anthrax outbreak in Canada, miniature horses were vaccinated using a live spore anthrax vaccine. Several of these horses died from an apparent immune-mediated vasculitis temporally associated with this vaccination. During the course of the outbreak, other miniature horses from different regions with a similar vaccination history, clinical signs, and necropsy findings were found.

  13. Miniature reaction chamber and devices incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2000-10-17

    The present invention generally relates to miniaturized devices for carrying out and controlling chemical reactions and analyses. In particular, the present invention provides devices which have miniature temperature controlled reaction chambers for carrying out a variety of synthetic and diagnostic applications, such as PCR amplification, nucleic acid hybridization, chemical labeling, nucleic acid fragmentation and the like.

  14. Cr:ZnSe planar waveguide mid-IR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willimas, J. E.; Martyshkin, D. V.; Fedorov, V. V.; Moskalev, I. S.; Camata, R. P.; Mirov, S. B.

    2011-02-01

    Middle infrared (mid-IR) chromium-doped zinc selenide (Cr:ZnSe) bulk lasers have attracted a lot of attention due to their unique combination of optical and laser properties facilitating a wide range of potential scientific, industrial, and medical applications. Utilization of thin film waveguide geometry enabling good thermal management and control of beam quality is a viable pathway for compact chip-integrated optical laser design. Cr:ZnSe thin films are also promising as saturable absorbers and mode-lockers of the cavities of solid state lasers operating over 1.3-2.1 μm. We recently reported the first successful demonstration of mid-IR Cr:ZnSe planar waveguide lasing at 2.6 μm under gain-switched short-pulse (5 ns) 1.56 μm excitation as well as the passive Q-switching of the cavity of a fiber-pumped Er:YAG laser operating at 1645 nm using a highly doped Cr:ZnSe thin film. PLD grown Cr:ZnSe waveguide were fabricated on sapphire substrates (Cr:ZnSe/sapphire) with chromium concentration of 1018-1019 cm-3. Further development of mid-IR lasing in the Cr:ZnSe planar waveguide under continuous wave excitation were investigated. In addition, deposition of Cr:ZnSe-based thin film structures on n-type GaAs substrates were also investigated for possible mid-IR electroluminescence.

  15. Stimulated degenerate four-wave mixing in Si nanocrystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Santanu; Bernard, Martino; Biasi, Stefano; Ramiro Manzano, Fernando; Mancinelli, Mattia; Ghulinyan, Mher; Pucker, George; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Parametric frequency conversion via four-wave mixing (FWM) in silicon nanocrystal (Si NC) waveguides is observed at 1550 nm. To investigate the role of Si NC, different types of waveguides containing Si NC in a SiO2 matrix were fabricated. Owing to the increase of the dipole oscillator strength mediated by the quantum confinement effect, the non-linear refractive index ({n}2) of Si NCs is found to be more than one order of magnitude larger than the one of bulk Si. Coupled differential equations for the degenerate FWM process taking into account the role of Si NC were numerically solved to model the experimental data. The modeling yields an effective {n}2 for Si NCs in SiO2 waveguides which is similar to the one of Si waveguides. We also measured a large signal to idler conversion bandwidth of ∼22 nm. The large non-linear refractive index is joined with a large two photon absorption coefficient which makes the use of Si NC in non-linear optical devices mostly suitable for mid-infrared applications.

  16. Simultaneous quasi-one-dimensional propagation and tuning of upconversion luminescence through waveguide effect

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dangli; Tian, Dongping; Zhang, Xiangyu; Gao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence-based waveguide is widely investigated as a promising alternative to conquer the difficulties of efficiently coupling light into a waveguide. But applications have been still limited due to employing blue or ultraviolet light as excitation source with the lower penetration depth leading to a weak guided light. Here, we show a quasi-one-dimensional propagation of luminescence and then resulting in a strong luminescence output from the top end of a single NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ microtube under near infrared light excitation. The mechanism of upconversion propagation, based on the optical waveguide effect accompanied with energy migration, is proposed. The efficiency of luminescence output is highly dependent on the concentration of dopant ions, excitation power, morphology, and crystallinity of tube as an indirect evidence of the existence of the optical actived waveguide effect. These findings provide the possibility for the construction of upconversion fiber laser. PMID:26926491

  17. Waveguides for performing enzymatic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Levene; Michael J. , Korlach; Jonas , Turner; Stephen W. , Craighead; Harold G. , Webb; Watt W.

    2007-11-06

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode wave guide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  18. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created in practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.

  19. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created inmore » practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.« less

  20. Advances in Miniaturized Instruments for Genomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of demonstrations of the miniaturized instruments were reported for genomic applications. They provided the advantages of miniaturization, automation, sensitivity, and specificity for the development of point-of-care diagnostics. The aim of this paper is to report on recent developments on miniaturized instruments for genomic applications. Based on the mature development of microfabrication, microfluidic systems have been demonstrated for various genomic detections. Since one of the objectives of miniaturized instruments is for the development of point-of-care device, impedimetric detection is found to be a promising technique for this purpose. An in-depth discussion of the impedimetric circuits and systems will be included to provide total consideration of the miniaturized instruments and their potential application towards real-time portable imaging in the “-omics” era. The current excellent demonstrations suggest a solid foundation for the development of practical and widespread point-of-care genomic diagnostic devices. PMID:25114919

  1. Miniature Microwave Applicator for Murine Bladder Hyperthermia Studies

    PubMed Central

    Salahi, Sara; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Rodrigues, Dario B.; Etienne, Wiguins; Landon, Chelsea D.; Inman, Brant A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Novel combinations of heat with chemotherapeutic agents are often studied in murine tumor models. Currently, no device exists to selectively heat small tumors at depth in mice. In this project, we modelled, built and tested a miniature microwave heat applicator, the physical dimensions of which can be scaled to adjust the volume and depth of heating to focus on the tumor volume. Of particular interest is a device that can selectively heat murine bladder. Materials and Methods Using Avizo® segmentation software, we created a numerical mouse model based on micro-MRI scan data. The model was imported into HFSS™ simulation software and parametric studies were performed to optimize the dimensions of a water-loaded circular waveguide for selective power deposition inside a 0.15ml bladder. A working prototype was constructed operating at 2.45GHz. Heating performance was characterized by mapping fiber-optic temperature sensors along catheters inserted at depths of 0-1mm (subcutaneous), 2-3mm (vaginal), and 4-5mm (rectal) below the abdominal wall, with the mid-depth catheter adjacent to the bladder. Core temperature was monitored orally. Results Thermal measurements confirm the simulations which demonstrate that this applicator can provide local heating at depth in small animals. Measured temperatures in murine pelvis show well-localized bladder heating to 42-43°C while maintaining normothermic skin and core temperatures. Conclusions Simulation techniques facilitate the design optimization of microwave antennas for use in pre-clinical applications such as localized tumor heating in small animals. Laboratory measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of a new miniature water-coupled microwave applicator for localized heating of murine bladder. PMID:22690856

  2. Multiscaffold DNA Origami Nanoparticle Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami templated self-assembly has shown its potential in creating rationally designed nanophotonic devices in a parallel and repeatable manner. In this investigation, we employ a multiscaffold DNA origami approach to fabricate linear waveguides of 10 nm diameter gold nanoparticles. This approach provides independent control over nanoparticle separation and spatial arrangement. The waveguides were characterized using atomic force microscopy and far-field polarization spectroscopy. This work provides a path toward large-scale plasmonic circuitry. PMID:23841957

  3. Optical Waveguide Scattering Reduction. II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    FAD-AOAR 815 BATTELLEWCOLUMBUS LABS ON F/S 20/6 OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE SCATTER ING REDUC TION. II.(U) 7 DEC 80 0 W VAHEY, N F HARTMAN, R C SHERMAN F3361... OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE SCATTERING REDUCTION II M BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABORATORIES 505 KING AVENUE COLUMBUS, OHIO 43201 DTIC ELECTEf MAY 12 198111 December...reviewed and is approved for publication. DOUGLAS AWIWILLE, Project Engineer KENNETH R. HUTCHINSON, Chief Electro- Optics Techniques and Electro- Optics

  4. MHD waveguides in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, N. G.; Fedorov, E. N.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2010-07-15

    The waveguide properties of two characteristic formations in the Earth's magnetotail-the plasma sheet and the current (neutral) sheet-are considered. The question of how the domains of existence of different types of MHD waveguide modes (fast and slow, body and surface) in the (k, {omega}) plane and their dispersion properties depend on the waveguide parameters is studied. Investigation of the dispersion relation in a number of particular (limiting) cases makes it possible to obtain a fairly complete qualitative pattern of all the branches of the dispersion curve. Accounting for the finite size of perturbations across the wave propagation direction reveals new additional effects such as a change in the critical waveguide frequencies, the excitation of longitudinal current at the boundaries of the sheets, and a change in the symmetry of the fundamental mode. Knowledge of the waveguide properties of the plasma and current sheets can explain the occurrence of preferred frequencies in the low-frequency fluctuation spectra in the magnetotail. In satellite observations, the type of waveguide mode can be determined from the spectral properties, as well as from the phase relationships between plasma oscillations and magnetic field oscillations that are presented in this paper.

  5. Modal Filters for Infrared Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ksendzov, Alexander; MacDonald, Daniel R.; Soibel, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Modal filters in the approximately equal to 10-micrometer spectral range have been implemented as planar dielectric waveguides in infrared interferometric applications such as searching for Earth-like planets. When looking for a small, dim object ("Earth") in close proximity to a large, bright object ("Sun"), the interferometric technique uses beams from two telescopes combined with a 180 phase shift in order to cancel the light from a brighter object. The interferometer baseline can be adjusted so that, at the same time, the light from the dimmer object arrives at the combiner in phase. This light can be detected and its infrared (IR) optical spectra can be studied. The cancellation of light from the "Sun" to approximately equal to 10(exp 6) is required; this is not possible without special devices-modal filters- that equalize the wavefronts arriving from the two telescopes. Currently, modal filters in the approximately equal to 10-micrometer spectral range are implemented as single- mode fibers. Using semiconductor technology, single-mode waveguides for use as modal filters were fabricated. Two designs were implemented: one using an InGaAs waveguide layer matched to an InP substrate, and one using InAlAs matched to an InP substrate. Photon Design software was used to design the waveguides, with the main feature all designs being single-mode operation in the 10.5- to 17-micrometer spectral range. Preliminary results show that the filter's rejection ratio is 26 dB.

  6. Dispersion-controlled slow light in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toshihiko; Adachi, Jun; Ishikura, Norihiro; Hamachi, Yohei; Sasaki, Hirokazu; Kawasaki, Takashi; Mori, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    Slow light with a markedly low group velocity is a promising solution for optical buffering and advanced time-domain optical signal processing. It is also anticipated to enhance linear and nonlinear effects and so miniaturize functional photonic devices because slow light compresses optical energy in space. Photonic crystal waveguide devices generate on-chip slow light at room temperature with a wide bandwidth and low dispersion suitable for short pulse transmission. This paper first explains the delay-bandwidth product, fractional delay, and tunability as crucial criteria for buffering capacity of slow light devices. Then the paper describes experimental observations of slow light pulse, exhibiting their record high values. It also demonstrates the nonlinear enhancement based on slow light pulse transmission.

  7. Biocompatible silk step-index optical waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, Matthew B.; Perotto, Giovanni; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatible optical waveguides were constructed entirely of silk fibroin. A silk film (n=1.54) was encapsulated within a silk hydrogel (n=1.34) to form a robust and biocompatible waveguide. Such waveguides were made using only biologically and environmentally friendly materials without the use of harsh solvents. Light was coupled into the silk waveguides by direct incorporation of a glass optical fiber. These waveguides are extremely flexible, and strong enough to survive handling and manipulation. Cutback measurements showed propagation losses of approximately 2 dB/cm. The silk waveguides were found to be capable of guiding light through biological tissue. PMID:26600988

  8. Waveguide harmonic damper for klystron amplifier.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.

    1998-10-27

    A waveguide harmonic damper was designed for removing the harmonic frequency power from the klystron amplifiers of the APS linac. Straight coaxial probe antennas are used in a rectangular waveguide to form a damper. A linear array of the probe antennas is used on a narrow wall of the rectangular waveguide for damping klystron harmonics while decoupling the fundamental frequency in dominent TE{sub 01} mode. The klystron harmonics can exist in the waveguide as waveguide higher-order modes above cutoff. Computer simulations are made to investigate the waveguide harmonic damping characteristics of the damper.

  9. Miniaturization of a Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Jamie D.; Jones, Evan O.; Dagle, Robert A.; Xia, Gordon; Cao, Chunshe; Wang, Yong

    2005-09-01

    The development of a miniaturized hydrogen plant is discussed. The micro-scale system is capable of producing 1-5 sccm hydrogen that could be used as a fuel supply in a small fuel cell to produce <1 W power. The paper describes the developmental approach, significant unit operations, material selection, and reactor design. The final microscale fuel processing system is composed of a catalytic combustor, catalytic methanol reformer, selective methanation reactor, and the necessary vaporizers and heat exchangers. The fuel processing system is less than 0.3 cm3 and less than 1 gram mass. Thermal efficiencies as high as 33% for hydrogen production were achieved. When a methanation reactor was incorporated into the system, a carbon monoxide level of less than 100 ppm was reached, but at a reduced system efficiency. Further development work includes increasing efficiency through improved system integration.

  10. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, Jr., David N.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components.

  11. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-10-21

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations is disclosed, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components. 2 figs.

  12. Overview of the miniaturization technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrington, Robert O., Jr.

    1995-09-01

    This overview paper will cover the miniaturization technologies as applied to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) or micromanufacturing. Technologies reviewed will include bulk and surface micromachining of silicon, the high-aspect ratio technologies including deep X-ray lithography (LIGA) and photo sensitive polyimide, and the complementary processes which include micro-drilling, milling, turning, and electrical discharge machining, laser based micromachining and focussed ion beam micromachining. Examples of each of the process technologies will be given and a capabilities comparison among the technologies will be presented. A historical comparison of MEMS with the vlsi industry will be made and the current status and market forecast for these technologies will be presented. A brief comparison of US research with current research in Japan and Europe will be made along with comments about the status of US research, including current research projects at the Institute for Micromanufacturing.

  13. Miniature drag-force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag-force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilever beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain-gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like those of a second-order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  14. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

  15. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  16. Miniature laser ignited bellows motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renfro, Steven L.; Beckman, Tom M.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature optically ignited actuation device has been demonstrated using a laser diode as an ignition source. This pyrotechnic driven motor provides between 4 and 6 lbs of linear force across a 0.090 inch diameter surface. The physical envelope of the device is 1/2 inch long and 1/8 inch diameter. This unique application of optical energy can be used as a mechanical link in optical arming systems or other applications where low shock actuation is desired and space is limited. An analysis was performed to determine pyrotechnic materials suitable to actuate a bellows device constructed of aluminum or stainless steel. The aluminum bellows was chosen for further development and several candidate pyrotechnics were evaluated. The velocity profile and delivered force were quantified using an non-intrusive optical motion sensor.

  17. Miniature mechanical transfer optical coupler

    DOEpatents

    Abel, Philip [Overland Park, KS; Watterson, Carl [Kansas City, MO

    2011-02-15

    A miniature mechanical transfer (MT) optical coupler ("MMTOC") for optically connecting a first plurality of optical fibers with at least one other plurality of optical fibers. The MMTOC may comprise a beam splitting element, a plurality of collimating lenses, and a plurality of alignment elements. The MMTOC may optically couple a first plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a first MT connector with a second plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a second MT connector and a third plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a third MT connector. The beam splitting element may allow a portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to pass through to the second plurality of fibers and simultaneously reflect another portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to the third plurality of fibers.

  18. Miniaturization of planar horn motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-04-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of a stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2×2×2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of 3 × 3 × 0.2 cm.

  19. Miniaturization of Planar Horn Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2x2x2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of3 x 3x 0.2 cm.

  20. Converting mid-infrared signals to near-infrared through optomechanical transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapsalis, A.; Mesaritakis, C.; Bogris, A.; Syvridis, D.

    2015-01-01

    Mid-infrared silicon photonics emerge as the dominant technology to bridge photonics and electronics in multifunctional high-speed integrated chips. The transmission and processing of optical signals lying at the mid-infrared wavelength region is ideal for sensing, absorption-spectroscopy and free-space communications and the use of group IV materials becomes principally promising as the vehicle towards their realization. In parallel, optical forces originating from modes and cavities can reach to outstandingly large values when sizes drop into the nanoscale. In this work, we propose the exploitation of large gradient optical forces generated between suspended silicon beams and optomechanical transduction as a means of converting signals from the mid-infrared to the near-infrared region. A midinfrared signal is injected into the waveguide system so as to excite the fundamental symmetric mode. In the 2-5μm wavelength range, separation gaps in the 100nm order and waveguide widths ranging from 300-600nm, the mode is mostly guided in the air slot between the waveguides which maximizes the optomechanical coupling coefficient and optical force. The resulting attractive force deflects the waveguides and the deflection is linearly dependent on the midinfrared optical power. A simple read-out technique using 1.55μm signals with conventional waveguiding in the directional coupler formed by the two beams is analyzed. A positive conversion efficiency (<0dB) is foreseen for waveguides with suspending lengths up to 150μm. The converter could be ideal for use in sensing and spectroscopy rendering the inefficient mid-infrared detectors obsolete. The low-index unconventional guiding in mid-infrared could be a key component towards multifunctional lab-on-a-chip devices.

  1. Advanced infrared laser modulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheo, P. K.; Wagner, R.; Gilden, M.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to develop an electrooptic waveguide modulator for generating continuous tunable sideband power from an infrared CO2 laser. Parameters included were the waveguide configurations, microstrip dimensions device impedance, and effective dielectric constants. An optimum infrared laser modulator was established and was fabricated. This modulator represents the state-of-the-art integrated optical device, which has a three-dimensional topology to accommodate three lambda/4 step transformers for microwave impedance matching at both the input and output terminals. A flat frequency response of the device over 20 HGz or = 3 dB) was achieved. Maximum single sideband to carrier power greater than 1.2% for 20 W microwave input power at optical carrier wavelength of 10.6 microns was obtained.

  2. Simplified flangeless unisex waveguide coupler assembly

    DOEpatents

    Michelangelo, Dimartino; Moeller, Charles P.

