Science.gov

Sample records for minimal non-extendably collapsible

  1. Experimental motivation and empirical consistency in minimal no-collapse quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosshauer, Maximilian . E-mail: MAXL@u.washington.edu

    2006-01-15

    We analyze three important experimental domains (SQUIDs, molecular interferometry, and Bose-Einstein condensation) as well as quantum-biophysical studies of the neuronal apparatus to argue that (i) the universal validity of unitary dynamics and the superposition principle has been confirmed far into the mesoscopic and macroscopic realm in all experiments conducted thus far; (ii) all observed 'restrictions' can be correctly and completely accounted for by taking into account environmental decoherence effects; (iii) no positive experimental evidence exists for physical state-vector collapse; (iv) the perception of single 'outcomes' is likely to be explainable through decoherence effects in the neuronal apparatus. We also discuss recent progress in the understanding of the emergence of quantum probabilities and the objectification of observables. We conclude that it is not only viable, but moreover compelling to regard a minimal no-collapse quantum theory as a leading candidate for a physically motivated and empirically consistent interpretation of quantum mechanics.

  2. Metal-air cells comprising collapsible foam members and means for minimizing internal pressure buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Glenn (Inventor); Putt, Ronald A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention provides a prismatic zinc-air cell including, in general, a prismatic container having therein an air cathode, a separator and a zinc anode. The container has one or more oxygen access openings, and the air cathode is disposed in the container in gaseous communication with the oxygen access openings so as to allow access of oxygen to the cathode. The separator has a first side in electrolytic communication with the air cathode and a second side in electrolytic communication with the zinc anode. The separator isolates the cathode and the zinc anode from direct electrical contact and allows passage of electrolyte therebetween. An expansion chamber adjacent to the zinc anode is provided which accommodates expansion of the zinc anode during discharge of the cell. A suitable collapsible foam member generally occupies the expansion space, providing sufficient resistance tending to oppose movement of the zinc anode away from the separator while collapsing upon expansion of the zinc anode during discharge of the cell. One or more vent openings disposed in the container are in gaseous communication with the expansion space, functioning to satisfactorily minimize the pressure buildup within the container by venting gasses expelled as the foam collapses during cell discharge.

  3. Collapse calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Marti, J.

    2007-05-01

    A collapse caldera is a volcanic explosive structure that forms during the collapse of crustal blocks on top of a shallow magma chamber. During this collapse, a large volume of magma is evacuated, first explosively, in the form of pyroclastic fallouts and pyroclastic flows, and then effusively, as lava domes or flows after collapse. The result is a catastrophic explosive volcanic collapse that forms a depression that could end with different shapes, circular, oval, rectangular, or irregular. Three main types of collapse calderas can be defined, 1) summit caldera, 2) classic caldera, and 3) graben caldera. Summit calderas are those formed at the top of large volcanoes and are related to relatively small-volume pyroclastic products that include plinian fallouts and ignimbrites, such as Crater Lake, Las Cañadas, and Somma-Vesuvio. Classic calderas are semi-circular to irregular-shaped large structures, several km in diameter that are related to relatively large-volume pyroclastic products including pumice fallouts and widespread ignimbrites, such as Long-Valley, Campi Flegrei, and Los Humeros. Graben calderas are explosive volcano-tectonic collapse structures from which large-volume, ignimbrite-forming eruptions occurred through several vents along the graben walls and the intra-graben block faults causing the collapse of the graben or of a sector of the graben. The main products of graben calderas are surge-deposits and large-volume widespread ignimbrite sheets. Pumice fallouts are practically absent. Examples include the Sierra Madre Occidental in Mexico, La Pacana (Andes), Catalan Pyrenees, and perhaps Scafell (United Kingdom). Any of the three caldera types mentioned above could have collapsed in three different ways, 1) piston, when the collapse occurs as a single crustal block; 2) trap-door, when collapse occurs unevenly along one side while the opposite side remains with no collapse; 3) piece-meal, when collapse occurs as broken pieces of the crust on top of

  4. Collapse Features

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-15

    The depressions in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey likely formed due to both volcanic and tectonic forces. Tectonic forces likely account for some of the depressions, while collapse into lava tubes and lava flow erosion account for the remainder.

  5. Tectonic Collapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-16

    The collapse valleys in this portion of the floor of Bernard Crater were likely caused by the formation of Memnonia Fossae, a system of tectonic graben, that passes through the region. This image was captured by NASA Mars Odyssey.

  6. Collapsed Lung

    MedlinePlus

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a ... is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, it is called atelectasis. Causes of ...

  7. Collapsing animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse van Rensburg, E. J.; Orlandini, E.; Tesi, M. C.

    1999-03-01

    Lattice animals with fugacities conjugate to the number of indepedent cycles, or to the number of nearest neighbour contacts, go through a collapse transition at a 0305-4470/32/9/007/img5-point at a critical value of the fugacity. We examine the phase diagram of a model which includes both a cycle and a contact fugacity with Monte Carlo methods. Using an underlying cut-and-paste Metropolis algorithm for lattice animals, we implement in the first instance a multiple Markov chain simulation of collapsing animals to estimate the location of the collapse transitions and the values of the crossover exponents associated with these. Secondly, we use umbrella sampling to sample animals over a rectangle in the phase diagram to examine the structure of the phase diagram of these animals.

  8. Collapsing Containers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Justina L.; Battino, Rubin

    1994-01-01

    Describes variations on atmospheric pressure demonstrations and some systematic studies. Demonstrations use steam, generated either externally or internally to the container, to sweep out residual air. Preferred vessels collapsed slowly. Demonstrations use plastic milk jugs set in layers of aluminum foil, pop bottles immersed in 4-L beakers…

  9. Collapsing Containers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Justina L.; Battino, Rubin

    1994-01-01

    Describes variations on atmospheric pressure demonstrations and some systematic studies. Demonstrations use steam, generated either externally or internally to the container, to sweep out residual air. Preferred vessels collapsed slowly. Demonstrations use plastic milk jugs set in layers of aluminum foil, pop bottles immersed in 4-L beakers…

  10. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  11. Collapsing granular suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kadau, D; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2009-11-01

    A 2D contact dynamics model is proposed as a microscopic description of a collapsing suspension/soil to capture the essential physical processes underlying the dynamics of generation and collapse of the system. Our physical model is compared with real data obtained from in situ measurements performed with a natural collapsing/suspension soil. We show that the shear strength behavior of our collapsing suspension/soil model is very similar to the behavior of this collapsing suspension soil, for both the unperturbed and the perturbed phases of the material.

  12. Collapsing bacterial cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, M. D.; Brenner, Michael P.

    2001-12-01

    Under special conditions bacteria excrete an attractant and aggregate. The high density regions initially collapse into cylindrical structures, which subsequently destabilize and break up into spherical aggregates. This paper presents a theoretical description of the process, from the structure of the collapsing cylinder to the spacing of the final aggregates. We show that cylindrical collapse involves a delicate balance in which bacterial attraction and diffusion nearly cancel, leading to corrections to the collapse laws expected from dimensional analysis. The instability of a collapsing cylinder is composed of two distinct stages: Initially, slow modulations to the cylinder develop, which correspond to a variation of the collapse time along the cylinder axis. Ultimately, one point on the cylinder pinches off. At this final stage of the instability, a front propagates from the pinch into the remainder of the cylinder. The spacing of the resulting spherical aggregates is determined by the front propagation.

  13. Collapsable seal member

    DOEpatents

    Sherrell, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  14. Critical chemotactic collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.

    2010-04-01

    A Keller-Segel model describes macroscopic dynamics of bacterial colonies and biological cells as well as dynamics of a gas of self-gravitating Brownian particles. Bacteria secret chemical which attracts other bacteria so that they move towards chemical gradient creating nonlocal attraction between bacteria. If bacterial (or Brownian particle) density exceeds a critical value then the density collapses (blows up) in a finite time which corresponds to bacterial aggregation or gravitational collapse. Collapse in the Keller-Segel model has striking qualitative similarities with a nonlinear Schrödinger equation including critical collapse in two dimensions and supercritical collapse in three dimensions. A self-similar solution near blow up point is studied in the critical two-dimensional case and it has a form of a rescaled steady state solution which contains a critical number of bacteria. Time dependence of scaling of that solution has square root scaling law with logarithmic modification.

  15. Minimal Pairs: Minimal Importance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Adam

    1995-01-01

    This article argues that minimal pairs do not merit as much attention as they receive in pronunciation instruction. There are other aspects of pronunciation that are of greater importance, and there are other ways of teaching vowel and consonant pronunciation. (13 references) (VWL)

  16. Sulci Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in serveral ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire ediface to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in an area of 'sulci' ridges east of Olympus Mons. Graben cut the ridges, and one graben hosts the collapse pits. It is likely that these collapse pits are related to volatile release from material that filled the lows at some point after graben formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 18.6, Longitude 234.6 East (125.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in

  17. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  18. Collapse of axion stars

    SciTech Connect

    Eby, Joshua; Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-12-15

    Axion stars, gravitationally bound states of low-energy axion particles, have a maximum mass allowed by gravitational stability. Weakly bound states obtaining this maximum mass have sufficiently large radii such that they are dilute, and as a result, they are well described by a leading-order expansion of the axion potential. Here, heavier states are susceptible to gravitational collapse. Inclusion of higher-order interactions, present in the full potential, can give qualitatively different results in the analysis of collapsing heavy states, as compared to the leading-order expansion. In this work, we find that collapsing axion stars are stabilized by repulsive interactions present in the full potential, providing evidence that such objects do not form black holes. In the last moments of collapse, the binding energy of the axion star grows rapidly, and we provide evidence that a large amount of its energy is lost through rapid emission of relativistic axions.

  19. Countdown to Systems Collapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tysseling, John C.; Easton, Jeff; Weaks, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the University of New Mexico Albuquerque developed a strategic business plan for renewing its utility systems when faced with the imminent collapse of its entire energy infrastructure and a $75-100 million price tag for upgrades. (EV)

  20. Countdown to Systems Collapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tysseling, John C.; Easton, Jeff; Weaks, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the University of New Mexico Albuquerque developed a strategic business plan for renewing its utility systems when faced with the imminent collapse of its entire energy infrastructure and a $75-100 million price tag for upgrades. (EV)

  1. Collapse of axion stars

    DOE PAGES

    Eby, Joshua; Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; ...

    2016-12-15

    Axion stars, gravitationally bound states of low-energy axion particles, have a maximum mass allowed by gravitational stability. Weakly bound states obtaining this maximum mass have sufficiently large radii such that they are dilute, and as a result, they are well described by a leading-order expansion of the axion potential. Here, heavier states are susceptible to gravitational collapse. Inclusion of higher-order interactions, present in the full potential, can give qualitatively different results in the analysis of collapsing heavy states, as compared to the leading-order expansion. In this work, we find that collapsing axion stars are stabilized by repulsive interactions present inmore » the full potential, providing evidence that such objects do not form black holes. In the last moments of collapse, the binding energy of the axion star grows rapidly, and we provide evidence that a large amount of its energy is lost through rapid emission of relativistic axions.« less

  2. Lava Tube Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in the southern hemisphere of Mars. They are likely lava tube collapse pits related to flows from Hadriaca Patera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -36.8, Longitude 89.6 East (270.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space

  3. Alba Patera Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    This image of the Alba Patera region has both lava tube collapse pits (running generally east/west) and subsidence related collapse within structural grabens.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 26.9, Longitude 256.5 East (103.5 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  4. Lava Tube Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in the southern hemisphere of Mars. They are likely lava tube collapse pits related to flows from Hadriaca Patera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -36.8, Longitude 89.6 East (270.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space

  5. Alba Patera Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    This image of the Alba Patera region has both lava tube collapse pits (running generally east/west) and subsidence related collapse within structural grabens.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 26.9, Longitude 256.5 East (103.5 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  6. Relativistic dynamical collapse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearle, Philip

    2015-05-01

    A model is discussed where all operators are constructed from a quantum scalar field whose energy spectrum takes on all real values. The Schrödinger picture wave function depends upon space and time coordinates for each particle, as well as an inexorably increasing evolution parameter s which labels a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces. The model is constructed to be manifestly Lorentz invariant in the interaction picture. Free particle states and interactions are discussed in this framework. Then, the formalism of the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) theory of dynamical collapse is applied. The collapse-generating operator is chosen to be the particle number space-time density. Unlike previous relativistically invariant models, the vacuum state is not excited. The collapse dynamics depends upon two parameters, a parameter Λ which represents the collapse rate/volume and a scale factor ℓ. A common example of collapse dynamics, involving a clump of matter in a superposition of two locations, is analyzed. The collapse rate is shown to be identical to that of nonrelativistic CSL when the GRW-CSL choice of ℓ=a =1 0-5 cm , is made, along with Λ =λ /a3 (GRW-CSL choice λ =1 0-16s-1). The collapse rate is also satisfactory with the choice ℓ as the size of the Universe, with Λ =λ /ℓa2. Because the collapse narrows wave functions in space and time, it increases a particle's momentum and energy, altering its mass. It is shown that, with ℓ=a , the change of mass of a nucleon is unacceptably large but, when ℓ is the size of the Universe, the change of mass over the age of the Universe is acceptably small.

  7. Collapsing white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, E.; Cooperstein, J.; Kahana, S.; Nomoto, K.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the hydrodynamic collapse of an accreting C + O white dwarf are presented. Collapse is induced by electron captures in the iron core behind a conductive deflagration front. The shock wave produced by the hydrodynamic bounce of the iron core stalls at about 115 km, and thus a neutron star formed in such a model would be formed as an optically quiet event.

  8. Explosions from stellar collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.

    The collapse of a massive star releases a considerable amount of gravitational potential energy. This energy is believed to be the power source of some of the largest explosions in the universe: supernovae, hypernovae, gamma-ray bursts. In this proceedings, we review the mechanisms by which the potential energy from stellar collapse can be tapped to produce these strong explosions, emphasizing how our understanding of massive stars can help constrain these mechanisms.

  9. Ascraeus Mons Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found on the flank of Ascraeus Mons. The pits and channels are all related to lava tube formation and emptying.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 8, Longitude 253.9 East (106.1 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  10. Tharsis Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found within the extensive lava flows of the Tharsis region. They are related to lava tubes, likely coming from Ascraeus Mons.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 22.8, Longitude 266.8 East (93.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office

  11. Sulci Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    This is the Noctis Labyrinthus region of Mars. These collapse pits are forming along structural fractures that are allowing the release of volatiles from the subsurface. This is believed to be the way that chaos terrain forms on Mars. This area represents the early stage of chaos formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -12.6, Longitude 264 East (96 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in

  12. Tractus Catena Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in graben located in Tractus Catena. These features are related to subsidence after magma chamber evacuation of Alba Patera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 35.8, Longitude 241.7 East (118.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  13. Alba Patera Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found within graben surrounding Alba Patera. Alba Patera is an old volcano that has subsided after it's magma chamber was evacuated.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 43.1, Longitude 259.4 East (100.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  14. Alba Patera Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found within graben surrounding Alba Patera. Alba Patera is an old volcano that has subsided after it's magma chamber was evacuated.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 43.1, Longitude 259.4 East (100.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  15. Tractus Catena Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in graben located in Tractus Catena. These features are related to subsidence after magma chamber evacuation of Alba Patera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 35.8, Longitude 241.7 East (118.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  16. Tharsis Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found within the extensive lava flows of the Tharsis region. They are related to lava tubes, likely coming from Ascraeus Mons.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 22.8, Longitude 266.8 East (93.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office

  17. Ascraeus Mons Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found on the flank of Ascraeus Mons. The pits and channels are all related to lava tube formation and emptying.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 8, Longitude 253.9 East (106.1 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  18. Sulci Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    This is the Noctis Labyrinthus region of Mars. These collapse pits are forming along structural fractures that are allowing the release of volatiles from the subsurface. This is believed to be the way that chaos terrain forms on Mars. This area represents the early stage of chaos formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -12.6, Longitude 264 East (96 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in

  19. Damage tolerant design using collapse techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new approach to the design of structures for improved global damage tolerance is presented. In its undamaged condition the structure is designed subject to strength, displacement and buckling constraints. In the damaged condition the only constraint is that the structure will not collapse. The collapse load calculation is formulated as a maximization problem and solved by an interior extended penalty function. The design for minimum weight subject to constraints on the undamaged structure and a specified level of the collapse load is a minimization problem which is also solved by a penalty function formulation. Thus the overall problem is of a nested or multilevel optimization. Examples are presented to demonstrate the difference between the present and more traditional approaches.

  20. Anterior chamber collapse syndrome in a koala.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Vl; Naranjo, C; Bernays, Me

    2014-05-01

    Anterior chamber collapse syndrome has been recognised in various species and is associated with early-life ocular disease or trauma. It is important to differentiate this acquired condition from a congenital malformation. An adult female koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) was referred for assessment of buphthalmos and severe keratitis of the right eye. The degree of keratitis obstructed examination of intraocular structures. Enucleation of the affected eye was performed and the histopathological diagnosis was anterior chamber collapse syndrome and secondary glaucoma. This case contributes to the limited information available in the literature on anterior chamber collapse syndrome, a disease unique in having secondary glaucoma with minimal or no inflammation. The case also expands the literature available on ocular disease in koalas. More specifically, this is the only reported case of glaucoma, of any aetiology, in the koala. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  1. On bore collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Harry H.; Ghazali, A.

    1988-06-01

    Using the laser-induced fluorescent method, the transition process from bore to runup mode, i.e., "bore collapse," is investigated experimentally. The observed process appears to be different from both previous analytical and numerical predictions. The results indicate that momentum exchange takes place between the incident bore and the quiescent water body along the shoreline. Turbulence generated in a bore nearshore is highly three-dimensional and sporadic. Very close to the shore, turbulence is advected with the bore front, and consequently, the bore collapse process involves strong turbulent action onto the dry beach bed.

  2. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  3. Impact Crater Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, H. J.; Ivanov, B. A.

    The detailed morphology of impact craters is now believed to be mainly caused by the collapse of a geometrically simple, bowl-shaped "transient crater." The transient crater forms immediately after the impact. In small craters, those less than approximately 15 km diameter on the Moon, the steepest part of the rim collapses into the crater bowl to produce a lens of broken rock in an otherwise unmodified transient crater. Such craters are called "simple" and have a depth-to-diameter ratio near 1:5. Large craters collapse more spectacularly, giving rise to central peaks, wall terraces, and internal rings in still larger craters. These are called "complex" craters. The transition between simple and complex craters depends on 1/g, suggesting that the collapse occurs when a strength threshold is exceeded. The apparent strength, however, is very low: only a few bars, and with little or no internal friction. This behavior requires a mechanism for temporary strength degradation in the rocks surrounding the impact site. Several models for this process, including acoustic fluidization and shock weakening, have been considered by recent investigations. Acoustic fluidization, in particular, appears to produce results in good agreement with observations, although better understanding is still needed.

  4. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to

  5. 1. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE. COLLAPSED ADIT AND COLLAPSED WOODEN STRUCTURE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE. COLLAPSED ADIT AND COLLAPSED WOODEN STRUCTURE. CAMERA IS POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Upper Nottingham Mine, West face of Florida Mountain, head of Jacobs Gulch, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  6. Small, Lightweight, Collapsible Glove Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    A small, lightweight, collapsible glove box enables its user to perform small experiments and other tasks. Originally intended for use aboard a space shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS), this glove box could also be attractive for use on Earth in settings in which work space or storage space is severely limited and, possibly, in which it is desirable to minimize weight. The development of this glove box was prompted by the findings that in the original space-shuttle or ISS setting, (1) it was necessary to perform small experiments in a large general-purpose work station, so that, in effect, they occupied excessive space; and it took excessive amounts of time to set up small experiments. The design of the glove box reflects the need to minimize the space occupied by experiments and the time needed to set up experiments, plus the requirement to limit the launch weight of the box and the space needed to store the box during transport into orbit. To prepare the glove box for use, the astronaut or other user has merely to insert hands through the two fabric glove ports in the side walls of the box and move two hinges to a locking vertical position (see figure). The user could do this while seated with the glove box on the user fs lap. When stowed, the glove box is flat and has approximately the thickness of two pieces of 8-in. (.20 cm) polycarbonate.

  7. Shock induced cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  8. Collapse of an antibubble.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen; Yuan, BaoGang; Ruan, XiaoDong; Fu, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to a soap bubble, an antibubble is a liquid globule surrounded by a thin film of air. The collapse behavior of an antibubble is studied using a high-speed video camera. It is found that the retraction velocity of the thin air film of antibubbles depends on the thickness of the air film, e, the surface tension coefficient σ, etc., and varies linearly with (σ/ρe)(1/2), according to theoretical analysis and experimental observations. During the collapse of the antibubble, many tiny bubbles can be formed at the rim of the air film due to the Rayleigh instability. In most cases, a larger bubble will emerge finally, which holds most of the volume of the air film.

  9. Self-Collapse Lithography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuanzhen; Xu, Xiaobin; Yang, Qing; Man, Tianxing; Jonas, Steven J; Schwartz, Jeffrey J; Andrews, Anne M; Weiss, Paul S

    2017-08-09

    We report a facile, high-throughput soft lithography process that utilizes nanoscale channels formed naturally at the edges of microscale relief features on soft, elastomeric stamps. Upon contact with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) functionalized substrates, the roof of the stamp collapses, resulting in the selective removal of SAM molecules via a chemical lift-off process. With this technique, which we call self-collapse lithography (SCL), sub-30 nm patterns were achieved readily using masters with microscale features prepared by conventional photolithography. The feature sizes of the chemical patterns can be varied continuously from ∼2 μm to below 30 nm by decreasing stamp relief heights from 1 μm to 50 nm. Likewise, for fixed relief heights, reducing the stamp Young's modulus from ∼2.0 to ∼0.8 MPa resulted in shrinking the features of resulting patterns from ∼400 to ∼100 nm. The self-collapse mechanism was studied using finite element simulation methods to model the competition between adhesion and restoring stresses during patterning. These results correlate well with the experimental data and reveal the relationship between the line widths, channel heights, and Young's moduli of the stamps. In addition, SCL was applied to pattern two-dimensional arrays of circles and squares. These chemical patterns served as resists during etching processes to transfer patterns to the underlying materials (e.g., gold nanostructures). This work provides new insights into the natural propensity of elastomeric stamps to self-collapse and demonstrates a means of exploiting this behavior to achieve patterning via nanoscale chemical lift-off lithography.

  10. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  11. Collapse, environment, and society

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Historical collapse of ancient states poses intriguing social-ecological questions, as well as potential applications to global change and contemporary strategies for sustainability. Five Old World case studies are developed to identify interactive inputs, triggers, and feedbacks in devolution. Collapse is multicausal and rarely abrupt. Political simplification undermines traditional structures of authority to favor militarization, whereas disintegration is preconditioned or triggered by acute stress (insecurity, environmental or economic crises, famine), with breakdown accompanied or followed by demographic decline. Undue attention to stressors risks underestimating the intricate interplay of environmental, political, and sociocultural resilience in limiting the damages of collapse or in facilitating reconstruction. The conceptual model emphasizes resilience, as well as the historical roles of leaders, elites, and ideology. However, a historical model cannot simply be applied to contemporary problems of sustainability without adjustment for cumulative information and increasing possibilities for popular participation. Between the 14th and 18th centuries, Western Europe responded to environmental crises by innovation and intensification; such modernization was decentralized, protracted, flexible, and broadly based. Much of the current alarmist literature that claims to draw from historical experience is poorly focused, simplistic, and unhelpful. It fails to appreciate that resilience and readaptation depend on identified options, improved understanding, cultural solidarity, enlightened leadership, and opportunities for participation and fresh ideas. PMID:22371579

  12. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for more than three decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2003-2.

  13. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2011-1.

  14. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  15. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-01

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke’s discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  16. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  17. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  18. Collapse of large vapor bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J.; Dominick, S.

    1982-01-01

    The refilling of propellant tanks while in a low-gravity environment requires that entrapped vapor bubbles be collapsed by increasing the system pressure. Tests were performed to verify the mechanism of collapse for these large vapor bubbles with the thermodynamic conditions, geometry, and boundary conditions being those applicable to propellant storage systems. For these conditions it was found that conduction heat transfer determined the collapse rate, with the specific bubble geometry having a significant influence.

  19. Collapse of Surface Nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chon U.; Chen, Longquan; Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-03-01

    Surface attached nanobubbles populate surfaces submerged in water. These nanobubbles have a much larger contact angle and longer lifetime than predicted by classical theory. Moreover, it is difficult to distinguish them from hydrophobic droplets, e.g., polymeric contamination, using standard atomic force microscopy. Here, we report fast dynamics of a three phase contact line moving over surface nanobubbles, polymeric droplets, and hydrophobic particles. The dynamics is distinct: across polymeric droplets the contact line quickly jumps and hydrophobic particles pin the contact line, while surface nanobubbles rapidly shrink once merging with the contact line, suggesting a method to differentiate nanoscopic gaseous, liquid, and solid structures. Although the collapse process of surface nanobubbles occurs within a few milliseconds, we show that it is dominated by microscopic dynamics rather than bulk hydrodynamics.

  20. The Nimitz Freeway Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2004-10-01

    One of the most tragic sights created by the Loma Prieta earthquake of Oct. 17, 1989, was the collapse of the double-deck Nimitz Freeway (the Cypress Street Viaduct on Interstate 880) just south and east of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in Oakland. Along a 1.4-km north-south stretch, the upper deck of the freeway fell on top of the lower deck of the freeway, killing 42 motorists (see Fig. 1). Even though the earthquake occurred during rush hour (5:04 p.m.), traffic was extremely light that day because the third game of the World Series between the Oakland Athletics and the San Francisco Giants was about to begin and many commuters were already at home in front of their television sets.

  1. Collapse and Relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Tumulka, Roderich

    2006-06-27

    Ever since we have been in the possession of quantum theories without observers, such as Bohmian mechanics or the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) theory of spontaneous wave function collapse, a major challenge in the foundations of quantum mechanics is to devise a relativistic quantum theory without observers. One of the difficulties is to reconcile nonlocality with relativity. I report about recent progress in this direction based on the GRW model: A relativistic version of the model has been devised for the case of N noninteracting (but entangled) particles. A key ingredient was to focus not on the evolution of the wave function but rather on the evolution of the matter in space-time as determined by the wave function.

  2. Non-extended phase space thermodynamics of Lovelock AdS black holes in the grand canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jie-Xiong; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2015-05-01

    Recently, extended phase space thermodynamics of Lovelock AdS black holes has been of great interest. To provide insight from a different perspective and gain a unified phase transition picture, the non-extended phase space thermodynamics of -dimensional charged topological Lovelock AdS black holes is investigated in detail in the grand canonical ensemble. Specifically, the specific heat at constant electric potential is calculated and the phase transition in the grand canonical ensemble is discussed. To probe the impact of the various parameters, we utilize the control variate method and solve the phase transition condition equation numerically for the cases . There are two critical points for the case , while there is only one for the other cases. For , there exists no phase transition point. To figure out the nature of the phase transition in the grand canonical ensemble, we carry out an analytic check of the analog form of the Ehrenfest equations proposed by Banerjee et al. It is shown that Lovelock AdS black holes in the grand canonical ensemble undergo a second-order phase transition. To examine the phase structure in the grand canonical ensemble, we utilize the thermodynamic geometry method and calculate both the Weinhold metric and the Ruppeiner metric. It is shown that for both analytic and graphical results that the divergence structure of the Ruppeiner scalar curvature coincides with that of the specific heat. Our research provides one more example that Ruppeiner metric serves as a wonderful tool to probe the phase structures of black holes.

  3. Caldera types and collapse styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.

    2008-12-01

    Three main types of collapse calderas can be defined, 1) summit caldera, 2) classic caldera, and 3) graben caldera. Summit calderas are those formed at the top of large volcanoes and are related to relatively small- volume pyroclastic products that include plinian fallouts and ignimbrites, such as Crater Lake, Las Cañadas, and Somma-Vesuvio. Classic calderas are semi-circular to irregular-shaped large structures, several km in diameter that are related to relatively large-volume pyroclastic products including pumice fallouts and widespread ignimbrites, such as Long-Valley, Campi Flegrei, and Los Humeros. Graben calderas are explosive volcano-tectonic collapse structures from which large-volume, ignimbrite-forming eruptions occurred through several vents along the graben walls and the intra-graben block faults causing the collapse of the graben or of a sector of the graben. The main products of graben calderas are surge-deposits and large-volume widespread ignimbrite sheets. Pumice fallouts are practically absent. Examples include the Sierra Madre Occidental in Mexico, La Pacana (Andes), Catalan Pyrenees, and perhaps Scafell (United Kingdom). Any of the three caldera types mentioned above could have collapsed at least in three different ways, 1) piston, when the collapse occurs as a single crustal block; 2) trap-door, when collapse occurs unevenly along one side while the opposite side remains with no collapse; 3) piece-meal, when collapse occurs as broken pieces of the crust on top of the magma chamber.

  4. Spherical collapse in chameleon models

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Ph.; Steer, D.A. E-mail: rosenfel@ift.unesp.br

    2010-08-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of an overdensity of nonrelativistic matter under the action of gravity and a chameleon scalar field. We show that the spherical collapse model is modified by the presence of a chameleon field. In particular, we find that even though the chameleon effects can be potentially large at small scales, for a large enough initial size of the inhomogeneity the collapsing region possesses a thin shell that shields the modification of gravity induced by the chameleon field, recovering the standard gravity results. We analyse the behaviour of a collapsing shell in a cosmological setting in the presence of a thin shell and find that, in contrast to the usual case, the critical density for collapse in principle depends on the initial comoving size of the inhomogeneity.

  5. Astrophysics of Collapsing Axion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eby, Joshua; Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Axion stars are condensed states of large numbers of axion particles, bound by self-gravitation and quantum self-interactions. The mass of weakly bound axion stars is limited by gravitational stability, with condensates exceeding the maximum mass subject to collapse. During the collapse process, the axion density increases and higher-order self-interactions become increasingly relevant. By taking these terms into account, we provide evidence that in spite of a leading attractive interaction, collapsing axion stars stabilize in a dense state which is larger than its Schwarzschild radius, and so do not form black holes. During the last moments of collapse, number changing processes take place in the axion star with a very large rate, leading to emission of many highly energetic axions which escape from galaxies and galaxy clusters. Finally, if axion stars are a significant fraction of cold dark matter, then frequent collisions with each other or with ordinary stars could catalyze this collapse process as well.

  6. Perturbing turbulence beyond collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Scarselli, Davide; Hof, Björn; Nonlinear Dynamics; Turbulence Group Team

    2016-11-01

    Wall-bounded turbulent flows are considered to be in principle stable against perturbations and persist as long as the Reynolds number is sufficiently high. We show for the example of pipe flow that a specific perturbation of the turbulent flow field disrupts the genesis of new turbulence at the wall. This leads to an immediate collapse of the turbulent flow and causes complete relaminarisation further downstream. The annihilation of turbulence is effected by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component only, greatly simplifying control efforts which usually require knowledge of the highly complex three dimensional and time dependent velocity fields. We present several different control schemes from laboratory experiments which achieve the required perturbation of the flow for total relaminarisation. Transient growth, a linear amplification mechanism measuring the efficiency of eddies in redistributing shear that quantifies the maximum perturbation energy amplification achievable over a finite time in a linearized framework, is shown to set a clear-cut threshold below which turbulence is impeded in its formation and thus permanently annihilated.

  7. Collapse pressure of coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-09-01

    The collapse pressure is a measure of an external force required to collapse a tube in the absence of internal pressure. It is defined as the minimum pressure required to yield the tube in the absence of internal pressure. Coiled tubing is sometimes used in high-pressure wells. If the external pressure becomes too high, the coiled tubing will collapse. This could not only lead to serious well-control problems, but may result in extensive fishing operations. A reliable safety criterion of collapse pressure for the coiled tubing is needed by the coiled tubing operators. Theoretical models of collapse pressure are well developed for perfectly round coiled tubing but not for oval coiled tubing. Coiled tubing is initially manufactured with nearly perfect roundness, sometimes having a small ovality (typically {le} 0.5%). Perfectly round CT becomes oval owing to the plastic mechanical deformation of the coiled tubing as it spooled on and off the reel and over the gooseneck. As the cycling continues, the ovality usually increases. This ovality significantly decreases the collapse failure pressure as compared to perfectly round tubing. In this paper, an analytical model of collapse pressure for oval tubing under axial tension or compression is developed based on elastic instability theory and the von Mises criterion. The theoretical model shows satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  8. Vibrational Collapse of Hexapod Packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Ding, Jingqiu; Barés, Jonathan; Zheng, Hu; Dierichs, Karola; Menges, Achim; Behringer, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Columns made of convex noncohesive grains like sand collapse after being released from a confining container. However, structures built from non-convex grains can be stable without external support. In the current experiments, we investigate the effect of vibration on destroying such columns. The change of column height during vertical vibration, can be well characterized by stretched exponential relaxation when the column is short, which is in agreement with previous work, while a faster collapse happens when the column is tall. We investigate the collapse after the fast process including its dependence on column geometry, and on interparticle and basal friction.

  9. Minimal Reduplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchner, Jesse Saba

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation introduces Minimal Reduplication, a new theory and framework within generative grammar for analyzing reduplication in human language. I argue that reduplication is an emergent property in multiple components of the grammar. In particular, reduplication occurs independently in the phonology and syntax components, and in both cases…

  10. Minimal Reduplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchner, Jesse Saba

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation introduces Minimal Reduplication, a new theory and framework within generative grammar for analyzing reduplication in human language. I argue that reduplication is an emergent property in multiple components of the grammar. In particular, reduplication occurs independently in the phonology and syntax components, and in both cases…

  11. Identification of a Collapsing Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Neal J., II; Zhou, Shudong; Kompe, Carsten; Walmsley, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    The globular molecular cloud B335 contains a single, deeply embedded far-infrared source. Our recent observations of H2CO and CS lines toward this source provide direct kinematic evidence for collapse. Both the intensity and detailed shape of the line profiles match those expected from inside-out collapse inside a radius of 0.036 pc. The collapse began about 1.5 x 10(exp 5) years ago, similar to the onset of the outflow. The mass accretion rate is about 10 times the outflow rate, and about 0.4 solar mass should have now accumulated in the star and disk. Because B335 rotates only, any disk would still be small (about 3 AU). The accretion luminosity should be adequate to power the observed luminosity. Consequently, we believe that B335 is indeed a collapsing protostar.

  12. Vibrational Collapse of Hexapod Packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Ding, Jingqiu; Barés, Jonathan; Dierichs, Karola; Behringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Columns made of convex noncohesive grains like sand collapse after being released from a confining container. However, structures built from concave grains can be stable without external support. Previous research show that the stability of the columns depends on column diameter and height, by observing column stability after carefully lifting their confinement tubes. Thinner and taller columns collapse with higher probability. While the column stability weakly depends on packing density, it strongly depends on inter-particle friction. Experiments that cause the column to collapse also reveal similar trends, as more effort (such as heavier loading or shearing) is required to destabilize columns that are intrinsically more stable. In the current experiments, we invesitage the effect of vibration on destructing a column. Short columns collapse following the relaxation dynamics of disorder systems, which coincides with similar experiments on staple packings. However, tall columns collapse faster at the beginning, in addition to the relaxation process coming after. Using high-speed imaging, we analyze column collapse data from different column geometries. Ongoing work is focusing on characterizing the stability of hexapod packings to vibration. We thanks NSF-DMR-1206351 and the William M. Keck Foundation.

  13. Collapse Pits in Bernard Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in serveral ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire ediface to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These pits occur in the floor of Bernard Crater. These collapse pits were likely formed by the release of volatiles from the materials deposited in the crater floor.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -24, Longitude 205.5 East (154.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission

  14. Constraining quantum collapse inflationary models with CMB data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Micol; Landau, Susana J.; Alcaniz, Jailson S.

    2016-12-01

    The hypothesis of the self-induced collapse of the inflaton wave function was proposed as responsible for the emergence of inhomogeneity and anisotropy at all scales. This proposal was studied within an almost de Sitter space-time approximation for the background, which led to a perfect scale-invariant power spectrum, and also for a quasi-de Sitter background, which allows to distinguish departures from the standard approach due to the inclusion of the collapse hypothesis. In this work we perform a Bayesian model comparison for two different choices of the self-induced collapse in a full quasi-de Sitter expansion scenario. In particular, we analyze the possibility of detecting the imprint of these collapse schemes at low multipoles of the anisotropy temperature power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) using the most recent data provided by the Planck Collaboration. Our results show that one of the two collapse schemes analyzed provides the same Bayesian evidence of the minimal standard cosmological model ΛCDM, while the other scenario is weakly disfavoured with respect to the standard cosmology.

  15. Cliff Collapses on Rosetta Comet

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-21

    Several sites of cliff collapse on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko were identified during Rosetta's mission. The yellow arrows mark the fractures where the detachment occurred. The collapsed sections are about 50 feet (15 meters) long for the left-hand section, and 30 feet (9 meters) for the right-hand section. Additional images taken from greater distances suggest the collapse occurred between May and December 2015. The images were taken by Rosetta's OSIRIS camera on Dec. 2, 2014 (left), and March 12, 2016 (right), with resolutions of 1.6 feet (0.5 meters) per pixel and 1 foot (0.3 meters) per pixel, respectively. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21564

  16. Convection, nucleosynthesis, and core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazan, Grant; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    We use a piecewise parabolic method hydrodynamics code (PROMETHEUS) to study convective burning in two dimensions in an oxygen shell prior to core collapse. Significant mixing beyond convective boundaries determined by mixing-length theory brings fuel (C-12) into the convective regon, causing hot spots of nuclear burning. Plumes dominate the velocity structure. Finite perturbations arise in a region in which O-16 will be explosively burned to Ni-56 when the star explodes; the resulting instabilities and mixing are likely to distribute Ni-56 throughout the supernova envelope. Inhomogeneities in Y(sub e) may be large enough to affect core collapse and will affect explosive nucleosynthesis. The nature of convective burning is dramatically different from that assumed in one-dimensional simulations; quantitative estimates of nucleosynthetic yields, core masses, and the approach to core collapse will be affected.

  17. Simulations of granular gravitational collapse.

    PubMed

    Kachuck, Samuel B; Voth, Greg A

    2013-12-01

    A freely cooling granular gas in a gravitational field undergoes a collapse to a multicontact state in a finite time. Previous theoretical [D. Volfson et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 061305 (2006)] and experimental work [R. Son et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 041302 (2008)] have obtained contradictory results about the rate of energy loss before the gravitational collapse. Here we use a molecular dynamics simulation in an attempt to recreate the experimental and theoretical results to resolve the discrepancy. We are able to nearly match the experimental results, and find that to reproduce the power law predicted in the theory we need a nearly elastic system with a constant coefficient of restitution greater than 0.993. For the more realistic velocity-dependent coefficient of restitution, there does not appear to be a power-law decay and the transition from granular gas to granular solid is smooth, making it difficult to define a time of collapse.

  18. Protostellar Collapse with a Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, John C.; Hsu, Juliana J.

    1995-01-01

    We reexamine both numerically and analytically the collapse of the singular isothermal sphere in the context of low-mass star formation. We consider the case where the onset of collapse is initiated by some arbitrary process which is accompanied by a central output of either heat or kinetic energy. We find two classes of numerical solutions describing this manner of collapse. The first approaches in time the expansion wave solution of Shu, while the second class is characterized by an ever-decreasing central accretion rate and the presence of an outwardly propagating weak shock. The collapse solution which represents the dividing case between these two classes is determined analytically by a similarity analysis. This solution shares with the expansion wave solution the properties that the gas remains stationary with an r(exp -2) density profile at large radius and that, at small radius, the gas free-falls onto a nascent core at a constant rate which depends only on the isothermal sound speed. This accretion rate is a factor of approx. 0.1 that predicted by the expansion wave solution. This reduction is due in part to the presence of a weak shock which propagates outward at 1.26 times the sound speed. Gas in the postshock region first moves out subsonically but is then decelerated and begins to collapse. The existence of two classes of numerical collapse solutions is explained in terms of the instability to radial perturbations of the analytic solution. Collapse occurring in the manner described by some of our solutions would eventually unbind a finite-sized core. However, this does not constitute a violation of the instability properties of the singular isothermal sphere which is unstable both to collapse and to expansion. To emphasize this, we consider a purely expanding solution for isothermal spheres. This solution is found to be self-similar and results in a uniform density core in the central regions of the gas. Our solutions may be relevant to the 'luminosity

  19. Protostellar Collapse with a Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, John C.; Hsu, Juliana J. L.

    1995-01-01

    We reexamine both numerically and analytically the collapse of the singular isothermal sphere in the context of low-mass star formation. We consider the case where the onset of collapse is initiated by some arbitrary process which is accompanied by a central output of either heat or kinetic energy. We find two classes of numerical solutions describing this manner of collapse. The first approaches in time the expansion wave solution of Shu, while the second class is characterized by an ever-decreasing central accretion rate and the presence of an outwardly propagating weak shock. The collapse solution which represents the dividing case between these two classes is determined analytically by a similarity analysis. This solution shares with the expansion wave solution the properties that the gas remains stationary with an r(sup -2) density profile at large radius and that, at small radius, the gas free-falls onto a nascent core at a constant rate which depends only on the isothermal sound speed. This accretion rate is a factor of approx. 0.1 that predicted by the expansion wave solution. This reduction is due in part to the presence of a weak shock which propagates outward at 1.26 times the sound speed. Gas in the postshock region first moves out subsonically but is then decelerated and begins to collapse. The existence of two classes of numerical collapse solutions is explained in terms of the instability to radial perturbations of the analytic solution. Collapse occurring in the manner described by some of our solutions would eventually unbind a finite-sized core. However, this does not constitute a violation of the instability properties of the singular isothermal sphere which is unstable both to collapse and to expansion. To emphasize this, we consider a purely expanding solution for isothermal spheres. This solution is found to be self-similar and results in a uniform density core in the central regions of the gas. Our solutions may be relevant to the 'luminosity

  20. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM STELLAR COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FRYER

    2001-01-01

    Stellar core-collapse plays an important role in nearly all facets of astronomy: cosmology (as standard candles), formation of compact objects, nucleosynthesis and energy deposition in galaxies. In addition, they release energy in powerful explosions of light over a range of energies, neutrinos, and the subject of this meeting, gravitational waves. Because of this broad range of importance, astronomers have discovered a number of constraints which can be used to help them understand the importance of stellar core-collapse as gravitational wave sources.

  1. Minimal cosmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Federico; Schücker, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The minimal requirement for cosmography—a non-dynamical description of the universe—is a prescription for calculating null geodesics, and time-like geodesics as a function of their proper time. In this paper, we consider the most general linear connection compatible with homogeneity and isotropy, but not necessarily with a metric. A light-cone structure is assigned by choosing a set of geodesics representing light rays. This defines a "scale factor" and a local notion of distance, as that travelled by light in a given proper time interval. We find that the velocities and relativistic energies of free-falling bodies decrease in time as a consequence of cosmic expansion, but at a rate that can be different than that dictated by the usual metric framework. By extrapolating this behavior to photons' redshift, we find that the latter is in principle independent of the "scale factor". Interestingly, redshift-distance relations and other standard geometric observables are modified in this extended framework, in a way that could be experimentally tested. An extremely tight constraint on the model, however, is represented by the blackbody-ness of the cosmic microwave background. Finally, as a check, we also consider the effects of a non-metric connection in a different set-up, namely, that of a static, spherically symmetric spacetime.

  2. Colony collapse disorder in Europe.

    PubMed

    Dainat, Benjamin; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Neumann, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is a condition of honey bees, which has contributed in part to the recent major losses of honey bee colonies in the USA. Here we report the first CCD case from outside of the USA. We suggest that more standardization is needed for the case definition to diagnose CCD and to compare data on a global scale.

  3. Chemotactic collapse and mesenchymal morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We study the effect of chemotactic signaling among mesenchymal cells. We show that the particular physiology of the mesenchymal cells allows one-dimensional collapse in contrast to the case of bacteria, and that the mesenchymal morphogenesis represents thus a more complex type of pattern formation than those found in bacterial colonies. We compare our theoretical predictions with recent in vitro experiments.

  4. Semiclassical environment of collapsing shells

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Kinjal; Paranjape, Aseem

    2009-12-15

    We explore in detail the semiclassical environment of collapsing shells of matter, and determine the semiclassical flux measured by a variety of observers. This study is a preliminary step in a broader investigation of thermodynamic properties of the geometry of collapsing objects. Specifically, in this paper we consider spherically symmetric null and timelike collapsing shells which form an event horizon, and calculate the flux measured by observers both inside and outside the shell, and both inside and outside the event horizon, and find nontrivial results in most of the cases. Additionally, we also investigate the environment of a shell which collapses but does not form a horizon, halting at some radius larger than the Schwarzschild radius, and find that such an object generically gives rise to a pulse of radiation which is sharply peaked as it travels inwards and is reflected at the origin, and eventually emerges from the shell in a thermalized form. Our results have potential consequences in addressing questions pertaining, e.g. to black hole entropy and backreaction.

  5. Thermal duality and gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Thermal duality is a relationship between the behaviour of heterotic string models of the E(8)×E(8) or SO(32) types at inversely related temperatures, a variant of T duality in the Euclidean regime. This duality would have consequences for the nature of the Hagedorn transition in these string models. We propose that the vacuum admits a family of deformations in situations where there are closed surfaces of constant area but high radial acceleration (a string regularized version of a Penrose trapped surface), such as would be formed in situations of extreme gravitational collapse. This would allow a radical resolution of the firewall paradox by allowing quantum effects to significantly modify the spacetime geometry around a collapsed object. A string bremsstrahlung process would convert the kinetic energy of infalling matter in extreme gravitational collapse to form a region of the deformed vacuum, which would be equivalent to forming a high temperature string phase. A heuristic criterion for the conversion process is presented, relating Newtonian gravity to the string tension, suggesting an upper limit to the strength of the gravitational interaction. This conversion process might have observable consequences for charged particles falling into a rotating collapsed object by producing high energy particles via a variant of the Penrose process.

  6. Line width roughness control and pattern collapse solutions for EUV patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Karen; Huang, George; Ashworth, Dominic; Georger, Jacque; Ren, Liping; Cho, K. Y.; Montgomery, Warren; Wurm, Stefan; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Dunn, Shannon; Ko, Akiteryu

    2011-04-01

    Line width roughness (LWR) control is a critical issue in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). The difficulty of controlling LWR and the need to minimize it have grown as the sensitivity of materials and resolution in the resist patterning process has improved. Another critical feature that has become difficult to control in EUVL and 22nm half-pitch systems is pattern collapse. The increase of aspect ratio that comes from further scaling promotes the onset of pattern collapse. Both pattern collapse and LWR are easily observed in EUVL and leading-edge ArF immersion lithography. This paper will demonstrate recent gains in LWR control in leading EUV films using track-based processes, etch-based improvements, and the results of combined techniques. Also the use of a newly developed EUV-specific FIRM™ rinse chemistry to reduce pattern collapse will be discussed along with future development activities and industry requirements for both LWR and pattern collapse.

  7. Non-extended cryoablation could be a new strategy in lung cancer management: An experiment on green fluorescent protein-labeled Lewis lung cancer-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Chen, Yujia; Li, Linyi; Qi, Hui; Shi, Jinping; Lu, Chongyi; Jiang, Sida; Geng, Tan; Yang, Meng; Li, Quanwang; Hu, Kaiwen

    2015-08-01

    Modern cryoablation has been performed in solid tumor management for more than two decades. Following the surgical spirits, it seems natural to pursue radical procedures in clinical practice, which results in unnecessary adverse effects. The attempt to use non-extended procedure made some marked achievements in practice but was criticized severely, because it was supposed to induce residual tumors, which would trigger the rapid development of cancer. Oncologists favored this procedure, however, claiming that non-extended cryoablation let lung cancer patients have higher quality of lives and longer survivals, in light of clinical observations. Therefore, this study was conducted trying to solve this controversy. In this study, fifty female C57BL/6J mice were grafted green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled Lewis lung cancer and randomized into two groups. The bidirectional diameters and fluorescence intensity of tumors, and the body weight of mice were recorded. Two weeks after the intervention, tumor volumes increased 20.95% in the cryoablation group, significantly different from that in the control group; the fluorescence intensity decreased 49.85% in the cryoablation group but increased 125.07% in the control group. Lung metastases could be observed in only 20% of mice in the cryosurgery group, contrasted to 64% in the control group. The non-extended lung cancer cryoablation does induce marginal tumor residuals, but will not trigger rapid tumor development. Inversely, the residual tumor cells are severely struck and the metastases are suppressed after the intervention. It could be a new strategy in lung cancer management, even for patients not in early stage.

  8. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    PubMed

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor.

  9. Collapsed Thunderstorm, Southwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This collapsed thunderstorm was observed over the open ocean (9.0N, 120.0E) between the Philippine island of Mindoro and Borneo, Malaysia. The cleared area in the center is the result of the clouds being driven from there by the sudden rush of katabatic air spreading downward and outward from the dying thunderstorm. Around the edges of the downdrafted air, new though smaller storms are developing. The two small coral atolls are the Tubbataha Reefs.

