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Sample records for minimal photoautotroph non-coding

  1. Viroids: the minimal non-coding RNAs with autonomous replication.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Delgado, Sonia; Gas, María-Eugenia; Carbonell, Alberto; Molina, Diego; Gago, Selma; De la Peña, Marcos

    2004-06-01

    Viroids are small (246-401 nucleotides), non-coding, circular RNAs able to replicate autonomously in certain plants. Viroids are classified into the families Pospiviroidae and Avsunviroidae, whose members replicate in the nucleus and chloroplast, respectively. Replication occurs by an RNA-based rolling-circle mechanism in three steps: (1). synthesis of longer-than-unit strands catalyzed by host DNA-dependent RNA polymerases forced to transcribe RNA templates, (2). processing to unit-length, which in family Avsunviroidae is mediated by hammerhead ribozymes, and (3). circularization either through an RNA ligase or autocatalytically. Disease induction might result from the accumulation of viroid-specific small interfering RNAs that, via RNA silencing, could interfere with normal developmental pathways.

  2. Blueprint for a minimal photoautotrophic cell: conserved and variable genes in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Simpler biological systems should be easier to understand and to engineer towards pre-defined goals. One way to achieve biological simplicity is through genome minimization. Here we looked for genomic islands in the fresh water cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (genome size 2.7 Mb) that could be used as targets for deletion. We also looked for conserved genes that might be essential for cell survival. Results By using a combination of methods we identified 170 xenologs, 136 ORFans and 1401 core genes in the genome of S. elongatus PCC 7942. These represent 6.5%, 5.2% and 53.6% of the annotated genes respectively. We considered that genes in genomic islands could be found if they showed a combination of: a) unusual G+C content; b) unusual phylogenetic similarity; and/or c) a small number of the highly iterated palindrome 1 (HIP1) motif plus an unusual codon usage. The origin of the largest genomic island by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) could be corroborated by lack of coverage among metagenomic sequences from a fresh water microbialite. Evidence is also presented that xenologous genes tend to cluster in operons. Interestingly, most genes coding for proteins with a diguanylate cyclase domain are predicted to be xenologs, suggesting a role for horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of Synechococcus sensory systems. Conclusions Our estimates of genomic islands in PCC 7942 are larger than those predicted by other published methods like SIGI-HMM. Our results set a guide to non-essential genes in S. elongatus PCC 7942 indicating a path towards the engineering of a model photoautotrophic bacterial cell. PMID:21226929

  3. Choreography of the transcriptome, photophysiology, and cell cycle of a minimal photoautotroph, prochlorococcus.

    PubMed

    Zinser, Erik R; Lindell, Debbie; Johnson, Zackary I; Futschik, Matthias E; Steglich, Claudia; Coleman, Maureen L; Wright, Matthew A; Rector, Trent; Steen, Robert; McNulty, Nathan; Thompson, Luke R; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2009-01-01

    The marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus MED4 has the smallest genome and cell size of all known photosynthetic organisms. Like all phototrophs at temperate latitudes, it experiences predictable daily variation in available light energy which leads to temporal regulation and partitioning of key cellular processes. To better understand the tempo and choreography of this minimal phototroph, we studied the entire transcriptome of the cell over a simulated daily light-dark cycle, and placed it in the context of diagnostic physiological and cell cycle parameters. All cells in the culture progressed through their cell cycles in synchrony, thus ensuring that our measurements reflected the behavior of individual cells. Ninety percent of the annotated genes were expressed, and 80% had cyclic expression over the diel cycle. For most genes, expression peaked near sunrise or sunset, although more subtle phasing of gene expression was also evident. Periodicities of the transcripts of genes involved in physiological processes such as in cell cycle progression, photosynthesis, and phosphorus metabolism tracked the timing of these activities relative to the light-dark cycle. Furthermore, the transitions between photosynthesis during the day and catabolic consumption of energy reserves at night- metabolic processes that share some of the same enzymes--appear to be tightly choreographed at the level of RNA expression. In-depth investigation of these patterns identified potential regulatory proteins involved in balancing these opposing pathways. Finally, while this analysis has not helped resolve how a cell with so little regulatory capacity, and a 'deficient' circadian mechanism, aligns its cell cycle and metabolism so tightly to a light-dark cycle, it does provide us with a valuable framework upon which to build when the Prochlorococcus proteome and metabolome become available.

  4. Non-coding RNAs in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Lara; da Costa Martins, Paula A

    2017-02-23

    Heart Failure is one of the largest contributors to disease burden and healthcare outflow in the Western world. Despite significant progress in the treatment of heart failure, disease prognosis remains very poor with the only curative therapy still being heart transplantation. To counteract the current situation, efforts have been made to better understand the underlying molecular pathways in the progression of cardiac disease towards heart failure, and to link the disease to novel therapeutic targets such as non-coding RNAs. The non-coding part of the genome has gained prominence over the last couple of decades by opening a completely new research field and having established different non-coding RNAs species as fundamental regulators of cellular functions. Not surprisingly, their dysregulation is increasingly being linked to pathology, including to cardiac disease. Pre-clinically, non-coding RNAs have been shown to be of great value as therapeutic targets in pathological cardiac remodelling and also as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for heart failure. Therefore, it is to expect that non-coding RNA-based therapeutic strategies will reach the bedside in the future and provide new and more efficient treatments for heart failure. Here, we review recent discoveries linking the function and molecular interactions of non-coding RNAs with the pathophysiology of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-coding RNAs as antibiotic targets.

    PubMed

    Colameco, Savannah; Elliot, Marie A

    2016-12-22

    Antibiotics inhibit a wide range of essential processes in the bacterial cell, including replication, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis. In many instances, these antibiotics exert their effects through association with non-coding RNAs. This review highlights many classical antibiotic targets (e.g. rRNAs and the ribosome), explores a number of emerging targets (e.g. tRNAs, RNase P, riboswitches and small RNAs), and discusses the future directions and challenges associated with non-coding RNAs as antibiotic targets.

  6. The non-coding RNAs as riboregulators.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, V A; Barciszewska, M Z; Szymanski, M; Hochberg, A; de Groot, N; Barciszewski, J

    2001-01-01

    The non-coding RNAs database (http://biobases.ibch.poznan.pl/ncRNA/) contains currently available data on RNAs, which do not have long open reading frames and act as riboregulators. Non-coding RNAs are involved in the specific recognition of cellular nucleic acid targets through complementary base pairing to control cell growth and differentiation. Some of them are connected with several well known developmental and neuro-behavioral disorders. We have divided them into four groups. This paper is a short introduction to the database and presents its latest, updated edition.

  7. Non-coding RNAs: An Introduction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jennifer X; Rastetter, Raphael H; Wilhelm, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    For many years the main role of RNA, it addition to the housekeeping functions of for example tRNAs and rRNAs, was believed to be a messenger between the genes encoded on the DNA and the functional units of the cell, the proteins. This changed drastically with the identification of the first small non-coding RNA, termed microRNA, some 20 years ago. This discovery opened the field of regulatory RNAs with no or little protein-coding potential. Since then many new classes of regulatory non-coding RNAs, including endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs), PIWI-associated RNAs (piRNAs), and long non-coding RNAs, have been identified and we have made amazing progress in elucidating their expression, biogenesis, mechanisms and mode of action, and function in many, if not all, biological processes. In this chapter we provide an introduction about the current knowledge of the main classes of non-coding RNAs, what is know about their biogenesis and mechanism of function.

  8. Non-coding RNAs in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ricciuti, Biagio; Mecca, Carmen; Crinò, Lucio; Baglivo, Sara; Cenci, Matteo; Metro, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that protein-coding genes represent less than 2% of all human genome, and the evidence that more than 90% of it is actively transcribed, changed the classical point of view of the central dogma of molecular biology, which was always based on the assumption that RNA functions mainly as an intermediate bridge between DNA sequences and protein synthesis machinery. Accumulating data indicates that non-coding RNAs are involved in different physiological processes, providing for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. They are important regulators of gene expression, cellular differentiation, proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and stem cell maintenance. Alterations and disruptions of their expression or activity have increasingly been associated with pathological changes of cancer cells, this evidence and the prospect of using these molecules as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets, make currently non-coding RNAs among the most relevant molecules in cancer research. In this paper we will provide an overview of non-coding RNA function and disruption in lung cancer biology, also focusing on their potential as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers. PMID:25593996

  9. Small non-coding RNA and cancer.

    PubMed

    Romano, Giulia; Veneziano, Dario; Acunzo, Mario; Croce, Carlo M

    2017-05-01

    The ENCODE project has reported that at least 80% of the human genome is biologically active, yet only a small part of human DNA encodes for protein. The massive amount of RNA transcribed but not translated into protein can be classified as housekeeping RNA (such as rRNA, tRNA) and regulatory RNA (such as miRNA, piRNA, lncRNA). Small non-coding RNAs, in particular, have been the focus of many studies in the last 20 years and their fundamental role in many human diseases is currently well established. Inter alia, their role in cancer development and progression, as well as in drug resistance, is being increasingly investigated. In this review, focusing our attention on recent research results, we provide an overview of the four large classes of small non-coding RNAs, namely, miRNAs, piRNAs, snoRNA and the new class of tRNA-derived fragments, highlighting their fundamental role in cancer and their potential as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Non-coding RNAs and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-Fei; Chen, Sheng-Can; Xia, Tian; Jiang, Xiao-Ming; Shao, Yong-Fu; Xiao, Bing-Xiu; Guo, Jun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play key roles in development, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Altered ncRNA expression is associated with gastric cancer occurrence, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is significantly related to gastric cancer tumor stage, size, differentiation and metastasis. MiRNAs interrupt cellular signaling pathways, inhibit the activity of tumor suppressor genes, and affect the cell cycle in gastric cancer cells. Some miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-106a and miR-421, could be potential markers for the diagnosis of gastric cancer. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a new research hotspot among cancer-associated ncRNAs, play important roles in epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Several gastric cancer-associated lncRNAs, such as CCAT1, GACAT1, H19, and SUMO1P3, have been explored. In addition, Piwi-interacting RNAs, another type of small ncRNA that is recognized by gastroenterologists, are involved in gastric carcinogenesis, and piR-651/823 represents an efficient diagnostic biomarker of gastric cancer that can be detected in the blood and gastric juice. Small interfering RNAs also function in post-transcriptional regulation in gastric cancer and might be useful in gastric cancer treatment. PMID:24833871

  11. Non-coding RNAs in cardiovascular ageing.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shashi Kumar; Piccoli, Maria Teresa; Thum, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The increasing burden of ageing populations and their healthcare expenditure is a major challenge worldwide. Ageing is a complex disorder and can be defined as progressive decline in function with time leading to increased incidence of various cardiovascular, neurological and immunological diseases. The human genome comprises of many protein coding and even more non-coding RNA genes. MicroRNAs, a class of non-coding RNA, regulate the expression of multiple messenger RNAs post-transcriptionally and are reported to be involved in crucial aspects of cell biology encompassing ageing. Recently, several studies have reported the regulation of microRNAs with ageing and microRNAs like miR-34 have emerged as critical regulator of ageing extending from Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. Here, we summarize the reported role of microRNAs as well as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the process of ageing with a special emphasis on cardiovascular ageing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R

    2015-10-15

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described.

  13. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described. PMID:26152199

  14. Non-coding landscapes of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ragusa, Marco; Barbagallo, Cristina; Statello, Luisa; Condorelli, Angelo Giuseppe; Battaglia, Rosalia; Tamburello, Lucia; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Purrello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    For two decades Vogelstein’s model has been the paradigm for describing the sequence of molecular changes within protein-coding genes that would lead to overt colorectal cancer (CRC). This model is now too simplistic in the light of recent studies, which have shown that our genome is pervasively transcribed in RNAs other than mRNAs, denominated non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The discovery that mutations in genes encoding these RNAs [i.e., microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs, and circular RNAs] are causally involved in cancer phenotypes has profoundly modified our vision of tumour molecular genetics and pathobiology. By exploiting a wide range of different mechanisms, ncRNAs control fundamental cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis: these data have also confirmed their role as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in cancer development and progression. The existence of a sophisticated RNA-based regulatory system, which dictates the correct functioning of protein-coding networks, has relevant biological and biomedical consequences. Different miRNAs involved in neoplastic and degenerative diseases exhibit potential predictive and prognostic properties. Furthermore, the key roles of ncRNAs make them very attractive targets for innovative therapeutic approaches. Several recent reports have shown that ncRNAs can be secreted by cells into the extracellular environment (i.e., blood and other body fluids): this suggests the existence of extracellular signalling mechanisms, which may be exploited by cells in physiology and pathology. In this review, we will summarize the most relevant issues on the involvement of cellular and extracellular ncRNAs in disease. We will then specifically describe their involvement in CRC pathobiology and their translational applications to CRC diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26556998

  15. Non-coding RNAs and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent a class of RNA molecules that typically do not code for proteins. Emerging data suggest that ncRNAs play an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including atherosclerosis. The best-characterized ncRNAs are the microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small, ~22 nucleotide (nt) sequences of RNA that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level through transcript degradation or translational repression. MiRNAs control several aspects of atherosclerosis including endothelial cell, vascular smooth cell, and macrophage functions as well as lipoprotein metabolism. Apart from miRNAs, recently ncRNAs, especially long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as important potential regulators of the progression of atherosclerosis. However, the molecular mechanism of their regulation and function as well as significance of other ncRNAs such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) during atherogenesis is largely unknown. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in the field, highlighting the importance of ncRNAs in atherosclerosis and discuss their potential use as therapeutic targets in CVDs. PMID:24623179

  16. Biogeography of photoautotrophs in the high polar biome

    PubMed Central

    Pointing, Stephen B.; Burkhard Büdel; Convey, Peter; Gillman, Len N.; Körner, Christian; Leuzinger, Sebastian; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2015-01-01

    The global latitudinal gradient in biodiversity weakens in the high polar biome and so an alternative explanation for distribution of Arctic and Antarctic photoautotrophs is required. Here we identify how temporal, microclimate and evolutionary drivers of biogeography are important, rather than the macroclimate features that drive plant diversity patterns elsewhere. High polar ecosystems are biologically unique, with a more central role for bryophytes, lichens and microbial photoautotrophs over that of vascular plants. Constraints on vascular plants arise mainly due to stature and ontogenetic barriers. Conversely non-vascular plant and microbial photoautotroph distribution is correlated with favorable microclimates and the capacity for poikilohydric dormancy. Contemporary distribution also depends on evolutionary history, with adaptive and dispersal traits as well as legacy influencing biogeography. We highlight the relevance of these findings to predicting future impacts on diversity of polar photoautotrophs and to the current status of plants in Arctic and Antarctic conservation policy frameworks. PMID:26442009

  17. Microdroplet photobioreactor for the photoautotrophic culture of microalgal cells.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Joon; Kim, Jaoon Young Hwan; Bong, Ki Wan; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-07

    Microalgae, unicellular photoautotrophic microorganisms, have attracted great attention for the production of biofuel and high-value products, but the commercial use of microalgae has been limited by low photosynthetic productivity. To overcome this limitation, it is required to develop an efficient platform for the rapid evaluation of photoautotrophic growth performance and productivity of microalgal strains. Here we describe a droplet-based photobioreactor for high-throughput analysis of the photoautotrophic growth of microalgal cells. By integrating micropillar arrays and adjusting the height of the microchamber, we could accurately monitor the growth kinetics of microalgae in an immobilized microdroplet and improve the transfer rate of CO2 into the microdroplet photobioreactor with an increased contact area between the microdroplet and PDMS surface. The improvement of CO2 transfer into the microdroplet was also confirmed by improved microalgal cell growth and a decrease in pH measured using colorimetric and fluorescence-based assays. The photoautotrophic growth kinetics of Chlorella vulgaris were measured under different CO2 concentrations (ambient, 1%, 2.5%, 5% and 7.5%) and light intensity (35, 55, 100, 150, and 200 μmol photons per m(2) per s) conditions, which are key factors for photoautotrophic growth. Chlorella vulgaris in a microdroplet showed better cell growth performance compared to a flask culture due to the reduced shading effects and improved mass transfer. Finally, we could evaluate the photoautotrophic growth performance of four microalgal strains (Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella protothecoides, Chlorella sorokiniana and Neochloris oleoabundans) for 120 hours. These results demonstrate that our microdroplet system can be used as an efficient photobioreactor for the rapid evaluation of the photoautotrophic growth of microalgal strains under various conditions.

  18. Nonextensive statistical approach to non-coding human DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, Th.; Provata, A.; Tirnakli, U.

    2008-04-01

    We use q-exponential distributions, which maximize the nonextensive entropy Sq (defined as Sq≡(1-∑ipiq)/(q-1)), to study the size distributions of non-coding DNA (including introns and intergenic regions) in all human chromosomes. We show that the value of the exponent q describing the non-coding size distributions is similar for all chromosomes and varies between 2≤q≤2.3 with the exception of chromosomes X and Y.

  19. Functional roles of non-coding Y RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Madzia P; Krude, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    Non-coding RNAs are involved in a multitude of cellular processes but the biochemical function of many small non-coding RNAs remains unclear. The family of small non-coding Y RNAs is conserved in vertebrates and related RNAs are present in some prokaryotic species. Y RNAs are also homologous to the newly identified family of non-coding stem-bulge RNAs (sbRNAs) in nematodes, for which potential physiological functions are only now emerging. Y RNAs are essential for the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in vertebrates and, when bound to the Ro60 protein, they are involved in RNA stability and cellular responses to stress in several eukaryotic and prokaryotic species. Additionally, short fragments of Y RNAs have recently been identified as abundant components in the blood and tissues of humans and other mammals, with potential diagnostic value. While the number of functional roles of Y RNAs is growing, it is becoming increasingly clear that the conserved structural domains of Y RNAs are essential for distinct cellular functions. Here, we review the biochemical functions associated with these structural RNA domains, as well as the functional conservation of Y RNAs in different species. The existing biochemical and structural evidence supports a domain model for these small non-coding RNAs that has direct implications for the modular evolution of functional non-coding RNAs.

  20. Non-coding RNAs in chromatin disease involving neurological defects

    PubMed Central

    Della Ragione, Floriana; Gagliardi, Miriam; D'Esposito, Maurizio; Matarazzo, Maria R.

    2014-01-01

    Novel classes of small and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are increasingly becoming apparent, being engaged in diverse structural, functional and regulatory activities. They take part in target gene silencing, play roles in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic processes, such as chromatin remodeling, nuclear reorganization with the formation of silent compartments and fine-tuning of gene recruitment into them. Among their functions, non-coding RNAs are thought to act either as guide or scaffold for epigenetic modifiers that write, erase, and read the epigenetic signature over the genome. Studies on human disorders caused by defects in epigenetic modifiers and involving neurological phenotypes highlight the disruption of diverse classes of non-coding RNAs. Noteworthy, these molecules mediate a wide spectrum of neuronal functions, including brain development, and synaptic plasticity. These findings imply a significant contribution of ncRNAs in pathophysiology of the aforesaid diseases and provide new concepts for potential therapeutic applications. PMID:24616662

  1. Long non-coding RNA expression profile in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia identifies a distinct signature and a new biomarker in NPM1-mutated patients.

    PubMed

    De Clara, Etienne; Gourvest, Morgane; Ma, Hanjing; Vergez, François; Tosolini, Marie; Dejean, Sébastien; Demur, Cécile; Delabesse, Eric; Recher, Christian; Touriol, Christian; Martelli, Maria Paola; Falini, Brunangelo; Brousset, Pierre; Bousquet, Marina

    2017-10-01

    Long non-coding RNAs are defined as transcripts larger than 200 nucleotides but without protein-coding potential. There is growing evidence of the important role of long non-coding RNAs in cancer initiation, development and progression. In this study, we sought to evaluate the long non-coding RNA expression profile of patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (AML). RNA-sequencing of 40 cytogenetically normal AML patients allowed us to quantify 11,036 long non-coding RNAs. Among these, more than 8000 were previously undescribed long non-coding RNAs. Using unsupervised analysis, we observed a specific long non-coding RNA expression profile dependent on the mutational status of the NPM1 gene. Statistical analysis allowed us to identify a minimal set of 12 long non-coding RNAs capable of discriminating NPM1-mutated from NPM1-wild-type patients. These results were validated by qRT-PCR on an independent cohort composed of 134 cytogenetically normal AML patients. Furthermore, we have identified one putative biomarker, the long non-coding RNA XLOC_109948 whose expression pattern predicts clinical outcome. Interestingly, low XLOC_109948 expression indicates a good prognosis especially for NPM1-mutated patients. Transient transfection of GapmeR against XLOC_109948 in NPM1-mutated OCI-AML3 cell line treated with Ara-C or ATRA enhances apoptosis suggesting XLOC_109948 plays a role in drug sensitivity. This study improves our knowledge of the long non-coding RNA transcriptome in cytogenetically normal AML patients. We observed a distinct long non-coding RNA expression profile in patients with the NPM1 mutation. The newly identified XLOC_109948 long non-coding RNA emerged as a strong prognostic factor able to better stratify NPM1-mutated patients. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  2. Non-coding RNAs in Mammary Gland Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurveen K; Milevskiy, Michael J G; Wilson, Wesley; Shewan, Annette M; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are untranslated RNA molecules that function to regulate the expression of numerous genes and associated biochemical pathways and cellular functions. NcRNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). They participate in the regulation of all developmental processes and are frequently aberrantly expressed or functionally defective in disease. This Chapter will focus on the role of ncRNAs, in particular miRNAs and lncRNAs, in mammary gland development and disease.

  3. Role of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    other non-coding RNAs such as long non-coding RNAs (>200 bases) ( lncRNAs ), which could account for 4-9% of transcripts in human genome. In this...application we proposed to test whether lncRNAs are dysregulated in prostate cancer. We demonstrated that lncRNA GAS5 is a direct target for miR-21...Together, our study suggests that lncRNAs are important players in prostate cancer biology, and further characterization of these lncRNAs will provide a

  4. The development of non-coding RNA ontology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingshan; Eilbeck, Karen; Smith, Barry; Blake, Judith A; Dou, Dejing; Huang, Weili; Natale, Darren A; Ruttenberg, Alan; Huan, Jun; Zimmermann, Michael T; Jiang, Guoqian; Lin, Yu; Wu, Bin; Strachan, Harrison J; de Silva, Nisansa; Kasukurthi, Mohan Vamsi; Jha, Vikash Kumar; He, Yongqun; Zhang, Shaojie; Wang, Xiaowei; Liu, Zixing; Borchert, Glen M; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Identification of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has been significantly improved over the past decade. On the other hand, semantic annotation of ncRNA data is facing critical challenges due to the lack of a comprehensive ontology to serve as common data elements and data exchange standards in the field. We developed the Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO) to handle this situation. By providing a formally defined ncRNA controlled vocabulary, the NCRO aims to fill a specific and highly needed niche in semantic annotation of large amounts of ncRNA biological and clinical data.

  5. The development of non-coding RNA ontology

    PubMed Central

    Eilbeck, Karen; Smith, Barry; Blake, Judith A.; Dou, Dejing; Huang, Weili; Natale, Darren A.; Ruttenberg, Alan; Huan, Jun; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Jiang, Guoqian; Lin, Yu; Wu, Bin; Strachan, Harrison J.; de Silva, Nisansa; Kasukurthi, Mohan Vamsi; Jha, Vikash Kumar; He, Yongqun; Zhang, Shaojie; Wang, Xiaowei; Liu, Zixing; Borchert, Glen M.; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Identification of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has been significantly improved over the past decade. On the other hand, semantic annotation of ncRNA data is facing critical challenges due to the lack of a comprehensive ontology to serve as common data elements and data exchange standards in the field. We developed the Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO) to handle this situation. By providing a formally defined ncRNA controlled vocabulary, the NCRO aims to fill a specific and highly needed niche in semantic annotation of large amounts of ncRNA biological and clinical data. PMID:27990175

  6. Non-coding RNAs in cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kerui; Sharma, Sambad; Venkat, Suresh; Liu, Keqin; Zhou, Xiaobo; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2016-01-01

    More than 90% of cancer death is attributed to metastatic disease, and the brain is one of the major metastatic sites of melanoma, colon, renal, lung and breast cancers. Despite the recent advancement of targeted therapy for cancer, the incidence of brain metastasis is increasing. One reason is that most therapeutic drugs can't penetrate blood-brain-barrier and tumor cells find the brain as sanctuary site. In this review, we describe the pathophysiology of brain metastases to introduce the latest understandings of metastatic brain malignancies. This review also particularly focuses on non-coding RNAs and their roles in cancer brain metastasis. Furthermore, we discuss the roles of the extracellular vesicles as they are known to transport information between cells to initiate cancer cell-microenvironment communication. The potential clinical translation of non-coding RNAs as a tool for diagnosis and for treatment is also discussed in this review. At the end, the computational aspects of non-coding RNA detection, the sequence and structure calculation and epigenetic regulation of non-coding RNA in brain metastasis are discussed.