    1993-01-01

    A unisex coupler assembly is disclosed capable of providing a leak tight coupling for waveguides with axial alignment of the waveguides and rotational capability. The sealing means of the coupler assembly are not exposed to RF energy, and the coupler assembly does not require the provision of external flanges on the waveguides. In a preferred embodiment, O ring seals are not used and the coupler assembly is, therefore, bakeable at a temperature up to about 150.degree. C. The coupler assembly comprises a split collar which clamps around the waveguides and a second collar which fastens to the split collar. The split collar contains an inner annular groove. Each of the waveguides is provided with an external annular groove which receives a retaining ring. The split collar is clamped around one of the waveguides with the inner annular groove of the split collar engaging the retaining ring carried in the external annular groove in the waveguide. The second collar is then slipped over the second waveguide behind the annular groove and retaining ring therein and the second collar is coaxially secured by fastening means to the split collar to draw the respective waveguides together by coaxial force exerted by the second collar against the retaining ring on the second waveguide. A sealing ring is placed against an external sealing surface at a reduced external diameter end formed on one waveguide to sealingly engage a corresponding sealing surface on the other waveguide as the waveguides are urged toward each other.

  3. Simplified flangeless unisex waveguide coupler assembly

    DOEpatents

    Michelangelo, D.; Moeller, C.P.

    1993-05-04

    A unisex coupler assembly is disclosed capable of providing a leak tight coupling for waveguides with axial alignment of the waveguides and rotational capability. The sealing means of the coupler assembly are not exposed to RF energy, and the coupler assembly does not require the provision of external flanges on the waveguides. In a preferred embodiment, O ring seals are not used and the coupler assembly is, therefore, bakeable at a temperature up to about 150 C. The coupler assembly comprises a split collar which clamps around the waveguides and a second collar which fastens to the split collar. The split collar contains an inner annular groove. Each of the waveguides is provided with an external annular groove which receives a retaining ring. The split collar is clamped around one of the waveguides with the inner annular groove of the split collar engaging the retaining ring carried in the external annular groove in the waveguide. The second collar is then slipped over the second waveguide behind the annular groove and retaining ring therein and the second collar is coaxially secured by fastening means to the split collar to draw the respective waveguides together by coaxial force exerted by the second collar against the retaining ring on the second waveguide. A sealing ring is placed against an external sealing surface at a reduced external diameter end formed on one waveguide to sealingly engage a corresponding sealing surface on the other waveguide as the waveguides are urged toward each other.

  4. Experimental demonstration of linearly polarized 2-10  μm supercontinuum generation in a chalcogenide rib waveguide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Gai, Xin; Ma, Pan; Vu, Khu; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Rongping; Choi, Duk-Yong; Madden, Steve; Luther-Davies, Barry

    2016-03-01

    This Letter reports the production of a supercontinuum extending from ≈2  μm to >10  μm generated using a chalcogenide buried rib waveguide pumped with 330 femtosecond pulses at 4.184 μm. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the broadest mid-infrared supercontinuum generated in any planar waveguide platform. Because the waveguide is birefringent, quasi-single-mode, and uses an optimized dispersion design, the supercontinuum is linearly polarized with an extinction ratio >100. Dual beam spectrophotometry is performed easily using this source.

  5. Integration of a waveguide self-electrooptic effect device and a vertically coupled interconnect waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2008-02-26

    A self-electrooptic effect device ("SEED") is integrated with waveguide interconnects through the use of vertical directional couplers. Light initially propagating in the interconnect waveguide is vertically coupled to the active waveguide layer of the SEED and, if the SEED is in the transparent state, the light is coupled back to the interconnect waveguide.

  6. Phased waveguide array with fixed tuning elements

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.; Bernabei, S.; Hooke, W.M.; Paoloni, F.J.

    1980-04-01

    The waveguide grill excites both penetrating lower hybrid waves and surface plasma waves. Quarter wavelength tuning elements attached to the sides of a twin waveguide are shown to reduce the surface wave component by a factor of approx. 3..

  7. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels were considered to serve as a filling for millimeter-wave waveguides. While these waveguides present a slightly higher loss than hollow waveguides, they have less losses than Duroid substrate integrated waveguides (less than 0.15 dB at Ka-band, in a 20 mm section), and exhibit an order of magnitude of mass reduction when compared to commercial waveguides. A Ka-band slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array was designed, which provided the same gain (9 dBi) as its standard waveguide counterpart, and a slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array using folded-slots was designed for comparison, obtaining a gain of 9 dB and a bandwidth of 590 MHz.

  8. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOEpatents

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-11-20

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  9. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOEpatents

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  10. Integrated-Circuit Broadband Infrared Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, G.; Jhabvala, M.; Burgess, A.

    1989-01-01

    Microscopic devices consume less power, run hotter, and are more reliable. Simple, compact, lightweight, rapidly-responding reference sources of broadband infrared radiation made available by integrated-circuit technology. Intended primarily for use in calibration of remote-sensing infrared instruments, devices eventually replace conventional infrared sources. New devices also replace present generation of miniature infrared sources. Self-passivating nature of poly-crystalline silicon adds to reliability of devices. Maximum operating temperature is 1,000 K, and power dissipation is only one-fourth that of prior devices.

  11. Planar waveguide sensor of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoziński, Roman; Tyszkiewicz, Cuma; Karasiński, Paweł; Izydorczyk, Weronika

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the concept of forming ammonia sensor based on a planar waveguide structure. It is an amplitude sensor produced on the basis of the multimode waveguide. The technological base for this kind of structure is the ion exchange method and the sol-gel method. The planar multimode waveguide of channel type is produced in glass substrate (soda-lime glass of Menzel-Glaser company) by the selective Ag+↔Na+ ion exchange. On the surface of the glass substrate a porous (~40%) silica layer is produced by the sol-gel method. This layer is sensitized to the presence of ammonia in the surrounding atmosphere by impregnation with Bromocresol Purple (BCP) dye. Therefore it constitutes a sensor layer. Spectrophotometric tests carried out showed about 50% reduction of cross-transmission changes of such sensor layer for a wave λ=593 nm caused by the presence of 25% ammonia water vapor in its ambience. The radiation source used in this type of sensor structure is a light emitting diode LED. The gradient channel waveguide is designed for frontal connection (optical glue) with a standard multimode telecommunications waveguide 62.5/125μm.

  12. Loop coupled resonator optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Song, Junfeng; Luo, Lian-Wee; Luo, Xianshu; Zhou, Haifeng; Tu, Xiaoguang; Jia, Lianxi; Fang, Qing; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2014-10-06

    We propose a novel coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structure that is made up of a waveguide loop. We theoretically investigate the forbidden band and conduction band conditions in an infinite periodic lattice. We also discuss the reflection- and transmission- spectra, group delay in finite periodic structures. Light has a larger group delay at the band edge in a periodic structure. The flat band pass filter and flat-top group delay can be realized in a non-periodic structure. Scattering matrix method is used to calculate the effects of waveguide loss on the optical characteristics of these structures. We also introduce a tunable coupling loop waveguide to compensate for the fabrication variations since the coupling coefficient of the directional coupler in the loop waveguide is a critical factor in determining the characteristics of a loop CROW. The loop CROW structure is suitable for a wide range of applications such as band pass filters, high Q microcavity, and optical buffers and so on.

  13. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation discussed the potential advantages of developing Slotted Waveguide Arrays using polyimide aerogels. Polyimide (PI) aerogels offer great promise as an enabling technology for lightweight aerospace antenna systems. PI aerogels are highly porous solids possessing low density and low dielectric permittivity combined with good mechanical properties. For slotted waveguide array applications, there are significant advantages in mass that more than compensate for the slightly higher loss of the aerogel filled waveguide when compared to state of practice commercial waveguide.

  14. Bending loss of terahertz pipe waveguides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jen-Tang; Hsueh, Yu-Chun; Huang, Yu-Ru; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2010-12-06

    We present an experimental study on the bending loss of terahertz (THz) pipe waveguide. Bending loss of pipe waveguides is investigated for various frequencies, polarizations, core diameters, cladding thicknesses, and cladding materials. Our results indicate that the pipe waveguides with lower guiding loss suffer lower bending loss due to stronger mode confinement. The unexpected low bending loss in the investigated simple leaky waveguide structure promises variety of flexible applications.

  15. Investigation of semiconductor clad optical waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchman, T. E.; Carson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been proposed for fabricating integrated optical devices using semiconductors, lithium niobate, and glasses as waveguides and substrates. The use of glass waveguides and their interaction with thin semiconductor cladding layers was studied. Though the interactions of these multilayer waveguide structures have been analyzed here using glass, they may be applicable to other types of materials as well. The primary reason for using glass is that it provides a simple, inexpensive way to construct waveguides and devices.

  16. Lasing in silicon-organic hybrid waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Dietmar; Lauermann, Matthias; Koeber, Sebastian; Appel, Patrick; Alloatti, Luca; Palmer, Robert; Dumon, Pieter; Freude, Wolfgang; Leuthold, Juerg; Koos, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Silicon photonics enables large-scale photonic-electronic integration by leveraging highly developed fabrication processes from the microelectronics industry. However, while a rich portfolio of devices has already been demonstrated on the silicon platform, on-chip light sources still remain a key challenge since the indirect bandgap of the material inhibits efficient photon emission and thus impedes lasing. Here we demonstrate a class of infrared lasers that can be fabricated on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integration platform. The lasers are based on the silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) integration concept and combine nanophotonic SOI waveguides with dye-doped organic cladding materials that provide optical gain. We demonstrate pulsed room-temperature lasing with on-chip peak output powers of up to 1.1 W at a wavelength of 1,310 nm. The SOH approach enables efficient mass-production of silicon photonic light sources emitting in the near infrared and offers the possibility of tuning the emission wavelength over a wide range by proper choice of dye materials and resonator geometry.

  17. Lasing in silicon–organic hybrid waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Dietmar; Lauermann, Matthias; Koeber, Sebastian; Appel, Patrick; Alloatti, Luca; Palmer, Robert; Dumon, Pieter; Freude, Wolfgang; Leuthold, Juerg; Koos, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics enables large-scale photonic–electronic integration by leveraging highly developed fabrication processes from the microelectronics industry. However, while a rich portfolio of devices has already been demonstrated on the silicon platform, on-chip light sources still remain a key challenge since the indirect bandgap of the material inhibits efficient photon emission and thus impedes lasing. Here we demonstrate a class of infrared lasers that can be fabricated on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integration platform. The lasers are based on the silicon–organic hybrid (SOH) integration concept and combine nanophotonic SOI waveguides with dye-doped organic cladding materials that provide optical gain. We demonstrate pulsed room-temperature lasing with on-chip peak output powers of up to 1.1 W at a wavelength of 1,310 nm. The SOH approach enables efficient mass-production of silicon photonic light sources emitting in the near infrared and offers the possibility of tuning the emission wavelength over a wide range by proper choice of dye materials and resonator geometry. PMID:26949229

  18. Scanning Miniature Microscopes without Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts some alternative designs of proposed compact, lightweight optoelectronic microscopes that would contain no lenses and would generate magnified video images of specimens. Microscopes of this type were described previously in Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO - 20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43 and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO 20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 1999), page 6a. To recapitulate: In the design and construction of a microscope of this type, the focusing optics of a conventional microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. Elimination of focusing optics reduces the size and weight of the instrument and eliminates the need for the time-consuming focusing operation. The microscopes described in the cited prior articles contained two-dimensional CCDs registered with two-dimensional arrays of microchannels and, as such, were designed to produce full two-dimensional images, without need for scanning. The microscopes of the present proposal would contain one-dimensional (line image) CCDs registered with linear arrays of microchannels. In the operation of such a microscope, one would scan a specimen along a line perpendicular to the array axis (in other words, one would scan in pushbroom fashion). One could then synthesize a full two-dimensional image of the specimen from the line-image data acquired at one-pixel increments of position along the scan. In one of the proposed microscopes, a beam of unpolarized light for illuminating the specimen would enter from the side. This light would be reflected down onto the specimen by a nonpolarizing beam splitter attached to the microchannels at their lower ends. A portion of the light incident on the specimen would be reflected upward, through the beam splitter and along the microchannels, to form an image on the CCD. If the

  19. Dispersion compensation in slot photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plastun, Alexander; Konyukhov, Andrey

    2015-03-01

    Dispersion tailoring using photonic crystal cladding for slot waveguide is proposed. Numerical modeling based on the Maxwell equation for Te and TM modes of the photonic crystal is performed. Slot waveguide provide high intencity at the central area. Photonic crystal cladding of the slot waveguide allow us to compensate high values of the host glass dispersion.

  20. Contact stresses calculated for miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, F. G.; Domerest, K. E.; Horton, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Using mathematical formulations to plot the graphs of the contact preload versus the Hertzian load, calculations of unit loading of the preloaded brushes on slip rings can be made. This optimizes the design of contact brushes and miniature slip rings.

  1. Using Miniature Landforms in Teaching Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, James F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper explores the uses of true landform miniatures and small-scale analogues and suggests ways to teach geomorphological concepts using small-scale relief features as illustrative examples. (JDH)

  2. Miniature robots can assist in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Oleynikov, D; Rentschler, M; Hadzialic, A; Dumpert, J; Platt, S R; Farritor, S

    2005-04-01

    Laparoscopy reduces patient trauma but eliminates the surgeon's ability to directly view and touch the surgical environment. Although current robot-assisted laparoscopy improves the surgeon's ability to manipulate and visualize the target organs, the instruments and cameras remain constrained by the entry incision. This limits tool tip orientation and optimal camera placement. This article focuses on developing miniature in vivo robots to assist surgeons during laparoscopic surgery by providing an enhanced field of view from multiple angles and dexterous manipulators not constrained by the abdominal wall fulcrum effect. Miniature camera robots were inserted through a small incision into the insufflated abdominal cavity of an anesthetized pig. Trocar insertion and other laparoscopic tool placements were then viewed with these robotic cameras. The miniature robots provided additional camera angles that improved surgical visualization during a cholecystectomy. These successful prototype trials have demonstrated that miniature in vivo robots can provide surgeons with additional visual information that can increase procedural safety.

  3. Novel magneto-electro-dielectric waveguided metamaterials and its applications to microstrip patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tong; Wang, Guang-Ming; Liang, Jian-Gang; Song, Zhi-Jie

    2014-09-01

    A novel magneto-electro-dielectric waveguided metamaterial (MED-WG-MTM) is proposed consisting of electric complementary spiral ring resonators and magnetic embedded Wunderlich line. Based on the control of effective medium parameters, the working mechanism of miniaturization, wide bandwidth, and also dual-band approach by loading MED-WG-MTM cells are investigated in depth. For experimental demonstration, two types of antennas are designed, fabricated, and measured following the established design procedures. For the former, the antenna with MED-WG-MTM loading realizes a miniaturization of 42.53 % and also 10 dB impedance bandwidth of about 3.71 times compared with the conventional antenna. In the latter case, dual-band antenna is researched. The prototype features compact occupying an area of only 0.20λ 0 × 0.20λ 0 and shows desirable similar radiation patterns. Moreover, both antennas are free of metallic via holes and practical for wireless communication system.

  4. Novel magneto-electro-dielectric waveguided metamaterials and its applications to microstrip patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tong; Wang, Guang-Ming; Liang, Jian-Gang; Song, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    A novel magneto-electro-dielectric waveguided metamaterial (MED-WG-MTM) is proposed consisting of electric complementary spiral ring resonators and magnetic embedded Wunderlich line. Based on the control of effective medium parameters, the working mechanism of miniaturization, wide bandwidth, and also dual-band approach by loading MED-WG-MTM cells are investigated in depth. For experimental demonstration, two types of antennas are designed, fabricated, and measured following the established design procedures. For the former, the antenna with MED-WG-MTM loading realizes a miniaturization of 42.53 % and also 10 dB impedance bandwidth of about 3.71 times compared with the conventional antenna. In the latter case, dual-band antenna is researched. The prototype features compact occupying an area of only 0.20 λ 0 × 0.20 λ 0 and shows desirable similar radiation patterns. Moreover, both antennas are free of metallic via holes and practical for wireless communication system.

  5. Methods and apparatus for mid-infrared sensing

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Pao Tai; Cai, Yan; Agarwal, Anuradha Murthy; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2015-06-02

    A chip-scale, air-clad semiconductor pedestal waveguide can be used as a mid-infrared (mid-IR) sensor capable of in situ monitoring of organic solvents and other analytes. The sensor uses evanescent coupling from a silicon or germanium waveguide, which is highly transparent in the mid-IR portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, to probe the absorption spectrum of fluid surrounding the waveguide. Launching a mid-IR beam into the waveguide exposed to a particular analyte causes attenuation of the evanescent wave's spectral components due to absorption by carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and/or nitrogen bonds in the surrounding fluid. Detecting these changes at the waveguide's output provides an indication of the type and concentration of one or more compounds in the surrounding fluid. If desired, the sensor may be integrated onto a silicon substrate with a mid-IR light source and a mid-IR detector to form a chip-based spectrometer.

  6. Sub-wavelength waveguide loaded by a complementary electric metamaterial for vacuum electron devices

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Zhaoyun; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A. Temkin, Richard J.

    2014-10-15

    We report the electromagnetic properties of a waveguide loaded by complementary electric split ring resonators (CeSRRs) and the application of the waveguide in vacuum electronics. The S-parameters of the CeSRRs in free space are calculated using the HFSS code and are used to retrieve the effective permittivity and permeability in an effective medium theory. The dispersion relation of a waveguide loaded with the CeSRRs is calculated by two approaches: by direct calculation with HFSS and by calculation with the effective medium theory; the results are in good agreement. An improved agreement is obtained using a fitting procedure for the permittivity tensor in the effective medium theory. The gain of a backward wave mode of the CeSRR-loaded waveguide interacting with an electron beam is calculated by two methods: by using the HFSS model and traveling wave tube theory; and by using a dispersion relation derived in the effective medium model. Results of the two methods are in very good agreement. The proposed all-metal structure may be useful in miniaturized vacuum electron devices.

  7. Miniaturized Plasma and Neutral Diagnostics for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McHarg, M. G.; Enloe, C. L.; Krause, L. A.; Herrero, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a miniaturized suite of instruments which provides both bulk energy resolved plasma properties and coarse neutral mass spectroscopy suitable for measurements on the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). The suite is comprised of two instruments; the Miniaturized Electro-Static Analyzer (MESA), and the Flat Plasma Spectrometer (FLAPS), designed to measure the near earth environment on the Air Force Academy small satellite missions Falconsat-2 and 3.

  8. Metamaterials for Miniaturization of Optical Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0226 METAMATERIALS FOR MINIATURIZATION OF OPTICAL COMPONENTS Aleksandr Figotin UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA IRVINE Final Report 09/24...8-98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 10/09/2014 Final 30/06/2011-30/06/2014 METAMATERIALS FOR MINIATURIZATION OF OPTICAL COMPONENTS FA9550-11-1...relativistic and spinorial aspects of our neoclassical electromagnetic theory. Metamaterials , fundamentals of electromagnetic theory, dissipation, magnetic

  9. Miniature Electrostatic Ion Thruster With Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A miniature electrostatic ion thruster is proposed that, with one exception, would be based on the same principles as those of the device described in the previous article, "Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster". The exceptional feature of this thruster would be that, in addition to using electric fields for linear acceleration of ions and electrons, it would use a magnetic field to rotationally accelerate slow electrons into the ion stream to neutralize the ions.