  10. Unilateral pulmonary collapse in asthmatics.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkirk, J A; Stark, J E

    1978-01-01

    Five asthmatic patients developed collapse of one lung. Three of the patients were children and three of the five had repeated episodes of atelectasis. Episodes of atelectasis were usually associated with localised chest pain, which was not pleuritic in character, and with breathlessness, but without wheezing. The were not related to clinically apparent respiratory infections or to deterioration of the underlying asthma. The cause is obscure, but re-expansion seems to be hastened by oral corticosteroid therapy. PMID:663880

  11. Collapse models and perceptual processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo Ghirardi, Gian; Romano, Raffaele

    2014-04-01

    Theories including a collapse mechanism have been presented various years ago. They are based on a modification of standard quantum mechanics in which nonlinear and stochastic terms are added to the evolution equation. Their principal merits derive from the fact that they are mathematically precise schemes accounting, on the basis of a unique universal dynamical principle, both for the quantum behavior of microscopic systems as well as for the reduction associated to measurement processes and for the classical behavior of macroscopic objects. Since such theories qualify themselves not as new interpretations but as modifications of the standard theory they can be, in principle, tested against quantum mechanics. Recently, various investigations identifying possible crucial test have been discussed. In spite of the extreme difficulty to perform such tests it seems that recent technological developments allow at least to put precise limits on the parameters characterizing the modifications of the evolution equation. Here we will simply mention some of the recent investigations in this direction, while we will mainly concentrate our attention to the way in which collapse theories account for definite perceptual process. The differences between the case of reductions induced by perceptions and those related to measurement procedures by means of standard macroscopic devices will be discussed. On this basis, we suggest a precise experimental test of collapse theories involving conscious observers. We make plausible, by discussing in detail a toy model, that the modified dynamics can give rise to quite small but systematic errors in the visual perceptual process.

  12. Collapse Mechanisms Of Masonry Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zuccaro, G.; Rauci, M.

    2008-07-08

    The paper outlines a possible approach to typology recognition, safety check analyses and/or damage measuring taking advantage by a multimedia tool (MEDEA), tracing a guided procedure useful for seismic safety check evaluation and post event macroseismic assessment. A list of the possible collapse mechanisms observed in the post event surveys on masonry structures and a complete abacus of the damages are provided in MEDEA. In this tool a possible combination between a set of damage typologies and each collapse mechanism is supplied in order to improve the homogeneity of the damages interpretation. On the other hand recent researches of one of the author have selected a number of possible typological vulnerability factors of masonry buildings, these are listed in the paper and combined with potential collapse mechanisms to be activated under seismic excitation. The procedure takes place from simple structural behavior models, derived from the Umbria-Marche earthquake observations, and tested after the San Giuliano di Puglia event; it provides the basis either for safety check analyses of the existing buildings or for post-event structural safety assessment and economic damage evaluation. In the paper taking advantage of MEDEA mechanisms analysis, mainly developed for the post event safety check surveyors training, a simple logic path is traced in order to approach the evaluation of the masonry building safety check. The procedure starts from the identification of the typological vulnerability factors to derive the potential collapse mechanisms and their collapse multipliers and finally addresses the simplest and cheapest strengthening techniques to reduce the original vulnerability. The procedure has been introduced in the Guide Lines of the Regione Campania for the professionals in charge of the safety check analyses and the buildings strengthening in application of the national mitigation campaign introduced by the Ordinance of the Central Government n. 3362

  13. Collapse Mechanisms Of Masonry Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccaro, G.; Rauci, M.

    2008-07-01

    The paper outlines a possible approach to typology recognition, safety check analyses and/or damage measuring taking advantage by a multimedia tool (MEDEA), tracing a guided procedure useful for seismic safety check evaluation and post event macroseismic assessment. A list of the possible collapse mechanisms observed in the post event surveys on masonry structures and a complete abacus of the damages are provided in MEDEA. In this tool a possible combination between a set of damage typologies and each collapse mechanism is supplied in order to improve the homogeneity of the damages interpretation. On the other hand recent researches of one of the author have selected a number of possible typological vulnerability factors of masonry buildings, these are listed in the paper and combined with potential collapse mechanisms to be activated under seismic excitation. The procedure takes place from simple structural behavior models, derived from the Umbria-Marche earthquake observations, and tested after the San Giuliano di Puglia event; it provides the basis either for safety check analyses of the existing buildings or for post-event structural safety assessment and economic damage evaluation. In the paper taking advantage of MEDEA mechanisms analysis, mainly developed for the post event safety check surveyors training, a simple logic path is traced in order to approach the evaluation of the masonry building safety check. The procedure starts from the identification of the typological vulnerability factors to derive the potential collapse mechanisms and their collapse multipliers and finally addresses the simplest and cheapest strengthening techniques to reduce the original vulnerability. The procedure has been introduced in the Guide Lines of the Regione Campania for the professionals in charge of the safety check analyses and the buildings strengthening in application of the national mitigation campaign introduced by the Ordinance of the Central Government n. 3362

  14. HIERARCHICAL GRAVITATIONAL FRAGMENTATION. I. COLLAPSING CORES WITHIN COLLAPSING CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Naranjo-Romero, Raúl; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Loughnane, Robert M.

    2015-11-20

    We investigate the Hierarchical Gravitational Fragmentation scenario through numerical simulations of the prestellar stages of the collapse of a marginally gravitationally unstable isothermal sphere immersed in a strongly gravitationally unstable, uniform background medium. The core developes a Bonnor–Ebert (BE)-like density profile, while at the time of singularity (the protostar) formation the envelope approaches a singular-isothermal-sphere (SIS)-like r{sup −2} density profile. However, these structures are never hydrostatic. In this case, the central flat region is characterized by an infall speed, while the envelope is characterized by a uniform speed. This implies that the hydrostatic SIS initial condition leading to Shu's classical inside-out solution is not expected to occur, and therefore neither should the inside-out solution. Instead, the solution collapses from the outside-in, naturally explaining the observation of extended infall velocities. The core, defined by the radius at which it merges with the background, has a time-variable mass, and evolves along the locus of the ensemble of observed prestellar cores in a plot of M/M{sub BE} versus M, where M is the core's mass and M{sub BE} is the critical BE mass, spanning the range from the “stable” to the “unstable” regimes, even though it is collapsing at all times. We conclude that the presence of an unstable background allows a core to evolve dynamically from the time when it first appears, even when it resembles a pressure-confined, stable BE-sphere. The core can be thought of as a ram-pressure confined BE-sphere, with an increasing mass due to the accretion from the unstable background.

  15. Universal Scaling Law for the Collapse of Viscous Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiakai; Yu, Jiayun; Corvalan, Carlos M

    2015-08-11

    Below a threshold size, a small pore nucleated in a fluid sheet will contract to minimize the surface energy. Such behavior plays a key role in nature and technology, from nanopores in biological membranes to nanopores in sensors for rapid DNA and RNA sequencing. Here we show that nanopores nucleated in viscous fluid sheets collapse following a universal scaling law for the pore radius. High-fidelity numerical simulations reveal that the scaling is largely independent of the initial conditions, including the size, shape, and thickness of the original nanopore. Results further show that the scaling law yields a constant speed of collapse as observed in recent experiments. Nanopores in fluid sheets of moderate viscosity also attain this constant terminal speed provided that they are sufficiently close to the singularity.

  16. Bubble-Induced Cave Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned “natural” instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a “collapse”. We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  17. Dynamics of dissipative gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O.

    2004-10-15

    The Misner and Sharp approach to the study of gravitational collapse is extended to the dissipative case in, both, the streaming out and the diffusion approximations. The role of different terms in the dynamical equation are analyzed in detail. The dynamical equation is then coupled to a causal transport equation in the context of Israel-Stewart theory. The decreasing of the inertial mass density of the fluid, by a factor which depends on its internal thermodynamics state, is reobtained, at any time scale. In accordance with the equivalence principle, the same decreasing factor is obtained for the gravitational force term. Prospective applications of this result to some astrophysical scenarios are discussed.

  18. Collapsed Thunderstorm, Southwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-05-16

    STS049-71-042 (8 May 1992) --- This photograph, taken from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour, shows a collapsed thunderstorm in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The clouds were pushed from this circular area of the ocean's surface by relatively cool air that spread downward and outward from a dying thunderstorm. Around the edges of the downdrafted air, new, though smaller, storms are developing. The photo was taken on May 8, 1992, between Borneo and the Philippine island of Mindoro. Two coral atolls can be seen near the center of the photograph. The crew members used a handheld Hasselblad camera, 250-mm lens, color film to expose the image.

  19. Stellar core collapse and supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Mayle, R.; Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.

    1985-04-01

    Massive stars that end their stable evolution as their iron cores collapse to a neutron star or black hole long been considered good candidates for producing Type II supernovae. For many years the outward propagation of the shock wave produced by the bounce of these iron cores has been studied as a possible mechanism for the explosion. For the most part, the results of these studies have not been particularly encouraging, except, perhaps, in the case of very low mass iron cores or very soft nuclear equations of state. The shock stalls, overwhelmed by photodisintegration and neutrino losses, and the star does not explode. More recently, slow late time heating of the envelope of the incipient neutron star has been found to be capable of rejuvenating the stalled shock and producing an explosion after all. The present paper discusses this late time heating and presents results from numerical calculations of the evolution, core collapse, and subsequent explosion of a number of recent stellar models. For the first time they all, except perhaps the most massive, explode with reasonable choices of input physics. 39 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Collapsible Cryogenic Storage Vessel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Collapsible cryogenic storage vessels may be useful for future space exploration missions by providing long-term storage capability using a lightweight system that can be compactly packaged for launch. Previous development efforts have identified an 'inflatable' concept as most promising. In the inflatable tank concept, the cryogen is contained within a flexible pressure wall comprised of a flexible bladder to contain the cryogen and a fabric reinforcement layer for structural strength. A flexible, high-performance insulation jacket surrounds the vessel. The weight of the tank and the cryogen is supported by rigid support structures. This design concept is developed through physical testing of a scaled pressure wall, and through development of tests for a flexible Layered Composite Insulation (LCI) insulation jacket. A demonstration pressure wall is fabricated using Spectra fabric for reinforcement, and burst tested under noncryogenic conditions. An insulation test specimens is prepared to demonstrate the effectiveness of the insulation when subject to folding effects, and to examine the effect of compression of the insulation under compressive loading to simulate the pressure effect in a nonrigid insulation blanket under the action atmospheric pressure, such as would be seen in application on the surface of Mars. Although pressure testing did not meet the design goals, the concept shows promise for the design. The testing program provides direction for future development of the collapsible cryogenic vessel concept.

  1. Grain Growth in Collapsing Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, S. C. F.; Benevides-Soares, P.; Barbuy, B.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se ha considerado un proceso de coagulaci6n de granos en nubes colapsantes de diferentes metalicidades. Se aplicaron los calculos al intervalo de densidades n = lO to , forrespondiendo a la fase isotermica de contracci6n de nubes. A lo largo de esta fase en el colap- so, la temperatura es por lo tanto constante, en donde se alcanza T Q lOKpara nubes de metalicidad solar y T 100 K para nubes de baja metalicidad. El tamano final del grano es mayor para las mayores metali- cidades. ABSTRACT. A process of grain coagulation in collapsing clouds of different metallicities is considered. The calculations are applied to the density range n = 1O to , corresponding to the isothermal phase of cloud contraction. Along this phase in the collapse, the temperature is thus a constant, where T % 10 K for solar-metallicity clouds, and T % 100 K for low metallicity clouds is reached. The final grain size is larger for the higher metallicities. Keq : INTERSTELLAR-CLOUDS - INTERSTELLAR-CRAINS

  2. Dyadosphere formed in gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, Remo; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-10-01

    We first recall the concept of Dyadosphere (electron-positron-photon plasma around a formed black holes) and its motivation, and recall on (i) the Dirac process: annihilation of electron-positron pairs to photons; (ii) the Breit-Wheeler process: production of electron-positron pairs by photons with the energy larger than electron-positron mass threshold; the Sauter-Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian and rate for the process of electron-positron production in a constant electric field. We present a general formula for the pair-production rate in the semi-classical treatment of quantum mechanical tunneling. We also present in the Quantum Electro-Dynamics framework, the calculations of the Schwinger rate and effective Lagrangian for constant electromagnetic fields. We give a review on the electron-positron plasma oscillation in constant electric fields, and its interaction with photons leading to energy and number equipartition of photons, electrons and positrons. The possibility of creating an overcritical field in astrophysical condition is pointed out. We present the discussions and calculations on (i) energy extraction from gravitational collapse; (ii) the formation of Dyadosphere in gravitational collapsing process, and (iii) its hydrodynamical expansion in Reissner Nordström geometry. We calculate the spectrum and flux of photon radiation at the point of transparency, and make predictions for short Gamma-Ray Bursts.

  3. Dyadosphere formed in gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffini, Remo; Xue Shesheng

    2008-10-10

    We first recall the concept of Dyadosphere (electron-positron-photon plasma around a formed black holes) and its motivation, and recall on (i) the Dirac process: annihilation of electron-positron pairs to photons; (ii) the Breit-Wheeler process: production of electron-positron pairs by photons with the energy larger than electron-positron mass threshold; the Sauter-Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian and rate for the process of electron-positron production in a constant electric field. We present a general formula for the pair-production rate in the semi-classical treatment of quantum mechanical tunneling. We also present in the Quantum Electro-Dynamics framework, the calculations of the Schwinger rate and effective Lagrangian for constant electromagnetic fields. We give a review on the electron-positron plasma oscillation in constant electric fields, and its interaction with photons leading to energy and number equipartition of photons, electrons and positrons. The possibility of creating an overcritical field in astrophysical condition is pointed out. We present the discussions and calculations on (i) energy extraction from gravitational collapse; (ii) the formation of Dyadosphere in gravitational collapsing process, and (iii) its hydrodynamical expansion in Reissner Nordstroem geometry. We calculate the spectrum and flux of photon radiation at the point of transparency, and make predictions for short Gamma-Ray Bursts.

  4. Silo Collapse under Granular Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, G.; Colonnello, C.; Boltenhagen, P.; Darias, J. R.; Peralta-Fabi, R.; Brau, F.; Clément, E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, at a laboratory scale, the collapse of cylindrical shells of radius R and thickness t induced by a granular discharge. We measure the critical filling height for which the structure fails upon discharge. We observe that the silos sustain filling heights significantly above an estimation obtained by coupling standard shell-buckling and granular stress distribution theories. Two effects contribute to stabilize the structure: (i) below the critical filling height, a dynamical stabilization due to granular wall friction prevents the localized shell-buckling modes to grow irreversibly; (ii) above the critical filling height, collapse occurs before the downward sliding motion of the whole granular column sets in, such that only a partial friction mobilization is at play. However, we notice also that the critical filling height is reduced as the grain size d increases. The importance of grain size contribution is controlled by the ratio d /√{R t }. We rationalize these antagonist effects with a novel fluid-structure theory both accounting for the actual status of granular friction at the wall and the inherent shell imperfections mediated by the grains. This theory yields new scaling predictions which are compared with the experimental results.

  5. Partially saturated granular column collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Barbara; Johnson, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Debris flows are gravity-driven sub-aerial mass movements containing water, sediments, soil and rocks. These elements lead to characteristics common to dry granular media (e.g. levee formation) and viscous gravity currents (viscous fingering and surge instabilities). The importance of pore fluid in these flows is widely recognised, but there is significant debate over the mechanisms of build up and dissipation of pore fluid pressure within debris flows, and the resultant effect this has on dilation and mobility of the grains. Here we specifically consider the effects of the liquid surface in the flow. We start with a simple experiment constituting a classical axisymmetric granular column collapse, but with fluid filling the column up to a depth comparable to the depth of grains. Thus, as the column collapses, capillary forces may be generated between the grains that prevent dilation. We explore a parameter space to uncover the effects of fluid viscosity, particle size, column size, aspect ratio, grain shape, saturation level, initial packing fraction and significantly, the effects of fine sediments in suspension which can alter the capillary interaction between wetted macroscopic grains. This work presents an initial scaling analysis and attempts to relate the findings to current debris flow modelling approaches.

  6. Pattern collapse solution for asymmetric pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, C. J.; Huang, C. H.; Yang, Elvis; Yang, T. H.; Chen, K. C.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most critical issues associate with decreasing photo-resist feature size is pattern collapse, and more serious pattern collapse can be easily observed especially in asymmetric pitch environment due to unbalanced capillary stress acting on photo-resist pattern during development rinse step. The pattern collapse would kill product yield in the worse condition. This work investigates the approaches of mitigating the asymmetric pattern collapse behavior, such as adjusting photoresist pattern aspect ratio, applying surfactant during development rinse to reduce the solution surface tension, and altering underlying anti-reflection coating and hard-mask combinations to tailor the photo-resist bottom profile as well as decreasing developer permeation into photo-resist interface. Pattern sizing to resist unbalanced capillary force is also explored in the asymmetric pattern region. Two novel layout methods to mitigate asymmetric dummy pattern collapse were demonstrated and both methods were confirmed to have higher immunity against pattern collapse in asymmetric pitch environment.

  7. Time symmetry in wave-function collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedingham, D. J.; Maroney, O. J. E.

    2017-04-01

    The notion of a physical collapse of the wave function is embodied in dynamical collapse models. These involve a modification of the unitary evolution of the wave function so as to give a dynamical account of collapse. The resulting dynamics is at first sight time asymmetric for the simple reason that the wave function depends on those collapse events in the past but not those in the future. Here we show that dynamical wave-function collapse models admit a general description that has no built-in direction of time. Given some simple constraints, we show that there exist empirically equivalent pictures of collapsing wave functions in both time directions, each satisfying the same dynamical rules. A preferred direction is singled out only by the asymmetric initial and final time constraints on the state of the universe.

  8. Core-collapse supernova explosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y

    2011-01-01

    Neutrinos play important roles in the pre-collapse evolution, explosion, and aftermath of core-collapse supernovae. Detected neutrino signals from core-collapse supernovae would provide insight into the explosion mechanism and unknown neutrino mixing parameters. Achieving these goals requires large-scale, multiphysics simulations. For many years, several groups have performed such simulations with increasing realism. Current simulations and plans for future work of the Oak Ridge group are described.

  9. Self-similar scalar field collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Narayan; Chakrabarti, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    A spherically symmetric collapsing scalar field model is discussed with a dissipative fluid which includes a heat flux. This vastly general matter distribution is analyzed at the expense of a high degree of symmetry in the space-time, that of conformal flatness and self-similarity. Indeed collapsing models terminating into a curvature singularity can be obtained. The formation of black holes or the occurrence of naked singularities depends on the initial collapsing profiles.

  10. Gravitational radiation from collapsing magnetized dust

    SciTech Connect

    Sotani, Hajime; Yoshida, Shijun; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2007-04-15

    In this article we study the influence of magnetic fields on the axial gravitational waves emitted during the collapse of a homogeneous dust sphere. We found that while the energy emitted depends weakly on the initial matter perturbations it has strong dependence on the strength and the distribution of the magnetic field perturbations. The gravitational wave output of such a collapse can be up to an order of magnitude larger or smaller calling for detailed numerical 3D studies of collapsing magnetized configurations.

  11. Radiation driven collapse of protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Boutet, Sébastien; Robinson, Ian K

    2006-01-01

    During coherent X-ray diffraction measurements on crystals of ferritin at room temperature using monochromatic undulator radiation from the Advanced Photon Source, a sudden lattice contraction was observed following a characteristic latent period and ultimately leading to the collapse of the crystal. The progression of this collapse is analysed using a two-state Hendricks-Teller model. It reveals that 55% of the layers collapse by 1.6% before the crystal completely stops diffracting.

  12. Dynamics of the constrained polymer collapse.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of California-San Diego

    2003-06-01

    The dynamics of polymer collapse with a fixed distance between endpoints is studied analytically and numerically by the Nose-Hoover algorithm. We find that at the pearling stage of the collapse the number of pearls decays as t{sup -1/2} leading to anomalously long collapse time. To understand the effect of Stokes drag we reduced the problem of long-polymer-chain collapse to the one-dimensional diffusion-limited coalescence of particles with the mass-dependent mobility. In this case the number of pearls decays slower, as t{sup -3/7}.

  13. Collapse of granular media subjected to wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Korchi, Fatima Zahra; Jamin, Frédéric; El Youssoufi, Moulay Saïd

    2017-06-01

    This paper focuses on the collapse of granular materials subjected to wetting action. For soils, the collapse potential depends on several parameters such as liquid limit, matric suction, compactness, initial water content and the amount of fine particles. The effect of grain size, which plays a key role in the rearrangement of grains, remains little studied and poorly understood. To investigate the capillary origin of the collapse phenomenon, we present an experimental study on macroscopic and local scales. Our results show the effect of grain size and water content on collapse.

  14. Time evolution of entropy in gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Eric

    2009-06-01

    We study the time evolution of the entropy of a collapsing spherical domain wall, from the point of view of an asymptotic observer, by investigating the entropy of the entire system (i.e. domain wall and radiation) and induced radiation alone during the collapse. By taking the difference, we find the entropy of the collapsing domain wall, since this is the object which will form a black hole. We find that for large values of time (times larger than t/R{sub s} ≈ 8), the entropy of the collapsing domain wall is a constant, which is of the same order as the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

  15. Gravitational collapse in f(R) theories

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J.A.R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Núñez, B. Montes E-mail: alvaro.delacruzdombriz@uct.ac.za

    2012-04-01

    We study the gravitational collapse in modified gravitational theories. In particular, we analyze a general f(R) model with uniformly collapsing cloud of self-gravitating dust particles. This analysis shares analogies with the formation of large-scale structures in the early Universe and with the formation of stars in a molecular cloud experiencing gravitational collapse. In the same way, this investigation can be used as a first approximation to the modification that stellar objects can suffer in these modified theories of gravity. We study concrete examples, and find that the analysis of gravitational collapse is an important tool to constrain models that present late-time cosmological acceleration.

  16. Catastrophic volcanic collapse: relation to hydrothermal processes.

    PubMed

    López, D L; Williams, S N

    1993-06-18

    Catastrophic volcanic collapse, without precursory magmatic activity, is characteristic of many volcanic disasters. The extent and locations of hydrothermal discharges at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia, suggest that at many volcanoes collapse may result from the interactions between hydrothermal fluids and the volcanic edifice. Rock dissolution and hydrothermal mineral alteration, combined with physical triggers such as earth-quakes, can produce volcanic collapse. Hot spring water compositions, residence times, and flow paths through faults were used to model potential collapse at Ruiz. Caldera dimensions, deposits, and alteration mineral volumes are consistent with parameters observed at other volcanoes.

  17. Axisymmetric collapses of granular columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lube, Gert; Huppert, Herbert E.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Hallworth, Mark A.

    2004-06-01

    Experimental observations of the collapse of initially vertical columns of small grains are presented. The experiments were performed mainly with dry grains of salt or sand, with some additional experiments using couscous, sugar or rice. Some of the experimental flows were analysed using high-speed video. There are three different flow regimes, dependent on the value of the aspect ratio a {=} h_i/r_i, where h_i and r_i are the initial height and radius of the granular column respectively. The differing forms of flow behaviour are described for each regime. In all cases a central, conically sided region of angle approximately 59(°) , corresponding to an aspect ratio of 1.7, remains undisturbed throughout the motion. The main experimental results for the final extent of the deposit and the time for emplacement are systematically collapsed in a quantitative way independent of any friction coefficients. Along with the kinematic data for the rate of spread of the front of the collapsing column, this is interpreted as indicating that frictional effects between individual grains in the bulk of the moving flow only play a role in the last instant of the flow, as it comes to an abrupt halt. For a {<} 1.7, the measured final runout radius, r_infty, is related to the initial radius by r_infty {=} r_i(1 {+} 1.24a); while for 1.7 {<} a the corresponding relationship is r_infty {=} r_i(1 {+} 1.6a(1/2) ). The time, t_infty, taken for the grains to reach r_infty is given by t_infty {=} 3(h_i/g)(1/2} {=} 3(r_i/g)({1/2}a^{1/2)) , where g is the gravitational acceleration. The insights and conclusions gained from these experiments can be applied to a wide range of industrial and natural flows of concentrated particles. For example, the observation of the rapid deposition of the grains can help explain details of the emplacement of pyroclastic flows resulting from the explosive eruption of volcanoes.

  18. Nonadiabatic charged spherical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; Le Denmat, G.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2007-09-15

    We present a complete set of the equations and matching conditions required for the description of physically meaningful charged, dissipative, spherically symmetric gravitational collapse with shear. Dissipation is described with both free-streaming and diffusion approximations. The effects of viscosity are also taken into account. The roles of different terms in the dynamical equation are analyzed in detail. The dynamical equation is coupled to a causal transport equation in the context of Israel-Stewart theory. The decrease of the inertial mass density of the fluid, by a factor which depends on its internal thermodynamic state, is reobtained, with the viscosity terms included. In accordance with the equivalence principle, the same decrease factor is obtained for the gravitational force term. The effect of the electric charge on the relation between the Weyl tensor and the inhomogeneity of the energy density is discussed.

  19. Critical perspectives on historical collapse

    PubMed Central

    Butzer, Karl W.; Endfield, Georgina H.

    2012-01-01

    Historical collapse of ancient states or civilizations has raised new awareness about its possible relevance to current issues of sustainability, in the context of global change. This Special Feature examines 12 case studies of societies under stress, of which seven suffered severe transformation. Outcomes were complex and unpredictable. Five others overcame breakdown through environmental, political, or socio-cultural resilience, which deserves as much attention as the identification of stressors. Response to environmental crises of the last millennium varied greatly according to place and time but drew from traditional knowledge to evaluate new information or experiment with increasing flexibility, even if modernization or intensification were decentralized and protracted. Longer-term diachronic experience offers insight into how societies have dealt with acute stress, a more instructive perspective for the future than is offered by apocalyptic scenarios. PMID:22371580

  20. Collapsing plumes and resurrecting fountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton; Hunt, Gary

    2012-11-01

    We explore the range of behaviour predicted for steady plumes and fountains that undergo an increase or decrease in buoyancy which arise due to phase changes or chemical reactions. We model these changes in the simplest possible way by assuming a quadratic relationship between the density and the temperature of the fluid. We thereby extend the model of Caulfield & Woods (`95) to include the most recent developments in the literature on steady releases of buoyancy emitted vertically from horizontal area sources in unconfined quiescent environments of uniform density based on the plume model of Morton, Taylor & Turner (`56). We provide closed-form solutions and identify four classes of solution: collapsing plumes, resurrecting fountains, plumes with enhanced buoyancy and fountains with enhanced negative buoyancy. We provide criteria for each category of behaviour in terms of the source-value of two non-dimensional quantities: the Richardson number and a temperature parameter.

  1. Gravitational collapse in Hořava-Lifshitz theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Jared; Lenells, Jonatan; Satheeshkumar, V. H.; Wang, Anzhong

    2013-07-01

    We study gravitational collapse of a spherical fluid in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of the Hořava-Lifshitz gravity with the projectability condition and an arbitrary coupling constant λ, where |λ-1| characterizes the deviation of the theory from general relativity in the infrared limit. The junction conditions across the surface of a collapsing star are derived under the (minimal) assumption that the junctions be mathematically meaningful in terms of distribution theory. When the collapsing star is made of a homogeneous and isotropic perfect fluid, and the external region is described by a stationary spacetime, the problem reduces to the matching of six independent conditions. If the perfect fluid is pressureless (a dust fluid), it is found that the matching is also possible. In particular, in the case λ=1, the external spacetime is described by the Sch-(anti-)de Sitter solution written in Painlevé-Gullstrand coordinates. In the case λ≠1, the external spacetime is static but not asymptotically flat. Our treatment can be easily generalized to other versions of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity or, more generally, to any theory of higher-order derivative gravity.

  2. Esophagectomy - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy; Robotic esophagectomy; Removal of the esophagus - minimally invasive; Achalasia - esophagectomy; Barrett esophagus - esophagectomy; Esophageal cancer - esophagectomy - laparoscopic; Cancer of the ...

  3. Collapse dynamics of bubble raft under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chin-Chang; Kachan, Devin; Levine, Alexander; Dennin, Michael; Department of Physics; Astronomy, University of California, Irvine Collaboration; Department of Physics; Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We report on the collapse of bubble rafts under compression in a closed rectangular geometry. A bubble raft is a single layer of bubbles at the air-water interface. A collapse event occurs when bubbles submerge beneath the neighboring bubbles under applied compression causing the structure of the bubble raft to go from single-layer to multi-layer. We studied the collapse dynamics as a function of compression velocity. At higher compression velocity we observe a more uniform distribution of collapse events, whereas at lower compression velocities, the collapse events accumulate at the system boundaries. We will present results that compare the distribution of collapse probability in the experiments to simulations based on a one-dimensional Ising model with elastic coupling between spin elements. Both the experimental system and simulations are excellent models for collapse in a number of complex systems. By comparing the two systems, we can tune the simulation to better understand the role of the Ising and elastic couplings in determining the collapse dynamics. We acknowledge DMR-1309402.

  4. Collective Baryon Decay and Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, George; Barbieri, James

    2014-01-01

    While it is widely believed that the gravitational collapse of a sufficiently large mass will lead to a density singularity and an event horizon, we propose that this never happens when quantum effects are taken into account. In particular, we propose that when the conditions become ripe for the formation of a trapped surface, a quantum critical firewall sweeps over the collapsing body, transforming the nucleons in the collapsing matter into a lepton/photon gas together with droplets of a positive vacuum energy. This will happen regardless of the matter density at the time a trapped surface starts to form, and as a result, we predict that at least in all cases of gravitational collapse involving ordinary matter, a large fraction of the rest mass of the collapsing matter will be converted into a burst of neutrinos and γ-rays. We predict that the peak luminosity of these bursts is only weakly dependent on the mass of the collapsing object, and on the order of (ɛq/mPc2)1/4c5/G where ɛq is the mean energy of a nucleon parton and mP is the Planck mass. The duration of the bursts will depend on the mass of the collapsing object; in the case of stellar core collapse, we predict that the duration of both the neutrino and γ-ray bursts will be on the order of 10s.

  5. Equations determine coiled tubing collapse pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Avakov, V.; Taliaferro, W.

    1995-07-24

    A set of equations has been developed for calculating pipe collapse pressure for oval tubing such as coiled tubing. When coiled tubing is placed onto a reel, the tubing is forced into an oval shape and never again returns to perfect roundness because the coiling process exceeds the plasticity limits of the tubing. Straightening the tubing for the trip into the well does not restore roundness. The consequence of this physical property is that all coiled tubing collapse pressure calculations should be made considering oval tubing, not round tubing. Tubing collapse can occur when formation pressure against the coiled tubing exceeds the collapse resistance inherent in the coiled tubing. As coiled tubing becomes more oval in shape, it becomes more oval in shape, it becomes more susceptible to collapse from outside pressure.

  6. Wetting dynamics of a collapsing fluid hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, J. B.; Dijksman, J. A.; Shearer, M.

    2017-01-01

    The collapse dynamics of an axisymmetric fluid cavity that wets the bottom of a rotating bucket bound by vertical sidewalls are studied. Lubrication theory is applied to the governing field equations for the thin film to yield an evolution equation that captures the effect of capillary, gravitational, and centrifugal forces on this converging flow. The focus is on the quasistatic spreading regime, whereby contact-line motion is governed by a constitutive law relating the contact-angle to the contact-line speed. Surface tension forces dominate the collapse dynamics for small holes with the collapse time appearing as a power law whose exponent compares favorably to experiments in the literature. Gravity accelerates the collapse process. Volume dependence is predicted and compared with experiment. Centrifugal forces slow the collapse process and lead to complex dynamics characterized by stalled spreading behavior that separates the large and small hole asymptotic regimes.

  7. Architecture of collapsed-paleocave reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Mescher, P.

    1996-12-31

    It is important to investigate the architecture of collapsed-paleocave reservoirs at interwell scales in outcrops because reservoir heterogeneities cannot be adequately characterized by cores and log correlation sections. A 3000-foot long quarry wall of Ellenburger strata in central Texas displays the lithologic and pore network heterogeneities at typical well spacings (1300 to 2600 feet). The quarry wall exposes the transition from stratified host rock into a complex collapsed-paleocave system showing several developmental episodes. This paleocave system has over 2600 feet of laterally continuous chaotic breccias. The dimensions of these breccias are similar as to what is imaged by 3-D seismic over paleocave reservoirs. Collapsed-paleocave reservoirs are not single collapsed passages of tens of feet across, but are homogenized collapsed-cave systems hundreds to several thousand feet across. This concept of scale is very important because collapsed-paleocave systems offer larger exploration targets than individual cave passages. Collapsed-paleocave systems are complex because they are the homogenization of chaotic breccias and cave-sediment fill from passages, chambers, and shafts and of crackle breccias from roof- and wall-rock and pillars. Pore networks are associated with chaotic breakdown breccias, cave roof- and wall-crackle breccias, and/or clastic sediment fill. Strong heterogeneity within a collapsed paleocave system should be expected. Lateral and vertical changes in collapsed-paleocave-related facies have the strongest effect on reservoir heterogeneity and quality. Within individual facies there can be distinct reservoir quality variation, such as between the cave-sediment fill and associated blocks. Tectonic fractures, however, can interconnect the highly variable pore networks within a collapsed-paleocave reservoir.

  8. Architecture of collapsed-paleocave reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G. ); Mescher, P. )

    1996-01-01

    It is important to investigate the architecture of collapsed-paleocave reservoirs at interwell scales in outcrops because reservoir heterogeneities cannot be adequately characterized by cores and log correlation sections. A 3000-foot long quarry wall of Ellenburger strata in central Texas displays the lithologic and pore network heterogeneities at typical well spacings (1300 to 2600 feet). The quarry wall exposes the transition from stratified host rock into a complex collapsed-paleocave system showing several developmental episodes. This paleocave system has over 2600 feet of laterally continuous chaotic breccias. The dimensions of these breccias are similar as to what is imaged by 3-D seismic over paleocave reservoirs. Collapsed-paleocave reservoirs are not single collapsed passages of tens of feet across, but are homogenized collapsed-cave systems hundreds to several thousand feet across. This concept of scale is very important because collapsed-paleocave systems offer larger exploration targets than individual cave passages. Collapsed-paleocave systems are complex because they are the homogenization of chaotic breccias and cave-sediment fill from passages, chambers, and shafts and of crackle breccias from roof- and wall-rock and pillars. Pore networks are associated with chaotic breakdown breccias, cave roof- and wall-crackle breccias, and/or clastic sediment fill. Strong heterogeneity within a collapsed paleocave system should be expected. Lateral and vertical changes in collapsed-paleocave-related facies have the strongest effect on reservoir heterogeneity and quality. Within individual facies there can be distinct reservoir quality variation, such as between the cave-sediment fill and associated blocks. Tectonic fractures, however, can interconnect the highly variable pore networks within a collapsed-paleocave reservoir.

  9. Computed tomography of lobar collapse: 2. Collapse in the absence of endobronchial obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Naidich, D.P.; McCauley, D.I.; Khouri, N.F.; Leitman, B.S.; Hulnick, D.H.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of collapse without endobronchial obstruction is reviewed. These 57 cases were classified by the etiology of collapse. The largest group consisted of 29 patients with passive atelectasis, i.e., collapse secondary to fluid, air, or both in the pleural space. Twenty-three of 29 proved secondary to malignant pleural disease. Computed tomography accurately predicted a malignant etiology in 22 of 23 cases. The second largest group of patients had lobar collapse secondary to cicatrization from chronic inflammation. In all cases the underlying etiology was tuberculosis. Radiation caused adhesive atelectasis in six patients secondary to a lack of production of surfactant. In each case a sharp line of demarcation could be defined between normal and abnormal collapsed pulmonary parenchyma. Three cases of unchecked tumor growth caused a peripheral form of collapse (replacement atelectasis). This form of collapse was characterized by an absence of endobronchial obstruction and extensive tumor not delineated by the normal boundaries of the pulmonary lobes.

  10. Spherical collapse and virialization in f(T) gravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Rui-Hui; Zhai, Xiang-Hua; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2017-03-01

    Using the classical top-hat profile, we study the non-linear growth of spherically symmetric density perturbation and structure formation in f(T) gravities. In particular, three concrete models, which have been tested against the observation of large-scale evolution and linear perturbation of the universe in the cosmological scenario, are investigated in this framework, covering both minimal and nonminimal coupling cases of f(T) gravities. Moreover, we consider the virialization of the overdense region in the models after they detach from the background expanding universe and turn around to collapse. We find that there are constraints in the magnitude and occurring epoch of the initial perturbation. The existence of these constraints indicates that a perturbation that is too weak or occurs too late will not be able to stop the expanding of the overdense region. The illustration of the evolution of the perturbation shows that in f(T) gravities, the initial perturbation within the constraints can eventually lead to clustering and form structure. The evolution also shows that nonminimal coupling models collapse slower than the minimal coupling one.

  11. Costa Rica's Chain of laterally collapsed volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, E.; Fernandez, E.

    2007-05-01

    From the NW extreme to the SW end of Costa Rica's volcanic backbone, a number of laterally collapsed volcanoes can be observed. Due to several factors, attention has been given to active volcanoes disregarding the importance of collapsed features in terms of assessing volcanic hazards for future generations around inhabited volcanoes. In several cases the typical horseshoe shape amphitheater-like depression can be easily observed. In other cases due to erosion, vegetation, topography, seismic activity or drastic weather such characteristics are not easily recognized. In the order mentioned above appear: Orosi-Cacao, Miravalles, Platanar, Congo, Von Frantzius, Cacho Negro and Turrialba volcanoes. Due to limited studies on these structures it is unknown if sector collapse occurred in one or several phases. Furthermore, in the few studied cases no evidence has been found to relate collapses to actual eruptive episodes. Detailed studies on the deposits and materials composing dome-like shapes will shed light on unsolved questions about petrological and chemical composition. Volume, form and distance traveled by deposits are part of the questions surrounding most of these collapsed volcanoes. Although most of these mentioned structures are extinct, at least Irazú volcano (active volcano) has faced partial lateral collapses recently. It did presented strombolian activity in the early 60s. Collapse scars show on the NW flank show important mass removal in historic and prehistoric times. Moreover, in 1994 a minor hydrothermal explosion provoked the weakening of a deeply altered wall that holds a crater lake (150m diameter, 2.6x106 ). A poster will depict images of the collapsed volcanoes named above with mayor descriptive characteristics. It will also focus on the importance of deeper studies to assess the collapse potential of Irazú volcano with related consequences. Finally, this initiative will invite researchers interested in such topic to join future studies in

  12. Biological effects of stellar collapse neutrinos

    PubMed

    Collar, J I

    1996-02-05

    Massive stars in their final stages of collapse radiate most of their binding energy in the form of MeV neutrinos. The recoil atoms that they produce in elastic scattering off nuclei in organic tissue create radiation damage which is highly effective in the production of irreparable DNA harm, leading to cellular mutation, neoplasia, and oncogenesis. Using a conventional model of the galaxy and of the collapse mechanism, the periodicity of nearby stellar collapses and the radiation dose are calculated. The possible contribution of this process to the paleontological record of mass extinctions is examined.

  13. Can catch shares prevent fisheries collapse?

    PubMed

    Costello, Christopher; Gaines, Steven D; Lynham, John

    2008-09-19

    Recent reports suggest that most of the world's commercial fisheries could collapse within decades. Although poor fisheries governance is often implicated, evaluation of solutions remains rare. Bioeconomic theory and case studies suggest that rights-based catch shares can provide individual incentives for sustainable harvest that is less prone to collapse. To test whether catch-share fishery reforms achieve these hypothetical benefits, we have compiled a global database of fisheries institutions and catch statistics in 11,135 fisheries from 1950 to 2003. Implementation of catch shares halts, and even reverses, the global trend toward widespread collapse. Institutional change has the potential for greatly altering the future of global fisheries.

  14. Minimal covering problem and PLA minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.H.; Muroga, S.

    1985-12-01

    Solving the minimal covering problem by an implicit enumeration method is discussed. The implicit enumeration method in this paper is a modification of the Quine-McCluskey method tailored to computer processing and also its extension, utilizing some new properties of the minimal covering problem for speedup. A heuristic algorithm is also presented to solve large-scale problems. Its application to the minimization of programmable logic arrays (i.e., PLAs) is shown as an example. Computational experiences are presented to confirm the improvements by the implicit enumeration method discussed.

  15. Quark Stars and Magnetic Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Martinez, A.; Perez Rojas, H.; Mosquera Cuesta, H. J.; Boligan, M.

    2005-09-28

    Quark matter is expected to exist in the interior of compact stellar objects as neutron stars or even the more exotic strange stars, based on the Bodmer-Witten conjecture. Bare strange quark stars and (normal) strange quark-matter stars, those possessing a baryon (electron) crust, are hypothesized as good candidates to explain the properties of a set of peculiar stellar sources as the enigmatic X-ray source RX J1856.5-3754, some pulsars as PSR B1828-11 and PSR B1642-03 (Xu 2003), and the anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters (Zhang et al. 2000). In the MIT bag model, quarks are treated as a degenerate Fermi gas confined to a region of space having a vacuum energy density Bbag (the Bag constant). In this note, we modified the MIT Bag Model by including the electromagnetic interaction. We also show that this version of the MIT model implies the anisotropy of the Bag pressure due to the presence of the magnetic field. The equations of state of degenerate quarks gases are studied in the presence of ultra strong magnetic fields. The behavior of a system made-up of quarks having (or not) an anomalous magnetic moment is reviewed. A structural instability is found, which is related to the anisotropic nature of the pressures in this highly magnetized matter. The conditions for the collapse of this system are obtained and compared to a previous model of neutron stars build-up on a neutron gas having anomalous magnetic moment.

  16. Core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae, the deaths of massive stars, are among the most spectacular phenomena in astrophysics: Not only can supernovae outshine their host galaxy for weeks; they are also laboratories for the behavior of matter at supranuclear densities, and one of the few environments where collective neutrino effects can become important. Moreover, supernovae play a central role in the cosmic matter cycle, e.g., as the dominant producers of oxygen in the Universe. Yet the mechanism by which massive stars explode has eluded us for decades, partly because classical astronomical observations across the electromagnetic spectrum cannot directly probe the supernovae ``engine''. Numerical simulations are thus our primary tool for understanding the explosion mechanism(s) of massive stars. Rigorous modeling needs to take a host of important physical ingredients into account, such as the emission and partial reabsorption of neutrinos from the young proto-neutron star, multi-dimensional fluid motions, general relativistic gravity, the equation of state of nuclear matter, and magnetic fields. This is a challenging multi-physics problem that has not been fully solved yet. Nonetheless, as I shall argue in this talk, recent first-principle 3D simulations have gone a long way towards demonstrating the viability of the most popular explosion scenario, the ``neutrino-driven mechanism''. Focusing on successful explosion models of the MPA-QUB-Monash collaboration, I will discuss possible requirements for robust explosions across a wide range of progenitors, such as accurate neutrino opacities, stellar rotation, and seed asymmetries from convective shell burning. With the advent of successful explosion models, supernova theory can also be confronted with astronomical observations. I will show that recent 3D models come closer to matching observed explosion parameters (explosion energies, neutron star kicks) than older 2D models, although there are still discrepancies. This work has

  17. Voltage collapse in complex power grids

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Porco, John W.; Dörfler, Florian; Bullo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    A large-scale power grid's ability to transfer energy from producers to consumers is constrained by both the network structure and the nonlinear physics of power flow. Violations of these constraints have been observed to result in voltage collapse blackouts, where nodal voltages slowly decline before precipitously falling. However, methods to test for voltage collapse are dominantly simulation-based, offering little theoretical insight into how grid structure influences stability margins. For a simplified power flow model, here we derive a closed-form condition under which a power network is safe from voltage collapse. The condition combines the complex structure of the network with the reactive power demands of loads to produce a node-by-node measure of grid stress, a prediction of the largest nodal voltage deviation, and an estimate of the distance to collapse. We extensively test our predictions on large-scale systems, highlighting how our condition can be leveraged to increase grid stability margins. PMID:26887284

  18. Axisymmetric Column Collapse in a Rotating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnett, Jay; Thomas, Peter; Dennisenko, Petr

    2012-11-01

    We discuss experimental and computational results of a study investigating the collapse of an initially axisymmetric cylindrical column of granular material within a rotating environment of air or liquids. In industry this type of granular column collapse that is subject to background rotation is encountered, for instance, in the context of the spreading of powders and fertilizers. In comparison to its non-rotating counterpart the physical characteristics of the column collapse in a rotating system are expected to be modified by effects arising from centrifugal forces and Coriolis forces. We compare our new results for the rotating flow to data available in the literature for the collapse of granular columns in non-rotating systems to highlight the differences observed.

  19. Simple Analytic Models of Gravitational Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, R.

    2005-02-09

    Most general relativity textbooks devote considerable space to the simplest example of a black hole containing a singularity, the Schwarzschild geometry. However only a few discuss the dynamical process of gravitational collapse, by which black holes and singularities form. We present here two types of analytic models for this process, which we believe are the simplest available; the first involves collapsing spherical shells of light, analyzed mainly in Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates; the second involves collapsing spheres filled with a perfect fluid, analyzed mainly in Painleve-Gullstrand coordinates. Our main goal is pedagogical simplicity and algebraic completeness, but we also present some results that we believe are new, such as the collapse of a light shell in Kruskal-Szekeres coordinates.

  20. Hawking radiation from a collapsing quantum shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, Jorge; Eyheralde, Rodrigo; Gambini, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    We study Hawking radiation from a collapsing shell with uncertainty in its position and momentum. We see there are deviations from the usual spectrum early on in the evolution, tending asymptotically to the usual spectrum plus small corrections.

  1. Voltage collapse in complex power grids.

    PubMed

    Simpson-Porco, John W; Dörfler, Florian; Bullo, Francesco

    2016-02-18

    A large-scale power grid's ability to transfer energy from producers to consumers is constrained by both the network structure and the nonlinear physics of power flow. Violations of these constraints have been observed to result in voltage collapse blackouts, where nodal voltages slowly decline before precipitously falling. However, methods to test for voltage collapse are dominantly simulation-based, offering little theoretical insight into how grid structure influences stability margins. For a simplified power flow model, here we derive a closed-form condition under which a power network is safe from voltage collapse. The condition combines the complex structure of the network with the reactive power demands of loads to produce a node-by-node measure of grid stress, a prediction of the largest nodal voltage deviation, and an estimate of the distance to collapse. We extensively test our predictions on large-scale systems, highlighting how our condition can be leveraged to increase grid stability margins.

  2. Naked singularity resolution in cylindrical collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Yasunari; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, we study the gravitational collapse of null dust in cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The naked singularity necessarily forms at the symmetry axis. We consider the situation in which null dust is emitted again from the naked singularity formed by the collapsed null dust and investigate the backreaction by this emission for the naked singularity. We show a very peculiar but physically important case in which the same amount of null dust as that of the collapsed one is emitted from the naked singularity as soon as the ingoing null dust hits the symmetry axis and forms the naked singularity. In this case, although this naked singularity satisfies the strong curvature condition by Krolak (limiting focusing condition), geodesics which hit the singularity can be extended uniquely across the singularity. Therefore, we may say that the collapsing null dust passes through the singularity formed by itself and then leaves for infinity. Finally, the singularity completely disappears and the flat spacetime remains.

  3. Hypercritical Accretion in the Induced Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, L. M.; Fryer, C. L.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.

    2017-07-01

    We presented the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm that have been applied to explain the long gamma ray burst (GRB) associated with type Ic supernova, and recently the X-ray flashes (XRFs)

  4. Cooperation, cheating, and collapse in biological populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    Natural populations can collapse suddenly in response to small changes in environmental conditions, and recovery from such a collapse can be difficult. We have used laboratory microbial ecosystems to directly measure theoretically proposed early warning signals of impending population collapse. Yeast cooperatively break down the sugar sucrose, meaning that below a critical size the population cannot sustain itself. We have demonstrated experimentally that changes in the fluctuations of the population size can serve as an early warning signal that the population is close to collapse. The cooperative nature of yeast growth on sucrose suggests that the population may be susceptible to ``cheater'' cells, which do not contribute to the public good and instead merely take advantage of the cooperative cells. We confirm this possibility experimentally and find that such social parasitism decreases the resilience of the population.

  5. Axisymmetric collapse of rotating, isothermal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Haber, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    The results of over 50 new models of the axisymmetric collapse of rotating, isothermal clouds are presented, with the following objectives: (1) to fully explore the initial conditions necessary for collapse from uniform density and uniform rotation, subject to constant volume and constant pressure boundary conditions; (2) to catalog the possible end states for cloud collapse from these initial conditions; and (3) to determine if there is a critical value of rotational energy/gravitational energy associated with ring formation, as appears to be the case for adiabatic clouds. Three end states are obtained: Bonnor-Ebert spheroids, rings and collapsing disks. The rings are formed with values of the ratio of rotational energy to the absolute value of the gravitational energy typically less than the Maclaurin spheroid value for dynamic instability to ring formation.

  6. Rinse liquid to improve pattern collapse behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geunsu; Lee, Sung-Koo; Hwang, Young-Sun; Jung, Jae-Chang; Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Moon, Seung-Chan; Shin, Ki-Soo

    2003-06-01

    We designed and prepared a test mask to study a pattern collapse (PC) and investigated a rinse dependency. We report the effect of surfactant and solvent in rinse. The collapse behavior was quantified in terms of the first collapsed critical dimension (FCCD) in 90nm L/S ArF resist patterns. In-house rinse liquids (SE series) showed relatively lower surface tension (ST) compared to commercial one. They greatly reduced pattern collapse behavior (PCB) of from FCCD 102nm to 85nm L/S using these solutions. However, SE-100 showed defect by bubble and the others show bad compatibility with photoresist. SES-100 is the only rinse liquid candidate in this experiment.

  7. Dark energy and collapsing axial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Manzoor, Rubab

    This paper investigates the effects of dark source term on the dissipative axially symmetric collapse by taking self-interacting Brans-Dicke (SBD) gravity as a dark energy (DE) candidate. We discuss physically feasible energy source of the model and formulate all the dynamical variables as well as structure scalars. It is found that the dark source term is one of the source of anisotropy and dissipation in the system. Further, we obtain structure scalars in this background. In order to discuss factors describing dissipative collapse, we develop equations related to the evolution of dynamical variables, heat transport equation as well as super-Poynting vector. We conclude that the thermodynamics of the collapse, evolution of kinematical terms (like expansion scalar, shear and vorticity) and inhomogeneity are affected by dark source term. Finally, we study the existence of radiation having repulsive gravitational nature in this collapse scenario.