  7. Prioritization of non-coding disease-causing variants and long non-coding RNAs in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; He, Zekun; Gu, Yang; Fang, Lin; Lv, Xin

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple bioinformatics tools available for the detection of coding driver mutations in cancers. However, the prioritization of pathogenic non-coding variants remains a challenging and demanding task. The present study was performed to discriminate non-coding disease-causing mutations and prioritize potential cancer-implicated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in liver cancer using a logistic regression model. A logistic regression model was constructed by combining 19,153 disease-associated ClinVar and human gene mutation database pathogenic variants as the response variable and non-coding features as the predictor variable. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) disease or trait-associated variants and recurrent somatic mutations were used to validate the model. Non-coding gene features with the highest fractions of load were characterized and potential cancer-associated lncRNA candidates were prioritized by combining the fraction of high-scoring regions and average score predicted by the logistic regression model. H3K9me3 and conserved regions were the most negatively and positively informative for the model, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the model was 0.92. The average score of GWAS disease-associated variants was significantly increased compared with neutral single nucleotide polymorphisms (5.8642 vs. 5.4707; P<0.001), the average score of recurrent somatic mutations of liver cancer was significantly increased compared with non-recurrent somatic mutations (5.4101 vs. 5.2768; P=0.0125). The present study found regions in lncRNAs and introns/untranslated regions of protein coding genes where mutations are most likely to be damaging. In total, 847 lncRNAs were filtered out from the background. Characterization of this subset of lncRNAs showed that these lncRNAs are more conservative, less mutated and more highly expressed compared with other control lncRNAs. In addition, 23 of these lncRNAs were differentially

  8. Prioritization of non-coding disease-causing variants and long non-coding RNAs in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; He, Zekun; Gu, Yang; Fang, Lin; Lv, Xin

    2016-11-01

    There are multiple bioinformatics tools available for the detection of coding driver mutations in cancers. However, the prioritization of pathogenic non-coding variants remains a challenging and demanding task. The present study was performed to discriminate non-coding disease-causing mutations and prioritize potential cancer-implicated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in liver cancer using a logistic regression model. A logistic regression model was constructed by combining 19,153 disease-associated ClinVar and human gene mutation database pathogenic variants as the response variable and non-coding features as the predictor variable. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) disease or trait-associated variants and recurrent somatic mutations were used to validate the model. Non-coding gene features with the highest fractions of load were characterized and potential cancer-associated lncRNA candidates were prioritized by combining the fraction of high-scoring regions and average score predicted by the logistic regression model. H3K9me3 and conserved regions were the most negatively and positively informative for the model, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the model was 0.92. The average score of GWAS disease-associated variants was significantly increased compared with neutral single nucleotide polymorphisms (5.8642 vs. 5.4707; P<0.001), the average score of recurrent somatic mutations of liver cancer was significantly increased compared with non-recurrent somatic mutations (5.4101 vs. 5.2768; P=0.0125). The present study found regions in lncRNAs and introns/untranslated regions of protein coding genes where mutations are most likely to be damaging. In total, 847 lncRNAs were filtered out from the background. Characterization of this subset of lncRNAs showed that these lncRNAs are more conservative, less mutated and more highly expressed compared with other control lncRNAs. In addition, 23 of these lncRNAs were differentially

  9. Long non-coding RNAs in cancer metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhen-Dong; Zhuang, Li; Gan, Boyi

    2016-10-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer. Accumulating recent evidence links long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a still poorly understood class of non-coding RNAs, to cancer metabolism. Here we review the emerging findings on the functions of lncRNAs in cancer metabolism, with particular emphasis on how lncRNAs regulate glucose and glutamine metabolism in cancer cells, discuss how lncRNAs regulate various aspects of cancer metabolism through their cross-talk with other macromolecules, explore the mechanistic conceptual framework of lncRNAs in reprogramming metabolism in cancers, and highlight the challenges in this field. A more in-depth understanding of lncRNAs in cancer metabolism may enable the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies targeting cancer metabolism.

  10. Long non-coding RNA CASC2 in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Giuseppe; Paliogiannis, Panagiotis; Sini, Maria Cristina; Manca, Antonella; Palomba, Grazia; Doneddu, Valentina; Tanda, Francesco; Pascale, Maria Rosa; Cossu, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Long non-coding RNAs cover large part of the non-coding information of the human DNA, which represents more than 90% of the whole genome. They constitute a wide and complex group of molecules with more than 200 nucleotides, which generally lack an open reading frame, and are involved in various ways in the pathophysiology of cancer. Their roles in the regulation of gene expression, imprinting, transcription, and post-translational processing have been described in several types of cancer. CASC2 was discovered in 2004 in patients with endometrial carcinoma as a potential tumor suppressor. Since then, additional studies in other types of neoplasia have been carried out, and both mechanisms and interactions of CASC2 in cancer have been better elucidated. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of CASC2 in the genesis, progression, and clinical management of human cancer.

  11. Putting Non-coding RNA on Display with CRISPR.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Jones, Matthew F; Lal, Ashish; Lu, Timothy K

    2015-07-16

    In a recent issue of Nature Methods, Shechner et al. (2015) reported the development of CRISPR Display (CRISP-Disp), which is a sophisticated, flexible, modular, and multiplexable platform for targeting different types of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) to genomic loci. CRISP-Disp will facilitate synthetic-biology applications and enable the elucidation of ncRNA functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Decoding the function of nuclear long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Ling; Carmichael, Gordon G

    2010-06-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are mRNA-like, non-protein-coding RNAs that are pervasively transcribed throughout eukaryotic genomes. Rather than silently accumulating in the nucleus, many of these are now known or suspected to play important roles in nuclear architecture or in the regulation of gene expression. In this review, we highlight some recent progress in how lncRNAs regulate these important nuclear processes at the molecular level. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transcription control by long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs have been found to regulate many cellular processes and thus expand the functional genetic repertoire contained within the genome. With the recent advent of genomic tools, it is now evident that these RNA molecules play central regulatory roles in many transcriptional programs. Here we discuss how they are targeted to promoters in several cases and how they operate at specific points in the transcription cycle to precisely control gene expression. PMID:22414755

  14. Dysregulation of non-coding RNAs in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing; Zhang, Ren-Wen; Sui, Peng-Cheng; He, Hai-Tao; Ding, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common cancers in the world and a significant threat to the health of patients, especially those from China and Japan. The prognosis for patients with late stage GC receiving the standard of care treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, remains poor. Developing novel treatment strategies, identifying new molecules for targeted therapy, and devising screening techniques to detect this cancer in its early stages are needed for GC patients. The discovery of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), primarily microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), helped to elucidate the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, diagnosis and treatment of GC. Recently, significant research has been conducted on non-coding RNAs and how the regulatory dysfunction of these RNAs impacts the tumorigenesis of GC. In this study, we review papers published in the last five years concerning the dysregulation of non-coding RNAs, especially miRNAs and lncRNAs, in GC. We summarize instances of aberrant expression of the ncRNAs in GC and their effect on survival-related events, including cell cycle regulation, AKT signaling, apoptosis and drug resistance. Additionally, we evaluate how ncRNA dysregulation affects the metastatic process, including the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, stem cells, transcription factor activity, and oncogene and tumor suppressor expression. Lastly, we determine how ncRNAs affect angiogenesis in the microenvironment of GC. We further discuss the use of ncRNAs as potential biomarkers for use in clinical screening, early diagnosis and prognosis of GC. At present, no ideal ncRNAs have been identified as targets for the treatment of GC. PMID:26494954

  15. The Landscape of long non-coding RNA classification

    PubMed Central

    St Laurent, Georges; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kapranov, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the depth and quality of transcriptome sequencing have revealed many new classes of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). lncRNA classification has mushroomed to accommodate these new findings, even though the real dimensions and complexity of the non-coding transcriptome remain unknown. Although evidence of functionality of specific lncRNAs continues to accumulate, conflicting, confusing, and overlapping terminology has fostered ambiguity and lack of clarity in the field in general. The lack of fundamental conceptual un-ambiguous classification framework results in a number of challenges in the annotation and interpretation of non-coding transcriptome data. It also might undermine integration of the new genomic methods and datasets in an effort to unravel function of lncRNA. Here, we review existing lncRNA classifications, nomenclature, and terminology. Then we describe the conceptual guidelines that have emerged for their classification and functional annotation based on expanding and more comprehensive use of large systems biology-based datasets. PMID:25869999

  16. Evaluation of non-coding variation in GLUT1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Chi; Lee, Jia Wei Audrey; Bellows, Susannah T; Damiano, John A; Mullen, Saul A; Berkovic, Samuel F; Bahlo, Melanie; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Hildebrand, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in SLC2A1, encoding glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), lead to dysfunction of glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. Ten percent of cases with hypoglycorrhachia (fasting cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] glucose <2.2mmol/L) do not have mutations. We hypothesized that GLUT1 deficiency could be due to non-coding SLC2A1 variants. We performed whole exome sequencing of one proband with a GLUT1 phenotype and hypoglycorrhachia negative for SLC2A1 sequencing and copy number variants. We studied a further 55 patients with different epilepsies and low CSF glucose who did not have exonic mutations or copy number variants. We sequenced non-coding promoter and intronic regions. We performed mRNA studies for the recurrent intronic variant. The proband had a de novo splice site mutation five base pairs from the intron-exon boundary. Three of 55 patients had deep intronic SLC2A1 variants, including a recurrent variant in two. The recurrent variant produced less SLC2A1 mRNA transcript. Fasting CSF glucose levels show an age-dependent correlation, which makes the definition of hypoglycorrhachia challenging. Low CSF glucose levels may be associated with pathogenic SLC2A1 mutations including deep intronic SLC2A1 variants. Extending genetic screening to non-coding regions will enable diagnosis of more patients with GLUT1 deficiency, allowing implementation of the ketogenic diet to improve outcomes. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  17. Photoautotrophic microorganisms as a carbon source for temperate soil invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Olaf; Dyckmans, Jens; Schrader, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We tested experimentally if photoautotrophic microorganisms are a carbon source for invertebrates in temperate soils. We exposed forest or arable soils to a (13)CO2-enriched atmosphere and quantified (13)C assimilation by three common animal groups: earthworms (Oligochaeta), springtails (Hexapoda) and slugs (Gastropoda). Endogeic earthworms (Allolobophora chlorotica) and hemiedaphic springtails (Ceratophysella denticulata) were highly (13)C enriched when incubated under light, deriving up to 3.0 and 17.0%, respectively, of their body carbon from the microbial source in 7 days. Earthworms assimilated more (13)C in undisturbed soil than when the microbial material was mixed into the soil, presumably reflecting selective surface grazing. By contrast, neither adult nor newly hatched terrestrial slugs (Deroceras reticulatum) grazed on algal mats. Non-photosynthetic (13)CO2 fixation in the dark was negligible. We conclude from these preliminary laboratory experiments that, in addition to litter and root-derived carbon from vascular plants, photoautotrophic soil surface microorganisms (cyanobacteria, algae) may be an ecologically important carbon input route for temperate soil animals that are traditionally assigned to the decomposer channel in soil food web models and carbon cycling studies.

  18. Photoautotrophic microorganisms as a carbon source for temperate soil invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Dyckmans, Jens; Schrader, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We tested experimentally if photoautotrophic microorganisms are a carbon source for invertebrates in temperate soils. We exposed forest or arable soils to a 13CO2-enriched atmosphere and quantified 13C assimilation by three common animal groups: earthworms (Oligochaeta), springtails (Hexapoda) and slugs (Gastropoda). Endogeic earthworms (Allolobophora chlorotica) and hemiedaphic springtails (Ceratophysella denticulata) were highly 13C enriched when incubated under light, deriving up to 3.0 and 17.0%, respectively, of their body carbon from the microbial source in 7 days. Earthworms assimilated more 13C in undisturbed soil than when the microbial material was mixed into the soil, presumably reflecting selective surface grazing. By contrast, neither adult nor newly hatched terrestrial slugs (Deroceras reticulatum) grazed on algal mats. Non-photosynthetic 13CO2 fixation in the dark was negligible. We conclude from these preliminary laboratory experiments that, in addition to litter and root-derived carbon from vascular plants, photoautotrophic soil surface microorganisms (cyanobacteria, algae) may be an ecologically important carbon input route for temperate soil animals that are traditionally assigned to the decomposer channel in soil food web models and carbon cycling studies. PMID:26740559

  19. UpSETing chromatin during non-coding RNA production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The packaging of eukaryotic DNA into nucleosomal arrays permits cells to tightly regulate and fine-tune gene expression. The ordered disassembly and reassembly of these nucleosomes allows RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) conditional access to the underlying DNA sequences. Disruption of nucleosome reassembly following RNAPII passage results in spurious transcription initiation events, leading to the production of non-coding RNA (ncRNA). We review the molecular mechanisms involved in the suppression of these cryptic initiation events and discuss the role played by ncRNAs in regulating gene expression. PMID:23738864

  20. Functions of plants long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, Sarfraz; Li, Jingrui; Sun, Qianwen

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been emerged as important players for various biological pathways, including dosage compensation, genomic imprinting, chromatin regulation, alternative splicing and nuclear organization. A large number of lncRNAs had already been identified by different approaches in plants, while the functions of only a few of them have been investigated. This review will summarize our current understanding of a wide range of plant lncRNAs functions, and highlight their roles in the regulation of diverse pathways in plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa.

  1. Non-coding RNAs: the architects of eukaryotic complexity.

    PubMed

    Mattick, J S

    2001-11-01

    Around 98% of all transcriptional output in humans is non-coding RNA. RNA-mediated gene regulation is widespread in higher eukaryotes and complex genetic phenomena like RNA interference, co-suppression, transgene silencing, imprinting, methylation, and possibly position-effect variegation and transvection, all involve intersecting pathways based on or connected to RNA signaling. I suggest that the central dogma is incomplete, and that intronic and other non-coding RNAs have evolved to comprise a second tier of gene expression in eukaryotes, which enables the integration and networking of complex suites of gene activity. Although proteins are the fundamental effectors of cellular function, the basis of eukaryotic complexity and phenotypic variation may lie primarily in a control architecture composed of a highly parallel system of trans-acting RNAs that relay state information required for the coordination and modulation of gene expression, via chromatin remodeling, RNA-DNA, RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions. This system has interesting and perhaps informative analogies with small world networks and dataflow computing.

  2. IRNdb: the database of immunologically relevant non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Denisenko, Elena; Ho, Daniel; Tamgue, Ousman; Ozturk, Mumin; Suzuki, Harukazu; Brombacher, Frank; Guler, Reto; Schmeier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and other functional non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as pivotal regulators involved in multiple biological processes. Recently, ncRNA control of gene expression has been identified as a critical regulatory mechanism in the immune system. Despite the great efforts made to discover and characterize ncRNAs, the functional role for most remains unknown. To facilitate discoveries in ncRNA regulation of immune system-related processes, we developed the database of immunologically relevant ncRNAs and target genes (IRNdb). We integrated mouse data on predicted and experimentally supported ncRNA-target interactions, ncRNA and gene annotations, biological pathways and processes and experimental data in a uniform format with a user-friendly web interface. The current version of IRNdb documents 12 930 experimentally supported miRNA-target interactions between 724 miRNAs and 2427 immune-related mouse targets. In addition, we recorded 22 453 lncRNA-immune target and 377 PIWI-interacting RNA-immune target interactions. IRNdb is a comprehensive searchable data repository which will be of help in studying the role of ncRNAs in the immune system. Database URL: http://irndb.org

  3. Non-coding RNAs in Uterine Development, Function and Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The major function of the uterus is to accept and provide a suitable environment for an embryo, ultimately leading the birth of offspring and successful propagation of the species. For this occur, there must be precise coordination of hormonal signalling within both the endometrial and myometrial components of this organ. Non-coding RNAs, specifically, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be essential for normal uterine development and function. Within this organ, miRNAs are proposed to fine-tune the actions of the female steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone. Not surprising, mis-expression of miRNAs has been documented in diseases of the endometrium and myometrium such as endometriosis and leiomyomas, respectively. In this chapter, I will review the current understanding on the role, regulation and function of non-coding RNAs focusing on miRNAs in both the normal physiology of the endometrium and myometrium as well as in pathologies of these tissues, namely endometriosis and leiomyomas. PMID:26659492

  4. A role for non-coding variation in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Roussos, Panos; Mitchell, Amanda C.; Voloudakis, Georgios; Fullard, John F.; Pothula, Venu M.; Tsang, Jonathan; Stahl, Eli A.; Georgakopoulos, Anastasios; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Charney, Alexander; Okada, Yukinori; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Plenge, Robert M.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Fromer, Menachem; Purcell, Shaun M.; Brennand, Kristen J.; Robakis, Nikolaos K.; Schadt, Eric E.; Akbarian, Schahram; Sklar, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A large portion of common variant loci associated with genetic risk for schizophrenia reside within non-coding sequence of unknown function. Here, we demonstrate promoter and enhancer enrichment in schizophrenia variants associated with expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). The enrichment is greater when functional annotations derived from human brain are used relative to peripheral tissues. Regulatory trait concordance analysis ranked genes within schizophrenia genome-wide significant loci for a potential functional role, based on co-localization of a risk SNP, eQTL and regulatory element sequence. We identified potential physical interactions of non-contiguous proximal and distal regulatory elements. This was verified in prefrontal cortex and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons for the L-type calcium channel (CACNA1C) risk locus. Our findings point to a functional link between schizophrenia-associated non-coding SNPs and 3-dimensional genome architecture associated with chromosomal loopings and transcriptional regulation in the brain. PMID:25453756

  5. Photoautotrophic hydrogen production by eukaryotic microalgae under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Choi, Jeong-A; Abou-Shanab, R A I; Dempsey, Brian A; Regan, John M; Kim, Jung Rae; Song, Hocheol; Nam, In-Hyun; Kim, Su-Nam; Lee, Woojung; Park, Donghee; Kim, Yongje; Choi, Jaeyoung; Ji, Min-Kyu; Jung, Woosik; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic algae and cyanobacteria produce hydrogen under anaerobic and limited aerobic conditions. Here we show that novel microalgal strains (Chlorella vulgaris YSL01 and YSL16) upregulate the expression of the hydrogenase gene (HYDA) and simultaneously produce hydrogen through photosynthesis, using CO2 as the sole source of carbon under aerobic conditions with continuous illumination. We employ dissolved oxygen regimes that represent natural aquatic conditions for microalgae. The experimental expression of HYDA and the specific activity of hydrogenase demonstrate that C. vulgaris YSL01 and YSL16 enzymatically produce hydrogen, even under atmospheric conditions, which was previously considered infeasible. Photoautotrophic H2 production has important implications for assessing ecological and algae-based photolysis.

  6. Callus production from photoautotrophic soybean cell culture protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Chowhury, V K; Widholm, J M

    1985-10-01

    Protoplasts were prepared from a photoautotrophic (PA) cell line of Glycine max (soybean). A yield of 75 to 90% after two to three hours digestion in a mixture of 1% Cellulase R10, 0.2% Pectolyase Y23 and 2% Driselase was obtained. Cell division and colony formation occurred from approximately 18% of the plated protoplasts. The cultured protoplasts were as sensitive to the herbicide atrazine, a photosynthetic inhibitor, as the original PA cells under the same conditions. Protoplasts and cells of a heterotrophic (HT) soybean culture were not as sensitive to atrazine. The isolated protoplasts retained the PA characteristics of the parental culture in the callus and cell suspension cultures obtained from the protoplasts. The chromosome numbers in the parental cell line and in cells derived from the isolated protoplasts (both PA and HT) were found to be largely (99%) the normal diploid number of 40.

  7. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This report contains the outcome of the assessment and the findings, observations, and NESC recommendations to the Agency and individual NASA Centers.

  8. [Epigenetics of plant vernalization regulated by non-coding RNAs].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Feng; Li, Xiao-Rong; Sun, Chuan-Bao; He, Yu-Ke

    2012-07-01

    Many higher plants must experience a period of winter cold to accomplish the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. This biological process is called vernalization. Some crops such as wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) produce seeds as edible organs, and therefore special measures of rotation and cultivation are necessary for plants to go through an early vernalization for flower differentiation and development, whereas the other crops such as Chinese cabbage (B rapa ssp. pekinenesis) and cabbage (Brassica napus L.) produce leafy heads as edible organs, and additional practice should be taken to avoid vernalization for a prolonged and fully vegetative growth. Before vernalization, flowering is repressed by the action of a gene called Flowering Locus C (FLC). This paper reviewed the function of non-coding RNAs and some proteins including VRN1, VRN2, and VIN3 in epigenetic regulation of FLC during vernalization.

  9. RNAcentral: a comprehensive database of non-coding RNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    RNAcentral is a database of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) sequences that aggregates data from specialised ncRNA resources and provides a single entry point for accessing ncRNA sequences of all ncRNA types from all organisms. Since its launch in 2014, RNAcentral has integrated twelve new resources, taking the total number of collaborating database to 22, and began importing new types of data, such as modified nucleotides from MODOMICS and PDB. We created new species-specific identifiers that refer to unique RNA sequences within a context of single species. The website has been subject to continuous improvements focusing on text and sequence similarity searches as well as genome browsing functionality. All RNAcentral data is provided for free and is available for browsing, bulk downloads, and programmatic access at http://rnacentral.org/. PMID:27794554

  10. [Long non-coding RNA and wound healing].

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Liu, D W

    2016-12-20

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is a class of RNA molecules longer than 200 nucleotides which does not encode proteins or only encode a few proteins, and it plays important regulatory roles in the expression of genes at the epigenetic, transcriptional, and posttranscriptional levels. The recent reports suggest that lncRNA plays a significant role in growth and development of body, cellular biological processes including in cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis, and regulation of wound healing processes such as re-epithelialization, angiogenesis, and scar formation. The lncRNA has become a new research hotspot in wound healing. This article reviews the role of lncRNA in different stages of wound repair to get a further understanding of molecular mechanisms of wound healing and provide a new target spot for prevention and treatment of pathological scars and wound healing.

  11. NONCODE v2.0: decoding the non-coding.

    PubMed

    He, Shunmin; Liu, Changning; Skogerbø, Geir; Zhao, Haitao; Wang, Jie; Liu, Tao; Bai, Baoyan; Zhao, Yi; Chen, Runsheng

    2008-01-01

    The NONCODE database is an integrated knowledge database designed for the analysis of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Since NONCODE was first released 3 years ago, the number of known ncRNAs has grown rapidly, and there is growing recognition that ncRNAs play important regulatory roles in most organisms. In the updated version of NONCODE (NONCODE v2.0), the number of collected ncRNAs has reached 206 226, including a wide range of microRNAs, Piwi-interacting RNAs and mRNA-like ncRNAs. The improvements brought to the database include not only new and updated ncRNA data sets, but also an incorporation of BLAST alignment search service and access through our custom UCSC Genome Browser. NONCODE can be found under http://www.noncode.org or http://noncode.bioinfo.org.cn.

  12. Flavivirus RNAi suppression: decoding non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Pijlman, Gorben P

    2014-08-01

    Flaviviruses are important human pathogens that are transmitted by invertebrate vectors, mostly mosquitoes and ticks. During replication in their vector, flaviviruses are subject to a potent innate immune response known as antiviral RNA interference (RNAi). This defense mechanism is associated with the production of small interfering (si)RNA that lead to degradation of viral RNA. To what extent flaviviruses would benefit from counteracting antiviral RNAi is subject of debate. Here, the experimental evidence to suggest the existence of flavivirus RNAi suppressors is discussed. I will highlight the putative role of non-coding, subgenomic flavivirus RNA in suppression of RNAi in insect and mammalian cells. Novel insights from ongoing research will reveal how arthropod-borne viruses modulate innate immunity including antiviral RNAi. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Decoding the non-coding RNAs in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schonrock, Nicole; Götz, Jürgen

    2012-11-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are integral components of biological networks with fundamental roles in regulating gene expression. They can integrate sequence information from the DNA code, epigenetic regulation and functions of multimeric protein complexes to potentially determine the epigenetic status and transcriptional network in any given cell. Humans potentially contain more ncRNAs than any other species, especially in the brain, where they may well play a significant role in human development and cognitive ability. This review discusses their emerging role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a human pathological condition characterized by the progressive impairment of cognitive functions. We discuss the complexity of the ncRNA world and how this is reflected in the regulation of the amyloid precursor protein and Tau, two proteins with central functions in AD. By understanding this intricate regulatory network, there is hope for a better understanding of disease mechanisms and ultimately developing diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

  14. Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Farooq; Shah, Abdullah; Shan, Ge

    2016-04-01

    An enormous amount of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) transcribed from eukaryotic genome are important regulators in different aspects of cellular events. Cytoplasm is the residence and the site of action for many lncRNAs. The cytoplasmic lncRNAs play indispensable roles with multiple molecular mechanisms in animal and human cells. In this review, we mainly talk about functions and the underlying mechanisms of lncRNAs in the cytoplasm. We highlight relatively well-studied examples of cytoplasmic lncRNAs for their roles in modulating mRNA stability, regulating mRNA translation, serving as competing endogenous RNAs, functioning as precursors of microRNAs, and mediating protein modifications. We also elaborate the perspectives of cytoplasmic lncRNA studies. Copyright © 2016 Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Genetics Society of China. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Long Non-coding RNAs and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing-Jing; Xie, Xiao-Juan; Li, Xu; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key players in gene expression that govern cell developmental processes, and thus contributing to diseases, especially cancers. Many studies have suggested that aberrant expression of lncRNAs is responsible for drug resistance, a substantial obstacle for cancer therapy. Drug resistance not only results from individual variations in patients, but also from genetic and epigenetic differences in tumors. It is reported that drug resistance is tightly modulated by lncRNAs which change the stability and translation of mRNAs encoding factors involved in cell survival, proliferation, and drug metabolism. In this review, we summarize recent advances in research on lncRNAs associated with drug resistance and underlying molecular or cellular mechanisms, which may contribute helpful approaches for the development of new therapeutic strategies to overcome treatment failure.