  10. Miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention documents the efforts on the research and development of a miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system. A miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system is presented; Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI) based alignment algorithm for space applications is discussed. Two navigation cameras are also included to measure the range and range rate which can be integrated into the GPS/MEMS IMU system to enhance the navigation solution.

  11. Silver-coated Teflon hollow waveguides for the delivery of terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzer, Jeffrey E.; Navarro-Cía, Miguel; Mitrofanov, Oleg; Harrington, James A.

    2014-02-01

    Significant research exists regarding the successful implementation of hollow waveguides for the low-loss transmission of infrared radiation in applications ranging from laser power delivery to spectroscopy. With the continued development of terahertz (THz) technologies and applications, it is often advantageous to have a waveguide for the transmission of THz radiation. This study focuses on the fabrication of novel silver-coated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) waveguides for the transmission of terahertz radiation. The hollow structure described in this paper is made by depositing a thin film of Ag on the outer surface of a dielectric tube. This is in contrast to depositing metallic and dielectric thin film coatings on the inner surface of capillary tubing as is commonly done for IR and some THz transmissive waveguides. In this work, the Teflon tubing itself is the dielectric layer that is used to enhance the reflectivity of the Ag. Theoretical loss calculations will be presented and compared to the loss obtained for the guides measured at THz frequencies. In addition the spectra of the guides in the infrared region are also measured as a means to study the uniformity of the Teflon "layer" and to confirm the wall thickness of the Teflon tubing. The surface topography of the silver / PTFE waveguides is obtained and the resulting surface roughness related scattering losses are calculated. The implications of the terahertz fiber for applications ranging from nondestructive evaluation (NDE), security, and medical imaging are briefly discussed.

  12. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes

    PubMed Central

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L’Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A.; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  13. Miniature Ion-Array Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A figure is shown that depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would share many features of design and operation of the instrument described in another article. The main differences between that instrument and this one would lie in the configuration and mode of operation of the filter and detector electrodes. A filter electrode and detector electrodes would be located along the sides of a drift tube downstream from the accelerator electrode. These electrodes would apply a combination of (1) a transverse AC electric field that would effect differential transverse dispersal of ions and (2) a transverse DC electric field that would drive the dispersed ions toward the detector electrodes at different distances along the drift tube. The electric current collected by each detector electrode would be a measure of the current, and thus of the abundance of the species of ions impinging on that electrode. The currents collected by all the detector electrodes could be measured simultaneously to obtain continuous readings of abundances of species. The downstream momentum of accelerated ions would be maintained through neutralization on the electrodes; the momentum of the resulting neutral atoms would serve to expel gases from spectrometer, without need for a pump.

  14. Miniature electrically operated diaphragm valve

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Spletzer, Barry L.; Wong, Chungnin C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Fischer, Gary J.; Hesketh, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a miniature electrically operated valve that can stand off significant pressures, that can be inexpensively produced, and that can be made to operate without continuous electrical power. A valve according to the present invention comprises a housing and a beam mounted with the housing. A diaphragm mounted with the housing forms a sealed fluid volume. An electromagnetic energy source, such as an electromagnetic coil, mounts with the housing and when energized urges the beam in one direction. The beam can be urged in the opposing direction by passive means or by reversing the polarity of the electromagnetic energy source or by a second electromagnetic energy source. Two fluid ports mount with the housing. A first fluid port mounts so that, as the beam is urged in one direction or the opposite, the beam urges the diaphragm to move between engaging and substantially sealing the fluid port and disengaging and not substantially sealing the fluid port. A seat can be mounted with the diaphragm to aid in sealing the fluid port. Latching mechanisms such as permanent magnets can be mounted so that the valve remains in the open or closed positions without continuous electrical power input. Fluid can flow through the housing between the two fluid ports when the diaphragm does not seal the first fluid port, but can be prevented from flowing by urging the beam so that the diaphragm seals the first fluid port. Various embodiments accommodate various latching mechanisms, electromagnetic energy sources, number of fluid ports, and diaphragm design considerations.

  15. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-04

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories.

  16. FluoSTIC: miniaturized fluorescence image-guided surgery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Coutard, Jean-Guillaume; Berger, Michel; Grateau, Henri; Josserand, Véronique; Keramidas, Michelle; Righini, Christian; Coll, Jean-Luc; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2012-10-01

    Over the last few years, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has witnessed rapid growth and is already used in clinical trials for various procedures. However, most clinically compatible imaging systems are optimized for large, open-surgery procedures. Such systems cannot be employed during head and neck oncologic surgeries because the system is not able to image inside deep cavities or allow the surgeon access to certain tumors due to the large footprint of the system. We describe a miniaturized, low-cost, NIR fluorescence system optimized for clinical use during oral oncologic surgeries. The system, termed FluoSTIC, employs a miniature, high-quality, consumer-grade lipstick camera for collecting fluorescence light and a novel custom circular optical fiber array for illumination that combines both white light and NIR excitation. FluoSTIC maintains fluorescence imaging quality similar to that of current large-size imaging systems and is 22 mm in diameter and 200 mm in height and weighs less than 200 g.

  17. A general waveguide circuit theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Roger B.; Williams, Dylan F.

    1992-10-01

    This work generalizes and extends the classical circuit theory of electromagnetic waveguides. Unlike the conventional theory, the present formulation applies to all waveguides composed of linear, isotropic material, even those involving lossy conductors and hybrid mode fields, in a fully rigorous way. Special attention is given to distinguishing the traveling waves, constructed with respect to a well-defined characteristic impedance, from a set of pseudo-waves, defined with respect to an arbitrary reference impedance. Matrices characterizing a linear circuit are defined, and relationships among them, some newly discovered, are derived. New ramifications of reciprocity are developed. Measurement of various network parameters is given extensive treatment.

  18. Waveguide Four-Wave Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    PL-TR--91-1045 /’--"PL-TR-- AD-A243 555 91-1045 WAVEGUIDE FOUR -WAVE MIXING Thomas B. Simpson Jia-ming Liu JAYCOR San Diego, CA 92186-5154 October...Final Report; May 88 - Mar 91 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS WAVEGUIDE FOUR -WAVE MIXING C: F29601-88-C-0023 PE: 62601F PR: 3326 6. AUTHOR(S...for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) This program has investigated four -wave mixing (4-win) in non- linear

  19. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane. The resulting infrared sensor can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. An alternative embodiment is implemented using a corrugated membrane to permit large deflection without complicated clamping and high deflection voltages. The alternative embodiment also employs a pinhole aperture in a membrane to accommodate environmental temperature variation and a sealed chamber to eliminate environmental contamination of the tunneling electrodes and undesireable accoustic coupling to the sensor.

  20. Miniature robotic sample analysis lab for planetary in situ mineralogy and microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruzelecky, Roman; Wong, Brian; Haddad, Emile; Jamroz, Wes; Cloutis, Edward; Strong, Kimberly; Ghafoor, Nadeem; Jessen, Sean

    the data synergy provided by infrared (IR) reflection between 900 and 4300 nm at about 4 nm resolution, visible micro-imaging, and complementary IR Raman spectroscopy from about 400 to 4000 cm-1 . IR spectroscopy provides direct information on the presence of H2 O or OH, either as free H2 O or bonded within hydrated minerals. The IR Raman provides for direct C-C biological detection and supplementary measurement of IR inactive modes. The boresight microimaging provides information on the sample grain structure to assist the spectral data analysis. The combined data synergy can, for the first time, directly and unambiguously detect H2 O and determine its state (ice/liquid/structural), distinguish key mineral species (including those associated with favourable habitats for microbial activity) and determine their hydration states, as well as detect and differentiate various C-H and C-C molecular structures for astrobiological investigations. The mission features a small He-inflatable Skycam aerostat tethered to the rover. It will provide stereographic 2-D VIS surface maps of the rover and its geolocation from a 10-15 m altitude to improve the rover autonomy and maneuverability around obstacles. The Skycam aerostat will also provide boundary layer investigations of Mars weather and residual atmospheric processes with high 0.015 nm spectral resolution for CO2 and CH4 using tunable fiber-optic sources to study the C isotopic ratios. Mission cost effectiveness is achieved through a synergistic instrument suite based on advanced but mature patented MPBC miniaturization technologies that enable high IR spectral measurement performance with minimal mass and power, and an innovative MDA tethered mole drill design. The estimated Inukshuk net payload mass including instrument suite, robotic tethered mole drill with insitu bore-hole probe and Skycam aerostat is under 12 kg. The core IR spectral processor is based on MPBC's patented IOSPEC technology for miniature guided

  1. Polymeric slot waveguide for photonics sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chovan, J.; Uherek, F.

    2016-12-01

    Polymeric slot waveguide for photonics sensing was designed, simulated and studied in this work. The polymeric slot waveguide was designed on commercial Ormocer polymer platform and operates at visible 632.8 nm wavelength. Designed polymeric slot waveguide detects the refractive index change of the ambient material by evanescent field label-free techniques. The motivation for the reported work was to design a low-cost polymeric slot waveguide for sensing arms of integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometer optical sensor with reduced temperature dependency. The minimal dimensions of advanced sensing slot waveguide structure were designed for researcher direct laser writing fabrication by nonlinear two-photon polymerization. The normalized effective refractive index changes of TE and TM fundamental modes in polymeric slot waveguide and slab waveguides were compared. The sensitivity of the normalized effective refractive index changes of TE and TM fundamental modes on refractive index changes of the ambient material was investigated by glucose-water solutions.

  2. Optofluidic waveguides: II. Fabrication and structures

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Holger

    2011-01-01

    We review fabrication methods and common structures for optofluidic waveguides, defined as structures capable of optical confinement and transmission through fluid filled cores. Cited structures include those based on total internal reflection, metallic coatings, and interference based confinement. Configurations include optical fibers and waveguides fabricated on flat substrates (integrated waveguides). Some examples of optofluidic waveguides that are included in this review are Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) and two-dimensional photonic crystal arrays, Bragg fibers and waveguides, and Anti Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguides (ARROWs). An emphasis is placed on integrated ARROWs fabricated using a thin-film deposition process, which illustrates how optofluidic waveguides can be combined with other microfluidic elements in the creation of lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:21603122

  3. Impedance generalization for plasmonic waveguides beyond the lumped circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Thomas; Hasan, Shakeeb Bin; Paul, Thomas; Pertsch, Thomas; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    We analytically derive a rigorous expression for the relative impedance ratio between two photonic structures based on their electromagnetic interaction. Our approach generalizes the physical meaning of the impedance to a measure for the reciprocity-based overlap of eigenmodes. The consistency with known cases in the radio-frequency and optical domain is shown. The analysis reveals where the applicability of simple circuit parameters ends and how the impedance can be interpreted beyond this point. We illustrate our approach by successfully describing a Bragg reflector that terminates an insulator-metal-insulator plasmonic waveguide in the near infrared by our impedance concept.

  4. Miniature Ion-Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would be fabricated by micromachining. Unlike prior ion-mobility spectrometers, the proposed instrument would not be based on a time-of-flight principle and, consequently, would not have some of the disadvantageous characteristics of prior time-of-flight ion-mobility spectrometers. For example, one of these characteristics is the need for a bulky carrier-gas-feeding subsystem that includes a shutter gate to provide short pulses of gas in order to generate short pulses of ions. For another example, there is need for a complex device to generate pulses of ions from the pulses of gas and the device is capable of ionizing only a fraction of the incoming gas molecules; these characteristics preclude miniaturization. In contrast, the proposed instrument would not require a carrier-gas-feeding subsystem and would include a simple, highly compact device that would ionize all the molecules passing through it. The ionization device in the proposed instrument would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several megavolts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. Ionization (but not avalanche arcing) would occur because the distance between the ionizing electrodes would be less than the mean free path of gas molecules at the operating pressure of instrument. An accelerating grid would be located inside the instrument, downstream from the ionizing membrane. The electric potential applied to this grid would be negative relative to the potential on the inside electrode of the ionizing membrane and would be of a magnitude sufficient to

  5. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  6. Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure presents a concept of a bipolar miniature electrostatic ion thruster for maneuvering a small spacecraft. The ionization device in the proposed thruster would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several mega-volts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. In a thruster-based on this concept, one or more propellant gases would be introduced into such a membrane ionizer. Unlike in larger prior ion thrusters, all of the propellant molecules would be ionized. This thruster would be capable of bipolar operation. There would be two accelerator grids - one located forward and one located aft of the membrane ionizer. In one mode of operation, which one could denote the forward mode, positive ions leaving the ionizer on the backside would be accelerated to high momentum by an electric field between the ionizer and an accelerator grid. Electrons leaving the ionizer on the front side would be ejected into free space by a smaller accelerating field. The equality of the ion and electron currents would eliminate the need for an additional electron- or ion-emitting device to keep the spacecraft charge-neutral. In another mode of operation, which could denote the reverse mode, the polarities of the voltages applied to the accelerator grids and to the electrodes of the membrane ionizer would be the reverse of those of the forward mode. The reversal of electric fields would cause the ion and electrons to be ejected in the reverse of their forward mode directions, thereby giving rise to thrust in the direction opposite that of the forward mode.

  7. High torque miniature rotary actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbandian, Ruben

    2005-07-01

    This paper summarizes the design and the development of a miniature rotary actuator (36 mm diameter by 100 mm length) used in spacecraft mechanisms requiring high torques and/or ultra-fine step resolution. This actuator lends itself to applications requiring high torque but with strict volume limitations which challenge the use of conventional rotary actuators. The design challenge was to develop a lightweight (less than 500 grams), very compact, high bandwidth, low power, thermally stable rotary actuator capable of producing torques in excess of 50 N.m and step resolutions as fine as 0.003 degrees. To achieve a relatively high torsional stiffness in excess of 1000 Nm/radian, the design utilizes a combination of harmonic drive and multistage planetary gearing. The unique design feature of this actuator that contributes to its light weight and extremely precise motion capability is a redundant stepper motor driving the output through a multistage reducing gearbox. The rotary actuator is powered by a high reliability space-rated stepper motor designed and constructed by Moog, Inc. The motor is a three-phase stepper motor of 15 degree step angle, producing twenty-four full steps per revolution. Since micro-stepping is not used in the design, and un-powered holding torque is exhibited at every commanded step, the rotary actuator is capable of reacting to torques as high as 35 Nm by holding position with the power off. The output is driven through a gear transmission having a total train ratio of 5120:1, resulting in a resolution of 0.003 degrees output rotation per motor step. The modular design of the multi-stage output transmission makes possible the addition of designs having different output parameters, such as lower torque and higher output speed capability. Some examples of an actuator family based on this growth capability will be presented in the paper.

  8. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  9. Two-octave spanning supercontinuum generation in stoichiometric silicon nitride waveguides pumped at telecom wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Porcel, Marco A G; Schepers, Florian; Epping, Jörn P; Hellwig, Tim; Hoekman, Marcel; Heideman, René G; van der Slot, Peter J M; Lee, Chris J; Schmidt, Robert; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Fallnich, Carsten; Boller, Klaus-J

    2017-01-23

    We demonstrate supercontinuum generation in stoichiometric silicon nitride (Si3N4 in SiO2) integrated optical waveguides, pumped at telecommunication wavelengths. The pump laser is a mode-locked erbium fiber laser at a wavelength of 1.56 µm with a pulse duration of 120 fs. With a waveguide-internal pulse energy of 1.4 nJ and a waveguide with 1.0 µm × 0.9 µm cross section, designed for anomalous dispersion across the 1500 nm telecommunication range, the output spectrum extends from the visible, at around 526 nm, up to the mid-infrared, at least to 2.6 µm, the instrumental limit of our detection. This output spans more than 2.2 octaves (454 THz at the -30 dB level). The measured output spectra agree well with theoretical modeling based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The infrared part of the supercontinuum spectra shifts progressively towards the mid-infrared, well beyond 2.6 µm, by increasing the width of the waveguides.

  10. Analytical relation between effective mode field area and waveguide dispersion in microstructure fibers.

    PubMed

    Moenster, Mathias; Steinmeyer, Günter; Iliew, Rumen; Lederer, Falk; Petermann, Klaus

    2006-11-15

    For optical fibers exhibiting a radially symmetric refractive index profile, there exists an analytical relation that connects waveguide dispersion and the Petermann-II mode field radius. We extend the usefulness of this relation to the nonradially symmetric case of microstructure fibers in the anomalous dispersion regime, yielding a simple relation between dispersion and effective mode field area. Assuming a Gaussian mode distribution, we derive a fundamental upper limit for the effective mode field area that is required to obtain a certain amount of anomalous waveguide dispersion. This relation is demonstrated to show excellent agreement for fiber designs suited for supercontinuum generation and soliton lasers in the near infrared.

  11. Analytical relation between effective mode field area and waveguide dispersion in microstructure fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moenster, Mathias; Steinmeyer, Günter; Iliew, Rumen; Lederer, Falk; Petermann, Klaus

    2006-11-01

    For optical fibers exhibiting a radially symmetric refractive index profile, there exists an analytical relation that connects waveguide dispersion and the Petermann-II mode field radius. We extend the usefulness of this relation to the nonradially symmetric case of microstructure fibers in the anomalous dispersion regime, yielding a simple relation between dispersion and effective mode field area. Assuming a Gaussian mode distribution, we derive a fundamental upper limit for the effective mode field area that is required to obtain a certain amount of anomalous waveguide dispersion. This relation is demonstrated to show excellent agreement for fiber designs suited for supercontinuum generation and soliton lasers in the near infrared.

  12. Reactive ion etching of tellurite and chalcogenide waveguides using hydrogen, methane, and argon

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, K. T.; Madden, S. J.

    2011-01-15

    The authors report in detail on the reactive plasma etching properties of tellurium and demonstrate a high quality etching process using hydrogen, methane, and argon. Very low loss planar ridge waveguides are demonstrated. Optical losses in tellurium dioxide waveguides below 0.1 dB/cm in most of the near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum and at 1550 nm have been achieved--the lowest ever reported by more than an order of magnitude and clearly suitable for planar integrated devices. The etch process is also shown to be suitable for chalcogenide glasses which may be of importance in applications such as phase change memory devices and nonlinear integrated optics.

  13. Negative refraction and lensing at visible wavelength: experimental results using a waveguide array.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, José A; Frins, Erna

    2011-07-04

    Experimental results showing "negative refraction" and some kind of "lensing" -in the microwave-infrared range- are often presented in the literature as undisputable evidence of the existence of composite left-handed materials. The purpose of this paper is to present experimental results on "negative refraction" and "lensing" at visible wavelengths involving a waveguide array formed by a tight-packed bundle of glass fibers. We will demonstrate that the observed phenomena are not necessarily evidence of the existence of left-handed materials and that they can be fully explained by classical optic concepts, e.g. light propagation in waveguides.

  14. Optical waveguides for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Lloyd W.

    1992-07-01

    Possibilities of employing thin film optical waveguides for chemical analysis are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of integrated or planar optical elements in sensors which may be applied to continuous or in situ monitoring in biomedical, environmental, and chemical processes.