  8. Arsia Mons Collapse Pits in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found on the flank of Arsia Mons and are related to lava tube collapse.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.8, Longitude 240.4 East (119.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal

  9. Arsia Mons Collapse Pits in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found on the flank of Arsia Mons and are related to lava tube collapse.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.8, Longitude 240.4 East (119.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal

  10. Climate and the collapse of civilization

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, T.

    1994-09-01

    This article looks at the archaeological debate over two important questions: whether abrupt climate changes caused or contributed to the collapse of ancient civilizations and, if the archaeological and paleoclimatological record yields evidence to that effect, what would it mean in a world that today debates whether industrial civilization is altering Earth's climate with uncertain consequences. Areas discussed include the following: climate hints from archaeological sites; hesitations about whether climate change caused civilizations to collapse; and the interdisciplinary checks on each side.

  11. Detailed Jet Dynamics in a Collapsing Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    We present detailed visualizations of the micro-jet forming inside an aspherically collapsing cavitation bubble near a free surface. The high-quality visualizations of large and strongly deformed bubbles disclose so far unseen features of the dynamics inside the bubble, such as a mushroom-like flattened jet-tip, crown formation and micro-droplets. We also find that jetting near a free surface reduces the collapse time relative to the Rayleigh time.

  12. Better Hyper-minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletti, Andreas

    Hyper-minimization aims to compute a minimal deterministic finite automaton (dfa) that recognizes the same language as a given dfa up to a finite number of errors. Algorithms for hyper-minimization that run in time O(n logn), where n is the number of states of the given dfa, have been reported recently in [Gawrychowski and Jeż: Hyper-minimisation made efficient. Proc. Mfcs, Lncs 5734, 2009] and [Holzer and Maletti: An n logn algorithm for hyper-minimizing a (minimized) deterministic automaton. Theor. Comput. Sci. 411, 2010]. These algorithms are improved to return a hyper-minimal dfa that commits the least number of errors. This closes another open problem of [Badr, Geffert, and Shipman: Hyper-minimizing minimized deterministic finite state automata. Rairo Theor. Inf. Appl. 43, 2009]. Unfortunately, the time complexity for the obtained algorithm increases to O(n 2).

  13. Four tails problems for dynamical collapse theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQueen, Kelvin J.

    2015-02-01

    The primary quantum mechanical equation of motion entails that measurements typically do not have determinate outcomes, but result in superpositions of all possible outcomes. Dynamical collapse theories (e.g. GRW) supplement this equation with a stochastic Gaussian collapse function, intended to collapse the superposition of outcomes into one outcome. But the Gaussian collapses are imperfect in a way that leaves the superpositions intact. This is the tails problem. There are several ways of making this problem more precise. But many authors dismiss the problem without considering the more severe formulations. Here I distinguish four distinct tails problems. The first (bare tails problem) and second (structured tails problem) exist in the literature. I argue that while the first is a pseudo-problem, the second has not been adequately addressed. The third (multiverse tails problem) reformulates the second to account for recently discovered dynamical consequences of collapse. Finally the fourth (tails problem dilemma) shows that solving the third by replacing the Gaussian with a non-Gaussian collapse function introduces new conflict with relativity theory.

  14. Cluster assembly in hierarchically collapsing molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    I will discuss the mechanism of cluster formation in hierarchically collapsing molecular clouds. Recent evidence, both observational and numerical, suggests that molecular clouds (MCs) may be undergoing global, hierarchical gravitational collapse. The "hierarchical" regime consists of small-scale collapses within larger-scale ones. The former occur in a more scattered fashion and at slightly earlier times, and are themselves falling into the larger potential well of the still-ongoing large-scale collapse. Instead, the large-scale collapse culminates a few Myr later, in a highly focused region, of higher density, mass, and velocity dispersion. The stars formed in the early, small-scale collapses share the infall velocity of their parent clumps towards the larger potential trough, while those formed later, in the aforementioned trough, form from gas that has already dissipated some of its kinetic energy, and thus have a lower velocity dispersion. This leads to a radial age gradient in the stellar population, in agreement with recent observations.

  15. Increasingly minimal bias routing

    DOEpatents

    Bataineh, Abdulla; Court, Thomas; Roweth, Duncan

    2017-02-21

    A system and algorithm configured to generate diversity at the traffic source so that packets are uniformly distributed over all of the available paths, but to increase the likelihood of taking a minimal path with each hop the packet takes. This is achieved by configuring routing biases so as to prefer non-minimal paths at the injection point, but increasingly prefer minimal paths as the packet proceeds, referred to herein as Increasing Minimal Bias (IMB).

  16. Increased Fracture Collapse after Intertrochanteric Fractures Treated by the Dynamic Hip Screw Adversely Affects Walking Ability but Not Survival.

    PubMed

    Fang, Christian; Gudushauri, Paata; Wong, Tak-Man; Lau, Tak-Wing; Pun, Terence; Leung, Frankie

    2016-01-01

    In osteoporotic hip fractures, fracture collapse is deliberately allowed by commonly used implants to improve dynamic contact and healing. The muscle lever arm is, however, compromised by shortening. We evaluated a cohort of 361 patients with AO/OTA 31.A1 or 31.A2 intertrochanteric fracture treated by the dynamic hip screw (DHS) who had a minimal follow-up of 3 months and an average follow-up of 14.6 months and long term survival data. The amount of fracture collapse and shortening due to sliding of the DHS was determined at the latest follow-up and graded as minimal (<1 cm), moderate (1-2 cm), or severe (>2 cm). With increased severity of collapse, more patients were unable to maintain their premorbid walking function (minimal collapse = 34.2%, moderate = 33.3%, severe = 62.8%, and p = 0.028). Based on ordinal regression of risk factors, increased fracture collapse was significantly and independently related to increasing age (p = 0.037), female sex (p = 0.024), A2 fracture class (p = 0.010), increased operative duration (p = 0.011), poor reduction quality (p = 0.000), and suboptimal tip-apex distance of >25 mm (p = 0.050). Patients who had better outcome in terms of walking function were independently predicted by younger age (p = 0.036), higher MMSE marks (p = 0.000), higher MBI marks (p = 0.010), better premorbid walking status (p = 0.000), less fracture collapse (p = 0.011), and optimal lag screw position in centre-centre or centre-inferior position (p = 0.020). According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, fracture collapse had no association with mortality from 2.4 to 7.6 years after surgery. In conclusion, increased fracture collapse after fixation of geriatric intertrochanteric fractures adversely affected walking but not survival.

  17. Quantum cosmology, polymer matter, and modified collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreienbuehl, Andreas

    In this dissertation I address the following three questions: 1) how do different clocks compare in regard of the avoidance of the big bang singularity, 2) what is the high energy behavior of polymer quantized matter, and 3) how do quantum gravity effects modify the formation and the properties of black holes? To discuss 1), I consider an isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology sourced by a non-negative cosmological constant and a massless scalar field. I choose the scale factor as clock and, using a trick by Dirac, Schrodinger quantize the reduced square root Hamiltonian. From the resulting spinor equation I show that no semiclassical wave packet avoids the big bang. I compare this work with that in loop quantum cosmology, where the scalar field is chosen as time variable and the big bang is avoided. As for 2), I explain the details of a project with Professor Husain in which we study a scalar field on a curved background and perform a polymer Fock quantization of the matter degrees of freedom. The quantization is based on the assumption that the underlying field space is discrete and it therefore comes with a fundamental scale. This renders the usual operators on the Fock space scale dependent and causes a transition from a bosonic to a fermionic behavior in the ultraviolet regime. Finally for 3), I present work with Professor Husain and Professor Seahra on a modification of the Hamiltonian formulation of a massless scalar field minimally coupled to a spherically symmetric spacetime. The modification is designed to mimic polymer quantum effects in the region where the scalar field collapses and it is implemented in such a way that the symmetry group of general relativity is preserved. This causes a drastic change in the way black holes form and, thus, in their properties. Namely, the scalar field has to overcome a repulsion and black holes form with a finite mass. Furthermore, the modification gives rise to oscillations in the relation between the black

  18. Spitzer Observations of L429: A Near-collapse or Collapsing Starless Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Rieke, George H.; Bieging, John H.; Misselt, Karl A.; Myers, Philip C.; Shirley, Yancy L.

    2009-01-01

    We present Spitzer infrared (IR) observations of the starless core L429. The IR images of this core show an absorption feature, caused by the dense core material, at wavelengths <= 70 μ. The core has a steep density profile, and reaches AV > 35 mag near the center. We show that L429 is either collapsing or in a near-collapse state.

  19. Hydrophobic Collapse of Trigger Factor Monomer in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Kushagra; Vreede, Jocelyne; Mashaghi, Alireza; Tans, Sander J.; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a chaperone, found in bacterial cells and chloroplasts, that interacts with nascent polypeptide chains to suppress aggregation. While its crystal structure has been resolved, the solution structure and dynamics are largely unknown. We performed multiple molecular dynamics simulations on Trigger factor in solution, and show that its tertiary domains display collective motions hinged about inter-domain linkers with minimal or no loss in secondary structure. Moreover, we find that isolated TF typically adopts a collapsed state, with the formation of domain pairs. This collapse of TF in solution is induced by hydrophobic interactions and stabilised by hydrophilic contacts. To determine the nature of the domain interactions, we analysed the hydrophobicity of the domain surfaces by using the hydrophobic probe method of Acharya et al. [1], [2], as the standard hydrophobicity scales predictions are limited due to the complex environment. We find that the formation of domain pairs changes the hydrophobic map of TF, making the N-terminal and arm2 domain pair more hydrophilic and the head and arm1 domain pair more hydrophobic. These insights into the dynamics and interactions of the TF domains are important to eventually understand chaperone-substrate interactions and chaperone function. PMID:23565160

  20. Anterior septal deviation and contralateral alar collapse.

    PubMed

    Schalek, P; Hahn, A

    2011-01-01

    Septal deviation is often found in conjunction with other pathological conditions that adversely affect nasal patency. Anterior septal deviation, together with contralateral alar collapse, is a relatively rare type of anatomical and functional incompetence. In our experience, it can often be resolved with septoplasty, without the necessity of surgery involving the external valve. The aim of this paper was to verify this hypothesis prospectively. Twelve patients with anterior septal deviation and simultaneous alar collapse on the opposite side were prospectively enrolled in the study. Subjective assessment of nasal patency was made on post-operative day 1, and again 6 months after surgery, using a subjective evaluation of nasal breathing. The width of the nostril (alar-columellar distance) on the side with the alar collapse was measured during inspiration pre-operatively, 1 day after surgery and again 6 months after surgery. Immediately after surgery, all patients reported improved or excellent nasal breathing on the side of the original septal deviation. On the collapsed side, one patient reported no change in condition. With the exception of one patient, all measurements showed some degree of improvement in the extension of the alar-columellar distance. The average benefit 6 months after surgery was an improvement of 4.54 mm. In our group of patients (anterior septal deviation and simultaneous contralateral alar collapse and no obvious structural changes of the alar cartilage) we found septoplasty to be entirely suitable and we recommend it as the treatment of choice in such cases.

  1. Laryngeal collapse in seven brachycephalic puppies.

    PubMed

    Pink, J J; Doyle, R S; Hughes, J M L; Tobin, E; Bellenger, C R

    2006-03-01

    To document the histories, clinical findings, and management of seven puppies with laryngeal collapse occurring secondarily to brachycephalic airway syndrome. Seven brachycephalic puppies aged between 4.5 and six months underwent surgery for management of brachycephalic airway syndrome following presentation for exercise intolerance and increased respiratory noise and effort. Stenotic nares of varying severity and an elongated soft palate were common to all dogs. All dogs had tracheal hypoplasia and this was severe in four dogs. Laryngeal collapse was present in all dogs. Two dogs had stage I, four dogs stage II, and one dog stage III laryngeal collapse. The dog with stage III laryngeal collapse and one dog with stage II laryngeal collapse died. There was no apparent association between the changes evident on thoracic radiographs or the degree of tracheal hypoplasia and postoperative outcome. The development of severe secondary laryngeal changes in dogs aged six months or less supports the suggestion that immature brachycephalic dogs should undergo assessment and, if indicated, surgery as soon as any clinical signs of BAS are apparent.

  2. Stellar core collapse. I - Infall epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Riper, K. A.; Lattimer, J. M.

    1981-10-01

    Simulations of the collapse of the central iron core of a 15-solar-mass spherically symmetric star are reported. In this paper the infall epoch, between the onset of collapse and core bounce, is considered. The models use the recent equation of state of Lamb, Lattimer, Pethick, and Ravenhall and general-relativistic hydrodynamics. The electron capture rates on nuclei proceed rapidly for densities less than 10 to the 11th g/cu cm, but are suppressed at higher densities where the neutron number of the nucleus, N, exceeds 40 (Fuller, Fowler, and Newman). Neutrino transport is treated by a leakage scheme. The effects of changes in the neutrino trapping density and of qualitative changes in the electron capture reactions on the evolution are explored. Greater lepton loss during collapse leads to larger pressure deficits, more rapid collapse, and smaller inner homologous cores. The entropy change during the infall is small, the absolute value of delta s being less than 0.8. The mass of inner core is given, to about 20%, by the formula of Goldreich and Weber. Because the collapsing core is far from equilibrium, the effects of general relativity are small.

  3. Fishing amplifies forage fish population collapses.

    PubMed

    Essington, Timothy E; Moriarty, Pamela E; Froehlich, Halley E; Hodgson, Emma E; Koehn, Laura E; Oken, Kiva L; Siple, Margaret C; Stawitz, Christine C

    2015-05-26

    Forage fish support the largest fisheries in the world but also play key roles in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to upper trophic-level predators, such as large fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Fishing can, thereby, have far reaching consequences on marine food webs unless safeguards are in place to avoid depleting forage fish to dangerously low levels, where dependent predators are most vulnerable. However, disentangling the contributions of fishing vs. natural processes on population dynamics has been difficult because of the sensitivity of these stocks to environmental conditions. Here, we overcome this difficulty by collating population time series for forage fish populations that account for nearly two-thirds of global catch of forage fish to identify the fingerprint of fisheries on their population dynamics. Forage fish population collapses shared a set of common and unique characteristics: high fishing pressure for several years before collapse, a sharp drop in natural population productivity, and a lagged response to reduce fishing pressure. Lagged response to natural productivity declines can sharply amplify the magnitude of naturally occurring population fluctuations. Finally, we show that the magnitude and frequency of collapses are greater than expected from natural productivity characteristics and therefore, likely attributed to fishing. The durations of collapses, however, were not different from those expected based on natural productivity shifts. A risk-based management scheme that reduces fishing when populations become scarce would protect forage fish and their predators from collapse with little effect on long-term average catches.

  4. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Gekle, Stephan; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-03-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disc on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  5. Collapse of biodiversity in fractured metacommunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Charles; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-03-01

    The increasing threat to global biodiversity from climate change, habitat destruction, and other anthropogenic factors motivates the search for features that increase the resistance of ecological communities to destructive disturbances. Recently, Gibson et al (Science 2013) observed that the damming of the Khlong Saeng river in Thailand caused a rapid collapse of biodiversity in the remaining tropical forests. Using a theoretical model that maps the distribution of coexisting species in an ecological community to a disordered system of Ising spins, we show that fracturing a metacommunity by inhibiting species dispersal leads to a collapse in biodiversity in the constituent local communities. The biodiversity collapse can be modeled as a diffusion on a rough energy landscape, and the resulting estimate for the rate of extinction highlights the role of species functional diversity in maintaining biodiversity following a disturbance.

  6. Relativistic Axions from Collapsing Bose Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levkov, D. G.; Panin, A. G.; Tkachev, I. I.

    2017-01-01

    The substructures of light bosonic (axionlike) dark matter may condense into compact Bose stars. We study the collapse of critical-mass stars caused by attractive self-interaction of the axionlike particles and find that these processes proceed in an unexpected universal way. First, nonlinear self-similar evolution (called "wave collapse" in condensed matter physics) forces the particles to fall into the star center. Second, interactions in the dense center create an outgoing stream of mildly relativistic particles which carries away an essential part of the star mass. The collapse stops when the star remnant is no longer able to support the self-similar infall feeding the collisions. We shortly discuss possible astrophysical and cosmological implications of these phenomena.

  7. The Theory of Dense Core Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun

    2014-07-01

    I will review the theory of dense core collapse, with an emphasis on disk formation. Disk formation, once thought to be a simple consequence of the conservation of angular momentum during hydrodynamic core collapse, is far more subtle in magnetized gas. In this case, rotation can be strongly magnetically braked. Indeed, both analytic arguments and numerical simulations have shown that disk formation is suppressed in ideal MHD at the observed level of core magnetization. I will discuss the physical reason for this so-called “magnetic braking catastrophe,” and review possible resolutions to the problem that have been proposed so far, including non-ideal MHD effects, misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis, and turbulence. Other aspects of core collapse, such as fragmentation and outflow generation, will also be discussed.

  8. Collapse of composite tubes under end moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.; Cooper, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    Cylindrical tubes of moderate wall thickness such as those proposed for the original space station truss, may fail due to the gradual collapse of the tube cross section as it distorts under load. Sometimes referred to as the Brazier instability, it is a nonlinear phenomenon. This paper presents an extension of an approximate closed form solution of the collapse of isotropic tubes subject to end moments developed by Reissner in 1959 to include specially orthotropic material. The closed form solution was verified by an extensive nonlinear finite element analysis of the collapse of long tubes under applied end moments for radius to thickness ratios and composite layups in the range proposed for recent space station truss framework designs. The finite element analysis validated the assumption of inextensional deformation of the cylindrical cross section and the approximation of the material as specially orthotropic.

  9. The sudden collapse of pollinator communities.

    PubMed

    Lever, J Jelle; van Nes, Egbert H; Scheffer, Marten; Bascompte, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Declines in pollinator populations may harm biodiversity and agricultural productivity. Little attention has, however, been paid to the systemic response of mutualistic communities to global environmental change. Using a modelling approach and merging network theory with theory on critical transitions, we show that the scale and nature of critical transitions is likely to be influenced by the architecture of mutualistic networks. Specifically, we show that pollinator populations may collapse suddenly once drivers of pollinator decline reach a critical point. A high connectance and/or nestedness of the mutualistic network increases the capacity of pollinator populations to persist under harsh conditions. However, once a tipping point is reached, pollinator populations collapse simultaneously. Recovering from this single community-wide collapse requires a relatively large improvement of conditions. These findings may have large implications for our view on the sustainability of pollinator communities and the services they provide. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  10. Unfolding Dynamics of Single Collapsed DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Y.; Wada, H.; Ishida, R.; Sano, M.

    We observed elastic responses of single DNA molecules and visualized them during the collapsing transition induced by trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD). The force-extension curves show worm-like behavior, force plateau, and stick-release responses depending on SPD concentration. The periodic stick-release responses may reflect the unraveling of toroidal condensates. At much higher SPD concentration, we observed re-elongation of a single collapsed DNA. For the visualization, a fluorescent dye, YOYO, was used. We observed bright spots in the fluorescence intensity profile of a collapsed DNA during stretching, which may correspond to the collapsed parts within the single DNA. The decrease of the intensity of the spots in stretching implies the mechanical unfolding of collapsed parts. Towards achieving a microscopic understanding of these experimental results, we also investigate the elastic properties of a highly charged polyelectrolyte (PE) chain by Brownian dynamics simulation method. In our dynamic simulation, a PE has a small intrinsic stiffness (i.e., the PE is semiflexible) to model the stiffness of DNA chain, and added multivalent counterions are explicitly taken into account. As the electrostatic coupling parameter (proportional to counterion valency) is increased, counterion condensation is observed, leading finally to the PE collapse through the discontinuous transition for a sufficiently large coupling parameter. Mechanical unfolding of a PE globule reveals its molecular elasticities including force plateau, in agreement with the experimental observations. A numerically deduced electrostatic condensation energy is compared to the experimental value. Charge ordering in the PE-counterion complex and its deformation by the external forcing are elucidated in conjunction with the PE elastic responses. Other dynamic effects such as the effect of a pulling speed are also discussed.

  11. Numerical calculations of protostellar hydrodynamic collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, P.; Black, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Although 1-D (spherically symmetric) experiments of protostar collapse are highly idealized, they are the only ones which have been carried to a stage where a 'stellar' object is formed. Experiments have shown that the parameters (e.g., radius and luminosity) of the visible stellar core are sensitive to the assumed initial conditions, particularly the initial density. One of the major findings of 2-D numerical experiments is the formation of rings. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical calculations indicate that a collapsing cloud will break up into two or more orbiting subcondensations with the possible subsequent development of a stellar multiple system.

  12. Glacier surge after ice shelf collapse.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Hernán; Skvarca, Pedro

    2003-03-07

    The possibility that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet will collapse as a consequence of ice shelf disintegration has been debated for many years. This matter is of concern because such an event would imply a sudden increase in sea level. Evidence is presented here showing drastic dynamic perturbations on former tributary glaciers that fed sections of the Larsen Ice Shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula before its collapse in 1995. Satellite images and airborne surveys allowed unambiguous identification of active surging phases of Boydell, Sjögren, Edgeworth, Bombardier, and Drygalski glaciers. This discovery calls for a reconsideration of former hypotheses about the stabilizing role of ice shelves.

  13. Collapse of composite tubes under end moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.; Cooper, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    The Reissner (1959) approximate closed-form solution of the collapse of isotropic tubes subject to end moments is presently extended to encompass specially orthotropic material. This closed-form solution is verified via extensive nonlinear FEM analysis of the collapse of long tubes under applied end-moments; the radius/thickness value and composite layup ranges are representative of space-station truss framework designs. The FEM analysis validates the assumption of an inextensional deformation of the cylindrical cross-section, as well as the approximation of the material as specially orthotropic.

  14. Magnetic Susceptibility of Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Tsuneya

    2017-02-01

    The orbital magnetic susceptibility is calculated in collapsed carbon nanotubes within an effective-mass scheme for two magnetic-field configurations, perpendicular and parallel to the flattened plane. The response is diamagnetic in both directions and is much larger for the perpendicular configuration, with some rare exceptions. In chiral nanotubes, calculated results show small and almost negligible effects of collapsing except for some modification due to change in the effective magnetic field. In nonchiral zigzag and armchair nanotubes, the susceptibility is strongly modified, depending on relative displacement of two layers in the flattened region.

  15. Minimizing Classroom Interruptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partin, Ronald L.

    1987-01-01

    Offers suggestions for minimizing classroom interruptions, such as suggesting to the principal that announcements not be read over the intercom during class time and arranging desks and chairs so as to minimize visual distractions. Contains a school interruption survey form. (JC)

  16. LISA pathfinder appreciably constrains collapse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, Bassam; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; McClelland, David E.; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous collapse models are phenomological theories formulated to address major difficulties in macroscopic quantum mechanics. We place significant bounds on the parameters of the leading collapse models, the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model, and the Diosi-Penrose (DP) model, by using LISA Pathfinder's measurement, at a record accuracy, of the relative acceleration noise between two free-falling macroscopic test masses. In particular, we bound the CSL collapse rate to be at most (2.96 ±0.12 ) ×10-8 s-1 . This competitive bound explores a new frequency regime, 0.7 to 20 mHz, and overlaps with the lower bound 10-8 ±2 s-1 proposed by Adler in order for the CSL collapse noise to be substantial enough to explain the phenomenology of quantum measurement. Moreover, we bound the regularization cutoff scale used in the DP model to prevent divergences to be at least 40.1 ±0.5 fm , which is larger than the size of any nucleus. Thus, we rule out the DP model if the cutoff is the size of a fundamental particle.

  17. Some analytical models of radiating collapsing spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A; Ospino, J.

    2006-08-15

    We present some analytical solutions to the Einstein equations, describing radiating collapsing spheres in the diffusion approximation. Solutions allow for modeling physical reasonable situations. The temperature is calculated for each solution, using a hyperbolic transport equation, which permits to exhibit the influence of relaxational effects on the dynamics of the system.

  18. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized symptoms of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new o...

  19. Geophysical mapping of solution and collapse sinkholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg

    2014-12-01

    Karst rocks such as limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, gypsum, or salt can be dissolved physically by water or chemically by water enriched with carbon dioxide. The dissolution is driven by water flowing through the karst aquifer and either occurs along fractures and bedding partings in telogenetic rocks, or within the primary interconnected pore space in eogenetic rocks. The enlargement of either fractures or pores by dissolution creates a large secondary porosity typical of soluble rocks, which is often very heterogenously distributed and results in preferential flow paths in the sub-surface, with cavities as large-scale end members of the sub-surface voids. Once the sub-surface voids enlarged by dissolution grow to a certain size, the overburden rock can become unstable and voids and caves can collapse. Depending on the type of overburden, the collapse initiated at depth may propagate towards the surface and finally results at the surface as collapse sinkholes and tiangkengs on the very large scale. We present results from geophysical surveys over existing karst structures based on gravimetric, electrical, and geomagnetical methods. We have chosen two types of sinkholes, solution and collapse sinkholes, to capture and compare the geophysical signals resulting from these karst structures. We compare and discuss our geophysical survey results with simplified theoretical models describing the evolution of the karst structure, and we derive three-dimensional structural models of the current situation for the different locations with our numerical tool PREDICTOR.

  20. Graphene wrinkling: formation, evolution and collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changguo; Liu, Yuanpeng; Lan, Lan; Tan, Huifeng

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we focus on the studies of graphene wrinkling, from its formation to collapse, and its dependence on aspect ratio and temperature using molecule dynamics simulation. Based on our results, the first wrinkle is not formed on the edge but in the interior of graphene. The fluctuations of edge slack warps drive the wrinkling evolution in graphene which is distinguished from the bifurcation in continuum film. There are several obvious stages in wrinkling progress, including incubation, infancy, youth, maturity and gerontism periods which are identified by the atomic displacement difference due to the occurrences of new wrinkles. The wrinkling progress is over when the C-C bonds in highly stretched corners are broken which contributes to the wrinkling collapse. The critical wrinkling strain, the wrinkling pattern and extent depend on the aspect ratio of graphene, the wrinkling level and collapsed strains do not. Only the collapsed strain is sensitive to the temperature, the other wrinkling parameters are independent of the temperature. Our results would benefit the understanding of the physics of graphene wrinkling and the design of nanomechanical devices by tuning the wrinkles.

  1. Colony Collapse Disorder: A descriptive studey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We ...

  2. Drops: The collapse of capillary jets

    PubMed Central

    Cordoba, Antonio; Cordoba, Diego; Fefferman, Charles; Fontelos, Marco A.

    2002-01-01

    The appearance of fluid filaments during the evolution of a viscous fluid jet is a commonly observed phenomenon. It is shown here that the break-up of such a jet subject to capillary forces is impossible through the collapse of a uniform filament. PMID:12172005

  3. Collapse of defect cascades to dislocation loops

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.A.; Robertson, I.M.; Jenkins, M.L.; English, C.A.; Black, T.J.; Vetrano, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    We review a number of experiments that we have recently performed to investigate the collapse of defect cascades to dislocation loops. This important ion and neutron irradiation phenomenon has been studied with in situ ion bombardment in the Argonne National Laboratory High Voltage Electron Microscope-Ion Accelerator Facility at temperatures of 30 and 300/sup 0/K in Cu/sub 3/Au, Cu, and Fe, and 30, 300 and 600/sup 0/K in Ni. These experiments have demonstrated that individual defect cascades collapse to dislocation loops athermally at 30/sup 0/K in some materials (Ni, Cu and Cu/sub 3/Au), while in another material (Fe) only overlapped cascades produced dislocation loops. A slight sensitivity to the irradiation temperature is demonstrated in Cu/sub 3/Au and Fe, and a strong dependence on the irradiation temperature is seen in Ni. This phenomenon of cascade collapse to dislocation loops in metals at 30/sup 0/K provides an understanding for previous neutron irradiation data. The more detailed dependencies of the collapse probability on material, temperature, bombarding ion dose, ion energy and ion mass contribute much information to a thermal spike model of the collision cascade which we will describe.

  4. Advanced collapsible tank for liquid containment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Tanks for bulk liquid containment will be required to support advanced planetary exploration programs. Potential applications include storage of potable, process, and waste water, and fuels and process chemicals. The launch mass and volume penalties inherent in rigid tanks suggest that collapsible tanks may be more efficient. Collapsible tanks are made of lightweight flexible material and can be folded compactly for storage and transport. Although collapsible tanks for terrestrial use are widely available, a new design was developed that has significantly less mass and bulk than existing models. Modelled after the shape of a sessible drop, this design features a dual membrane with a nearly uniform stress distribution and a low surface-to-volume ratio. It can be adapted to store a variety of liquids in nearly any environment with constant acceleration field. Three models of 10L, 50L, and 378L capacity have been constructed and tested. The 378L (100 gallon) model weighed less than 10 percent of a commercially available collapsible tank of equivalent capacity, and required less than 20 percent of the storage space when folded for transport.

  5. Sudden collapse of a colloidal gel.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Paul; Teece, Lisa J; Faers, Malcolm A

    2012-02-01

    Metastable gels formed by weakly attractive colloidal particles display a distinctive two-stage time-dependent settling behavior under their own weight. Initially, a space-spanning network is formed that, for a characteristic time, which we define as the lag time τ(d), resists compaction. This solidlike behavior persists only for a limited time. Gels whose age t(w) is greater than τ(d) yield and suddenly collapse. We use a combination of confocal microscopy, rheology, and time-lapse video imaging to investigate both the process of sudden collapse and its microscopic origin in a refractive-index matched emulsion-polymer system. We show that the height h of the gel in the early stages of collapse is well described by the surprisingly simple expression, h(τ)=h(0)-Aτ(3/2), with h(0) the initial height and τ=t(w)-τ(d) the time counted from the instant where the gel first yields. We propose that this unexpected result arises because the colloidal network progressively builds up internal stress as a consequence of localized rearrangement events, which leads ultimately to collapse as thermal equilibrium is reestablished.

  6. Properties of neutron star critical collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Mew-Bing

    Critical phenomena in gravitational collapse opened a new mathematical vista into the theory of general relativity and may ultimately entail fundamental physical implication in the astrophysical realm, especially in gravitational collapse scenarios. However, at present, the dynamics of critical phenomena in realistic astrophysical gravitational collapse scenarios are still largely unknown. My thesis seeks to understand the properties of the neutron star critical solution, understand the properties of the threshold in the solution space of the Einstein field equations between the black hole and a neutron star phases, and clarify the implication these results on realistic astrophysical scenarios. We develop a new set of neutron star-like initial data to establish the universality of the neutron star critical solution and analyze the structure of neutron star and neutron star-like critical collapses via the framework of phase spaces. We also study the different time scales involved in the neutron star critical solution and analyze the properties of the critical index via comparisons between neutron star and neutron star-like initial data. Finally, we explore the boundary of the attraction basin of the neutron star critical solution and its transition to a known set of non-critical fixed points.

  7. Spherical gravitational collapse in N dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Rituparno; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2007-10-15

    We investigate here spherically symmetric gravitational collapse in a space-time with an arbitrary number of dimensions and with a general type I matter field, which is a broad class that includes most of the physically reasonable matter forms. We show that given the initial data for matter in terms of the initial density and pressure profiles at an initial surface t=t{sub i} from which the collapse evolves, there exist the rest of the initial data functions and classes of solutions of Einstein equations which we construct here, such that the space-time evolution goes to a final state which is either a black hole or a naked singularity, depending on the nature of initial data and evolutions chosen, and subject to validity of the weak energy condition. The results are discussed and analyzed in the light of the cosmic censorship hypothesis in black hole physics. The formalism here combines the earlier results on gravitational collapse in four dimensions in a unified treatment. Also the earlier work is generalized to higher-dimensional space-times to allow a study of the effect of the number of dimensions on the possible final outcome of the collapse in terms of either a black hole or naked singularity. No restriction is adopted on the number of dimensions, and other limiting assumptions such as self-similarity of space-time are avoided, in order to keep the treatment general. Our methodology allows us to consider to an extent the genericity and stability aspects related to the occurrence of naked singularities in gravitational collapse.

  8. Minimal Orderings Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.W.

    1999-07-01

    When minimum orderings proved too difficult to deal with, Rose, Tarjan, and Leuker instead studied minimal orderings and how to compute them (Algorithmic aspects of vertex elimination on graphs, SIAM J. Comput., 5:266-283, 1976). This paper introduces an algorithm that is capable of computing much better minimal orderings much more efficiently than the algorithm in Rose et al. The new insight is a way to use certain structures and concepts from modern sparse Cholesky solvers to re-express one of the basic results in Rose et al. The new algorithm begins with any initial ordering and then refines it until a minimal ordering is obtained. it is simple to obtain high-quality low-cost minimal orderings by using fill-reducing heuristic orderings as initial orderings for the algorithm. We examine several such initial orderings in some detail.

  9. Minimally invasive stomas.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Michael D; Al Haddad, Abdullah

    2008-02-01

    Traditionally, stoma creation and end stoma reversal have been performed via a laparotomy incision. However, in many situations, stoma construction may be safely performed in a minimally invasive nature. This may include a trephine, laparoscopic, or combined approach. Furthermore, Hartmann's colostomy reversal, a procedure traditionally associated with substantial morbidity, may also be performed laparoscopically. The authors briefly review patient selection, preparation, and indications, and focus primarily on surgical techniques and results of minimally invasive stoma creation and Hartmann's reversal.

  10. Minimally invasive lumbar foraminotomy.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel

    2013-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is a common problem. Nerve root compression can occur at different places along a nerve root's course including in the foramina. Minimal invasive approaches allow easier exposure of the lateral foramina and decompression of the nerve root in the foramina. This video demonstrates a minimally invasive approach to decompress the lumbar nerve root in the foramina with a lateral to medial decompression. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/jqa61HSpzIA.

  11. Formation of planetesimals in collapsing pebble clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlberg Jansson, K.; Johansen, A.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids and Kuiper belt objects are remnant planetesimals from the epoch of planet formation. Their physical properties hold important clues to understanding how minor bodies formed in the Solar Nebula. The first stage of the planet formation process is the accumulation of dust and ice grains into mm-cm-sized pebbles. Due to the interaction with the gas in the protoplanetary disk, these pebbles can clump together through the streaming instability and form gravitationally bound particle pebble 'clouds'. Pebbles in the cloud collide with each other, dissipating energy into heat. As the cloud loses energy, it contracts, and one would expect the particles to move faster and faster due to the negative heat capacity nature of self-gravitating systems. However, for high-mass clouds, the collapse is limited by free-fall and the cloud does not have time to virialize. This in turn leads to lower collision speeds but thanks to increased density also to increased collision rates and a runaway collapse. We investigate three important properties of the collapse: (i) the time-scale to collapse to solid density, (ii) the temporal evolution of the size spectrum of the pebbles, and (iii) the multiplicity of the resulting planetesimals. We find that planetesimals larger than 100 km in radius collapse on the free-fall time-scale of about 25 years. Lower-mass clouds have longer pebble collision time-scales and hence collapse much more slowly, with collapse times of a few hundred years for 10-km-scale planetesimals and a few thousand years for 1-km-scale planetesimals. The mass of the pebble cloud also determines the structure of the resulting planetesimal. The collision speed among the pebbles in low- mass clouds is below the threshold for fragmentation, forming pebble- pile planetesimals consisting of the primordial pebbles from the nebula. Planetesimals above 100 km in radius, on the other hand, consist of mixtures of dust (pebble fragments) and pebbles which have undergone

  12. Optimal design against collapse after buckling. [of beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masur, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    After buckling, statically indeterminate trusses, beams, and other strictly symmetric structures may collapse under loads which reach limiting magnitudes. Optimal design is discussed for prescribed values of these collapse loads.

  13. Dynamic control of collapse in a vortex Airy beam.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chew, Khian-Hooi; He, Sailing

    2013-01-01

    Here we study systematically the self-focusing dynamics and collapse of vortex Airy optical beams in a Kerr medium. The collapse is suppressed compared to a non-vortex Airy beam in a Kerr medium due to the existence of vortex fields. The locations of collapse depend sensitively on the initial power, vortex order, and modulation parameters. The collapse may occur in a position where the initial field is nearly zero, while no collapse appears in the region where the initial field is mainly distributed. Compared with a non-vortex Airy beam, the collapse of a vortex Airy beam can occur at a position away from the area of the initial field distribution. Our study shows the possibility of controlling and manipulating the collapse, especially the precise position of collapse, by purposely choosing appropriate initial power, vortex order or modulation parameters of a vortex Airy beam.

  14. Dynamic Control of Collapse in a Vortex Airy Beam

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chew, Khian-Hooi; He, Sailing

    2013-01-01

    Here we study systematically the self-focusing dynamics and collapse of vortex Airy optical beams in a Kerr medium. The collapse is suppressed compared to a non-vortex Airy beam in a Kerr medium due to the existence of vortex fields. The locations of collapse depend sensitively on the initial power, vortex order, and modulation parameters. The collapse may occur in a position where the initial field is nearly zero, while no collapse appears in the region where the initial field is mainly distributed. Compared with a non-vortex Airy beam, the collapse of a vortex Airy beam can occur at a position away from the area of the initial field distribution. Our study shows the possibility of controlling and manipulating the collapse, especially the precise position of collapse, by purposely choosing appropriate initial power, vortex order or modulation parameters of a vortex Airy beam. PMID:23518858

  15. Collapse of Corroded Pipelines under Combined Tension and External Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Yan, Sunting; Jin, Zhijiang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, collapse of corroded pipeline under combined external pressure and tension is investigated through numerical method. Axially uniform corrosion with symmetric imperfections is firstly considered. After verifying with existing experimental results, the finite element model is used to study the effect of tension on collapse pressure. An extensive parametric study is carried out using Python script and FORTRAN subroutine to investigate the influence of geometric parameters on the collapse behavior under combined loads. The results are used to develop an empirical equation for estimating the collapse pressure under tension. In addition, the effects of loading path, initial imperfection length, yielding anisotropy and corrosion defect length on the collapse behavior are also investigated. It is found that tension has a significant influence on collapse pressure of corroded pipelines. Loading path and anisotropic yielding are also important factors affecting the collapse behavior. For pipelines with relatively long corrosion defect, axially uniform corrosion models could be used to estimate the collapse pressure. PMID:27111544

  16. Consequences of nuclear electron capture in core collapse supernovae.

    PubMed

    Hix, W R; Messer, O E B; Mezzacappa, A; Liebendörfer, M; Sampaio, J; Langanke, K; Dean, D J; Martínez-Pinedo, G

    2003-11-14

    The most important weak nuclear interaction to the dynamics of stellar core collapse is electron capture, primarily on nuclei with masses larger than 60. In prior simulations of core collapse, electron capture on these nuclei has been treated in a highly parametrized fashion, if not ignored. With realistic treatment of electron capture on heavy nuclei come significant changes in the hydrodynamics of core collapse and bounce. We discuss these as well as the ramifications for the postbounce evolution in core collapse supernovae.

  17. Why do naked singularities form in gravitational collapse? II

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Goswami, Rituparno; Dadhich, Naresh

    2004-10-15

    We examine physical features that could lead to formation of a naked singularity rather than black hole, as end state of spherical collapse. Generalizing earlier results on dust collapse to general type I matter fields, it is shown that collapse always creates black hole if shear vanishes or density is homogeneous. It follows that nonzero shear is a necessary condition for singularity to be visible to external observers, when trapped surface formation is delayed by shearing forces or inhomogeneity within the collapsing cloud.

  18. Lessons Learned from the University of Virginia's Balcony Collapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillman, Robert P.; Klingel, Jay W.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the 1997 collapse of a balcony on a historic building at the University of Virginia, which resulted in a death and several injuries. Explores the balcony structure and cause of the collapse, any possibly preventative measures, and the resolution of legal proceedings resulting from the collapse. (EV)

  19. 26 CFR 1.341-1 - Collapsible corporations; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collapsible corporations; in general. 1.341-1... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Collapsible Corporations; Foreign Personal Holding Companies § 1.341-1 Collapsible corporations; in general. Subject to the limitations contained in § 1.341-4 and the...

  20. Collapse of 9 solar mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, E.; Cooperstein, J.; Kahana, S.

    1987-01-01

    General relativistic hydrodynamical calculations of the collapse of O + Ne + Mg cores of a 9 solar mass star are reported. Collapse is induced by rapid electron captures as the O + Ne + Mg is burned to nuclear statistical equilibrium. The high entropy in the core after burning leads to a large abundance of free protons which readily capture electrons. This leads to large neutrino losses and a correspondingly small infalling homologous core. The hydrodynamic shock thus forms at a small mass point. The shock stalls before reaching the edge of the O + Ne + Mg core and thereby fails to produce a successful supernova explosion by the direct mechanism. No enhancement in the shock energy due to nuclear burning is found.

  1. J protein mutations and resulting proteostasis collapse

    PubMed Central

    Koutras, Carolina; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a century of intensive investigation the effective treatment of protein aggregation diseases remains elusive. Ordinarily, molecular chaperones ensure that proteins maintain their functional conformation. The appearance of misfolded proteins that aggregate implies the collapse of the cellular chaperone quality control network. That said, the cellular chaperone network is extensive and functional information regarding the detailed action of specific chaperones is not yet available. J proteins (DnaJ/Hsp40) are a family of chaperone cofactors that harness Hsc70 (heat shock cognate protein of 70 kDa) for diverse conformational cellular tasks and, as such, represent novel clinically relevant targets for diseases resulting from the disruption of proteostasis. Here we review incisive reports identifying mutations in individual J protein chaperones and the proteostasis collapse that ensues. PMID:25071450

  2. Collapsible four wheel electric powered vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Enix, C.

    1980-06-24

    A collapsible four wheel vehicle is disclosed that is powered by an electrical source , including a storage battery, an electric motor, rear wheels driven by the electric motor, a pair of front wheels having a diameter nearly as great as the diameter of the rear wheels, a resistance bank connected between said battery and said electric motor, a switch means to control the operation of said electric motor, a steering mechanism to steer the front wheels, passenger seat, and a chassis frame on which all of said component parts are mounted and which frame is collapsible in the sense that it may be disassembled easily and quickly into two main sections each of which are foldable into a flat compact unit.

  3. Gravitational collapse in generalized teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeem-ul-Haq Bhatti, M.; Yousaf, Z.; Hanif, Sonia

    2017-05-01

    The idea of this work is to exhibit the unstable regions of a self-gravitating celestial object which collapses adiabatically with a non-vanishing expansion scalar. We adopted the generalized teleparallel gravity for a plane-symmetric self-gravitating object and matter distribution as dissipative and anisotropic. We analyzed the instability regions of the stellar model by considering a particular model, i.e., β T + γ Tn. We established the basic dynamical equations together with junction conditions and equation of state proposed by Harrison et al. The linear perturbation strategy is applied to the metric, matter and f ( T) function up to first order. The equations of motion are developed under this perturbative framework to construct collapse equation. We demonstrate the unstable phases at weak field limit and post-Newtonian epochs and deduce a vital role of adiabatic index to explain the stability/instability issues for planar model in f ( T) gravity.

  4. Improving and Facilitating Research on Collapse Calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo; Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Joan; Acocella, Valerio

    2011-02-01

    Roughly circular depressions known as calderas are distinctive features in volcanic areas (see Figure 1). Current views explain a caldera as the surface expression of a magma chamber's collapsed roof after magma drains elsewhere. Although not all calderas are associated with explosive activity, most major eruptions (i.e., those with a volcanic explosivity index of 5 or higher) develop such collapse calderas. Calderas are usually associated with magmatic systems that have endured for thousands of years at least. These systems undergo periods of unrest highlighted by ground displacement, seismicity, and gas emissions. As a consequence, calderas are some of the most studied volcanic features, particularly for their possible implications for hazard assessment and mitigation. In addition, calderas can be associated with geothermal and ore resources and can affect climate through the products they emit.

  5. Pulse Emission from Relativistic Collapsing Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, V.

    2005-03-15

    We discuss observable form of the radiation emitted from a surface of a collapsing object using a simplified model in which a radiation of massless particles has a sharp in time profile and it happens at the surface at the same moment of comoving time. Its redshift and bending angle are affected by the strong gravitational field. We obtain a simple expression for the observed flux of the radiation as a function of time. To find an explicit expression for the flux we develop an analytical approximation for the bending angle and time delay for null rays emitted by a collapsing surface at R > 2R{sub g}. We obtain an approximate analytical expression for the observed flux and study its properties.

  6. Expanding and collapsing scalar field thin shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Abbas, G.

    2012-09-01

    This paper deals with the dynamics of scalar field thin shell in the Reissner-Nordstr öm geometry. The Israel junction conditions between Reissner-Nordstr öm spacetimes are derived, which lead to the equation of motion of scalar field shell and Klien-Gordon equation. These equations are solved numerically by taking scalar field model with the quadratic scalar potential. It is found that solution represents the expanding and collapsing scalar field shell. For the better understanding of this problem, we investigate the case of massless scalar field (by taking the scalar field potential zero). Also, we evaluate the scalar field potential when p is an explicit function of R. We conclude that both massless as well as massive scalar field shell can expand to infinity at constant rate or collapse to zero size forming a curvature singularity or bounce under suitable conditions.

  7. Energy balance in the WTC collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kaiqi; Xu, Kang; Ansourian, Peter; Tahmasebinia, Faham; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The main aim of this report is to provide an analysis of Twin Towers of the New York City's World Trade Centre collapsed after attacked by two jet aircrafts. The approach mainly focused on the effect of temperature on mechanical properties of the building, by modelling heat energy in the south tower. Energy balance during the collapse between the energy inputs by aircraft petrol and the transient heat to the towers was conducted. Both the overall structure between 80 to 83 stories and individual elements was modelled. The main elements contributed to the heat transition includes external and internal columns. Heat applied in 2D and 3D models for single elements was through convection and conduction. Analysis of transient heat was done using Strand7.

  8. Collapse and revival in holographic quenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Emilia; Lopez, Esperanza; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We study holographic models related to global quantum quenches in finite size systems. The holographic set up describes naturally a CFT, which we consider on a circle and a sphere. The enhanced symmetry of the conformal group on the circle motivates us to compare the evolution in both cases. Depending on the initial conditions, the dual geometry exhibits oscillations that we holographically interpret as revivals of the initial field theory state. On the sphere, this only happens when the energy density created by the quench is small compared to the system size. However on the circle considerably larger energy densities are compatible with revivals. Two different timescales emerge in this latter case. A collapse time, when the system appears to have dephased, and the revival time, when after rephasing the initial state is partially recovered. The ratio of these two times depends upon the initial conditions in a similar way to what is observed in some experimental setups exhibiting collapse and revivals.

  9. Wavefunction Collapse via a Nonlocal Relativistic Variational Principle

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Alan K.

    2012-06-18

    Since the origin of quantum theory in the 1920's, some of its practitioners (and founders) have been troubled by some of its features, including indeterminacy, nonlocality and entanglement. The 'collapse' process described in the Copenhagen Interpretation is suspect for several reasons, and the act of 'measurement,' which is supposed to delimit its regime of validity, has never been unambiguously defined. In recent decades, nonlocality and entanglement have been studied energetically, both theoretically and experimentally, and the theory has been reinterpreted in imaginative ways, but many mysteries remain. We propose that it is necessary to replace the theory by one that is explicitly nonlinear and nonlocal, and does not distinguish between measurement and non-measurement regimes. We have constructed such a theory, for which the phase of the wavefunction plays the role of a hidden variable via the process of zitterbewegung. To capture this effect, the theory must be relativistic, even when describing nonrelativistic phenomena. It is formulated as a variational principle, in which Nature attempts to minimize the sum of two spacetime integrals. The first integral tends to drive the solution toward a solution of the standard quantum mechanical wave equation, and also enforces the Born rule of outcome probabilities. The second integral drives the collapse process. We demonstrate that the new theory correctly predicts the possible outcomes of the electron two-slit experiment, including the infamous 'delayed-choice' variant. We observe that it appears to resolve some long-standing mysteries, but introduces new ones, including possible retrocausality (a cause later than its effect). It is not clear whether the new theory is deterministic.

  10. Neutrinos from Pre-Collapse Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misch, G. Wendell; Fuller, George M.

    We show that in order to make realistic predictions of the nuclear neutrino spectra from pre-collapse stellar cores, one must properly account for nuclear structure effects; often, the dominant nuclear transitions involve excited states, sometimes in both parent and daughter nuclei. We show that the standard technique of producing a neutrino energy spectrum by using a single effective transition structured to fit published neutrino production rates and energy losses will not accurately capture important spectral features.

  11. Collapsing glomerulopathy associated with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasaprasad, N D; Chandramohan, G; Praveen, V; Fernando, M E

    2016-09-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) usually presents with reduced glomerular filtration rate, heavy proteinuria and has unfavorable prognosis. Numerous associations with CG are found. We encountered a case of CG associated with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with proteinuria and dialysis-requiring severe renal failure. Our patient made partial recovery of his renal function and became dialysis-independent after antituberculous therapy and oral steroids. Long-term follow-up is needed to assess the progression of the disease.

  12. Collapsible sheath fluid reservoirs for flow cytometers

    DOEpatents

    Mark, Graham A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a container in the form of a single housing for holding fluid, including a first collapsible reservoir having a first valve. The first reservoir initially contains a volume of fluid. The container also includes a second reservoir, initially empty (or substantially empty), expandable to a second volume. The second reservoir has a second valve. As the volume of said first reservoir decreases, the volume of the second reservoir proportionally increases.