  16. Long non-coding RNAs in normal and malignant hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Nobili, Lucia; Lionetti, Marta; Neri, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are defined as ncRNAs of more than 200 nt in length. They are involved in a large spectrum of biological processes, such as maintenance of genome integrity, genomic imprinting, cell differentiation, and development by means of mechanisms that remain to be fully elucidated. Besides their role in normal cellular physiology, accumulating evidence has linked lncRNA expression and functions to cancer development and progression. In this review, we summarize and discuss what is known about their expression and roles in hematopoiesis with a particular focus on their cell-type specificity, functional interactions, and involvement in the pathobiology of hematological malignancies. PMID:27177333

  17. Cell cycle regulation by long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Kotake, Yojiro; Niida, Hiroyuki; Ohhata, Tatsuya

    2013-12-01

    The mammalian cell cycle is precisely controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and related pathways such as the RB and p53 pathways. Recent research on long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) indicates that many lncRNAs are involved in the regulation of critical cell cycle regulators such as the cyclins, CDKs, CDK inhibitors, pRB, and p53. These lncRNAs act as epigenetic regulators, transcription factor regulators, post-transcription regulators, and protein scaffolds. These cell cycle-regulated lncRNAs mainly control cellular levels of cell cycle regulators via various mechanisms, and may provide diversity and reliability to the general cell cycle. Interestingly, several lncRNAs are induced by DNA damage and participate in cell cycle arrest or induction of apoptosis as DNA damage responses. Therefore, deregulations of these cell cycle regulatory lncRNAs may be involved in tumorigenesis, and they are novel candidate molecular targets for cancer therapy and diagnosis.

  18. RNAcentral: A comprehensive database of non-coding RNA sequences

    DOE PAGES

    Williams, Kelly Porter; Lau, Britney Yan

    2016-10-28

    RNAcentral is a database of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) sequences that aggregates data from specialised ncRNA resources and provides a single entry point for accessing ncRNA sequences of all ncRNA types from all organisms. Since its launch in 2014, RNAcentral has integrated twelve new resources, taking the total number of collaborating database to 22, and began importing new types of data, such as modified nucleotides from MODOMICS and PDB. We created new species-specific identifiers that refer to unique RNA sequences within a context of single species. Furthermore, the website has been subject to continuous improvements focusing on text and sequence similaritymore » searches as well as genome browsing functionality.« less

  19. RNAcentral: A comprehensive database of non-coding RNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kelly Porter; Lau, Britney Yan

    2016-10-28

    RNAcentral is a database of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) sequences that aggregates data from specialised ncRNA resources and provides a single entry point for accessing ncRNA sequences of all ncRNA types from all organisms. Since its launch in 2014, RNAcentral has integrated twelve new resources, taking the total number of collaborating database to 22, and began importing new types of data, such as modified nucleotides from MODOMICS and PDB. We created new species-specific identifiers that refer to unique RNA sequences within a context of single species. Furthermore, the website has been subject to continuous improvements focusing on text and sequence similarity searches as well as genome browsing functionality.

  20. The Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO): a comprehensive resource for the unification of non-coding RNA biology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingshan; Eilbeck, Karen; Smith, Barry; Blake, Judith A; Dou, Dejing; Huang, Weili; Natale, Darren A; Ruttenberg, Alan; Huan, Jun; Zimmermann, Michael T; Jiang, Guoqian; Lin, Yu; Wu, Bin; Strachan, Harrison J; He, Yongqun; Zhang, Shaojie; Wang, Xiaowei; Liu, Zixing; Borchert, Glen M; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, sequencing technologies have enabled the identification of a wide range of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Unfortunately, annotation and integration of ncRNA data has lagged behind their identification. Given the large quantity of information being obtained in this area, there emerges an urgent need to integrate what is being discovered by a broad range of relevant communities. To this end, the Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO) is being developed to provide a systematically structured and precisely defined controlled vocabulary for the domain of ncRNAs, thereby facilitating the discovery, curation, analysis, exchange, and reasoning of data about structures of ncRNAs, their molecular and cellular functions, and their impacts upon phenotypes. The goal of NCRO is to serve as a common resource for annotations of diverse research in a way that will significantly enhance integrative and comparative analysis of the myriad resources currently housed in disparate sources. It is our belief that the NCRO ontology can perform an important role in the comprehensive unification of ncRNA biology and, indeed, fill a critical gap in both the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) Library and the National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) BioPortal. Our initial focus is on the ontological representation of small regulatory ncRNAs, which we see as the first step in providing a resource for the annotation of data about all forms of ncRNAs. The NCRO ontology is free and open to all users, accessible at: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ncro.owl.

  1. Dynamic energy budgets in syntrophic symbiotic relationships between heterotrophic hosts and photoautotrophic symbionts.

    PubMed

    Muller, Erik B; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M; Edmunds, Peter J; Doyle, Francis J; Nisbet, Roger M

    2009-07-07

    In this paper we develop and investigate a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model describing the syntrophic symbiotic relationship between a heterotrophic host and an internal photoautotrophic symbiont. The model specifies the flows of matter and energy among host, symbiont and environment with minimal complexity and uses the concept of synthesizing units to describe smoothly the assimilation of multiple limiting factors, in particular inorganic carbon and nitrogen, and irradiance. The model has two passive regulation mechanisms: the symbiont shares only photosynthate that it cannot use itself, and the host delivers only excess nutrients to the symbiont. With parameter values plausible for scleractinian corals, we show that these two regulation mechanisms suffice to obtain a stable symbiotic relationship under constant ambient conditions, provided those conditions support sustenance of host and symbiont. Furthermore, the symbiont density in the host varies relatively little as a function of ambient food density, inorganic nitrogen and irradiance. This symbiont density tends to increase with light deprivation or nitrogen enrichment, either directly or via food. We also investigate the relative benefit each partner derives from the relationship and conclude that this relationship may shift from mutualism to parasitism as environmental conditions change.

  2. Long non-coding RNAs in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xia; Tang, Bo; Xiao, Yu-Feng; Xie, Rui; Li, Bo-Sheng; Dong, Hui; Zhou, Jian-Yun; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2016-02-02

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite substantial progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms and treatment of CRC in recent years, the overall survival rate of CRC patients has not improved dramatically. The development of CRC is multifactor and multistep processes, in which abnormal gene expression may play an important role. With the advance of human tumor molecular biology, a series of studies have highlighted the role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the development of CRC. CRC-related lncRNAs have been demonstrated to regulate the genes by various mechanisms, including epigenetic modifications, lncRNA-miRNA and lncRNA-protein interactions, and by their actions as miRNA precursors or pseudogenes. Since some lncRNAs can be detected in human body fluid and have good specificity and accessibility, they have been suggested to be used as novel potential biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and prognosis as well as in the prediction of the response to therapy. Therefore, in this review, we will focus on lncRNAs in CRC development, the mechanisms and biomarkers of lncRNAs in CRC.

  3. Sequence and Structural Analyses for Functional Non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yasubumi; Sato, Kengo

    Analysis and detection of functional RNAs are currently important topics in both molecular biology and bioinformatics research. Several computational methods based on stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) have been developed for modeling and analysing functional RNA sequences. These grammatical methods have succeeded in modeling typical secondary structures of RNAs and are used for structural alignments of RNA sequences. Such stochastic models, however, are not sufficient to discriminate member sequences of an RNA family from non-members, and hence to detect non-coding RNA regions from genome sequences. Recently, the support vector machine (SVM) and kernel function techniques have been actively studied and proposed as a solution to various problems in bioinformatics. SVMs are trained from positive and negative samples and have strong, accurate discrimination abilities, and hence are more appropriate for the discrimination tasks. A few kernel functions that extend the string kernel to measure the similarity of two RNA sequences from the viewpoint of secondary structures have been proposed. In this article, we give an overview of recent progress in SCFG-based methods for RNA sequence analysis and novel kernel functions tailored to measure the similarity of two RNA sequences and developed for use with support vector machines (SVM) in discriminating members of an RNA family from non-members.

  4. Long Non-Coding RNAs in Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Maria A.; Bullock, Marc D.; Ling, Hui; Pichler, Martin; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma (EC), the second most common form of gynaecological malignancy, can be divided into two distinct sub-types: Type I tumours arise from hyperplastic endometrium and typically effect women around the time of menopause, whereas type II tumours arise in postmenopausal women from atrophic endometrium. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a novel class of non-protein coding molecules that have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of many types of cancer including gynaecological tumours. Although they play critical physiological roles in cellular metabolism, their expression and function are deregulated in EC compared with paired normal tissue, indicating that they may also participate in tumour initiation and progression. For instance, the lncRNA MALAT-1 is down-regulated in EC samples compared to normal or hyperplastic endometrium, whereas the lncRNA OVAL is down-regulated in type II disease but up-regulated in type I disease. Other notatble lncRNAs such as HOTAIR, H19 and SRA become up-regulated with increasing EC tumour grade and other features associated with poor prognosis. In the current review, we will examine the growing body of evidence linking deregulated lncRNAs with specific biological functions of tumour cells in EC, we will highlight associations between lncRNAs and the molecular pathways implicated in EC tumourigenesis and we will identify critical knowledge gaps that remain to be addressed. PMID:26556343

  5. Community structure of non-coding RNA interaction network.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Jose C

    2013-04-02

    Rapid technological advances have shown that the ratio of non-protein coding genes rises to 98.5% in humans, suggesting that current knowledge on genetic information processing might be largely incomplete. It implies that protein-coding sequences only represent a small fraction of cellular transcriptional information. Here, we examine the community structure of the network defined by functional interactions between non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and proteins related bio-macromolecules (PRMs) using a two-fold approach: modularity in bipartite network and k-clique community detection. First, the high modularity scores as well as the distribution of community sizes showing a scaling-law revealed manifestly non-random features. Second, the k-clique sub-graphs and overlaps show that the identified communities of the ncRNA molecules of H. sapiens can potentially be associated with certain functions. These findings highlight the complex modular structure of ncRNA interactions and its possible regulatory roles in the cell.

  6. Biocomputational prediction of small non-coding RNAs in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Pánek, Josef; Bobek, Jan; Mikulík, Karel; Basler, Marek; Vohradský, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Background The first systematic study of small non-coding RNAs (sRNA, ncRNA) in Streptomyces is presented. Except for a few exceptions, the Streptomyces sRNAs, as well as the sRNAs in other genera of the Actinomyces group, have remained unstudied. This study was based on sequence conservation in intergenic regions of Streptomyces, localization of transcription termination factors, and genomic arrangement of genes flanking the predicted sRNAs. Results Thirty-two potential sRNAs in Streptomyces were predicted. Of these, expression of 20 was detected by microarrays and RT-PCR. The prediction was validated by a structure based computational approach. Two predicted sRNAs were found to be terminated by transcription termination factors different from the Rho-independent terminators. One predicted sRNA was identified computationally with high probability as a Streptomyces 6S RNA. Out of the 32 predicted sRNAs, 24 were found to be structurally dissimilar from known sRNAs. Conclusion Streptomyces is the largest genus of Actinomyces, whose sRNAs have not been studied. The Actinomyces is a group of bacterial species with unique genomes and phenotypes. Therefore, in Actinomyces, new unique bacterial sRNAs may be identified. The sequence and structural dissimilarity of the predicted Streptomyces sRNAs demonstrated by this study serve as the first evidence of the uniqueness of Actinomyces sRNAs. PMID:18477385

  7. Non-Coding RNAs in Stroke and Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Saugstad, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    This review will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) in stroke and neuroprotection. There will be a brief introduction to microRNAs (miRNA), long ncRNAs (lncRNA), and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNA), followed by evidence for the regulation of ncRNAs in ischemia. This review will also discuss the effect of neuroprotection induced by a sublethal duration of ischemia or other stimuli given before a stroke (preconditioning) on miRNA expression and the role of miRNAs in preconditioning-induced neuroprotection. Experimental manipulation of miRNAs and/or their targets to induce pre- or post-stroke protection will also be presented, as well as discussion on miRNA responses to current post-stroke therapies. This review will conclude with a brief discussion of future directions for ncRNAs studies in stroke, such as new approaches to model complex ncRNA datasets, challenges in ncRNA studies, and the impact of extracellular RNAs on human diseases such as stroke. PMID:25821444

  8. Neighboring gene regulation by antisense long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Victoria E; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation--pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional--through DNA-RNA, RNA-RNA or protein-RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm.

  9. Non-coding recurrent mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Puente, Xose S; Beà, Silvia; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Villamor, Neus; Gutiérrez-Abril, Jesús; Martín-Subero, José I; Munar, Marta; Rubio-Pérez, Carlota; Jares, Pedro; Aymerich, Marta; Baumann, Tycho; Beekman, Renée; Belver, Laura; Carrio, Anna; Castellano, Giancarlo; Clot, Guillem; Colado, Enrique; Colomer, Dolors; Costa, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Enjuanes, Anna; Estivill, Xavier; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Gelpí, Josep L; González, Blanca; González, Santiago; González, Marcos; Gut, Marta; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; López-Guerra, Mónica; Martín-García, David; Navarro, Alba; Nicolás, Pilar; Orozco, Modesto; Payer, Ángel R; Pinyol, Magda; Pisano, David G; Puente, Diana A; Queirós, Ana C; Quesada, Víctor; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M; Royo, Cristina; Royo, Romina; Rozman, María; Russiñol, Nuria; Salaverría, Itziar; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Tamborero, David; Terol, María J; Valencia, Alfonso; López-Bigas, Nuria; Torrents, David; Gut, Ivo; López-Guillermo, Armando; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2015-10-22

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a frequent disease in which the genetic alterations determining the clinicobiological behaviour are not fully understood. Here we describe a comprehensive evaluation of the genomic landscape of 452 CLL cases and 54 patients with monoclonal B-lymphocytosis, a precursor disorder. We extend the number of CLL driver alterations, including changes in ZNF292, ZMYM3, ARID1A and PTPN11. We also identify novel recurrent mutations in non-coding regions, including the 3' region of NOTCH1, which cause aberrant splicing events, increase NOTCH1 activity and result in a more aggressive disease. In addition, mutations in an enhancer located on chromosome 9p13 result in reduced expression of the B-cell-specific transcription factor PAX5. The accumulative number of driver alterations (0 to ≥4) discriminated between patients with differences in clinical behaviour. This study provides an integrated portrait of the CLL genomic landscape, identifies new recurrent driver mutations of the disease, and suggests clinical interventions that may improve the management of this neoplasia.

  10. Perspectives of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Eduardo M.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) transcribed from intergenic and intronic regions of the human genome constitute a broad class of cellular transcripts that are under intensive investigation. While only a handful of lncRNAs have been characterized, their involvement in fundamental cellular processes that control gene expression highlights a central role in cell homeostasis. Not surprisingly, aberrant expression of regulatory lncRNAs has been increasingly documented in different types of cancer, where they can mediate both oncogenic or tumor suppressor effects. Interaction with chromatin remodeling complexes that promote silencing of specific genes or modulation of splicing factor proteins seem to be two general modes of lncRNA regulation, but it is conceivable that additional mechanisms of action are yet to be unveiled. LncRNAs show greater tissue specificity compared to protein-coding mRNAs making them attractive in the search of novel diagnostics/prognostics cancer biomarkers in body fluid samples. In fact, lncRNA prostate cancer antigen 3 can be detected in urine samples and has been shown to improve diagnosis of prostate cancer. We suggest that an unbiased screening of the presence of RNAs in easily accessible body fluids such as serum and urine might reveal novel circulating lncRNAs as potential biomarkers in many types of cancer. Annotation and functional characterization of the lncRNA complement of the cancer transcriptome will conceivably provide new venues for early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:22408643

  11. CANTATAdb: A Collection of Plant Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Szcześniak, Michał W.; Rosikiewicz, Wojciech; Makałowska, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a class of potent regulators of gene expression that are found in a wide array of eukaryotes; however, our knowledge about these molecules in plants is still very limited. In particular, a number of model plant species still lack comprehensive data sets of lncRNAs and their annotations, and very little is known about their biological roles. To meet these shortcomings, we created an online database of lncRNAs in 10 model plant species. The lncRNAs were identified computationally using dozens of publicly available RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) libraries. Expression values, coding potential, sequence alignments as well as other types of data provide annotation for the identified lncRNAs. In order to better characterize them, we investigated their potential roles in splicing modulation and deregulation of microRNA functions. The data are freely available for searching, browsing and downloading from an online database called CANTATAdb (http://cantata.amu.edu.pl, http://yeti.amu.edu.pl/CANTATA/). PMID:26657895

  12. Small non-coding RNA deregulation in endometrial carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ravo, Maria; Cordella, Angela; Rinaldi, Antonio; Bruno, Giuseppina; Alexandrova, Elena; Saggese, Pasquale; Nassa, Giovanni; Giurato, Giorgio; Tarallo, Roberta; Marchese, Giovanna; Rizzo, Francesca; Stellato, Claudia; Biancardi, Rossella; Troisi, Jacopo; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Zullo, Fulvio; Weisz, Alessandro; Guida, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) represent a heterogeneous group of <200nt-long transcripts comprising microRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and small-nucleolar-RNAs (snoRNAs) involved in physiological and pathological processes such as carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Aberrant sncRNA expression in cancer has been associated with specific clinical phenotypes, grading, staging, metastases development and resistance to therapy. Aim of the present work is to study the role of sncRNAs in endometrial carcinogenesis. Changes in sncRNA expression were identified by high-throughput genomic analysis of paired normal, hyperplastic and cancerous endometrial tissues obtained by endometrial biopsies (n = 10). Using smallRNA sequencing and microarrays we identified significant differences in sncRNA expression pattern between normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic endometrium. This led to the definition of a sncRNA signature (129 microRNAs, 2 of which not previously described, 10 piRNAs and 3 snoRNAs) of neoplastic transformation. Functional bioinformatics analysis identified as downstream targets multiple signaling pathways potentially involved in the hyperplastic and neoplastic tissue responses, including Wnt/β-catenin, and ERK/MAPK and TGF-β-Signaling. Considering the regulatory role of sncRNAs, this newly identified sncRNA signature is likely to reflect the events leading to endometrial cancer, which can be exploited to dissect the carcinogenic process including novel biomarkers for early and non-invasive diagnosis of these tumors. PMID:25686835

  13. Ageing and the Small, Non-Coding RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masaomi; Slack, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs, a class of small, non-coding RNAs, are now widely known for their importance in many aspects of biology. These small regulatory RNAs have critical functions in diverse biological events, including development and disease. Recent findings show that microRNAs are essential for lifespan determination in the model organisms, C. elegans and Drosophila, suggesting that microRNAs are also involved in the complex process of ageing. Further, short RNA fragments derived from longer parental RNAs, such as transfer RNA cleavage fragments, have now emerged as a novel class of regulatory RNAs that inhibit translation in response to stress. In addition, the RNA editing pathway is likely to act in the double-stranded RNA-mediated silencing machinery to suppress unfavorable RNA interference activity in the ageing process. These multiple, redundant layers in gene regulatory networks may make it possible to both stably and flexibly regulate genetic pathways in ensuring robustness of developmental and ageing processes. PMID:22504407

  14. Non-coding RNAs and complex distributed genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-08-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the mRNA-protein interplay can be dramatically influenced by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Although this new paradigm is now widely accepted, an understanding of the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks is lacking. To clarify what may happen in this case, we propose a mean-field kinetic model describing the influence of ncRNA on a complex genetic network with a distributed architecture including mutual protein-mediated regulation of many genes transcribed into mRNAs. ncRNA is considered to associate with mRNAs and inhibit their translation and/or facilitate degradation. Our results are indicative of the richness of the kinetics under consideration. The main complex features are found to be bistability and oscillations. One could expect to find kinetic chaos as well. The latter feature has however not been observed in our calculations. In addition, we illustrate the difference in the regulation of distributed networks by mRNA and ncRNA.

  15. Non-coding Y RNAs as tethers and gates

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Sandra L; Belair, Cedric; Boccitto, Marco; Chen, Xinguo; Sim, Soyeong; Taylor, David W; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) called Y RNAs are abundant components of both animal cells and a variety of bacteria. In all species examined, these ~100 nt RNAs are bound to the Ro 60 kDa (Ro60) autoantigen, a ring-shaped protein that also binds misfolded ncRNAs in some vertebrate nuclei. Although the function of Ro60 RNPs has been mysterious, we recently reported that a bacterial Y RNA tethers Ro60 to the 3′ to 5′ exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) to form RYPER (Ro60/Y RNA/PNPase Exoribonuclease RNP), a new RNA degradation machine. PNPase is a homotrimeric ring that degrades single-stranded RNA, and Y RNA-mediated tethering of Ro60 increases the effectiveness of PNPase in degrading structured RNAs. Single particle electron microscopy of RYPER suggests that RNA threads through the Ro60 ring into the PNPase cavity. Further studies indicate that Y RNAs may also act as gates to regulate entry of RNA substrates into the Ro60 channel. These findings reveal novel functions for Y RNAs and raise questions about how the bacterial findings relate to the roles of these ncRNAs in animal cells. Here we review the literature on Y RNAs, highlighting their close relationship with Ro60 proteins and the hypothesis that these ncRNAs function generally to tether Ro60 rings to diverse RNA-binding proteins. PMID:24036917

  16. The roles of non-coding RNAs in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Majidinia, Maryam; Mihanfar, Aynaz; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Nourazarian, Alireza; Bagca, BakiyeGoker; Avci, Çığır Biray

    2016-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered as a high prevalence neurodegenerative disorders worldwide. Pathologically, the demise of dopamine-producing cells, in large part due to an abnormal accumulation of the α-synuclein in the substantia nigra, is one of the main causes of the disease. Up until now, many de novo investigations have been conducted to disclose the mechanisms underlying in PD. Among them, impacts of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) on the pathogenesis and/or progression of PD need to be highlighted. microRNAs (miRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) are more noteworthy in this context. miRNAs are small ncRNAs (with 18-25 nucleotide in length) that control the expression of multiple genes at post-transcriptional level, while lncRNAs have longer size (over 200 nucleotides) and are involved in some key biological processes through various mechanisms. Involvement of miRNAs has been well documented in the development of PD, particularly gene expression. Hence, in this current review, we will discuss the impacts of miRNAs in regulation of the expression of PD-related genes and the role of lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of PD.

  17. Gene regulation of mammalian long non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Heeyoun

    2017-09-11

    RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcribes two classes of RNAs, protein-coding and non-protein-coding (ncRNA) genes. ncRNAs are also synthesized by RNA polymerases I and III (Pol I and III). In humans, the number of ncRNA genes exceeds more than twice that of protein-coding genes. However, the history of studying Pol II-synthesized ncRNA is relatively short. Since early 2000s, important biological and pathological functions of these ncRNA genes have begun to be discovered and intensively studied. And transcription mechanisms of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) have been recently reported. Transcription of lncRNAs utilizes some transcription factors and mechanisms shared in that of protein-coding genes. In addition, tissue specificity in lncRNA gene expression has been shown. LncRNAs play essential roles in regulating the expression of neighboring or distal genes through different mechanisms. This leads to the implication of lncRNAs in a wide variety of biological pathways and pathological development. In this review, the newly discovered transcription mechanisms, characteristics, and functions of lncRNA are discussed.

  18. Non-Coding RNAs in Neural Networks, REST-Assured

    PubMed Central

    Rossbach, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In the nervous system, several key steps in cellular complexity and development are regulated by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor (REST/NRSF). REST recruits gene regulatory complexes to regulatory sequences, among them the repressor element-1/neuron-restrictive silencer element, and mediates developmental stage-specific gene expression or repression, chromatin (re-)organization or silencing for protein-coding genes as well as for several ncRNAs like microRNAs, short interfering RNAs or long ncRNAs. NcRNAs are far from being just transcriptional noise and are involved in chromatin accessibility, transcription and post-transcriptional processing, trafficking, or RNA editing. REST and its cofactor CoREST are both highly regulated through various ncRNAs. The importance of the correct regulation within the ncRNA network, the ncRNAome, is demonstrated when it comes to a deregulation of REST and/or ncRNAs associated with molecular pathophysiology underlying diverse disorders including neurodegenerative diseases or brain tumors. PMID:22303307

  19. Expanding the Genetic Code of a Photoautotrophic Organism.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Yonatan; Friedman, Mor; Heltberg, Mathias; Bakhrat, Anna; Nagar, Elad; Schwarz, Rakefet; Jensen, Mogens Høgh; Alfonta, Lital

    2017-04-25

    The photoautotrophic freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is widely used as a chassis for biotechnological applications as well as a photosynthetic bacterial model. In this study, a method for expanding the genetic code of this cyanobacterium has been established, thereby allowing the incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins. This was achieved through UAG stop codon suppression, using an archaeal pyrrolysyl orthogonal translation system. We demonstrate incorporation of unnatural amino acids into green fluorescent protein with 20 ± 3.5% suppression efficiency. The introduced components were shown to be orthogonal to the host translational machinery. In addition, we observed that no significant growth impairment resulted from the integration of the system. To interpret the observations, we modeled and investigated the competition over the UAG codon between release factor 1 and pyl-tRNACUA. On the basis of the model results, and the fact that 39.6% of the stop codons in the S. elongatus genome are UAG stop codons, the suppression efficiency in S. elongatus is unexpectedly high. The reason for this unexpected suppression efficiency has yet to be determined.

  20. Biotransformations of monoterpenes by photoautotrophic micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Balcerzak, L; Lipok, J; Strub, D; Lochyński, S

    2014-12-01

    Monoterpenes are widely used in food technology, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries and as compounds of agricultural importance. It is known that compounds comprising this class can be transformed by a variety of organisms, namely by: bacteria, fungi, yeasts, plants or isolated enzymes. Biotransformations, as one of the most important tools of green chemistry, allow obtaining new products using whole cells of micro-organisms or isolated enzymes in mild reaction conditions. Therefore, biotransformations of monoterpenes, by different type of reaction such as: epoxidation, oxidation and stereoselective hydroxylation, resulted in the production of so desired, enantiomerically defined compounds that can be advised as natural seem to be interesting. Bearing in mind that such processes are carried out also by easy to maintain, photoautotrophic micro-organisms cultivated at large scale, this paper is focused on biotransformations of acyclic, monocyclic and bicyclic monoterpenes by freshwater or haliphylic cyanobacteria and microalgae on the way of mainly stereoselective hydroxylation. Moreover, aspects of potential industrial application of obtained products in medicine, perfume, cosmetics and food industry are discussed.