  15. Birefringence compensated arrayed waveguide grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Xia, Xiang; Lang, Tingting; He, Jian-Jun

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we review our work on birefringence compensated arrayed waveguide grating. We elaborate on a birefringence compensation technique based on angled star couplers in arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) and discuss several demonstrations both in low-index-contrast and high-index-contrast material systems. A 16-channel AWG with 100GHz channel spacing for DWDM application is designed and fabricated in silica-based low-index-contrast waveguide. The experimental results confirm that the polarization-dependent wavelength shift (PDλ) can be tuned by varying the incident/diffraction angle at the star couplers and a birefringence-free property can be achieved without additional fabrication process as compared to conventional AWG. A further validation of this technique is demonstrated in high-index-contrast silicon-on-insulator waveguide, in combination with different diffraction orders for TE and TM polarizations. A birefringence compensated silicon nanowire AWG for CWDM optical interconnects is designed and fabricated. The theoretical and experimental results show that the PDλ can be reduced from 380-420nm to 0.5-3.5 nm, below 25% of the 3 dB bandwidth of the channel response in the wavelength range of 1500 to 1600nm.

  16. Polymer Waveguides for Quantum Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    design, fabrication and testing of slab waveguides made of EO polymer and covers the initial phase of installation, testing and use of the spin ... coating system to make a few simple slabs with the anticipation of testing those for coupling and other processes.

  17. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z. H.; Chen, H.; Yang, F. S.; Luo, C. R.; Zhao, X. P.

    2016-11-01

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths.

  18. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide.

    PubMed

    Fang, Z H; Chen, H; Yang, F S; Luo, C R; Zhao, X P

    2016-11-25

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths.

  19. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Z. H.; Chen, H.; Yang, F. S.; Luo, C. R.; Zhao, X. P.

    2016-01-01

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths. PMID:27886279

  20. High-resolution waveguide THz spectroscopy of biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Laman, N; Harsha, S Sree; Grischkowsky, D; Melinger, Joseph S

    2008-02-01

    Low-frequency vibrational modes of biological molecules consist of intramolecular modes, which are dependent on the molecule as a whole, as well as intermolecular modes, which arise from hydrogen-bonding interactions and van der Waals forces. Vibrational modes thus contain important information about conformation dynamics of biological molecules, and can also be used for identification purposes. However, conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) often result in broad, overlapping features that are difficult to distinguish. The technique of waveguide THz-TDS has been recently developed, resulting in sharper features. For this technique, an ordered polycrystalline film of the molecule is formed on a metal sample plate. This plate is incorporated into a metal parallel-plate waveguide and probed via waveguide THz-TDS. The planar order of the film reduces the inhomogeneous broadening, and cooling of the samples to 77K reduces the homogenous broadening. This combination results in the line-narrowing of THz vibrational modes, in some cases to an unprecedented degree. Here, this technique has been demonstrated with seven small biological molecules, thymine, deoxycytidine, adenosine, D-glucose, tryptophan, glycine, and L-alanine. The successful demonstration of this technique shows the possibilities and promise for future studies of internal vibrational modes of large biological molecules.

  1. A Laser Interferometric Miniature Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Dustin W., PhD.; Baldwin, Patrick C.; Milburn, Howard; Robinson, David

    2011-09-12

    This is the second year of a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract geared towards the development of a new seismic sensor. Ground-based seismic monitoring systems have proven to be very capable in identifying nuclear tests, and can provide somewhat precise information on the location and yield of the explosive device. Making these measurements, however, currently requires very expensive and bulky seismometers that are difficult to deploy in places where they are most needed. A high performance, compact device can enable rapid deployment of large scale arrays, which can in turn be used to provide higher quality data during times of critical need. The use of a laser interferometer-based device has shown considerable promise, while also presenting significant challenges. The greatest strength of this optical readout technique is the ability to decouple the mechanical design from the transducer, thus enabling a miniaturized design that is not accessible with conventional sensing techniques. However, the nonlinearity in the optical response must be accounted for in the sensor output. Previously, we had proposed using a force-feedback approach to position the sensor at a point of maximum linearity. However, it can be shown that the combined nonlinearities of the optical response and the force-feedback curve necessarily results in a significant amount of unwanted noise at low frequencies. Having realized this, we have developed a new approach that eliminates force feedback, allowing the proof mass to move freely at all times. This takes advantage of some advanced optical spatial filtering that was developed at Symphony Acoustics for other types of sensors, and was recently adapted to this work. After processing the signals in real time, the digital output of the device is intrinsically linear, and the sensor can operate at any orientation with the same level of resolution, while instantly adapting to significant changes in orientation. Ultimately, we

  2. Waveguide ring coupling design of MOG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiang; Li, Zi-li; Chen, Yuan-you; Qin, Xiao-hu; Lv, Xin

    2010-10-01

    The key technology of micro optic gyroscopes (MOGs) is to fabricate low-loss waveguide and use coupling technology to form reciprocal structure. The main topic in this paper is to study the coupling structure of MOG's spiral-ring waveguide. Using for the reference of fiber's low-loss character, the fiber-preform project is chosen as optimization means. According to the singlemode conditions, the width and thickness of rectangle waveguide can be calculated. The bend loss waveguide can decrease by means of introducing an offset at the junction of two waveguides and etching groove at the outside of bend waveguide. In this article intersection waveguide is designed to reduce the difficulty of coupling processing. Light in-and-out port coupled at opposite side is choosen for machining easiness in experiment.What's more, the edge-coupling technology being put forward to keep light transmit along the same rotary direction. An efficient means is introduced, which uses angle 45°to reflect the light to couple two waveguide at inside-end or outside-end, and outside-end coupling is chosen for processing convenience in the design. In experiment, the waveguide be fabricated by thick photoresist AZ4620, etched by RIE, When the angle of wafer and ion is set 85°, the angle of one sidewall can be etched almost 45°. It's benefit to design the coupling structure of MOG's spiral-ring waveguide.

  3. FY 2004 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Keller, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Martin, Peter M.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Brian J.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong; Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at PNNL is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for the MWIR and LWIR by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin film deposition capabilities, direct-laser writing techniques, IR photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology - all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

  4. Confirmation of Slow-Waves in a Crosstie Overlay Coplanar Waveguide and Its Application to Band-Reject Gratings and Reflectors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    structures in a printed circuit form constructed with crosstie overlay slow - wave structures . It is well known [31] that the electromagnetic wave propagating...proposed new crosstie overlay slow - wave structures are believed to be potentially useful for miniaturization of distributed circuits in GaAs MMIC’s...candidates for new slow - wave mechanism implementation 10 2.2 Slow - wave principle and waveguide structure for the

  5. Goniometry and Limb Girth in Miniature Dachshunds

    PubMed Central

    Thomovsky, Stephanie A.; Chen, Annie V.; Kiszonas, Alecia M.; Lutskas, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the mean and median pelvic limb joint angles and girth measurements in miniature Dachshunds presenting with varying degrees of pelvic limb weakness secondary to thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion. Methods. 15 miniature Dachshunds who presented to WSU-VTH for thoracolumbar disc extrusion. Dachshunds varied in neurologic status from ambulatory paraparetic to paraplegic at the time of measurements. Results. There were no significant differences in joint angles or girth among the three groups (ambulatory paraparetic, nonambulatory paraparetic, or paraplegic) (P > 0.05). When group was disregarded and values for extension, flexion, and girth combined, no differences existed. Conclusions. Goniometry and limb girth measurements can successfully be made in the miniature Dachshund; however, the shape of the Dachshund leg makes obtaining these values challenging. There were no differences in joint angle or girth measurements between dogs with varying neurologic dysfunction at the time of measurement. PMID:27403455

  6. Superamphiphobic miniature boat fabricated by laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kai; Dong, Xinran; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Cong; Duan, Ji'an

    2017-03-01

    We fabricated a superamphiphobic miniature boat with marked drag reduction and excellent loading capacity using femtosecond laser direct writing technology. The as-prepared superamphiphobic surface of the boat exhibited apparent contact angles larger than 150° toward both water and oil. Miniature boats with the superamphiphobic surface slid effortlessly on both water and oil-polluted water surfaces, with an increase in sliding distance by up to 52% and load increase of up to 27% compared with those of a boat with an untreated surface. A potential mechanism that explains the excellent performance of the superamphiphobic miniature boat was also discussed. This work provides a simple and economically viable strategy to obtain advanced surfaces for use in microfluidics and marine engineering.

  7. Compact Miniaturized Antenna for 210 MHz RFID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Chun, Kue

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and simulation of a miniaturized square-ring antenna. The miniaturized antenna, with overall dimensions of approximately one tenth of a wavelength (0.1 ), was designed to operate at around 210 MHz, and was intended for radio-frequency identification (RFID) application. One unique feature of the design is the use of a parasitic element to improve the performance and impedance matching of the antenna. The use of parasitic elements to enhance the gain and bandwidth of patch antennas has been demonstrated and reported in the literature, but such use has never been applied to miniaturized antennas. In this work, we will present simulation results and discuss design parameters and their impact on the antenna performance.

  8. Acral mutilation syndrome in a miniature pinscher.

    PubMed

    Bardagí, M; Montoliu, P; Ferrer, L; Fondevila, D; Pumarola, M

    2011-01-01

    Acral mutilation syndrome (AMS) is a rare canine hereditary sensory neuropathy that results in progressive mutilation of the distal extremities and which has been reported only in German short-haired pointers, English pointers, English springer spaniels and French spaniels. The present report describes a case of AMS in an 18-month-old female miniature pinscher with progressive self-mutilation of the hind feet. The dog did not respond to any treatment and was humanely destroyed at the age of 30 months. Microscopical findings post mortem were restricted to the nervous system and were compatible with AMS. This is the first case of AMS described in a miniature pinscher. It is not known if the disease was the result of a point mutation in this particular dog or if the miniature pinscher breed will evolve to become a breed predisposed to AMS.

  9. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1998-07-21

    A miniature plastic gripper is described actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  10. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, Milton A.; Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  11. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, Milton A.; Folta, James A.

    1998-01-01

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  12. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1997-03-11

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same are disclosed. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  13. Method and system for assembling miniaturized devices

    DOEpatents

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Klingmann, Jeffrey L.; Seugling, Richard M.

    2013-03-12

    An apparatus for assembling a miniaturized device includes a manipulator system including six manipulators operable to position and orient components of the miniaturized device with submicron precision and micron-level accuracy. The manipulator system includes a first plurality of motorized axes, a second plurality of manual axes, and force and torque and sensors. Each of the six manipulators includes at least one translation stage, at least one rotation stage, tooling attached to the at least one translation stage or the at least one rotation stage, and an attachment mechanism disposed at a distal end of the tooling and operable to attach at least a portion of the miniaturized device to the tooling. The apparatus also includes an optical coordinate-measuring machine (OCMM) including a machine-vision system, a laser-based distance-measuring probe, and a touch probe. The apparatus also includes an operator control system coupled to the manipulator system and the OCMM.

  14. Presynaptic miniature GABAergic currents in developing interneurons.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Bouhours, Brice; Rostaing, Philippe; Papageorgiou, George; Corrie, John E T; Triller, Antoine; Ogden, David; Marty, Alain

    2010-04-29

    Miniature synaptic currents have long been known to represent random transmitter release under resting conditions, but much remains to be learned about their nature and function in central synapses. In this work, we describe a new class of miniature currents ("preminis") that arise by the autocrine activation of axonal receptors following random vesicular release. Preminis are prominent in gabaergic synapses made by cerebellar interneurons during the development of the molecular layer. Unlike ordinary miniature postsynaptic currents in the same cells, premini frequencies are strongly enhanced by subthreshold depolarization, suggesting that the membrane depolarization they produce belongs to a feedback loop regulating neurotransmitter release. Thus, preminis could guide the formation of the interneuron network by enhancing neurotransmitter release at recently formed synaptic contacts.

  15. Tunable trapping and releasing light in graded graphene-silica metamaterial waveguide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Jian, Shuisheng

    2014-10-06

    We present a detailed study on trapping and releasing of light in a graded graphene-silica metamaterial waveguide. By applying proper gate voltages onto the graphene layers, the metamaterial with graded-permittivity has the ability to trap the light due to the vanishing of normalized optical power flow between forward and backward modes. Based on the effective medium theory, the distributions of modes and the transmission characteristics of normalized power flows are investigated. Theoretical investigation shows that the waveguide has the ability to turn on or off the mid-infrared light from 5400 nm to 5800 nm. Moreover, adjusting the voltages on graphene layers can alter the bandwidth of trapped light. The graded metamaterial waveguide can be the candidate for multi-wavelength absorber based on the light trapping effect.

  16. Low-loss as-grown germanosilicate layers for optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, Feridun; Aydinli, Atilla; Agan, Sedat

    2003-12-01

    We report on systematic growth and characterization of low-loss germanosilicate layers for use in optical waveguide technology. The films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique using silane, germane, and nitrous oxide as precursor gases. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor the compositional properties of the samples. It was found that addition of germane leads to decreasing of N-H- and O-H-related bonds. The propagation loss values of the planar waveguides were correlated with the decrease in the hydrogen-related bonds of the as-deposited waveguides and resulted in very low values, eliminating the need for high-temperature annealing as is usually done.

  17. Influence of gold nanoparticles on the 1.53 µm optical gain in Er3+/Yb3+: PbO-GeO2 RIB waveguides.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Davinson Mariano; Kassab, Luciana Reyes Pires; Siarkowski, Acácio L; de Araújo, Cid B

    2014-06-30

    We report the fabrication of waveguide amplifiers produced by RF-sputtering, using a PbO-GeO(2) glass (PGO glass) film codoped with Er(3+)/Yb(3+). RIB waveguides were obtained from PGO thin films using optical lithography followed by reactive ion etching process. The optical losses in the waveguide were ≈1.0 dB/cm and the maximum internal gain at 1.53 µm, with excitation at 980 nm, was 3 dB/cm. Nanostructured gold films deposited on the waveguides enhanced the Er(3+) ions photoluminescence (PL) by ≈400% in the red region and ≈30% in the infrared, under 980 nm pumping. The optical gain was enhanced and reached 6.5 dB/cm. The results demonstrate that the PGO waveguides, with or without gold nanoparticles, are promising for integrated photonics.

  18. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed. PMID:24605161

  19. Jarvik 2000 pump technology and miniaturization.

    PubMed

    Jarvik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Blood-pump miniaturization has made amazing progress, reducing the pump diameter to one-tenth of the size of previous positive displacement pumps. In particular, axial-flow-pump technology allows tiny pumps running at high speeds to deliver from 2 to 10 L/min. A review of the background inventions of the Jarvik 2000 technology is presented, together with the reason that making pumps smaller than demanded by the particular application for which they are designed is counterproductive. Pump miniaturization is nearing its practical limit. The optimization of performance and patient outcomes should remain our primary design goal.

  20. Batch fabrication of precision miniature permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    Christenson, Todd R.; Garino, Terry J.; Venturini, Eugene L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of processes for fabrication of precision miniature rare earth permanent magnets is disclosed. Such magnets typically have sizes in the range 0.1 to 10 millimeters, and dimensional tolerances as small as one micron. Very large magnetic fields can be produced by such magnets, lending to their potential application in MEMS and related electromechanical applications, and in miniature millimeter-wave vacuum tubes. This abstract contains simplifications, and is supplied only for purposes of searching, not to limit or alter the scope or meaning of any claims herein.

  1. Miniature rotating transmissive optical drum scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert (Inventor); Parrington, Lawrence (Inventor); Rutberg, Michael (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A miniature rotating transmissive optical scanner system employs a drum of small size having an interior defined by a circumferential wall rotatable on a drum axis, an optical element positioned within the interior of the drum, and a light-transmissive lens aperture provided at an angular position in the circumferential wall of the drum for scanning a light beam to or from the optical element in the drum along a beam azimuth angle as the drum is rotated. The miniature optical drum scanner configuration obtains a wide scanning field-of-view (FOV) and large effective aperture is achieved within a physically small size.

  2. Miniature biotelemeter gives multichannel wideband biomedical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carraway, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    A miniature biotelemeter was developed for sensing and transmitting multiple channels of biomedical data over a radio link. The design of this miniature, 10-channel, wideband (5 kHz/channel), pulse amplitude modulation/ frequency modulation biotelemeter takes advantage of modern device technology (e.g., integrated circuit operational amplifiers, complementary symmetry/metal oxide semiconductor logic, and solid state switches) and hybrid packaging techniques. The telemeter is being used to monitor 10 channels of neuron firings from specific regions of the brain in rats implanted with chronic electrodes. Design, fabrication, and testing of an engineering model biotelemeter are described.

  3. Wideband unbalanced waveguide power dividers and combiners

    SciTech Connect

    Halligan, Matthew; McDonald, Jacob Jeremiah; Strassner, II, Bernd H.

    2016-05-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to waveguide dividers and waveguide combiners for application in radar systems, wireless communications, etc. Waveguide dividers-combiners can be manufactured in accordance with custom dimensions, as well as in accordance with waveguide standards such that the input and output ports are of a defined dimension and have a common impedance. Various embodiments are presented which can incorporate one or more septum(s), one or more pairs of septums, an iris, an input matching region, a notch located on the input waveguide arm, waveguide arms having stepped transformer regions, etc. The various divider configurations presented herein can be utilized in high fractional bandwidth applications, e.g., a fractional bandwidth of about 30%, and RF applications in the Ka frequency band (e.g., 26.5-40 GHz).

  4. Plasmonic coaxial waveguide-cavity devices.

    PubMed

    Mahigir, Amirreza; Dastmalchi, Pouya; Shin, Wonseok; Fan, Shanhui; Veronis, Georgios

    2015-08-10

    We theoretically investigate three-dimensional plasmonic waveguide-cavity structures, built by side-coupling stub resonators that consist of plasmonic coaxial waveguides of finite length, to a plasmonic coaxial waveguide. The resonators are terminated either in a short or an open circuit. We show that the properties of these waveguide-cavity systems can be accurately described using a single-mode scattering matrix theory. We also show that, with proper choice of their design parameters, three-dimensional plasmonic coaxial waveguide-cavity devices and two-dimensional metal-dielectric-metal devices can have nearly identical transmission spectra. Thus, three-dimensional plasmonic coaxial waveguides offer a platform for practical implementation of two-dimensional metal-dielectric-metal device designs.