  13. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-01

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  14. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-15

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  15. Minimally invasive procedures

    PubMed Central

    Baltayiannis, Nikolaos; Michail, Chandrinos; Lazaridis, George; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive procedures, which include laparoscopic surgery, use state-of-the-art technology to reduce the damage to human tissue when performing surgery. Minimally invasive procedures require small “ports” from which the surgeon inserts thin tubes called trocars. Carbon dioxide gas may be used to inflate the area, creating a space between the internal organs and the skin. Then a miniature camera (usually a laparoscope or endoscope) is placed through one of the trocars so the surgical team can view the procedure as a magnified image on video monitors in the operating room. Specialized equipment is inserted through the trocars based on the type of surgery. There are some advanced minimally invasive surgical procedures that can be performed almost exclusively through a single point of entry—meaning only one small incision, like the “uniport” video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Not only do these procedures usually provide equivalent outcomes to traditional “open” surgery (which sometimes require a large incision), but minimally invasive procedures (using small incisions) may offer significant benefits as well: (I) faster recovery; (II) the patient remains for less days hospitalized; (III) less scarring and (IV) less pain. In our current mini review we will present the minimally invasive procedures for thoracic surgery. PMID:25861610

  16. Formation of satellites from cold collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhaiem, David; Sylos Labini, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    We study the collapse of an isolated, initially cold, irregular (but almost spherical) and slightly inhomogeneous cloud of self-gravitating particles.The cloud is driven towards a virialized quasi-equilibrium state by a fast relaxation mechanism, occurring in a typical time τc, whose signature is a large change in the particle energy distribution. Post-collapse particles are divided into two main species: bound and free, the latter being ejected from the system. Because of the initial system's anisotropy, the time varying gravitational field breaks spherical symmetry so that the ejected mass can carry away angular momentum and the bound system can gain a non-zero angular momentum. In addition, while strongly bound particles form a compact core, weakly bound ones may form, in a time scale of the order of τc, several satellite sub-structures. These satellites have a finite lifetime that can be longer than τc and generally form a flattened distribution. Their origin and their abundance are related to the amplitude and nature ofinitial density fluctuations and to the initial cloud deviations from spherical symmetry, which are both amplified during the collapse phase. Satellites show a time dependent virial ratio that can be different from the equilibrium value b ≈ -1: although they are bound to the main virialized object, they are not necessarily virially relaxed.

  17. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, Stephen; Blondin, John

    2014-04-15

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  18. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Endeve, Eirik; ...

    2014-03-27

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10more » $$^{44}$$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.« less

  19. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark L.; Chertkow, Merek A.; Harris, James A.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.

    2014-03-27

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{44}$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  20. Collapse of tall granular columns in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Krishna; Soga, Kenichi; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2017-06-01

    Avalanches, landslides, and debris flows are geophysical hazards, which involve rapid mass movement of granular solids, water, and air as a multi-phase system. In order to describe the mechanism of immersed granular flows, it is important to consider both the dynamics of the solid phase and the role of the ambient fluid. In the present study, the collapse of a granular column in fluid is studied using 2D LBM - DEM. The flow kinematics are compared with the dry and buoyant granular collapse to understand the influence of hydrodynamic forces and lubrication on the run-out. In the case of tall columns, the amount of material destabilised above the failure plane is larger than that of short columns. Therefore, the surface area of the mobilised mass that interacts with the surrounding fluid in tall columns is significantly higher than the short columns. This increase in the area of soil - fluid interaction results in an increase in the formation of turbulent vortices thereby altering the deposit morphology. It is observed that the vortices result in the formation of heaps that significantly affects the distribution of mass in the flow. In order to understand the behaviour of tall columns, the run-out behaviour of a dense granular column with an initial aspect ratio of 6 is studied. The collapse behaviour is analysed for different slope angles: 0°, 2.5°, 5° and 7.5°.

  1. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  2. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  3. Pattern collapse mitigation strategies for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Dario L.; Bruce, Robert L.; Bucchignano, James J.; Klaus, David P.; Guillorn, Michael A.; Wu, Chunghsi J.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, a comprehensive approach towards assessing pattern collapse challenges and solutions for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUV) resists beyond the 14nm node is undertaken. The fundamental forces that drive pattern deformation are reassessed in order to propose a generalized design criterion for EUV photoresists and aqueous surfactanated rinses. Furthermore, ultimate pattern collapse solutions such as solvent drying utilizing pressurized fluids (supercritical CO2) are exemplified for sub-60nm pitch EUV patterning. In parallel, alternative EUV integration schemes that use a metal-based hardmask (MHM) are studied using a specifically tailored self-assembled monolayer (SAM) to prevent delamination-driven pattern collapse due to resist-hardmask interfacial adhesion failure. Finally, the marginal image transfer of 40nm pitched L/S of ultrathin EUV resist into a SiARC-underlayer stack appears to be gated by the EUV resist resolution limit and the reduced film thickness budget. An alternative method for achieving improved postetch line width roughness (LWR) with an ultrathin MHM-based integration scheme is herein demonstrated.

  4. Stability of Flow Through Collapsible Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadiche, M.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2000-11-01

    The stability of the Hagen--Poiseuille flow of a Newtonian fluid in an incompressible, collapsible, viscoelastic tube is determined using linear stability analysis. The temporal stability of the system subjected to infinitesimal axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric disturbances is considered. A novel numerical strategy is introduced to study the stability of the coupled fluid--structure system. The strategy alleviates the need for an initial guess and thus ensuring that all the unstable modes within a given closed region in the complex eigenvalue plane will be found. The parameters of the system are chosen such that it is stable if the duct is not allowed to collapse, in this way the unstable modes found are expected to be unique to collapsible tubes. Three different unstable modes are found and the present results are in excellent agreement with the experiments of Bertram and Godbole (J. Fluids & Structures 9, pp. 257--277,1995). Two of the unstable modes have approximately the same frequency which is about a third of the frequency of the third mode. Moreover, the high-frequency mode is non-axisymmetric while one of the low-frequency modes is axisymmetric and the other one non-axisymmetric. The variation of all three unstable modes with the pliability of the duct and the other control parameters of the system will be discussed.

  5. Matter and gravitons in the gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Roberto; Giugno, Andrea; Giusti, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    We consider the effects of gravitons in the collapse of baryonic matter that forms a black hole. We first note that the effective number of (soft off-shell) gravitons that account for the (negative) Newtonian potential energy generated by the baryons is conserved and always in agreement with Bekenstein's area law of black holes. Moreover, their (positive) interaction energy reproduces the expected post-Newtonian correction and becomes of the order of the total ADM mass of the system when the size of the collapsing object approaches its gravitational radius. This result supports a scenario in which the gravitational collapse of regular baryonic matter produces a corpuscular black hole without central singularity, in which both gravitons and baryons are marginally bound and form a Bose-Einstein condensate at the critical point. The Hawking emission of baryons and gravitons is then described by the quantum depletion of the condensate and we show the two energy fluxes are comparable, albeit negligibly small on astrophysical scales.

  6. Cooperation, cheating, and collapse in microbial populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    Natural populations can suffer catastrophic collapse in response to small changes in environmental conditions, and recovery after such a collapse can be exceedingly difficult. We have used laboratory yeast populations to study proposed early warning signals of impending extinction. Yeast cooperatively breakdown the sugar sucrose, meaning that there is a minimum number of cells required to sustain the population. We have demonstrated experimentally that the fluctuations in the population size increase in magnitude and become slower as the population approaches collapse. The cooperative nature of yeast growth on sucrose suggests that the population may be susceptible to cheater cells, which do not contribute to the public good and instead merely take advantage of the cooperative cells. We have confirmed this possibility experimentally by using a cheater yeast strain that lacks the gene encoding the cooperative behavior [1]. However, recent results in the lab demonstrate that the presence of a bacterial competitor may drive cooperation within the yeast population.[4pt] [1] Gore et al, Nature 459, 253 -- 256 (2009)

  7. C60 fullerene promotes lung monolayer collapse

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Urbini, Laura; Monticelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Airborne nanometre-sized pollutants are responsible for various respiratory diseases. Such pollutants can reach the gas-exchange surface in the alveoli, which is lined with a monolayer of lung surfactant. The relationship between physiological effects of pollutants and molecular-level interactions is largely unknown. Here, we determine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on the properties of a model of lung monolayer using molecular simulations. We simulate phase-separated lipid monolayers in the presence of a model pollutant nanoparticle, C60 fullerene. In the absence of nanoparticles, the monolayers collapse only at very low surface tensions (around 0 mN m−1). In the presence of nanoparticles, instead, monolayer collapse is observed at significantly higher surface tensions (up to ca 10 mN m−1). Collapse at higher tensions is related to lower mechanical rigidity of the monolayer. It is possible that similar mechanisms operate on lung surfactant in vivo, which suggests that health effects of airborne carbon nanoparticles may be mediated by alterations of the mechanical properties of lung surfactant. PMID:25589571

  8. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, Stephen; Blondin, John

    2014-04-01

    Carrying 1044 joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  9. Properties of Neutron Star Critical Collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Mew-Bing

    2010-01-01

    Critical phenomena in gravitational collapse opened a new mathematical vista into the theory of general relativity and may ultimately entail fundamental physical implication in observations. However, at present, the dynamics of critical phenomena in gravitational collapse scenarios are still largely unknown. My thesis seeks to understand the properties of the threshold in the solution space of the Einstein field equations between the black hole and neutron star phases, understand the properties of the neutron star critical solution and clarify the implication of these results on realistic astrophysical scenarios. We develop a new set of neutron star-like initial data to establish the universality of the neutron star critical solution and analyze the structure of neutron star and neutron star-like critical collapses via the study of the phase spaces. We also study the different time scales involved in the neutron star critical solution and analyze the properties of the critical index via comparisons between neutron star and neutron star-like initial data. Finally, we explore the boundary of the attraction basin of the neutron star critical solution and its transition to a known set of non-critical fixed points.

  10. Gopherus agassizii (desert tortoise). Burrow collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loughran, Caleb L.; Ennen, Joshua; Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    In the deserts of the southwestern U.S., burrows are utilized by the Desert Tortoise to escape environmental extremes (reviewed by Ernst and Lovich 2009. Turtles of the United States and Canada. 2nd ed. Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore, Maryland. 827 pp.). However, the potential for mortality through burrow collapse and entrapment is poorly documented. Nicholson and Humphreys (1981. Proceedings of the Desert Tortoise Council, pp. 163−194) suggested that collapse due to livestock trampling may cause mortality. In addition, Lovich et al. (2011. Chelon. Cons. Biol. 10[1]:124–129) documented a Desert Tortoise that used a steel culvert as a burrow surrogate. The culvert filled completely with sediment following a significant rain event, entombing the animal and ultimately resulting in its death. We note that this mortality was associated with an anthropogenic structure; because tortoises are prodigious diggers, one might hypothesize that they have the ability to dig out of collapsed natural burrows in most situations. Circumstances described here presented us with an opportunity to test this hypothesis.

  11. Minimal gaugino mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmaltz, Martin; Skiba, Witold

    2000-11-01

    We propose minimal gaugino mediation as the simplest known solution to the supersymmetric flavor and CP problems. The framework predicts a very minimal structure for the soft parameters at ultrahigh energies: gaugino masses are unified and non-vanishing whereas all other soft supersymmetry breaking parameters vanish. We show that this boundary condition naturally arises from a small extra dimension and present a complete model which includes a new extra-dimensional solution to the {mu} problem. We briefly discuss the predicted superpartner spectrum as a function of the two parameters of the model. The commonly ignored renormalization group evolution above the GUT scale is crucial to the viability of minimal gaugino mediation but does not introduce new model dependence.

  12. Minimal Gaugino Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmaltz, M.

    2000-01-19

    The authors propose Minimal Gaugino Mediation as the simplest known solution to the supersymmetric flavor and CP problems. The framework predicts a very minimal structure for the soft parameters at ultra-high energies: gaugino masses are unified and non-vanishing whereas all other soft supersymmetry breaking parameters vanish. The authors show that this boundary condition naturally arises from a small extra dimension and present a complete model which includes a new extra-dimensional solution to the mu problem. The authors briefly discuss the predicted superpartner spectrum as a function of the two parameters of the model. The commonly ignored renormalization group evolution above the GUT scale is crucial to the viability of Minimal Gaugino Mediation but does not introduce new model dependence.

  13. Collapse and fragmentation of molecular cloud cores. 2: Collapse induced by stellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1995-01-01

    The standard scenario for low-mass star formation involves 'inside-out' collapse of a dense molecular cloud core following loss of magnetic field support through ambipolar diffusion. However, isotopic anomalies in presolar grains and meteoritical inclusions imply that the collapse of the presolar cloud may have been triggered by a stellar shock wave. This paper explores 'outside-in' collapse, that is, protostellar collapse initiated directly by the compression of quiescent dense cloud cores impacted by relatively slow stellar shock waves. A second-order accurate, gravitational hydrodynamics code has been used to study both the spherically symmetrical and three-dimensional evolution of initially centrally condensed, isothermal, self-gravitating, solar-mass cloud cores that are struck by stellar shock waves with velocities up to 25 km/s and postshock temperatures of 10 to 10,000 K. The models show that such mild shock waves do not completely shred and destroy the cloud, and that the dynamical ram pressure can compress the cloud to the verge of self-gravitational collapse. However, compression caused by a high postshock temperature is a considerably more effective means of inducing collapse. Shock-induced collapse produces high initial mass accretion rates (greater than 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr in a solar-mass cloud) that decline rapidly to much lower values, depending on the presence (approximately 10(exp -6) solar mass/yr) or absence (approximately 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr) of an infinite reservoir of mass. Stellar mass accretion rates approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr have been previously inferred from the luminosities of T Tauri stars; balanced mass accretion (stellar rate = envelope rate) at approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr could then be possible if accretion occurs from a finite mass reservoir. Fluid tracers are used to determine what fraction of the stellar shock material is incorporated into the resulting protostellar object and disk

  14. Observation of Weak Collapse in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigen, Christoph; Gaunt, Alexander L.; Suleymanzade, Aziza; Navon, Nir; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Smith, Robert P.

    2016-10-01

    We study the collapse of an attractive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate prepared in the uniform potential of an optical-box trap. We characterize the critical point for collapse and the collapse dynamics, observing universal behavior in agreement with theoretical expectations. Most importantly, we observe a clear experimental signature of the counterintuitive weak collapse, namely, that making the system more unstable can result in a smaller particle loss. We experimentally determine the scaling laws that govern the weak-collapse atom loss, providing a benchmark for the general theories of nonlinear wave phenomena.

  15. Collapse dynamics of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Daniel Alan

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are micron-sized gas bubbles encapsulated with thin shells on the order of nanometers thick. The damping effects of these viscoelastic coatings are widely known to significantly alter the bubble dynamics for linear and low-amplitude behavior; however, their effects on strongly nonlinear and destruction responses are much less studied. This dissertation examines the behaviors of single collapsing shelled microbubbles using experimental and theoretical methods. The study of their dynamics is particularly relevant for emerging experimental uses of UCAs which seek to leverage localized mechanical forces to create or avoid specialized biomedical effects. The central component in this work is the study of postexcitation rebound and collapse, observed acoustically to identify shell rupture and transient inertial cavitation of single UCA microbubbles. This time-domain analysis of the acoustic response provides a unique method for characterization of UCA destruction dynamics. The research contains a systematic documentation of single bubble postexcitation collapse through experimental measurement with the double passive cavitation detection (PCD) system at frequencies ranging from 0.9 to 7.1 MHz and peak rarefactional pressure amplitudes (PRPA) ranging from 230 kPa to 6.37 MPa. The double PCD setup is shown to improve the quality of collected data over previous setups by allowing symmetric responses from a localized confocal region to be identified. Postexcitation signal percentages are shown to generally follow trends consistent with other similar cavitation metrics such as inertial cavitation, with greater destruction observed at both increased PRPA and lower frequency over the tested ranges. Two different types of commercially available UCAs are characterized and found to have very different collapse thresholds; lipid-shelled Definity exhibits greater postexcitation at lower PRPAs than albumin-shelled Optison. Furthermore, by altering

  16. The Unique Source Mechanism of an Explosively Induced Mine Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoning, Stump, B.W., Phillips, W.S.

    1997-12-31

    Mining explosions and collapses, in addition to earthquakes, may trigger the future Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system. Most naturally occurring mine collapses have source mechanisms similar to a closing void which might provide a physical basis to discriminate them from explosions. In this study, an explosively induced mine collapse is investigated. The collapse occurred immediately after the support pillars of an underground mine opening were destroyed by explosives. We estimated the time-dependent source moment tensor of the collapse by inverting the surface ground motion data ({lt}1200 m). The results indicate that the source mechanism of the collapse can be represented by a horizontal crack. A unique source characteristic of the induced collapse is that, unlike natural collapses, the induced collapse initiated as a tensile crack. Because of the initial expansion source mechanism, induced mine collapses may pose some difficulties to the seismic discrimination problem. On the other hand, the collapse has a more band limited source spectrum than a typical underground explosion.

  17. Periodic minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Alan L.

    1985-04-01

    A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces periodic in three dimensions. These periodic minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of periodic minimal surfaces.

  18. CONMIN- CONSTRAINED FUNCTION MINIMIZATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    In many mathematical problems, it is necessary to determine the minimum and maximum of a function of several variables, limited by various linear and nonlinear inequality constraints. It is seldom possible, in practical applications, to solve these problems directly. In most cases, an iterative method must be used to numerically obtain a solution. The CONMIN program was developed to numerically perform the minimization of a multi-variable function subject to a set of inequality constraints. The function need not be a simple analytical equation; it may be any function which can be numerically evaluated. The basic analytic technique used by CONMIN is to minimize the function until one or more of the constraints become active. The minimization process then continues by following the constraint boundaries in a direction such that the value of the function continues to decrease. When a point is reached where no further decrease in the function can be obtained, the process is terminated. Function maximization may be achieved by minimizing the negative of the function. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 43K (octal) of 60 bit words. The CONMIN program was originally developed in 1973 and last updated in 1978.

  19. Minimally invasive valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y Joseph

    2009-08-01

    Traditional cardiac valve replacement surgery is being rapidly supplanted by innovative, minimally invasive approaches toward the repair of these valves. Patients are experiencing benefits ranging from less bleeding and pain to faster recovery and greater satisfaction. These operations are proving to be safe, highly effective, and durable, and their use will likely continue to increase and become even more widely applicable.

  20. Universality in the collapse of rotating gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Choptuik's discovery of critical phenomena in the collapse of a spherically symmetric massless scalar field has spurred much interest over the years to explore critical collapse in more general settings. By evolving one-parameter families of initial data, it was found that spacetimes near the threshold of collapse or dispersion exhibited type II critical phenomena, with the properties of universality, scaling, and self-similarity. Shortly afterwards, similar results were obtained by Abrahams and Evans (and more recently by Sorkin) for the critical collapse of axisymmetric non-rotating gravitational waves. Despite many investigations into the critical collapse of other spherically symmetric or axisymmetric configurations, there has been relatively little headway on studying the critical collapse of non-axisymmetric configurations, which may carry angular momentum. In this talk, I will report on progress in simulating the critical collapse of non-axisymmetric rotating gravitational waves, which instead exhibit signs of type I critical phenomena, and comment on evidence for universality.

  1. Ancient reef ecosystem expansion and collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copper, P.

    1994-01-01

    Platform carbonate and, particularly, reef ecosystem development (with reefs representing the acme of carbonate platform growth) were highly cyclical in early to mid Paleozoic time, especially in relation to known or postulated times of global warming or cooling. These cycles do not appear to correspond to postulated 26 Ma rhythms seen in diversity patterns, nor were they regular. There were major periods of worldwide reef expansion (e.g. mid-Silurian-Late Devonian), corresponding to global warming well above present day norms, and periods of complete global reef collapse (e.g., mid-Cambrian to mid-Ordovician, Late Devonian) corresponding to global perturbations. At times of major reef expansion in the Paleozoic, areas covered by equatorial reef and inter-reef carbonate platforms are conservatively estimated to have periodically exceeded 5 million sq. km, nearly ten times that in the modern ocean. At times of global reef collapse, e.g. the Famennian (Late Devonian), reef complexes were completely absent or, at best, covered <1000 sq. km. The chief factors relating to periodic collapse and mass extinction of reef biotas appear to be related to climatic change and possibly ocean anoxic events, in turn as a response to large scale, geologically disruptive factors such as plate collisions, plate movement across equatorial belts and volcanism. Stress “signals” in Cambrian through Cretaceous reef ecosystems appear to be comparable to those of today: whether these relate to physical versus biological stress is uncertain. Reef stress is evident in globally reduced areas and thicknesses of reef carbonate production, the absence of large scale barrier reef systems and reduction to smaller patch reef complexes (or, periodically, following mass extinctions, no reefs at all), reduced species and genus diversity, small skeletons or colonies, limited or no biotic zonation along reef transects, and arrested succession and ecologic replacement of complex, more highly evolved

  2. Gravitational collapse of conventional polytropic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yu-Qing; Hu, Xu-Yao

    2017-07-01

    In reference to general polytropic and conventional polytropic hydrodynamic cylinders of infinite length with axial uniformity and axisymmetry under self-gravity, the dynamic evolution of central collapsing mass string in free-fall dynamic accretion phase is re-examined in details. We compare the central mass accretion rate and the envelope mass infall rate at small radii. Among others, we correct mistakes and typos of Kawachi & Hanawa (KH hereafter) and in particular prove that their key asymptotic free-fall solution involving polytropic index γ in the two power exponents is erroneous by analytical analyses and numerical tests. The correct free-fall asymptotic solutions at sufficiently small \\hat{r} (the dimensionless independent self-similar variable) scale as {˜ } -|ln \\hat{r}|^{1/2} in contrast to KH's ˜ -|ln \\hat{r}|^{(2-γ )/2} for the reduced bulk radial flow velocity and as {˜ } \\hat{r}^{-1}|ln \\hat{r}|^{-1/2} in contrast to KH's {˜ } \\hat{r}^{-1} |ln \\hat{r}|^{-(2-γ )/2} for the reduced mass density. We offer consistent scenarios for numerical simulation code testing and theoretical study on dynamic filamentary structure formation and evolution as well as pertinent stability properties. Due to unavoidable Jeans instabilities along the cylinder, such collapsing massive filaments or strings can further break up into clumps and segments of various lengths as well as clumps embedded within segments and evolve into chains of gravitationally collapsed objects (such as gaseous planets, brown dwarfs, protostars, white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes in a wide mass range, globular clusters, dwarf spheroidals, galaxies, galaxy clusters and even larger mass reservoirs etc.) in various astrophysical and cosmological contexts as articulated by Lou & Hu recently. As an example, we present a model scheme for comparing with observations of molecular filaments for forming protostars, brown dwarfs and gaseous planets and so forth.

  3. Pore collapse and hot spots in HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    The computing power now available has led researchers to reconsider mesoscale simulations as a means to develop a detailed understanding of detonation waves in a heterogeneous explosive. Since chemical reaction rates are sensitive to temperature, hot spots are of critical importance for initiation. In a plastic-bonded explosive, shock desensitization experiments imply that hot spots generated by pore collapse dominate shock initiation. Here, for the collapse of a single pore driven by a shock, the dependence of the temperature distribution on numerical resolution and dissipative mechanism i s investigated. An inert material (with the constibtive properties of HMX) is used to better focus on the mechanics of pore collapse. ' h o important findings resulted from this study. Eust, too low a resolution can significantly enhance the hot-spot mass. Second, at even moderate piston velocities (< 1W s),s hock dissipation alone does not generate sufficient hot-spot mass. ' b oo ther dissipative mechanism investigated are plastic work and viscous heating. In the cases studied, the integrated lempera!xre distribution has a power-law tail with exponent related to a parameter with dimensions of viscosity. For a particular case, the parameter of either dissipative mechanism can be fit to obtain quantitatively the hot-spot mass needed for initiation. But the dissipative mechanisms scale differently with shock strength and pore size. Consequently, to predict initiation behavior over a range of stimuli and as the micro-stmcture properties of a PBX am varied, sufficient numerical resolution and the correct physical dissipative mechanism are essential.

  4. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  5. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253, but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  6. (Extreme) Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mösta, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    In this talk I will present recent progress on modeling core-collapse supernovae with massively parallel simulations on the largest supercomputers available. I will discuss the unique challenges in both input physics and computational modeling that come with a problem involving all four fundamental forces and relativistic effects and will highlight recent breakthroughs overcoming these challenges in full 3D simulations. I will pay particular attention to how these simulations can be used to reveal the engines driving some of the most extreme explosions and conclude by discussing what remains to be done in simulation work to maximize what we can learn from current and future time-domain astronomy transient surveys.

  7. Black hole collapse and democratic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Aron; Magán, Javier M.

    2016-11-01

    We study the evolution of black hole entropy and temperature in collapse scenarios in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetime, finding three generic lessons. First, entropy evolution is extensive. Second, at large times, entropy and temperature ring with twice the frequency of the lowest quasinormal mode. Third, the entropy oscillations saturate black hole area theorems in general relativity. The first two features are characteristic of entanglement dynamics in "democratic" models. Solely based on general relativity and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula, our results point to democratic models as microscopic theories of black holes. The third feature can be taken as a prediction for microscopic models of black hole physics.

  8. Core-collapse supernovae and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1994-12-01

    I discuss some of the physics that governs the collapse and explosion of a massive star, including issues such as lepton number losses in the infall stage and neutrino heating and convection following the core bounce. I review recent work on the neutrino process and the r-process, describing how the nucleosynthesis depends on the explosion mechanism. Some of the interesting possibilities for oscillations of closure mass {nu}{sub {tau}}s are discussed, along with their signatures in terrestrial detectors and in nucleosynthesis.

  9. Nuclear Physics in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Fischer, T.; Froelich, C.; Hix, William Raphael; Langanke, Karlheinz; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Scheidegger, Simon; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl W.; Whitehouse, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Core-collapse and the launch of a supernova explosion form a very short episode of few seconds in the evolution of a massive star, during which an enormous gravitational energy of several times 1053 erg is transformed into observable neutrino-, kinetic-, and electromagnetic radiation energy. We emphasize the wide range of matter conditions that prevail in a supernova event and sort the conditions into distinct regimes in the density and entropy phase diagram to briefly discuss their different impact on the neutrino signal, gravitational wave emission, and ejecta.

  10. Collapsing glomerulopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Abadeer, Kerolos; Alsaad, Ali A; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J; Porter, Ivan E

    2017-02-27

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) is a rare disease that can be associated with multiple other disorders. It usually leads to poor prognosis with a high percentage of patients progressing to end-stage renal disease. In this article, we illustrate a clinical case of CG associated with systemic lupus erythematosus that had a prompt response to mycophenolate and prednisone. The condition started after sudden cessation of the already established mycophenolate treatment regimen. The patient then presented with acute kidney injury due to kidney biopsy-proven CG. In that circumstance, we hypothesised that mycophenolate may play a role in prevention and development of CG.

  11. Collapse tests expand coiled tubing uses

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, E.J.; Mason, C.M. )

    1990-03-05

    Tests on coiled tubing have allowed the authors' company to decrease well work costs for some operations, especially squeeze cementing. They conducted collapse tests of 1.5 in. (0.095 in. and 0.109-in. wall thickness) and 1.75-in. (0.109-in. wall thickness) OD coiled tubing while under imposed axial load and differential pressure. These tests were performed to define accurate field operating limits for this size of coiled tubing. Findings from these tests are reported and discussed.

  12. Lift-induced vortex dipole collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, S.; Dixit, Harish N.; Govindarajan, Rama

    2017-03-01

    Two vortices of opposite sign in two dimensions merely move along parallel lines. We show that even a small buoyancy completely changes this dynamics. When the vortices are of different density from their surroundings, buoyancy produces a lateral drift by Kutta lift. This causes the density patches to merge, and the vortex dipole to collapse. This is followed by a rapid upward (for light vortices) ejection and creation of small-scale structures by baroclinic torque. Our simple analytical equation explains the trajectory of the vortices. We show that these events occur in viscous simulations of many buoyant vortices.

  13. Climate and the collapse of Maya civilization.

    PubMed

    Haug, Gerald H; Günther, Detlef; Peterson, Larry C; Sigman, Daniel M; Hughen, Konrad A; Aeschlimann, Beat

    2003-03-14

    In the anoxic Cariaco Basin of the southern Caribbean, the bulk titanium content of undisturbed sediment reflects variations in riverine input and the hydrological cycle over northern tropical South America. A seasonally resolved record of titanium shows that the collapse of Maya civilization in the Terminal Classic Period occurred during an extended regional dry period, punctuated by more intense multiyear droughts centered at approximately 810, 860, and 910 A.D. These new data suggest that a century-scale decline in rainfall put a general strain on resources in the region, which was then exacerbated by abrupt drought events, contributing to the social stresses that led to the Maya demise.

  14. Critical conditions for core-collapse supernovae.

    PubMed

    Keshet, Uri; Balberg, Shmuel

    2012-06-22

    The explosion of a core-collapse supernova can be approximated by the breakdown of steady-state solutions for accretion onto a proto-neutron star (PNS). We analytically show that as the neutrino luminosity exceeds a critical value L(c), the neutrinosphere pressure exceeds the hydrostatic limit even for an optimal shock radius R. This yields L(c) [proportionally] M(2)T(2) (with logarithmic corrections) and R [proportionally] M/T, in agreement with numerical results, where M and T are the PNS mass and neutrino temperature, respectively. The near-critical flow can be approximated as a ballistic shell on top of an isothermal layer.

  15. Mass tree mortality leads to mangrove peat collapse at Bay Islands, Honduras after Hurricane Mitch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Hensel, P.; Rybczyk, J.; McKee, K.L.; Proffitt, C.E.; Perez, B.C.

    2003-01-01

    We measured sediment elevation and accretion dynamics in mangrove forests on the islands of Guanaja and Roatan, Honduras, impacted by Hurricane Mitch in 1998 to determine if collapse of underlying peat was occurring as a result of mass tree mortality. Little is known about the balance between production and decomposition of soil organic matter in the maintenance of sediment elevation of mangrove forests with biogenic soils. Sediment elevation change measured with the rod surface elevation table from 18 months to 33 months after the storm differed significantly among low, medium and high wind impact sites. Mangrove forests suffering minimal to partial mortality gained elevation at a rate (5 mm yeara??1) greater than vertical accretion (2 mm yeara??1) measured from artificial soil marker horizons, suggesting that root production contributed to sediment elevation. Basin forests that suffered mass tree mortality experienced peat collapse of about 11 mm yeara??1 as a result of decomposition of dead root material and sediment compaction. Low soil shear strength and lack of root growth accompanied elevation decreases. Model simulations using the Relative Elevation Model indicate that peat collapse in the high impact basin mangrove forest would be 37 mm yeara??1 for the 2 years immediately after the storm, as root material decomposed. In the absence of renewed root growth, the model predicts that peat collapse will continue for at least 8 more years at a rate (7 mm yeara??1) similar to that measured (11 mm yeara??1). Mass tree mortality caused rapid elevation loss. Few trees survived and recovery of the high impact forest will thus depend primarily on seedling recruitment. Because seedling establishment is controlled in large part by sediment elevation in relation to tide height, continued peat collapse could further impair recovery rates.

  16. Preliminary design study of the beam collapser and certain optomechanical aspects of the siderostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Four topics were studied during this phase of the design of the USNO astrometric interferometer: (1) the optical configuration of the beam collapser; (2) the mirror mount for the primary mirror of the beam collapser; (3) the beam collapser structure, and (4) bearings for use in the siderostat. A Gregorian beam collapser configuration, with a 750-mm diameter f/2.7 primary mirror, a 1 16-mm diameter secondary mirror, with a radius of curvature of 623 mm, and a vertex-to-vertex spacing 2337 mm is recommended. Use of a Gregorian beam collapser reduces optical fabrication costs, with a small impact in overall system length and weight. A solid primary mirror, 100-mm thick and oversized, with a 85% mm diameter, is the simplest and most economical mirror to fabricate and mount. A roller chain would provide radial support for the primary mirror; a six-point whiffle tree located outside the optical clear aperture would provide axial support. A modified Serrurier truss connects the secondary mirror to the primary mirror; the upper forward section of the truss is removed to allow better sky coverage for the siderostat. Use of a modified Serrurier truss permits testing of the system in the optical axis horizontal position, and without loss of alignment in the 100 down position. In addition, this type of truss is center supported, permitting the use of a tapered pier to minimize concrete volume on site. Spacing from the primary mirror to the secondary mirror, a critical parameter for system performance, is controlled by a pair of metering rods made from the same type of material as the optics. Rolling element bearings, oil pad bearings, and air bearings were considered for use in the siderostat. Although an extensive literature survey was performed, and a number of vendors contacted, it is not yet established which bearings are optimum for the siderostat.

  17. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Zamora Nava, Luis Eduardo; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo

    2011-06-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. Physician does generally not perceive cirrhosis complications, and neuropsychological tests and another especial measurement like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography can only make diagnosis. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  18. Discrete Minimal Surface Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnlind, Joakim; Hoppe, Jens

    2010-05-01

    We consider discrete minimal surface algebras (DMSA) as generalized noncommutative analogues of minimal surfaces in higher dimensional spheres. These algebras appear naturally in membrane theory, where sequences of their representations are used as a regularization. After showing that the defining relations of the algebra are consistent, and that one can compute a basis of the enveloping algebra, we give several explicit examples of DMSAs in terms of subsets of sln (any semi-simple Lie algebra providing a trivial example by itself). A special class of DMSAs are Yang-Mills algebras. The representation graph is introduced to study representations of DMSAs of dimension d ≤ 4, and properties of representations are related to properties of graphs. The representation graph of a tensor product is (generically) the Cartesian product of the corresponding graphs. We provide explicit examples of irreducible representations and, for coinciding eigenvalues, classify all the unitary representations of the corresponding algebras.

  19. Minimally symmetric Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Ian

    2015-06-17

    Models addressing the naturalness of a light Higgs boson typically employ symmetries, either bosonic or fermionic, to stabilize the Higgs mass. We consider a setup with the minimal amount of symmetries: four shift symmetries acting on the four components of the Higgs doublet, subject to the constraints of linearly realized SU(2)(L) x U(1)(Y) electroweak symmetry. Up to terms that explicitly violate the shift symmetries, the effective Lagrangian can be derived, irrespective of the spontaneously broken group G in the ultraviolet, and is universal among all models where the Higgs arises as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson. Very high energy scatterings of vector bosons could provide smoking gun signals of a minimally symmetric Higgs boson.

  20. Karst collapse in cities and mining areas, China

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Chen )

    1988-08-01

    Karst collapse is a dynamic geological phenomenon, in which the rock mass or deposits overlying the karstified zone subsides down along the karst cavity, resulting in a collapse pit or sinkhole. After discussing the typical examples of collapse emerging in the karst cities and mines in provinces and regions of South China, such as Guangdong, Guangxi, Hunan, Hubei, Zhejiang, Yunnan, Guizhou, and Jiangxi, it is considered that human activities of economy and production have become a major effect in causing karst collapse. Man-made collapses make 66.4 percent of the total, whereas natural ones 33.6 percent. Most of the collapses occurred to the area with soil overburden (96.7 percent), only a few in areas of bedrock overburden (3.3 percent). The karst collapses have a close relationship with the extent of karst development, the character and the thickness of overburden, and the dynamic condition of underground water. Collapse usually occurs in those parts of an area that are more intensely karstified, with soil thickness less than 5 m and a high amplitude of water table fluctuation. Many kinds of mechanical effects are caused by pumping or draining on the over-burden and destroying its equilibrium, leading to the collapse. These effects included the support loss and load-added effect, penetrating suffusion, gas explosion, water-hammer, suction pressure erosion, and liquefaction effects. The collapses are the result of varied comprehensive effects, particularly the support loss and load-added, and penetrating suffusion.

  1. Karst collapse in cities and mining areas, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    1988-08-01

    Karst collapse is a dynamic geological phenomenon, in which the rock mass or deposits overlying the karstified zone subsides down along the karst cavity, resulting in a collapse pit or sinkhole. After discussing the typical examples of collapse emerging in the karst cities and mines in provinces and regions of South China, such as Guangdong. Guangxi, Hunan, Hubei, Zhejiang, Yunnan, Guizhou, and Jiangxi, it is considered that human activities of economy and production have become a major effect in causing karst collapse. Man-made collapses make 66.4 percent of the total, whereas natural ones 33.6 percent. Most of the collapses occurred to the area with soil overburden (96.7 percent), only a few in areas of bedrock overburden (3.3 percent). The karst collapses have a close relationship with the extent of karst development, the character and the thickness of overburden, and the dynamic condition of underground water. Collapse usually occurs in those parts of an area that are more intensely karstified, with soil thickness less than 5 m and a high amplitude of water table fluctuation. Many kinds of mechanical effects are caused by pumping or draining on the overburden and destroying its equilibrium, leading to the collapse. These effects included the support loss and loadadded effect, penetrating suffusion, gas explesion, water-hammer, suction pressure erosion, and liquatienal effects. The collapses are the result of varied comprehensive effects, particularly the support loss and load-added, and penetrating suffusion.

  2. Waste Minimization Crosscut Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-13

    On November 27, 1991, the Secretary of Energy directed that a Department of Energy (DOE) crosscut plan for waste minimization (WMin) be prepared and submitted by March 1, 1992. This Waste Minimization Crosscut Plan responds to the Secretary's direction and supports the National Energy Strategy (NES) goals of achieving greater energy security, increasing energy and economic efficiency, and enhancing environmental quality. It provides a DOE-wide planning framework for effective coordination of all DOE WMin activities. This Plan was jointly prepared by the following Program Secretarial Officer (PSO) organizations: Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW); Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE); Defense Programs (DP); Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), lead; Energy Research (ER); Fossil Energy (FE); Nuclear Energy (NE); and New Production Reactors (NP). Assistance and guidance was provided by the offices of Policy, Planning, and Analysis (PE) and Environment, Safety and Health (EH). Comprehensive application of waste minimization within the Department and in both the public and private sectors will provide significant benefits and support National Energy Strategy goals. These benefits include conservation of a substantial proportion of the energy now used by industry and Government, improved environmental quality, reduced health risks, improved production efficiencies, and longer useful life of disposal capacity. Taken together, these benefits will mean improved US global competitiveness, expanded job opportunities, and a better quality of life for all citizens.

  3. Waste Minimization Crosscut Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-13

    On November 27, 1991, the Secretary of Energy directed that a Department of Energy (DOE) crosscut plan for waste minimization (WMin) be prepared and submitted by March 1, 1992. This Waste Minimization Crosscut Plan responds to the Secretary`s direction and supports the National Energy Strategy (NES) goals of achieving greater energy security, increasing energy and economic efficiency, and enhancing environmental quality. It provides a DOE-wide planning framework for effective coordination of all DOE WMin activities. This Plan was jointly prepared by the following Program Secretarial Officer (PSO) organizations: Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW); Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE); Defense Programs (DP); Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), lead; Energy Research (ER); Fossil Energy (FE); Nuclear Energy (NE); and New Production Reactors (NP). Assistance and guidance was provided by the offices of Policy, Planning, and Analysis (PE) and Environment, Safety and Health (EH). Comprehensive application of waste minimization within the Department and in both the public and private sectors will provide significant benefits and support National Energy Strategy goals. These benefits include conservation of a substantial proportion of the energy now used by industry and Government, improved environmental quality, reduced health risks, improved production efficiencies, and longer useful life of disposal capacity. Taken together, these benefits will mean improved US global competitiveness, expanded job opportunities, and a better quality of life for all citizens.

  4. Minimal surfaces over stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougall, Jane; Schaubroeck, Lisbeth

    2008-04-01

    A JS surface is a minimal graph over a polygonal domain that becomes infinite in magnitude at the domain boundary. Jenkins and Serrin characterized the existence of these minimal graphs in terms of the signs of the boundary values and the side-lengths of the polygon. For a convex polygon, there can be essentially only one JS surface, but a non-convex domain may admit several distinct JS surfaces. We consider two families of JS surfaces corresponding to different boundary values, namely JS0 and JS1, over domains in the form of regular stars. We give parameterizations for these surfaces as lifts of harmonic maps, and observe that all previously constructed JS surfaces have been of type JS0. We give an example of a JS1 surface that is a new complete embedded minimal surface generalizing Scherk's doubly periodic surface, and show also that the JS0 surface over a regular convex 2n-gon is the limit of JS1 surfaces over non-convex stars. Finally we consider the construction of other JS surfaces over stars that belong neither to JS0 nor to JS1.

  5. [Minimally invasive thymus surgery].

    PubMed

    Rückert, J C; Ismail, M; Swierzy, M; Braumann, C; Badakhshi, H; Rogalla, P; Meisel, A; Rückert, R I; Müller, J M

    2008-01-01

    There are absolute and relative indications for complete removal of the thymus gland. In the complex therapy of autoimmune-related myasthenia gravis, thymectomy plays a central role and is performed with relative indication. In case of thymoma with or without myasthenia, thymectomy is absolutely indicated. Thymus resection is further necessary for cases of hyperparathyroidism with ectopic intrathymic parathyroids or with certain forms of multiple endocrine neoplasia. The transcervical operation technique traditionally reflected the well-founded desire for minimal invasiveness for thymectomy. Due to the requirement of radicality however, most of these operations were performed using sternotomy. With the evolution of therapeutic thoracoscopy in thoracic surgery, several pure or extended minimally invasive operation techniques for thymectomy have been developed. At present uni- or bilateral, subxiphoid, and modified transcervical single or combination thoracoscopic techniques are in use. Recently a very precise new level of thoracoscopic operation technique was developed using robotic-assisted surgery. There are special advantages of this technique for thymectomy. An overview of the development and experiences with minimally invasive thymectomy is presented, including data from the largest series published so far.

  6. Shear flow induced unfolding of collapsed polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Netz, Roland

    2006-03-01

    In the process of clotting in small vessels, platelets form a plug in an injured zone only in the presence of a protein known as the von Willebrand Factor (vWF). The absence or malfunction of the vWF leads to a bleeding disorder, the so-called von Willebrand disease. It is believed that the protein is collapsed (or globular) when released into the blood flow, and that it undergoes a transition at high shear rates that allows it to bind platelets. Using hydrodynamic simulations of a simple model of the vWF in shear flow, we show that a globular polymer undergoes a globule-stretch transition at a critical shear rate. Below this threshold shear rate the polymer remains collapsed and slightly deformed, while above it the chain displays strong elongations in the direction of the flow. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our results in the case of blood flow, and compare them to the physiological values present in the body.

  7. Quantum corrected spherical collapse: A phenomenological framework

    SciTech Connect

    Ziprick, Jonathan; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2010-08-15

    A phenomenological framework is presented for incorporating quantum gravity motivated corrections into the dynamics of spherically symmetric collapse. The effective equations are derived from a variational principle that guarantees energy conservation and the existence of a Birkhoff theorem. The gravitational potential can be chosen as a function of the areal radius to yield specific nonsingular static spherically symmetric solutions that generically have two horizons. For a specific choice of potential, the effective stress energy tensor violates only the dominant energy condition. The violations are maximum near the inner horizon and die off rapidly. A numerical study of the quantum corrected collapse of a spherically symmetric scalar field in this case reveals that the modified gravitational potential prevents the formation of a central singularity and ultimately yields a static, mostly vacuum, spacetime with two horizons. The matter 'piles up' on the inner horizon giving rise to mass inflation at late times. The Cauchy horizon is transformed into a null, weak singularity, but in contrast to Einstein gravity, the absence of a central singularity renders this null singularity stable.

  8. Critical Collapse of Rotating Radiation Fluids.

    PubMed

    Baumgarte, Thomas W; Gundlach, Carsten

    2016-06-03

    We present results from the first fully relativistic simulations of the critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids. We observe critical scaling both in subcritical evolutions-in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space-and in supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of black holes. We measure the mass and angular momentum of these black holes, and find that both show critical scaling with critical exponents that are consistent with perturbative results. The critical exponents are universal: they are not affected by angular momentum, and are independent of the direction in which the critical curve, which separates subcritical from supercritical evolutions in our two-dimensional parameter space, is crossed. In particular, these findings suggest that the angular momentum decreases more rapidly than the square of the mass, so that, as criticality is approached, the collapse leads to the formation of a nonspinning black hole. We also demonstrate excellent agreement of our numerical data with new closed-form extensions of power-law scalings that describe the mass and angular momentum of rotating black holes formed close to criticality.

  9. Scapholunate advanced collapse: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Brian T; Diaz, Luis E; Murakami, Akira M; Roemer, Frank W; Goud, Ajay R; Arndt, William F; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-08-01

    Scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) is the most common cause of osteoarthritis involving the wrist. Along with clinical investigation, radiological studies play a vital role in the diagnosis of SLAC wrist. Given that the osteoarthritic changes that are seen with SLAC occur in a predictable progressive pattern, it is important to understand the pathological evolution of SLAC to be able to recognise the associated progressive imaging findings seen with this disease process. Focusing on radiological findings, this article provides a pictorial review of the anatomy of the scapholunate interosseous ligament as well as the common terminology and biomechanical alterations seen in the pathway leading to the development of SLAC arthropathy. We will then discuss two additional common causes of SLAC wrist and their imaging findings, namely scaphoid non-union advanced collapse and calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate disease. In addition, we will provide a brief overview of the current treatment options of these pathological entities. • SLAC is the most common cause of osteoarthritis involving the wrist. • Arthritic changes of SLAC occur in a predictable progressive pathological and radiographic pattern. • Imaging is key for diagnosing, monitoring progression and assessing post-treatment changes of SLAC.

  10. Sudden trust collapse in networked societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Gama Batista, João; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Challet, Damien

    2015-03-01

    Trust is a collective, self-fulfilling phenomenon that suggests analogies with phase transitions. We introduce a stylized model for the build-up and collapse of trust in networks, which generically displays a first order transition. The basic assumption of our model is that whereas trustworthiness begets trustworthiness, panic also begets panic, in the sense that a small decrease in trustworthiness may be amplified and ultimately lead to a sudden and catastrophic drop of collective trust. We show, using both numerical simulations and mean-field analytic arguments, that there are extended regions of the parameter space where two equilibrium states coexist: a well-connected network where global confidence is high, and a poorly connected network where global confidence is low. In these coexistence regions, spontaneous jumps from the well-connected state to the poorly connected state can occur, corresponding to a sudden collapse of trust that is not caused by any major external catastrophe. In large systems, spontaneous crises are replaced by history dependence: whether the system is found in one state or in the other essentially depends on initial conditions. Finally, we document a new phase, in which agents are well connected yet distrustful.

  11. Optical Absorption in Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Tsuneya

    2017-06-01

    The optical absorption spectra are calculated in collapsed carbon nanotubes, described by dynamical conductivity σyy(ω) for the polarization of electric field parallel to the axis, and \\tilde{σ }xx| (ω ) and \\tilde{σ }xx \\bot (ω ) perpendicular to the axis and parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the flattened region. For σyy(ω), clear interband peaks appear corresponding to band gaps between allowed bands. Inter-wall interaction due to collapsing causes splitting and shift of the peaks from uncollapsed tubes. Such effects are largest in nonchiral zigzag and armchair tubes, for which the spectra depends on the relative displacement in the flattened region, and rapidly decrease for tubes with chiral structure. Depolarization effect suppresses interband absorption in \\tilde{σ }xx| (ω ) and tilde{σ }xx \\bot (ω ). For \\tilde{σ }xx \\bot (ω ), the rapid spatial variation of the effective electric field tends to reduce the absorption in the low energy region and shifts the threshold to higher energy than for \\tilde{σ }xx| (ω ).

  12. Multiscale Analysis of a Collapsible Respiratory Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiali, Samir; Bell, E. David; Swarts, J. Douglas

    2006-11-01

    The Eustachian tube (ET) is a collapsible respiratory airway that connects the nasopharynx with the middle ear (ME). The ET normally exists in a collapsed state and must be periodically opened to maintain a healthy and sterile ME. Although the inability to open the ET (i.e. ET dysfunction) is the primary etiology responsible for several common ME diseases (i.e. Otitis Media), the mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction are not well established. To investigate these mechanisms, we developed a multi-scale model of airflow in the ET and correlated model results with experimental data obtained in healthy and diseased subjects. The computational models utilized finite-element methods to simulate fluid-structure interactions and molecular dynamics techniques to quantify the adhesive properties of mucus glycoproteins. Results indicate that airflow in the ET is highly sensitive to both the dynamics of muscle contraction and molecular adhesion forces within the ET lumen. In addition, correlation of model results with experimental data obtained in diseased subjects was used to identify the biomechanical mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction.

  13. Core collapse supernova remnants with ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grichener, Aldana; Soker, Noam

    2017-06-01

    We study the morphologies of core collapse supernova remnants (CCSNRs) and find that about third of CCSNRs in our sample have two opposite 'ears' protruding from their main shell. We assume that the ears are formed by jets, and argue that these properties are compatible with the expectation from the explosion jet feedback mechanism. Based on previous studies of ears in CCSNRs and the similarity of some ears to those found in planetary nebulae, we assume that the ears are inflated by jets that are launched during the explosion, or a short time after it. Under simple geometrical assumptions, we find that the extra kinetic energy of the ears is in the range of 1-10 per cent of the explosion energy. As not all of the kinetic energy of the jets ends in the ears, we estimate that the typical kinetic energy in the jets that inflated the ears, under our assumptions, is about 5-15 per cent of the explosion energy. This study supports a serious consideration of jet-driven core-collapse supernova mechanisms.