  1. A photoautotrophic source for lycopane in marine water columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeham, Stuart G.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Pease, Tamara K.; Hayes, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Suspended particulate matter and recent sediments from diverse oceanic sites have been investigated for their contents of lycopane. Lycopane was present in all samples, including both oxic and anoxic water column and sediments. The highest concentrations in the water column were found in surface waters of the central Pacific gyre (1.5 ng/L) and in the anoxic waters of the Cariaco Trench (1.1 ng/L) and the Black Sea (0.3 ng/L). Vertical concentration profiles suggest that lycopane is probably algal in origin. Moreover, biogeochemical conditions in anoxic zones apparently result in a secondary production of lycopane from an as yet unidentified precursor. Compound-specific carbon isotopic analyses have been carried out on lycopane from water column and sediment samples. Isotopic compositions of lycopane range between -23.6 and -32.9 percent and are consistent with a photoautotrophic origin. We postulate that some lycopane is produced in surface waters of the ocean, while additional lycopane is produced in anoxic zones by anaerobic microbial action on an algal precursor.

  2. Regulation of mammalian cell differentiation by long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqian; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-11-06

    Differentiation of specialized cell types from stem and progenitor cells is tightly regulated at several levels, both during development and during somatic tissue homeostasis. Many long non-coding RNAs have been recognized as an additional layer of regulation in the specification of cellular identities; these non-coding species can modulate gene-expression programmes in various biological contexts through diverse mechanisms at the transcriptional, translational or messenger RNA stability levels. Here, we summarize findings that implicate long non-coding RNAs in the control of mammalian cell differentiation. We focus on several representative differentiation systems and discuss how specific long non-coding RNAs contribute to the regulation of mammalian development.

  3. Non-Coding RNAs: New Players in Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Herter, Eva K.; Xu Landén, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Significance: Wound healing is a basic physiological process that is utilized to keep the integrity of the skin. Impaired wound repair, such as chronic wounds and pathological scars, presents a major health and economic burden worldwide. To date, efficient targeted treatment for these wound disorders is still lacking, which is largely due to our limited understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying these diseases. Research driven around discovering new therapies for these complications is, therefore, an urgent need. Recent Advances: The vast majority of the human genome is transcribed to RNAs that lack protein-coding capacity. Intensive research in the recent decade has revealed that these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) function as important regulators of cellular physiology and pathology, which makes them promising therapeutic and diagnostic entities. Critical Issues: A class of short ncRNAs, microRNAs, has been found to be indispensable for all the phases of skin wound healing and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of wound complications. The role of long ncRNAs (lncRNA) in skin wound healing remains largely unexplored. Recent studies revealed the essential role of lncRNAs in epidermal differentiation and stress response, indicating their potential importance for skin wound healing, which warrants future research. Future Directions: An investigation of ncRNAs will add new layers of complexity to our understanding of normal skin wound healing as well as to the pathogenesis of wound disorders. Development of ncRNA-based biomarkers and treatments is an interesting and important avenue for future research on wound healing. PMID:28289554

  4. Non-Coding RNAs: New Players in Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Herter, Eva K; Xu Landén, Ning

    2017-03-01

    Significance: Wound healing is a basic physiological process that is utilized to keep the integrity of the skin. Impaired wound repair, such as chronic wounds and pathological scars, presents a major health and economic burden worldwide. To date, efficient targeted treatment for these wound disorders is still lacking, which is largely due to our limited understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying these diseases. Research driven around discovering new therapies for these complications is, therefore, an urgent need. Recent Advances: The vast majority of the human genome is transcribed to RNAs that lack protein-coding capacity. Intensive research in the recent decade has revealed that these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) function as important regulators of cellular physiology and pathology, which makes them promising therapeutic and diagnostic entities. Critical Issues: A class of short ncRNAs, microRNAs, has been found to be indispensable for all the phases of skin wound healing and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of wound complications. The role of long ncRNAs (lncRNA) in skin wound healing remains largely unexplored. Recent studies revealed the essential role of lncRNAs in epidermal differentiation and stress response, indicating their potential importance for skin wound healing, which warrants future research. Future Directions: An investigation of ncRNAs will add new layers of complexity to our understanding of normal skin wound healing as well as to the pathogenesis of wound disorders. Development of ncRNA-based biomarkers and treatments is an interesting and important avenue for future research on wound healing.

  5. Kinetic models of gene expression including non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-03-01

    In cells, genes are transcribed into mRNAs, and the latter are translated into proteins. Due to the feedbacks between these processes, the kinetics of gene expression may be complex even in the simplest genetic networks. The corresponding models have already been reviewed in the literature. A new avenue in this field is related to the recognition that the conventional scenario of gene expression is fully applicable only to prokaryotes whose genomes consist of tightly packed protein-coding sequences. In eukaryotic cells, in contrast, such sequences are relatively rare, and the rest of the genome includes numerous transcript units representing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). During the past decade, it has become clear that such RNAs play a crucial role in gene expression and accordingly influence a multitude of cellular processes both in the normal state and during diseases. The numerous biological functions of ncRNAs are based primarily on their abilities to silence genes via pairing with a target mRNA and subsequently preventing its translation or facilitating degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Many other abilities of ncRNAs have been discovered as well. Our review is focused on the available kinetic models describing the mRNA, ncRNA and protein interplay. In particular, we systematically present the simplest models without kinetic feedbacks, models containing feedbacks and predicting bistability and oscillations in simple genetic networks, and models describing the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks. Mathematically, the presentation is based primarily on temporal mean-field kinetic equations. The stochastic and spatio-temporal effects are also briefly discussed.

  6. Novel classes of non-coding RNAs and cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    For the many years, the central dogma of molecular biology has been that RNA functions mainly as an informational intermediate between a DNA sequence and its encoded protein. But one of the great surprises of modern biology was the discovery that protein-coding genes represent less than 2% of the total genome sequence, and subsequently the fact that at least 90% of the human genome is actively transcribed. Thus, the human transcriptome was found to be more complex than a collection of protein-coding genes and their splice variants. Although initially argued to be spurious transcriptional noise or accumulated evolutionary debris arising from the early assembly of genes and/or the insertion of mobile genetic elements, recent evidence suggests that the non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) may play major biological roles in cellular development, physiology and pathologies. NcRNAs could be grouped into two major classes based on the transcript size; small ncRNAs and long ncRNAs. Each of these classes can be further divided, whereas novel subclasses are still being discovered and characterized. Although, in the last years, small ncRNAs called microRNAs were studied most frequently with more than ten thousand hits at PubMed database, recently, evidence has begun to accumulate describing the molecular mechanisms by which a wide range of novel RNA species function, providing insight into their functional roles in cellular biology and in human disease. In this review, we summarize newly discovered classes of ncRNAs, and highlight their functioning in cancer biology and potential usage as biomarkers or therapeutic targets. PMID:22613733

  7. Effective knockdown of Drosophila long non-coding RNAs by CRISPR interference

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sanjay; Tibbit, Charlotte; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as regulators of gene expression across metazoa. Interestingly, some lncRNAs function independently of their transcripts – the transcription of the lncRNA locus itself affects target genes. However, current methods of loss-of-function analysis are insufficient to address the role of lncRNA transcription from the transcript which has impeded analysis of their function. Using the minimal CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system, we show that coexpression of the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) and guide RNAs targeting the endogenous roX locus in the Drosophila cells results in a robust and specific knockdown of roX1 and roX2 RNAs, thus eliminating the need for recruiting chromatin modifying proteins for effective gene silencing. Additionally, we find that the human and Drosophila codon optimized dCas9 genes are functional and show similar transcription repressive activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the minimal CRISPRi system suppresses roX transcription efficiently in vivo resulting in loss-of-function phenotype, thus validating the method for the first time in a multicelluar organism. Our analysis expands the genetic toolkit available for interrogating lncRNA function in situ and is adaptable for targeting multiple genes across model organisms. PMID:26850642

  8. Atrazine tolerance mechanism(s) in photoautotrophic potato cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smeda, R.J.; Hasegawa, P.M.; Weller, S.C. )

    1989-04-01

    A photoautotrophic potato cell line (variant) was isolated and is capable of sustained growth in media containing in the herbicide atrazine at concentration up to 100 x greater than the lethal concentration for the unselected (wild type) cell line (1.0 {mu}M). Fresh weight doubling times of variant cells in the presence or absence of 1.0 {mu}M atrazine were identical to wild type cells grown in the absence of atrazine. Maintenance of variant cells up to 10 passages in the absence of atrazine resulted in a reduction in the concentration of atrazine necessary to inhibit fresh weight gain by 99% (ID{sub 99}) from 100 to 80 {mu}M. Comparison of {sup 14}C-atrazine uptake indicated wild type cells accumulated up to 2.5-fold more atrazine than varient cells within 72h of exposure but no differences were detected thereafter. Electron transport of both isolated chloroplasts and intact cells were significantly inhibited in the wild type cell line by 1.0 {mu}M atrazine but unaffected in the variant cell line by atrazine concentrations up to 10 {mu}M. After 30 days in the presence of 1.0 {mu}M atrazine, wild type cells did not significantly metabolize atrazine, however, variant cells reduced atrazine concentrations to <0.05 {mu}M regardless if the initial atrazine concentration was 1.0 or 10.0 {mu}M. Both metabolism of atrazine and alterations within the chloroplast (potentially a reduction in atrazine binding affinity) appear to be important components of tolerance within variant cells.

  9. Extracellular secretion of free fatty acids by the chrysophyte Ochromonas danica under photoautotrophic and mixotrophic growth.

    PubMed

    Abomohra, Abd El-Fatah; El-Sheekh, Mostafa; Hanelt, Dieter

    2014-12-01

    Recently, microalgae have gained a lot of attention because of their ability to produce fatty acids in their surrounding environments. The present paper describes the influence of organic carbon on the different fatty acid pools including esterified fatty acids, intracellular free fatty acids and extracellular free fatty acids in Ochromonas danica. It also throws light on the ability of O. danica to secrete free fatty acids in the growth medium under photoautotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. Biomass production of photoautotrophically grown O. danica was higher than that of mixotrophically grown, where a cellular biomass formation of 1.8 g L(-1) was observed under photoautotrophic condition which was about five folds higher than that under mixotrophic conditions. Contrary, the esterified fatty acid content reached up to 99 mg g(-1) CDW under photoautotrophic conditions at the late exponential phase, while during mixotrophic conditions a maximum of 212 mg g(-1) CDW was observed at the stationary phase. Furthermore, O. danica cells grown under mixotrophic conditions showed higher intracellular free fatty acid and extracellular free fatty acid contents (up to 51 and 20 mg g(-1) CDW, respectively) than cells grown under photoautotrophic conditions (up to 26 and 4 mg g(-1) CDW, respectively). The intra- and extracellular free fatty acids consisted of a high proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids, mainly C18:2n-6, C18:3n-3 and C20:4n-6.

  10. Definition and annotation of (myco)bacterial non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Gyanu; Arnvig, Kristine B; McDonough, Kathleen A

    2013-01-01

    RNA in bacteria may be broadly classified into coding and non-coding types. The prior, also known as messenger RNA, encode proteins as their final product. The non-coding RNA include all RNAs that are not translated into a protein. Examples of extensively studied and therefore prominent non-coding RNAs include rRNA, tRNA, tmRNA, whose designations reflect the functions performed by these RNAs. Discoveries of non-coding RNAs in mycobacteria have been reported in the recent years. At this early stage of this discipline of mycobacterial research, there is an opportunity for the scientific community to establish a consistent, systematic and objective approach to annotation of these RNAs. We are providing recommendations for this systematic annotation that we hope will be adopted by the mycobacterial research community. These may also serve as templates for annotation of non-coding RNAs in other bacteria.

  11. The long non-coding RNA Morrbid regulates Bim and short-lived myeloid cell lifespan

    PubMed Central

    McCright, Sam J.; Kumar, Dinesh B. Uthaya; Collet, Magalie A.; Mowel, Walter K.; Elliott, Ellen N.; Uyar, Asli; Makiya, Michelle A.; Dunagin, Margaret C.; Harman, Christian C.D.; Virtue, Anthony T.; Zhu, Stella; Bailis, Will; Stein, Judith; Hughes, Cynthia; Raj, Arjun; Wherry, E. John; Goff, Loyal A.; Klion, Amy D.; Rinn, John L.; Williams, Adam; Flavell, Richard A.; Henao-Mejia, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neutrophils, eosinophils and “classical” monocytes collectively account for ~70% of human blood leukocytes and are among the shortest-lived cells in the body1,2. Precise regulation of the lifespan of these myeloid cells is critical to maintain protective immune responses while minimizing the deleterious consequences of prolonged inflammation1,2. However, how the lifespan of these cells is strictly controlled remains largely unknown. Here, we identify a novel long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that we termed Morrbid, which tightly controls the survival of neutrophils, eosinophils and “classical” monocytes in response to pro-survival cytokines. To control the lifespan of these cells, Morrbid regulates the transcription of its neighboring pro-apoptotic gene, Bcl2l11 (Bim), by promoting the enrichment of the PRC2 complex at the Bcl2l11 promoter to maintain this gene in a poised state. Notably, Morrbid regulates this process in cis, enabling allele-specific control of Bcl2l11 transcription. Thus, in these highly inflammatory cells, changes in Morrbid levels provide a locus-specific regulatory mechanism that allows for rapid control of apoptosis in response to extracellular pro-survival signals. As MORRBID is present in humans and dysregulated in patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome, this lncRNA may represent a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory disorders characterized by aberrant short-lived myeloid cell lifespan. PMID:27525555

  12. Decoding the usefulness of non-coding RNAs as breast cancer markers.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Maria; Salta, Sofia; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2016-09-15

    Although important advances in the management of breast cancer (BC) have been recently accomplished, it still constitutes the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. BC is a heterogeneous and complex disease, making clinical prediction of outcome a very challenging task. In recent years, gene expression profiling emerged as a tool to assist in clinical decision, enabling the identification of genetic signatures that better predict prognosis and response to therapy. Nevertheless, translation to routine practice has been limited by economical and technical reasons and, thus, novel biomarkers, especially those requiring non-invasive or minimally invasive collection procedures, while retaining high sensitivity and specificity might represent a significant development in this field. An increasing amount of evidence demonstrates that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), particularly microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), are aberrantly expressed in several cancers, including BC. miRNAs are of particular interest as new, easily accessible, cost-effective and non-invasive tools for precise management of BC patients because they circulate in bodily fluids (e.g., serum and plasma) in a very stable manner, enabling BC assessment and monitoring through liquid biopsies. This review focus on how ncRNAs have the potential to answer present clinical needs in the personalized management of patients with BC and comprehensively describes the state of the art on the role of ncRNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy in BC.

  13. Non-coding RNAs and Berberine: A new mechanism of its anti-diabetic activities.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang

    2017-01-15

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease with high mortality and morbidity. Non-coding RNAs, including small and long non-coding RNAs, are a novel class of functional RNA molecules that regulate multiple biological functions through diverse mechanisms. Studies in the last decade have demonstrated that non-coding RNAs may represent compelling therapeutic targets and play important roles in regulating the course of insulin resistance and T2D. Berberine, a plant-based alkaloid, has shown promise as an anti-hyperglycaemic, anti-hyperlipidaemic agent against T2D. Previous studies have primarily focused on a diverse array of efficacy end points of berberine in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndromes and inflammation or oxidative stress. Currently, an increasing number of studies have revealed the importance of non-coding RNAs as regulators of the anti-diabetic effects of berberine. The regulation of non-coding RNAs has been associated with several therapeutic actions of berberine in T2D progression. Thus, this review summarizes the anti-diabetic mechanisms of berberine by focusing on its role in regulating non-coding RNA, thus demonstrating that berberine exerts global anti-diabetic effects by targeting non-coding RNAs and that these effects involve several miRNAs, lncRNAs and multiple signal pathways, which may enhance the current understanding of the anti-diabetic mechanism actions of berberine and provide new pathological targets for the development of berberine-related drugs.

  14. Facts and updates about cardiovascular non-coding RNAs in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Thum, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    About 11% of all deaths include heart failure as a contributing cause. The annual cost of heart failure amounts to US $34,000,000,000 in the United States alone. With the exception of heart transplantation, there is no curative therapy available. Only occasionally there are new areas in science that develop into completely new research fields. The topic on non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and circular RNAs, is such a field. In this short review, we will discuss the latest developments about non-coding RNAs in cardiovascular disease. MicroRNAs are short regulatory non-coding endogenous RNA species that are involved in virtually all cellular processes. Long non-coding RNAs also regulate gene and protein levels; however, by much more complicated and diverse mechanisms. In general, non-coding RNAs have been shown to be of great value as therapeutic targets in adverse cardiac remodelling and also as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for heart failure. In the future, non-coding RNA-based therapeutics are likely to enter the clinical reality offering a new treatment approach of heart failure.

  15. Non-Coding RNAs as Potential Neuroprotectants against Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prameet; Liu, Fujia; Tan, Jun Rong; Lim, Kai Ying; Sepramaniam, Sugunavathi; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2013-03-20

    Over the past decade, scientific discoveries have highlighted new roles for a unique class of non-coding RNAs. Transcribed from the genome, these non-coding RNAs have been implicated in determining the biological complexity seen in mammals by acting as transcriptional and translational regulators. Non-coding RNAs, which can be sub-classified into long non-coding RNAs, microRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs and several others, are widely expressed in the nervous system with roles in neurogenesis, development and maintenance of the neuronal phenotype. Perturbations of these non-coding transcripts have been observed in ischemic preconditioning as well as ischemic brain injury with characterization of the mechanisms by which they confer toxicity. Their dysregulation may also confer pathogenic conditions in neurovascular diseases. A better understanding of their expression patterns and functions has uncovered the potential use of these riboregulators as neuroprotectants to antagonize the detrimental molecular events taking place upon ischemic-reperfusion injury. In this review, we discuss the various roles of non-coding RNAs in brain development and their mechanisms of gene regulation in relation to ischemic brain injury. We will also address the future directions and open questions for identifying promising non-coding RNAs that could eventually serve as potential neuroprotectants against ischemic brain injury.

  16. Non-coding RNAs and LRRFIP1 Regulate TNF Expression1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lihua; Song, Li; Fitzgerald, Michael; Maurer, Kelly; Bagashev, Asen; Sullivan, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs have been implicated in the regulation of expression of numerous genes, however, the mechanism is not fully understood. We identified bidirectional, long non-coding RNAs upstream of the TNF gene using five different methods. They arose in a region where the repressors LRRFIP1, EZH2, and SUZ12 were demonstrated to bind, suggesting a role in repression. The non-coding RNAs were polyadenylated, capped, and chromatin-associated. Knock-down of the non-coding RNAs was associated with de-repression of TNF mRNA and diminished binding of LRRFIP1 to both RNA targets and chromatin. Over-expression of the non-coding RNAs led to diminished expression of TNF and recruitment of repressor proteins to the locus. One repressor protein, LRRFIP1, bound directly to the non-coding RNAs. These data place the non-coding RNAs upstream of TNF gene as central to the transcriptional regulation. They appear to serve as a platform for the assembly of a repressive complex. PMID:24567534

  17. Identification and analysis of mouse non-coding RNA using transcriptome data.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuhui; Liu, Wanfei; Zeng, Jingyao; Liu, Shoucheng; Tan, Xinyu; Aljohi, Hasanawad; Hu, Songnian

    2016-06-01

    Transcripts are expressed spatially and temporally and they are very complicated, precise and specific; however, most studies are focused on protein-coding related genes. Recently, massively parallel cDNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has emerged to be a new and promising tool for transcriptome research, and numbers of non-coding RNAs, especially lincRNAs, have been widely identified and well characterized as important regulators of diverse biological processes. In this study, we used ultra-deep RNA-seq data from 15 mouse tissues to study the diversity and dynamic of non-coding RNAs in mouse. Using our own criteria, we identified totally 16,249 non-coding genes (21,569 non-coding RNAs) in mouse. We annotated these non-coding RNAs by diverse properties and found non-coding RNAs are generally shorter, have fewer exons, express in lower level and are more strikingly tissue-specific compared with protein-coding genes. Moreover, these non-coding RNAs show significant enrichment with transcriptional initiation and elongation signals including histone modifications (H3K4me3, H3K27me3 and H3K36me3), RNAPII binding sites and CAGE tags. The gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) result revealed several sets of lincRNAs associated with diverse biological processes such as immune effector process, muscle development and sexual reproduction. Taken together, this study provides a more comprehensive annotation of mouse non-coding RNAs and gives an opportunity for future functional and evolutionary study of mouse non-coding RNAs.

  18. Regulation of mammalian cell differentiation by long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenqian; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of specialized cell types from stem and progenitor cells is tightly regulated at several levels, both during development and during somatic tissue homeostasis. Many long non-coding RNAs have been recognized as an additional layer of regulation in the specification of cellular identities; these non-coding species can modulate gene-expression programmes in various biological contexts through diverse mechanisms at the transcriptional, translational or messenger RNA stability levels. Here, we summarize findings that implicate long non-coding RNAs in the control of mammalian cell differentiation. We focus on several representative differentiation systems and discuss how specific long non-coding RNAs contribute to the regulation of mammalian development. PMID:23070366

  19. Non-coding RNAs: an emerging player in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunzhi; Peng, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs play a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability which is essential for cell survival and preventing tumorigenesis. Through an extensive crosstalk between non-coding RNAs and the canonical DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathway, DDR-induced expression of non-coding RNAs can provide a regulatory mechanism to accurately control the expression of DNA damage responsive genes in a spatio-temporal manner. Mechanistically, DNA damage alters expression of a variety of non-coding RNAs at multiple levels including transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation, and RNA degradation. In parallel, non-coding RNAs can directly regulate cellular processes involved in DDR by altering expression of their targeting genes, with a particular emphasis on miRNAs and lncRNAs. MiRNAs are required for almost every aspect of cellular responses to DNA damage, including sensing DNA damage, transducing damage signals, repairing damaged DNA, activating cell cycle checkpoints, and inducing apoptosis. As for lncRNAs, they control transcription of DDR relevant gene by four different regulatory models, including signal, decoy, guide, and scaffold. In addition, we also highlight potential clinical applications of non-coding RNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for anti-cancer treatments using DNA-damaging agents including radiation and chemotherapy. Although tremendous advances have been made to elucidate the role of non-coding RANs in genome maintenance, many key questions remain to be answered including mechanistically how non-coding RNA pathway and DNA damage response pathway is coordinated in response to genotoxic stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Large-scale prediction of long non-coding RNA functions in a coding–non-coding gene co-expression network

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qi; Liu, Changning; Yuan, Xiongying; Kang, Shuli; Miao, Ruoyu; Xiao, Hui; Zhao, Guoguang; Luo, Haitao; Bu, Dechao; Zhao, Haitao; Skogerbø, Geir; Wu, Zhongdao; Zhao, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Although accumulating evidence has provided insight into the various functions of long-non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), the exact functions of the majority of such transcripts are still unknown. Here, we report the first computational annotation of lncRNA functions based on public microarray expression profiles. A coding–non-coding gene co-expression (CNC) network was constructed from re-annotated Affymetrix Mouse Genome Array data. Probable functions for altogether 340 lncRNAs were predicted based on topological or other network characteristics, such as module sharing, association with network hubs and combinations of co-expression and genomic adjacency. The functions annotated to the lncRNAs mainly involve organ or tissue development (e.g. neuron, eye and muscle development), cellular transport (e.g. neuronal transport and sodium ion, acid or lipid transport) or metabolic processes (e.g. involving macromolecules, phosphocreatine and tyrosine). PMID:21247874

  1. Impact of Nutrition on Non-Coding RNA Epigenetics in Breast and Gynecological Cancer.

    PubMed

    Krakowsky, Rosanna H E; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in females. According to the American Cancer Society, there are 327,660 new cases in breast and gynecological cancers estimated in 2014, placing emphasis on the need for cancer prevention and new cancer treatment strategies. One important approach to cancer prevention involves phytochemicals, biologically active compounds derived from plants. A variety of studies on the impact of dietary compounds found in cruciferous vegetables, green tea, and spices like curry and black pepper have revealed epigenetic changes in female cancers. Thus, an important emerging topic comprises epigenetic changes due to the modulation of non-coding RNA levels. Since it has been shown that non-coding RNAs such as microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs are aberrantly expressed in cancer, and furthermore are linked to distinct cancer phenotypes, understanding the effects of dietary compounds and supplements on the epigenetic modulator non-coding RNA is of great interest. This article reviews the current findings on nutrition-induced changes in breast and gynecological cancers at the non-coding RNA level.

  2. Challenges and progress in interpretation of non-coding genetic variants associated with human disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yizhou; Tazearslan, Cagdas; Suh, Yousin

    2017-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have shown that the far majority of disease-associated variants reside in the non-coding regions of the genome, suggesting that gene regulatory changes contribute to disease risk. To identify truly causal non-coding variants and their affected target genes remains challenging but is a critical step to translate the genetic associations to molecular mechanisms and ultimately clinical applications. Here we review genomic/epigenomic resources and in silico tools that can be used to identify causal non-coding variants and experimental strategies to validate their functionalities. Impact statement Most signals from genome-wide association studies (GWASs) map to the non-coding genome, and functional interpretation of these associations remained challenging. We reviewed recent progress in methodologies of studying the non-coding genome and argued that no single approach allows one to effectively identify the causal regulatory variants from GWAS results. By illustrating the advantages and limitations of each method, our review potentially provided a guideline for taking a combinatorial approach to accurately predict, prioritize, and eventually experimentally validate the causal variants.