  5. Thin hollow glass waveguide for near IR radiation delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, Michal; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Iwai, Katsumasa; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2008-02-01

    The delivery of the radiation by thin fiber is required for some application, especially in medical internals treatment. Therefore a new 100 μm and 250 μm inner diameter hollow glass waveguides were developed and investigated for the possibility to transport high power near infrared laser radiation without damage of these delivery systems. As laser sources two Nd:YAG laser systems working in Q-switched regime at wavelength 1.06 μm and 1.34 μm were utilized. Delivered radiation characterization was performed. By Alexandrite laser (755 nm) pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been generating 1.06 μm wavelength radiation with 6 ns length of pulse and maximum output energy 0.7 mJ (116.7 kW). The laser was Q-switched using LiF:F 2- saturable absorber. Second laser system was Nd:YAG/V:YAG microchip pumped by laser diode operating at 808 nm. The radiation at 1.3 μm wavelength has been generated with 250 Hz repetition rate. Pulse length was 6 ns and mean output power 25 mW. Corresponding pulse energy and peak power was 0.1 mJ and 16.7 kW, respectively. Both lasers were operating in fundamental TEM 00 mode (M2 ~ 1). For delivery a special cyclic olefin polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguides with the inner/outer diameters 100/190 μm and 250/360 μm were used. The delivery system was consisted of lens, protector, and waveguide. As results the transmission more than 55% and reasonable spatial profile of laser output radiation were found. From these measurements it can be recommended using of this system for near infrared powerful radiation delivery as well as for medical treatment.

  6. Digital waveguide adiabatic passage part 1: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkus, Jesse A.; Steel, M. J.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage represents a new way to design integrated photonic devices. In conventional adiabatic passage designs require smoothly varying waveguide separations. Here we show modelling of adiabatic passage devices where the waveguide separation is varied digitally. Despite digitisation, our designs show robustness against variations in the input wavelength and refractive index contrast of the waveguides relative to the cladding. This approach to spatial adiabatic passage opens new design strategies and hence the potential for new photonics devices.

  7. Shift multiplexing by planar waveguide referencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tao; Zhang, Jiasen; Yan, Lifen; Gong, Qihuang

    2005-09-01

    We present a new method with which to implement shift multiplexing by planar waveguide referencing. In this method, a planar waveguide is used to steer the reference beam, and we implement shift multiplexing by shifting the recording medium. A spatial selectivity as high as 1.1 μm is obtained. By using waveguide referencing we can make a compact and simple holographic system.

  8. Dispersion Characteristics of a Dielectric Loaded Waveguide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-30

    NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANOAODS-1963-A ., ’I A NSWC TR 84-338 00 In ’DISPERSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A SDIELECTRIC LOADED WAVEGUIDE By H. CROSBY J. CHOE Y...4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED DISPERSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A DIELECTRIC LOADED WAVEGUIDE S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES S. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse aide it necessary and Identify by block number) Dielectric Loaded Waveguide ) " Resonant Cavity) a

  9. Optical fiber having wave-guiding rings

    DOEpatents

    Messerly, Michael J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Beach, Raymond J.; Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2011-03-15

    A waveguide includes a cladding region that has a refractive index that is substantially uniform and surrounds a wave-guiding region that has an average index that is close to the index of the cladding. The wave-guiding region also contains a thin ring or series of rings that have an index or indices that differ significantly from the index of the cladding. The ring or rings enable the structure to guide light.

  10. Constitutive Parameter Measurement Using Double Ridge Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    CONSTITUTIVE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE THESIS Nathan J. Lehman, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENG-13-M-30 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-13-M-30 CONSTITUTIVE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE THESIS Presented to the Faculty...PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE Nathan J. Lehman, B.S.E.E. Captain, USAF Approved: Michael Havrilla, PhD (Chairman) Maj Milo Hyde, PhD

  11. Analysis of piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers attached to waveguides using waveguide finite elements.

    PubMed

    Loveday, Philip W

    2007-10-01

    A finite-element modeling procedure for computing the frequency response of piezoelectric transducers attached to infinite constant cross-section waveguides, as encountered in guided wave ultrasonic inspection, is presented. Two-dimensional waveguide finite elements are used to model the waveguide. Conventional three-dimensional finite elements are used to model the piezoelectric transducer. The harmonic forced response of the waveguide is used to obtain a dynamic stiffness matrix (complex and frequency dependent), which represents the waveguide in the transducer model. The electrical and mechanical frequency response of the transducer, attached to the waveguide, can then be computed. The forces applied to the waveguide are calculated and are used to determine the amplitude of each mode excited in the waveguide. The method is highly efficient compared to time integration of a conventional finite-element model of a length of waveguide. In addition, the method provides information about each mode that is excited in the waveguide. The method is demonstrated by modeling a sandwich piezoelectric transducer exciting a waveguide of rectangular cross section, although it could be applied to more complex situations. It is expected that the modeling method will be useful during the optimization of piezoelectric transducers for exciting specific wave propagation modes in waveguides.

  12. Ground-slot waveguide laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chenausky, P.; Drinkwater, E.H.; Laughman, L.M.

    1985-03-18

    A method of fabricating CO/sub 2/ waveguide-type lasers of the type comprising a slot formed in a broad surface of a hard ceramic material, comprising grinding the slot in a conventional surface grinding machine in two steps. The first step utilizes a coarse grinding wheel and the second a finer grinding wheel. The resultant laser cavity can produce high optical-power output when provided with RF excitation.

  13. Fluorescent immunosensors using planar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, James N.; Caldwell, Karin D.; Christensen, Douglas A.; Dyer, Shellee; Hlady, Vladimir; Huang, P.; Janatova, V.; Wang, Hiabo K.; Wei, A. P.

    1993-05-01

    The goal of our research program is to develop competitive and sandwich fluoroimmunoassays with high sensitivity and fast response time, that do not require external reagents. Our approach to this problem is to employ an optical immunoassay based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). Specifically, monoclonal antibodies are immobilized on a planar waveguide. Total internal reflection of light in the planar waveguide sets up an evanescent field which extends about 2000 angstroms from the interface. In the competitive immunoassay, a fluorescent label is coupled to a small synthetic antigen which is packaged with the antibody. In the absence of analyte, the fluorescently labeled antigen binds to the antibody and is excited by the evanescent field. Upon the addition of analyte, the fluorescently labeled antigen molecules are displaced by unlabeled antigen molecules and diffuse out of the evanescent field. In the sandwich assay, a primary or `capture' antibody is immobilized on the planar waveguide, and a secondary or `tracer' antibody (which is labeled with a fluorescent dye) is added to the bulk solution. In the absence of analyte, the tracer antibody remains in solution and very little fluorescence is observed. However, upon addition of analyte, a `molecular sandwich' is formed on the waveguide, composed of: (1) the capture antibody; (2) the analyte; and (3) the tracer antibody. Once this sandwich forms, the tracer antibody is within the evanescent field and fluoresces. Fluorescence emission is detected by a charged- coupled device (CCD). Using this approach, we have developed a prototype immunosensor for the detection of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). This device meets our design goals and exhibits a sensitivity of 0.1 - 1 pmolar.

  14. Robustness and reliability of MOEMS for miniature spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, A.; Broas, M.; Hokka, J.; Mattila, T.; Antila, J.; Laamanen, M.; Saari, H.

    2013-03-01

    Tunable MOEMS Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) are key elements in the miniaturization of spectroscopic instrumentation. Robustness and high reliability of the MOEMS structure are important factors especially for sensors utilized in challenging environments such as in space- and automotive applications. This paper presents reliability assessment of two types of MOEMS optical filters; a tunable ALD (atomic layer deposition) -based surface micromachined FPI for visible - near-infrared range, and a tunable FPI for mid- infrared applications based on LPCVD (low-pressure chemical vapor deposition) thin-film micromachining. High-G shock tests were performed on both MOEMS FPIs. The FPI structures can survive mechanical impact up to 18 000 G without any detectable changes in the capacitance, while detected failure mechanisms in this range arise from packaging and not from the MOEMS structures. The effect of DDMS SAM (dichlorodimethylsilane self-assembled monolayer) coating to prevent in-use stiction was evaluated in both humidity- and impact tests. In humidity tests, 20% stiction rate in non-coated devices vs. 0% stiction rate in DDMS-coated LPCVD FPIs under pull-in was observed. These results indicate good shock-impact robustness for both types of surface-micromachined structures, while DDMS SAM can be utilized to improve in-use reliability of MOEMS.

  15. RF window assembly comprising a ceramic disk disposed within a cylindrical waveguide which is connected to rectangular waveguides through elliptical joints

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Yeremian, Anahid D.

    2016-03-15

    A high-power microwave RF window is provided that includes a cylindrical waveguide, where the cylindrical waveguide includes a ceramic disk concentrically housed in a central region of the cylindrical waveguide, a first rectangular waveguide, where the first rectangular waveguide is connected by a first elliptical joint to a proximal end of the cylindrical waveguide, and a second rectangular waveguide, where the second rectangular waveguide is connected by a second elliptical joint to a distal end of the cylindrical waveguide.

  16. A miniature origami biofuel cell based on a consumed cathode.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Han, Yujie; Lou, Baohua; Zhang, Lingling; Han, Lei; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-11-10

    Considerable interest has been focused on miniature biofuel cells (BFCs) because of their portability and possibility to be implantable. Origami devices with hollow channels will provide novel insight into the assembly methods of miniature BFCs. Herein a miniature origami BFC has been fabricated from a MnO2-graphite flake consumed solid-state cathode. For further practical applications, miniature origami BFCs can directly generate energy from soft drinks.

  17. Photonics-on-a-Chip: Recent Advances in Integrated Waveguides as Enabling Detection Elements for Real-World, Lab-on-a-Chip Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Adam L.

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging advances in semiconductor microfabrication technologies, chip-integrated optical biosensors are poised to make an impact as scalable and multiplexable bioanalytical measurement tools for lab-on-a-chip applications. In particular, waveguide-based optical sensing technology appears to be exceptionally amenable to chip integration and miniaturization, and, as a result, the recent literature is replete with examples of chip-integrated waveguide sensing platforms developed to address a wide range of contemporary analytical challenges. As an overview of the most recent advances within this dynamic field, this review highlights work from the last 2–3 years in the areas of grating-coupled, interferometric, photonic crystal, and microresonator waveguide sensors. With a focus towards device integration, particular emphasis is placed on demonstrations of biosensing using these technologies within microfluidically controlled environments. In addition, examples of multiplexed detection and sensing within complex matrices—important features for real-world applicability—are given special attention. PMID:20957245

  18. Ridge waveguides in Nd:ABC3O7 disordered crystals produced by swift C5+ ion irradiation and precise diamond dicing: Broad band guidance and spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Luan, Qingfang; He, Ruiyun; Cheng, Chen; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Chen, Feng

    2015-05-01

    Optical ridge waveguides have been manufactured in the crystals of Nd:SrLaGa3O7 and Nd:SrGdGa3O7 by combining techniques of swift carbon ion irradiation with precise diamond blade dicing. The guiding properties of the waveguides are investigated at broadband (at wavelength of 633 nm, 1064 nm, and 4 μm). After annealing treatment at 200 °C for 1 h, the propagation losses of ridge waveguides could be reduced to as low as 1 dB/cm. The confocal microfluorescence emission spectra confirm that the fluorescence properties of Nd3+ ions are almost unchanged after the ion irradiation processing, showing promising potentials as application of miniature light sources in integrated optics.

  19. Photonics-on-a-chip: recent advances in integrated waveguides as enabling detection elements for real-world, lab-on-a-chip biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Adam L; Bailey, Ryan C

    2011-01-21

    By leveraging advances in semiconductor microfabrication technologies, chip-integrated optical biosensors are poised to make an impact as scalable and multiplexable bioanalytical measurement tools for lab-on-a-chip applications. In particular, waveguide-based optical sensing technology appears to be exceptionally amenable to chip integration and miniaturization, and, as a result, the recent literature is replete with examples of chip-integrated waveguide sensing platforms developed to address a wide range of contemporary analytical challenges. As an overview of the most recent advances within this dynamic field, this review highlights work from the last 2-3 years in the areas of grating-coupled, interferometric, photonic crystal, and microresonator waveguide sensors. With a focus towards device integration, particular emphasis is placed on demonstrations of biosensing using these technologies within microfluidically controlled environments. In addition, examples of multiplexed detection and sensing within complex matrices--important features for real-world applicability--are given special attention.

  20. Low loss SiGe graded index waveguides for mid-IR applications.

    PubMed

    Brun, Mickael; Labeye, Pierre; Grand, Gilles; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Boulila, Fahem; Carras, Mathieu; Nicoletti, Sergio

    2014-01-13

    In the last few years Mid InfraRed (MIR) photonics has received renewed interest for a variety of commercial, scientific and military applications. This paper reports the design, the fabrication and the characterization of SiGe/Si based graded index waveguides and photonics integrated devices. The thickness and the Ge concentration of the core layer were optimized to cover the full [3 - 8 µm] band. The developed SiGe/Si stack has been used to fabricate straight waveguides and basic optical functions such as Y-junction, crossings and couplers. Straight waveguides showed losses as low as 1 dB/cm at λ = 4.5 µm and 2 dB/cm at 7.4 µm. Likewise straight waveguides, basic functions exhibit nearly theoretical behavior with losses compatible with the implementation of more complex functions in integrated photonics circuits. To the best of our knowledge, the performances of those Mid-IR waveguides significantly exceed the state of the art, confirming the feasibility of using graded SiGe/Si devices in a wide range of wavelengths. These results represent a capital breakthrough to develop a photonic platform working in the Mid-IR range.

  1. Two Views of Islam: Ceramic Tile Design and Miniatures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaulay, Sara Grove

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project focusing on Islamic art that consists of two parts: (1) ceramic tile design; and (2) Islamic miniatures. Provides background information on Islamic art and step-by-step instructions for designing the Islamic tile and miniature. Includes learning objectives and resources on Islamic tile miniatures. (CMK)

  2. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section... Miniature pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A miniature pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure the pressure between a device and soft tissue by converting mechanical...

  3. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section... Miniature pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A miniature pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure the pressure between a device and soft tissue by converting mechanical...

  4. Miniature Housings for Electronics With Standard Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E.; Smith, Dennis A.; Alhorn, Dean C.

    2006-01-01

    A family of general-purpose miniature housings has been designed to contain diverse sensors, actuators, and drive circuits plus associated digital electronic readout and control circuits. The circuits contained in the housings communicate with the external world via standard RS-485 interfaces.

  5. The technology of miniature acoustic element arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bom, N.; Lancee, C. T.; Ridder, J.; Ligtvoet, C.; Roelandt, J.

    1975-01-01

    Various aspects of miniature element array construction are discussed. Some initial results on optimization of lateral resolution with a special focusing technique in linear array design is presented, together with the constructional details. Furthermore the construction of a catheter tip array is treated in detail.

  6. Miniaturization of a biomedical gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Mirtaheri, Peyman; Omtveit, Tore; Klotzbuecher, Thomas; Grimnes, Sverre; Martinsen, Orjan G; Tønnessen, Tor Inge

    2004-12-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that a conductivity based PCO2 sensor is an attractive solution for early detection of ischemia and presented two design geometries. For organ surface measurements, the planar design was suitable but it was difficult to insert the sensor into the tissue. A cylindrical design solution was favored for insertion due to the large membrane contact area and easy placement in a medical catheter. Since the previous cylindrical prototype was large and could damage the tissue, a more miniaturized sensor was needed. In the current paper, we present a miniaturized sensor with an outer diameter of 1 mm. The applied technology for manufacturing the sensor was a combination of mechanical turning, excimer laser drilling and conventional molding technique. The materials applied were PEEK (polyetherether ketone), PI (polyimide) with gold layers and polysiloxane. The membrane had to be gas permeable while acting as a barrier for ion transport, and was made of polysiloxane and had a thickness of 100-150 microm. The miniaturized sensor was tested for calibration, response time, drifting and pressure sensitivity. The results show that the miniaturized PCO2 sensor is capable of rapid and stable measurements both in vitro and ex vivo. The result from this study will be applied for the industrial manufacturing of such a biomedical sensor as a clinical product.

  7. A miniature mass spectrometer for hydrazine detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Sinha, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    A Miniature Mass Spectrometer (MMS) with a focal plane (Mattauch-Herzog) geometry has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The MMS has the potential to meet the NASA requirements of 10 parts per billion sensitivity for Hydrazine detection, as well as the requirements for instant response, portability, and low maintenance.

  8. Miniature Paintings: Small Size, Big Impact!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Bill

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a miniature painting project that allows students to research a master painter and then replicate the work on a smaller scale. This lesson focuses on the students' ability to learn to identify style, subject matter, themes, and content in painting through the study of historical paintings, and the application of various…

  9. Miniature Marimbas: Migrant Workers' Memories of Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Jayne

    1995-01-01

    Three Mexican migrant workers attending classes at Geneseo (New York) Migrant Center used leftover art materials to represent their home village in miniature. A spontaneous artistic expression, the objects allowed the men an opportunity to reminisce and reinforce cultural and interpersonal ties, and gave insight about their background and culture…

  10. Mid-infrared supercontinuum generation using a silicon racetrack resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiangga, S.; Suwanarat, S.; Amiri, I. S.; Yupapin, P.

    2017-03-01

    A micro-optic racetrack waveguide is designed and simulated for a mid-infrared supercontinuum (SC) generation, where the device structure consists of a single-couple racetrack ridge and double-couple racetrack ridge waveguides, which can be engineered to have the anomalous dispersion silicon-on-insulator ridge waveguide. Using the commercial software, the numerical results are obtained and investigated. Using a 50 fs pulse input with a low peak power of 25 W, the obtained results have shown that the dispersion of the propagation pulse, D = +28.89 nm-1 km-1 at the near-infrared wavelength can be obtained, in which the obtained broadband SC spectrum can be extended around 2100 and 1613 nm with a -30 dB covering the wavelength range from 1043 nm to 3152 and 1030 to 2643 nm, respectively, which can be compared with the ridge waveguide, from which the spectrum is extended to have the maximum of 4.77 and 3.66 octaves, respectively. It is also found that the physical process of the supercontinuum generation in both couple racetrack ridge waveguides is related to the soliton fission and Cherenkov radiation, self-phase modulation and accumulations are inside the racetrack waveguide resonator until the amplitude and spectrum width are stabled, which is discussed.

  11. Miniature Scroll Pumps Fabricated by LIGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiberg, Dean; Shcheglov, Kirill; White, Victor; Bae, Sam

    2009-01-01

    Miniature scroll pumps have been proposed as roughing pumps (low - vacuum pumps) for miniature scientific instruments (e.g., portable mass spectrometers and gas analyzers) that depend on vacuum. The larger scroll pumps used as roughing pumps in some older vacuum systems are fabricated by conventional machining. Typically, such an older scroll pump includes (1) an electric motor with an eccentric shaft to generate orbital motion of a scroll and (2) conventional bearings to restrict the orbital motion to a circle. The proposed miniature scroll pumps would differ from the prior, larger ones in both design and fabrication. A miniature scroll pump would include two scrolls: one mounted on a stationary baseplate and one on a flexure stage (see figure). An electromagnetic actuator in the form of two pairs of voice coils in a push-pull configuration would make the flexure stage move in the desired circular orbit. The capacitance between the scrolls would be monitored to provide position (gap) feedback to a control system that would adjust the drive signals applied to the voice coils to maintain the circular orbit as needed for precise sealing of the scrolls. To minimize power consumption and maximize precision of control, the flexure stage would be driven at the frequency of its mechanical resonance. The miniaturization of these pumps would entail both operational and manufacturing tolerances of <1 m. Such tight tolerances cannot be achieved easily by conventional machining of high-aspect-ratio structures like those of scroll-pump components. In addition, the vibrations of conventional motors and ball bearings exceed these tight tolerances by an order of magnitude. Therefore, the proposed pumps would be fabricated by the microfabrication method known by the German acronym LIGA ( lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung, which means lithography, electroforming, molding) because LIGA has been shown to be capable of providing the required tolerances at large aspect ratios.