  14. Collapse and fragmentation of rotating, prolate clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Richard P.

    1998-08-01

    We present the results of collapse calculations for uniformly rotating, prolate clouds performed using the numerical method: smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The clouds considered are isothermal, prolate spheroids with different axial ratios (a/b), and with different values of β, the ratio of the rotational to gravitational energy. Small density perturbations are added to the clouds, and different initial perturbation spectra are studied. All of the clouds considered are strongly unstable to gravitational contraction, and so collapse to form a spindle configuration. Such a linear structure is unstable to fragmentation, so that the clouds break up into a number of subcondensations. The long-term evolution of the system is then determined by the angular momentum possessed by these fragments. It is found that a number of the calculations performed result in the formation of orbitally stable binary systems, composed of two rotationally supported discs in orbit about their common centre of mass. Tidal interactions during closest approach, close three-body interactions and the continued accretion of material with high specific angular momentum are all found to increase the orbital separation during these calculations, ensuring that the systems do not merge at later times. The calculations are therefore relevant to the problem of binary star formation, though the systems produced tend to have large orbital separations and periods. One of the strong points of the models presented, however, is their ability to produce systems with a range of mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, without the explicit inclusion of biases in the initial conditions.

  15. Urban Earthquakes - Reducing Building Collapse Through Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilham, R.

    2004-12-01

    Fatalities from earthquakes rose from 6000k to 9000k/year in the past decade, yet the ratio of numbers of earthquake fatalities to instantaneous population continues to fall. Since 1950 the ratio declined worldwide by a factor of three, but in some countries the ratio has changed little. E.g in Iran, 1 in 3000 people can expect to die in an earthquake, a percentage that has not changed significantly since 1890. Fatalities from earthquakes remain high in those countries that have traditionally suffered from frequent large earthquakes (Turkey, Iran, Japan, and China), suggesting that the exposure time of recently increased urban populations in other countries may be too short to have interacted with earthquakes with long recurrence intervals. This in turn, suggests that disasters of unprecendented size will occur (more than 1 million fatalities) when future large earthquakes occur close to megacities. However, population growth is most rapid in cities of less than 1 million people in the developing nations, where the financial ability to implement earthquake resistant construction methods is limited. In that structural collapse can often be traced to ignorance about the forces at work in an earthquake, the future collapse of buildings presently under construction could be much reduced were contractors, builders and occupants educated in the principles of earthquake resistant assembly. Education of builders who are tempted to cut assembly costs is likely to be more cost effective than material aid.

  16. Gravitationally collapsing shells in (2+1) dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Robert B.; Oh, John J.

    2006-12-15

    We study gravitationally collapsing models of pressureless dust, fluids with pressure, and the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) shell in (2+1)-dimensional spacetimes. Various collapse scenarios are investigated under a variety of the background configurations such as anti-de Sitter (AdS) black hole, de Sitter (dS) space, flat and AdS space with a conical deficit. As with the case of a disk of dust, we find that the collapse of a dust shell coincides with the Oppenheimer-Snyder type collapse to a black hole provided the initial density is sufficiently large. We also find - for all types of shell - that collapse to a naked singularity is possible under a broad variety of initial conditions. For shells with pressure this singularity can occur for a finite radius of the shell. We also find that GCG shells exhibit diverse collapse scenarios, which can be easily demonstrated by an effective potential analysis.

  17. Minimally invasive mediastinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Melfi, Franca M. A.; Mussi, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    In the past, mediastinal surgery was associated with the necessity of a maximum exposure, which was accomplished through various approaches. In the early 1990s, many surgical fields, including thoracic surgery, observed the development of minimally invasive techniques. These included video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which confers clear advantages over an open approach, such as less trauma, short hospital stay, increased cosmetic results and preservation of lung function. However, VATS is associated with several disadvantages. For this reason, it is not routinely performed for resection of mediastinal mass lesions, especially those located in the anterior mediastinum, a tiny and remote space that contains vital structures at risk of injury. Robotic systems can overcome the limits of VATS, offering three-dimensional (3D) vision and wristed instrumentations, and are being increasingly used. With regards to thymectomy for myasthenia gravis (MG), unilateral and bilateral VATS approaches have demonstrated good long-term neurologic results with low complication rates. Nevertheless, some authors still advocate the necessity of maximum exposure, especially when considering the distribution of normal and ectopic thymic tissue. In recent studies, the robotic approach has shown to provide similar neurological outcomes when compared to transsternal and VATS approaches, and is associated with a low morbidity. Importantly, through a unilateral robotic technique, it is possible to dissect and remove at least the same amount of mediastinal fat tissue. Preliminary results on early-stage thymomatous disease indicated that minimally invasive approaches are safe and feasible, with a low rate of pleural recurrence, underlining the necessity of a “no-touch” technique. However, especially for thymomatous disease characterized by an indolent nature, further studies with long follow-up period are necessary in order to assess oncologic and neurologic results through minimally

  18. Caldera collapse at near-ridge seamounts: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coumans, Jason P.; Stix, John

    2016-10-01

    Collapse calderas are sub-circular volcanic depressions caused by subsidence of the magma reservoir roof during an eruption. Scaled physical models of caldera collapse using flat topography have been instrumental in investigating the spatial and temporal development of calderas, in particular, two distinctive sets of concentric ring faults, one reverse and one normal. More recent analog studies have investigated the effect of non-flat topography which alters the principle stress trajectories and resulting collapse structure. This work provides the basis for investigating how naturally scaled topographic loads may affect caldera collapse in relation to shallow magma reservoirs. The objective of this study is to understand how a near-ridge seamount affects caldera collapse from both a central and offset position as the seamount migrates above the magma reservoir as a result of plate motion. We utilize scaled analog models of caldera collapse in conjunction with three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) to investigate caldera collapse dynamics at near-ridge seamounts. Experiments using a seamount cone positioned centrally above the magma reservoir result in (1) increased subsidence along the interior outward-dipping faults and (2) a preference to more symmetric collapse patterns as indicated by the subsidence profile and structure of the caldera relative to experiments with an offset cone. When the cone is offset, the collapse is asymmetric and trapdoor in nature, with the center of greatest subsidence displaced away from the region of largest topographic load. For these latter experiments, subsidence is focused where the roof is thinnest along an initial reverse fault, followed by a transition to an antithetic graben structure. The asymmetric collapse in the experiments results in a caldera with a tilted profile. Offset calderas at near-ridge seamounts are tilted towards the ridge axis, suggesting that they may have collapsed

  19. Energy localization in nonlinear fiber arrays: Collapse-effect compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, A.B.; Luther, G.G.; De Angelis, C.; Turitsyn, S.K.

    1995-07-03

    We analyze a collapse mechanism of energy localization in nonlinear fiber arrays. The nonlinear fiber array is suggested as a device to amplify and compress optical pulses. Pulse propagation in one-dimensional fiber arrays has features of collapse (self-focusing) dynamics. Collapse-type compression leads to the localization of all energy initially dispersed in array into a few fibers. Numerical simulations demonstrate the robustness of the suggested compression mechanism.

  20. GENERAL: Non-Spherical Gravitational Collapse of Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Zade S.; D, Patil K.; N, Mulkalwar P.

    2008-05-01

    We study the non-spherical gravitational collapse of the strange quark null fluid. The interesting feature which emerges is that the non-spherical collapse of charged strange quark matter leads to a naked singularity whereas the gravitational collapse of neutral quark matter proceeds to form a black hole. We extend the earlier work of Harko and Cheng [Phys. Lett. A 266 (2000) 249] to the non-spherical case.

  1. Inherently unstable networks collapse to a critical point.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, M; Sharma, A; Alvarado, J; Koenderink, G H; MacKintosh, F C

    2015-07-01

    Nonequilibrium systems that are driven or drive themselves towards a critical point have been studied for almost three decades. Here we present a minimalist example of such a system, motivated by experiments on collapsing active elastic networks. Our model of an unstable elastic network exhibits a collapse towards a critical point from any macroscopically connected initial configuration. Taking into account steric interactions within the network, the model qualitatively and quantitatively reproduces results of the experiments on collapsing active gels.

  2. Tight Left Upper Lobe Collapse from Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Tight Left Upper Lobe Collapse from Lung Cancer Military Medicine Radiology Corner, Volume 175, July 2010 Radiology Corner Tight Left Upper Lobe...Collapse from Lung Cancer Guarantor: CAPT Robert C. Baril, USAF, MC * Contributors: CAPT Robert C. Baril, USAF, MC * ; 2LT A. Yusupov, USA; Lt...2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tight Left Upper Lobe Collapse from Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  3. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  4. Wake Vortex Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A status report is presented on research directed at reducing the vortex disturbances of aircraft wakes. The objective of such a reduction is to minimize the hazard to smaller aircraft that might encounter these wakes. Inviscid modeling was used to study trailing vortices and viscous effects were investigated. Laser velocimeters were utilized in the measurement of aircraft wakes. Flight and wind tunnel tests were performed on scale and full model scale aircraft of various design. Parameters investigated included the effect of wing span, wing flaps, spoilers, splines and engine thrust on vortex attenuation. Results indicate that vortives may be alleviated through aerodynamic means.

  5. The ZOOM minimization package

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, Mark S.; Sachs, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    A new object-oriented Minimization package is available for distribution in the same manner as CLHEP. This package, designed for use in HEP applications, has all the capabilities of Minuit, but is a re-write from scratch, adhering to modern C++ design principles. A primary goal of this package is extensibility in several directions, so that its capabilities can be kept fresh with as little maintenance effort as possible. This package is distinguished by the priority that was assigned to C++ design issues, and the focus on producing an extensible system that will resist becoming obsolete.

  6. Atomistic modeling of shock-induced void collapse in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Davila, L P; Erhart, P; Bringa, E M; Meyers, M A; Lubarda, V A; Schneider, M S; Becker, R; Kumar, M

    2005-03-09

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that shock-induced void collapse in copper occurs by emission of shear loops. These loops carry away the vacancies which comprise the void. The growth of the loops continues even after they collide and form sessile junctions, creating a hardened region around the collapsing void. The scenario seen in our simulations differs from current models that assume that prismatic loop emission is responsible for void collapse. We propose a new dislocation-based model that gives excellent agreement with the stress threshold found in the MD simulations for void collapse as a function of void radius.

  7. Developing empirical collapse fragility functions for global building types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, K.; Wald, D.; D'Ayala, D.

    2011-01-01

    Building collapse is the dominant cause of casualties during earthquakes. In order to better predict human fatalities, the U.S. Geological Survey’s Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) program requires collapse fragility functions for global building types. The collapse fragility is expressed as the probability of collapse at discrete levels of the input hazard defined in terms of macroseismic intensity. This article provides a simple procedure for quantifying collapse fragility using vulnerability criteria based on the European Macroseismic Scale (1998) for selected European building types. In addition, the collapse fragility functions are developed for global building types by fitting the beta distribution to the multiple experts’ estimates for the same building type (obtained from EERI’s World Housing Encyclopedia (WHE)-PAGER survey). Finally, using the collapse probability distributions at each shaking intensity level as a prior and field-based collapse-rate observations as likelihood, it is possible to update the collapse fragility functions for global building types using the Bayesian procedure.

  8. Protostellar collapse in a self-gravitating sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Boss, Alan; Calvet, Nuria; Whitney, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    We present preliminary calculations of protostellar cloud collapse starting from an isothermal, self-gravitating gaseous layer in hydrostatic equilibrium. This gravitationally unstable layer collapses into a flattened or toroidal density distribution, even in the absence of rotation or magnetic fields. We suggest that the flat infalling envelope recently observed in HL Tau by Hayashi et al.is the result of collapse from an initially nonspherical layer. We also speculate that the later evolution of such a flattened, collapsing envelope can produce a structure similar to the 'flared disk' invoked by Kenyon and Hartmann to explain the infrared excesses of many T Tauri stars.

  9. Experimental bounds on collapse models from gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlesso, Matteo; Bassi, Angelo; Falferi, Paolo; Vinante, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Wave function collapse models postulate a fundamental breakdown of the quantum superposition principle at the macroscale. Therefore, experimental tests of collapse models are also fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. Here, we compute the upper bounds on the collapse parameters, which can be inferred by the gravitational wave detectors LIGO, LISA Pathfinder, and AURIGA. We consider the most widely used collapse model, the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model. We show that these experiments exclude a huge portion of the CSL parameter space, the strongest bound being set by the recently launched space mission LISA Pathfinder. We also rule out a proposal for quantum-gravity-induced decoherence.

  10. Spreading and collapse of big basaltic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Peltier, Aline; Poland, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. In the frame of MED-SVU project, our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at three Supersite volcanoes: Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These

  11. Spreading And Collapse Of Big Basaltic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, G.; Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Peltier, A.; Poland, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. Our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These volcanoes, due to their similarities and differences, coupled with

  12. Interpretation of collapsed terrain on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewa Zalewska, Natalia; Skocki, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    On the images from HiRISE camera within volcanoes and circumpolar areas there are depressions that can be explained in two ways, either by melting subsurface layer of ice or by cooling of lava which forms branch intrusion and flank craters underneath. On many pictures from Mars similar cavities are found on the slopes of Martian craters on Arsia Mons , Pavonis Mons on northern hemisphere and Alba Patera on southern hemisphere. Such cavities can be compared to a Hawaiian type volcanoes. At the top of Mauna Loa linearly arranged craters can be seen, strikingly similar to those on Arsia Mons . Basing on map ice content measured by Odyssey GRS apparatus, in this place of the volcanic cone, quite small ice content can be observed that varies in the range of 2-4% hydrogen abundance. It is therefore difficult to explain these collapses by unfreezing of subsurface ice. In an infrared spectrum of these areas there are no bands of water in the CRISM spectra, although it does not say that the water in the form of ice couldn't have been there before. In the central part of Chryse, there are series of chains depressions caused most likely by the collapse of land. These forms have been associated with an open pingo type system additionally with assisted topography of the area or tectonics and internal cracks in the rocks. These are noticed on the slopes of craters or wherever the area decline. Then flowing subsurface water or brine coming from the ice layer could while freezing accumulate and create a longitudinal hill that collapsed due to seasonal thawing forming gullies or canyons . At the end of these gullies remaining trace of the leak can be seen, as if there was a crack in the ground and liquid flew out on the surface. Cryosubsurface processes on Mars can support the hypothesis of geochemical origin of water, which separates from the magma, and its primary source comes from the protoplanetary disk. The water separated from the magma migrates up to the surface and if the

  13. Logarithmic superconformal minimal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Paul A.; Rasmussen, Jørgen; Tartaglia, Elena

    2014-05-01

    The higher fusion level logarithmic minimal models {\\cal LM}(P,P';n) have recently been constructed as the diagonal GKO cosets {(A_1^{(1)})_k\\oplus (A_1^ {(1)})_n}/ {(A_1^{(1)})_{k+n}} where n ≥ 1 is an integer fusion level and k = nP/(P‧- P) - 2 is a fractional level. For n = 1, these are the well-studied logarithmic minimal models {\\cal LM}(P,P')\\equiv {\\cal LM}(P,P';1). For n ≥ 2, we argue that these critical theories are realized on the lattice by n × n fusion of the n = 1 models. We study the critical fused lattice models {\\cal LM}(p,p')_{n\\times n} within a lattice approach and focus our study on the n = 2 models. We call these logarithmic superconformal minimal models {\\cal LSM}(p,p')\\equiv {\\cal LM}(P,P';2) where P = |2p - p‧|, P‧ = p‧ and p, p‧ are coprime. These models share the central charges c=c^{P,P';2}=\\frac {3}{2}\\big (1-{2(P'-P)^2}/{P P'}\\big ) of the rational superconformal minimal models {\\cal SM}(P,P'). Lattice realizations of these theories are constructed by fusing 2 × 2 blocks of the elementary face operators of the n = 1 logarithmic minimal models {\\cal LM}(p,p'). Algebraically, this entails the fused planar Temperley-Lieb algebra which is a spin-1 Birman-Murakami-Wenzl tangle algebra with loop fugacity β2 = [x]3 = x2 + 1 + x-2 and twist ω = x4 where x = eiλ and λ = (p‧- p)π/p‧. The first two members of this n = 2 series are superconformal dense polymers {\\cal LSM}(2,3) with c=-\\frac {5}{2}, β2 = 0 and superconformal percolation {\\cal LSM}(3,4) with c = 0, β2 = 1. We calculate the bulk and boundary free energies analytically. By numerically studying finite-size conformal spectra on the strip with appropriate boundary conditions, we argue that, in the continuum scaling limit, these lattice models are associated with the logarithmic superconformal models {\\cal LM}(P,P';2). For system size N, we propose finitized Kac character formulae of the form q^{-{c^{P,P';2}}/{24}+\\Delta ^{P,P';2} _{r

  14. O the Verge of Collapse: Modal Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetsche, Laura

    1995-01-01

    The conjunction of Schrodinger dynamics and the usual way of thinking about the conditions under which quantum systems exhibit determinate values implies that measurements don't have outcomes. The orthodox fix to this quantum measurement problem is von Neumann's postulate of measurement collapse, which suspends Schrodinger dynamics in measurement contexts. Contending that the fundamental dynamical law of quantum theory breaks down every time we test the theory empirically, the collapse postulate is unsatisfactory. Recently philosophers (e.g., van Fraassen and Healey) and physicists (e.g., Kochen and Dieks) have proposed a less violent solution to the measurement problem. Their modal interpretations of quantum mechanics advocate unusual ways of thinking about the situations under which quantum systems exhibit determinate observable values, semantics which reconcile determinate measurement outcomes with universal Schrodinger dynamics. Thus modal interpretations hold out hope that quantum theory is complete and exceptionless. This dissertation tempers that hope. I consider the modal approach to the neglected problem of state preparation. A promising modal account exploits standard quantum transition probabilities. But, I claim, modal interpretations must subject these transition probabilities to a consistency constraint which they can be shown to violate. Non-standard transition probabilities might avoid this inconsistency, but they would also introduce novel dynamics, and so undo the modal triumph of taking Schrodinger dynamics to be complete and universal. Next I consider Albert and Loewer's assault on modal accounts of "error-prone" measurements. I argue that the Albert-Loewer problem is more general than Albert, Loewer, or their critics appreciate, and that the Araki-Yanase theorem implies the existence of a class of observables whose error-free measurements succumb to the Albert-Loewer problem. I review modal responses to Albert and Loewer which appeal to the

  15. Wetting dynamics of a collapsing fluid hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Dijksman, Joshua; Shearer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    An axisymmetric fluid cavity at the bottom of a rotating bucket bound by vertical sidewalls is studied, as it is filled in by the wetting fluid. Lubrication theory is applied to reduce the governing equations to a single evolution equation for the film thickness. In the quasi-static regime the contact-line motion is governed by a constitutive law relating the effective contact angle to the contact-line speed. The dependence of the collapse time on the initial hole size is calculated. For small holes, surface tension dominates the dynamics, leading to a universal power law that compares favorably to experiments in the literature. Further verification of the model is obtained through comparison of volume dependence with experimental results.

  16. On stress collapse in adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. W.; Walter, J. W.

    T HE DYNAMICS of adiabatic shear band formation is considered making use of a simplified thermo/visco/plastic flow law. A new numerical solution is used to follow the growth of a perturbation from initiation, through early growth and severe localization, to a slowly varying terminal configuration. Asymptotic analyses predict the early and late stage patterns, but the timing and structure of the abrupt transition to severe localization can only be studied numerically, to date. A characteristic feature of the process is that temperature and plastic strain rate begin to localize immediately, but only slowly, whereas the stress first evolves almost as if there were no perturbation, but then collapses rapidly when severe localization occurs.

  17. Collapse and bounce of null fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creelman, Bradley; Booth, Ivan

    2017-06-01

    Exact solutions describing the spherical collapse of null fluids can contain regions which violate the energy conditions. Physically the violations occur when the infalling matter continues to move inward even when nongravitational repulsive forces become stronger than gravity. In 1991 Ori proposed a resolution for these violations: spacetime surgery should be used to replace the energy condition violating region with an outgoing solution. The matter bounces. We revisit and implement this proposal for the more general Husain null fluids including a careful study of potential discontinuities and associated matter shells between the regions. Along the way we highlight an error in the standard classification of energy condition violations for type II stress-energy tensors.

  18. Photochemically driven collapse of Titan's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, R D; McKay, C P; Lunine, J I

    1997-01-31

    Saturn's giant moon Titan has a thick (1.5 bar) nitrogen atmosphere, which has a temperature structure that is controlled by the absorption of solar and thermal radiation by methane, hydrogen, and organic aerosols into which methane is irreversibly converted by photolysis. Previous studies of Titan's climate evolution have been done with the assumption that the methane abundance was maintained against photolytic depletion throughout Titan's history, either by continuous supply from the interior or by buffering by a surface or near surface reservoir. Radiative-convective and radiative-saturated equilibrium models of Titan's atmosphere show that methane depletion may have allowed Titan's atmosphere to cool so that nitrogen, its main constituent, condenses onto the surface, collapsing Titan into a Triton-like frozen state with a thin atmosphere.

  19. The collapse of the conventional career.

    PubMed

    Mangan, P

    The Collapse of the Conventional Career was commissioned by the ENB as 'the first in a number of discussion papers in which important issues were to be explored so that the professional could debate them fully' (Jean Hooper, chairwoman of the ENB, in her foreword). The author Celia Davis' premise was that, conventionally, a career was seen as comprising full-time work carried out without a break in service. Because many female nurses could not fulfil this expectation they were disadvantaged in a number of ways. In order to address the problems faced in practice by those who would not be able, for various reasons, to undertake a conventional career, Professor Davis looked at what changes in thinking and policy would be required.

  20. Petascale Core-Collapse Supernova Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, Bronson

    2009-11-01

    The advent of petascale computing brings with it the promise of substantial increases in physical fidelity for a host of scientific problems. However, the realities of computing on these resources are daunting, and the architectural features of petascale machines will require considerable innovation for effective use. Nevertheless, there exists a class of scientific problems whose ultimate answer requires the application of petascale (and beyond) computing. One example is ascertaining the core-collapse supernova mechanism and explaining the rich phenomenology associated with these events. These stellar explosions produce and disseminate a dominant fraction of the elements in the Universe; are prodigious sources of neutrinos, gravitational waves, and photons across the electromagnetic spectrum; and lead to the formation of neutron stars and black holes. I will describe our recent multidimensional supernova simulations performed on petascale platforms fielded by the DOE and NSF.

  1. Collapsing health care in Serbia and Montenegro.

    PubMed Central

    Black, M E

    1993-01-01

    Serbia and Montenegro together form the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. As well as the Serb majority this includes the mixed province of Vojvodina, the mainly Albanian population in Kosovo, and the large Muslim minority in Sandzak. Since the start of war in 1991 the attention and sympathies of the world have focused on Bosnia and Croatia. The United Nations imposed economic sanctions on the federal republic in 1992, although in theory medical supplies and aid are exempt. The economy has now collapsed under the triple burden of war, loss of trade between the republics, and UN sanctions. A major public health catastrophe is unfolding in the federal republic. Images p1135-a p1136-a PMID:8251816

  2. Angular momentum in cluster Spherical Collapse Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupani, Guido; Mezzetti, Marino; Mardirossian, Fabio

    2011-11-01

    Our new formulation of the Spherical Collapse Model (SCM-L) takes into account the presence of angular momentum associated with the motion of galaxy groups infalling towards the centre of galaxy clusters. The angular momentum is responsible for an additional term in the dynamical equation which is useful to describe the evolution of the clusters in the non-equilibrium region which is investigated in the present paper. Our SCM-L can be used to predict the profiles of several strategic dynamical quantities as the radial and tangential velocities of member galaxies, and the total cluster mass. A good understanding of the non-equilibrium region is important since it is the natural scenario where the infall in galaxy clusters and the accretion phenomena present in these objects can be studied. Our results corroborate previous estimates and are in very good agreement with the analysis of recent observations and of simulated clusters.

  3. Gravitational collapse of the OMC-1 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacar, A.; Alves, J.; Tafalla, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2017-06-01

    We have investigated the global dynamical state of the integral shaped filament in the Orion A cloud using new N2H+ (1-0) large-scale, IRAM 30 m observations. Our analysis of its internal gas dynamics reveals the presence of accelerated motions towards the Orion Nebula Cluster, showing a characteristic blue-shifted profile centred at the position of the OMC-1 South region. The properties of these observed gas motions (profile, extension, and magnitude) are consistent with the expected accelerations for the gravitational collapse of the OMC-1 region and explain both the physical and kinematic structure of this cloud. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  4. Crystallization and collapse in relativistically degenerate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, it is shown that a mass density limit exists beyond which the relativistically degenerate matter would crystallize. The mass density limit, found here, is quite analogous to the mass limit predicted by Chandrasekhar for a type of compact stars called white dwarfs (MCh≃1.43 Solar Mass). In this study, the old problem of white dwarf core collapse, which has been previously investigated by Chandrasekhar using hydrostatic stability criteria, is revisited in the framework of the quantum hydrodynamics model by inspection of the charge screening at atomic scales in the relativistic degeneracy plasma regime taking into account the relativistic Fermi-Dirac statistics and electron interaction features such as the quantum statistical pressure, Coulomb attraction, electron exchange-correlation, and quantum recoil effects. It is revealed that the existence of ion correlation and crystallization of matter in the relativistically degenerate plasma puts a critical mass density limit on white dwarf core region. It is shown that a white dwarf star with a core mass density beyond this critical limit can undergo the spontaneous core collapse (SCC). The SCC phenomenon, which is dominantly caused by the electron quantum recoil effect (interference and localization of the electron wave function), leads to a new exotic state of matter. In such exotic state, the relativistic electron degeneracy can lead the white dwarf crystallized core to undergo the nuclear fusion and an ultimate supernova by means of the volume reduction (due to the enhanced compressibility) and huge energy release (due to the increase in cohesive energy), under the stars huge inward gravitational pressure. Moreover, it is found that the SCC phenomenon is significantly affected by the core composition (it is more probable for heavier plasmas). The critical mass density found here is consistent with the values calculated for core density of typical white dwarf stars.

  5. Collapse in ultracold Bose Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, M.; Trombettoni, A.; Bassi, A.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate how ultracold atoms in double-well potentials can be used to study and put bounds on models describing wave-function collapse. We refer in particular to the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model, which is the most well studied among dynamical reduction models. It modifies the Schrödinger equation in order to include the collapse of the wave function in its dynamics. We consider Bose Josephson junctions, where ultracold bosons are trapped in a double-well potential, since they can be experimentally controlled with high accuracy and are suited and used to study macroscopic quantum phenomena on a scale of microns, with a number of particles typically ranging from ˜102-103 to ˜105-106 . We study the CSL dynamics of three atomic states showing macroscopic quantum coherence: the atomic coherent state, the superposition of two atomic coherent states, and the NOON state. We show that for the last two states, the suppression of quantum coherence induced by the CSL model increases exponentially with the number of atoms. We observe that in the case of optically trapped atoms, the spontaneous photon emission of the atoms induces a dynamics similar to the CSL one, and we conclude that magnetically trapped atoms may be more convenient to experimentally test the CSL model. Finally, we discuss decoherence effects in order to provide reasonable estimates on the bounds that it is (or will be) possible to obtain for the parameters of the CSL model in such class of experiments. As an example, we show that a NOON state with N ˜103 with a coherence time of ˜1 s can constrain the CSL parameters in a region where the other systems presently cannot.

  6. Crystallization and collapse in relativistically degenerate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, it is shown that a mass density limit exists beyond which the relativistically degenerate matter would crystallize. The mass density limit, found here, is quite analogous to the mass limit predicted by Chandrasekhar for a type of compact stars called white dwarfs (M{sub Ch} Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.43 Solar Mass). In this study, the old problem of white dwarf core collapse, which has been previously investigated by Chandrasekhar using hydrostatic stability criteria, is revisited in the framework of the quantum hydrodynamics model by inspection of the charge screening at atomic scales in the relativistic degeneracy plasma regime taking into account the relativistic Fermi-Dirac statistics and electron interaction features such as the quantum statistical pressure, Coulomb attraction, electron exchange-correlation, and quantum recoil effects. It is revealed that the existence of ion correlation and crystallization of matter in the relativistically degenerate plasma puts a critical mass density limit on white dwarf core region. It is shown that a white dwarf star with a core mass density beyond this critical limit can undergo the spontaneous core collapse (SCC). The SCC phenomenon, which is dominantly caused by the electron quantum recoil effect (interference and localization of the electron wave function), leads to a new exotic state of matter. In such exotic state, the relativistic electron degeneracy can lead the white dwarf crystallized core to undergo the nuclear fusion and an ultimate supernova by means of the volume reduction (due to the enhanced compressibility) and huge energy release (due to the increase in cohesive energy), under the stars huge inward gravitational pressure. Moreover, it is found that the SCC phenomenon is significantly affected by the core composition (it is more probable for heavier plasmas). The critical mass density found here is consistent with the values calculated for core density of typical white dwarf stars.

  7. Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Cornman, R. Scott; Tarpy, David R.; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees. PMID:22927991

  8. Looking older: Fibroblast Collapse and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Gary J.; Varani, James; Voorhees, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Skin appearance is a primary indicator of age. During the last decade, substantial progress has been made towards understanding underlying mechanisms of human skin aging. This understanding provides the basis for current use and new development of anti-aging treatments. Objective To present state of the art knowledge pertaining to mechanisms involved in skin aging, with specific focus on the dermal collagen matrix. Results A major feature of aged skin is fragmentation of the dermal collagen matrix. Fragmentation results from actions of specific enzymes (matrix metalloproteinases), and impairs the structural integrity of the dermis. Fibroblasts that produce and organize the collagen matrix cannot attach to fragmented collagen. Loss of attachment prevents fibroblasts from receiving mechanical information from their support and they collapse. Stretch is critical for normal balanced production of collagen and collagen-degrading enzymes. In aged skin, collapsed fibroblasts produce low levels of collagen and high levels of collagen–degrading enzymes. This imbalance advances the aging process, in a self-perpetuating, never-ending deleterious cycle. Clinically-proven anti-aging treatments such as topical retinoic acid, CO2 laser resurfacing, and intradermal injection of cross-linked hyaluronic acid stimulate production of new undamaged collagen. Attachment of fibroblasts to this new collagen allows stretch, which in turn balances collagen production/degradation and thereby slows the aging process. Conclusion Collagen fragmentation is responsible for loss of structural integrity and impairment of fibroblast function in aged human skin. Treatments that stimulate production of new, non-fragmented collagen should provide substantial improvement to the appearance and health of aged skin. PMID:18490597

  9. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Cornman, R Scott; Tarpy, David R; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  10. The physics of core collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swesty, Frank Douglas

    1993-01-01

    I have developed an equation of state (EOS) for hot, dense matter that is intended specifically for use in radiation hydrodynamic simulations of supernovae, proto-neutron star cooling, and neutron stars. This EOS makes use of an adjustable nucleon-nucleon interaction that allows for the input of various nuclear force parameters that are not well determined by laboratory measurements. Properties of the EOS as a function of these input parameters were studied and comparisons were made to another EOS that is currently used in stellar collapse simulations. Using this EOS I have conducted simulations of core collapse supernovae with several ideas in mind. First, I have attempted to delineate role of the incompressibility of dense matter in supernovae. I have conducted a parameter study in which the compression modulous of bulk nuclear matter was varied and have found some new and surprising results. When the EOS is constrained by the observed mass of 1.44M(solar mass) for one of the components of the binary pulsar system PSR1913+16, the 'stiffness' of the EOS no longer plays a role in the shock dynamics of the supernova. Secondly, I varied the symmetry energy coefficients in the EOS to determine the role of these coefficients in supernovae. I have found that the symmetry energy behavior of the EOS has potentially observable effects and may play an important role in determining the efficacy of the late-time heating mechanism for the explosion and the stability of the post-bounce core against convection. Finally, I have developed an implicit, general relativistic, radiation hydrodynamics algorithm for the numerical simulation of supernovae. By allowing simulation timesteps to exceed the Courant timescale, this algorithm makes practical high resolution simulations of supernovae to late times. I discuss this algorithm and the associated computer code along with code verification tests and an example of a late-time calculation.

  11. Fingerprinting Hydrogen in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nance, Sarafina; Parrent, Jerod; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on the mass of remaining hydrogen envelopes for stars massive enough to explode under core collapse. Using the stellar evolution code, MESA, our initial findings suggest that a significant fraction of massive stars with M_ZAMS = 20-60 Msun lose all but 10^-3 Msun -10^-1 Msun as they near eventual core collapse. This result is dependent on the mass-loss prescription, degree of rotation, metallicity, rates of nuclear burning in the core, and the final stellar configuration. Nevertheless, each of our test cases include a few stars that retain trace amounts of surface hydrogen, which would then be detected as faint H in type IIb/Ib/Ic supernova spectra. We also compare our findings to the progenitor candidate identified for iPTF13bvn using the most recent photometric corrections. We agree with the previous conclusion found by Groh et al. (2013) that the progenitor had an initial mass of 32 Msun, but now with an additional condition of 0.06 Msun of hydrogen on its surface just prior to the explosion. We demonstrate through our study that not all Type Ib supernovae are fully devoid of hydrogen at the time of explosion, which has implications for the nature of the progenitor star and thus provides impetus for a revised classification scheme for 'stripped envelope' supernovae. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  12. Critical behaviour of the seismic precursors of a cliff collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, J.; Amitrano, D.; Senfaute, G.

    2004-12-01

    We analyse the statistical pattern of seismicity before a 1-2 103 m3 chalk cliff collapse on the Normandie ocean shore, Western France. About 500 seismic events, in both 40 Hz-1.5 kHz and 2 Hz-10kHz frequency range, have been recorded during the six months before the collapse, and more than 200 during the two hours preceding the collapse. The collapse occurred within a seismic network of five microseismic stations, in such a manner that the central station was located at few meters of the failure surface. This allows us to investigate the properties of the seismicity emitted by the damage process leading to the cliff collapse. The study focused on the statistical properties of the seismic events. The event size distribution displays a power law distribution (N(E)∝ E-b) on more than 3 magnitude orders with an exponent of 0.55. Such a distribution can be compared to the Gutenberg-Richter law observed for crustal earthquakes. During the last hour before the collapse, we observed a continuous decrease of b-value until the collapse occurred, indicating that the proportion of large events increases toward the time to failure. We show that, contemporary to this exponent decrease, a power law acceleration of seismicity rate and energy is defined on 3 order of magnitude, within 2 hours from the collapse time. We discuss these results, in the context of brittle failure and tertiary creep models. Our analysis of this first seismic monitoring data of a cliff collapse suggests that the thermodynamic phase transition models for brittle rupture may apply for this cliff collapse. We suggest that the case study presented here is one of the first (even the first) case showing a power law acceleration before a cliff collapse. It open new routes both to monitor and to understand the physics rock slope and landslide instabilities.

  13. Numerical simulations of non-spherical bubble collapse

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSEN, ERIC; COLONIUS, TIM

    2009-01-01

    A high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing scheme is used to simulate the collapse of a gas bubble in water. In order to better understand the damage caused by collapsing bubbles, the dynamics of the shock-induced and Rayleigh collapse of a bubble near a planar rigid surface and in a free field are analysed. Collapse times, bubble displacements, interfacial velocities and surface pressures are quantified as a function of the pressure ratio driving the collapse and of the initial bubble stand-off distance from the wall; these quantities are compared to the available theory and experiments and show good agreement with the data for both the bubble dynamics and the propagation of the shock emitted upon the collapse. Non-spherical collapse involves the formation of a re-entrant jet directed towards the wall or in the direction of propagation of the incoming shock. In shock-induced collapse, very high jet velocities can be achieved, and the finite time for shock propagation through the bubble may be non-negligible compared to the collapse time for the pressure ratios of interest. Several types of shock waves are generated during the collapse, including precursor and water-hammer shocks that arise from the re-entrant jet formation and its impact upon the distal side of the bubble, respectively. The water-hammer shock can generate very high pressures on the wall, far exceeding those from the incident shock. The potential damage to the neighbouring surface is quantified by measuring the wall pressure. The range of stand-off distances and the surface area for which amplification of the incident shock due to bubble collapse occurs is determined. PMID:19756233

  14. Transanal Minimally Invasive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    deBeche-Adams, Teresa; Nassif, George

    2015-01-01

    Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was first described in 2010 as a crossover between single-incision laparoscopic surgery and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) to allow access to the proximal and mid-rectum for resection of benign and early-stage malignant rectal lesions. The TAMIS technique can also be used for noncurative intent surgery of more advanced lesions in patients who are not candidates for radical surgery. Proper workup and staging should be done before surgical decision-making. In addition to the TAMIS port, instrumentation and set up include readily available equipment found in most operating suites. TAMIS has proven its usefulness in a wide range of applications outside of local excision, including repair of rectourethral fistula, removal of rectal foreign body, control of rectal hemorrhage, and as an adjunct in total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer. TAMIS is an easily accessible, technically feasible, and cost-effective alternative to TEM. PMID:26491410

  15. Membranes minimize liquid discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Cappos, S.

    1995-07-01

    Zero discharge is a matter of concentration. Liquid and solid waste are repeatedly reduced to minimize or eliminate their discharge. But the process is intense, requiring an array of filtering and purifying technologies to achieve discharge goals. One of the most productive and effective technologies for this purpose is reverse osmosis (RO). Developed in the 1960s, RO produces a high-quality permeate for reuse, and a small concentrated stream for further treatment. The addition of RO to a wastewater treatment system can reduce overall operating costs and the capital costs of other components, as well as reduce a waste treatment system`s reliance on chemical treatment. The paper discusses how RO works, when RO is the best solution, where the waste goes, alternative technologies (clarifiers, vapor compression evaporators, and ion exchange demineralizers), and recent advances in membrane technology.

  16. Minimally invasive esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Herbella, Fernando A; Patti, Marco G

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal resection is associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) might theoretically decrease this rate. We reviewed the current literature on MIE, with a focus on the available techniques, outcomes and comparison with open surgery. This review shows that the available literature on MIE is still crowded with heterogeneous studies with different techniques. There are no controlled and randomized trials, and the few retrospective comparative cohort studies are limited by small numbers of patients and biased by historical controls of open surgery. Based on the available literature, there is no evidence that MIE brings clear benefits compared to conventional esophagectomy. Increasing experience and the report of larger series might change this scenario. PMID:20698044

  17. Minimally invasive valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y Joseph; Seeburger, Joerg; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2007-01-01

    As alternatives to standard sternotomy, surgeons have developed innovative, minimally invasive approaches to conducting valve surgery. Through very small skin incisions and partial upper sternal division for aortic valve surgery and right minithoracotomy for mitral surgery, surgeons have become adept at performing complex valve procedures. Beyond cosmetic appeal, apparent benefits range from decreased pain and bleeding to improved respiratory function and recovery time. The large retrospective studies and few small prospective randomized studies are herein briefly summarized. The focus is then directed toward describing specific intraoperative technical details in current clinical use, covering anesthetic preparation, incision, mediastinal access, cardiovascular cannulation, valve exposure, and valve reconstruction. Finally, unique situations such as pulmonic valve surgery, reoperations, beating heart surgery, and robotics are discussed.

  18. Minimally invasive parathyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noureldine, Salem I.; Gooi, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, bilateral cervical exploration for localization of all four parathyroid glands and removal of any that are grossly enlarged has been the standard surgical treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). With the advances in preoperative localization studies and greater public demand for less invasive procedures, novel targeted, minimally invasive techniques to the parathyroid glands have been described and practiced over the past 2 decades. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) can be done either through the standard Kocher incision, a smaller midline incision, with video assistance (purely endoscopic and video-assisted techniques), or through an ectopically placed, extracervical, incision. In current practice, once PHPT is diagnosed, preoperative evaluation using high-resolution radiographic imaging to localize the offending parathyroid gland is essential if MIP is to be considered. The imaging study results suggest where the surgeon should begin the focused procedure and serve as a road map to allow tailoring of an efficient, imaging-guided dissection while eliminating the unnecessary dissection of multiple glands or a bilateral exploration. Intraoperative parathyroid hormone (IOPTH) levels may be measured during the procedure, or a gamma probe used during radioguided parathyroidectomy, to ascertain that the correct gland has been excised and that no other hyperfunctional tissue is present. MIP has many advantages over the traditional bilateral, four-gland exploration. MIP can be performed using local anesthesia, requires less operative time, results in fewer complications, and offers an improved cosmetic result and greater patient satisfaction. Additional advantages of MIP are earlier hospital discharge and decreased overall associated costs. This article aims to address the considerations for accomplishing MIP, including the role of preoperative imaging studies, intraoperative adjuncts, and surgical techniques. PMID:26425454

  19. Differing Semaphorin 3A concentrations trigger distinct signaling mechanisms in growth cone collapse

    PubMed Central

    Manns, Richard P.C.; Cook, Geoffrey M.W.; Holt, Christine E.; Keynes, Roger J.

    2012-01-01

    Semaphorin-3A (Sema3A) is a major guidance cue in the developing nervous system. Previous studies have revealed a dependence of responses to Sema3A on local protein synthesis (PS) in axonal growth cones, but a recent study has called this dependence into question. To understand the basis of this discrepancy we used the growth cone collapse assay on chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We show that the dependence of growth cone collapse on protein synthesis varies according to Sema3A concentration, from near-total at low concentration (<100ng/ml) to minimal at high concentration (>625ng/ml). Further, we show that neuropilin-1 (NP-1) mediates both PS-dependent and PS–independent collapse. Our findings are consistent with the operation of at least two distinct Sema3A signaling pathways: one that is PS-dependent, involving mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and one that is PS-independent, involving GSK-3β activation and operative at all concentrations of Sema3A examined. The results provide a plausible explanation for the discrepancy in PS-dependence reported in the literature, and indicate that different signaling pathways activated within growth cones can be modulated by changing the concentration of the same guidance cue. PMID:22723695

  20. Quantum vacuum effects on the final fate of a collapsing ball of dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Noorikuhani, Milad

    2017-02-01

    We consider the quantum vacuum effects of the massless scalar fields that are non-minimally coupled to the background geometry of a collapsing homogeneous ball of dust. It is shown that for a definite range of coupling constants, there are repulsive quantum vacuum effects, capable of stopping the collapse process inside the black hole and precluding the formation of singularity. The final fate of the collapse will be a black hole with no singularity, inside which the matter stays balanced. The density of the final static matter will be close to the Planck density. We show that the largest possible radius of the stable static ball inside a black hole with Schwarzschild mass M is given by {(1/90πM/m_p)}^{1/3}{ℓ}_p . If the black hole undergoes Hawking radiation, the final state will be an extremal quantum-corrected black hole, with zero temperature, with a remnant of matter inside. We show that the resolution of singularity is not disrupted under Hawking radiation.

  1. 2. EMPIRE STATE MINE. VIEW OF COLLAPSED BUILDINGS AT MINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EMPIRE STATE MINE. VIEW OF COLLAPSED BUILDINGS AT MINE WITH TAILINGS ON RIGHT. CAMERA POINTED SOUTHWEST. COLLAPSED ADIT APPROXIMATELY 25 YARDS UPHILL TO THE LEFT OF FAR BUILDING. TIP TOP AND ONTARIO ARE LOCATED OUT OF THE PICTURE TO THE RIGHT. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Empire State Mine, West side of Florida Mountain, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  2. Maternal Postpartum Role Collapse as a Theory of Postpartum Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amankwaa, Linda Clark

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of a theory of maternal postpartum role collapse. The influences of traditional role theory and symbolic interactionism are presented. The development of the maternal postpartum role collapse theory emerged from the study of postpartum depression among African-American women (Amankwaa, 2000).…

  3. Can a collapse of global civilization be avoided?

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Paul R; Ehrlich, Anne H

    2013-03-07

    Environmental problems have contributed to numerous collapses of civilizations in the past. Now, for the first time, a global collapse appears likely. Overpopulation, overconsumption by the rich and poor choices of technologies are major drivers; dramatic cultural change provides the main hope of averting calamity.

  4. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse on Film and Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Don; Hook, Joseph; Doescher, Russell; Wolf, Steven

    2015-01-01

    This month marks the 75th anniversary of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse. During a gale on Nov. 7, 1940, the bridge exhibited remarkable oscillations before collapsing spectacularly (Figs. 1-5). Physicists over the years have spent a great deal of time and energy studying this event. By using open-source analysis tools and digitized footage of…

  5. The Direct Collapse of Supermassive Black Hole Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, John A.; Johansson, Peter H.; Wise, John H.

    2016-10-01

    The direct collapse model of supermassive black hole seed formation requires that thegas cools predominantly via atomic hydrogen. To this end we simulate the effect of ananisotropic radiation source on the collapse of a halo at high redshift. The radiationsource is placed at a distance of 3 kpc (physical) from the collapsing object and is setto emit monochromatically in the center of the Lyman-Werner (LW) band. The LW radiationemitted from the high redshift source is followed self-consistently using ray tracingtechniques. Due to self-shielding, a small amount of H2 is able to form at the verycenter of the collapsing halo even under very strong LW radiation. Furthermore, we find thata radiation source, emitting < 1054 (~103 J21) photons per second isrequired to cause the collapse of a clump of M ~ 105 M⊙. The resultingaccretion rate onto the collapsing object is ~ 0.25 M⊙ yr-1.Our results display significant differences, compared to the isotropic radiation field case,in terms of H2 fraction at an equivalent radius. These differences will significantly effectthe dynamics of the collapse. With the inclusion of a strong anisotropic radiation source, thefinal mass of the collapsing object is found to be M ~ 105 M⊙. This is consistentwith predictions for the formation of a supermassive star or quasi-star leading to asupermassive black hole.

  6. PREVENTION OF PHOTORESIST PATTERN COLLAPSE BY USING LIQUID CARBON DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photoresist polymers with small aspect ratios are presently cleaned with aqueous solutions. For small aspect ratios, the pattern collapses during the drying step. The origin of resist pattern collapse is the surface tension of the rinse liquid. Following a theoretic model, we pre...

  7. Collapse events of two-color optical beams

    DOE PAGES

    Sukhinin, Alexey; Aceves, Alejandro B.; Diels, Jean-Claude; ...

    2017-03-08

    Here in this work, we study optical self-focusing that leads to collapse events for the time-independent model of copropagating beams with different wavelengths. We show that collapse events depend on the combined critical power of two beams for fundamental, vortex, and mixed configurations as well as on the ratio of their individual powers.

  8. PREVENTION OF PHOTORESIST PATTERN COLLAPSE BY USING LIQUID CARBON DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photoresist polymers with small aspect ratios are presently cleaned with aqueous solutions. For small aspect ratios, the pattern collapses during the drying step. The origin of resist pattern collapse is the surface tension of the rinse liquid. Following a theoretic model, we pre...

  9. QCD axion star collapse with the chiral potential

    DOE PAGES

    Eby, Joshua; Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; ...

    2017-06-05

    In a previous study, we analyzed collapsing axion stars using the low-energy instanton potential, showing that the total energy is always bounded and that collapsing axion stars do not form black holes. In this paper, we provide a proof that the conclusions are unchanged when using instead the more general chiral potential for QCD axions.

  10. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse on Film and Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Don; Hook, Joseph; Doescher, Russell; Wolf, Steven

    2015-01-01

    This month marks the 75th anniversary of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse. During a gale on Nov. 7, 1940, the bridge exhibited remarkable oscillations before collapsing spectacularly (Figs. 1-5). Physicists over the years have spent a great deal of time and energy studying this event. By using open-source analysis tools and digitized footage of…

  11. Avoiding bandwidth collapse in long chains of coupled optical microresonators.

    PubMed

    Mookherjea, Shayan; Schneider, Mark A

    2011-12-01

    Coupled photonic oscillators and resonators are sensitive to unavoidable nanoscale disorder, and localization in periodic structures induced by disorder leads eventually to a complete collapse of the bandwidth, which is generally considered problematic for device applications. Here, we investigate the dependence of bandwidth collapse on the interresonator coupling coefficient, a parameter controllable by lithography or device operation.

  12. Spatial distribution of pipe collapses in Goodwin Creek Watershed, Mississippi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Internal erosion of soil pipes can induce pipe collapses that affect soil erosion process and landform evolution. The objective of this study was to determine the spatial distribution of pipe collapses in agricultural fields of Goodwin Creek watershed. Ground survey was carried out to detect pipe co...

  13. Can a collapse of global civilization be avoided?

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Paul R.; Ehrlich, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental problems have contributed to numerous collapses of civilizations in the past. Now, for the first time, a global collapse appears likely. Overpopulation, overconsumption by the rich and poor choices of technologies are major drivers; dramatic cultural change provides the main hope of averting calamity. PMID:23303549

  14. Maternal Postpartum Role Collapse as a Theory of Postpartum Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amankwaa, Linda Clark

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of a theory of maternal postpartum role collapse. The influences of traditional role theory and symbolic interactionism are presented. The development of the maternal postpartum role collapse theory emerged from the study of postpartum depression among African-American women (Amankwaa, 2000).…

  15. Comparing solvophobic and multivalent induced collapse in polyelectrolyte brushes

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, Nicholas E.; Brettmann, Blair K.; Vishwanath, Venkatram; ...