  3. The Function and Therapeutic Potential of Long Non-coding RNAs in Cardiovascular Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Clarissa P C; Spencer, Helen; Ford, Kerrie L; Michel, Lauriane Y M; Baker, Andrew H; Emanueli, Costanza; Balligand, Jean-Luc; Devaux, Yvan

    2017-09-15

    The popularization of genome-wide analyses and RNA sequencing led to the discovery that a large part of the human genome, while effectively transcribed, does not encode proteins. Long non-coding RNAs have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression in both normal and disease states. Studies of long non-coding RNAs expressed in the heart, in combination with gene association studies, revealed that these molecules are regulated during cardiovascular development and disease. Some long non-coding RNAs have been functionally implicated in cardiac pathophysiology and constitute potential therapeutic targets. Here, we review the current knowledge of the function of long non-coding RNAs in the cardiovascular system, with an emphasis on cardiovascular development and biology, focusing on hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, ischemia, and heart failure. We discuss potential therapeutic implications and the challenges of long non-coding RNA research, with directions for future research and translational focus. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-coding RNAs as emerging molecular targets of gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Tekcham, Dinesh Singh; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar

    2016-08-15

    Gallbladder cancer is one of the most common cancers of biliary tract with aggressive pathophysiology, now emerging as a global health issue. Although minority of gallbladder cancer patients could receive such curative resection due to late diagnosis, this increases the survival rate. Lack of potential target molecule (s) for early diagnosis, better prognosis and effective therapy of gallbladder cancer has triggered investigators to look for novel technological or high throughput approaches to identify potential biomarker for gallbladder cancer. Intervention of non-coding RNAs in gallbladder cancer has been revealed recently. Non-coding RNAs are now widely implicated in cancer. Recent reports have revealed association of non-coding RNAs (microRNAs or miRNAs and long non-coding RNAs or lncRNAs) with gallbladder cancer. Here, we present an updated overview on the biogenesis, mechanism of action, role of non-coding RNAs, the identified cellular functions in gallbladder tumorigenesis, their prognostic & therapeutic potentials (efficacies) and future significance in developing effective biomarker(s), in future, for gallbladder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of Nutrition on Non-Coding RNA Epigenetics in Breast and Gynecological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krakowsky, Rosanna H. E.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in females. According to the American Cancer Society, there are 327,660 new cases in breast and gynecological cancers estimated in 2014, placing emphasis on the need for cancer prevention and new cancer treatment strategies. One important approach to cancer prevention involves phytochemicals, biologically active compounds derived from plants. A variety of studies on the impact of dietary compounds found in cruciferous vegetables, green tea, and spices like curry and black pepper have revealed epigenetic changes in female cancers. Thus, an important emerging topic comprises epigenetic changes due to the modulation of non-coding RNA levels. Since it has been shown that non-coding RNAs such as microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs are aberrantly expressed in cancer, and furthermore are linked to distinct cancer phenotypes, understanding the effects of dietary compounds and supplements on the epigenetic modulator non-coding RNA is of great interest. This article reviews the current findings on nutrition-induced changes in breast and gynecological cancers at the non-coding RNA level. PMID:26075205

  6. Water/carbonate stripping for CO.sub.2 capture adsorber regeneration and CO.sub.2 delivery to photoautotrophs

    DOEpatents

    Chance, Ronald; Koros, William J.; McCool, Benjamin; Noel, James

    2015-08-11

    The invention provides systems and methods for the delivery of carbon to photoautotrophs. The invention utilizes low energy regeneration of adsorbent for CO.sub.2 capture and provides for effective CO.sub.2 loading into liquids useful for photoautotroph growth and/or production of photosynthetic products, such as biofuels, via photoautotrophic culture media. The inventive system comprises a fluid/membrane/fluid contactor that provides selective transfer of molecular CO.sub.2 via a dense (non-porous) membrane from a carbonate-based CO.sub.2 snipping solution to a culture medium where the CO.sub.2 is consumed by a photoautotroph for the production of biofuels, biofuel precursors or other commercial products.

  7. Influence of microRNAs and Long Non-Coding RNAs in Cancer Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Duncan; Vandesompele, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Innate and acquired chemoresistance exhibited by most tumours exposed to conventional chemotherapeutic agents account for the majority of relapse cases in cancer patients. Such chemoresistance phenotypes are of a multi-factorial nature from multiple key molecular players. The discovery of the RNA interference pathway in 1998 and the widespread gene regulatory influences exerted by microRNAs (miRNAs) and other non-coding RNAs have certainly expanded the level of intricacy present for the development of any single physiological phenotype, including cancer chemoresistance. This review article focuses on the latest research efforts in identifying and validating specific key molecular players from the two main families of non-coding RNAs, namely miRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), having direct or indirect influences in the development of cancer drug resistance properties and how such knowledge can be utilised for novel theranostics in oncology. PMID:28273813

  8. Emerging Roles for Non-Coding RNAs in Male Reproductive Development in Flowering Plants.

    PubMed

    Grant-Downton, Robert; Rodriguez-Enriquez, Josefina

    2012-12-04

    Knowledge of sexual reproduction systems in flowering plants is essential to humankind, with crop fertility vitally important for food security. Here, we review rapidly emerging new evidence for the key importance of non-coding RNAs in male reproductive development in flowering plants. From the commitment of somatic cells to initiating reproductive development through to meiosis and the development of pollen-containing the male gametes (sperm cells)-in the anther, there is now overwhelming data for a diversity of non-coding RNAs and emerging evidence for crucial roles for them in regulating cellular events at these developmental stages. A particularly exciting development has been the association of one example of cytoplasmic male sterility, which has become an unparalleled breeding tool for producing new crop hybrids, with a non-coding RNA locus.

  9. Influence of microRNAs and Long Non-Coding RNAs in Cancer Chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Duncan; Vandesompele, Jo

    2017-03-03

    Innate and acquired chemoresistance exhibited by most tumours exposed to conventional chemotherapeutic agents account for the majority of relapse cases in cancer patients. Such chemoresistance phenotypes are of a multi-factorial nature from multiple key molecular players. The discovery of the RNA interference pathway in 1998 and the widespread gene regulatory influences exerted by microRNAs (miRNAs) and other non-coding RNAs have certainly expanded the level of intricacy present for the development of any single physiological phenotype, including cancer chemoresistance. This review article focuses on the latest research efforts in identifying and validating specific key molecular players from the two main families of non-coding RNAs, namely miRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), having direct or indirect influences in the development of cancer drug resistance properties and how such knowledge can be utilised for novel theranostics in oncology.

  10. Emerging Roles for Non-Coding RNAs in Male Reproductive Development in Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Grant-Downton, Robert; Rodriguez-Enriquez, Josefina

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of sexual reproduction systems in flowering plants is essential to humankind, with crop fertility vitally important for food security. Here, we review rapidly emerging new evidence for the key importance of non-coding RNAs in male reproductive development in flowering plants. From the commitment of somatic cells to initiating reproductive development through to meiosis and the development of pollen—containing the male gametes (sperm cells)—in the anther, there is now overwhelming data for a diversity of non-coding RNAs and emerging evidence for crucial roles for them in regulating cellular events at these developmental stages. A particularly exciting development has been the association of one example of cytoplasmic male sterility, which has become an unparalleled breeding tool for producing new crop hybrids, with a non-coding RNA locus. PMID:24970151

  11. Non-coding RNAs in pluripotency and neural differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lukovic, Dunja; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Klabusay, Martin; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Erceg, Slaven

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the important role of non-coding RNAs as regulators of posttranscriptional processes, including stem cells self-renewal and neural differentiation. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (ihPSCs) show enormous potential in regenerative medicine due to their capacity to differentiate to virtually any type of cells of human body. Deciphering the role of non-coding RNAs in pluripotency, self-renewal and neural differentiation will reveal new molecular mechanisms involved in induction and maintenances of pluripotent state as well as triggering these cells toward clinically relevant cells for transplantation. In this brief review we will summarize recently published studies which reveal the role of non-coding RNAs in pluripotency and neural differentiation of hESCs and ihPSC. PMID:24860598

  12. A Micropeptide Encoded by a Putative Long Non-coding RNA Regulates Muscle Performance

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas M.; Anderson, Kelly M.; Chang, Chi-Lun; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; McAnally, John R.; Kasaragod, Prasad; Shelton, John M.; Liou, Jen; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional micropeptides can be concealed within RNAs that appear to be non-coding. We discovered a conserved micropeptide, that we named myoregulin (MLN), encoded by a skeletal muscle-specific RNA annotated as a putative long non-coding RNA. MLN shares structural and functional similarity with phospholamban (PLN) and sarcolipin (SLN), which inhibit SERCA, the membrane pump that controls muscle relaxation by regulating Ca2+ uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). MLN interacts directly with SERCA and impedes Ca2+ uptake into the SR. In contrast to PLN and SLN, which are expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscle in mice, MLN is robustly expressed in all skeletal muscle. Genetic deletion of MLN in mice enhances Ca2+ handling in skeletal muscle and improves exercise performance. These findings identify MLN as an important regulator of skeletal muscle physiology and highlight the possibility that additional micropeptides are encoded in the many RNAs currently annotated as non-coding. PMID:25640239

  13. Therapeutic Resistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Role of Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zebisch, Armin; Hatzl, Stefan; Pichler, Martin; Wölfler, Albert; Sill, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is caused by malignant transformation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells and displays the most frequent acute leukemia in adults. Although some patients can be cured with high dose chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the majority still succumbs to chemoresistant disease. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-coding RNA fragments and act as key players in the regulation of both physiologic and pathologic gene expression profiles. Aberrant expression of various non-coding RNAs proved to be of seminal importance in the pathogenesis of AML, as well in the development of resistance to chemotherapy. In this review, we discuss the role of miRNAs and lncRNAs with respect to sensitivity and resistance to treatment regimens currently used in AML and provide an outlook on potential therapeutic targets emerging thereof. PMID:27973410

  14. Structure based approaches for targeting non-coding RNAs with small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Varani, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The increasing appreciation of the central role of non-coding RNAs (miRNAs and long non coding RNAs) in chronic and degenerative human disease makes them attractive therapeutic targets. This would not be unprecedented: the bacterial ribosomal RNA is a mainstay for antibacterial treatment, while the conservation and functional importance of viral RNA regulatory elements has long suggested they would constitute attractive targets for new antivirals. Oligonucleotide-based chemistry has obvious appeals but also considerable pharmacological limitations that are yet to be addressed satisfactorily. Recent studies identifying small molecules targeting non-coding RNAs may provide an alternative approach to oligonucleotide methods. Here we review recent work investigating new structural and chemical principles for targeting RNA with small molecules. PMID:25687935

  15. Photoautotrophic microorganisms and bioremediation of industrial effluents: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Brar, Amandeep; Kumar, Manish; Vivekanand, Vivek; Pareek, Nidhi

    2017-05-01

    Growth of the industrial sector, a result of population explosion has become the root cause of environmental deterioration and has raised the concerns for efficient wastewater management and reuse. Photoautotrophic cultivation of microorganisms is a boon and considered as a potential biological treatment for remediation of wastewater as it sequesters CO2 during growth. Photoautotrophs viz. cyanobacteria, micro-algae and macro-algae can photosynthetically assimilate the excessive pollutants present in the wastewater. The present review emphasizes on the achievability of microorganisms to bestow wastewater as the nutrient source for biomass production, which can further be reused for feed, food and fertilizers. To support this, various case studies have been cited that prove phycoremediation as a cost-effective and sustainable process over conventional wastewater treatment processes that requires high chemical load and more energy inputs.

  16. The decalog of long non-coding RNA involvement in cancer diagnosis and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kunej, Tanja; Obsteter, Jana; Pogacar, Ziva; Horvat, Simon; Calin, George Adrian

    2014-12-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcripts without protein-coding capacity; initially regarded as "transcriptional noise", lately they have emerged as essential factors in both cell biology and mechanisms of disease. In this article, we present basic knowledge of lncRNA molecular mechanisms, associated physiological processes and cancer association, as well as their diagnostic and therapeutic value in the form of a decalog: (1) Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are transcripts without protein-coding capacity divided by size (short and long ncRNAs), function (housekeeping RNA and regulatory RNA) and direction of transcription (sense/antisense, bidirectional, intronic and intergenic), containing a broad range of molecules with diverse properties and functions, such as messenger RNA, transfer RNA, microRNA and long non-coding RNAs. (2) Long non-coding RNAs are implicated in many molecular mechanisms, such as transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation and processing of other short ncRNAs. (3) Long non-coding RNAs play an important role in many physiological processes such as X-chromosome inactivation, cell differentiation, immune response and apoptosis. (4) Long non-coding RNAs have been linked to hallmarks of cancer: (a) sustaining proliferative signaling; (b) evading growth suppressors; (c) enabling replicative immortality; (d) activating invasion and metastasis; (e) inducing angiogenesis; (f) resisting cell death; and (g) reprogramming energy metabolism. (5) Regarding their impact on cancer cells, lncRNAs are divided into two groups: oncogenic and tumor-suppressor lncRNAs. (6) Studies of lncRNA involvement in cancer usually analyze deregulated expression patterns at the RNA level as well as the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variations at the DNA level. (7) Long non-coding RNAs have potential as novel biomarkers due to tissue-specific expression patterns, efficient detection in body fluids and high stability. (8) LncRNAs serve

  17. Non-coding RNA and its potential role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arnvig, Kristine; Young, Douglas

    2012-04-01

    It is estimated that one third of the human population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Efforts to understand the molecular basis of its gene regulation have been focused on identification of protein encoding genes and regulons implicated in pathogenesis. Recently, a number of studies have described the identification of several non-coding RNAs that are likely to contribute significantly to the regulatory networks responsible for adaptation and virulence in M. tuberculosis. We have reviewed emerging information on the presence and abundance of different types of non-coding RNA in M. tuberculosis and consider their potential contribution to the adaptive responses that underlie disease pathogenesis.

  18. Predicting Dissolved Inorganic Carbon in Photoautotrophic Microalgae Culture via the Nitrogen Source.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Binh T; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2015-08-18

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and pH are key factors that control the growth rate of microalgae growing photoautotrophically. Being able to quantify how DIC and pH independently affect growth kinetics requires a means to control each parameter independently. In this study, we used the Proton Condition (PC) to develop means to control pH and DIC independently. Using the PC, we found that different N sources systematically affect the alkalinity and the DIC in distinct ways. With pH controlled at a fixed level by CO2 addition, using nitrate as the N source increased the alkalinity and DIC concentration in proportion to the increase in biomass concentration. In contrast, using ammonium caused the alkalinity and DIC to decline, while using ammonium nitrate left the DIC nearly unchanged. Experiments with a model photoautotroph cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, in batch experiments with modified BG-11 media and a pH-stat confirmed all of the DIC predictions of the PC-based model. Thus, this study provides a mechanistic basis for managing the DIC for photoautotrophic cultures through the N source. In particular, using ammonium nitrate makes it possible to control DIC and pH independently in a pH-stat.

  19. The evolving ribosome: from non-coded peptide bond formation to sophisticated translation machinery.

    PubMed

    Davidovich, Chen; Belousoff, Matthew; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada

    2009-09-01

    Structural analysis supported by biochemical, mutagenesis and computational evidence, revealed that the contemporary ribosome's active site is a universal symmetrical pocket made of ribosomal RNA. This pocket seems to be the remnant of the proto-ribosome, a dimeric RNA assembly evolved by gene duplication, capable of autonomously catalyzing peptide bond formation and non-coded amino acid polymerization.

  20. Identification and characterization of long non-coding RNAs in rainbow trout eggs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are in general considered as a diverse class of transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides that structurally resemble mRNAs but do not encode proteins. Recent advances in RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and bioinformatics methods have provided an opportunity to indentify and ana...

  1. The non-coding landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Angela E.; Zheng, Hao; Saad, Maarouf A.; Rahimy, Mehran; Ku, Jonjei; Kuo, Selena Z.; Honda, Thomas K.; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Xuan, Yinan; Korrapati, Avinaash; Yu, Vicky; Singh, Pranav; Grandis, Jennifer R.; King, Charles C.; Lippman, Scott M.; Wang, Xiao Qi; Hinton, Andrew; Ongkeko, Weg M.

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive disease marked by frequent recurrence and metastasis and stagnant survival rates. To enhance molecular knowledge of HNSCC and define a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) landscape of the disease, we profiled the transcriptome-wide dysregulation of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), microRNA (miRNA), and PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) using RNA-sequencing data from 422 HNSCC patients in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). 307 non-coding transcripts differentially expressed in HNSCC were significantly correlated with patient survival, and associated with mutations in TP53, CDKN2A, CASP8, PRDM9, and FBXW7 and copy number variations in chromosomes 3, 5, 7, and 18. We also observed widespread ncRNA correlation to concurrent TP53 and chromosome 3p loss, a compelling predictor of poor prognosis in HNSCCs. Three selected ncRNAs were additionally associated with tumor stage, HPV status, and other clinical characteristics, and modulation of their expression in vitro reveals differential regulation of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and apoptotic response. This comprehensive characterization of the HNSCC non-coding transcriptome introduces new layers of understanding for the disease, and nominates a novel panel of transcripts with potential utility as prognostic markers or therapeutic targets. PMID:27323410

  2. The non-coding landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zou, Angela E; Zheng, Hao; Saad, Maarouf A; Rahimy, Mehran; Ku, Jonjei; Kuo, Selena Z; Honda, Thomas K; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Xuan, Yinan; Korrapati, Avinaash; Yu, Vicky; Singh, Pranav; Grandis, Jennifer R; King, Charles C; Lippman, Scott M; Wang, Xiao Qi; Hinton, Andrew; Ongkeko, Weg M

    2016-08-09

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive disease marked by frequent recurrence and metastasis and stagnant survival rates. To enhance molecular knowledge of HNSCC and define a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) landscape of the disease, we profiled the transcriptome-wide dysregulation of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), microRNA (miRNA), and PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) using RNA-sequencing data from 422 HNSCC patients in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). 307 non-coding transcripts differentially expressed in HNSCC were significantly correlated with patient survival, and associated with mutations in TP53, CDKN2A, CASP8, PRDM9, and FBXW7 and copy number variations in chromosomes 3, 5, 7, and 18. We also observed widespread ncRNA correlation to concurrent TP53 and chromosome 3p loss, a compelling predictor of poor prognosis in HNSCCs. Three selected ncRNAs were additionally associated with tumor stage, HPV status, and other clinical characteristics, and modulation of their expression in vitro reveals differential regulation of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and apoptotic response. This comprehensive characterization of the HNSCC non-coding transcriptome introduces new layers of understanding for the disease, and nominates a novel panel of transcripts with potential utility as prognostic markers or therapeutic targets.

  3. Mining the coding and non-coding genome for cancer drivers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Drubay, Damien; Michiels, Stefan; Gautheret, Daniel

    2015-12-28

    Progress in next-generation sequencing provides unprecedented opportunities to fully characterize the spectrum of somatic mutations of cancer genomes. Given the large number of somatic mutations identified by such technologies, the prioritization of cancer-driving events is a consistent bottleneck. Most bioinformatics tools concentrate on driver mutations in the coding fraction of the genome, those causing changes in protein products. As more non-coding pathogenic variants are identified and characterized, the development of computational approaches to effectively prioritize cancer-driving variants within the non-coding fraction of human genome is becoming critical. After a short summary of methods for coding variant prioritization, we here review the highly diverse non-coding elements that may act as cancer drivers and describe recent methods that attempt to evaluate the deleteriousness of sequence variation in these elements. With such tools, the prioritization and identification of cancer-implicated regulatory elements and non-coding RNAs is becoming a reality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Long Non-coding RNA HOTTIP Enhances Pancreatic Cancer Cell Proliferation, Survival and Migration

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACTHOTTIP is a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcribed from the 5' tip of the HOXA locus and is associated with the polycomb repressor complex 2 (PRC2) and WD repeat containing protein 5 (WDR5)/mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) chromatin modifying complexes. HOTTIP is expres...

  5. cncRNAs: Bi-functional RNAs with protein coding and non-coding functions.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Pooja; Sampath, Karuna

    2015-12-01

    For many decades, the major function of mRNA was thought to be to provide protein-coding information embedded in the genome. The advent of high-throughput sequencing has led to the discovery of pervasive transcription of eukaryotic genomes and opened the world of RNA-mediated gene regulation. Many regulatory RNAs have been found to be incapable of protein coding and are hence termed as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). However, studies in recent years have shown that several previously annotated non-coding RNAs have the potential to encode proteins, and conversely, some coding RNAs have regulatory functions independent of the protein they encode. Such bi-functional RNAs, with both protein coding and non-coding functions, which we term as 'cncRNAs', have emerged as new players in cellular systems. Here, we describe the functions of some cncRNAs identified from bacteria to humans. Because the functions of many RNAs across genomes remains unclear, we propose that RNAs be classified as coding, non-coding or both only after careful analysis of their functions.

  6. Standing your Ground to Exoribonucleases: Function of Flavivirus Long Non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Charley, Phillida A.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Flaviviridae (e.g. Dengue virus, West Nile virus, and Hepatitis C virus) contain a positive-sense RNA genome that encodes a large polyprotein. It is now also clear most if not all of these viruses also produce an abundant subgenomic long non-coding RNA. These non-coding RNAs, which are called subgenomicflavivirus RNAs (sfRNAs) or Xrn1-resistant RNAs (xrRNAs), are stable decay intermediates generated from the viral genomic RNA through the stalling of the cellular exoribonuclease Xrn1 at highly structured regions. Several functions of these flavivirus long non-coding RNAs have been revealed in recent years. The generation of these sfRNAs/xrRNAs from viral transcripts results in the repression of Xrn1 and the dysregulation of cellular mRNA stability. The abundant sfRNAs also serve directly as a decoy for important cellular protein regulators of the interferon and RNA interference antiviral pathways. Thus the generation of long non-coding RNAs from flaviviruses, hepaciviruses and pestiviruses likely disrupts aspects of innate immunity and may directly contribute to viral replication, cytopathology and pathogenesis. PMID:26368052

  7. Progressive changes in non-coding RNA profile in leucocytes with age

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Irizar, Haritz; Gorostidi, Ana; Alberro, Ainhoa; Osorio-Querejeta, Iñaki; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Olascoaga, Javier; de Munain, Adolfo López; Otaegui, David

    2017-01-01

    It has been observed that immune cell deterioration occurs in the elderly, as well as a chronic low-grade inflammation called inflammaging. These cellular changes must be driven by numerous changes in gene expression and in fact, both protein-coding and non-coding RNA expression alterations have been observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from elder people. In the present work we have studied the expression of small non-coding RNA (microRNA and small nucleolar RNA -snoRNA-) from healthy individuals from 24 to 79 years old. We have observed that the expression of 69 non-coding RNAs (56 microRNAs and 13 snoRNAs) changes progressively with chronological age. According to our results, the age range from 47 to 54 is critical given that it is the period when the expression trend (increasing or decreasing) of age-related small non-coding RNAs is more pronounced. Furthermore, age-related miRNAs regulate genes that are involved in immune, cell cycle and cancer-related processes, which had already been associated to human aging. Therefore, human aging could be studied as a result of progressive molecular changes, and different age ranges should be analysed to cover the whole aging process. PMID:28448962

  8. There is a world beyond protein mutations: the role of non-coding RNAs in melanomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Swoboda, Rolf K; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2013-05-01

    Until recently, the general perception has been that mutations in protein-coding genes are responsible for tumorigenesis. With the discovery of (V600E)BRAF in about 50% of cutaneous melanomas, there was an increased effort to find additional mutations. However, mutations characterized in melanoma to date cannot account for the development of all melanomas. With the discovery of microRNAs as important players in melanomagenesis, protein mutations are no longer considered the sole drivers of tumors. Recent research findings have expanded the view for tumor initiation and progression to additional non-coding RNAs. The data suggest that tumorigenesis is likely an interplay between mutated proteins and deregulation of non-coding RNAs in the cell with an additional role of the tumor environment. With the exception of microRNAs, our knowledge of the role of non-coding RNAs in melanoma is in its infancy. Using few examples, we will summarize some of the roles of non-coding RNAs in tumorigenesis. Thus, there is a whole world beyond protein-coding sequences and microRNAs, which can cause melanoma.

  9. Mammalian hibernation and regulation of lipid metabolism: a focus on non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Lang-Ouellette, D; Richard, T G; Morin, P

    2014-11-01

    Numerous species will confront severe environmental conditions by undergoing significant metabolic rate reduction. Mammalian hibernation is one such natural model of hypometabolism. Hibernators experience considerable physiological, metabolic, and molecular changes to survive the harsh challenges associated with winter. Whether as fuel source or as key signaling molecules, lipids are of primary importance for a successful bout of hibernation and their careful regulation throughout this process is essential. In recent years, a plethora of non-coding RNAs has emerged as potential regulators of targets implicated in lipid metabolism in diverse models. In this review, we introduce the general characteristics associated with mammalian hibernation, present the importance of lipid metabolism prior to and during hibernation, as well as discuss the potential relevance of non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs and lncRNAs during this process.