  12. Miniature Grating for Spectrally-Encoded Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongkyun; Martinez, Ramses V.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally-encoded endoscopy (SEE) is an ultraminiature endoscopy technology that acquires high-definition images of internal organs through a sub-mm endoscopic probe. In SEE, a grating at the tip of the imaging optics diffracts the broadband light into multiple beams, where each beam with a distinctive wavelength is illuminated on a unique transverse location of the tissue. By encoding one transverse coordinate with the wavelength, SEE can image a line of the tissue at a time without using any beam scanning devices. This feature of the SEE technology allows the SEE probe to be miniaturized to sub-mm dimensions. While previous studies have shown that SEE has the potential to be utilized for various clinical imaging applications, the translation of SEE for medicine has been hampered by challenges in fabricating the miniature grating inherent to SEE probes. This paper describes a new fabrication method for SEE probes. The new method uses a soft lithographic approach to pattern a high-aspect-ratio grating at the tip of the miniature imaging optics. Using this technique, we have constructed a 500-μm-diameter SEE probe. The miniature grating at the tip of the probe had a measured diffraction efficiency of 75%. The new SEE probe was used to image a human finger and formalin fixed mouse embryos, demonstrating the capability of this device to visualize key anatomic features of tissues with high image contrast. In addition to providing high quality imaging SEE optics, the soft lithography method allows cost-effective and reliable fabrication of these miniature endoscopes, which will facilitate the clinical translation of SEE technology. PMID:23503940

  13. Mid infrared LHS system packaging using flexible waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Chung

    1987-01-01

    As mid IR fiber optic systems are rapidly approaching a reality, so is the feasibility of fiber optic laser heterodyne systems. Laser heterodyne spectroscopy for high resolution monitoring of atmospheric gaseous pollutants is necessarily in the mid IR, the region in which the absorption signature of gaseous species is most prominent. It so happens that the lowest theoretical loss due to Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering also lies in the mid IR. Prospects of highly efficient laser heterodyne systems are thus very good. Such fibers are now beginning to be commercially available, and a test program is being conducted for such fibers with ambient temperature ranging from cryogenic to above room, and stringest mechanical flexibility requirements. Preliminary results are encouraging. A program is being started to explore the possibility of mid IR fiber optic device applications, by taking advantage of this phonon rich region. The potential long interaction length in fibers coupled with predicted extremely low losses point to stimulated Brillouin scattering based devices in the mW range. The generation of backscattered sBs at low laser powers is significant not only as an ultimate power limiting factor for laser transmission in fibers in the mid IR, but also the presence of frequency-shifted multiple order sBs Stokes and antiStokes lines will certainly have severe effect on the laser beats crucial in high resolution heterodyne spectroscopy.

  14. Development of 2D Microdisplay Using an Integrated Microresonating Waveguide Scanning System

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Wei-Shu; Wang, Wei-Chih; Wu, Wen-Jong; Tsui, Chi Leung; Cui, Wei; Shih, Wen-Pin

    2012-01-01

    Our research team has developed a 2D micro image display device that can potentially overcome the size reduction limits while maintaining the high-image resolution and field of view obtained by mirror-based display systems. The basic design of the optical scanner includes a microfabricated SU-8 cantilever waveguide that is electromechanically deflected by a piezoelectric actuator. From the distal tip of the cantilever waveguide, a light beam is emitted and the direction of propagation is displaced along two orthogonal directions. The waveforms for the actuator and the LED light modulation are generated and controlled using a field programmable gate array. Our recent study is an update to the previously-reported mechanical scanner, replacing the hand-built PZT scanner and fiber waveguide with a microfabricated system incorporating aerosol-deposited PZT thin film and a polymeric SU-8 wave guide. In this article, we report on the design and fabrication of a prototype miniaturized 2D scanner, discuss optical and mechanical the modeling of the system’s properties and present the experimental results. PMID:22876080

  15. Scalar Product in the Space of Waveguide Modes of an Open Planar Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevastianov, A. L.; Sevastianov, L. A.; Tiutiunnik, A. A.; Nikolaev, N. E.

    2016-02-01

    To implement the method of adiabatic waveguide modes for modeling the propagation of polarized monochromatic electromagnetic radiation in irregular integrated optics structures it is necessary to expand the desired solution in basic adiabatic waveguide modes. This expansion requires the use of the scalar product in the space of waveguide vector fields of integrated optics waveguide. This work solves the first stage of this problem - the construction of the scalar product in the space of vector solutions of the eigenmode problem (classical and generalized) waveguide modes of an open planar waveguide. In constructing the mentioned sesquilinear form, we used the Lorentz reciprocity principle of waveguide modes and tensor form of the Ostrogradsky-Gauss theorem.

  16. Waveguide tapering for beam-width control in a waveguide transducer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Eui; Jeon, Hyun Joong; Kim, Hoe Woong; Kim, Yoon Young

    2014-03-01

    In a waveguide transducer that transmits an ultrasonic wave through a waveguide unit to a test structure, it is most preferred to send a non-dispersive ultrasonic wave of a narrow beam width. However, there is an unresolved conflict between the generation of the non- or less-dispersive wave and the transmission of a narrow-beam wave into a test structure. Among others, the thickness of the waveguide unit in a waveguide transducer is the key variable determining these two conflicting criteria, but the use of a uniformly-thick waveguide of any thickness cannot fulfill the two conflicting criteria simultaneously. In this study, we propose a specially-engineered tapered waveguide unit for the simultaneous satisfaction. An excitation unit is installed at the end of the thin region of the tapered waveguide and generates only the lowest non-dispersive shear-horizontal wave. Then the generated wave propagates through the tapered region of the waveguide unit and reaches the thick region of the waveguide with insignificant mode conversion to higher modes. If the tapered waveguide is used, the surviving lowest mode in the thick region of the waveguide is shown to carry most of the transmitted power and is finally propagated into a test structure. Because the beam size of the propagated wave and the thickness of the contacting waveguide region are inversely related, the thick contacting region of the tapered waveguide ensures narrow beam width. Numerical and experimental investigations were performed to check the effectiveness of the proposed waveguide-tapering approach.

  17. Infrared Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lascours, Jean; Albe, Virginie

    2001-01-01

    Describes a series of simple and nontraditional experiments that enable students to discover the properties of infrared radiation by studying the propagation, reflection, diffusion, and refraction of infrared. The experiments rely on two modules, an infrared transmitter and an infrared receiver. (SAH)

  18. Detection of glucose variability in saline solutions from transmission and reflection measurements using V-band waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Garcia, Helena; Kosmas, Panagiotis; Sotiriou, Ioannis; Papadopoulos-Kelidis, Ioannis; Parini, Clive; Gouzouasis, Ioannis; Palikaras, George; Kallos, Efthymios

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents experimental results that demonstrate the correlation of glucose concentration in water and saline solutions with transmitted electromagnetic (EM) energy in the frequency range of 50-75 GHz. The system is based on placing the aqueous solutions in acrylic holding tanks sandwiched between two open V-band waveguides. The measured samples have clinically relevant range of glucose concentrations, as low as 0.025 wt%. Our measurements show for the first time that it is possible to establish an approximately linear relationship between the signals transmitted through this simple waveguide-based system and the glucose content in the samples. Accurate full-wave EM simulations confirm this linear correlation. The results suggest the possibility of developing a miniaturized non-invasive glucose sensing device based on the transmission of radio waves in this frequency range.

  19. Cooling Waveguide Flanges in Microwave Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C.; Hartop, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Flang appendage circulates coolant for conductive heat removal. Flange appendage bore accomodates coolant tube. O-ring surrounds bore; when adjacent waveguide sections are bolted together, continuous conduit is formed for coolant. Pressure release groove in modified flange prevents coolant from entering waveguide should O'ring seal fail.

  20. Planar fluoride waveguides for amplifiers and lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Grishutkina, T E; Doroshenko, M E; Karasik, A Ya; Konyushkin, V A; Konyushkin, D V; Nakladov, A N; Osiko, V V; Tsvetkov, V B

    2015-08-31

    We have produced planar optical waveguides having a crystalline CaF{sub 2} – YF{sub 3} – NdF{sub 3} mixed yttrofluorite core and two reflective claddings in order to improve waveguide excitation efficiency. Under diode pumping, lasing has been achieved at a wavelength of 1064 nm with a slope efficiency near 15%. (lasers)

  1. Waveguide Transition for Submillimeter-Wave MMICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, Kevin M.; Deal, William R.; Radisic, Vesna; Mei, Xiaobing; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd C.

    2009-01-01

    An integrated waveguide-to-MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) chip operating in the 300-GHz range is designed to operate well on high-permittivity semiconductor substrates typical for an MMIC amplifier, and allows a wider MMIC substrate to be used, enabling integration with larger MMICs (power amplifiers). The waveguide-to- CBCPW (conductor-backed coplanar waveguide) transition topology is based on an integrated dipole placed in the E-plane of the waveguide module. It demonstrates low loss and good impedance matching. Measurement and simulation demonstrate that the loss of the transition and waveguide loss is less than 1-dB over a 340-to-380-GHz bandwidth. A transition is inserted along the propagation direction of the waveguide. This transition uses a planar dipole aligned with the maximum E-field of the TE10 waveguide mode as an inter face between the waveguide and the MMIC. Mode conversion between the coplanar striplines (CPS) that feed the dipole and the CBCPW transmission line is accomplished using a simple air-bridge structure. The bottom side ground plane is truncated at the same reference as the top-side ground plane, leaving the end of the MMIC suspended in air.

  2. High temperature pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Caines, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  3. Capillary waveguide optrodes for Medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieslinger, Dietmar; Weigl, Bernhard H.; Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-01-01

    Glass capillaries with a chemically sensitive coating on the inner surface are used as optical sensors for medical diagnostics. The capillary simultaneously serves as a sample compartment, a sensor element, and an inhomogeneous optical waveguide. Different optical setups have been investigated and compared regarding its waveguiding properties.

  4. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  5. Evaporated As2S3 Luneburg lenses for LiNbO3:Ti optical waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, J. R.; Wood, V. E.; Kenan, R. P.; Verber, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    Luneburg lenses of good quality were formed on high index optical waveguides by evaporation of arsenic trisulfide glass through simple masks. Using only two thin circular aperture masks, lenses with focal spots of a few times the diffraction limited width at f/4 were obtained. These lenses were designed for and tested at both visible (633 nm) and infrared wavelengths. Procedures for the design, fabrication, and testing of lenses of this type are described.

  6. Light propagation in periodically modulated complex waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Sean; Yang, Jianke

    2015-03-01

    Light propagation in optical waveguides with periodically modulated index of refraction and alternating gain and loss are investigated for linear and nonlinear systems. Based on a multiscale perturbation analysis, it is shown that for many non-parity-time- (PT -) symmetric waveguides, their linear spectrum is partially complex; thus light exponentially grows or decays upon propagation, and this growth or decay is not altered by nonlinearity. However, several classes of non-PT -symmetric waveguides are also identified to possess all-real linear spectrum. For PT -symmetric waveguides, phase transition is predicted analytically. In the nonlinear regime longitudinally periodic and transversely quasilocalized modes are found for PT -symmetric waveguides both above and below phase transition. These nonlinear modes are stable under evolution and can develop from initially weak initial conditions.

  7. A Novel Miniature Wide-band Radiometer for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykulska-Lawrence, Hanna

    2016-10-01

    Design, development and testing of a novel miniaturised infrared radiometer is described. The instrument opens up new possibilities in planetary science of deployment on smaller platforms - such as unmanned aerial vehicles and microprobes - to enable study of a planet's radiation balance, as well as terrestrial volcano plumes and trace gases in planetary atmospheres, using low-cost long-term observations. Thus a key enabling development is that of miniaturised, low-power and well-calibrated instrumentation.The paper reports advances in miniature technology to perform high accuracy visible / IR remote sensing measurements. The infrared radiometer is akin to those widely used for remote sensing for earth and space applications, which are currently either large instruments on orbiting platforms or medium-sized payloads on balloons. We use MEMS microfabrication techniques to shrink a conventional design, while combining the calibration benefits of large (>1kg) type radiometers with the flexibility and portability of a <10g device. The instrument measures broadband (0.2 to 100um) upward and downward radiation fluxes, with built-in calibration capability, incorporating traceability to temperature standards such as ITS-90.The miniature instrument described here was derived from a concept developed for a European Space Agency study, Dalomis (Proc. of 'i-SAIRAS 2005', Munich, 2005), which involved dropping multiple probes into the atmosphere of Venus from a balloon to sample numerous parts of the complex weather systems on the planet. Data from such an in-situ instrument would complement information from a satellite remote sensing instrument or balloon radiosonde. Moreover, the addition of an internal calibration standard facilitates comparisons between datasets.One of the main challenges for a reduced size device is calibration. We use an in-situ method whereby a blackbody source is integrated within the device and a micromirror switches the input to the detector between

  8. Miniaturization and Optimization of Nanoscale Resonant Oscillators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-07

    dielectric cavities can be grouped into two main categories: (i) surface bound (that is, surface plasmon polariton (SPP)) resonant modes and (ii...photonic molecule lasing. IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 12, 78–85 (2006). 7. Min, B. K. et al. High-Q surface-plasmon– polariton whispering-gallery... polaritons on planar metallic waveguides. Opt. Express 12, 4072–4079 (2004). 16. P. Yeh, A. Yariv, and E. Marom, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 1196 (1978). 17. A

  9. Miniature sensor suitable for electronic nose applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.; Gehl, Anthony C.; Allman, Steve L.; Johansson, Alicia; Boisen, Anja

    2007-05-01

    A major research effort has been devoted over the years for the development of chemical sensors for the detection of chemical and explosive vapors. However, the deployment of such chemical sensors will require the use of multiple sensors (probably tens of sensors) in a sensor package to achieve selective detection. In order to keep the overall detector unit small, miniature sensors with sufficient sensitivity of detection will be needed. We report sensitive detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a stimulant for the nerve agents, using a miniature sensor unit based on piezoresistive microcantilevers. The sensor can detect parts-per-trillion concentrations of DMMP within 10s exposure times. The small size of the sensor makes it ideally suited for electronic nose applications.

  10. SMARBot: a modular miniature mobile robot platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yan; Johnson, Kerry; Simms, Brian; Conforth, Matthew

    2008-04-01

    Miniature robots have many advantages over their larger counterparts, such as low cost, low power, and easy to build a large scale team for complex tasks. Heterogeneous multi miniature robots could provide powerful situation awareness capability due to different locomotion capabilities and sensor information. However, it would be expensive and time consuming to develop specific embedded system for different type of robots. In this paper, we propose a generic modular embedded system architecture called SMARbot (Stevens Modular Autonomous Robot), which consists of a set of hardware and software modules that can be configured to construct various types of robot systems. These modules include a high performance microprocessor, a reconfigurable hardware component, wireless communication, and diverse sensor and actuator interfaces. The design of all the modules in electrical subsystem, the selection criteria for module components, and the real-time operating system are described. Some proofs of concept experimental results are also presented.

  11. Miniature Reversal Electron-Attachment Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara

    1994-01-01

    Miniature reversal electron-attachment detector (miniREAD) enables direct injection of air or vapor at atmospheric pressure from monitored area into mass-spectrometric instrument to detect explosives, narcotics, or other substances, vapors of which suspected of being present in low concentrations. In comparison with older reversal electron-attachment detector, miniREAD simpler in design; more rugged; and easier to build, repair, and maintain. In addition, probably more sensitive.

  12. Miniature, Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilski, Steve; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Sorensen, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Miniature Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscope (MVS-CMG) was designed for small satellites (mass from less than 1 kg up to 500 kg). Currently available CMGs are too large and heavy, and available miniature CMGs do not provide sufficient control authority for use on practical satellites. This primarily results from the need to greatly increase the speed of rotation of the flywheel in order to reduce the flywheel size and mass. This goal was achieved by making use of a proprietary, space-qualified, high-speed (100,000 rpm) motor technology to spin the flywheel at a speed ten times faster than other known miniature CMGs under development. NASA is supporting innovations in propulsion, power, and guidance and navigation systems for low-cost small spacecraft. One of the key enabling technologies is attitude control mechanisms. CMGs are particularly attractive for spacecraft attitude control since they can achieve higher torques with lower mass and power than reaction wheels, and they provide continuous torque capability that enables precision pointing (in contrast to on-off thruster control). The aim of this work was to develop a miniature, variable-speed CMG that is sized for use on small satellites. To achieve improved agility, these spacecraft must be able to slew at high rate, which requires attitude control actuators that can apply torques on the order of 5 N-m. The MVS-CMG is specifically designed to achieve a high-torque output with a minimum flywheel and system mass. The flywheel can be run over a wide range of speeds, which is important to help reduce/eliminate potential gimbal lock, and can be used to optimize the operational envelope of the CMG.

  13. Degenerative myelopathy in an adult miniature poodle.

    PubMed

    Matthews, N S; de Lahunta, A

    1985-06-01

    Degenerative myelopathy was diagnosed at necropsy of an adult Miniature Poodle with a 33-month history of progressive pelvic limb ataxia and proprioceptive deficit. Microscopic examination of the cord revealed diffuse degenerative myelopathy. Degenerative myelopathy is usually seen in adult, large-breed dogs and progresses over a period of months. In this case, the myelopathy progressed slowly and the degree of paralysis became more extensive than usually seen.

  14. A miniature tilting pad gas lubricated bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixsmith, H.; Swift, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a miniature tilting pad gas bearing developed for use in very small turbomachines. The bearings have been developed for cryogenic turboexpanders with shaft diameters down to about 0.3 cm and rotational speeds up to one million rpm. Cryogenic expansion turbines incorporating this type of bearing should be suitable for refrigeration rates down to about 10 w.

  15. Sub miniaturized laser doppler velocimeter sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gharib, Morteza (Inventor); Modaress, Darius (Inventor); Taugwalder, Frederic (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A miniaturized laser Doppler velocimeter is formed in a housing that is preferably 3 mm in diameter or less. A laser couples light to a first diffractive optical element that is formed on the fiber end. The light is coupled to a lens that also includes a diffractive optical element. The same lens is also used to collect receive light, and receives includes another diffractive optical element to collect that received light.