    2017-02-03

    Here, coarse-grained molecular dynamics enhanced by free-energy sampling methods is used to examine the roles of solvophobicity and multivalent salts on polyelectrolyte brush collapse. Specifically, we demonstrate that while ostensibly similar, solvophobic collapsed brushes and multivalent-ion collapsed brushes exhibit distinct mechanistic and structural features. Notably, multivalent-induced heterogeneous brush collapse is observed under good solvent polymer backbone conditions, demonstrating that the mechanism of multivalent collapse is not contingent upon a solvophobic backbone. Umbrella sampling of the potential of mean-force (PMF) between two individual brush strands confirms this analysis, revealing starkly different PMFs under solvophobic and multivalent conditions, suggesting the role ofmore » multivalent “bridging” as the discriminating feature in trivalent collapse. Structurally, multivalent ions show a propensity for nucleating order within collapsed brushes, whereas poor-solvent collapsed brushes are more disordered; this difference is traced to the existence of a metastable PMF minimum for poor solvent conditions, and a global PMF minimum for trivalent systems, under experimentally relevant conditions.« less

  16. Rising catch variability preceded historical fisheries collapses in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Litzow, Michael A; Mueter, Franz J; Urban, J Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Statistical indicators such as rising variance and rising skewness in key system parameters may provide early warning of "regime shifts" in communities and populations. However, the utility of these indicators has rarely been tested in the large, complex ecosystems that are of most interest to managers. Crustacean fisheries in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea experienced a series of collapses beginning in the 1970s, and we used spatially resolved catch data from these fisheries to test the predictions that increasing variability and skewness would precede stock collapse. Our data set consisted of catch data from 14 fisheries (12 collapsing and two non-collapsing), spanning 278 cumulative years. Our sampling unit for analysis was the Alaska Department of Fish and Game statistical reporting area (mean n for individual fisheries = 42 areas, range 7-81). We found that spatial variability in catches increased prior to stock collapse: a random-effects model estimating trend in variability across all 12 collapsing fisheries showed strong evidence of increasing variability prior to collapse. Individual trends in variability were statistically significant for only four of the 12 collapsing fisheries, suggesting that rising variability might be most effective as an indicator when information from multiple populations is available. Analyzing data across multiple fisheries allowed us to detect increasing variability 1-4 years prior to collapse, and trends in variability were significantly different for collapsing and non-collapsing fisheries. In spite of theoretical expectations, we found no evidence of pre-collapse increases in catch skewness. Further, while models generally predict that rising variability should be a transient phenomenon around collapse points, increased variability was a persistent feature of collapsed fisheries in our study. We conclude that this result is more consistent with fishing effects as the cause of increased catch variability, rather than the

  17. Formation and evolution of cores in globally collapsing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-07-01

    I will present recent results on the hierarchical gravitational fragmentation (HGF) of molecular clouds (MCs) leading to the formation of dense cores. I will first discuss the scenario of HGF as an alternative to the standard scenario of turbulent support --> turbulent dissipation --> collapse. In it, clouds are multi-Jeans-mass object undergoing global, multi-scale collapse, and the cores are the local centers of collapse. The lapse between the onset of local collapse and the formation of a singularity constitutes the prestellar phase. I will present numerical simulations of core growth during this phase in the idealized case of spherical geometry, immersed in a globally collapsing environment, discussing the evolution of the density and velocity profiles. I will also present synthetic molecular line observations of such idealized cores, aimed at determining to what extent such an idealized setup recovers the basic observational features of the cores, and which features require additional physics such as background turbulence and non-spherical symmetry.

  18. Minimal Marking: A Success Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeilly, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The minimal-marking project conducted in Ryerson's School of Journalism throughout 2012 and early 2013 resulted in significantly higher grammar scores in two first-year classes of minimally marked university students when compared to two traditionally marked classes. The "minimal-marking" concept (Haswell, 1983), which requires…

  19. Volcanic rock properties control sector collapse events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Amy; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Hornby, Adrian; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes constructed by superimposed layers of varying volcanic materials are inherently unstable structures. The heterogeneity of weak and strong layers consisting of ash, tephra and lavas, each with varying coherencies, porosities, crystallinities, glass content and ultimately, strength, can promote volcanic flank and sector collapses. These volcanoes often exist in areas with complex regional tectonics adding to instability caused by heterogeneity, flank overburden, magma movement and emplacement in addition to hydrothermal alteration and anomalous geothermal gradients. Recent studies conducted on the faulting properties of volcanic rocks at variable slip rates show the rate-weakening dependence of the friction coefficients (up to 90% reduction)[1], caused by a wide range of factors such as the generation of gouge and frictional melt lubrication [2]. Experimental data from experiments conducted on volcanic products suggests that frictional melt occurs at slip rates similar to those of plug flow in volcanic conduits [1] and the bases of mass material movements such as debris avalanches from volcanic flanks [3]. In volcanic rock, the generation of frictional heat may prompt the remobilisation of interstitial glass below melting temperatures due to passing of the glass transition temperature at ˜650-750 ˚C [4]. In addition, the crushing of pores in high porosity samples can lead to increased comminution and strain localisation along slip surfaces. Here we present the results of friction tests on both high density, glass rich samples from Santaguito (Guatemala) and synthetic glass samples with varying porosities (0-25%) to better understand frictional properties underlying volcanic collapse events. 1. Kendrick, J.E., et al., Extreme frictional processes in the volcanic conduit of Mount St. Helens (USA) during the 2004-2008 eruption. J. Structural Geology, 2012. 2. Di Toro, G., et al., Fault lubrication during earthquakes. Nature, 2011. 471(7339): p. 494-498. 3

  20. Numerical modelling of collapsing volcanic edifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Ana; Marques, Fernando; Kaus, Boris

    2017-04-01

    The flanks of Oceanic Volcanic Edifice's (OVEs) can occasionally become unstable. If that occurs, they can deform in two different modes: either slowly along localization failure zones (slumps) or catastrophically as debris avalanches. Yet the physics of this process is incompletely understood, and the role of factors such as the OVE's strength (viscosity, cohesion, friction angle), dimensions, geometry, and existence of weak layers remain to be addressed. Here we perform numerical simulations to study the interplay between viscous and plastic deformation on the gravitational collapse of an OVE (diffuse deformation vs. localization of failure along discrete structures). We focus on the contribution of the edifice's strength parameters for the mode of deformation, as well as on the type of basement. Tests were performed for a large OVE (7.5 km high, 200 km long) and either purely viscous (overall volcano edifice viscosities between 1019-1023 Pa.s), or viscoplastic rheology (within a range of cohesion and friction angle values). Results show that (a) for a strong basement (no slip basal boundary condition), the deformation pattern suggests wide/diffuse "listric" deformation within the volcanic edifice, without the development of discrete plastic failure zones; (b) for a weak basement (free slip basal boundary condition), rapid collapse of the edifice through the propagation of plastic failure structures within the edifice occurs. Tests for a smaller OVE (4.5 km by 30 km) show that failure localization along large-scale listric structures occurs more readily for different combinations of cohesion and friction angles. In these tests, high cohesion values combined with small friction angles lead to focusing of deformation along a narrower band. Tests with a weak layer underlying part of the volcanic edifice base show deformation focused along discrete structures mainly dipping towards the distal sector of the volcano. These tests for a small OVE constitute a promising

  1. Minimal Higgs inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Debaprasad

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we propose minimal Higgs inflation scenarios by non-polynomial modification of the Higgs potential. The modification is done in such a way that it creates a flat plateau for a huge range of field values at the inflationary energy scale μ ≃(λ) 1 / 4 α. Assuming the perturbative Higgs quartic coupling, λ ≃ O (1), our model prediction for all the cosmologically relevant quantities, (ns , r , dnsk), fit extremely well with observations made by PLANCK. For both the models the inflation energy scale turned out to be μ ≃ (1014 ,1015) GeV. Considering observed central value of the scalar spectral index, ns = 0.968, models predict efolding number, N = (52 , 47). Within a wide range of viable parameter space, we found that the prediction of tensor to scalar ratio r (≤10-5) is far below the current experimental limit. The prediction for the running of scalar spectral index, dnsk, remains very small. We also computed the background field dependent unitarity scale Λ (h), which turned out to be much larger than the aforementioned inflationary energy scale.

  2. Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island

    PubMed Central

    Paxton, Eben H.; Camp, Richard J.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Crampton, Lisa H.; Leonard, David L.; VanderWerf, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    The viability of many species has been jeopardized by numerous negative factors over the centuries, but climate change is predicted to accelerate and increase the pressure of many of these threats, leading to extinctions. The Hawaiian honeycreepers, famous for their spectacular adaptive radiation, are predicted to experience negative responses to climate change, given their susceptibility to introduced disease, the strong linkage of disease distribution to climatic conditions, and their current distribution. We document the rapid collapse of the native avifauna on the island of Kaua‘i that corresponds to changes in climate and disease prevalence. Although multiple factors may be pressuring the community, we suggest that a tipping point has been crossed in which temperatures in forest habitats at high elevations have reached a threshold that facilitates the development of avian malaria and its vector throughout these species’ ranges. Continued incursion of invasive weeds and non-native avian competitors may be facilitated by climate change and could also contribute to declines. If current rates of decline continue, we predict multiple extinctions in the coming decades. Kaua‘i represents an early warning for the forest bird communities on the Maui and Hawai‘i islands, as well as other species around the world that are trapped within a climatic space that is rapidly disappearing. PMID:27617287

  3. Tourism's collapse puts Gambian women at risk.

    PubMed

    Coker, M S

    1995-06-01

    Despite efforts of the Gambian government, which established a ministry in 1981 that would tackle gender issues, improve women's health, and promote empowerment, women are underrepresented in government and business, and 84% are illiterate. Child mortality is among the highest in Africa; 134 children per 1000 die before their fifth birthday. In the mid-1980s austerity measures adopted by the World Bank and IMF left the ministry without funds. Rice and vegetable production, the main source of income for women, fell in the 1990s. In 1994, paddy production dropped 23% from the previous year; this was due to a lack of technical and financial assistance. The collapse of tourism with Capt. Yahya Jammeh's seizure of power has put prostitutes catering to tourists out of work, but women who have lost jobs in the hotel industry may be pushed into local prostitution to survive. The impact of this on the HIV/AIDS epidemic is unclear. Although Gambia is one of the world's most aid-dependent countries (more than a quarter of the GNP before the coup), corruption and mismanagement in the nongovernmental sector is widespread. The director of the Women in Development Programme, a $15m World Bank project, was forced to resign over allegations of fraud. The political process sidelines women; only village chiefs, who are traditionally men, are allowed to vote when new heads are elected.

  4. Collapse of superhydrophobicity on nanopillared surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabili, Matteo; Giacomello, Alberto; Meloni, Simone; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2017-03-01

    The mechanism of the collapse of the superhydrophobic state is elucidated for submerged nanoscale textures forming a three-dimensional interconnected vapor domain. This key issue for the design of nanotextures poses significant simulation challenges as it is characterized by diverse time and length scales. State-of-the-art atomistic rare events simulations are applied for overcoming the long time scales connected with the large free energy barriers. In such interconnected surface cavities wetting starts with the formation of a liquid finger between two pillars. This break of symmetry induces a more gentle bend in the rest of the liquid-vapor interface, which triggers the wetting of the neighboring pillars. This collective mechanism, involving the wetting of several pillars at the same time, could not be captured by previous atomistic simulations using surface models comprising a small number of pillars (often just one). Atomistic results are interpreted in terms of a sharp-interface continuum model which suggests that line tension, condensation, and other nanoscale phenomena play a minor role in the simulated conditions.

  5. Flux-driven simulations of turbulence collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Park, G. Y.; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun; Rhee, T.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.

    2015-03-15

    Using three-dimensional nonlinear simulations of tokamak turbulence, we show that an edge transport barrier (ETB) forms naturally once input power exceeds a threshold value. Profiles, turbulence-driven flows, and neoclassical coefficients are evolved self-consistently. A slow power ramp-up simulation shows that ETB transition is triggered by the turbulence-driven flows via an intermediate phase which involves coherent oscillation of turbulence intensity and E×B flow shear. A novel observation of the evolution is that the turbulence collapses and the ETB transition begins when R{sub T} > 1 at t = t{sub R} (R{sub T}: normalized Reynolds power), while the conventional transition criterion (ω{sub E×B}>γ{sub lin} where ω{sub E×B} denotes mean flow shear) is satisfied only after t = t{sub C} ( >t{sub R}), when the mean flow shear grows due to positive feedback.

  6. Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Eben H; Camp, Richard J; Gorresen, P Marcos; Crampton, Lisa H; Leonard, David L; VanderWerf, Eric A

    2016-09-01

    The viability of many species has been jeopardized by numerous negative factors over the centuries, but climate change is predicted to accelerate and increase the pressure of many of these threats, leading to extinctions. The Hawaiian honeycreepers, famous for their spectacular adaptive radiation, are predicted to experience negative responses to climate change, given their susceptibility to introduced disease, the strong linkage of disease distribution to climatic conditions, and their current distribution. We document the rapid collapse of the native avifauna on the island of Kaua'i that corresponds to changes in climate and disease prevalence. Although multiple factors may be pressuring the community, we suggest that a tipping point has been crossed in which temperatures in forest habitats at high elevations have reached a threshold that facilitates the development of avian malaria and its vector throughout these species' ranges. Continued incursion of invasive weeds and non-native avian competitors may be facilitated by climate change and could also contribute to declines. If current rates of decline continue, we predict multiple extinctions in the coming decades. Kaua'i represents an early warning for the forest bird communities on the Maui and Hawai'i islands, as well as other species around the world that are trapped within a climatic space that is rapidly disappearing.

  7. Collapse in self-gravitating turbulent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Daniel W.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman W.; Pittman, John

    2017-02-01

    Motivated by the non-linear star formation efficiency found in recent numerical simulations by a number of workers, we perform high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of star formation in self-gravitating turbulently driven gas. As we follow the collapse of this gas, we find that the character of the flow changes at two radii, the disc radius rd and the radius r*, where the enclosed gas mass exceeds the stellar mass. Accretion starts at large scales and works inwards. In line with recent analytical work, we find that the density evolves to a fixed attractor, ρ(r, t) → ρ(r), for rd < r < r*; mass flows through this structure on to a sporadically gravitationally unstable disc and from thence on to the star. In the bulk of the simulation box, we find that the random motions vT ∼ rp with p ∼ 0.5 are in agreement with Larson's size-linewidth relation. In the vicinity of massive star-forming regions, we find p ∼ 0.2-0.3, as seen in observations. For r < r*, vT increases inwards, with p = -1/2. Finally, we find that the total stellar mass M*(t) ∼ t2 is in line with previous numerical and analytic work that suggests a non-linear rate of star formation.

  8. NAPA Observations of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Stuart; Stockdale, Christopher; van Dyk, Schuyler; Panagia, Nino; Amy, Shaun; Immler, Stefan; Burlon, Davide; Kotak, Rubina; Polshaw, Joe; Romero-Canizales, Cristina

    2014-10-01

    We propose to continue NAPA observations of nearby core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) to: (1) Determine the physics of SNe through the study of the mass-loss rate, absorption mechanisms, and density distribution of the circumstellar medium (CSM) laid down by the pre-SN stellar wind; (2) Improve our understanding of the various subgroupings (Type Ib, Ic, IIL, IIP, IIn, IIb) which characterise the range of CCSN progenitor systems; and (3) Provide targets for Chandra/Swift X-ray ToO which is sensitive to the thermal emission from the SN shock and, thus, complementary to the non-thermal radio observations. To date we have detected and then monitored 4 out of 6 CCSNe out to distances ~30 Mpc, something not possible prior to CABB. By combining our data with optical and X-ray observations for the Type IIb SN 2011hs and the Type IIP SN 2011ja, we could confirm that their progenitors were a Wolf-Rayet star, and a red supergiant, respectively.

  9. NAPA Observations of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Stuart; Stockdale, Christopher; van Dyk, Schuyler; Panagia, Nino; Amy, Shaun; Immler, Stefan; Burlon, Davide; Kotak, Rubina; Polshaw, Joe

    2014-04-01

    We propose to continue NAPA observations of nearby core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) to: (1) Determine the physics of SNe through the study of the mass-loss rate, absorption mechanisms, and density distribution of the circumstellar medium (CSM) laid down by the pre-SN stellar wind; (2) Improve our understanding of the various subgroupings (Type Ib, Ic, IIL, IIP, IIn, IIb) which characterise the range of CCSN progenitor systems; and (3) Provide targets for Chandra/Swift X-ray ToO which is sensitive to the thermal emission from the SN shock and, thus, complementary to the non-thermal radio observations. To date we have detected and then monitored 4 out of 6 CCSNe out to distances ~30 Mpc, something not possible prior to CABB. By combining our data with optical and X-ray observations for the Type IIb SN 2011hs and the Type IIP SN 2011ja, we could confirm that their progenitors were a Wolf-Rayet star, and a red supergiant, respectively.

  10. Rippling Instability of a Collapsing Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilveira, Rava; Chaieb, Sahraoui; Mahadevan, L.

    1999-01-01

    The rippling instability of a liquid sheet was first observed by Debregeas, de Gennes, an Brochard-Wyart [Science 279, 1704 (1998)] on a hemispherical bubble resting on a free surface. Unlike a soap bubble, it collapses under its own weight while bursting, and folds into a wavy structure which breaks the original axisymmetry. In fact, this effect occurs for both purely elastic and purely viscous (liquid) sheets, and an analogy can be made between the two mechanisms. We present a theory for the onset of the instability in both cases, in which the growth of the corrugation out of an inextensible initial condition is governed by the competition between gravitational and bending (shearing) forces. The instability occurs for a range of densities, stiffnesses (viscosities), and sizes, a result which arises less from dynamics than from geometry, suggesting a wide validity. We further obtain a quantitative expression for the number of ripples. Finally, we present the results of experiments, which are consistent with our predictions.

  11. Colony Collapse Disorder: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.; Saegerman, Claude; Mullin, Chris; Haubruge, Eric; Nguyen, Bach Kim; Frazier, Maryann; Frazier, Jim; Cox-Foster, Diana; Chen, Yanping; Underwood, Robyn; Tarpy, David R.; Pettis, Jeffery S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We initiated a descriptive epizootiological study in order to better characterize CCD and compare risk factor exposure between populations afflicted by and not afflicted by CCD. Methods and Principal Findings Of 61 quantified variables (including adult bee physiology, pathogen loads, and pesticide levels), no single measure emerged as a most-likely cause of CCD. Bees in CCD colonies had higher pathogen loads and were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens than control populations, suggesting either an increased exposure to pathogens or a reduced resistance of bees toward pathogens. Levels of the synthetic acaricide coumaphos (used by beekeepers to control the parasitic mite Varroa destructor) were higher in control colonies than CCD-affected colonies. Conclusions/Significance This is the first comprehensive survey of CCD-affected bee populations that suggests CCD involves an interaction between pathogens and other stress factors. We present evidence that this condition is contagious or the result of exposure to a common risk factor. Potentially important areas for future hypothesis-driven research, including the possible legacy effect of mite parasitism and the role of honey bee resistance to pesticides, are highlighted. PMID:19649264

  12. Pseudospectral method for gravitational wave collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilditch, David; Weyhausen, Andreas; Brügmann, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    We present a new pseudospectral code, bamps, for numerical relativity written with the evolution of collapsing gravitational waves in mind. We employ the first-order generalized harmonic gauge formulation. The relevant theory is reviewed, and the numerical method is critically examined and specialized for the task at hand. In particular, we investigate formulation parameters—gauge- and constraint-preserving boundary conditions well suited to nonvanishing gauge source functions. Different types of axisymmetric twist-free moment-of-time-symmetry gravitational wave initial data are discussed. A treatment of the axisymmetric apparent horizon condition is presented with careful attention to regularity on axis. Our apparent horizon finder is then evaluated in a number of test cases. Moving on to evolutions, we investigate modifications to the generalized harmonic gauge constraint damping scheme to improve conservation in the strong-field regime. We demonstrate strong-scaling of our pseudospectral penalty code. We employ the Cartoon method to efficiently evolve axisymmetric data in our 3 +1 -dimensional code. We perform test evolutions of the Schwarzschild spacetime perturbed by gravitational waves and by gauge pulses, both to demonstrate the use of our black-hole excision scheme and for comparison with earlier results. Finally, numerical evolutions of supercritical Brill waves are presented to demonstrate durability of the excision scheme for the dynamical formation of a black hole.

  13. Colony collapse disorder: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D; Saegerman, Claude; Mullin, Chris; Haubruge, Eric; Nguyen, Bach Kim; Frazier, Maryann; Frazier, Jim; Cox-Foster, Diana; Chen, Yanping; Underwood, Robyn; Tarpy, David R; Pettis, Jeffery S

    2009-08-03

    Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We initiated a descriptive epizootiological study in order to better characterize CCD and compare risk factor exposure between populations afflicted by and not afflicted by CCD. Of 61 quantified variables (including adult bee physiology, pathogen loads, and pesticide levels), no single measure emerged as a most-likely cause of CCD. Bees in CCD colonies had higher pathogen loads and were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens than control populations, suggesting either an increased exposure to pathogens or a reduced resistance of bees toward pathogens. Levels of the synthetic acaricide coumaphos (used by beekeepers to control the parasitic mite Varroa destructor) were higher in control colonies than CCD-affected colonies. This is the first comprehensive survey of CCD-affected bee populations that suggests CCD involves an interaction between pathogens and other stress factors. We present evidence that this condition is contagious or the result of exposure to a common risk factor. Potentially important areas for future hypothesis-driven research, including the possible legacy effect of mite parasitism and the role of honey bee resistance to pesticides, are highlighted.

  14. Pre-collapse phase studies before Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafalla, M.

    2012-03-01

    The role of molecular clouds as factories of stars has been recognized for decades, but understanding how a large cloud of tens of thousands or more solar masses fragments into stellar-sized pockets with an efficiency of only a few percent and an IMF spectrum is still a puzzling mystery. In this talk, I will review how our observational understanding of the stages prior to star formation has evolved with time, from the earliest molecular studies to the pre-Herschel era. Both the large scale of clouds and the small structure of dense cores will be covered, following the results from molecular-line observation and dust emission/extinction studies. Although Herschel observations are clearly revolutionizing our view of cloud and core formation, parallel work on the kinematics of the cloud gas is also shedding new light on the pre-collapse phases. I will end my presentation showing how large-scale kinematics studies, highly complementary to the Herschel continuum data, reveal a sequence of fragmentation that seems responsible for core formation.

  15. Child mortality in a collapsing African society.

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, M. M.; Omar, H. M.; Persson, L. A.; Wall, S.

    1996-01-01

    A cohort study of mortality among under-5-year-olds was carried out in two Somali villages in 1987-89, a period of economic and political collapse in the rural parts of the country. Analysed was the relative importance of the social characteristics for under-5-year-old mortality against a background of deteriorating political and economic conditions. Mortality increased among under-5-year-olds from 1987 (211 per 1000) to 1988 (323 per 1000) to 1989 (414 per 1000). The mortality risk was more pronounced for boys than girls and was more so for infants than children aged 1-4 years. The major signs prior to death were respiratory infections, diarrhoeal diseases, fever/malaria and tetanus in the neonatal period. Over the 3-year study period mortality rates for diarrhoeal diseases increased significantly, while those for respiratory infections and diseases preventable by immunization increased more slowly. The increasing trend in under-5-year-old mortality was more pronounced in instances when the mother derived her major income from sources other than farming and in larger households. PMID:9002335

  16. Tulsa Oklahoma Oktoberfest Tent Collapse Report

    PubMed Central

    Deal, Kelly E.; Synovitz, Carolyn K.; Goodloe, Jeffrey M.; King, Brandi; Stewart, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. On October 17, 2007, a severe weather event collapsed two large tents and several smaller tents causing 23 injuries requiring evacuation to emergency departments in Tulsa, OK. Methods. This paper is a retrospective analysis of the regional health system's response to this event. Data from the Tulsa Fire Department, The Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA), receiving hospitals and coordinating services were reviewed and analyzed. EMS patient care reports were reviewed and analyzed using triage designators assigned in the field, injury severity scores, and critical mortality. Results. EMT's and paramedics from Tulsa Fire Department and EMSA provided care at the scene under unified incident command. Of the 23 patients transported by EMS, four were hospitalized, one with critical spinal injury and one with critical head injury. One patient is still in ongoing rehabilitation. Discussion. Analysis of the 2007 Tulsa Oktoberfest mass casualty incident revealed rapid police/fire/EMS response despite challenges of operations at dark under severe weather conditions and the need to treat a significant number of injured victims. There were no fatalities. Of the patients transported by EMS, a minority sustained critical injuries, with most sustaining injuries amenable to discharge after emergency department care. PMID:22649732

  17. Collapse of cooperation in evolving games

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alexander J.; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2014-01-01

    Game theory provides a quantitative framework for analyzing the behavior of rational agents. The Iterated Prisoner’s Dilemma in particular has become a standard model for studying cooperation and cheating, with cooperation often emerging as a robust outcome in evolving populations. Here we extend evolutionary game theory by allowing players’ payoffs as well as their strategies to evolve in response to selection on heritable mutations. In nature, many organisms engage in mutually beneficial interactions and individuals may seek to change the ratio of risk to reward for cooperation by altering the resources they commit to cooperative interactions. To study this, we construct a general framework for the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in arbitrary iterated games. We show that, when there is a tradeoff between the benefits and costs of cooperation, coevolution often leads to a dramatic loss of cooperation in the Iterated Prisoner’s Dilemma. The collapse of cooperation is so extreme that the average payoff in a population can decline even as the potential reward for mutual cooperation increases. Depending upon the form of tradeoffs, evolution may even move away from the Iterated Prisoner’s Dilemma game altogether. Our work offers a new perspective on the Prisoner’s Dilemma and its predictions for cooperation in natural populations; and it provides a general framework to understand the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in iterated interactions. PMID:25422421

  18. Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben; Camp, Richard J.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Crampton, Lisa H.; Leonard, David L.; VanderWerf, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The viability of many species has been jeopardized by numerous negative factors over the centuries, but climate change is predicted to accelerate and increase the pressure of many of these threats, leading to extinctions. The Hawaiian honeycreepers, famous for their spectacular adaptive radiation, are predicted to experience negative responses to climate change, given their susceptibility to introduced disease, the strong linkage of disease distribution to climatic conditions, and their current distribution. We document the rapid collapse of the native avifauna on the island of Kaua‘i that corresponds to changes in climate and disease prevalence. Although multiple factors may be pressuring the community, we suggest that a tipping point has been crossed in which temperatures in forest habitats at high elevations have reached a threshold that facilitates the development of avian malaria and its vector throughout these species’ ranges. Continued incursion of invasive weeds and non-native avian competitors may be facilitated by climate change and could also contribute to declines. If current rates of decline continue, we predict multiple extinctions in the coming decades. Kaua‘i represents an early warning for the forest bird communities on the Maui and Hawai‘i islands, as well as other species around the world that are trapped within a climatic space that is rapidly disappearing.

  19. Tulsa oklahoma oktoberfest tent collapse report.

    PubMed

    Deal, Kelly E; Synovitz, Carolyn K; Goodloe, Jeffrey M; King, Brandi; Stewart, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    Background. On October 17, 2007, a severe weather event collapsed two large tents and several smaller tents causing 23 injuries requiring evacuation to emergency departments in Tulsa, OK. Methods. This paper is a retrospective analysis of the regional health system's response to this event. Data from the Tulsa Fire Department, The Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA), receiving hospitals and coordinating services were reviewed and analyzed. EMS patient care reports were reviewed and analyzed using triage designators assigned in the field, injury severity scores, and critical mortality. Results. EMT's and paramedics from Tulsa Fire Department and EMSA provided care at the scene under unified incident command. Of the 23 patients transported by EMS, four were hospitalized, one with critical spinal injury and one with critical head injury. One patient is still in ongoing rehabilitation. Discussion. Analysis of the 2007 Tulsa Oktoberfest mass casualty incident revealed rapid police/fire/EMS response despite challenges of operations at dark under severe weather conditions and the need to treat a significant number of injured victims. There were no fatalities. Of the patients transported by EMS, a minority sustained critical injuries, with most sustaining injuries amenable to discharge after emergency department care.

  20. Collapse and recovery of marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, J A

    2000-08-24

    Overexploitation and subsequent collapse of marine fishes has focused attention on the ability of affected populations to recover to former abundance levels and on the degree to which their persistence is threatened by extinction. Although potential for recovery has been assessed indirectly, actual changes in population size following long-term declines have not been examined empirically. Here I show that there is very little evidence for rapid recovery from prolonged declines, in contrast to the perception that marine fishes are highly resilient to large population reductions. With the possible exception of herring and related species that mature early in life and are fished with highly selective equipment, my analysis of 90 stocks reveals that many gadids (for example, cod, haddock) and other non-clupeids (for example, flatfishes) have experienced little, if any, recovery as much as 15 years after 45-99% reductions in reproductive biomass. Although the effects of overfishing on single species may generally be reversible, the actual time required for recovery appears to be considerable. To exempt marine fishes from existing criteria used to assign extinction risk would be inconsistent with precautionary approaches to fisheries management and the conservation of marine biodiversity.

  1. Collapse of cooperation in evolving games.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Alexander J; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2014-12-09

    Game theory provides a quantitative framework for analyzing the behavior of rational agents. The Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma in particular has become a standard model for studying cooperation and cheating, with cooperation often emerging as a robust outcome in evolving populations. Here we extend evolutionary game theory by allowing players' payoffs as well as their strategies to evolve in response to selection on heritable mutations. In nature, many organisms engage in mutually beneficial interactions and individuals may seek to change the ratio of risk to reward for cooperation by altering the resources they commit to cooperative interactions. To study this, we construct a general framework for the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in arbitrary iterated games. We show that, when there is a tradeoff between the benefits and costs of cooperation, coevolution often leads to a dramatic loss of cooperation in the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma. The collapse of cooperation is so extreme that the average payoff in a population can decline even as the potential reward for mutual cooperation increases. Depending upon the form of tradeoffs, evolution may even move away from the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game altogether. Our work offers a new perspective on the Prisoner's Dilemma and its predictions for cooperation in natural populations; and it provides a general framework to understand the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in iterated interactions.

  2. Discrete minimal flavor violation

    SciTech Connect

    Zwicky, Roman; Fischbacher, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the consequences of replacing the global flavor symmetry of minimal flavor violation (MFV) SU(3){sub Q}xSU(3){sub U}xSU(3){sub D}x{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot} by a discrete D{sub Q}xD{sub U}xD{sub D}x{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot} symmetry. Goldstone bosons resulting from the breaking of the flavor symmetry generically lead to bounds on new flavor structure many orders of magnitude above the TeV scale. The absence of Goldstone bosons for discrete symmetries constitute the primary motivation of our work. Less symmetry implies further invariants and renders the mass-flavor basis transformation observable in principle and calls for a hierarchy in the Yukawa matrix expansion. We show, through the dimension of the representations, that the (discrete) symmetry in principle does allow for additional {delta}F=2 operators. If though the {delta}F=2 transitions are generated by two subsequent {delta}F=1 processes, as, for example, in the standard model, then the four crystal-like groups {sigma}(168){approx_equal}PSL(2,F{sub 7}), {sigma}(72{phi}), {sigma}(216{phi}) and especially {sigma}(360{phi}) do provide enough protection for a TeV-scale discrete MFV scenario. Models where this is not the case have to be investigated case by case. Interestingly {sigma}(216{phi}) has a (nonfaithful) representation corresponding to an A{sub 4} symmetry. Moreover we argue that the, apparently often omitted, (D) groups are subgroups of an appropriate {delta}(6g{sup 2}). We would like to stress that we do not provide an actual model that realizes the MFV scenario nor any other theory of flavor.

  3. Minimal Change Disease.

    PubMed

    Vivarelli, Marina; Massella, Laura; Ruggiero, Barbara; Emma, Francesco

    2017-02-07

    Minimal change disease (MCD) is a major cause of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (NS), characterized by intense proteinuria leading to edema and intravascular volume depletion. In adults, it accounts for approximately 15% of patients with idiopathic NS, reaching a much higher percentage at younger ages, up to 70%-90% in children >1 year of age. In the pediatric setting, a renal biopsy is usually not performed if presentation is typical and the patient responds to therapy with oral prednisone at conventional doses. Therefore, in this setting steroid-sensitive NS can be considered synonymous with MCD. The pathologic hallmark of disease is absence of visible alterations by light microscopy and effacement of foot processes by electron microscopy. Although the cause is unknown and it is likely that different subgroups of disease recognize a different pathogenesis, immunologic dysregulation and modifications of the podocyte are thought to synergize in altering the integrity of the glomerular basement membrane and therefore determining proteinuria. The mainstay of therapy is prednisone, but steroid-sensitive forms frequently relapse and this leads to a percentage of patients requiring second-line steroid-sparing immunosuppression. The outcome is variable, but forms of MCD that respond to steroids usually do not lead to chronic renal damage, whereas forms that are unresponsive to steroids may subsequently reveal themselves as FSGS. However, in a substantial number of patients the disease is recurrent and requires long-term immunosuppression, with significant morbidity because of side effects. Recent therapeutic advances, such as the use of anti-CD20 antibodies, have provided long-term remission off-therapy and suggest new hypotheses for disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Predicting mining collapse: Superjerks and the appearance of record-breaking events in coal as collapse precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiang; Liu, Hanlong; Main, Ian G.; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2017-08-01

    The quest for predictive indicators for the collapse of coal mines has led to a robust criterion from scale-model tests in the laboratory. Mechanical collapse under uniaxial stress forms avalanches with a power-law probability distribution function of radiated energy P ˜E-ɛ , with exponent ɛ =1.5 . Impending major collapse is preceded by a reduction of the energy exponent to the mean-field value ɛ =1.32 . Concurrently, the crackling noise increases in intensity and the waiting time between avalanches is reduced when the major collapse is approaching. These latter criteria were so-far deemed too unreliable for safety assessments in coal mines. We report a reassessment of previously collected extensive collapse data sets using "record-breaking analysis," based on the statistical appearance of "superjerks" within a smaller spectrum of collapse events. Superjerks are defined as avalanche signals with energies that surpass those of all previous events. The final major collapse is one such superjerk but other "near collapse" events equally qualify. In this way a very large data set of events is reduced to a sparse sequence of superjerks (21 in our coal sample). The main collapse can be anticipated from the sequence of energies and waiting times of superjerks, ignoring all weaker events. Superjerks are excellent indicators for the temporal evolution, and reveal clear nonstationarity of the crackling noise at constant loading rate, as well as self-similarity in the energy distribution of superjerks as a function of the number of events so far in the sequence Es j˜nδ with δ =1.79 . They are less robust in identifying the precise time of the final collapse, however, than the shift of the energy exponents in the whole data set which occurs only over a short time interval just before the major event. Nevertheless, they provide additional diagnostics that may increase the reliability of such forecasts.

  5. On the Aggregation of Multimarker Information for Marker-Set and Sequencing Data Analysis: Genotype Collapsing vs. Similarity Collapsing

    PubMed Central

    Pongpanich, Monnat; Neely, Megan L.; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Methods that collapse information across genetic markers when searching for association signals are gaining momentum in the literature. Although originally developed to achieve a better balance between retaining information and controlling degrees of freedom when performing multimarker association analysis, these methods have recently been proven to be a powerful tool for identifying rare variants that contribute to complex phenotypes. The information among markers can be collapsed at the genotype level, which focuses on the mean of genetic information, or the similarity level, which focuses on the variance of genetic information. The aim of this work is to understand the strengths and weaknesses of these two collapsing strategies. Our results show that neither collapsing strategy outperforms the other across all simulated scenarios. Two factors that dominate the performance of these strategies are the signal-to-noise ratio and the underlying genetic architecture of the causal variants. Genotype collapsing is more sensitive to the marker set being contaminated by noise loci than similarity collapsing. In addition, genotype collapsing performs best when the genetic architecture of the causal variants is not complex (e.g., causal loci with similar effects and similar frequencies). Similarity collapsing is more robust as the complexity of the genetic architecture increases and outperforms genotype collapsing when the genetic architecture of the marker set becomes more sophisticated (e.g., causal loci with various effect sizes or frequencies and potential non-linear or interactive effects). Because the underlying genetic architecture is not known a priori, we also considered a two-stage analysis that combines the two top-performing methods from different collapsing strategies. We find that it is reasonably robust across all simulated scenarios. PMID:22303404

  6. Reversible Leaf Xylem Collapse: A Potential "Circuit Breaker" against Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Rockwell, Fulton E; Graham, Adam C; Alexander, Teressa; Holbrook, N Michele

    2016-12-01

    We report a novel form of xylem dysfunction in angiosperms: reversible collapse of the xylem conduits of the smallest vein orders that demarcate and intrusively irrigate the areoles of red oak (Quercus rubra) leaves. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy revealed gradual increases in collapse from approximately -2 MPa down to -3 MPa, saturating thereafter (to -4 MPa). Over this range, cavitation remained negligible in these veins. Imaging of rehydration experiments showed spatially variable recovery from collapse within 20 s and complete recovery after 2 min. More broadly, the patterns of deformation induced by desiccation in both mesophyll and xylem suggest that cell wall collapse is unlikely to depend solely on individual wall properties, as mechanical constraints imposed by neighbors appear to be important. From the perspective of equilibrium leaf water potentials, petioles, whose vessels extend into the major veins, showed a vulnerability to cavitation that overlapped in the water potential domain with both minor vein collapse and buckling (turgor loss) of the living cells. However, models of transpiration transients showed that minor vein collapse and mesophyll capacitance could effectively buffer major veins from cavitation over time scales relevant to the rectification of stomatal wrong-way responses. We suggest that, for angiosperms, whose subsidiary cells give up large volumes to allow large stomatal apertures at the cost of potentially large wrong-way responses, vein collapse could make an important contribution to these plants' ability to transpire near the brink of cavitation-inducing water potentials. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Numerical simulation of a collapsing bubble subject to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouvinis, P.; Gavaises, M.; Supponen, O.; Farhat, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present paper focuses on the simulation of the expansion and aspherical collapse of a laser-generated bubble subjected to an acceleration field and comparison of the results with instances from high-speed videos. The interaction of the liquid and gas is handled with the volume of fluid method. Compressibility effects have been included for each phase to predict the propagation of pressure waves. Initial conditions were estimated through the Rayleigh Plesset equation, based on the maximum bubble size and collapse time. The simulation predictions indicate that during the expansion the bubble shape is very close to spherical. On the other hand, during the collapse the bubble point closest to the bottom of the container develops a slightly higher collapse velocity than the rest of the bubble surface. Over time, this causes momentum focusing and leads to a positive feedback mechanism that amplifies the collapse locally. At the latest collapse stages, a jet is formed at the axis of symmetry, with opposite direction to the acceleration vector, reaching velocities of even 300 m/s. The simulation results agree with the observed bubble evolution and pattern from the experiments, obtained using high speed imaging, showing the collapse mechanism in great detail and clarity.

  8. Massive collapse of volcano edifices triggered by hydrothermal pressurization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Catastrophic collapse of steep volcano flanks threatens lives at stratovolcanoes around the world. Although destabilizing shallow intrusion of magma into the edifice accompanies some collapses (e.g., Mount St. Helens), others have occurred without eruption of juvenile magmatic materials (e.g., Bandai). These latter collapses can be difficult to anticipate. Historic collapses without magmatic eruption are associated with shallow hydrothermal groundwater systems at the time of collapse. Through the use of numerical models of heat and groundwater flow, I evaluate the efficacy of hydrothermally driven collapse. Heating from remote magma intrusion at depth can generate temporarily elevated pore-fluid pressures that propagate upward into an edifice. Effective-stress deformation modeling shows that these pressures are capable of destabilizing the core of an edifice, resulting in massive, deep-seated collapse. Far-field pressurization only occurs with specific rock hydraulic properties; however, data from numerous hydrothermal systems illustrate that this process can transpire in realistic settings. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  9. Induction of ventricular collapse by an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Amin, D V; Antaki, J F; Litwak, P; Thomas, D; Wu, Z J; Watach, M

    1998-01-01

    An important consideration for clinical application of rotary blood pump based ventricular assist is the avoidance of ventricular collapse due to excessive operating speed. Because healthy animals do not typically demonstrate this phenomenon, it is difficult to evaluate control algorithms for avoiding suction in vivo. An acute hemodynamic study was thus conducted to determine the conditions under which suction could be induced. A 70 kg calf was implanted with an axial flow assist device (Nimbus/UoP IVAS; Nimbus Inc., Rancho Cordova, CA) cannulated from the left ventricular apex to ascending aorta. On initiation of pump operation, several vasoactive interventions were performed to alter preload, afterload, and contractility of the left ventricle. Initially, dobutamine increased contractility and heart rate ([HR] = 139; baseline = 70), but ventricular collapse was not achievable, even at the maximal pump speed of 15,000 rpm. Norepinephrine decreased HR (HR = 60), increased contractility, and increased systemic vascular resistance ([SVR] = 24; baseline = 15), resulting in ventricular collapse at a pump speed of 14,000 rpm. Isoproterenol (beta agonist) increased HR (HR = 103) and decreased SVR (SVR = 12), but ventricular collapse was not achieved. Inferior vena cava occlusion reduced preload, and ventricular collapse was achieved at speeds as low as 11,000 rpm. Esmolol (beta1 antagonist) decreased HR (HR = 55) and contractility, and ventricular collapse was achieved at 11,500 rpm. Episodes of ventricular collapse were characterized initially by the pump output exceeding the venous return and the aortic valve remaining closed throughout the cardiac cycle. If continued, the mitral valve would remain open throughout the cardiac cycle. Using these unique states of the mitral and aortic valves, the onset of ventricular collapse could reliably be identified. It is hoped that the ability to detect the onset of ventricular collapse, rather than the event itself, will assist in

  10. Seeing sleep: dynamic imaging of upper airway collapse and collapsibility in children.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Khrishna S; Fleck, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing in children ranges from snoring, which has a prevalence of 12%, to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome, which has a prevalence of 2?3% in the general population [1]. The underlying causes of pediatric OSA are extremely complex. There are bony structural influences, as seen in craniofacial abnormalities, and soft tissue abnormalities, such as a large tongue, redundant soft tissue, or compliance/collapsibility issues. In some groups, such as those with Down syndrome, a combination of these factors comes into play.

  11. CSL Collapse Model Mapped with the Spontaneous Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscicchia, Kristian; Bassi, Angelo; Curceanu, Catalina; Grande, Raffaele; Donadi, Sandro; Hiesmayr, Beatrix; Pichler, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, new upper limits on the parameters of the Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) collapse model are extracted. To this end, the X-ray emission data collected by the IGEX collaboration are analyzed and compared with the spectrum of the spontaneous photon emission process predicted by collapse models. This study allows the obtainment of the most stringent limits within a relevant range of the CSL model parameters, with respect to any other method. The collapse rate $\\lambda$ and the correlation length $r_C$ are mapped, thus allowing the exclusion of a broad range of the parameter space.

  12. Recoverable and Programmable Collapse from Folding Pressurized Origami Cellular Solids.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Fang, H; Wang, K W

    2016-09-09

    We report a unique collapse mechanism by exploiting the negative stiffness observed in the folding of an origami solid, which consists of pressurized cells made by stacking origami sheets. Such a collapse mechanism is recoverable, since it only involves rigid folding of the origami sheets and it is programmable by pressure control and the custom design of the crease pattern. The collapse mechanism features many attractive characteristics for applications such as energy absorption. The reported results also suggest a new branch of origami study focused on its nonlinear mechanics associated with folding.

  13. Recoverable and Programmable Collapse from Folding Pressurized Origami Cellular Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Fang, H.; Wang, K. W.

    2016-09-01

    We report a unique collapse mechanism by exploiting the negative stiffness observed in the folding of an origami solid, which consists of pressurized cells made by stacking origami sheets. Such a collapse mechanism is recoverable, since it only involves rigid folding of the origami sheets and it is programmable by pressure control and the custom design of the crease pattern. The collapse mechanism features many attractive characteristics for applications such as energy absorption. The reported results also suggest a new branch of origami study focused on its nonlinear mechanics associated with folding.

  14. Particle creation in (2+1) circular dust collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Gutti, Sashideep; Singh, T. P.

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the quantum particle creation during the circularly symmetric collapse of a 2+1 dust cloud, for the cases when the cosmological constant is either zero or negative. We derive the Ford-Parker formula for the 2+1 case, which can be used to compute the radiated quantum flux in the geometric optics approximation. It is shown that no particles are created when the collapse ends in a naked singularity, unlike in the 3+1 case. When the collapse ends in a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole, we recover the expected Hawking radiation.

  15. Unexpected collapses during isotropic consolidation of model granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doanh, Thiep; Le Bot, Alain; Abdelmoula, Nouha; Gribaa, Lassad; Hans, Stéphane; Boutin, Claude

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the unexpected instantaneous instabilities of idealized granular materials under simple isotropic drained compression. Specimens of monosized glass beads submitted to isotropic compression exhibit a series of local collapses under undetermined external stress with partial liquefaction, experience sudden volumetric compaction and axial contraction of various amplitude. Short-lived excess pore water pressure vibrates like an oscillating underdamped system in the first dynamic transient phase and rapidly disperses in the subsequent longer dissipation phase. However, very dense samples maintain a collapse-free behaviour below a threshold void ratio e0col at 30 kPa of stress. The potential mechanisms that could explain these spontaneous collapses are discussed.

  16. Modeling electrostatically induced collapse transitions in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shklyaev, Oleg E; Mockensturm, Eric; Crespi, Vincent H

    2011-04-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate how a mechanically bistable single-walled carbon nanotube can act as a variable-shaped capacitor. If the voltage is tuned so that collapsed and inflated states are degenerate, the tube's susceptibility to diverse external stimuli--temperature, voltage, trapped atoms--diverges following a universal curve, yielding an exceptionally sensitive sensor or actuator. The boundary between collapsed and inflated states can shift hundreds of angstroms in response to a single gas atom inside the tube. Several potential nanoelectromechanical devices could be based on this electrically tuned crossover between near-degenerate collapsed and inflated configurations.

  17. Search for stellar gravitational collapses with the MACRO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MACRO Collaboration

    2004-10-01

    We present the final results of the search for stellar gravitational collapses obtained by the MACRO experiment. The detector was active for a stellar collapse search for more than 11 years and it was sensitive to collapses occurring all over in our galaxy for 8.6 years. A real time system for a prompt recognition of neutrino bursts was developed and was operating on-line for almost the whole life of the experiment. No signal compatible with a neutrino burst from a galactic supernova was observed.

  18. Radiating gravitational collapse with shearing motion and bulk viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, R.

    2001-03-01

    A model is proposed of a collapsing radiating star consisting of a shearing fluid with bulk viscosity undergoing radial heat flow with outgoing radiation. The pressure of the star, at the beginning of the collapse, is isotropic but due to the presence of the bulk viscosity the pressure becomes more and more anisotropic. The behavior of the density, pressure, mass, luminosity, the effective adiabatic index and the Kretschmann scalar is analyzed. Our work is compared to the case of a collapsing shearing fluid of a previous model, for a star with 6 Msun.

  19. Dissipative gravitational collapse of an (an)isotropic star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shyam; Sharma, Ranjan; Paul, Bikash Chandra; Deb, Rumi

    2016-03-01

    We develop a framework to study the effects of pressure anisotropy on the evolution of a collapsing star dissipating energy in the form of radial heat flux. In this construction, the star begins its collapse from an initial static configuration described by Paul and Deb (Astrophys. Space Sci. 354:421, 2014) solution in the presence (or absence) of anisotropic stresses. The form of the initial static solution, which is a generalization of Pant and Sah (Phys. Rev. D 32:1538, 1985) model, complies with all the requirements of a realistic star and provides a simple method to analyze the impacts of anisotropy onto the collapse.

  20. Upper airway collapsibility in anesthetized children.

    PubMed

    Litman, Ronald S; McDonough, Joseph M; Marcus, Carole L; Schwartz, Alan R; Ward, Denham S

    2006-03-01

    We sought to establish the feasibility of measuring upper airway narrowing in spontaneously breathing, anesthetized children using dynamic application of negative airway pressure. A secondary aim was to compare differences in upper airway collapsibility after the administration of sevoflurane or halothane. Subjects were randomized to either drug for inhaled anesthetic induction. Each was adjusted to their 1 MAC value (0.9% for halothane and 2.5% for sevoflurane) and a blinded anesthesia provider held the facemask without performing manual airway opening maneuvers but with inclusion of an oral airway device. Inspiratory flows were measured during partial upper airway obstruction created by an adjustable negative pressure-generating vacuum motor inserted into the anesthesia circuit. Critical closing pressure of the pharynx (Pcrit) was obtained by plotting the peak inspiratory flow of the obstructed breaths against the corresponding negative pressure in the facemask and extrapolating to zero airflow using linear correlation. Fourteen children were enrolled, seven in each anesthetic group. Two children in the halothane group did not develop flow-limited airway obstruction despite negative pressures as low as -9 cm H2O. Pcrit for sevoflurane ranged from -6.7 to -11.6 (mean +/- sd, -9.8 +/- 1.9) cm H2O. Pcrit for halothane ranged from -8.1 to -33 (mean +/- sd, -19.4 +/- 9.3) cm H2O (sevoflurane versus halothane, P = 0.048). We conclude that when using dynamic application of negative airway pressure, halothane appears to cause less upper airway obstruction than sevoflurane at equipotent concentrations.

  1. Catastrophic Ecosystem Collapse in Pleistocene Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. H.; Fogel, M.; Magee, J. W.; Gagan, M.

    2002-12-01

    Extinction of the Australian megafauna (50ñ5ka) occurred shortly after human colonization (55ñ5ka). A link between the two has been suggested, including the possibility that landscape modification was influential, but pinpointing the role of humans remains elusive. To evaluate changes at the ecosystem level across the extinction event we utilize dietary information recorded by d13C preserved in eggshells of the extant emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), a large flightless bird. Emus are opportunistic feeders; their diet reflects the range of food sources available in the weeks before nesting (June). d13C quantifies the proportion of C3 vs C4 vegetation that constitutes the emu's diet. A 150,000-year record of emu dietary intact has been reconstructed using more than 300 individuals from Lake Eyre (south-central Australia) dated by 14C, luminescence and/or racemization. Prior to 50 ka emu diet was highly variable, ranging from 100% C3 to 100% C4. However, immediately after 50 ka, emu diet shifted dramatically: the C4 contribution never exceeded 50% (n=200) after 50 ka, whereas more than half the samples older than 50 ka old contain >50% C4 dietary sources. We attribute the observed changes in emu diet to a fundamental rearrangement of the plant ecosystems in semi-arid central Australia. Such a change in plant communities may have contributed to the extinction of many dependent herbivores. The coincidence in time of megafauna extinction and ecosystem collapse shortly after human colonization suggests there may be a causal link. Development of similar records of vegetation change for other regions of Australia are currently underway to evaluate whether the Lake Eyre record reflects a continental scale reorganization of the Australian biota.