  10. Long non-coding RNAs act as regulators of cell autophagy in diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhijie; Yan, Yuanliang; Qian, Long; Gong, Zhicheng

    2017-01-01

    Identification of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) has provided a substantial increase in our understanding of the non-coding transcriptome. Studies have revealed a crucial function of lncRNAs in the modulation of cell autophagy in vitro and in vivo, further contributing to the hallmarks of disease phenotypes. These findings have profoundly altered our understanding of disease pathobiology, and may lead to the emergence of new biological concepts underlying autophagy-associated diseases, such as the carcinomas. Studies on the molecular mechanism of the lncRNA-autophagy axis may offer additional avenues for therapeutic intervention and biomarker assessment. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the multiple molecular roles of regulatory lncRNAs in the signaling pathways of cell autophagy. The emerging knowledge in this rapidly advancing field will offer novel insights into human diseases, especially cancers. PMID:28184916

  11. MicroRNAs and other non-coding RNAs as targets for anticancer drug development

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Fabbri, Muller; Calin, George A.

    2015-01-01

    With the first cancer-targeted microRNA drug, MRX34, a liposome-based miR-34 mimic, entering phase I clinical trial in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in April 2013, miRNA therapeutics are attracting special attention from both academia and biotechnology companies. Although to date the most studied non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are miRNAs, the importance of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is increasingly being recognized. Here we summarize the roles of miRNAs and lncRNAs in cancer, with a focus on the recently identified novel mechanisms of action, and discuss the current strategies in designing ncRNA-targeting therapeutics, as well as the associated challenges. PMID:24172333

  12. Long non-coding RNA produced by RNA polymerase V determines boundaries of heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Sethuraman, Shriya; Rowley, M Jordan; Krzyszton, Michal; Rothi, M Hafiz; Bouzit, Lilia; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T

    2016-10-25

    RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing is a conserved process where small RNAs target transposons and other sequences for repression by establishing chromatin modifications. A central element of this process are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), which in Arabidopsis thaliana are produced by a specialized RNA polymerase known as Pol V. Here we show that non-coding transcription by Pol V is controlled by preexisting chromatin modifications located within the transcribed regions. Most Pol V transcripts are associated with AGO4 but are not sliced by AGO4. Pol V-dependent DNA methylation is established on both strands of DNA and is tightly restricted to Pol V-transcribed regions. This indicates that chromatin modifications are established in close proximity to Pol V. Finally, Pol V transcription is preferentially enriched on edges of silenced transposable elements, where Pol V transcribes into TEs. We propose that Pol V may play an important role in the determination of heterochromatin boundaries.

  13. Role of Non-coding Regulatory RNA in the Virulence of Human Pathogenic Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Reytor, Diliana; Plaza, Nicolás; Espejo, Romilio T.; Navarrete, Paola; Bastías, Roberto; Garcia, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, the identification of small non-coding RNAs in bacteria has revealed an important regulatory mechanism of gene expression involved in the response to environmental signals and to the control of virulence. In the family Vibrionaceae, which includes several human and animal pathogens, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are closely related to important processes including metabolism, quorum sensing, virulence, and fitness. Studies conducted in silico and experiments using microarrays and high-throughput RNA sequencing have led to the discovery of an unexpected number of sRNAs in Vibrios. The present review discusses the most relevant reports regarding the mechanisms of action of sRNAs and their implications in the virulence of the main human pathogens in the family Vibrionaceae: Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholerae. PMID:28123382

  14. A comprehensive review of web-based non-coding RNA resources for cancer research.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun; Liu, Li; Shukla, Girish C

    2017-08-18

    Non-coding RNAs include many kinds of RNAs that did not encode proteins. Recent evidences reveal that ncRNAs play critical roles in initiation and progression of cancers. But it is not easy for cancer biologists and medical doctors to easily know the potential roles of ncRNAs in cancer and retrieve the information of ncRNAs under their investigations. To make the available web-based resources more accessible and understandable, we made a comprehensive review for 49 web-based resources of three types of ncRNAs, i.e., microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and circular RNAs (circRNAs). We also listed some preferred resources for 6 different types of analyses related to ncRNAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Long non-coding RNA PARTICLE bridges histone and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Valerie Bríd; Hain, Sarah; Maugg, Doris; Smida, Jan; Azimzadeh, Omid; Tapio, Soile; Ovsepian, Saak Victor; Atkinson, Michael John

    2017-05-11

    PARTICLE (Gene PARTICL- 'Promoter of MAT2A-Antisense RadiaTion Induced Circulating LncRNA) expression is transiently elevated following low dose irradiation typically encountered in the workplace and from natural sources. This long non-coding RNA recruits epigenetic silencers for cis-acting repression of its neighbouring Methionine adenosyltransferase 2A gene. It now emerges that PARTICLE operates as a trans-acting mediator of DNA and histone lysine methylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) and immunological evidence established elevated PARTICLE expression linked to increased histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation. Live-imaging of dbroccoli-PARTICLE revealing its dynamic association with DNA methyltransferase 1 was confirmed by flow cytometry, immunoprecipitation and direct competitive binding interaction through electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Acting as a regulatory docking platform, the long non-coding RNA PARTICLE serves to interlink epigenetic modification machineries and represents a compelling innovative component necessary for gene silencing on a global scale.

  16. Detection of Long Non-coding RNA Expression by Non-radioactive Northern Blots

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaowen; Feng, Yi; Hu, Zhongyi; Zhang, Youyou; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Xu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    With the advances in sequencing technology and transcriptome analysis, it is estimated that up to 75% of the human genome is transcribed into RNAs. This finding prompted intensive investigations on the biological functions of non-coding RNAs and led to very exciting discoveries of microRNAs as important players in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic applications. Research on long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is in its infancy, yet a broad spectrum of biological regulations has been attributed to lncRNAs. As a novel class of RNA transcripts, the expression level and splicing variants of lncRNAs are various. Northern blot analysis can help us learn about the identity, size, and abundance of lncRNAs. Here we describe how to use northern blot to determine lncRNA abundance and identify different splicing variants of a given lncRNA. PMID:26721491

  17. The Role and Molecular Mechanism of Non-Coding RNAs in Pathological Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinning; Xu, Wenhua; Wang, Jianxun; Wang, Kun; Li, Peifeng

    2017-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a class of RNA molecules that do not encode proteins. Studies show that ncRNAs are not only involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, metabolism and other physiological processes, but also involved in the pathogenesis of diseases. Cardiac remodeling is the main pathological basis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Many studies have shown that the occurrence and development of cardiac remodeling are closely related with the regulation of ncRNAs. Recent research of ncRNAs in heart disease has achieved rapid development. Thus, we summarize here the latest research progress and mainly the molecular mechanism of ncRNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and circular RNAs (circRNAs), in cardiac remodeling, aiming to look for new targets for heart disease treatment. PMID:28287427

  18. Role of Non-coding Regulatory RNA in the Virulence of Human Pathogenic Vibrios.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Reytor, Diliana; Plaza, Nicolás; Espejo, Romilio T; Navarrete, Paola; Bastías, Roberto; Garcia, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, the identification of small non-coding RNAs in bacteria has revealed an important regulatory mechanism of gene expression involved in the response to environmental signals and to the control of virulence. In the family Vibrionaceae, which includes several human and animal pathogens, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are closely related to important processes including metabolism, quorum sensing, virulence, and fitness. Studies conducted in silico and experiments using microarrays and high-throughput RNA sequencing have led to the discovery of an unexpected number of sRNAs in Vibrios. The present review discusses the most relevant reports regarding the mechanisms of action of sRNAs and their implications in the virulence of the main human pathogens in the family Vibrionaceae: Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholerae.

  19. Enhancers as non-coding RNA transcription units: recent insights and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbo; Notani, Dimple; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Networks of regulatory enhancers dictate distinct cell identities and cellular responses to diverse signals by instructing precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression. However, 35 years after their discovery, enhancer functions and mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that many, if not all, functional enhancers are themselves transcription units, generating non-coding enhancer RNAs. This observation provides a fundamental insight into the inter-regulation between enhancers and promoters, which can both act as transcription units; it also raises crucial questions regarding the potential biological roles of the enhancer transcription process and non-coding enhancer RNAs. Here, we review research progress in this field and discuss several important, unresolved questions regarding the roles and mechanisms of enhancers in gene regulation.

  20. Barcelona conference on epigenetics and cancer 2015: Coding and non-coding functions of the genome

    PubMed Central

    Corujo, David; Mas, Gloria; Malinverni, Roberto; Di Croce, Luciano; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Barcelona Conference on Epigenetics and Cancer (BCEC) entitled “Coding and Non-Coding functions of the Genome” took place October 29–30, 2015 in Barcelona. The 2015 BCEC was the third edition of a series of annual conferences jointly organized by 5 leading research centers in Barcelona together with B-Debate, an initiative of BioCat. Luciano Di Croce from the Center for Genomic Regulation and Marcus Buschbeck from the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute put together the scientific program with a particular focus on the role of non-coding RNAs in enhancer regulation, epigenetic control by Polycomb complexes, histone variants, and nuclear organization. In one and a half days, 22 talks and 56 posters were presented to an audience of 215 participants. PMID:26996885

  1. Computational approaches towards understanding human long non-coding RNA biology.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Saakshi; Kapoor, Shruti; Sivadas, Ambily; Bhartiya, Deeksha; Scaria, Vinod

    2015-07-15

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form the largest class of non-protein coding genes in the human genome. While a small subset of well-characterized lncRNAs has demonstrated their significant role in diverse biological functions like chromatin modifications, post-transcriptional regulation, imprinting etc., the functional significance of a vast majority of them still remains an enigma. Increasing evidence of the implications of lncRNAs in various diseases including cancer and major developmental processes has further enhanced the need to gain mechanistic insights into the lncRNA functions. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the various computational approaches and tools available for the identification and annotation of long non-coding RNAs. We also discuss a conceptual roadmap to systematically explore the functional properties of the lncRNAs using computational approaches.

  2. New Neurons in Aging Brains: Molecular Control by Small Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Marijn; Buijink, M. Renate; Lucassen, Paul J.; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis generates functional neurons from neural stem cells present in specific brain regions. It is largely confined to two main regions: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG), in the hippocampus. With age, the function of the hippocampus and particularly the DG is impaired. For instance, adult neurogenesis is decreased with aging, in both proliferating and differentiation of newborn cells, while in parallel an age-associated decline in cognitive performance is often seen. Surprisingly, the synaptogenic potential of adult-born neurons is only marginally influenced by aging. Therefore, although proliferation, differentiation, and synaptogenesis of adult-born new neurons in the DG are closely related to each other, they are differentially affected by aging. In this review we discuss the crucial roles of a novel class of recently discovered modulators of gene expression, the small non-coding RNAs, in the regulation of adult neurogenesis. Multiple small non-coding RNAs are differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In particular a subgroup of the small non-coding RNAs, the microRNAs, fine-tune the progression of adult neurogenesis. This makes small non-coding RNAs appealing candidates to orchestrate the functional alterations in adult neurogenesis and cognition associated with aging. Finally, we summarize observations that link changes in circulating levels of steroid hormones with alterations in adult neurogenesis, cognitive decline, and vulnerability to psychopathology in advanced age, and discuss a potential interplay between steroid hormone receptors and microRNAs in cognitive decline in aging individuals. PMID:22363255

  3. Variation in conserved non-coding sequences on chromosome 5q andsusceptibility to asthma and atopy

    SciTech Connect

    Donfack, Joseph; Schneider, Daniel H.; Tan, Zheng; Kurz,Thorsten; Dubchak, Inna; Frazer, Kelly A.; Ober, Carole

    2005-09-10

    Background: Evolutionarily conserved sequences likely havebiological function. Methods: To determine whether variation in conservedsequences in non-coding DNA contributes to risk for human disease, westudied six conserved non-coding elements in the Th2 cytokine cluster onhuman chromosome 5q31 in a large Hutterite pedigree and in samples ofoutbred European American and African American asthma cases and controls.Results: Among six conserved non-coding elements (>100 bp,>70percent identity; human-mouse comparison), we identified one singlenucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in each of two conserved elements and sixSNPs in the flanking regions of three conserved elements. We genotypedour samples for four of these SNPs and an additional three SNPs each inthe IL13 and IL4 genes. While there was only modest evidence forassociation with single SNPs in the Hutterite and European Americansamples (P<0.05), there were highly significant associations inEuropean Americans between asthma and haplotypes comprised of SNPs in theIL4 gene (P<0.001), including a SNP in a conserved non-codingelement. Furthermore, variation in the IL13 gene was strongly associatedwith total IgE (P = 0.00022) and allergic sensitization to mold allergens(P = 0.00076) in the Hutterites, and more modestly associated withsensitization to molds in the European Americans and African Americans (P<0.01). Conclusion: These results indicate that there is overalllittle variation in the conserved non-coding elements on 5q31, butvariation in IL4 and IL13, including possibly one SNP in a conservedelement, influence asthma and atopic phenotypes in diversepopulations.

  4. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K

    2015-07-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  5. Transcriptional Dynamics Reveal Critical Roles for Non-coding RNAs in the Immediate-Early Response

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Stuart; Magi, Shigeyuki; Alhendi, Ahmad M. N.; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Daub, Carsten O.; Arner, Erik; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Khachigian, Levon M.; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Semple, Colin A.

    2015-01-01

    The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs) and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset. PMID:25885578

  6. An expanding universe of the non-coding genome in cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; He, Lin

    2014-06-01

    Neoplastic transformation is caused by accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that ultimately convert normal cells into tumor cells with uncontrolled proliferation and survival, unlimited replicative potential and invasive growth [Hanahan,D. et al. (2011) Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation. Cell, 144, 646-674]. Although the majority of the cancer studies have focused on the functions of protein-coding genes, emerging evidence has started to reveal the importance of the vast non-coding genome, which constitutes more than 98% of the human genome. A number of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) derived from the 'dark matter' of the human genome exhibit cancer-specific differential expression and/or genomic alterations, and it is increasingly clear that ncRNAs, including small ncRNAs and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), play an important role in cancer development by regulating protein-coding gene expression through diverse mechanisms. In addition to ncRNAs, nearly half of the mammalian genomes consist of transposable elements, particularly retrotransposons. Once depicted as selfish genomic parasites that propagate at the expense of host fitness, retrotransposon elements could also confer regulatory complexity to the host genomes during development and disease. Reactivation of retrotransposons in cancer, while capable of causing insertional mutagenesis and genome rearrangements to promote oncogenesis, could also alter host gene expression networks to favor tumor development. Taken together, the functional significance of non-coding genome in tumorigenesis has been previously underestimated, and diverse transcripts derived from the non-coding genome could act as integral functional components of the oncogene and tumor suppressor network.

  7. Transcriptional dynamics reveal critical roles for non-coding RNAs in the immediate-early response.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Stuart; Magi, Shigeyuki; Alhendi, Ahmad M N; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Daub, Carsten O; Arner, Erik; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Khachigian, Levon M; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Semple, Colin A

    2015-04-01

    The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs) and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset.

  8. Hominoid-Specific De Novo Protein-Coding Genes Originating from Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chu-Jun; Zhou, Wei-Zhen; Li, Ying; Zhang, Mao; Zhang, Rongli; Wei, Liping; Li, Chuan-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Tinkering with pre-existing genes has long been known as a major way to create new genes. Recently, however, motherless protein-coding genes have been found to have emerged de novo from ancestral non-coding DNAs. How these genes originated is not well addressed to date. Here we identified 24 hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes with precise origination timing in vertebrate phylogeny. Strand-specific RNA–Seq analyses were performed in five rhesus macaque tissues (liver, prefrontal cortex, skeletal muscle, adipose, and testis), which were then integrated with public transcriptome data from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. On the basis of comparing the RNA expression profiles in the three species, we found that most of the hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes encoded polyadenylated non-coding RNAs in rhesus macaque or chimpanzee with a similar transcript structure and correlated tissue expression profile. According to the rule of parsimony, the majority of these hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes appear to have acquired a regulated transcript structure and expression profile before acquiring coding potential. Interestingly, although the expression profile was largely correlated, the coding genes in human often showed higher transcriptional abundance than their non-coding counterparts in rhesus macaque. The major findings we report in this manuscript are robust and insensitive to the parameters used in the identification and analysis of de novo genes. Our results suggest that at least a portion of long non-coding RNAs, especially those with active and regulated transcription, may serve as a birth pool for protein-coding genes, which are then further optimized at the transcriptional level. PMID:23028352

  9. Small non-coding RNAs in plant-pathogenic Xanthomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Abendroth, Ulrike; Schmidtke, Cornelius; Bonas, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    The genus Xanthomonas comprises a large group of plant-pathogenic bacteria. The infection and bacterial multiplication in the plant tissue depends on the type III secretion system and other virulence determinants. Recent studies revealed that bacterial virulence is also controlled at the post-transcriptional level by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs). In this review, we highlight our current knowledge about sRNAs and RNA-binding proteins in Xanthomonas species.

  10. The Notch driven long non-coding RNA repertoire in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Durinck, Kaat; Wallaert, Annelynn; Van de Walle, Inge; Van Loocke, Wouter; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Vanhauwaert, Suzanne; Geerdens, Ellen; Benoit, Yves; Van Roy, Nadine; Poppe, Bruce; Soulier, Jean; Cools, Jan; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo; Rondou, Pieter; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Genetic studies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have uncovered a remarkable complexity of oncogenic and loss-of-function mutations. Amongst this plethora of genetic changes, NOTCH1 activating mutations stand out as the most frequently occurring genetic defect, identified in more than 50% of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, supporting a role as an essential driver for this gene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia oncogenesis. In this study, we aimed to establish a comprehensive compendium of the long non-coding RNA transcriptome under control of Notch signaling. For this purpose, we measured the transcriptional response of all protein coding genes and long non-coding RNAs upon pharmacological Notch inhibition in the human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line CUTLL1 using RNA-sequencing. Similar Notch dependent profiles were established for normal human CD34(+) thymic T-cell progenitors exposed to Notch signaling activity in vivo. In addition, we generated long non-coding RNA expression profiles (array data) from ex vivo isolated Notch active CD34(+) and Notch inactive CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes and from a primary cohort of 15 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with known NOTCH1 mutation status. Integration of these expression datasets with publicly available Notch1 ChIP-sequencing data resulted in the identification of long non-coding RNAs directly regulated by Notch activity in normal and malignant T cells. Given the central role of Notch in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia oncogenesis, these data pave the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target hyperactive Notch signaling in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  11. Functional annotation of the vlinc class of non-coding RNAs using systems biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Georges St.; Vyatkin, Yuri; Antonets, Denis; Ri, Maxim; Qi, Yao; Saik, Olga; Shtokalo, Dmitry; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Kawaji, Hideya; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Arner, Erik; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Nicolas, Estelle; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kapranov, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Functionality of the non-coding transcripts encoded by the human genome is the coveted goal of the modern genomics research. While commonly relied on the classical methods of forward genetics, integration of different genomics datasets in a global Systems Biology fashion presents a more productive avenue of achieving this very complex aim. Here we report application of a Systems Biology-based approach to dissect functionality of a newly identified vast class of very long intergenic non-coding (vlinc) RNAs. Using highly quantitative FANTOM5 CAGE dataset, we show that these RNAs could be grouped into 1542 novel human genes based on analysis of insulators that we show here indeed function as genomic barrier elements. We show that vlincRNAs genes likely function in cis to activate nearby genes. This effect while most pronounced in closely spaced vlincRNA–gene pairs can be detected over relatively large genomic distances. Furthermore, we identified 101 vlincRNA genes likely involved in early embryogenesis based on patterns of their expression and regulation. We also found another 109 such genes potentially involved in cellular functions also happening at early stages of development such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Overall, we show that Systems Biology-based methods have great promise for functional annotation of non-coding RNAs. PMID:27001520

  12. Prospective and therapeutic screening value of non-coding RNA as biomarkers in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Albert; Eken, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) is a class of genetic, epigenetic and translational regulators, containing short and long transcripts with intriguing abilities for use as biomarkers due to their superordinate role in disease development. In the past five years many of these have been investigated in cardiovascular diseases (CVD), mainly myocardial infarction (MI) and heart failure. To extend this view, we summarize the existing data about ncRNA as biomarker in the whole entity of CVDs by literature-based review and comparison of the identified candidates. The myomirs miRNA-1, -133a/b, -208a, -499 with well-defined cellular functions have proven equal to classic protein biomarkers for disease detection in MI. Other microRNAs (miRNAs) were reproducibly found to correlate with disease, disease severity and outcome in heart failure, stroke, coronary artery disease (CAD) and aortic aneurysm. An additional utilization has been discovered for therapeutic monitoring. The function of long non-coding transcripts is only about to be unraveled, yet shows great potential for outcome prediction. ncRNA biomarkers have a distinct role if no alternative test is available or has is performing poorly. With increasing mechanistic understanding, circulating miRNA and long non-coding transcripts will provide useful disease information with high predictive power. PMID:27429962

  13. MicroRNAs: Non-coding fine tuners of receptor tyrosine kinase signalling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Donzelli, Sara; Cioce, Mario; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina; Yarden, Yosef; Blandino, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence point to a crucial role for non-coding RNAs in modulating homeostatic signaling under physiological and pathological conditions. MicroRNAs, the best-characterized non-coding RNAs to date, can exquisitely integrate spatial and temporal signals in complex networks, thereby confer specificity and sensitivity to tissue response to changes in the microenvironment. MicroRNAs appear as preferential partners for Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) in mediating signaling under stress conditions. Stress signaling can be especially relevant to disease. Here we focus on the ability of microRNAs to mediate RTK signaling in cancer, by acting as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes. We will provide a few general examples of microRNAs modulating specific tumorigenic functions downstream of RTK signaling and integrate oncogenic signals from multiple RTKs. A special focus will be devoted to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, a system offering relatively rich information. We will explore the role of selected microRNAs as bidirectional modulators of EGFR functions in cancer cells. In addition, we will present the emerging evidence for microRNAs being specifically modulated by oncogenic EGFR mutants and we will discuss how this impinges on EGFRmut driven chemoresistance, which fits into the tumor heterogeneity-driven cancer progression. Finally, we discuss how other non-coding RNA species are emerging as important modulators of cancer progression and why the scenario depicted herein is destined to become increasingly complex in the future.

  14. Role of long non-coding RNA in tumor drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Deng, Heng; Zhang, Jun; Shi, JinJun; Guo, ZhengDong; He, ChunRong; Ding, Li; Tang, Jin Hai; Hou, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapy has been extensively used in tumor treatment, including either systemic or local treatment. Miserably, in many kinds of cancers, chemotherapy is gradually insensitive. The mechanisms of tumor drug resistance have been widely explored, yet have not been fully characterized. With several studies in the development of drug resistance, recent works have highlighted the involvement of non-coding RNAs in tumor development. A growing number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified as transcripts of larger than 200 nucleotides in length, which have low coding potential, but potentially coding small peptides with 50-70 amino acids. Despite so often being branded as transcriptional noise, it is becoming increasingly clear that a large number of lncRNAs are crucial molecular regulators of the processes of tumor involving the initiation and progression of human tumor. More recently, accumulating evidence is revealing an important role of lncRNA in tumor drug resistance and lncRNA expression profiling can be correlated with the evolution of tumor drug resistance. The long non-coding-RNA-mediated form of drug resistance brings yet another mechanism of drug resistance. So, exploiting the newly emerging knowledge of lncRNAs for the development of new therapeutic applications to overcome human tumor drug resistance will be significant.

  15. A two-dimensional mutate-and-map strategy for non-coding RNA structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kladwang, Wipapat; Vanlang, Christopher C.; Cordero, Pablo; Das, Rhiju

    2011-12-01

    Non-coding RNAs fold into precise base-pairing patterns to carry out critical roles in genetic regulation and protein synthesis, but determining RNA structure remains difficult. Here, we show that coupling systematic mutagenesis with high-throughput chemical mapping enables accurate base-pair inference of domains from ribosomal RNA, ribozymes and riboswitches. For a six-RNA benchmark that has challenged previous chemical/computational methods, this ‘mutate-and-map’ strategy gives secondary structures that are in agreement with crystallography (helix error rates, 2%), including a blind test on a double-glycine riboswitch. Through modelling of partially ordered states, the method enables the first test of an interdomain helix-swap hypothesis for ligand-binding cooperativity in a glycine riboswitch. Finally, the data report on tertiary contacts within non-coding RNAs, and coupling to the Rosetta/FARFAR algorithm gives nucleotide-resolution three-dimensional models (helix root-mean-squared deviation, 5.7 Å) of an adenine riboswitch. These results establish a promising two-dimensional chemical strategy for inferring the secondary and tertiary structures that underlie non-coding RNA behaviour.

  16. Non-coding RNA in control of gene regulatory programs in cardiac development and disease.

    PubMed

    Philippen, Leonne E; Dirkx, Ellen; da Costa-Martins, Paula A; De Windt, Leon J

    2015-12-01

    Organogenesis of the vertebrate heart is a highly specialized process involving progressive specification and differentiation of distinct embryonic cardiac progenitor cell populations driven by specialized gene programming events. Likewise, the onset of pathologies in the adult heart, including cardiac hypertrophy, involves the reactivation of embryonic gene programs. In both cases, these intricate genomic events are temporally and spatially regulated by complex signaling networks and gene regulatory networks. Apart from well-established transcriptional mechanisms, increasing evidence indicates that gene programming in both the developing and the diseased myocardium are under epigenetic control by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). MicroRNAs regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, and numerous studies have now established critical roles for this species of tiny RNAs in a broad range of aspects from cardiogenesis towards adult heart failure. Recent reports now also implicate the larger family of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in these processes as well. Here we discuss the involvement of these two ncRNA classes in proper cardiac development and hypertrophic disease processes of the adult myocardium. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Non-coding RNAs.