  16. High Q Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated high Q measurements in a room temperature Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator (MSAR). Initial measurements of bulk acoustic modes in room temperature sapphire at 39 MHz have demonstrated a Q of 8.8 x 10(exp 6). The long term goal of this work is to integrate such a high Q resonator with small, low noise quartz oscillator electronics, providing a fractional frequency stability better than 1 x 10(exp -14) @ 1s.

  17. One-way electromagnetic waveguide using multiferroic Fibonacci superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhenghua; Lei, Dajun; Huang, Jianquan; Jin, Gui; Qiu, Feng; Yan, Wenyan

    2015-12-01

    The multiferroic Fibonacci superlattices (MFSs) are composed of single-phase multiferroic domains with polarization and magnetization according to the rule of Fibonacci sequence. We propose to construct a one-way electromagnetic waveguide by the MFSs. The forbidden band structures of the MFSs for the forward and backward electromagnetic waves are not completely overlapped, and an obvious translation between them occurs around the fixed point ω bar = 1 with broken time-reversal and space inversion symmetries (TRSIS), which indicates the existence of one-way electromagnetic modes in the MFSs. Transmission spectrum is utilized to present this property and to indicate further one-way electromagnetic modes lying within the polaritonic band gap. The maximum forbidden bandwidth (divided by midgap frequency) of 5.4% for the backward electromagnetic wave (BEW) is found, in which the forward electromagnetic wave (FEW) can pass. The functions of one-way propagation modes and polaritonic band gap integrated into the MFSs can miniaturize the one-way photonic devices. The properties can also be applied to construct compact microwave isolators.

  18. Strain controlled cyclic tests on miniaturized specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, R.; Džugan, J.

    2017-02-01

    The paper is dealing with strain controlled cyclic tests using a non-contact strain measurement based on digital image correlation techniques on proportional sizes of conventional specimens. The cyclic behaviour of 34CrNiMo6 high-strength steel was investigated on miniaturized round specimens with diameter of 2mm that were compared with specimens in accordance with ASTM E606 standards. The cycle asymmetry coefficient was R= -1. This application is intended to be used for life time assessment of in service components in future work which enables to carried out a group of mechanical tests from a limited amount of the experimental material. The attention was paid to confirm the suitability of the proposed size miniaturization geometry, testing set up and procedure. The test results obtained enabled to construct Manson-Coffin curves and assess fatigue parameters. The purpose of this study is to present differences between cyclic curves and cyclic parameters which have been evaluated based on conventional and miniaturized specimens.

  19. Stability-Augmentation Devices for Miniature Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, RIchard M.

    2005-01-01

    Non-aerodynamic mechanical devices are under consideration as means to augment the stability of miniature autonomous and remotely controlled aircraft. Such aircraft can be used for diverse purposes, including military reconnaissance, radio communications, and safety-related monitoring of wide areas. The need for stability-augmentation devices arises because adverse meteorological conditions generally affect smaller aircraft more strongly than they affect larger aircraft: Miniature aircraft often become uncontrollable under conditions that would not be considered severe enough to warrant grounding of larger aircraft. The need for the stability-augmentation devices to be non-aerodynamic arises because there is no known way to create controlled aerodynamic forces sufficient to counteract the uncontrollable meteorological forces on miniature aircraft. A stability-augmentation device of the type under consideration includes a mass pod (a counterweight) at the outer end of a telescoping shaft, plus associated equipment to support the operation of the aircraft. The telescoping shaft and mass pod are stowed in the rear of the aircraft. When deployed, they extend below the aircraft. Optionally, an antenna for radio communication can be integrated into the shaft. At the time of writing this article, the deployment of the telescoping shaft and mass pod was characterized as passive and automatic, but information about the deployment mechanism(s) was not available. The feasibility of this stability-augmentation concept was demonstrated in flights of hand-launched prototype aircraft.

  20. Miniature standoff Raman probe for neurosurgical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Oliver A. C.; Hutchings, Joanne; Gray, William; Vincent, Rosa Louise; Day, John C.

    2016-08-01

    Removal of intrinsic brain tumors is a delicate process, where a high degree of specificity is required to remove all of the tumor tissue without damaging healthy brain. The accuracy of this process can be greatly enhanced by intraoperative guidance. Optical biopsies using Raman spectroscopy are a minimally invasive and lower-cost alternative to current guidance methods. A miniature Raman probe for performing optical biopsies of human brain tissue is presented. The probe allows sampling inside a conventional stereotactic brain biopsy system: a needle of length 200 mm and inner diameter of 1.8 mm. By employing a miniature stand-off Raman design, the probe removes the need for any additional components to be inserted into the brain. Additionally, the probe achieves a very low internal silica background while maintaining good collection of Raman signal. To illustrate this, the probe is compared with a Raman probe that uses a pair of optical fibers for collection. The miniature stand-off Raman probe is shown to collect a comparable number of Raman scattered photons, but the Raman signal to background ratio is improved by a factor of five at Raman shifts below ˜500 cm-1. The probe's suitability for use on tissue is demonstrated by discriminating between different types of healthy porcine brain tissue.

  1. Miniature Robotic Spacecraft for Inspecting Other Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven; Abbott, Larry; Duran, Steve; Goode, Robert; Howard, Nathan; Jochim, David; Rickman, Steve; Straube, Tim; Studak, Bill; Wagenknecht, Jennifer; Lemke, Matthew; Wade, Randall; Wheeler, Scott; Baggerman, Clinton

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the Miniature Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (Mini AERCam)-- a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. The Mini AERCam is a successor to the AERCam Sprint -- a prior miniature robotic inspection spacecraft that was demonstrated in a space-shuttle flight experiment in 1997. The prototype of the Mini AERCam is a demonstration unit having approximately the form and function of a flight system. The Mini AERCam is approximately spherical with a diameter of about 7.5 in. (.19 cm) and a weight of about 10 lb (.4.5 kg), yet it has significant additional capabilities, relative to the 14-in. (36-cm), 35-lb (16-kg) AERCam Sprint. The Mini AERCam includes miniaturized avionics, instrumentation, communications, navigation, imaging, power, and propulsion subsystems, including two digital video cameras and a high-resolution still camera. The Mini AERCam is designed for either remote piloting or supervised autonomous operations, including station keeping and point-to-point maneuvering. The prototype has been tested on an air-bearing table and in a hardware-in-the-loop orbital simulation of the dynamics of maneuvering in proximity to the International Space Station.

  2. Ultralow loss cavities and waveguides scattering loss cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Rakich, Peter T

    2014-01-07

    A waveguide system includes a first waveguide having surface roughness along at least one surface and a second waveguide substantially identical to the first waveguide and having substantially identical surface roughness along a corresponding side. The first and second waveguides are separated from each other by a predermined distance and are configured to receive respective first and second light signals having antisymmetric modes. The predetermined distance between the first and second waveguide tends to cause cancellation of at least far-field polarization radiation emanating from the first and second waveguides and resulting from surface roughness.

  3. Planar micro-optic solar concentration using multiple imaging lenses into a common slab waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Jason H.; Ford, Joseph E.

    2009-08-01

    Conventional CPV systems focus sunlight directly onto a PV cell, usually through a non-imaging optic to avoid hot spots. In practice, many systems use a shared tracking platform to mount multiple smaller aperture lenses, each concentrating light into an associated PV cell. Scaling this approach to the limit would result in a thin sheet-like geometry. This would be ideal in terms of minimizing the tracking system payload, especially since such thin sheets can be arranged into louvered strips to minimize wind-force loading. However, simply miniaturizing results in a large number of individual PV cells, each needed to be packaged, aligned, and electrically connected. Here we describe for the first time a different optical system approach to solar concentrators, where a thin lens array is combined with a shared multimode waveguide. The benefits of a thin optical design can therefore be achieved with an optimum spacing of the PV cells. The guiding structure is geometrically similar to luminescent solar concentrators, however, in micro-optic waveguide concentrators sunlight is coupled directly into the waveguide without absorption or wavelength conversion. This opens a new design space for high-efficiency CPV systems with the potential for cost reduction in both optics and tracking mechanics. In this paper, we provide optical design and preliminary experimental results of one implementation specifically intended to be compatible with large-scale roll processing. Here the waveguide is a uniform glass sheet, held between the lens array and a corresponding array of micro-mirrors self-aligned to each lens focus during fabrication.

  4. Nanoconcentration of terahertz radiation in plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, Anastasia; Durach, Maxim; Nelson, Keith A.; Stockman, Mark I.

    2008-10-01

    Recent years have seen an explosive research and development of nanoplasmonics in the visible and near-infrared (near-ir) frequency regions. One of the most fundamental effects in nanoplasmonics is nano-concentration of optical energy. Plasmonic nanofocusing has been predicted and experimentally achieved. It will be very beneficial for the fundamental science, engineering, environmental, and defense applications to be able to nano-concentrate terahertz radiation (frequency 1 - 10 THz or vacuum wavelength 300 - 30 microns). This will allow for the nanoscale spatial resolution for THz imaging and introduce the THz spectroscopy on the nanoscale, taking full advantage of the rich THz spectra and submicron to nanoscale structures of many engineering, physical, and biological objects of wide interest: electronic components (integrated circuits, etc.), bacteria, their spores, viruses, macromolecules, carbon clusters and nanotubes, etc. In this Letter we establish the principal limits for the nanoconcentration of the THz radiation in metal/dielectric waveguides and determine their optimum shapes required for this nanoconcentration We predict that the adiabatic compression of THz radiation from the initial spot size of light wavelength to the final size of R = 100 - 250 nm can be achieved with the THz radiation intensity increased by a factor of 10 to 250. This THz energy nanoconcentration will not only improve the spatial resolution and increase the signal/noise ratio for the THz imaging and spectroscopy, but in combination with the recently developed sources of powerful THz pulses will allow the observation of nonlinear THz effects and a carrying out a variety of nonlinear spectroscopies (such as two-dimensional spectroscopy), which are highly informative.

  5. Annealed proton exchanged optical waveguides in lithium niobate: differences between the X- and Z-cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekvindová, Pavla; Špirková, Jarmila; Červená, Jarmila; Budnar, Milos; Razpet, Alenka; Zorko, Benjamin; Pelicon, Primož

    2002-04-01

    This article summarizes results and assessments of our systematic fabrication and characterization of proton exchanged (PE) and annealed proton exchanged (APE) waveguides study in lithium niobate. This study focused on different behavior of crystallographically diverse X(1 1 2¯ 0) and Z(0 0 0 1) substrate cuts during waveguides fabrication, and differences in characteristics of the resulting waveguides. Non-toxic adipic acid was used as a proton source, and the waveguides properties were defined by a mode spectroscopy (waveguides characteristics) and neutron depth profiling (NDP, lithium concentration and distribution), infrared vibration spectra and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA, concentration and depth distribution of hydrogen). It was discovered that the X-cuts structure is more permeable for moving particles (lithium and hydrogen ions), which leads to a higher effectiveness of the PE process within the X-cut. The explanation of this phenomenon is based on the fitting X-cuts orientation towards cleavage planes of lithium niobate crystal. Higher content of interstitial hydrogen in the X-cuts then prevents lithium from free movement during the post-exchange annealing in direction to the surface of samples, and so causes a typical step-like shape of the depth concentration profiles of lithium within the X-cuts. A free transport of lithium within the Z-cuts is being reflected in a gradient shape of the lithium depth concentration profiles and extraordinary refractive index, as well the last but not least, in a trouble-free good reproducibility of the waveguides fabrication within the Z-cuts.

  6. Design of a miniature SWIR hyperspectral snapshot imager utilizing multivariate optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priore, Ryan; Dougherty, John; Cohen, Omer; Bikov, Leonid; Hirsh, Itay

    2016-10-01

    CIRTEMO, SCD and Pixelteq have co-developed a miniature short-wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral snapshot imager utilizing Multivariate Optical Elements (MOEs). The resultant product may address many of the detection challenges facing multiple markets including commercial, medical, security and defense. This paper highlights the design process of developing MOEs for a targeted application, as well as the technological challenges faced and solutions developed for successful integration of a micro-patterned mosaic array to an InGaAs focal plane array.

  7. Waveguide-Based Biosensors for Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mukundan, Harshini; Anderson, Aaron S.; Grace, W. Kevin; Grace, Karen M.; Hartman, Nile; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Swanson, Basil I.

    2009-01-01

    Optical phenomena such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, polarization, interference and non-linearity have been extensively used for biosensing applications. Optical waveguides (both planar and fiber-optic) are comprised of a material with high permittivity/high refractive index surrounded on all sides by materials with lower refractive indices, such as a substrate and the media to be sensed. This arrangement allows coupled light to propagate through the high refractive index waveguide by total internal reflection and generates an electromagnetic wave—the evanescent field—whose amplitude decreases exponentially as the distance from the surface increases. Excitation of fluorophores within the evanescent wave allows for sensitive detection while minimizing background fluorescence from complex, “dirty” biological samples. In this review, we will describe the basic principles, advantages and disadvantages of planar optical waveguide-based biodetection technologies. This discussion will include already commercialized technologies (e.g., Corning’s EPIC® Ô, SRU Biosystems’ BIND™, Zeptosense®, etc.) and new technologies that are under research and development. We will also review differing assay approaches for the detection of various biomolecules, as well as the thin-film coatings that are often required for waveguide functionalization and effective detection. Finally, we will discuss reverse-symmetry waveguides, resonant waveguide grating sensors and metal-clad leaky waveguides as alternative signal transducers in optical biosensing. PMID:22346727

  8. Plasmonic antennas hybridized with dielectric waveguides.

    PubMed

    Bernal Arango, Felipe; Kwadrin, Andrej; Koenderink, A Femius

    2012-11-27

    For the purpose of using plasmonics in an integrated scheme where single emitters can be probed efficiently, we experimentally and theoretically study the scattering properties of single nanorod gold antennas as well as antenna arrays placed on one-dimensional dielectric silicon nitride waveguides. Using real space and Fourier microscopy correlated with waveguide transmission measurements, we quantify the spectral properties, absolute strength, and directivity of scattering. The scattering processes can be well understood in the framework of the physics of dipolar objects placed on a planar layered environment with a waveguiding layer. We use the single plasmonic structures on top of the waveguide as dipolar building blocks for new types of antennas where the waveguide enhances the coupling between antenna elements. We report on waveguide hybridized Yagi-Uda antennas which show directionality in out-coupling of guided modes as well as directionality for in-coupling into the waveguide of localized excitations positioned at the feed element. These measurements together with simulations demonstrate that this system is ideal as a platform for plasmon quantum optics schemes as well as for fluorescence lab-on-chip applications.

  9. Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Holger; Hawkins, Aaron R.

    2011-01-01

    We review recent developments and current status of liquid-core optical waveguides in optofluidics with emphasis on suitability for creating fully planar optofluidic labs-on-a-chip. In this first of two contributions, we give an overview of the different waveguide types that are being considered for effectively combining micro and nanofluidics with integrated optics. The large number of approaches is separated into conventional index-guided waveguides and more recent implementations using wave interference. The underlying principle for waveguiding and the current status are described for each type. We then focus on reviewing recent work on microfabricated liquid-core antiresonant reflecting optical (ARROW) waveguides, including the development of intersecting 2D waveguide networks and optical fluorescence and Raman detection with planar beam geometry. Single molecule detection capability and addition of electrical control for electrokinetic manipulation and analysis of single bioparticles are demonstrated. The demonstrated performance of liquid-core ARROWs is representative of the potential of integrated waveguides for on-chip detection with ultrahigh sensitivity, and points the way towards the next generation of high-performance, low-cost and portable biomedical instruments. PMID:21442048

  10. Flexible waveguide enabled single-channel terahertz endoscopic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world. The current standard of care for colorectal cancer is the conventional colonoscopy, which relies exclusively on the Physician's experience. Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, noninvasive medical imaging modality for detecting cancers. The current study demonstrates the design and development of a prototype terahertz endoscopic system based on flexible metal-coated terahertz waveguides. A CO2 pumped Far-Infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz frequency was used for illuminating the tissue, while the reflected signals were detected using liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer. The continuous-wave terahertz imaging system utilizes a single waveguide channel to transmit the radiation and collect the back reflected intrinsic terahertz signal from the sample and is capable of operation in both transmission and reflection modalities. The two dimensional reflectance images obtained using a prototype terahertz endoscopic system showed intrinsic contrast between cancerous and normal regions of the colorectal tissue, thereby demonstrating the potential impact of terahertz imaging for in vivo cancer detection.

  11. Miniaturized Gas Correlation Radiometer for the Detection of Trace Gases in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melroy, Hilary R.; Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We present a miniaturized and simplified version of a gas correlation radiometer (GCR) capable of simultaneously mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR was achieved by implementing compact, light-weight 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fibers (hollow waveguides) as the gas correlation cells. In a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 GCR instrument, exchanging the 10 m multipass cells with hollow waveguide gas correlation cells of equivalent path length reduces the mass from approximately 150 kg to approximately 0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately 1 meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of greater than 99%). A unique feature of this instrument is its stackable module design, with a single module for each trace gas. Each of the modules is self-contained, and fundamentally identical; differing by the bandpass filter wavelength range and gas mixtures inside the hollow-waveguide absorption cells. The current configuration contains four stacked modules for simultaneous measurements of methane (CH4), formaldehyde (H2CO), water vapor (H2O), and deuterated water vapor (HDO) but could easily be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance. Preliminary results indicate that a 1 ppb detection limit is possible for both formaldehyde and methane with one second of averaging. Using non-optimized components, we have demonstrated an instrument sensitivity equivalent to approximately 30 ppb for formaldehyde, and approximately 500 ppb for methane. We expect custom

  12. Optical waveguide materials, structures, and dispersion modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jiaming; Lin, Jian; Li, Wenxiu; Xue, Xia; Huang, Anping; Xiao, Zhisong

    2016-11-01

    Optical waveguide is used in most integrated optic devices to confine and guide light in higher refractive index channels. The structures and materials of slot waveguides are reviewed in this paper. Coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) can be used for a rotation sensor with compact size, low power consumption and low cost. The loss determines the ultimate sensitivity of CROW gyros. Resonator-based optical gyroscope's sensitivity for measuring rotation is enhanced via using the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation, which can be also generated by using passive optical resonators.

  13. Waveguide optical isolator: a new design.

    PubMed

    Ando, K

    1991-03-20

    A new design of a thin film waveguide optical isolator is described. It is composed of a nonreciprocal mode converter by the Faraday effect, a reciprocal mode converter by the Cotton-Mouton effect, an integrated mirror, and TE-mode selectors. Its mode transfer matrices are derived. Numerical calculations show that wider tolerances of the film parameters and smaller dimensions are obtained compared with the ordinary tandem type waveguide isolators without the integrated mirror. This structure is free of the problem of the localized control of the directions of the magnetization, which has been required for the ordinary tandem type waveguide isolator.