  2. Shape and material characteristics of the trachea in the leatherback sea turtle promote progressive collapse and reinflation during dives.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colm; Kelliher, Denis; Davenport, John

    2012-09-01

    The leatherback turtle regularly undertakes deep dives and has been recorded attaining depths in excess of 1200 m. Its trachea is an almost solid, elliptical-section tube of uncalcified hyaline cartilage with minimal connective tissue between successive rings. The structure appears to be advantageous for diving and perfectly designed for withstanding repeated collapse and reinflation. This study applies Boyle's law to the respiratory system (lungs, trachea and larynx) and estimates the changes in tracheal volume during a dive. These changes are subsequently compared with the results predicted by a corresponding finite element (FE) structural model, itself based on laboratory studies of the trachea of an adult turtle. Boyle's law predicts that the lungs will collapse first during the initial stages of a dive with tracheal compression beginning at much deeper depths after complete air mass expulsion from the lungs. The FE model reproduces the changes extremely well (agreeing closely with Boyle's law estimations) and provides visual representation of the deformed tracheal luminal area. Initially, the trachea compresses both ventrally and dorsally before levelling ventrally. Bulges are subsequently formed laterally and become more pronounced at deeper depths. The geometric configuration of the tracheal structure confers both homogeneity and strength upon it, which makes it extremely well suited for enduring repeated collapse and re-expansion. The structure actually promotes collapse and is an adaptation to the turtle's natural environment in which large numbers of deep dives are performed annually.

  3. Late Cenozoic regional collapse due to evaporite flow and Dissolution in the Carbondale Collapse Center, West-Central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirkham, R.M.; Streufert, R.K.; Budahn, J.R.; Kunk, M.J.; Perry, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Dissolution and flow of Pennsylvanian evaporitic rocks in west-central Colorado created the Carbondale Collapse Center, a 450 mi2 structural depression with about 4,000 ft of vertical collapse during the late Cenozoic. This paper describes evidence of collapse in the lower Roaring Fork River valley. Both the lateral extent and amount of vertical collapse is constrained by deformed upper Cenozoic volcanic rocks that have been correlated using field mapping, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, geochemistry, and paleomagnetism. The Carbondale Collapse Center is one of at least two contiguous areas that have experienced major evaporite tectonism during the late Cenozoic. Historic sinkholes, deformed Holocene deposits, and modern high-salinity loads in the rivers and thermal springs indicate the collapse process continues today. Flow of evaporitic rocks is an important element in the collapse process, and during initial stages of collapse it was probably the primary causative mechanism. Dissolution, however, is the ultimate means by which evaporite is removed from the collapse area. As the Roaring Fork River began to rapidly down-cut through a broad volcanic plateau during the late Miocene, the underlying evaporite beds were subjected to differential overburden pressures. The evaporitic rocks flowed from beneath the upland areas where overburden pressures remained high, toward the Roaring Fork River Valley where the pressures were much lower. Along the valley the evaporitic rocks rose upward, sometimes as diapirs, forming or enhancing a valley anticline in bedrock and locally upwarping Pleistocene terraces. Wherever the evaporites encountered relatively fresh ground water, they were dissolved, forming underground voids into which overlying bedrock and surficial deposits subsided. The saline ground water eventually discharged to streams and rivers through thermal springs and by seepage into alluvial aquifers.

  4. 5. TIP TOP MINE. EAST SIDE OF STRUCTURE WITH COLLAPSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TIP TOP MINE. EAST SIDE OF STRUCTURE WITH COLLAPSED ADIT. CAMERA POINTED WEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  5. 28. Rear lot of the Adelman Block. The collapsed truss ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Rear lot of the Adelman Block. The collapsed truss roof (ca. 1932) originally sheltered an automobile sales garage - Lockport Historic District, Bounded by Eighth, Hamilton & Eleventh Streets & Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lockport, Will County, IL

  6. BRIDGE ABUTMENTS WITH ARCH SEGMENTS ON RIVER BOTTOM. ARCHES COLLAPSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRIDGE ABUTMENTS WITH ARCH SEGMENTS ON RIVER BOTTOM. ARCHES COLLAPSED AROUND EIGHT YEARS BEFORE THIS DATE. - Whittlesey Road Bridge, Spanning Black River at Whittlesey Road, Lyons Falls, Lewis County, NY

  7. 26 CFR 1.341-1 - Collapsible corporations; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 1.341-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Collapsible Corporations; Foreign Personal Holding Companies... exchange of property, shall be considered as ordinary income. ...

  8. 26 CFR 1.341-1 - Collapsible corporations; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 1.341-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Collapsible Corporations; Foreign Personal Holding Companies... exchange of property, shall be considered as ordinary income. ...

  9. 26 CFR 1.341-1 - Collapsible corporations; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 1.341-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Collapsible Corporations; Foreign Personal Holding Companies § 1.341-1... considered as ordinary income. ...

  10. 26 CFR 1.341-1 - Collapsible corporations; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 1.341-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (Continued) Collapsible Corporations; Foreign Personal Holding Companies... exchange of property, shall be considered as ordinary income. ...

  11. 3. View of collapsed structure (type A) next to type ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of collapsed structure (type A) next to type B structure, facing east-northeast - Nevada Test Site, Japanese Village, Area 4, Yucca Flat, 4-04 Road near Rainier Mesa Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  12. 3. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE, COLLAPSED ADIT. CAMERA IS POINTED EAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE, COLLAPSED ADIT. CAMERA IS POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Upper Nottingham Mine, West face of Florida Mountain, head of Jacobs Gulch, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  13. Precise computations of chemotactic collapse using moving mesh methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, C. J.; Carretero-González, R.; Russell, R. D.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the problem of computing blow-up solutions of chemotaxis systems, or the so-called chemotactic collapse. In two spatial dimensions, such solutions can have approximate self-similar behaviour, which can be very challenging to verify in numerical simulations [cf. Betterton and Brenner, Collapsing bacterial cylinders, Phys. Rev. E 64 (2001) 061904]. We analyse a dynamic (scale-invariant) remeshing method which performs spatial mesh movement based upon equidistribution. Using a suitably chosen monitor function, the numerical solution resolves the fine detail in the asymptotic solution structure, such that the computations are seen to be fully consistent with the asymptotic description of the collapse phenomenon given by Herrero and Velázquez [Singularity patterns in a chemotaxis model, Math. Ann. 306 (1996) 583-623]. We believe that the methods we construct are ideally suited to a large number of problems in mathematical biology for which collapse phenomena are expected.

  14. Instability of black hole formation in gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2011-01-15

    We consider here the classic scenario given by Oppenheimer, Snyder, and Datt, for the gravitational collapse of a massive matter cloud, and examine its stability under the introduction of small tangential stresses. We show, by offering an explicit class of physically valid tangential stress perturbations, that an introduction of tangential pressure, however small, can qualitatively change the final fate of collapse from a black hole final state to a naked singularity. This shows instability of black hole formation in collapse and sheds important light on the nature of cosmic censorship hypothesis and its possible formulations. The key effect of these perturbations is to alter the trapped surface formation pattern within the collapsing cloud and the apparent horizon structure. This allows the singularity to be visible, and implications are discussed.

  15. 6. Photocopy of photograph, 1972. GRAFTON BRIDGE COLLAPSE IN AUGUST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of photograph, 1972. GRAFTON BRIDGE COLLAPSE IN AUGUST OF 1890 (From the original collection of Miss Lois Heflin, Grafton, WV) - Northwestern Virginia Railroad, Grafton Bridge, Spanning Tygart Valley River, Grafton, Taylor County, WV

  16. Battery Weymouth Combined Observation Station ruin, collapsed; view to west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Battery Weymouth Combined Observation Station ruin, collapsed; view to west - Fort McKinley, Battery Weymouth Combined Observation Station, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 125 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  17. Battery Carpenter Observation Station, collapsed ruin showing south wall; view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Battery Carpenter Observation Station, collapsed ruin showing south wall; view northeast - Fort McKinley, Battery Carpenter Observation Station, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 275 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  18. 30. DETAIL OF COLLAPSED BRIDGE NO. 14 SUSPENSION STRUCTURE. LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. DETAIL OF COLLAPSED BRIDGE NO. 14 SUSPENSION STRUCTURE. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Greenville Yard, Transfer Bridge System, Port of New York/New Jersey, Upper New York Bay, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  19. Probing spontaneous wave-function collapse with entangled levitating nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Tiancai; Li, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Wave-function collapse models are considered to be the modified theories of standard quantum mechanics at the macroscopic level. By introducing nonlinear stochastic terms in the Schrödinger equation, these models (different from standard quantum mechanics) predict that it is fundamentally impossible to prepare macroscopic systems in macroscopic superpositions. The validity of these models can only be examined by experiments, and hence efficient protocols for these kinds of experiments are greatly needed. Here we provide a protocol that is able to probe the postulated collapse effect by means of the entanglement of the center-of-mass motion of two nanospheres optically trapped in a Fabry-Pérot cavity. We show that the collapse noise results in a large reduction of the steady-state entanglement, and the entanglement, with and without the collapse effect, shows distinguishable scalings with certain system parameters, which can be used to determine unambiguously the effect of these models.

  20. Deep ocean early warning signals of an Atlantic MOC collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qing Yi; Viebahn, Jan P.; Dijkstra, Henk A.

    2014-08-01

    A future collapse of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) has been identified as one of the most dangerous tipping points in the climate system. It is therefore crucial to develop early warning indicators for such a potential collapse based on relatively short time series. So far, attempts to use indicators based on critical slowdown have been marginally successful. Based on complex climate network reconstruction, we here present a promising new indicator for the MOC collapse that efficiently monitors spatial changes in deep ocean circulation. Through our analysis of the performance of this indicator, we formulate optimal locations of measurement of the MOC to provide early warning signals of a collapse. Our results imply that an increase in spatial resolution of the Atlantic MOC observations (i.e., at more sections) can improve early detection, because the spatial coherence in the deep ocean arising near the transition is better captured.

  1. Mechanism for microbial population collapse in a fluctuating resource environment.

    PubMed

    Turkarslan, Serdar; Raman, Arjun V; Thompson, Anne W; Arens, Christina E; Gillespie, Mark A; von Netzer, Frederick; Hillesland, Kristina L; Stolyar, Sergey; López García de Lomana, Adrian; Reiss, David J; Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Zane, Grant M; Ranish, Jeffrey A; Wall, Judy D; Stahl, David A; Baliga, Nitin S

    2017-03-20

    Managing trade-offs through gene regulation is believed to confer resilience to a microbial community in a fluctuating resource environment. To investigate this hypothesis, we imposed a fluctuating environment that required the sulfate-reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris to undergo repeated ecologically relevant shifts between retaining metabolic independence (active capacity for sulfate respiration) and becoming metabolically specialized to a mutualistic association with the hydrogen-consuming Methanococcus maripaludis Strikingly, the microbial community became progressively less proficient at restoring the environmentally relevant physiological state after each perturbation and most cultures collapsed within 3-7 shifts. Counterintuitively, the collapse phenomenon was prevented by a single regulatory mutation. We have characterized the mechanism for collapse by conducting RNA-seq analysis, proteomics, microcalorimetry, and single-cell transcriptome analysis. We demonstrate that the collapse was caused by conditional gene regulation, which drove precipitous decline in intracellular abundance of essential transcripts and proteins, imposing greater energetic burden of regulation to restore function in a fluctuating environment.

  2. Critical fitness collapse in three-dimensional spatial population genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.

    2015-05-01

    If deleterious mutations near a fitness maximum in a spatially distributed population are sufficiently frequent or detrimental, the population can undergo a fitness collapse, similarly to the Muller's ratchet effect in well-mixed populations. Recent studies of 1D habitats (e.g. the frontier of a 2D range expansion) have shown that the onset of the fitness collapse is described by a directed percolation phase transition with its associated critical exponents. We consider population fitness collapse in 3D range expansions with both inflating and fixed-size frontiers (applicable to, e.g. expanding and treadmilling spherical tumors, respectively). We find that the onset of fitness collapse in these two cases obeys different scaling laws, and that competition between species at the frontier leads to a deviation from directed percolation scaling. As in 2D range expansions, inflating frontiers modify the critical behavior by causally disconnecting well-separated portions of the population.

  3. More collapse tests add to coiled tubing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, E.J. ); Costall, D. )

    1991-06-17

    The collapse limits of thicker-walled coiled tubing have been determined to ensure safe and successful workover operations. Prudhoe Bay has been using 1.75-in OD coiled tubing for 2 years. When BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. initially started using this larger size coil, collapse tests were run on 0.109-in. wall thickness coil. These tests provide a base curve by which much work has been performed in the western operating area of the Prudhoe Bay Unit. However, use of 1.75-in. coiled tubing has been expanded to include wall thickness of 0.125, 0.134, and 0.156-in. Except for theoretical calculations, no data were available to ensure that we would know the collapsed limitations for these sizes. To fill in this gap, further collapse testing has been done.

  4. 9. South abutment, detail of collapsed east wing wall; also ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. South abutment, detail of collapsed east wing wall; also detail of bottom lateral bracing and stringers; looking southeast - Dodd Ford Bridge, County Road 147 Spanning Blue Earth River, Amboy, Blue Earth County, MN

  5. 31. VIEW OF COLLAPSED APRON OF BRIDGE NO. 10 AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF COLLAPSED APRON OF BRIDGE NO. 10 AND ELEMENTS OF SUSPENSION STRUCTURE. LOOKING SOUTH. - Greenville Yard, Transfer Bridge System, Port of New York/New Jersey, Upper New York Bay, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  6. Wall shear stress in collapsed tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naili, S.; Ribreau, C.

    1999-01-01

    A small flexural wall rigidity brings unique features to cross-sectional shapes and blood flow within veins, which are characterised by a non-uniform hemodynamical environment acting upon endothelial cells. Velocity fields and related wall shear stress were numerically determined for a large number of conditions, assuming a fully developed, steady, incompressible laminar flow through an uniform smooth pipe with a constant cross-section. It was shown that the flatness greatly influences the resulting distribution of the wall shear stresses along the lumen perimeter. For instance, under a steady longitudinal pressure gradient at about 500 Pascal per meter inside a constant oval-shaped tube, with a lumen perimeter of the order of 5 × 10^{-2} meter, the maximum wall shear stress is found at about 2 Pascal where the local curvature is minimal. On the other hand, the minimal wall shear stress of the order of 1 Pascal is found where the local curvature is maximal. Clear indications have been reported showing that the hemodynamical wall shear stress does alter endothelial cell morphology and orientation. These results are being used for developing an experimental set-up in order to locally map out the characteristic shear stresses looking for endothelial shape modifications whenever a viscous fluid flow is applied.

  7. Thermal Design of a Collapsible Cryogenic Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegab, Hisham E.

    2001-01-01

    Strategic planning for human exploration missions to Mars has conclusively identified in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) as an enabling technology. Most mission scenarios include an ISRU plant to produce propellants for ascent from Mars as well as the production of backup reserves of water, oxygen, and process gases. Current mission scenarios call for an ISRU plant to be deployed and then produce and store the required propellants and life support reserves before the arrival of the first human mission. Reliable cryogenic propellant liquefaction and storage technologies for extended period missions are especially critical. This report examines the cryogenic storage problem for liquid oxygen produced by an ISRU plant for a human mission scenario. The analysis examines various hardware configurations including insulation types, packaging techniques, and required cryocoolers to minimize the initial launch mass to low Earth orbit. Results of the analyses indicate that high vacuum insulation systems requiring vacuum pressures below one millitorr will be required to minimize the 'initial launch mass into low Earth orbit even though the temperature on the surface of Mars is much lower than Earth.

  8. The Collapse of the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    On Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2007, at 6:05 p.m. (during evening rush hour), the I-35W bridge across the Mississippi River in Minneapolis collapsed, killing 13 people and injuring 145. At the time of the collapse, repair work was in progress on the deck of the bridge, resulting in an additional 287 tons of construction material and equipment being on the…

  9. Black hole mass threshold from nonsingular quantum gravitational collapse.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin; Goswami, Rituparno; Maartens, Roy; Singh, Parampreet

    2005-08-26

    Quantum gravity is expected to remove the classical singularity that arises as the end state of gravitational collapse. To investigate this, we work with a toy model of a collapsing homogeneous scalar field. We show that nonperturbative semiclassical effects of loop quantum gravity cause a bounce and remove the black hole singularity. Furthermore, we find a critical threshold scale below which no horizon forms: quantum gravity may exclude very small astrophysical black holes.

  10. The Collapse of the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    On Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2007, at 6:05 p.m. (during evening rush hour), the I-35W bridge across the Mississippi River in Minneapolis collapsed, killing 13 people and injuring 145. At the time of the collapse, repair work was in progress on the deck of the bridge, resulting in an additional 287 tons of construction material and equipment being on the…

  11. Collapse of the soap-film bridge - Quasistatic description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cryer, Steven A.; Steen, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the collapse of a soap-film bridge from a connected to a disconnected state are recorded. The equilibrium framework for this nonequilibrium event is classical. Experiments confirm predictions of stable and unstable equilibria. A quasistatic description is introduced for the dynamic states to extend the static theory. It is found to adequately describe the collapse trajectory while the bridge is still connected.

  12. Towards the Core-Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y; Endeve, Eirik; Budiardja, R. D.; Marronetti, Pedro; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are amazing displays of astrohysical fireworks - and the optical emission is only a tiny part of the story. These events involve virtually all branches of physics and spawn phenomena observale by every kind of astronomical observation. This richness of theory and observation presents a formidable challenge to their understanding via computer simulations, but we are entering a new era of realism and maturity in modeling the key processes by collapse and explosion.

  13. Collapse of the soap-film bridge - Quasistatic description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cryer, Steven A.; Steen, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the collapse of a soap-film bridge from a connected to a disconnected state are recorded. The equilibrium framework for this nonequilibrium event is classical. Experiments confirm predictions of stable and unstable equilibria. A quasistatic description is introduced for the dynamic states to extend the static theory. It is found to adequately describe the collapse trajectory while the bridge is still connected.

  14. Towards the Core-Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardall, C. Y.; Endeve, E.; Budiardja, R. D.; Marronetti, P.; Mezzacappa, A.

    2012-07-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are amazing displays of astrophysical fireworks - and the optical emission is only a tiny part of the story. These events involve virtually all branches of physics and spawn phenomena observable by every kind of astronomical observation. This richness of theory and observation presents a formidable challenge to their understanding via computer simulations, but we are entering a new era of realism and maturity in modeling the key processes of collapse and explosion.

  15. Seeing Core-Collapse Supernovae in the Ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter

    Core-collapse supernovae are the catastrophic deaths of massive stars. Ultraviolet observations are needed to understand the energy of the explosion through the study of the bolometric light curves. Early-time ultraviolet observations constrain the size of the progenitor. Ultraviolet spectra can break the degeneracies between temperature/ionization, reddening, and metallicity which hinder our understanding of ultraviolet photometry. Optical observations of high-redshift supernovae probe rest-frame ultraviolet wavelengths, requiring space-based observations of nearby supernovae against which to compare. Ultraviolet observations of core-collapse supernovae can also help distinguish them from type Ia supernovae, enabling cleaner photometric type Ia supernova samples for cosmological measurements. The Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on the Swift satellite has observed over two hundred core-collapse supernovae in the ultraviolet, including sixty-nine ultraviolet grism spectra of twenty core-collapse SNe. Additional ultraviolet spectra have been obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer, Hubble Space Telescope, and Galaxy Evolution Explorer. We propose a project to reduce the Swift grism spectra and combine with the other ultraviolet and groundbased optical/NIR spectra to create time-series bolometric spectra. We will use these bolometric spectra to better understand temperature, reddening, and metallicity and create bolometric light curves of these core collapse SNe. We will also use early time ultraviolet photometry and spectroscopy to constrain the progenitors of core collapse SNe. The ultraviolet observations fill a critical niche in our understanding of core collapse supernovae, and this program will enhance the scientific use of this important dataset from multiple space missions. Beyond core-collapse supernovae, the templates will allow studies of the dust properties around the progenitor systems (including the wavelength dependence of the extinction

  16. Gravitational Collapse with Cosmological Constant and Anisotropic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Zahid; Malik, Sania Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the gravitational collapse of anisotropic perfect fluid by applying junction conditions and spherically symmetric space-times in the presence of cosmological constant. We show that the cosmological constant slows down the collapsing process and also reduces the size of black hole.This work provides a generalization of the previous studies by Cissoko et al. (arXiv: gr-qc/9809057) for dust and by Sharif and Ahmad (Mod. Phys. Lett. A, 22:1493, 2007) for perfect fluid.

  17. Estimating the Collapse Pressure of an Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baginski, Frank E.; Brakke, Kenneth A.; Cruz, Juan R.

    2013-01-01

    The collapse pressure of an inflatable membrane is the minimum differential pressure which will sustain a specific desired shape under an applied load. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the collapse pressure of a tension-cone inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (IAD) that is subject to a static aerodynamic load. The IAD surface is modeled as an elastic membrane. For a given aerodynamic load and sufficiently high torus differential pressure, the IAD assumes a stable axisymmetric equilibrium shape. When the torus pressure is reduced sufficiently, the symmetric equilibrium state becomes unstable and we define this instance to be the critical pressure Pcr. In this paper, we will compare our predicted critical torus pressure with the corresponding observed torus collapse pressure (OTCP) for fifteen tests that were conducted by the third author and his collaborators at the NASA Glenn Research Center 10x10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel in April 2008. One of the difficulties with these types of comparisons is establishing the instance of torus collapse and determining the OTCP from quantities measured during the experiment. In many cases, torus collapse is gradual and the OTCP is not well-defined. However, in eight of the fifteen wind tunnel tests where the OTCP is well-defined, we find that the average of the relative differences (Pcr - OTCP/Pcr) was 8.9%. For completeness, we will also discuss the seven tests where the observed torus collapse pressure is not well-defined.

  18. Inspection of collapse cause of Sampoong Department Store.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Won

    2012-04-10

    On June 29, 1995, the Sampoong Department Store in Seoul, South Korea, completely collapsed. It was a five story reinforced concrete (RC) building with underground 4 floors and was built using a technique called "flat slab construction". The collapse is the largest peacetime disaster in South Korean history - 502 people died, 6 missing, and 937 sustained injuries. The Sampoong Department Store was completed in late 1989, and it opened to the public on July 7, 1990, attracting an estimated 40,000 people per day during the building's 5 years in service. After the collapse, intense investigation was conducted to find out the direct causes of the collapse through (1) survey on the present collapse situation and ground condition, (2) strength test of the concrete and steel collected at the site, (3) design documents and construction/management reports, and (4) structural analysis. The investigation revealed that the Sampoong Department Store collapsed because so many direct and indirect causes such as flaws in design phase and mistakes in construction and management process were overlapped. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation from collapsing shells, semiclassical backreaction, and black hole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Padmanabhan, T.

    2009-08-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of quantum field theory around a collapsing shell and discuss several conceptual issues related to the emission of radiation flux and formation of black holes. Explicit calculations are performed using a model for a collapsing shell, which turns out to be analytically solvable. We use the insights gained in this model to draw reliable conclusions regarding more realistic models. We first show that any shell of mass M, which collapses to a radius close to r=2M, will emit approximately thermal radiation for a period of time. In particular, a shell that collapses from some initial radius to a final radius 2M(1-γ2)-1 (where γ≪1) without forming a black hole, will emit thermal radiation during the period M≲t≲Mln⁡(1/γ2). Later on (t≫Mln⁡(1/γ2)), the flux from such a shell will decay to zero exponentially. We next study the effect of backreaction computed using the vacuum expectation value of the stress tensor on the collapse. We find that, in any realistic collapse scenario, the backreaction effects do not prevent the formation of the event horizon. The time at which the event horizon is formed is, of course, delayed due to the radiated flux—which decreases the mass of the shell—but this effect is not sufficient to prevent horizon formation. We also clarify several conceptual issues and provide pedagogical details of the calculations in the Appendices to the paper.

  20. Newton force from wave function collapse: speculation and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos

    2014-04-01

    The Diosi-Penrose model of quantum-classical boundary postulates gravity-related spontaneous wave function collapse of massive degrees of freedom. The decoherence effects of the collapses are in principle detectable if not masked by the overwhelming environmental decoherence. But the DP (or any other, like GRW, CSL) spontaneous collapses are not detectable themselves, they are merely the redundant formalism of spontaneous decoherence. To let DP collapses become testable physics, recently we extended the DP model and proposed that DP collapses are responsible for the emergence of the Newton gravitational force between massive objects. We identified the collapse rate, possibly of the order of 1/ms, with the rate of emergence of the Newton force. A simple heuristic emergence (delay) time was added to the Newton law of gravity. This non-relativistic delay is in peaceful coexistence with Einstein's relativistic theory of gravitation, at least no experimental evidence has so far surfaced against it. We derive new predictions of such a 'lazy' Newton law that will enable decisive laboratory tests with available technologies. The simple equation of 'lazy' Newton law deserves theoretical and experimental studies in itself, independently of the underlying quantum foundational considerations.

  1. Comparing fixed and collapsing boundary versions of the diffusion model

    PubMed Central

    Voskuilen, Chelsea; Ratcliff, Roger; Smith, Philip L.

    2016-01-01

    Optimality studies and studies of decision-making in monkeys have been used to support a model in which the decision boundaries used to evaluate evidence collapse over time. This article investigates whether a diffusion model with collapsing boundaries provides a better account of human data than a model with fixed boundaries. We compared the models using data from four new numerosity discrimination experiments and two previously published motion discrimination experiments. When model selection was based on BIC values, the fixed boundary model was preferred over the collapsing boundary model for all of the experiments. When model selection was carried out using a parametric bootstrap cross-fitting method (PBCM), which takes into account the flexibility of the alternative models and the ability of one model to account for data from another model, data from 5 of 6 experiments favored either fixed boundaries or boundaries with only negligible collapse. We found that the collapsing boundary model produces response times distributions with the same shape as those produced by the fixed boundary model and that its parameters were not well-identified and were difficult to recover from data. Furthermore, the estimated boundaries of the best-fitting collapsing boundary model were relatively flat and very similar to those of the fixed-boundary model. Overall, a diffusion model with decision boundaries that converge over time does not provide an improvement over the standard diffusion model for our tasks with human data. PMID:28579640

  2. Collapse of ordered spatial pattern in neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinlin; Wang, Chunni; Ma, Jun; Ren, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Spatiotemporal systems can emerge some regular spatial patterns due to self organization or under external periodical pacing while external attack or intrinsic collapse can destroy the regularity in the spatial system. For an example, the electrical activities of neurons in nervous system show regular spatial distribution under appropriate coupling and connection. It is believed that distinct regularity could be induced in the media by appropriate forcing or feedback, while a diffusive collapse induced by continuous destruction can cause breakdown of the media. In this paper, the collapse of ordered spatial distribution is investigated in a regular network of neurons (Morris-Lecar, Hindmarsh-Rose) in two-dimensional array. A stable target wave is developed regular spatial distribution emerges by imposing appropriate external forcing with diversity, or generating heterogeneity (parameter diversity in space). The diffusive invasion could be produced by continuous parameter collapse or switch in local area, e.g, the diffusive poisoning in ion channels of potassium in Morris-Lecar neurons causes breakdown in conductance of channels. It is found that target wave-dominated regularity can be suppressed when the collapsed area is diffused in random. Statistical correlation functions for sampled nodes (neurons) are defined to detect the collapse of ordered state by series analysis.

  3. Dynamics of concerted bubble cluster collapse in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-10-01

    Cavitation bubble cluster collapse at the surface of artificial kidney stones during shock wave lithotripsy was investigated in vitro by means of multiframe high-speed photography, passive cavitation detection (PCD), and pressure waveform measurements using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone (FOPH). It was observed that after the passage of the lithotripter shock pulse the stone was covered by numerous individual bubbles. During their growth phase the bubbles coalesced into bubble clusters, with the biggest cluster at the proximal face of the stone. High-speed camera images suggested that cluster collapse started at the periphery and ended with a violent collapse in a small region in the center of the surface of the stone. Shadowgraphy resolved numerous secondary shock waves emitted during this focused collapse. Shock wave emission during cluster collapse was confirmed by PCD. Measurement with the FOPH showed that these shock waves were typically of short duration (0.2 μs). The majority of the shock waves emanating from cluster collapse were low amplitude but some shock waves registered amplitudes on the order of the incident shock pulse (tens of MPa). [Work supported by NIH DK43881, DK55674.

  4. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  5. Influenza SIRS with Minimal Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Erramilli, Shruti; Mannam, Praveen; Manthous, Constantine A

    2016-01-01

    Although systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a known complication of severe influenza pneumonia, it has been reported very rarely in patients with minimal parenchymal lung disease. We here report a case of severe SIRS, anasarca, and marked vascular phenomena with minimal or no pneumonitis. This case highlights that viruses, including influenza, may cause vascular dysregulation causing SIRS, even without substantial visceral organ involvement.

  6. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  7. Cover-collapse sinkholes of the Franconian Alb / Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappe, M.; Heckmann, T.; Mehlhorn, S.; Umstädter, K.; Miedaner, H.; Becht, M.

    2012-04-01

    Recent events of cover-collapse sinkhole formation, the geomorphological, geological and hydrological conditions of selected sinkholes and the spatial and temporal occurrences of such landforms were studied in the Franconian Alb, a karst area located in southeastern Germany. The Franconian Alb consists of karstified limestones and dolomites of Jurassic Age. It is partly covered by Cretaceous and Miocene deposits and a clayey to loamy overburden. The thickness of the loamy cover ranges from a few decimetres up to ten meters. Sinkholes are widely distributed in the area, to some extent they were formed by cover-collapse processes. In order to prepare a geohazard map, historical records from different archives (municipalities, counties, water management agencies, governmental archives, newspapers) were used for a compilation of sinkholes which resulted from collapses. The frequency of occurrence of cover-collapse sinkholes differs in areas with agricultural or forestal use. Farmers often backfill these surficial cavities immediately after their formation, before they can be registered officially. Therefore a documentation of such collapse events may be restricted in terms of detailed statistical analyses. Nevertheless seasonal clusters of collapses can be observed. Recent collapses show close relations to climatic conditions. During winter or spring the majority of collapse events is associated with snow melt or heavy rainfall resulting in an increase of the soil moisture and a decrease of shear strength within the loamy cover. Consequently, loose material overlaying cavities can be washed down, or the sediment itself moves downward. For single events, the antecedent climatic development (precipitation, thickness of snow cover, air temperature, soil temperature) was analysed for identification of the triggering factors. In this context, small-scale surficial karst depressions without outlet (underlain by thick loamy deposits) show an efficient drainage via a few

  8. HYROGEOLOGIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE U-3at COLLAPSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-08-01

    Hydrogeologic characteristics and properties of the U-3at collapse zone were determined from cores obtained from two angled boreholes drilled in 1996 under the subsidence crater formed by an underground nuclear test in 1963. This crater, used for disposal of bulk low-level radioactive waste since 1988, is located within the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. The purpose of this characterization effort was to provide data required to develop a conceptual hydrogeologic model and to complete flow and transport modeling required for the Area 3 performance assessment and composite analysis. To minimize disturbance of the core samples, drilling was done by a method that used only air as the drilling fluid. No evidence of preferential pathways for water flow was detected via visual geologic descriptions of the core samples. Laboratory analyses showed physical and hydraulic properties that are typical of alluvial valleys at the Nevada Test Site. Water content values ranged from 0.05 to 0.33 cubic meters per cubic meter, with water content tending to increase with depth. Water potential values ranged from -10.7 MegaPascals at a depth of 15.3 meters to greater than -0.40 MegaPascals at 78.9 meters. Tritium concentrations in pore water extracted from the cores were below the detection limits from the surface to a depth of 118.9 meters. Below this depth, concentrations generally increased to a maximum of 2,200 picoCuries per liter in the deepest sample at 146.9 meters. Unusually wet alluvium recovered from the drill bit during drilling between 50.9 and 71.6 meters in the first borehole raised concerns that water condensed in the compressed air system or excess oil introduced into the borehole may have penetrated core segments intended for analyses. The drilling process was modified to preclude introduction of fluids and the borehole was completed without further evidence of excess water. Using the same drilling

  9. Endograft Collapse After Endovascular Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bandorski, Dirk Brueck, Martin; Guenther, Hans-Ulrich; Manke, Christoph

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular treatment is an established therapy for thoracic aortic disease. Collapse of the endograft is a potentially fatal complication. We reviewed 16 patients with a thoracic endograft between 2001 and 2006. Medical records of the treated patients were studied. Data collected include age, gender, diagnosis, indication for endoluminal treatment, type of endograft, and time of follow up. All patients (n = 16; mean age, 61 years; range, 21-82 years) underwent computed tomography (CT) for location of the lesion and planning of the intervention. Time of follow-up with CT scan ranged from 1 to 61 months. Indications for endovascular treatment were degenerative aneurysm (n = 7; 44%), aortic dissection (n = 2; 12%), perforated aortic ulcer (n = 4; 25%), and traumatic aortic injury (n = 3; 19%). Three patients suffered from a collapse of the endograft (one patient distal, two patients proximal) between 3 and 8 days after endovascular treatment. These patients were younger (mean age, 37 {+-} 25 years vs. 67 {+-} 16 years; P < 0.05) and showed more oversizing (proximal, 36 {+-} 19.8% vs. 29 {+-} 20.7% [P > 0.05]; distal, 45 {+-} 23.5% vs. 38 {+-} 21.7% [P > 0.05]). Proximal collapse was corrected by placing a bare stent. In conclusion, risk factors for stent-graft collapse are a small lumen of the aorta and a small radius of the aortic arch curvature (young patients), as well as oversizing, which is an important risk factor and is described for different types of endografts and protheses (Gore TAG and Cook Zenith). Dilatation of the collapsed stent-graft is not sufficient. Following therapy implantation of a second stent or surgery is necessary in patients with a proximal endograft collapse. Distal endograft collapse can possibly be treated conservatively under close follow-up.

  10. Hierarchical star cluster assembly in globally collapsing molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; González-Samaniego, Alejandro; Colín, Pedro

    2017-05-01

    We discuss the mechanism of cluster formation in a numerical simulation of a molecular cloud (MC) undergoing global hierarchical collapse, focusing on how the gas motions in the parent cloud control the assembly of the cluster. The global collapse implies that the star formation rate (SFR) increases over time. The collapse is hierarchical because it consists of small-scale collapses within larger scale ones. The latter culminate a few Myr later than the first small-scale ones and consist of filamentary flows that accrete on to massive central clumps. The small-scale collapses consist of clumps that are embedded in the filaments and falling on to the large-scale collapse centres. The stars formed in the early, small-scale collapses share the infall motion of their parent clumps, so that the filaments feed both gas and stars to the massive central clump. This process leads to the presence of a few older stars in a region where new protostars are forming, and also to a self-similar structure, in which each unit is composed of smaller scale subunits that approach each other and may merge. Because the older stars formed in the filaments share the infall motion of the gas on to the central clump, they tend to have larger velocities and to be distributed over larger areas than the younger stars formed in the central clump. Finally, interpreting the initial mass function (IMF) simply as a probability distribution implies that massive stars only form once the local SFR is large enough to sample the IMF up to high masses. In combination with the increase of the SFR, this implies that massive stars tend to appear late in the evolution of the MC, and only in the central massive clumps. We discuss the correspondence of these features with observed properties of young stellar clusters, finding very good qualitative agreement.

  11. On the number density of `direct collapse' black hole seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habouzit, Mélanie; Volonteri, Marta; Latif, Muhammad; Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien

    2016-11-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) reside in the centre of most local galaxies, but they also power active galactic nuclei and quasars, detected up to z = 7. These quasars put constraints on early BH growth and the mass of BH seeds. The scenario of `direct collapse' is appealing as it leads to the formation of large mass BH seeds, 104-106 M⊙, which eases explaining how quasars at z = 6-7 are powered by BHs with masses >109 M⊙. Direct collapse, however, appears to be rare, as the conditions required by the scenario are that gas is metal-free, the presence of a strong photodissociating Lyman-Werner flux, and large inflows of gas at the centre of the halo, sustained for 10-100 Myr. We performed several cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that cover a large range of box sizes and resolutions, thus allowing us to understand the impact of several physical processes on the distribution of direct collapse BHs. We identify haloes where direct collapse can happen, and derive the number density of BHs. We also investigate the discrepancies between hydrodynamical simulations, direct or post-processed, and semi-analytical studies. Under optimistic assumptions, we find that for direct collapse to account for BHs in normal galaxies, the critical Lyman-Werner flux required for direct collapse must be about two orders of magnitude lower than predicted by 3D simulations that include detailed chemical models. However, when supernova feedback is relatively weak, enough direct collapse BHs to explain z = 6-7 quasars can be obtained for Lyman-Werner fluxes about one order of magnitude lower than found in 3D simulations.

  12. Performance Characteristics of Upper Airway Critical Collapsing Pressure Measurements during Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Kirkness, Jason P.; Peterson, Leigh A.; Squier, Samuel B.; McGinley, Brian M.; Schneider, Hartmut; Meyer, Adrian; Schwartz, Alan R.; Smith, Philip L.; Patil, Susheel P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The critical pressure (PCRIT), a measurement of upper airway collapsibility, is a determinant of the severity of upper airway obstruction during sleep. We examined the performance characteristics of the passive and active PCRIT by examining both within-night and between-night variability in the measurements. Methods: We studied 54 sleep apnea patients (39 men, 15 women) and 34 normal subjects (20 men, 14 women) on either 1 or 2 nights during sleep. The PCRIT was measured during relative hypotonia (“passive” state) or during periods of sustained upper airway obstruction used to recruit upper airway neuromuscular responses (“active” state) within- and between-nights. In a subgroup of 10 normal subjects, we performed repeated measurements during hypnotic-induced sleep. Bland-Altman analyses were used to determine the within-night and between-night reliability of the PCRIT measurements. Results: There were no significant within-night or between-night differences for the mean passive PCRIT. The active PCRIT was ∼1 cm H2O more collapsible on the second night than on the first night. The limits of agreement, which bound the passive and active PCRIT, was ∼ ± 3 cm H2O and was reduced to ∼ ± 1 cm H2O for the passive PCRIT with hypnotic-induced sleep. Conclusion: Passive and active PCRIT measurements are reasonably reliable within and between nights. An approximately 3 cm H2O change in passive or active PCRIT appears to represent the minimally significant change in PCRIT necessary to assess the effect of an intervention (e.g., positional therapy, surgical interventions, oral appliance effects, and pharmacotherapy) on upper airway mechanical loads or neuromuscular responses. Citation: Kirkness JP; Peterson LA; Squier SB; McGinley BM; Schneider H; Meyer A; Schwartz AR; Smith PL; Patil SP. Performance characteristics of upper airway critical collapsing pressure measurements during sleep. SLEEP 2011;34(4):459-467. PMID:21461324

  13. Minimizing waste in environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, L.; Thuot, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    Environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning and facility dismantelment projects are not typically known for their waste minimization and pollution prevention efforts. Typical projects are driven by schedules and milestones with little attention given to cost or waste minimization. Conventional wisdom in these projects is that the waste already exists and cannot be reduced or minimized. In fact, however, there are three significant areas where waste and cost can be reduced. Waste reduction can occur in three ways: beneficial reuse or recycling; segregation of waste types; and reducing generation of secondary waste. This paper will discuss several examples of reuse, recycle, segregation, and secondary waste reduction at ANL restoration programs.

  14. Left Atrial Appendage Resection During Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Surgery via Right Minithoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Nobuo; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Hiraoka, Arudo; Tamura, Kentaro; Yoshitaka, Hidenori; Sakaguchi, Taichi

    2017-07-25

    Here, we report concomitant resection of the left atrial appendage through the transverse sinus during minimally invasive aortic valve replacement via right anterolateral thoracotomy. The left atrial appendage was exposed by raising the collapsed ascending aorta and was safely resected using a surgical stapling device. This procedure is a feasible option in elderly patients, for whom a percutaneous procedure would be inappropriate, and could be useful for preventing thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications.

  15. Collapse in boson-fermion mixtures with all-repulsive interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Prytula, Vladyslav I.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.; Vekslerchik, Vadym E.

    2007-10-15

    We describe the collapse of the bosonic component in a boson-fermion mixture due to the pressure exerted on it by a large fermionic component, leading to collapse in a system with all-repulsive interactions. We describe the phenomena of early collapse and superslow collapse of the mixture.

  16. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart is reduced. This is called aortic stenosis. The aortic valve can be replaced using: Minimally ... RN, Wang A. Percutaneous heart valve replacement for aortic stenosis: state of the evidence. Ann Intern Med . 2010; ...

  17. A validated approach for modeling collapse of steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saykin, Vitaliy Victorovich

    A civil engineering structure is faced with many hazardous conditions such as blasts, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and fires during its lifetime. Even though structures are designed for credible events that can happen during a lifetime of the structure, extreme events do happen and cause catastrophic failures. Understanding the causes and effects of structural collapse is now at the core of critical areas of national need. One factor that makes studying structural collapse difficult is the lack of full-scale structural collapse experimental test results against which researchers could validate their proposed collapse modeling approaches. The goal of this work is the creation of an element deletion strategy based on fracture models for use in validated prediction of collapse of steel structures. The current work reviews the state-of-the-art of finite element deletion strategies for use in collapse modeling of structures. It is shown that current approaches to element deletion in collapse modeling do not take into account stress triaxiality in vulnerable areas of the structure, which is important for proper fracture and element deletion modeling. The report then reviews triaxiality and its role in fracture prediction. It is shown that fracture in ductile materials is a function of triaxiality. It is also shown that, depending on the triaxiality range, different fracture mechanisms are active and should be accounted for. An approach using semi-empirical fracture models as a function of triaxiality are employed. The models to determine fracture initiation, softening and subsequent finite element deletion are outlined. This procedure allows for stress-displacement softening at an integration point of a finite element in order to subsequently remove the element. This approach avoids abrupt changes in the stress that would create dynamic instabilities, thus making the results more reliable and accurate. The calibration and validation of these models are

  18. Collapsing lattice animals and lattice trees in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-06-01

    We present high statistics simulations of weighted lattice bond animals and lattice trees on the square lattice, with fugacities for each non-bonded contact and for each bond between two neighbouring monomers. The simulations are performed using a newly developed sequential sampling method with resampling, very similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used for linear chain polymers. We determine with high precision the line of second-order transitions from an extended to a collapsed phase in the resulting two-dimensional phase diagram. This line includes critical bond percolation as a multicritical point, and we verify that this point divides the line into different universality classes. One of them corresponds to the collapse driven by contacts and includes the collapse of (weakly embeddable) trees. There is some evidence that the other is subdivided again into two parts with different universality classes. One of these (at the far side from collapsing trees) is bond driven and is represented by the Derrida-Herrmann model of animals having bonds only (no contacts). Between the critical percolation point and this bond-driven collapse seems to be an intermediate regime, whose other end point is a multicritical point P* where a transition line between two collapsed phases (one bond driven and the other contact driven) sparks off. This point P* seems to be attractive (in the renormalization group sense) from the side of the intermediate regime, so there are four universality classes on the transition line (collapsing trees, critical percolation, intermediate regime, and Derrida-Herrmann). We obtain very precise estimates for all critical exponents for collapsing trees. It is already harder to estimate the critical exponents for the intermediate regime. Finally, it is very difficult to obtain with our method good estimates of the critical parameters of the Derrida-Herrmann universality class. As regards the bond-driven to contact-driven transition in the

  19. Bubble Proliferation in Shock Wave Lithotripsy Occurs during Inertial Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-06-01

    In shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), firing shock pulses at slow pulse repetition frequency (0.5 Hz) is more effective at breaking kidney stones than firing shock waves (SWs) at fast rate (2 Hz). Since at fast rate the number of cavitation bubbles increases, it appears that bubble proliferation reduces the efficiency of SWL. The goal of this work was to determine the basis for bubble proliferation when SWs are delivered at fast rate. Bubbles were studied using a high-speed camera (Imacon 200). Experiments were conducted in a test tank filled with nondegassed tap water at room temperature. Acoustic pulses were generated with an electromagnetic lithotripter (DoLi-50). In the focus of the lithotripter the pulses consisted of a ˜60 MPa positive-pressure spike followed by up to -8 MPa negative-pressure tail, all with a total duration of about 7 μs. Nonlinear propagation steepened the shock front of the pulses to become sufficiently thin (˜0.03 μm) to impose differential pressure across even microscopic bubbles. High-speed camera movies showed that the SWs forced preexisting microbubbles to collapse, jet, and break up into daughter bubbles, which then grew rapidly under the negative-pressure phase of the pulse, but later coalesced to re-form a single bubble. Subsequent bubble growth was followed by inertial collapse and, usually, rebound. Most, if not all, cavitation bubbles emitted micro-jets during their first inertial collapse and re-growth. After jetting, these rebounding bubbles could regain a spherical shape before undergoing a second inertial collapse. However, either upon this second inertial collapse, or sometimes upon the first inertial collapse, the rebounding bubble emerged from the collapse as a cloud of smaller bubbles rather than a single bubble. These daughter bubbles could continue to rebound and collapse for a few cycles, but did not coalesce. These observations show that the positive-pressure phase of SWs fragments preexisting bubbles but this initial

  20. Tumor-selective mitochondrial network collapse induced by atmospheric gas plasma-activated medium.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kosuke; Asai, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Sahara, Junki; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Fukuda, Noboru; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Soma, Masayoshi; Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-12

    Non-thermal atmospheric gas plasma (AGP) exhibits cytotoxicity against malignant cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. However, the mechanisms of its tumor-selective cytotoxicity remain unclear. Here we report that AGP-activated medium increases caspase-independent cell death and mitochondrial network collapse in a panel of human cancer cells, but not in non-transformed cells. AGP irradiation stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGP-activated medium, and in turn the resulting stable ROS, most likely hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), activated intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) accumulation. Culture in AGP-activated medium resulted in cell death and excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering, and these responses were inhibited by ROS scavengers. AGP-activated medium also increased dynamin-related protein 1-dependent mitochondrial fission in a tumor-specific manner, and H2O2 administration showed similar effects. Moreover, the vulnerability of tumor cells to mitochondrial network collapse appeared to result from their higher sensitivity to mROS accumulation induced by AGP-activated medium or H2O2. The present findings expand our previous observations on death receptor-mediated tumor-selective cell killing and reinforce the importance of mitochondrial network remodeling as a powerful target for tumor-selective cancer treatment.

  1. Tumor-selective mitochondrial network collapse induced by atmospheric gas plasma-activated medium

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kosuke; Asai, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Sahara, Junki; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Fukuda, Noboru; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Soma, Masayoshi; Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric gas plasma (AGP) exhibits cytotoxicity against malignant cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. However, the mechanisms of its tumor-selective cytotoxicity remain unclear. Here we report that AGP-activated medium increases caspase-independent cell death and mitochondrial network collapse in a panel of human cancer cells, but not in non-transformed cells. AGP irradiation stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGP-activated medium, and in turn the resulting stable ROS, most likely hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), activated intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) accumulation. Culture in AGP-activated medium resulted in cell death and excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering, and these responses were inhibited by ROS scavengers. AGP-activated medium also increased dynamin-related protein 1-dependent mitochondrial fission in a tumor-specific manner, and H2O2 administration showed similar effects. Moreover, the vulnerability of tumor cells to mitochondrial network collapse appeared to result from their higher sensitivity to mROS accumulation induced by AGP-activated medium or H2O2. The present findings expand our previous observations on death receptor-mediated tumor-selective cell killing and reinforce the importance of mitochondrial network remodeling as a powerful target for tumor-selective cancer treatment. PMID:26942565

  2. Gravitational collapse of thin shells of dust in asymptotically flat shape dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercati, Flavio; Gomes, Henrique; Koslowski, Tim; Napoletano, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    In a recent paper, one of us studied spherically symmetric, asymptotically flat solutions of shape dynamics, finding that the spatial metric has characteristics of a wormhole—two asymptotically flat ends and a minimal-area sphere, or "throat," in between. In this paper, we investigate whether that solution can emerge as a result of gravitational collapse of matter. With this goal, we study the simplest kind of spherically symmetric matter: an infinitely-thin shell of dust. Our system can be understood as a model of a star accreting a thin layer of matter. We solve the dynamics of the shell exactly and find that, indeed, as it collapses, the shell leaves in its wake the wormhole metric. In the maximal-slicing time we use for asymptotically flat solutions, the shell only approaches the throat asymptotically and does not cross it in a finite amount of time (as measured by a clock "at infinity"). This leaves open the possibility that a more realistic cosmological solution of shape dynamics might see this crossing happening in a finite amount of time (as measured by the change of relational or shape degrees of freedom).

  3. Constrained minimization for monotonic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.; Kothe, D.B.

    1996-08-20

    The authors present several innovations in a method for monotonic reconstructions. It is based on the application of constrained minimization techniques for the imposition of monotonicity on a reconstruction. In addition, they present extensions of several classical TVD limiters to a genuinely multidimensional setting. In this case the linear least squares reconstruction method is expanded upon. They also clarify data dependent weighting techniques used with the minimization process.

  4. Shapes of embedded minimal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Colding, Tobias H; Minicozzi, William P

    2006-07-25

    Surfaces that locally minimize area have been extensively used to model physical phenomena, including soap films, black holes, compound polymers, protein folding, etc. The mathematical field dates to the 1740s but has recently become an area of intense mathematical and scientific study, specifically in the areas of molecular engineering, materials science, and nanotechnology because of their many anticipated applications. In this work, we show that all minimal surfaces are built out of pieces of the surfaces in Figs. 1 and 2.