  17. Exploiting the hypoxia sensitive non-coding genome for organ-specific physiologic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Corinne; Krishnan, Jaya

    2016-07-01

    In this review we highlight the role of non-coding RNAs in the development and progression of cardiac pathology and explore the possibility of disease-associated RNAs serving as targets for cardiac-directed therapeutics. Contextually, we focus on the role of stress-induced hypoxia as a driver of disease development and progression through activation of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) and explore mechanisms underlying HIFα function as an enforcer of cardiac pathology through direct transcriptional coupling with the non-coding transcriptome. In the interest of clarity, we will confine our analysis to cardiac pathology and focus on three defining features of the diseased state, namely metabolic, growth and functional reprogramming. It is the aim of this review to explore possible mechanisms through which HIF1α regulation of the non-coding transcriptome connects to spatiotemporal control of gene expression to drive establishment of the diseased state, and to propose strategies for the exploitation of these unique RNAs as targets for clinical therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements and Non-Coding RNAs in the Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sabrina B.; Spencer-Smith, Russell; Shah, Mahwish; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Cook, Richard T.; Snyder, Lori A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is capable of causing gonorrhoea and more complex diseases in the human host. Neisseria meningitidis is a closely related pathogen that shares many of the same genomic features and virulence factors, but causes the life threatening diseases meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia. The importance of non-coding RNAs in gene regulation has become increasingly evident having been demonstrated to be involved in regulons responsible for iron acquisition, antigenic variation, and virulence. Neisseria spp. contain an IS-like element, the Correia Repeat Enclosed Element, which has been predicted to be mobile within the genomes or to have been in the past. This repeat, present in over 100 copies in the genome, has the ability to alter gene expression and regulation in several ways. We reveal here that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements tend to be near non-coding RNAs in the Neisseria spp., especially N. gonorrhoeae. These results suggest that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements may have disrupted ancestral regulatory networks not just through their influence on regulatory proteins but also for non-coding RNAs. PMID:27681925

  19. Current Status of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cerk, Stefanie; Schwarzenbacher, Daniela; Adiprasito, Jan Basri; Stotz, Michael; Hutterer, Georg C.; Gerger, Armin; Ling, Hui; Calin, George Adrian; Pichler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer represents a major health burden in Europe and North America, as recently published data report breast cancer as the second leading cause of cancer related death in women worldwide. Breast cancer is regarded as a highly heterogeneous disease in terms of clinical course and biological behavior and can be divided into several molecular subtypes, with different prognosis and treatment responses. The discovery of numerous non-coding RNAs has dramatically changed our understanding of cell biology, especially the pathophysiology of cancer. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein-coding transcripts >200 nucleotides in length. Several studies have demonstrated their role as key regulators of gene expression, cell biology and carcinogenesis. Deregulated expression levels of lncRNAs have been observed in various types of cancers including breast cancer. lncRNAs are involved in cancer initiation, progression, and metastases. In this review, we summarize the recent literature to highlight the current status of this class of long non-coding lncRNAs in breast cancer. PMID:27608009

  20. Synthetic long non-coding RNAs [SINEUPs] rescue defective gene expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Indrieri, Alessia; Grimaldi, Claudia; Zucchelli, Silvia; Tammaro, Roberta; Gustincich, Stefano; Franco, Brunella

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs provide additional regulatory layers to gene expression as well as the potential to being exploited as therapeutic tools. Non-coding RNA-based therapeutic approaches have been attempted in dominant diseases, however their use for treatment of genetic diseases caused by insufficient gene dosage is currently more challenging. SINEUPs are long antisense non-coding RNAs that up-regulate translation in mammalian cells in a gene-specific manner, although, so far evidence of SINEUP efficacy has only been demonstrated in in vitro systems. We now show that synthetic SINEUPs effectively and specifically increase protein levels of a gene of interest in vivo. We demonstrated that SINEUPs rescue haploinsufficient gene dosage in a medakafish model of a human disorder leading to amelioration of the disease phenotype. Our results demonstrate that SINEUPs act through mechanisms conserved among vertebrates and that SINEUP technology can be successfully applied in vivo as a new research and therapeutic tool for gene-specific up-regulation of endogenous functional proteins. PMID:27265476

  1. Origin and evolution of the long non-coding genes in the X-inactivation center.

    PubMed

    Romito, Antonio; Rougeulle, Claire

    2011-11-01

    Random X chromosome inactivation (XCI), the eutherian mechanism of X-linked gene dosage compensation, is controlled by a cis-acting locus termed the X-inactivation center (Xic). One of the striking features that characterize the Xic landscape is the abundance of loci transcribing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including Xist, the master regulator of the inactivation process. Recent comparative genomic analyses have depicted the evolutionary scenario behind the origin of the X-inactivation center, revealing that this locus evolved from a region harboring protein-coding genes. During mammalian radiation, this ancestral protein-coding region was disrupted in the marsupial group, whilst it provided in eutherian lineage the starting material for the non-translated RNAs of the X-inactivation center. The emergence of non-coding genes occurred by a dual mechanism involving loss of protein-coding function of the pre-existing genes and integration of different classes of mobile elements, some of which modeled the structure and sequence of the non-coding genes in a species-specific manner. The rising genes started to produce transcripts that acquired function in regulating the epigenetic status of the X chromosome, as shown for Xist, its antisense Tsix, Jpx, and recently suggested for Ftx. Thus, the appearance of the Xic, which occurred after the divergence between eutherians and marsupials, was the basis for the evolution of random X inactivation as a strategy to achieve dosage compensation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Genome-Wide Discovery of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tobasei, Rafet; Paneru, Bam; Salem, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The ENCODE project revealed that ~70% of the human genome is transcribed. While only 1–2% of the RNAs encode for proteins, the rest are non-coding RNAs. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form a diverse class of non-coding RNAs that are longer than 200nt. Emerging evidence indicates that lncRNAs play critical roles in various cellular processes including regulation of gene expression. LncRNAs show low levels of gene expression and sequence conservation, which make their computational identification in genomes difficult. In this study, more than two billion Illumina sequence reads were mapped to the genome reference using the TopHat and Cufflinks software. Transcripts shorter than 200nt, with more than 83–100 amino acids ORF, or with significant homologies to the NCBI nr-protein database were removed. In addition, a computational pipeline was used to filter the remaining transcripts based on a protein-coding-score test. Depending on the filtering stringency conditions, between 31,195 and 54,503 lncRNAs were identified, with only 421 matching known lncRNAs in other species. A digital gene expression atlas revealed 2,935 tissue-specific and 3,269 ubiquitously-expressed lncRNAs. This study annotates the lncRNA rainbow trout genome and provides a valuable resource for functional genomics research in salmonids. PMID:26895175

  3. Transcription of the non-coding RNA upperhand controls Hand2 expression and heart development

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kelly M.; Anderson, Douglas M.; McAnally, John R.; Shelton, John M.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2017-01-01

    HAND2 is an ancestral regulator of heart development and one of four transcription factors that control the reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes1–4. Deletion of Hand2 in mice results in right ventricle hypoplasia and embryonic lethality1,5. Hand2 expression is tightly regulated by upstream enhancers6,7 that reside within a super-enhancer delineated by histone H3 acetyl Lys27 (H3K27ac) modifications8. Here we show that transcription of a Hand2-associated long non-coding RNA, which we named upperhand (Uph), is required to maintain the super-enhancer signature and elongation of RNA polymerase II through the Hand2 enhancer locus. Blockade of Uph transcription, but not knockdown of the mature transcript, abolished Hand2 expression, causing right ventricular hypoplasia and embryonic lethality in mice. Given the substantial number of uncharacterized promoter-associated long non-coding RNAs encoded by the mammalian genome9, the Uph–Hand2 regulatory partnership offers a mechanism by which divergent non-coding transcription can establish a permissive chromatin environment. PMID:27783597

  4. NCAD, a database integrating the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-coded amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Revilla-López, Guillem; Torras, Juan; Curcó, David; Casanovas, Jordi; Calaza, M. Isabel; Zanuy, David; Jiménez, Ana I.; Cativiela, Carlos; Nussinov, Ruth; Grodzinski, Piotr; Alemán, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Peptides and proteins find an ever-increasing number of applications in the biomedical and materials engineering fields. The use of non-proteinogenic amino acids endowed with diverse physicochemical and structural features opens the possibility to design proteins and peptides with novel properties and functions. Moreover, non-proteinogenic residues are particularly useful to control the three-dimensional arrangement of peptidic chains, which is a crucial issue for most applications. However, information regarding such amino acids –also called non-coded, non-canonical or non-standard– is usually scattered among publications specialized in quite diverse fields as well as in patents. Making all these data useful to the scientific community requires new tools and a framework for their assembly and coherent organization. We have successfully compiled, organized and built a database (NCAD, Non-Coded Amino acids Database) containing information about the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-proteinogenic residues determined by quantum mechanical calculations, as well as bibliographic information about their synthesis, physical and spectroscopic characterization, conformational propensities established experimentally, and applications. The architecture of the database is presented in this work together with the first family of non-coded residues included, namely, α-tetrasubstituted α-amino acids. Furthermore, the NCAD usefulness is demonstrated through a test-case application example. PMID:20455555

  5. Genome-Wide Discovery of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Rainbow Trout.

    PubMed

    Al-Tobasei, Rafet; Paneru, Bam; Salem, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The ENCODE project revealed that ~70% of the human genome is transcribed. While only 1-2% of the RNAs encode for proteins, the rest are non-coding RNAs. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form a diverse class of non-coding RNAs that are longer than 200 nt. Emerging evidence indicates that lncRNAs play critical roles in various cellular processes including regulation of gene expression. LncRNAs show low levels of gene expression and sequence conservation, which make their computational identification in genomes difficult. In this study, more than two billion Illumina sequence reads were mapped to the genome reference using the TopHat and Cufflinks software. Transcripts shorter than 200 nt, with more than 83-100 amino acids ORF, or with significant homologies to the NCBI nr-protein database were removed. In addition, a computational pipeline was used to filter the remaining transcripts based on a protein-coding-score test. Depending on the filtering stringency conditions, between 31,195 and 54,503 lncRNAs were identified, with only 421 matching known lncRNAs in other species. A digital gene expression atlas revealed 2,935 tissue-specific and 3,269 ubiquitously-expressed lncRNAs. This study annotates the lncRNA rainbow trout genome and provides a valuable resource for functional genomics research in salmonids.

  6. nRC: non-coding RNA Classifier based on structural features.

    PubMed

    Fiannaca, Antonino; La Rosa, Massimo; La Paglia, Laura; Rizzo, Riccardo; Urso, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) are small non-coding sequences involved in gene expression regulation of many biological processes and diseases. The recent discovery of a large set of different ncRNAs with biologically relevant roles has opened the way to develop methods able to discriminate between the different ncRNA classes. Moreover, the lack of knowledge about the complete mechanisms in regulative processes, together with the development of high-throughput technologies, has required the help of bioinformatics tools in addressing biologists and clinicians with a deeper comprehension of the functional roles of ncRNAs. In this work, we introduce a new ncRNA classification tool, nRC (non-coding RNA Classifier). Our approach is based on features extraction from the ncRNA secondary structure together with a supervised classification algorithm implementing a deep learning architecture based on convolutional neural networks. We tested our approach for the classification of 13 different ncRNA classes. We obtained classification scores, using the most common statistical measures. In particular, we reach an accuracy and sensitivity score of about 74%. The proposed method outperforms other similar classification methods based on secondary structure features and machine learning algorithms, including the RNAcon tool that, to date, is the reference classifier. nRC tool is freely available as a docker image at https://hub.docker.com/r/tblab/nrc/. The source code of nRC tool is also available at https://github.com/IcarPA-TBlab/nrc.

  7. Downregulation of long non-coding RNA MEG3 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chak, Wing-Po; Lung, Raymond Wai-Ming; Tong, Joanna Hung-Man; Chan, Sylvia Yat-Yee; Lun, Samantha Wei-Man; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Lo, Kwok-Wai; To, Ka-Fai

    2017-03-01

    In our previous whole-transcriptome sequencing analysis, downregulation of a long non-coding RNA, maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3), was identified in NPC samples. This finding suggests the possible role of MEG3 as a tumor suppressor in this distinctive disease. In the present study, two MEG3 variants, AF119863 (MEG3-AF) and BX247998 (MEG3-BX), were found abundantly expressed in a normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line, NP69. Significant downregulation of MEG3-AF was further verified in a panel of NPC samples including xenografts and primary biopsies. MEG3 is an imprinted gene located within chromosome 14q32, a common deleted region in NPC. Both DNA copy number loss and aberrant promoter methylation contributed to MEG3 inactivation. Interestingly, MEG3 expression could successfully be rescued by the treatment of a demethylation agent. Besides, ectopic expression of MEG3 in NPC cell lines resulted in considerable repression of in vitro anchorage-independent growth and in vivo tumorigenicity, in addition to significant inhibition in cell proliferation, colony formation, and induction of cell cycle arrest. Finally, we revealed the association between MEG3 activity and the p53 signaling cascade. Our findings characterize MEG3 as a tumor suppressive long non-coding RNA in NPC and encourage the development of precise long non-coding RNA-targeted epigenetic therapy against this malignancy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Transcription of the non-coding RNA upperhand controls Hand2 expression and heart development.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kelly M; Anderson, Douglas M; McAnally, John R; Shelton, John M; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2016-11-17

    HAND2 is an ancestral regulator of heart development and one of four transcription factors that control the reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes. Deletion of Hand2 in mice results in right ventricle hypoplasia and embryonic lethality. Hand2 expression is tightly regulated by upstream enhancers that reside within a super-enhancer delineated by histone H3 acetyl Lys27 (H3K27ac) modifications. Here we show that transcription of a Hand2-associated long non-coding RNA, which we named upperhand (Uph), is required to maintain the super-enhancer signature and elongation of RNA polymerase II through the Hand2 enhancer locus. Blockade of Uph transcription, but not knockdown of the mature transcript, abolished Hand2 expression, causing right ventricular hypoplasia and embryonic lethality in mice. Given the substantial number of uncharacterized promoter-associated long non-coding RNAs encoded by the mammalian genome, the Uph-Hand2 regulatory partnership offers a mechanism by which divergent non-coding transcription can establish a permissive chromatin environment.

  9. The 5' and 3' ends of alphavirus RNAs--Non-coding is not non-functional.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Jennifer L; Chen, Rubing; Trobaugh, Derek W; Diamond, Michael S; Weaver, Scott C; Klimstra, William B; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2015-08-03

    The non-coding regions found at the 5' and 3' ends of alphavirus genomes regulate viral gene expression, replication, translation and virus-host interactions, which have significant implications for viral evolution, host range, and pathogenesis. The functions of these non-coding regions are mediated by a combination of linear sequence and structural elements. The capped 5' untranslated region (UTR) contains promoter elements, translational regulatory sequences that modulate dependence on cellular translation factors, and structures that help to avoid innate immune defenses. The polyadenylated 3' UTR contains highly conserved sequence elements for viral replication, binding sites for cellular miRNAs that determine cell tropism, host range, and pathogenesis, and conserved binding regions for a cellular protein that influences viral RNA stability. Nonetheless, there are additional conserved elements in non-coding regions of the virus (e.g., the repeated sequence elements in the 3' UTR) whose function remains obscure. Thus, key questions remain as to the function of these short yet influential untranslated segments of alphavirus RNAs.

  10. Non-coding RNAs: Functions and applications in endocrine-related cancer.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Thejaswini; Suresh, Padmanaban S; Tsutsumi, Rie

    2015-11-15

    A significant fraction of the human genome is transcribed as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). This non-coding transcriptome has challenged the notion of the central dogma and its involvement in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is well established. Interestingly, several ncRNAs are dysregulated in cancer and current non-coding transcriptome research aims to use our increasing knowledge of these ncRNAs for the development of cancer biomarkers and anti-cancer drugs. In endocrine-related cancers, for which survival rates can be relatively low, there is a need for such advancements. In this review, we aimed to summarize the roles and clinical implications of recently discovered ncRNAs, including long ncRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs, tRNA- and Y RNA-derived ncRNAs, and small nucleolar RNAs, in endocrine-related cancers affecting both sexes. We focus on recent studies highlighting discoveries in ncRNA biology and expression in cancer, and conclude with a discussion on the challenges and future directions, including clinical application. ncRNAs show great promise as diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets, but further work is necessary to realize the potential of these unconventional transcripts.

  11. Differential lipid and fatty acid profiles of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic Chlorella zofingiensis: assessment of algal oils for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Junchao; Sun, Zheng; Zhong, Yujuan; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document and compare the lipid class and fatty acid composition of the green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis cultivated under photoautotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, a 900% increase in lipid yield was achieved in heterotrophic cells fed with 30 g L(-1) of glucose. Furthermore heterotrophic cells accumulated predominantly neutral lipids (NL) that accounted for 79.5% of total lipids with 88.7% being triacylglycerol (TAG); whereas photoautotrophic cells contained mainly the membrane lipids glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL). Together with the much higher content of oleic acid (C18:1) (35.2% of total fatty acids), oils from heterotrophic C. zofingiensis appear to be more feasible for biodiesel production. Our study highlights the possibility of using heterotrophic algae for producing high quality biodiesel.

  12. Biosynthetic controls on the 13C contents of organic components in the photoautotrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    van Der Meer, M T; Schouten, S; van Dongen, B E; Rijpstra, W I; Fuchs, G; Damste, J S; de Leeuw, J W; Ward, D M

    2001-04-06

    To assess the effects related to known and proposed biosynthetic pathways on the (13)C content of lipids and storage products of the photoautotrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, the isotopic compositions of bulk cell material, alkyl and isoprenoid lipids, and storage products such as glycogen and polyhydroxyalkanoic acids have been investigated. The bulk cell material was 13 per thousand depleted in (13)C relative to the dissolved inorganic carbon. Evidently, inorganic carbon fixation by the main carboxylating enzymes used by C. aurantiacus, which are assumed to use bicarbonate rather than CO(2), results in a relatively small carbon isotopic fractionation compared with CO(2) fixation by the Calvin cycle. Even carbon numbered fatty acids, odd carbon numbered fatty acids, and isoprenoid lipids were 14, 15, and 17-18 per thousand depleted in (13)C relative to the carbon source, respectively. Based on the (13)C contents of alkyl and isoprenoid lipids, a 40 per thousand difference in (13)C content between the carboxyl and methyl carbon from acetyl-coenzyme A has been calculated. Both sugars and polyhydroxyalkanoic acid were enriched in (13)C relative to the alkyl and isoprenoid lipids. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report in which the stable carbon isotopic composition of a large range of biosynthetic products in a photoautotrophic organism has been investigated and interpreted based on previously proposed inorganic carbon fixation and biosynthetic pathways. Our results indicate that compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis may provide a rapid screening tool for carbon fixation pathways.

  13. Biosynthetic controls on the 13C contents of organic components in the photoautotrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, M T; Schouten, S; van Dongen, B E; Rijpstra, W I; Fuchs, G; Damsté, J S; de Leeuw, J W; Ward, D M

    2001-06-15

    To assess the effects related to known and proposed biosynthetic pathways on the (13)C content of lipids and storage products of the photoautotrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, the isotopic compositions of bulk cell material, alkyl and isoprenoid lipids, and storage products such as glycogen and polyhydroxyalkanoic acids have been investigated. The bulk cell material was 13 per thousand depleted in (13)C relative to the dissolved inorganic carbon. Evidently, inorganic carbon fixation by the main carboxylating enzymes used by C. aurantiacus, which are assumed to use bicarbonate rather than CO(2), results in a relatively small carbon isotopic fractionation compared with CO(2) fixation by the Calvin cycle. Even carbon numbered fatty acids, odd carbon numbered fatty acids, and isoprenoid lipids were 14, 15, and 17-18 per thousand depleted in (13)C relative to the carbon source, respectively. Based on the (13)C contents of alkyl and isoprenoid lipids, a 40 per thousand difference in (13)C content between the carboxyl and methyl carbon from acetyl-coenzyme A has been calculated. Both sugars and polyhydroxyalkanoic acid were enriched in (13)C relative to the alkyl and isoprenoid lipids. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report in which the stable carbon isotopic composition of a large range of biosynthetic products in a photoautotrophic organism has been investigated and interpreted based on previously proposed inorganic carbon fixation and biosynthetic pathways. Our results indicate that compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis may provide a rapid screening tool for carbon fixation pathways.

  14. The non-coding B2 RNA binds to the DNA cleft and active site region of RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Ponicsan, Steven L.; Houel, Stephane; Old, William M.; Ahn, Natalie G.; Goodrich, James A.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2013-01-01

    The B2 family of short interspersed elements is transcribed into non-coding RNA by RNA polymerase III. The ~180 nt B2 RNA has been shown to potently repress mRNA transcription by binding tightly to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and assembling with it into complexes on promoter DNA, where it keeps the polymerase from properly engaging the promoter DNA. Mammalian Pol II is a ~500 kD complex that contains 12 different protein subunits, providing many possible surfaces for interaction with B2 RNA. We found that the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest Pol II subunit was not required for B2 RNA to bind Pol II and repress transcription in vitro. To identify the surface on Pol II to which the minimal functional region of B2 RNA binds, we coupled multi-step affinity purification, reversible formaldehyde crosslinking, peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry, and analysis of peptide enrichment. The Pol II peptides most highly recovered after crosslinking to B2 RNA mapped to the DNA binding cleft and active site region of Pol II. These studies determine the location of a defined nucleic acid binding site on a large, native, multi-subunit complex and provide insight into the mechanism of transcriptional repression by B2 RNA. PMID:23416138

  15. Non-coding RNAs and Hypertension–Unveiling Unexpected Mechanisms of Hypertension by the Dark Matter of the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor of cardiovascular diseases and a most important health problem in developed countries. Investigations on pathophysiology of hypertension have been based on gene products from coding region that occupies only about 1% of total genome region. On the other hand, non-coding region that occupies almost 99% of human genome has been regarded as “junk” for a long time and went unnoticed until these days. But recently, it turned out that non-coding region is extensively transcribed to non-coding RNAs and has various functions. This review highlights recent updates on the significance of non-coding RNAs such as micro RNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) on the pathogenesis of hypertension, also providing an introduction to basic biology of non-coding RNAs. For example, microRNAs are associated with hypertension via neuro-fumoral factor, sympathetic nerve activity, ion transporters in kidneys, endothelial function, vascular smooth muscle phenotype transformation, or communication between cells. Although reports of lncRNAs on pathogenesis of hypertension are scarce at the moment, new lncRNAs in relation to hypertension are being discovered at a rapid pace owing to novel techniques such as microarray or next-generation sequencing. In the clinical settings, clinical use of non-coding RNAs in identifying cardiovascular risks or developing novel tools for treating hypertension such as molecular decoy or mimicks is promising, although improvement in chemical modification or drug delivery system is necessary. PMID:25828869

  16. Potential prognostic long non-coding RNA identification and their validation in predicting survival of patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ai-Xin; Huang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Lin; Shen, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Multiple myeloma, a typical hematological malignancy, is characterized by malignant proliferation of plasma cells. This study was to identify differently expressed long non-coding RNAs to predict the survival of patients with multiple myeloma efficiently. Gene expressing profiles of diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma, GSE24080 (559 samples) and GSE57317 (55 samples), were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. After processing, survival-related long non-coding RNAs were identified by Cox regression analysis. The prognosis of multiple myeloma patients with differently expressed long non-coding RNAs was predicted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Meanwhile, stratified analysis was performed based on the concentrations of serum beta 2-microglobulin (S-beta 2m), albumin, and lactate dehydrogenase of multiple myeloma patients. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed to further explore the functions of identified long non-coding RNAs. A total of 176 long non-coding RNAs significantly related to the survival of multiple myeloma patients (p < 0.05) were identified. In dataset GSE24080 and GSE57317, there were 558 and 55 patients being clustered into two groups with significant differences, respectively. Stratified analysis indicated that prediction of the prognoses with these long non-coding RNAs was independent from other clinical phenotype of multiple myeloma. Gene set enrichment analysis-identified pathways of cell cycle, focal adhesion, and G2-M checkpoint were associated with these long non-coding RNAs. A total of 176 long non-coding RNAs, especially RP1-286D6.1, AC008875.2, MTMR9L, AC069360.2, and AL512791.1, were potential biomarkers to evaluate the prognosis of multiple myeloma patients. These long non-coding RNAs participated indispensably in many pathways associated to the development of multiple myeloma; however, the molecular mechanisms need to be further studied.