  14. Waveguide grating mirror for laser resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabady, Rabi Ibrahim

    Improved beam quality for semiconductor lasers has been a challenging problem since laser invention. The approach proposed in this thesis for beam improvement is based on zero-order anomalies in the reflectance spectra of periodically corrugated waveguides, which is the waveguide analogy of the well-known Wood anomalies in diffraction spectra of metallic gratings. The proposed investigation include developing a high-quality and reliable technologies for optical waveguides, holographic-grating, and optical resonant filters. Applications of this research include high-power and high-brightness vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), large area lasers, and laser arrays for optical communications, lidars, and industrial material processing.

  15. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Karen M.; Swanson, Basil I.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2007-03-13

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  16. Optical planar waveguide for cell counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, John; Mueller, Andrew J.; Prinz, Adrian; Butte, Manish J.

    2012-01-01

    Low cost counting of cells has medical applications in screening, military medicine, disaster medicine, and rural healthcare. In this report, we present a shallow, buried, planar waveguide fabricated by potassium ion exchange in glass that enables low-cost and rapid counting of metal-tagged objects that lie in the evanescent field of the waveguide. Laser light transmitted through the waveguide was attenuated proportionately to the presence of metal-coated microstructures fabricated from photoresist. This technology enables the low-cost enumeration of cells from blood, urine, or other biofluids.

  17. Guided modes of elliptical metamaterial waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Halterman, Klaus; Feng, Simin; Overfelt, P. L.

    2007-07-15

    The propagation of guided electromagnetic waves in open elliptical metamaterial waveguide structures is investigated. The waveguide contains a negative-index media core, where the permittivity {epsilon} and permeability {mu} are negative over a given bandwidth. The allowed mode spectrum for these structures is numerically calculated by solving a dispersion relation that is expressed in terms of Mathieu functions. By probing certain regions of parameter space, we find the possibility exists to have extremely localized waves that transmit along the surface of the waveguide.

  18. On the development of co-axial miniature pulse tube coolers for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Liang, J. T.; Zhu, W. Q.; Cai, J. H.; Ju, Y. L.

    2002-05-01

    Cryocoolers for cooling infrared sensors in space applications require high reliability, long lifetime, low power and minimum weight. In this paper we report work on a miniature pulse tube cooler specifically designed for such applications. A series of engineering model co-axial miniature pulse tube coolers with a flexure bearing linear compressor of 1 cc swept volume have been designed and fabricated in our laboratory. A theoretical model is established based on the analyses of thermodynamic and hydrodynamic behaviors of oscillatory flows in regenerator, for performance prediction, optimization and as a rough guide in the early stages of system design. An experimental apparatus, including a hot wire anemometer, has been set up to study the flow resistance of regenerators under oscillatory flow conditions. The co-axial, multi-bypass, and symmetric nozzle structure has been used in the coolers. We will present here the performance of two sizes of coolers with 9 mm and 8 mm diameter of cold fingers. The 9 mm cooler currently provides 500 mW net cooling power at 80 K with input power of 47 W, and the 8 mm cooler, provides 450 mW at 80 K with 51 W input power with a 65% efficient compressor. The cold fingers of our co-axial pulse tube coolers have the similar size of miniature Stirling coolers and are the only one that could meet the geometry specifications of the Standard Advance Dewar Assembly (SADA) for thermal imaging systems in most military applications.

  19. A novel 2nd-order bandpass MFSS filter with miniaturized structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, C. Y.; Gao, J. S.; Feng, X. G.

    2015-08-01

    In order to effectively obtain a miniaturized structure and good filtering properties, we propose a novel 2nd-order bandpass metamaterial frequency selective surface (MFSS) filter which contains two capacitive layers and one inductive layer, where there are multi-loop metallic patches as shunt capacitor C and planar wire grids as series inductor L respectively. Unlike the traditional operation way—the tuned elements used in resonant surface approximately equal to one wavelength in circumference and the structure thickness with a spacing of a quarter wavelength apart, by changing the value of L and C and matching multilayer dielectric to adjust the LC coupling resonance and the resonance impedance respectively, the proposed MFSS filter can achieves a miniatured structure with ideal bandpass properties. Measurement results of the fabricated prototype of the bandpass filter (BPF) indicate that the dimension of the tuned element on resonant surface is approximately 0.025 wavelength, i.e., 0.025λ. At the same time, the filter has the stable center frequency of f0 = 1.53GHz and the transmittance of T ⩾ 96.3% and high Q-value for the TE/TM wave polarization at various incidence angles. The novel 2nd-order bandpass MFSS filter with miniaturized structure not only can decrease structure dimension, but also has a wide range of applications to microwave and infrared band.

  20. High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucoli, Giovanni; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2014-02-01

    Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

  1. High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Brucoli, Giovanni; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad

    2014-02-24

    Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

  2. Study on miniature pulse tube cryocooler for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, W.; Sun, W.; Yang, J.; Li, S.

    2000-03-01

    Pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) is a new type of mechanical cryocooler with the potential of long-term operation in space. Theoretical and experimental studies are currently on the way in the Cryogenic Laboratory of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CL/CAS) in order to develop a 85 K/250 mW class pulse tube cryocooler to be used to cool space-borne infrared devices. A theoretical model is established based on the analyses of the thermodynamic behavior of gas parcels in oscillating flow regenerators. It helps us to understand the cooler and can be used to study the influence of DC flow on the refrigeration performance. The flow resistance of the regenerator is an important factor for the cooler performance. A test bench, including a hot-wire anemometer has been set up to investigate the flow resistance characteristics of regenerators with oscillating flow. The results of measurement are correlated and served for practical design. The Oxford type linear pressure wave generator with flexure bearings is also under development in CL/CAS. The prototype miniature pulse tube cryocooler, driven by a linear pressure wave generator of 1.06 cm3 maximum swept volume, provides at present 200 mW net cooling power at 81 K with 28.4 W input power. Improvements are being made to further increase the cooling power and reduce the input power.

  3. Recent results on photonic devices made by laser writing: 3D 3T near IR waveguides, mid-IR spectrometers and electro-optic beam combiners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Vázquez de Aldana, J. R.; Rodenas, A.; d'Amico, C.; Stoian, R.

    2016-07-01

    Direct laser writing is a powerful technique for the development of astrophotonic devices, namely by allowing 3D structuring of waveguides and structures. One of the main interests is the possibility to avoid in-plane crossings of waveguides that can induce losses and crosstalk in future multi-telescope beam combiners. We will present our results in 3D three telescope beam combiners in the near infrared, that allow for phase closure studies. Besides, laser writing can be used to inscribe a grating over long distances along the waveguide direction. This can be used as an on-chip diffraction grating or as a way to sample a stationary wave that can be obtained in the waveguide. Thus, integrated optics spectrometers based on the SWIFTS concept (stationary wave integrated Fourier transform spectrometer) have been realized and characterized in the near and mid infrared using commercial chalcogenide glasses. Finally, we will also present our results on laser writing on electro-optic materials, that allow to obtain waveguides and beam combiners that can be phase-modulated using electrodes. We have focused our work on two well-known materials: Lithium Niobate, that allows for TM waveguides and has a high electro-optical coefficient, and BGO, that has a lower coefficient, but presents the advantage of being isotropic, guiding both TE and TM polarizations identically.

  4. Waveguide silicon nitride grating coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvik, Jan; Dolnak, Ivan; Dado, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Grating couplers are one of the most used elements for coupling of light between optical fibers and photonic integrated components. Silicon-on-insulator platform provides strong confinement of light and allows high integration. In this work, using simulations we have designed a broadband silicon nitride surface grating coupler. The Fourier-eigenmode expansion and finite difference time domain methods are utilized in design optimization of grating coupler structure. The fully, single etch step grating coupler is based on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer with 0.55 μm waveguide Si3N4 layer. The optimized structure at 1550 nm wavelength yields a peak coupling efficiency -2.6635 dB (54.16%) with a 1-dB bandwidth up to 80 nm. It is promising way for low-cost fabrication using complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor fabrication process.

  5. Color sorting by retinal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Labin, Amichai M; Ribak, Erez N

    2014-12-29

    Light is being detected by the two distinct types of photoreceptors in the human retina: cones and rods. Before light arrives at the photoreceptors, it must traverse the whole retina, along its array of higher-index Müller cells serving as natural waveguides. Here we analyze this optical process of light propagation through Müller cells by two independent optical methods: numerical beam propagation and analytical modal analysis. We show that the structure and refractive index profile of the Müller cells create a unique spatio-spectral distribution of light. This distribution corresponds to the positions and spectral sensitivities of both cones and rods to improve their light absorption.

  6. Slotted antenna waveguide plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A high density plasma generated by microwave injection using a windowless electrodeless rectangular slotted antenna waveguide plasma source has been demonstrated. Plasma probe measurements indicate that the source could be applicable for low power ion thruster applications, ion implantation, and related applications. This slotted antenna plasma source invention operates on the principle of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). It employs no window and it is completely electrodeless and therefore its operation lifetime is long, being limited only by either the microwave generator itself or charged particle extraction grids if used. The high density plasma source can also be used to extract an electron beam that can be used as a plasma cathode neutralizer for ion source beam neutralization applications.

  7. Waveguides having patterned, flattened modes

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, Michael J.; Pax, Paul H.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-10-27

    Field-flattening strands may be added to and arbitrarily positioned within a field-flattening shell to create a waveguide that supports a patterned, flattened mode. Patterning does not alter the effective index or flattened nature of the mode, but does alter the characteristics of other modes. Compared to a telecom fiber, a hexagonal pattern of strands allows for a three-fold increase in the flattened mode's area without reducing the separation between its effective index and that of its bend-coupled mode. Hexagonal strand and shell elements prove to be a reasonable approximation, and, thus, to be of practical benefit vis-a-vis fabrication, to those of circular cross section. Patterned flattened modes offer a new and valuable path to power scaling.

  8. Multimode waveguide based directional coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rajib; Rifat, Ahmmed A.; Sabouri, Aydin; Al-Qattan, Bader; Essa, Khamis; Butt, Haider

    2016-07-01

    The Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) based platform overcomes limitations of the previous copper and fiber based technologies. Due to its high index difference, SOI waveguide (WG) and directional couplers (DC) are widely used for high speed optical networks and hybrid Electro-Optical inter-connections; TE00-TE01, TE00-TE00 and TM00-TM00 SOI direction couplers are designed with symmetrical and asymmetrical configurations to couple with TE00, TE01 and TM00 in a multi-mode semi-triangular ring-resonator configuration which will be applicable for multi-analyte sensing. Couplers are designed with effective index method and their structural parameters are optimized with consideration to coupler length, wavelength and polarization dependence. Lastly, performance of the couplers are analyzed in terms of cross-talk, mode overlap factor, coupling length and coupling efficiency.

  9. Analysis of microwave leaky modes propagating through laser plasma filaments column waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2012-12-15

    A plasma column waveguide formed by a bundle of closely spaced plasma filaments induced by the propagation of ultrafast laser pulses in air and revived by a longer infrared laser pulse is shown to support microwave radiation. We consider values of both the plasma electron density and microwave frequency for which the refractive index of plasma is lower than the refractive index of air; therefore, a leaky plasma waveguide can be realized in extremely high frequency band. The guiding mechanism does not require high conductance of the plasma and can be easily excited by using commercial femtosecond laser sources. A theoretical study of leaky mode characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous plasma column waveguides is investigated with several values of plasma and waveguide structure parameters. The microwave transmission loss was found to be mainly caused by the microwave leakage through the air-plasma interface and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In spite of losses of microwaves caused by leakage and plasma absorption, it is shown to be much lower than both that accompanying to surface waves attaching to single conducting plasma wire and the free space propagation over distances in the order of the filament length, which opens exciting perspectives for short distance point to point wireless transmission of pulsed-modulated microwaves.

  10. Narrow-line waveguide terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of aspirin and aspirin precursors.

    PubMed

    Laman, N; Harsha, S Sree; Grischkowsky, D

    2008-03-01

    Low frequency vibrational modes of pharmaceutical molecules are dependent on the molecule as a whole and can be used for identification purposes. However, conventional Fourier transform far-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) often result in broad, overlapping features that are difficult to distinguish. The technique of waveguide THz-TDS has been recently developed, resulting in sharper spectral features. Waveguide THz-TDS consists of forming an ordered polycrystalline film on a metal plate and incorporating that plate in a parallel-plate waveguide, where the film is probed by THz radiation. The planar order of the film on the metal surface strongly reduces the inhomogeneous broadening, while cooling the waveguide to 77 K reduces the homogeneous broadening. This combination results in sharper absorption lines associated with the vibrational modes of the molecule. Here, this technique has been demonstrated with aspirin and its precursors, benzoic acid and salicylic acid, as well as the salicylic acid isomers 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. Linewidths as narrow as 20 GHz have been observed, rivaling single crystal measurements.

  11. Polymer and composite polymer slot waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Marianne; Fegadolli, William S.; Lira, Hugo L. R.; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hiltunen, Jussi; Aikio, Sanna; Almeida, Vilson R.; Karioja, Pentti

    2014-05-01

    A fully polymer slot Young interferometer operating at 633 nm wavelength was fabricated by using nanoimprint molding method. The phase response of the interference pattern was measured with several concentrations of glucose-water solutions, utilizing both TE and TM polarization states. The sensor was experimentally found to detect a bulk refractive index change of 6.4×10-6 RIU. Temperature dependency of silicon slot waveguide has been demonstrated to be reduced with composite slot waveguide structure. The slot filled with thermally stable polymer having negative thermo-optic coefficient showed nearly an athermal operation of silicon slot waveguide. Experimental results show that the slot waveguide geometry covered with Ormocomp has thermo-optical coefficient of 6 pm/K.

  12. Electro-optic Waveguide Beam Deflector.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    beam deflection by variation in the electro - optic effect produced within the waveguide region in response to known or determinable magnitude variations in the electrical potential of an applied signal source.

  13. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  14. Photoreceptor waveguides and effective retinal image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohnsen, Brian

    2007-03-01

    Individual photoreceptor waveguiding suggests that the entire retina can be considered as a composite fiber-optic element relating a retinal image to a corresponding waveguided image. In such a scheme, a visual sensation is produced only when the latter interacts with the pigments of the outer photoreceptor segments. Here the possible consequences of photoreceptor waveguiding on vision are studied with important implications for the pupil-apodization method commonly used to incorporate directional effects of the retina. In the absence of aberrations, it is found that the two approaches give identical predictions for an effective retinal image only when the pupil apodization is chosen twice as narrow as suggested by the traditional Stiles-Crawford effect. In addition, phase variations in the retinal field due to ocular aberrations can delicately alter a waveguided image, and this may provide plausible justification for an improved visual sensation as compared with what should be expected on the grounds of a retinal image only.

  15. Wideband waveguide polarizer development for SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P.; Stanton, P.

    1991-01-01

    A wideband polarizer for the Deep Space Network (DSN) 34 meter beam waveguide antenna is needed for the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project. The results of a computer analysis of a wideband polarizer are presented.

  16. Radiation from Axisymmetric Waveguide Fed Horns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinn, G. C.; Hoppe, D. J.; Epp, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Return losses and radiation patterns for axisymmetric waveguide fed horns are calculated with the finite element method (FEM) in conjunction with the method of moments (MoM) and the mode matching technique (MM).

  17. Flexible parylene-film optical waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagiwa, S.; Ishida, M.; Kawano, T.

    2015-08-01

    Modulation of neuronal activities by light [e.g., laser or light-emitting diode] using optogenetics is a powerful tool for studies on neuronal functions in a brain. Herein, flexible thin-film optical waveguide arrays based on a highly biocompatible material of parylene are reported. Parylene-C and -N thin layers with the different refractive indices form the clad and the core of the waveguide, respectively, and neural recording microelectrodes are integrated to record optical stimuli and electrical recordings simultaneously using the same alignment. Both theoretical and experimental investigations confirm that light intensities of more than 90% can propagate in a bent waveguide with a curvature radius of >5 mm. The proposed flexible thin-film waveguide arrays with microelectrodes can be used for numerous spherical bio-tissues, including brain and spinal cord samples.

  18. Low-index discontinuity terahertz waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Michael; Marchewka, Astrid; Kurz, Heinrich

    2006-10-01

    A new type of dielectric THz waveguide based on recent approaches in the field of integrated optics is presented with theoretical and experimental results. Although the guiding mechanism of the low-index discontinuity (LID) THz waveguide is total internal reflection, the THz wave is predominantly confined in the virtually lossless low-index air gap within a high-index dielectric waveguide due to the continuity of electric flux density at the dielectric interface. Attenuation, dispersion and single-mode confinement properties of two LID structures are discussed and compared with other THz waveguide solutions. The new approach provides an outstanding combination of high mode confinement and low transmission losses currently not realizable with any other metal-based or photonic crystal approach. These exceptional properties might enable the breakthrough of novel integrated THz systems or endoscopy applications with sub-wavelength resolution.

  19. Optical Waveguide Output Couplers Fabricated in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Abushagur, Mustafa A. G.; Ashley, Paul R.; Johnson-Cole, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Waveguide output couplers fabricated in Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA) #81 and AMOCO Ultradel 9020D polyimide are investigated. The output couplers are implemented using periodic relief gratings on a planar waveguide. Design theory of the couplers is based on the perturbation approach. Coupling of light from waveguide propagation modes to output radiation modes is described by coupled mode theory and the transmission line approximation of the perturbed area (grating structure). Using these concepts, gratings can be accurately designed to output a minimum number of modes at desired output angles. Waveguide couplers were designed using these concepts. These couplers were fabricated and analyzed for structural accuracy, output beam accuracy, and output efficiency. The results for the two different materials are compared.

  20. Miniature loops in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barczynski, K.; Peter, H.; Savage, S. L.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Magnetic loops filled with hot plasma are the main building blocks of the solar corona. Usually they have lengths of the order of the barometric scale height in the corona that is 50 Mm. Aims: Previously it has been suggested that miniature versions of hot loops exist. These would have lengths of only 1 Mm barely protruding from the chromosphere and spanning across just one granule in the photosphere. Such short loops are well established at transition region temperatures (0.1 MK), and we investigate if such miniature loops also exist at coronal temperatures (>1 MK). Methods: We used extreme UV (EUV) imaging observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) at an unprecedented spatial resolution of 0.3'' to 0.4''. Together with EUV imaging and magnetogram data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) data from Hinode we investigated the spatial, temporal and thermal evolution of small loop-like structures in the solar corona above a plage region close to an active region and compared this to a moss area within the active region. Results: We find that the size, motion and temporal evolution of the loop-like features are consistent with photospheric motions, suggesting a close connection to the photospheric magnetic field. Aligned magnetograms show that one of their endpoints is rooted at a magnetic concentration. Their thermal structure, as revealed together with the X-ray observations, shows significant differences to moss-like features. Conclusions: Considering different scenarios, these features are most probably miniature versions of hot loops rooted at magnetic concentrations at opposite sides of a granule in small emerging magnetic loops (or flux tubes).