  5. Correlated random walks caused by dynamical wavefunction collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedingham, D. J.; Ulbricht, H.

    2015-08-01

    Wavefunction collapse models modify Schrödinger’s equation so that it describes the collapse of a superposition of macroscopically distinguishable states as a dynamical process. This provides a basis for the resolution of the quantum measurement problem. An additional generic consequence of the collapse mechanism is that it causes particles to exhibit a tiny random diffusive motion. Here it is shown that for the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model—one of the most well developed collapse models—the diffusions of two sufficiently nearby particles are positively correlated. An experimental test of this effect is proposed in which random displacements of pairs of free nanoparticles are measured after they have been simultaneously released from nearby traps. The experiment must be carried out at sufficiently low temperature and pressure in order for the collapse effects to dominate over the ambient environmental noise. It is argued that these constraints can be satisfied by current technologies for a large region of the viable parameter space of the CSL model. The effect disappears as the separation between particles exceeds the CSL length scale. The test therefore provides a means of bounding this length scale.

  6. Subsidence and collapse sinkholes in soluble rock: a numerical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Romanov, Douchko; Hiller, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Soluble rocks such as limestone, gypsum, anhydrite, and salt are prone to subsidence and the sudden creation of collapse sinkholes. The reason for this behaviour stems from the solubility of the rock: Water percolating through fissures and bedding partings can remove material from the rock walls and thus increase the permeability of the host rock by orders of magnitudes. This process occurs on time scales of 1,000-100,000 years, resulting in enlarged fractures, voids and cavities, which then carry flow efficiently through the rock. The enlargement of sub-surface voids to the meter-size within such short times creates mechanical conditions prone to collapse. The collapse initiates at depth, but then propagates to the surface. By means of numerical modelling, we discuss the long-term evolution of secondary porosity in gypsum rocks, resulting in zones of sub-surface voids, which then become mechanically unstable and collapse. We study two real-world case scenarios, in which we can relate field observations to our numerical model: (i) A dam-site scenario, where flow around the dam caused widespread dissolution of gypsum and subsequent subsidence of the dam and a nearby highway. (ii) A natural collapse sinkhole forming as a result of freshwater inflow into a shallow anhydrite formation with rapid evolution of voids in the sub-surface.

  7. Probing the core-collapse supernova mechanism with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Christian D.

    2009-10-01

    The mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions must draw on the energy provided by gravitational collapse and transfer the necessary fraction to the kinetic and internal energy of the ejecta. Despite many decades of concerted theoretical effort, the detailed mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions is still unknown, but indications are strong that multi-D processes lie at its heart. This opens up the possibility of probing the supernova mechanism with gravitational waves, carrying direct dynamical information from the supernova engine deep inside a dying massive star. I present a concise overview of the physics and primary multi-D dynamics in neutrino-driven, magnetorotational, and acoustically driven core-collapse supernova explosion scenarios. Discussing and contrasting estimates for the gravitational-wave emission characteristics of these mechanisms, I argue that their gravitational-wave signatures are clearly distinct and that the observation (or non-observation) of gravitational waves from a nearby core-collapse event could put strong constraints on the supernova mechanism.

  8. Near-Field Microscopy Studies of Lung Surfactant Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aga, Rachel; Dunn, Robert

    2003-03-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), the fourth leading cause of infant mortality in the United States, arises from an insufficiently developed lung surfactant (LS). Healthy LS, a mixture of lipids and proteins that coats the inner surface of the lungs, reduces the alveolar surface tension to a few millinewtons per meter and, thus, facilitates breathing by stabilizing the large surface area changes associated with respiration. In the absence of an effective LS, surfactant collapse pressure (i.e., monolayer compressibility) and the ability of the monolayer to re-spread during the breathing cycle are reduced, resulting in labored breathing, reduced oxygen transport, and often death in those afflicted. In this study, we investigate the mechanism of collapse and re-spreading of a monolayer formed by a replacement surfactant commonly used in treatment of RDS. Through confocal microscopy fluorescence images obtained at a series of pressures near collapse, we find evidence for multilayer formation in the films. A further understanding of the collapse mechanism is obtained by comparing high resolution fluorescence and topography information measured with near-field scanning optical microscopy. The combined data from both confocal and near-field measurements are used to develop a model of lung surfactant collapse and re-spreading.

  9. Protostellar formation in rotation interstellar clouds. III. Nonaxisymmetric collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, A.P.

    1980-05-01

    A full three spatial-dimension gravitational hydrodynamics code has been used to follow the collapse of isothermal rotating clouds subjected to various nonaxialy symmetric perturbations (NAP). An initially axially symmetric cloud collapsed to form a ring which then fragmented into a binary protostellar system. A low thermal energy cloud with a large bar-shaped NAP collapsed and fragmented directly into a binary; higher thermal energy clouds damp out such NAPs while higher rotational rotational energy clouds produce binaries with wider separations. Fragmentation into single and binary systems has been seen. The tidal effects of other nearby protostellar clouds are shown to have an important effect upon the collapse and should not be neglected. The three-dimensional calculations indicate that isothermal interstellar clouds may fragment (with or without passing through a transitory ring phase) into protostellar objects while still in the isothermal regime. The fragments obtained have masses and specific spin angular momenta roughly a 10th that of the original cloud. Interstellar clouds and their fragments may pass through successive collapse phases with fragmentation and reduction of spin angular momentum (by conversion to orbital angular momentum and preferential accretion of low angular momentum matter) terminating in the formation of pre--main-sequence stars with the observed pre--main-sequence rotation rates.

  10. SIGNATURES OF STAR CLUSTER FORMATION BY COLD COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-10

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  11. Gravitational collapse of colloidal gels: Origins of the tipping point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Poornima; Zia, Roseanna

    2016-11-01

    Reversible colloidal gels are soft viscoelastic solids in which durable but reversible bonds permit on-demand transition from solidlike to liquidlike behavior; these O(kT) bonds also lead to ongoing coarsening and age stiffening, making their rheology inherently time dependent. To wit, such gels may remain stable for an extended time, but then suddenly collapse, sedimenting to the bottom of the container (or creaming to the top) and eliminating any intended functionality of the material. Although this phenomenon has been studied extensively in the experimental literature, the microscopic mechanism underlying the collapse is not well understood. Effects of gel age, interparticle attraction strength, and wall effects all have been shown to affect collapse behavior, but the microstructural transformations underlying the 'tipping point' remain murky. To study this behavior, we conduct large-scale dynamic simulation to model the structural and rheological evolution of colloidal gels subjected to various gravitational stresses, examining the detailed micromechanics in three temporal regimes: slow sedimentation prior to collapse; the tipping point leading to the onset of rapid collapse; and the subsequent compaction of the material as it approaches its final bed height. Acknowledgment for funding and support from the Office of Naval Research; the National Science Foundation; and NSF XSEDE.

  12. Detecting the Collapse of Cooperation in Evolving Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cavaliere, Matteo; Yang, Guoli; Danos, Vincent; Dakos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The sustainability of biological, social, economic and ecological communities is often determined by the outcome of social conflicts between cooperative and selfish individuals (cheaters). Cheaters avoid the cost of contributing to the community and can occasionally spread in the population leading to the complete collapse of cooperation. Although such collapse often unfolds unexpectedly, it is unclear whether one can detect the risk of cheater’s invasions and loss of cooperation in an evolving community. Here, we combine dynamical networks and evolutionary game theory to study the abrupt loss of cooperation with tools for studying critical transitions. We estimate the risk of cooperation collapse following the introduction of a single cheater under gradually changing conditions. We observe an increase in the average time it takes for cheaters to be eliminated from the community as the risk of collapse increases. We argue that such slow system response resembles slowing down in recovery rates prior to a critical transition. In addition, we show how changes in community structure reflect the risk of cooperation collapse. We find that these changes strongly depend on the mechanism that governs how cheaters evolve in the community. Our results highlight novel directions for detecting abrupt transitions in evolving networks. PMID:27492876

  13. Spherical collapse model in agegraphic dark energy cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Mehdi; Malekjani, Mohammad

    2017-09-01

    Under the commonly used spherical collapse model, we study how dark energy affects the growth of large scale structures of the Universe in the context of agegraphic dark energy models. The dynamics of the spherical collapse of dark matter halos in nonlinear regimes is determined by the properties of the dark energy model. We show that the main parameters of the spherical collapse model are directly affected by the evolution of dark energy in the agegraphic dark energy models. We compute the spherical collapse quantities for different values of agegraphic model parameter α in two different scenarios: first, when dark energy does not exhibit fluctuations on cluster scales, and second, when dark energy inside the overdense region collapses similar to dark matter. Using the Sheth-Tormen and Reed mass functions, we investigate the abundance of dark matter halos in the framework of agegraphic dark energy cosmologies. The model parameter α is a crucial parameter in order to count the abundance of dark matter halos. Specifically, the present analysis suggests that the agegraphic dark energy model with a bigger (smaller) value of α predicts less (more) virialized halos with respect to that of Λ CDM cosmology. We also show that in agegraphic dark energy models, the number of halos strongly depends on clustered or uniformed distributions of dark energy.

  14. Signatures of Star Cluster Formation by Cold Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  15. Detailed Simulations of Bubble-Cluster Collapse Adjacent Material Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Arpit; Pantano, Carlos; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2013-11-01

    The collapse of bubble clusters adjacent material surfaces is thought to be an important damage mechanism, in both engineering and biomedical applications. Homogeneous models of these clusters have been able to reproduce some of their gross dynamics, however diagnostic challenges leave it unclear how important the bubble dynamics are for important quantities such as peak pressures on the surface. We study in detail the dynamics of small clusters collapsing adjacent to a wall using a numerical scheme that faithfully represents bubble-scale dynamics. It is based on a recently developed interface capturing method that is asymptotically consistent with a well-posed mixture model for the two phases. For collapse near a rigid wall, we show strong inward focusing of re-entrant jets, which enhances the impulsive pressures generated on the wall. The homogeneous model we compare with fails to capture the true peak pressures on the walls. We further apply our scheme to simulate cluster collapse near a viscous fluid as a model for soft tissue, as in therapeutic ultrasound. In this case, the low impedance mismatch at the wall leads to significantly different dynamics. Simulations suggest that clusters can actually be relatively protective when compared to single-bubble collapses.

  16. Correlated random walks caused by dynamical wavefunction collapse

    PubMed Central

    Bedingham, D. J.; Ulbricht, H.

    2015-01-01

    Wavefunction collapse models modify Schrödinger’s equation so that it describes the collapse of a superposition of macroscopically distinguishable states as a dynamical process. This provides a basis for the resolution of the quantum measurement problem. An additional generic consequence of the collapse mechanism is that it causes particles to exhibit a tiny random diffusive motion. Here it is shown that for the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model—one of the most well developed collapse models—the diffusions of two sufficiently nearby particles are positively correlated. An experimental test of this effect is proposed in which random displacements of pairs of free nanoparticles are measured after they have been simultaneously released from nearby traps. The experiment must be carried out at sufficiently low temperature and pressure in order for the collapse effects to dominate over the ambient environmental noise. It is argued that these constraints can be satisfied by current technologies for a large region of the viable parameter space of the CSL model. The effect disappears as the separation between particles exceeds the CSL length scale. The test therefore provides a means of bounding this length scale. PMID:26303388

  17. On Rapidly Rotating Magnetic Core-Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J R; Mathews, G J; Dalhed, H E

    2004-12-20

    The authors have analyzed magnetic effects which may occur in rapidly rotating core collapse supernovae. They consider effects from both magnetic turbulence and the formation of magnetic bubbles. For magnetic turbulence they have made a perturbative analysis for the spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova model that incorporates the build up of magnetic field energy in the matter accreting onto the proto-neutron star shortly after collapse and bounce. This significantly modifies the pressure profile and increases the heating of the material above the proto-neutron star resulting in an explosion even in rotating stars which would not explode otherwise. Regarding magnetic bubbles it is shown that a model with an initial uniform magnetic field ({approx} 10{sup 8}) gauss and uniform angular velocity of ({approx} 0.1 rad sec{sup -1}) can form magnetic bubbles due to the very non homologous nature of the collapse. It is estimated that the buoyancy of the bubbles causes matter in the proto-neutron star to rise, carrying neutrino-rich material to the neutron-star surface. This increases the neutrino luminosity sufficiently at early times to achieve a successful neutrino-driven explosion. Both magnetic mechanisms thus provide new means for initiating a Type II core-collapse supernova.

  18. Correction on the edge collapse during the synchrospeed polishing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Bingqin; Shen, Yi; Zhang, Hao; Hui, Changshun

    2016-10-01

    In the last few years, synchrospeed polishing has been widely employed in the mass spherical optical surface manufacturing process with the development of the optical polishing technology and equipment. However, the edge collapse appears easily in the synchrospeed polishing process because of the high edge pressure. The principle of the spherical surface synchrospeed polishing process is introduced, and the motion mathematical model is developed. A new multi-mode polishing method which utilizes a big polishing tool combined with a small one to correction on the edge collapse is proposed. A sphere that aperture is 110mm and radiuses is 238mm is polished via the mew method. The collapse radio is decease from 20% to 10%, and the D-value of collapse is deceased from 459.29nm to 68.74nm before and after the correct polishing process. The surface figure accuracy RMS is improved from 90.97nm to 15.97nm accordingly. The experiment proved that the correction method is very useful to correct the edge collapse.

  19. Improvements in the spherical collapse model and dark energy cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    In the present paper, we study how the effects of deviations from spherical symmetry of a system, produced by angular momentum, and shear stress, influence typical parameters of the spherical collapse model, like the linear density threshold for collapse of the non-relativistic component (δ c) and its virial overdensity (Δ V). The study is performed in the framework of the Einstein-de Sitter and Λ CDM models, and assuming that the vacuum component is not clustering within the homogeneous non-spherical overdensities. We start from the standard spherical top hat model (SCM) which does not take account the non-spherical effects, and we add to this model the shear term and angular momentum term, which are finally expressed in terms of the density contrast, δ . We find that the non-spherical terms change the non-linear evolution of the system and that the collapse stops ``naturally" at the virial radius, differently from the standard spherical collapse model. Moreover, shear and rotation gives rise to higher values of the linear overdensity parameter and different values of Δ V with respect to the standard spherical collapse model.

  20. Aftershock collapse vulnerability assessment of reinforced concrete frame structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raghunandan, Meera; Liel, Abbie B.; Luco, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In a seismically active region, structures may be subjected to multiple earthquakes, due to mainshock–aftershock phenomena or other sequences, leaving no time for repair or retrofit between the events. This study quantifies the aftershock vulnerability of four modern ductile reinforced concrete (RC) framed buildings in California by conducting incremental dynamic analysis of nonlinear MDOF analytical models. Based on the nonlinear dynamic analysis results, collapse and damage fragility curves are generated for intact and damaged buildings. If the building is not severely damaged in the mainshock, its collapse capacity is unaffected in the aftershock. However, if the building is extensively damaged in the mainshock, there is a significant reduction in its collapse capacity in the aftershock. For example, if an RC frame experiences 4% or more interstory drift in the mainshock, the median capacity to resist aftershock shaking is reduced by about 40%. The study also evaluates the effectiveness of different measures of physical damage observed in the mainshock-damaged buildings for predicting the reduction in collapse capacity of the damaged building in subsequent aftershocks. These physical damage indicators for the building are chosen such that they quantify the qualitative red tagging (unsafe for occupation) criteria employed in post-earthquake evaluation of RC frames. The results indicated that damage indicators related to the drift experienced by the damaged building best predicted the reduced aftershock collapse capacities for these ductile structures.

  1. Considering thermal-viscous collapse of the Greenland ice sheet.

    PubMed

    Colgan, William; Sommers, Aleah; Rajaram, Harihar; Abdalati, Waleed; Frahm, Joel

    2015-07-01

    We explore potential changes in Greenland ice sheet form and flow associated with increasing ice temperatures and relaxing effective ice viscosities. We define "thermal-viscous collapse" as a transition from the polythermal ice sheet temperature distribution characteristic of the Holocene to temperate ice at the pressure melting point and associated lower viscosities. The conceptual model of thermal-viscous collapse we present is dependent on: (1) sufficient energy available in future meltwater runoff, (2) routing of meltwater to the bed of the ice sheet interior, and (3) efficient energy transfer from meltwater to the ice. Although we do not attempt to constrain the probability of thermal-viscous collapse, it appears thermodynamically plausible to warm the deepest 15% of the ice sheet, where the majority of deformational shear occurs, to the pressure melting point within four centuries. First-order numerical modeling of an end-member scenario, in which prescribed ice temperatures are warmed at an imposed rate of 0.05 K/a, infers a decrease in ice sheet volume of 5 ± 2% within five centuries of initiating collapse. This is equivalent to a cumulative sea-level rise contribution of 33 ± 18 cm. The vast majority of the sea-level rise contribution associated with thermal-viscous collapse, however, would likely be realized over subsequent millennia.

  2. Expansion and Collapse in the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Michael; Becker, George D.; Viel, Matteo; Sargent, Wallace L. W.; Smette, Alain; Simcoe, Robert A.; Barlow, Thomas A.; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2005-10-01

    We study the kinematics of the gaseous cosmic web at high redshift using Lyα forest absorption in multiple QSO sight lines. Observations of the projected velocity shifts between Lyα absorbers common to the lines of sight to a gravitationally lensed QSO and three more widely separated QSO pairs are used to directly measure the expansion of the cosmic web in units of the Hubble velocity, as a function of redshift and spatial scale. The lines of sight used span a redshift range from about 2 to 4.5 and represent transverse scales from the subkiloparsec range to about 300 h-170 physical kpc. Using a simple analytic model and a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation, we constrain the underlying three-dimensional distribution of expansion velocities from the observed line-of-sight distribution of velocity shear across the plane of the sky. The shape of the shear distribution and its width (14.9 km s-1 rms for a physical transverse separation of 61 h-170 kpc at z=2, 30.0 km s-1 for 261 h-170 kpc at z=3.6) are found to be in good agreement with the IGM undergoing large-scale motions dominated by the Hubble flow, making this one of the most direct observations possible of the expansion of the universe. However, modeling the Lyα clouds with a simple ``expanding pancake'' model, the average expansion velocity of the gaseous structures causing the Lyα forest in the lower redshift (z~2) smaller separation (61 kpc) sample appears about 20% lower than the local Hubble expansion velocity. In order to understand the observed velocity distribution further we investigated the statistical distribution of expansion velocities in cosmological Lyα forest simulations. The mean expansion velocity in the (z~2, separation ~ 60 kpc) simulation is indeed somewhat smaller than the Hubble velocity, as found in the real data. We interpret this finding as tentative evidence for some Lyα forest clouds breaking away from the Hubble flow and undergoing the early stages of gravitational collapse

  3. Elastic collapse in disordered isostatic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukarzel, C. F.

    2012-02-01

    Isostatic networks are minimally rigid and therefore have, generically, nonzero elastic moduli. Regular isostatic networks have finite moduli in the limit of large sizes. However, numerical simulations show that all elastic moduli of geometrically disordered isostatic networks go to zero with system size. This holds true for positional as well as for topological disorder. In most cases, elastic moduli decrease as inverse power laws of system size. On directed isostatic networks, however, of which the square and cubic lattices are particular cases, the decrease of the moduli is exponential with size. For these, the observed elastic weakening can be quantitatively described in terms of the multiplicative growth of stresses with system size, giving rise to bulk and shear moduli of order e-bL. The case of sphere packings, which only accept compressive contact forces, is considered separately. It is argued that these have a finite bulk modulus because of specific correlations in contact disorder, introduced by the constraint of compressivity. We discuss why their shear modulus, nevertheless, is again zero for large sizes. A quantitative model is proposed that describes the numerically measured shear modulus, both as a function of the loading angle and system size. In all cases, if a density p>0 of overconstraints is present, as when a packing is deformed by compression or when a glass is outside its isostatic composition window, all asymptotic moduli become finite. For square networks with periodic boundary conditions, these are of order \\sqrt{p} . For directed networks, elastic moduli are of order e-c/p, indicating the existence of an "isostatic length scale" of order 1/p.

  4. Gravitational collapse to a Kerr-Newman black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathanail, Antonios; Most, Elias R.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2017-07-01

    We present the first systematic study of the gravitational collapse of rotating and magnetized neutron stars to charged and rotating (Kerr-Newman) black holes. In particular, we consider the collapse of magnetized and rotating neutron stars assuming that no pair-creation takes place and that the charge density in the magnetosphere is so low that the stellar exterior can be described as an electrovacuum. Under these assumptions, which are rather reasonable for a pulsar that has crossed the 'death line', we show that when the star is rotating, it acquires a net initial electrical charge, which is then trapped inside the apparent horizon of the newly formed back hole. We analyse a number of different quantities to validate that the black hole produced is indeed a Kerr-Newman one and show that, in the absence of rotation or magnetic field, the end result of the collapse is a Schwarzschild or Kerr black hole, respectively.

  5. Fate of accreting white dwarfs: Type I supernovae vs collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    1986-01-01

    The final fate of accreting C + O white dwarfs is either thermonuclear explosion or collapse, if the white dwarf mass grows to the Chandrasekhar mass. We discuss how the fate depends on the initial mass, age, composition of the white dwarf and the mass accretion rate. Relatively fast accretion leads to a carbon deflagration at low central density that gives rise to a Type Ia supernova. Slower accretion induces a helium detonation that could be observed as a Type Ib supernova. If the initial mass of the C + O white dwarf is larger than 1.2 Msub solar, a carbon deflagration starts at high central density and induces a collapse of the white dwarf to form a neutron star. We examine the critical condition for which a carbon deflagration leads to collapse, not explosion. For the case of explosion, we discuss to what extent the nucleosynthesis models are consistent with spectra of Type Ia and Ib supernovae. 61 refs., 18 figs.

  6. Collapsing shells, critical phenomena, and black hole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2016-04-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of two thin shells of matter, in asymptotically flat spacetime or constrained to move within a spherical box. We show that this simple two-body system has surprisingly rich dynamics, which includes prompt collapse to a black hole, perpetually oscillating solutions or black hole formation at arbitrarily large times. Collapse is induced by shell crossing and the black hole mass depends sensitively on the number of shell crossings. At certain critical points, the black hole mass exhibits critical behavior, determined by the change in parity (even or odd) of the number of crossings, with or without mass-gap during the transition. Some of the features we observe are reminiscent of confined scalars undergoing "turbulent" dynamics.

  7. Localized microjetting in the collapse of surface macrocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olney, K. L.; Chiu, P.-H.; Benson, D. J.; Higgins, A.; Serge, M.; Nesterenko, V. F.

    2015-02-01

    This paper focuses on the multiscale mechanism of collapse of hemicylindrical annular surface macrocavities in steel caused by high-strain, high-strain rate plastic flow of copper. Experiments and simulations revealed that a two-stage process is responsible for the observed microjetting phenomena: the formation of lateral copper microjets from the localized shear flow in copper at the interface during the filling of the cavity, and their subsequent collision at the apex of the macrocavity generating two additional horizontal microjets. The lengths of these microjets were an order of magnitude smaller than the cavity size but linearly scaled with the cavity radius. This process of microjet development is sensitive to the cavity geometry and is unlike the previously observed jetting phenomena in cavitation, impact crater collapse, or shock-induced cavity collapse.

  8. Critical Phenomena in Velocity-Induced Perfect Fluid Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Scott C.; Choptuik, Matthew W.

    2003-04-01

    We consider critical collapse of spherically-symmetric, general relativistic neutron star models. In order to induce collapse in nominally static star solutions, we give the stars initially "in-going" velocity profiles, where an overall amplitude factor of the profile is tuned to produce a critical solution that sits at the threshold of black hole formation. By examining how the global maximum of the Ricci scalar varies with the control parameter, we are able to measure the critical scaling exponents associated with the critical solutions. For a stiff fluid model, we calculate a scaling exponent consistent with previous investigations of ultra-relativistic fluid collapse. However, our exponent is in disagreement with a recent study by J. Novak (2001) which used the same initial data prescription but failed to resolve the dynamics at the threshold of black hole formation.

  9. Pre-Hawking radiation from a collapsing shell

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Eric; Podolsky, Dmitry; Starkman, Glenn E-mail: podolsky@phys.cwru.edu

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the effect of induced massive radiation given off during the time of collapse of a massive spherically symmetric domain wall in the context of the functional Schrödinger formalism. Here we find that the introduction of mass suppresses the occupation number in the infrared regime of the induced radiation during the collapse. The suppression factor is found to be given by e{sup −βm}, which is in agreement with the expected Planckian distribution of induced radiation. Thus a massive collapsing domain wall will radiate mostly (if not exclusively) massless scalar fields, making it difficult for the domain wall to shed any global quantum numbers and evaporate before the horizon is formed.

  10. Unexpected patterns of fisheries collapse in the world's oceans.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Malin L; Jensen, Olaf P; Ricard, Daniel; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2011-05-17

    Understanding which species are most vulnerable to human impacts is a prerequisite for designing effective conservation strategies. Surveys of terrestrial species have suggested that large-bodied species and top predators are the most at risk, and it is commonly assumed that such patterns also apply in the ocean. However, there has been no global test of this hypothesis in the sea. We analyzed two fisheries datasets (stock assessments and landings) to determine the life-history traits of species that have suffered dramatic population collapses. Contrary to expectations, our data suggest that up to twice as many fisheries for small, low trophic-level species have collapsed compared with those for large predators. These patterns contrast with those on land, suggesting fundamental differences in the ways that industrial fisheries and land conversion affect natural communities. Even temporary collapses of small, low trophic-level fishes can have ecosystem-wide impacts by reducing food supply to larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals.

  11. Cosmic censorship conjecture in some matching spherical collapsing metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapiedra, Ramon; Morales-Lladosa, Juan Antonio

    2017-03-01

    A physically plausible Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi collapse in the marginally bound case is considered. By "physically plausible," we mean that the corresponding metric is C1 matched at the collapsing star surface and further that its intrinsic energy is, as due, stationary and finite. It is proved for this Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi collapse, for some parameter values, that its intrinsic central singularity is globally naked, thus violating the cosmic censorship conjecture with, for each direction, one photon, or perhaps a pencil of photons, leaving the singularity and reaching the null infinity. Our result is discussed in relation to some other cases in the current literature on the subject in which some of the central singularities are globally naked, too.

  12. Indicators of collapse in systems undergoing unsustainable growth.

    PubMed

    Ridolfi, Luca; D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    Unsustainable growth is typical of systems that rely on a finite pool of non-renewable resources that are tapped until they are depleted. The decrease in resource availability eventually leads these systems to a decline. Here we investigate the dynamics of systems that exhibit unsustainable growth and are prone to a collapse to an alternative ("degraded") state. For these systems the possible imminent occurrence of a collapse is difficult to avert because they keep growing as they approach the transition point. It is therefore important to identify some early warning signs that can be used to predict whether the system is approaching a critical and likely irreversible transition to an undesired and degraded state. This study evaluates whether existing theories of precursors of phase transitions based on the critical slowing down phenomenon are applicable as leading indicators of state shift in unsustainable growth dynamics. It is found that such indicators fail to serve as reliable early warning signs of the system's collapse.

  13. Collapsing Glomerulopathy in a Child with Galloway-Mowat Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zeybek, Cengiz; Basbozkurt, Gokalp; Hamcan, Salih; Ozcan, Ayhan; Gul, Davut; Gok, Faysal

    2016-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GMS) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a poor prognosis that was first defined as a triad of central nervous system involvement, hiatal hernia, and nephrotic syndrome. However, this syndrome is now known to have a heterogeneous clinical presentation. The nephrotic syndrome is steroid resistant and is responsible for the outcome. The combination of collapsing glomerulopathy and GMS is very rare. A 26-month-old boy presented with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome associated with neurologic findings, including microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, and nystagmus. Magnetic resonance imaging showed marked cerebral atrophy, optic atrophy, and hypomyelination. A renal biopsy was consistent with collapsing glomerulopathy. If collapsing glomerulopathy is associated with neurological abnormalities, especially with microcephaly, clinicians should consider GMS as a possible underlying cause. PMID:27403357

  14. West antarctic ice sheet collapse: Chimera or clear danger

    SciTech Connect

    Alley, R.B. ); MacAyeal, D.R. )

    1993-01-01

    The specter of a west antarctic collapse has been with us for 25 years. Recently, certain official assessments concerned primarily with the future response to projected global warming have concluded that Antarctica will not cause much sea-level rise within the planning horizon of a century or so. At the same time startling new results on ice sheet (in)stability have been emerging, pointing to less stability then previously believed. Some recent results are reviewed briefly: Heinrich layers in the North Atlantic show basally lubricated surges of the Laurentide ice sheet; the west antarctic ice sheet collapsed recently; the modern west antarctic ice sheet is changing rapidly locally; the bed of ice stream B is exceptionally well lubricated by water and water-saturated soft sediments; the modern ice sheet is thinning slowly on average; a model west antarctic ice sheet undergoes rapid collapses long after forcing and probably related to penetration of warmth to the bed. 23 refs.

  15. Magnetorotatioal Collapse of Supermassive Stars: Black Hole Formation and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lunan; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Ruiz, Milton; Shapiro, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    We perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations in full general relativity of the collapse of radially unstable, uniformly rotating, massive stars to black holes. The stars spin at the mass-shedding limit, account for magnetic fields and obey a Γ = 4/3 EOS. The calculations lift the restriction of axisymmetry imposed in previous simulations. Our simulations model the direct collapse of supermassive stars to supermassive BHs (>=104M⊙) at high cosmological redshifts, which may explain the appearance of supermassive BHs and quasars by z 7. They also crudely model the collapse of massive Pop III stars to massive BHs, which could power some of the long gamma-ray bursts observed by FERMI and SWIFT at z 6-8. We analyze the properties of the electromagnetic and gravitational wave signatures of these events and discuss the detectability of such multimessenger sources.

  16. Modeling colony collapse disorder in honeybees as a contagion.

    PubMed

    Kribs-Zaleta, Christopher M; Mitchell, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Honeybee pollination accounts annually for over $14 billion in United States agriculture alone. Within the past decade there has been a mysterious mass die-off of honeybees, an estimated 10 million beehives and sometimes as much as 90% of an apiary. There is still no consensus on what causes this phenomenon, called Colony Collapse Disorder, or CCD. Several mathematical models have studied CCD by only focusing on infection dynamics. We created a model to account for both healthy hive dynamics and hive extinction due to CCD, modeling CCD via a transmissible infection brought to the hive by foragers. The system of three ordinary differential equations accounts for multiple hive population behaviors including Allee effects and colony collapse. Numerical analysis leads to critical hive sizes for multiple scenarios and highlights the role of accelerated forager recruitment in emptying hives during colony collapse.

  17. Theoretical analysis of wake-induced parachute collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Spahr, H.R.; Wolf, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    During recent drop tests of a prototype weapon system, the parachute collapsed soon after it became fully inflated. The magnitude and duration of the collapses were severe enough to degrade parachute performance drastically. A computer-assisted analysis is presented which models parachute inflation, forebody and parachute wake generation, and interaction between the wake and the inflating or collapsing parachute. Comparison of the analysis results with full-scale drop test results shows good agreement for two parachute sizes; both parachutes were tested with and without permanent reefing. Computer-generated graphics (black and white drawings, color slides, and color movies) show the forebody and inflating parachute, the wake, and the wake and parachute interaction.

  18. Improved Noninterferometric Test of Collapse Models Using Ultracold Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinante, A.; Mezzena, R.; Falferi, P.; Carlesso, M.; Bassi, A.

    2017-09-01

    Spontaneous collapse models predict that a weak force noise acts on any mechanical system, as a consequence of the collapse of the wave function. Significant upper limits on the collapse rate have been recently inferred from precision mechanical experiments, such as ultracold cantilevers and the space mission LISA Pathfinder. Here, we report new results from an experiment based on a high-Q cantilever cooled to millikelvin temperatures, which is potentially able to improve the current bounds on the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model by 1 order of magnitude. High accuracy measurements of the cantilever thermal fluctuations reveal a nonthermal force noise of unknown origin. This excess noise is compatible with the CSL heating predicted by Adler. Several physical mechanisms able to explain the observed noise have been ruled out.

  19. Gravitational collapse of massless scalar field in f (R ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng-Yong; Tang, Zi-Yu; Wang, Bin

    2016-11-01

    We study the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of massless scalar matter field in asymptotic flat spacetime in the Starobinsky R2 gravity, one specific model in the f (R ) gravity. In the Einstein frame of f (R ) gravity, an additional scalar field arises due to the conformal transformation. We find that in addition to the usual competition between gravitational energy and kinetic energy in the process of gravitational collapse, the new scalar field brought by the conformal transformation adds one more competing force in the dynamical system. The dynamical competition can be controlled by tuning the amplitudes of the initial perturbations of the new scalar field and the matter field. To understand the physical reasons behind these phenomena, we analyze the gravitational potential behavior and calculate the Ricci scalar at center with the change of initial amplitudes of perturbations. We find rich physics on the formation of black holes through gravitational collapse in f (R ) gravity.

  20. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1993-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium implies that it is produced by particles of dominant size of approximately 10(exp -5) cm. There is some indication that in the cores of dense molecular clouds, sub-micron grains can coagulate to form larger particles; this process is probably driven by turbulence. The most primitive meteorites (carbonaceous chondrites) are composed of particles with a bimodal size distribution with peaks near 1 micron (matrix) and 1 mm (chondrules). Models for chondrule formation that involve processing of presolar material by chemical reactions or through an accretion shock during infall assume that aggregates of the requisite mass could form before or during collapse. The effectiveness of coagulation during collapse has been disputed; it appears to depend on specific assumptions. The first results of detailed numerical modeling of spatial and temporal variations of particle sizes in presolar clouds, both static and collapsing, is reported in this article.

  1. Collapse of magnetized hypermassive neutron stars in general relativity.

    PubMed

    Duez, Matthew D; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L; Shibata, Masaru; Stephens, Branson C

    2006-01-27

    Hypermassive neutron stars (HMNSs)--equilibrium configurations supported against collapse by rapid differential rotation--are possible transient remnants of binary neutron-star mergers. Using newly developed codes for magnetohydrodynamic simulations in dynamical spacetimes, we are able to track the evolution of a magnetized HMNS in full general relativity for the first time. We find that secular angular momentum transport due to magnetic braking and the magnetorotational instability results in the collapse of an HMNS to a rotating black hole, accompanied by a gravitational wave burst. The nascent black hole is surrounded by a hot, massive torus undergoing quasistationary accretion and a collimated magnetic field. This scenario suggests that HMNS collapse is a possible candidate for the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts.

  2. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse on Film and Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Don; Hook, Joseph; Doescher, Russell; Wolf, Steven

    2015-11-01

    This month marks the 75th anniversary of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse. During a gale on Nov. 7, 1940, the bridge exhibited remarkable oscillations before collapsing spectacularly (Figs. 1-5). Physicists over the years have spent a great deal of time and energy studying this event. By using open-source analysis tools and digitized footage of the disaster, physics students in both high school and college can continue in this tradition. Students can watch footage of "Galloping Gertie," ask scientific questions about the bridge's collapse, analyze data, and draw conclusions from that analysis. Students should be encouraged to pursue their own investigations, but the question that drove our inquiry was this: "When physics classes watch modern video showing the oscillations and the free fall of the bridge fragments, are these scenes sped up, slowed down, or at the correct speed compared to what was observed by the eyewitnesses on Nov. 7, 1940?"

  3. Improved Noninterferometric Test of Collapse Models Using Ultracold Cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Vinante, A; Mezzena, R; Falferi, P; Carlesso, M; Bassi, A

    2017-09-15

    Spontaneous collapse models predict that a weak force noise acts on any mechanical system, as a consequence of the collapse of the wave function. Significant upper limits on the collapse rate have been recently inferred from precision mechanical experiments, such as ultracold cantilevers and the space mission LISA Pathfinder. Here, we report new results from an experiment based on a high-Q cantilever cooled to millikelvin temperatures, which is potentially able to improve the current bounds on the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model by 1 order of magnitude. High accuracy measurements of the cantilever thermal fluctuations reveal a nonthermal force noise of unknown origin. This excess noise is compatible with the CSL heating predicted by Adler. Several physical mechanisms able to explain the observed noise have been ruled out.

  4. Lateral stress relaxation and collapse in lipid monolayers†

    PubMed Central

    Pocivavsek, Luka; Frey, Shelli L.; Krishan, Kapilanjan; Gavrilov, Kseniya; Ruchala, Piotr; Waring, Alan J.; Walther, Frans J.; Dennin, Michael; Witten, Thomas A.; Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2009-01-01

    Surfactants at air/water interfaces are often subjected to mechanical stresses as the interfaces they occupy are reduced in area. The most well characterized forms of stress relaxation in these systems are first order phase transitions from lower density to higher density phases. Here we study stress relaxation in lipid monolayers that occurs once chemical phase transitions have been exhausted. At these highly compressed states, the monolayer undergoes global mechanical relaxations termed collapse. By studying four different types of monolayers, we determine that collapse modes are most closely linked to in-plane rigidity. We characterize the rigidity of the monolayer by analyzing in-plane morphology on numerous length scales. More rigid monolayers collapse out-of-plane via a hard elastic mode similar to an elastic membrane, while softer monolayers relax in-plane by shearing. PMID:19657472

  5. HYPERCRITICAL ACCRETION, INDUCED GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE, AND BINARY-DRIVEN HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2014-09-16

    We successfully, applied the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm to the explanation of GRB-SNe. The progenitor is a tight binary system composed of a CO core and a NS companion. Furthermore, the explosion of the SN leads to hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion, which reaches the critical mass, gravitationally collapsing to a BH with consequent emission of the GRB. The first estimates of this process were based on a simplified model of the binary parameters and the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion rate. We present the first full numerical simulations of the IGC process. We simulate the core-collapse, the SN explosion, and the hydrodynamic evolution of the accreting material falling into the Bondi-Hoyle surface of the NS. For appropriate binary parameters, the IGC occurs in short timescale 102–103 s due to the combined action of photon trapping and neutrino cooling near the NS surface. We also address the observational features of this process.

  6. Tunneling into microstate geometries: quantum effects stop gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Mayerson, Daniel R.; Puhm, Andrea; Vercnocke, Bert

    2016-07-01

    Collapsing shells form horizons, and when the curvature is small classical general relativity is believed to describe this process arbitrarily well. On the other hand, quantum information theory based (fuzzball/firewall) arguments suggest the existence of some structure at the black hole horizon. This structure can only form if classical general relativity stops being the correct description of the collapsing shell before it reaches the horizon size. We present strong evidence that classical general relativity can indeed break down prematurely, by explicitly computing the quantum tunneling amplitude of a collapsing shell of branes into smooth horizonless microstate geometries. We show that the amplitude for tunneling into microstate geometries with a large number of topologically non-trivial cycles is parametrically larger than e - S BH , which indicates that the shell can tunnel into a horizonless configuration long before the horizon has any chance to form. We also use this technology to investigate the tunneling of M2 branes into LLM bubbling geometries.

  7. Epiglottis collapse in adult obstructive sleep apnea: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Torre, Carlos; Camacho, Macario; Liu, Stanley Yung-Chuan; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Capasso, Robson

    2016-02-01

    To systematically review the international literature evaluating the role of the epiglottis in snoring and obstructive sleep apnea and to explore possible treatment options available. PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Google Scholar, Book Citation Index-Science, CINAHL, Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science, The Cochrane Collaboration Databases, and Web of Science. The searches were performed from the first year of each database through March 5, 2015. Fourteen studies about the prevalence of epiglottis collapse in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were found. Most involved drug-induced sleep endoscopy studies that indirectly reported their findings about epiglottis collapse. The data suggests that the prevalence of epiglottis collapse in OSA is higher than previously described. The epiglottis has been implicated in 12% of cases of snoring, and sound originating from it has a higher pitch than palatal snoring. Continuous positive pressure (CPAP) surgery and positional therapy in the treatment of epiglottis collapse were also considered. Lateral position of the head may reduce the frequency of epiglottis collapse. With regard to CPAP, available reports suggest that it may accentuate collapse of the epiglottis. Surgery may help reduce snoring in some patients with a lax epiglottis and improve OSA in patients undergoing multilevel surgery. Knowledge regarding the role of the epiglottis in adult OSA and snoring patients is limited. The prevalence of this phenomenon in OSA seems to be greater than previously reported, and more research is needed to understand its role in OSA and the best way to treat it. NA. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Radiation from collapsing shells, semiclassical backreaction, and black hole formation

    SciTech Connect

    Paranjape, Aseem; Padmanabhan, T.

    2009-08-15

    We provide a detailed analysis of quantum field theory around a collapsing shell and discuss several conceptual issues related to the emission of radiation flux and formation of black holes. Explicit calculations are performed using a model for a collapsing shell, which turns out to be analytically solvable. We use the insights gained in this model to draw reliable conclusions regarding more realistic models. We first show that any shell of mass M, which collapses to a radius close to r=2M, will emit approximately thermal radiation for a period of time. In particular, a shell that collapses from some initial radius to a final radius 2M(1-{epsilon}{sup 2}){sup -1} (where {epsilon}<<1) without forming a black hole, will emit thermal radiation during the period M < or approx. t < or approx. Mln(1/{epsilon}{sup 2}). Later on (t>>Mln(1/{epsilon}{sup 2})), the flux from such a shell will decay to zero exponentially. We next study the effect of backreaction computed using the vacuum expectation value of the stress tensor on the collapse. We find that, in any realistic collapse scenario, the backreaction effects do not prevent the formation of the event horizon. The time at which the event horizon is formed is, of course, delayed due to the radiated flux--which decreases the mass of the shell--but this effect is not sufficient to prevent horizon formation. We also clarify several conceptual issues and provide pedagogical details of the calculations in the Appendices to the paper.

  9. The White Pine Mine explosively induced, controlled collapse experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W.; Phillips, W.S.

    1996-09-01

    On September 3, 1995, the White Pine Mine, which is owned by Copper Range Company, conducted the first of a planned series of explosive removal of existing pillars in their underground mining operations. The purpose of this operation is to evaluate the effectiveness of pillar rubbilization and roof collapse for planned in-situ leaching of the copper ore from the rock mass. This type of seismic source is unique in that a large, delay fired, explosive source was expected to be followed by collapse of the rock immediately above the explosion into the void created. Characterization of this type of mining source is of interest to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) R&D Seismic Program due to its unique properties. These include the controlled nature of the source in time, location, and magnitude, the fact that the source is located in an active region of underground mining, and that natural collapse of large portions of this mine have occurred in the recent past. The Mine operator is concerned with the characterization of the vibration induced by both the explosive and implosive components of the procedure and determination of the depth to which chimneying of the roof proceeded. This report will document: The reasons for conducting both the explosively induced collapse and the Los Alamos National Laboratory CTBT R&D Experimental Field Program experiment; The local and regional seismic, acoustic, and videographic data acquired; Analysis of the explosion/collapse seismic signal generated; Analysis and location of the aftershocks associated with the collapse; and Conclusions made concerning this type of mining explosion in relation to verification of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  10. Minimal but non-minimal inflation and electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Marzola, Luca; Racioppi, Antonio

    2016-10-07

    We consider the most minimal scale invariant extension of the standard model that allows for successful radiative electroweak symmetry breaking and inflation. The framework involves an extra scalar singlet, that plays the rôle of the inflaton, and is compatibile with current experimental bounds owing to the non-minimal coupling of the latter to gravity. This inflationary scenario predicts a very low tensor-to-scalar ratio r≈10{sup −3}, typical of Higgs-inflation models, but in contrast yields a scalar spectral index n{sub s}≃0.97 which departs from the Starobinsky limit. We briefly discuss the collider phenomenology of the framework.

  11. Method to compute the stress-energy tensor for a quantum field outside a black hole that forms from collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul; Evans, Charles

    2017-01-01

    A method to compute the stress-energy tensor for a quantized massless minimally coupled scalar field outside the event horizon of a 4-D black hole that forms from the collapse of a spherically symmetric null shell is given. The method is illustrated in the corresponding 2-D case which is mathematically similar but is simple enough that the calculations can be done analytically. The approach to the Unruh state at late times is discussed. National Science Foundation Grant No. PHY-1505875 to Wake Forest University and National Science Foundation Grant No. PHY-1506182 to the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

  12. TeV neutrinos from core collapse supernovae and hypernovae.

    PubMed

    Razzaque, Soebur; Mészáros, Peter; Waxman, Eli

    2004-10-29

    A fraction of core-collapse supernovae of type Ib/c are associated with gamma-ray bursts, which are thought to produce highly relativistic jets. Recently, it has been hypothesized that a larger fraction of core-collapse supernovae produce slower jets, which may contribute to the disruption and ejection of the supernova envelope, and explain the unusually energetic hypernovae. We explore the TeV neutrino signatures expected from such slower jets, and calculate the expected detection rates with upcoming Gigaton Cherenkov experiments. We conclude that individual jetted supernovae may be detectable from nearby galaxies.

  13. Gravitational collapse, chaos in CFT correlators and the information paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahi, Arya; Pando Zayas, Leopoldo A.

    2014-06-01

    We consider gravitational collapse of a massless scalar field in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetime. Following the AdS/CFT dictionary we further study correlations in the field theory side by way of the Klein-Gordon equation of a probe scalar field in the collapsing background. We present evidence that in a certain regime the probe scalar field behaves chaotically, thus supporting Hawking's argument in the black hole information paradox proposing that although the information can be retrieved in principle, deterministic chaos impairs, in practice, the process of unitary extraction of information from a black hole. We emphasize that quantum chaos will change this picture. .

  14. Source Analysis of the Crandall Canyon, Utah, Mine Collapse

    DOE PAGES

    Dreger, D. S.; Ford, S. R.; Walter, W. R.

    2008-07-11

    Analysis of seismograms from a magnitude 3.9 seismic event on August 6, 2007 in central Utah reveals an anomalous radiation pattern that is contrary to that expected for a tectonic earthquake, and which is dominated by an implosive component. The results show the seismic event is best modeled as a shallow underground collapse. Interestingly, large transverse surface waves require a smaller additional non-collapse source component that represents either faulting in the rocks above the mine workings or deformation of the medium surrounding the mine.

  15. Activity-induced collapse and reexpansion of rigid polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J.; Valeriani, C.; Cacciuto, A.

    2014-12-01

    We study the elastic properties of a rigid filament in a bath of self-propelled particles. We find that while fully flexible filaments swell monotonically upon increasing the strength of the propelling force, rigid filaments soften for moderate activities, collapse into metastable hairpins for intermediate strengths, and eventually reexpand when the strength of the activity of the surrounding fluid is large. This collapse and reexpansion of the filament with the bath activity is reminiscent of the behavior observed in polyelectrolytes in the presence of different concentrations of multivalent salt.

  16. Collapse of triangular channels in a soft elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepáyotl-Ramírez, Daniel; Lu, Tong; Park, Yong-Lae; Majidi, Carmel

    2013-01-01

    We extend classical solutions in contact mechanics to examine the collapse of channels in a soft elastomer. These channels have triangular cross-section and collapse when pressure is applied to the surrounding elastomer. Treating the walls of the channel as indenters that penetrate the channel base, we derive an algebraic mapping between pressure and cross-sectional area. These theoretical predictions are in strong agreement with results that we obtain through finite element analysis and experimental measurements. This is accomplished without data fitting and suggests that the theoretical approach may be generalized to a broad range of cross-sectional geometries in soft microfluidics.

  17. Spontaneous symmetry breaking and collapse in bosonic Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzarella, Giovanni; Salasnich, Luca

    2010-09-15

    We investigate an attractive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) trapped by a double-well potential in the axial direction and by a harmonic potential in the transverse directions. We obtain numerically a quantum phase diagram which includes all the three relevant phases of the system: Josephson, spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB), and collapse. We consider also the coherent dynamics of the BEC and calculate the frequency of population-imbalance mode in the Josephson phase and in the SSB phase up to the collapse. We show that these phases can be observed by using ultracold vapors of {sup 7}Li atoms in a magneto-optical trap.

  18. Thermoinertial bouncing of a relativistic collapsing sphere: A numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A.; Barreto, W.

    2006-01-15

    We present a numerical model of a collapsing radiating sphere, whose boundary surface undergoes bouncing due to a decreasing of its inertial mass density (and, as expected from the equivalence principle, also of the 'gravitational' force term) produced by the 'inertial' term of the transport equation. This model exhibits for the first time the consequences of such an effect, and shows that under physically reasonable conditions this decreasing of the gravitational term in the dynamic equation may be large enough as to revert the collapse and produce a bouncing of the boundary surface of the sphere.

  19. Collapsing glomerulopathy in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, S I; Gutta, H; Nair, R; McFarren, C; Wheeler, D E

    2011-02-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) is a distinct clinicopathological entity characterized by glomerular capillary collapse, podocyte proliferation, diffuse mesangial sclerosis, and podocyte maturation arrest. Initially noted primarily in HIV infected patients, a number of other diseases have now been associated with CG. Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a disease with overlapping features of systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, and polymyositis. It was originally thought that renal involvement was a rare complication of MCTD. However, over the years, it has become clearer that renal involvement, although not always clinically apparent, is frequent. In this report we present a patient with MCTD who developed CG.

  20. Rat instigated human population collapse on easter island.

    PubMed

    Basener, William; Brooks, Bernard; Radin, Michael; Wiandt, Tamas

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we develop an invasive species differential equations model for the population collapse on Easter Island. This model, motivated by recent archaeological results of T. Hunt, allows us to examine the role of rats in the collapse. In Hunt's theory, the decline of resources was accelerated by Polynesian rats and not merely the result of the overuse by the island's human population. Hunt uses archaeological data which suggests a different timeline for the settlement and the long term population dynamics of Easter Island. Our goal is to estimate the plausibility of Hunt's hypothesis.