  17. Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs: Novel Drivers of Human Lymphocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Panzeri, Ilaria; Rossetti, Grazisa; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Upon recognition of a foreign antigen, CD4+ naïve T lymphocytes proliferate and differentiate into subsets with distinct functions. This process is fundamental for the effective immune system function, as CD4+ T cells orchestrate both the innate and adaptive immune response. Traditionally, this differentiation event has been regarded as the acquisition of an irreversible cell fate so that memory and effector CD4+ T subsets were considered terminally differentiated cells or lineages. Consequently, these lineages are conventionally defined thanks to their prototypical set of cytokines and transcription factors. However, recent findings suggest that CD4+ T lymphocytes possess a remarkable phenotypic plasticity, as they can often re-direct their functional program depending on the milieu they encounter. Therefore, new questions are now compelling such as which are the molecular determinants underlying plasticity and stability and how the balance between these two opposite forces drives the cell fate. As already mentioned, in some cases, the mere expression of cytokines and master regulators could not fully explain lymphocytes plasticity. We should consider other layers of regulation, including epigenetic factors such as the modulation of chromatin state or the transcription of non-coding RNAs, whose high cell-specificity give a hint on their involvement in cell fate determination. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances in understanding CD4+ T lymphocytes subsets specification from an epigenetic point of view. In particular, we will emphasize the emerging importance of non-coding RNAs as key players in these differentiation events. We will also present here new data from our laboratory highlighting the contribution of long non-coding RNAs in driving human CD4+ T lymphocytes differentiation. PMID:25926836

  18. Harnessing the Power of SIRT1 and Non-coding RNAs in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) contribute to a significant amount of disability and death in the world. Of these disorders, vascular disease is ranked high, falls within the five leading causes of death, and impacts multiple other disease entities such as those of the cardiac system, nervous system, and metabolic disease. Targeting the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1) pathway and the modulation of micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) may hold great promise for the development of novel strategies for the treatment of vascular disease since each of these pathways are highly relevant to cardiac and nervous system disorders as well as to metabolic dysfunction. SIRT1 is vital in determining the course of stem cell development and the survival, metabolism, and life span of differentiated cells that are overseen by both autophagy and apoptosis. SIRT1 interfaces with a number of pathways that involve forkhead transcription factors, mechanistic of rapamycin (mTOR), AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1) such that the level of activity of SIRT1 can become a critical determinant for biological and clinical outcomes. The essential fine control of SIRT1 is directly tied to the world of non-coding RNAs that ultimately oversee SIRT1 activity to either extend or end cellular survival. Future studies that can further elucidate the crosstalk between SIRT1 and non-coding RNAs should serve well our ability to harness the power of SIRT1 and non-coding RNAs for the treatment of vascular disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Integrated genome analysis suggests that most conserved non-coding sequences are regulatory factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Hemberg, Martin; Gray, Jesse M.; Cloonan, Nicole; Kuersten, Scott; Grimmond, Sean; Greenberg, Michael E.; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    More than 98% of a typical vertebrate genome does not code for proteins. Although non-coding regions are sprinkled with short (<200 bp) islands of evolutionarily conserved sequences, the function of most of these unannotated conserved islands remains unknown. One possibility is that unannotated conserved islands could encode non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs); alternatively, unannotated conserved islands could serve as promoter-distal regulatory factor binding sites (RFBSs) like enhancers. Here we assess these possibilities by comparing unannotated conserved islands in the human and mouse genomes to transcribed regions and to RFBSs, relying on a detailed case study of one human and one mouse cell type. We define transcribed regions by applying a novel transcript-calling algorithm to RNA-Seq data obtained from total cellular RNA, and we define RFBSs using ChIP-Seq and DNAse-hypersensitivity assays. We find that unannotated conserved islands are four times more likely to coincide with RFBSs than with unannotated ncRNAs. Thousands of conserved RFBSs can be categorized as insulators based on the presence of CTCF or as enhancers based on the presence of p300/CBP and H3K4me1. While many unannotated conserved RFBSs are transcriptionally active to some extent, the transcripts produced tend to be unspliced, non-polyadenylated and expressed at levels 10 to 100-fold lower than annotated coding or ncRNAs. Extending these findings across multiple cell types and tissues, we propose that most conserved non-coding genomic DNA in vertebrate genomes corresponds to promoter-distal regulatory elements. PMID:22684627

  20. Mutational Signatures of De-Differentiation in Functional Non-Coding Regions of Melanoma Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Stephen C. J.; Gartner, Jared; Cardenas-Navia, Isabel; Wei, Xiaomu; Ozel Abaan, Hatice; Ajay, Subramanian S.; Hansen, Nancy F.; Song, Lingyun; Bhanot, Umesh K.; Killian, J. Keith; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Walker, Robert L.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mullikin, James C.; Furey, Terrence S.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Samuels, Yardena; Margulies, Elliott H.

    2012-01-01

    Much emphasis has been placed on the identification, functional characterization, and therapeutic potential of somatic variants in tumor genomes. However, the majority of somatic variants lie outside coding regions and their role in cancer progression remains to be determined. In order to establish a system to test the functional importance of non-coding somatic variants in cancer, we created a low-passage cell culture of a metastatic melanoma tumor sample. As a foundation for interpreting functional assays, we performed whole-genome sequencing and analysis of this cell culture, the metastatic tumor from which it was derived, and the patient-matched normal genomes. When comparing somatic mutations identified in the cell culture and tissue genomes, we observe concordance at the majority of single nucleotide variants, whereas copy number changes are more variable. To understand the functional impact of non-coding somatic variation, we leveraged functional data generated by the ENCODE Project Consortium. We analyzed regulatory regions derived from multiple different cell types and found that melanocyte-specific regions are among the most depleted for somatic mutation accumulation. Significant depletion in other cell types suggests the metastatic melanoma cells de-differentiated to a more basal regulatory state. Experimental identification of genome-wide regulatory sites in two different melanoma samples supports this observation. Together, these results show that mutation accumulation in metastatic melanoma is nonrandom across the genome and that a de-differentiated regulatory architecture is common among different samples. Our findings enable identification of the underlying genetic components of melanoma and define the differences between a tissue-derived tumor sample and the cell culture created from it. Such information helps establish a broader mechanistic understanding of the linkage between non-coding genomic variations and the cellular evolution of cancer

  1. NONCODEv4: exploring the world of long non-coding RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chaoyong; Yuan, Jiao; Li, Hui; Li, Ming; Zhao, Guoguang; Bu, Dechao; Zhu, Weimin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Runsheng; Zhao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    NONCODE (http://www.bioinfo.org/noncode/) is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to non-coding RNAs (excluding tRNAs and rRNAs). Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been implied in diseases and identified to play important roles in various biological processes. Since NONCODE version 3.0 was released 2 years ago, discovery of novel ncRNAs has been promoted by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). In this update of NONCODE, we expand the ncRNA data set by collection of newly identified ncRNAs from literature published in the last 2 years and integration of the latest version of RefSeq and Ensembl. Particularly, the number of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has increased sharply from 73 327 to 210 831. Owing to similar alternative splicing pattern to mRNAs, the concept of lncRNA genes was put forward to help systematic understanding of lncRNAs. The 56 018 and 46 475 lncRNA genes were generated from 95 135 and 67 628 lncRNAs for human and mouse, respectively. Additionally, we present expression profile of lncRNA genes by graphs based on public RNA-seq data for human and mouse, as well as predict functions of these lncRNA genes. The improvements brought to the database also include an incorporation of an ID conversion tool from RefSeq or Ensembl ID to NONCODE ID and a service of lncRNA identification. NONCODE is also accessible through http://www.noncode.org/. PMID:24285305

  2. Activation of p53 by MEG3 non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunli; Zhong, Ying; Wang, Yingying; Zhang, Xun; Batista, Dalia L; Gejman, Roger; Ansell, Peter J; Zhao, Jing; Weng, Catherine; Klibanski, Anne

    2007-08-24

    MEG3 is a maternally expressed imprinted gene suggested to function as a non-coding RNA. Our previous studies suggest that MEG3 has a function of tumor suppression. The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor suppression and mediates the functions of many other tumor suppressors. Therefore, we hypothesized that MEG3 functions through activation of p53. We found that transfection of expression constructs for MEG3 and its isoforms results in a significant increase in p53 protein levels and dramatically stimulates p53-dependent transcription from a p53-responsive promoter. Using this as the functional assay, we demonstrated that the open reading frames encoded by MEG3 transcripts are not required for MEG3 function, and the folding of MEG3 RNA is critical to its function, supporting the concept that MEG3 functions as a non-coding RNA. We further found that MEG3 stimulates expression of the growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) by enhancing p53 binding to the GDF15 gene promoter. Interestingly, MEG3 does not stimulate p21(CIP1) expression, suggesting that MEG3 can regulate the specificity of p53 transcriptional activation. p53 degradation is mainly mediated by the mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2). We found that MDM2 levels were down-regulated in cells transfected with MEG3, suggesting that MDM2 suppression contributes at least in part to p53 accumulation induced by MEG3. Finally, we found that MEG3 is able to inhibit cell proliferation in the absence of p53. These data suggest that MEG3 non-coding RNA may function as a tumor suppressor, whose action is mediated by both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways.

  3. Long antisense non-coding RNAs and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vadaie, Nadia; Morris, Kevin V

    2013-08-01

    Shortly after the completion of the human genome project in 2003, the Encode project was launched. The project was set out to identify the functional elements in the human genome, and unexpectedly it was found that >80% of the genome is transcribed. The Encode project identified those transcribed regions of the genome to be encoded by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). With only 2% of the genome carrying gene-encoding proteins, the conundrum was then, what is the function, if any, of these non-coding regions of the genome? These ncRNAs included both short and long RNAs. The focus of this review will be on antisense long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), as these transcripts have been observed to play a role in gene expression of protein-coding genes. Some lncRNAs have been found to regulate protein-coding gene transcription at the epigenetic level, whereby they suppress transcription through the recruitment of protein complexes to target loci in the genome. Conversely, there are lncRNAs that have a positive role in gene expression with less known about mechanism, and some lncRNAs have been shown to be involved in post-transcriptional processes. Additionally, lncRNAs have been observed to regulate their own expression in a positive feedback loop by functioning as a decoy. The biological significance of lncRNAs is only just now becoming evident, with many lncRNAs found to play a significant role in several human diseases.

  4. Divergence of conserved non-coding sequences: rate estimates and relative rate tests.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Günter P; Fried, Claudia; Prohaska, Sonja J; Stadler, Peter F

    2004-11-01

    In many eukaryotic genomes only a small fraction of the DNA codes for proteins, but the non-protein coding DNA harbors important genetic elements directing the development and the physiology of the organisms, like promoters, enhancers, insulators, and micro-RNA genes. The molecular evolution of these genetic elements is difficult to study because their functional significance is hard to deduce from sequence information alone. Here we propose an approach to the study of the rate of evolution of functional non-coding sequences at a macro-evolutionary scale. We identify functionally important non-coding sequences as Conserved Non-Coding Nucleotide (CNCN) sequences from the comparison of two outgroup species. The CNCN sequences so identified are then compared to their homologous sequences in a pair of ingroup species, and we monitor the degree of modification these sequences suffered in the two ingroup lineages. We propose a method to test for rate differences in the modification of CNCN sequences among the two ingroup lineages, as well as a method to estimate their rate of modification. We apply this method to the full sequences of the HoxA clusters from six gnathostome species: a shark, Heterodontus francisci; a basal ray finned fish, Polypterus senegalus; the amphibian, Xenopus tropicalis; as well as three mammalian species, human, rat and mouse. The results show that the evolutionary rate of CNCN sequences is not distinguishable among the three mammalian lineages, while the Xenopus lineage has a significantly increased rate of evolution. Furthermore the estimates of the rate parameters suggest that in the stem lineage of mammals the rate of CNCN sequence evolution was more than twice the rate observed within the placental amniotes clade, suggesting a high rate of evolution of cis-regulatory elements during the origin of amniotes and mammals. We conclude that the proposed methods can be used for testing hypotheses about the rate and pattern of evolution of putative

  5. Involvement of Host Non-Coding RNAs in the Pathogenesis of the Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanmei; Ouyang, Jing; Wei, Jingyun; Maarouf, Mohamed; Chen, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a new type of regulators that play important roles in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. ncRNAs, including small non-coding RNAs (e.g., microRNAs, small interfering RNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), are pervasively transcribed in human and mammalian cells. Recently, it has been recognized that these ncRNAs are critically implicated in the virus–host interaction as key regulators of transcription or post-transcription during viral infection. Influenza A virus (IAV) is still a major threat to human health. Hundreds of ncRNAs are differentially expressed in response to infection with IAV, such as infection by pandemic H1N1 and highly pathogenic avian strains. There is increasing evidence demonstrating functional involvement of these regulatory microRNAs, vault RNAs (vtRNAs) and lncRNAs in pathogenesis of influenza virus, including a variety of host immune responses. For example, it has been shown that ncRNAs regulate activation of pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-associated signaling and transcription factors (nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, NF-κB), as well as production of interferons (IFNs) and cytokines, and expression of critical IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). The vital functions of IAV-regulated ncRNAs either to against defend viral invasion or to promote progeny viron production are summarized in this review. In addition, we also highlight the potentials of ncRNAs as therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:28035991

  6. Expression profile of long non-coding RNAs in colorectal cancer: A microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jia; Xu, Luning; Jiang, Yigui; Zhuo, Dexiang; Zhang, Shengjun; Wu, Lianhui; Xu, Huadong; Huang, Yue

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent malignant tumors and the second cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Due to increased morbidity and mortality rates, there is an urgent need to understand the pathogenesis of CRC, discover strategies that can improve diagnosis, and ultimately identify therapies targeting this disease. Over the past several years, research into tumor progression mechanisms has been devoted to identifying and understanding various coding and non-coding regions of the genome and how these genetic variants may affect tumorigenesis and progression. Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are non‑protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides, have emerged as a key aspect in tumor pathogenesis. In the present study, we examined the lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles in 4 patients with colon adenocarcinoma, with paired adjacent normal tissues as controls. Microarray data showed that a total of 3,523 lncRNAs and 2,515 mRNAs were consistently differentially expressed in the CRC tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. Upon comparison of the differentially expressed transcripts between the groups, we identified 22 pathways which were related to the upregulated transcripts and 24 pathways that corresponded to the downregulated transcripts. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the upregulated transcripts were predominantly enriched in DNA metabolic processes, and the downregulated transcripts were predominantly enriched in organic hydroxyl compound metabolic processes. Coding-non-coding gene co-expression analysis showed that these differentially expressed lncRNAs were closely correlated with 'Wnt signaling pathway' components, whose aberrant activation plays a central role in CRC, indicating that a functional correlation exists between them. In conclusion, the results of the microarray and informatic analysis strongly suggest that lncRNA dysregulation is involved in the complicated process of CRC development

  7. Harnessing the Power of SIRT1 and Non-coding RNAs in Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) contribute to a significant amount of disability and death in the world. Of these disorders, vascular disease is ranked high, falls within the five leading causes of death, and impacts multiple other disease entities such as those of the cardiac system, nervous system, and metabolic disease. Targeting the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1) pathway and the modulation of micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) may hold great promise for the development of novel strategies for the treatment of vascular disease since each of these pathways are highly relevant to cardiac and nervous system disorders as well as to metabolic dysfunction. SIRT1 is vital in determining the course of stem cell development and the survival, metabolism, and life span of differentiated cells that are overseen by both autophagy and apoptosis. SIRT1 interfaces with a number of pathways that involve forkhead transcription factors, mechanistic of rapamycin (mTOR), AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1) such that the level of activity of SIRT1 can become a critical determinant for biological and clinical outcomes. The essential fine control of SIRT1 is directly tied to the world of non-coding RNAs that ultimately oversee SIRT1 activity to either extend or end cellular survival. Future studies that can further elucidate the crosstalk between SIRT1 and non-coding RNAs should serve well our ability to harness the power of SIRT1 and non-coding RNAs for the treatment of vascular disorders. PMID:27897112

  8. Pathophysiology and Clinical Utility of Non-coding RNAs in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yiye; Chen, Yinghui

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder. The underlying pathological processes include synaptic strength, inflammation, ion channels, and apoptosis. Acting as epigenetic factors, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) participate in the regulation of pathophysiologic processes of epilepsy and are dysregulated during epileptogenesis. Aberrant expression of ncRNAs are observed in epilepsy patients and animal models of epilepsy. Furthermore, ncRNAs might also be used as biomarkers for diagnosis and the prognosis of treatment response in epilepsy. In this review, we will summarize the role of ncRNAs in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and the putative utilization of ncRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  9. RNA in unexpected places: long non-coding RNA functions in diverse cellular contexts

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Sarah; Coller, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The increased application of transcriptome-wide profiling approaches has led to an explosion in the number of documented long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). While these new and enigmatic players in the complex transcriptional milieu are encoded by a significant proportion of the genome, their functions are mostly unknown. Early discoveries support a paradigm in which lncRNAs regulate transcription via chromatin modulation, but new functions are steadily emerging. Given the biochemical versatility of RNA, lncRNAs may be used for various tasks, including post-transcriptional regulation, organization of protein complexes, cell-cell signalling and allosteric regulation of proteins. PMID:24105322

  10. A Central Role for Long Non-Coding RNA in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sheetal A.; Mitra, Anirban P.; Triche, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been shown to regulate important biological processes that support normal cellular functions. Aberrant regulation of these essential functions can promote tumor development. In this review, we underscore the importance of the regulatory role played by this distinct class of ncRNAs in cancer-associated pathways that govern mechanisms such as cell growth, invasion, and metastasis. We also highlight the possibility of using these unique RNAs as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in malignancies. PMID:22363342

  11. Multisubunit RNA Polymerases IV and V: Purveyors of Non-Coding RNA for Plant Gene Silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2011-08-01

    In all eukaryotes, nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II and III synthesize the myriad RNAs that are essential for life. Remarkably, plants have evolved two additional multisubunit RNA polymerases, RNA polymerases IV and V, which orchestrate non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing processes affecting development, transposon taming, antiviral defence and allelic crosstalk. Biochemical details concerning the templates and products of RNA polymerases IV and V are lacking. However, their subunit compositions reveal that they evolved as specialized forms of RNA polymerase II, which provides the unique opportunity to study the functional diversification of a eukaryotic RNA polymerase family.

  12. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  13. In silico discovery and modeling of non-coding RNA structure in viruses.

    PubMed

    Moss, Walter N; Steitz, Joan A

    2015-12-01

    This review covers several computational methods for discovering structured non-coding RNAs in viruses and modeling their putative secondary structures. Here we will use examples from two target viruses to highlight these approaches: influenza A virus-a relatively small, segmented RNA virus; and Epstein-Barr virus-a relatively large DNA virus with a complex transcriptome. Each system has unique challenges to overcome and unique characteristics to exploit. From these particular cases, generically useful approaches can be derived for the study of additional viral targets.

  14. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs) . Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This document contains the appendices to the main report.

  15. NEAT1: A novel cancer-related long non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Li, Zheng; Zheng, Heyi; Chan, Matthew T V; Wu, William Ka Kei

    2017-04-01

    Aberrant overexpression of the long non-coding RNA NEAT1 (nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1) has been documented in different types of solid tumours, such as lung cancer, oesophageal cancer, colorectal cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, in which its high levels are associated with poor prognosis. In contrast, NEAT1 is downregulated in acute promyelocytic leukaemia where it promotes leucocyte differentiation. In this review, we provide an overview of current evidence concerning the oncogenic role and potential clinical utilities of NEAT1. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate the upstream and downstream mechanisms of NEAT1 overexpression.

  16. The Mix of Two Worlds: Non-Coding RNAs and Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maitri Y.

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of functional cell-free circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in human body fluids has opened new avenues for the application of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) as noninvasive, specific and sensitive biomarkers for cancers and other human diseases. In this review, we explore the concept of circulating miRNAs as hormones, and discuss their potential functions in cellular communication and transferring of signals. We also provide a brief overview of their identification, processing, and potential functions and applications in human diseases. PMID:23051203

  17. The mix of two worlds: non-coding RNAs and hormones.

    PubMed

    Shah, Maitri Y; Calin, George A

    2013-02-01

    The recent discovery of functional cell-free circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in human body fluids has opened new avenues for the application of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) as noninvasive, specific and sensitive biomarkers for cancers and other human diseases. In this review, we explore the concept of circulating miRNAs as hormones, and discuss their potential functions in cellular communication and transferring of signals. We also provide a brief overview of their identification, processing, and potential functions and applications in human diseases.

  18. Emerging role of non-coding RNA in neural plasticity, cognitive function, and neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Spadaro, Paola A.; Bredy, Timothy W.

    2012-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as critical regulators of transcription, epigenetic processes, and gene silencing, which make them ideal candidates for insight into molecular evolution and a better understanding of the molecular pathways of neuropsychiatric disease. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding various classes of ncRNAs and their role in neural plasticity and cognitive function, and highlight the potential contribution they may make to the development of a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, addiction, and fear-related anxiety disorders. PMID:22811697

  19. Roles, Functions, and Mechanisms of Long Non-coding RNAs in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yiwen; Fullwood, Melissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in cancer. They are involved in chromatin remodeling, as well as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, through a variety of chromatin-based mechanisms and via cross-talk with other RNA species. lncRNAs can function as decoys, scaffolds, and enhancer RNAs. This review summarizes the characteristics of lncRNAs, including their roles, functions, and working mechanisms, describes methods for identifying and annotating lncRNAs, and discusses future opportunities for lncRNA-based therapies using antisense oligonucleotides. PMID:26883671

  20. Conservation and dissipation of light energy in desiccation-tolerant photoautotrophs, two sides of the same coin.

    PubMed

    Heber, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Conservation of light energy in photosynthesis is possible only in hydrated photoautotrophs. It requires complex biochemistry and is limited in capacity. Charge separation in reaction centres of photosystem II initiates energy conservation but opens also the path to photooxidative damage. A main mechanism of photoprotection active in hydrated photoautotrophs is controlled by light. This is achieved by coupling light flux to the protonation of a special thylakoid protein which activates thermal energy dissipation. This mechanism facilitates the simultaneous occurrence of energy conservation and energy dissipation but cannot completely prevent damage by light. Continuous metabolic repair is required to compensate damage. More efficient photoprotection is needed by desiccation-tolerant photoautotrophs. Loss of water during desiccation activates ultra-fast energy dissipation in mosses and lichens. Desiccation-induced energy dissipation neither requires a protonation reaction nor light but photoprotection often increases when light is present during desiccation. Two different mechanisms contribute to photoprotection of desiccated photoautotrophs. One facilitates energy dissipation in the antenna of photosystem II which is faster than energy capture by functional reaction centres. When this is insufficient for full photoprotection, the other one permits energy dissipation in the reaction centres themselves.

  1. Improving a Synechocystis-based photoautotrophic chassis through systematic genome mapping and validation of neutral sites

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Filipe; Pacheco, Catarina C.; Oliveira, Paulo; Montagud, Arnau; Landels, Andrew; Couto, Narciso; Wright, Phillip C.; Urchueguía, Javier F.; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The use of microorganisms as cell factories frequently requires extensive molecular manipulation. Therefore, the identification of genomic neutral sites for the stable integration of ectopic DNA is required to ensure a successful outcome. Here we describe the genome mapping and validation of five neutral sites in the chromosome of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, foreseeing the use of this cyanobacterium as a photoautotrophic chassis. To evaluate the neutrality of these loci, insertion/deletion mutants were produced, and to assess their functionality, a synthetic green fluorescent reporter module was introduced. The constructed integrative vectors include a BioBrick-compatible multiple cloning site insulated by transcription terminators, constituting robust cloning interfaces for synthetic biology approaches. Moreover, Synechocystis mutants (chassis) ready to receive purpose-built synthetic modules/circuits are also available. This work presents a systematic approach to map and validate chromosomal neutral sites in cyanobacteria, and that can be extended to other organisms. PMID:26490728

  2. Live Cell Chemical Profiling of Temporal Redox Dynamics in a Photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Serres, Margrethe H.; Merkley, Eric D.; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Kim, Sangtae; Zink, Erika M.; Datta, Suchitra; Smith, Richard D.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-01-01

    Protein reduction-oxidation (redox) modification is an important mechanism that allows microorganisms to sense environmental changes and initiate cellular responses. We have developed a quantitative chemical probe approach for live cell labeling of proteins that are sensitive to redox modifications. We utilize this in vivo strategy to identify 176 proteins undergoing ~5-10 fold dynamic redox change in response to nutrient limitation and subsequent replenishment in the photoautotrophic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. We detect redox changes in as little as 30 seconds after nutrient perturbation, and oscillations in reduction and oxidation for 60 minutes following the perturbation. Many of the proteins undergoing dynamic redox transformations participate in the major components for the production (photosystems and electron transport chains) or consumption (Calvin-Benson cycle and protein synthesis) of reductant and/or energy in photosynthetic organisms. Thus, our in vivo approach reveals new redox-susceptible proteins, in addition to validating those previously identified in vitro.

  3. Screening and characterization of oleaginous Chlorella strains and exploration of photoautotrophic Chlorella protothecoides for oil production.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-gang; Gerken, Henri; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jin

    2015-05-01

    The growth and oil production of nine Chlorella strains were comparatively assessed and Chlorellaprotothecoides CS-41 demonstrated the greatest lipid production potential. The effects of different nitrogen forms and concentrations, phosphorus concentrations and light intensities on growth and oil production were studied in laboratory columns. C. protothecoides CS-41 accumulated lipids up to 55% of dry weight, with triacylglycerol and oleic acid being 71% of total lipids and 59% of total fatty acids, respectively. High biomass and lipid productivities were achieved in outdoor panel PBRs, up to 1.25 and 0.59 g L(-1) day(-1), or 44. 1 and 16.1 g m(-2) day(-1), respectively. A two-stage cultivation strategy was proposed to enhance the algal biomass and lipid production. This is the first comprehensive investigation of both indoor and outdoor photoautotrophic C. protothecoides cultures for oil production, and C. protothecoides CS-41 represents a promising biofuel feedstock worthy of further exploration.

  4. Prognostic and biologic significance of long non-coding RNA profiling in younger adults with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Dimitrios; Nicolet, Deedra; Volinia, Stefano; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Yan, Pearlly; Bundschuh, Ralf; Carroll, Andrew J; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Blum, William; Powell, Bayard L; Uy, Geoffrey L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Wang, Eunice S; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Orwick, Shelley J; Lucas, David M; Caligiuri, Michael A; Stone, Richard M; Byrd, John C; Garzon, Ramiro; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2017-08-01

    Long non-coding ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are a novel class of RNA molecules, which are increasingly recognized as important molecular players in solid and hematologic malignancies. Herein we investigated whether long non-coding RNA expression is associated with clinical and molecular features, as well as outcome of younger adults (aged <60 years) with de novo cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. Whole transcriptome profiling was performed in a training (n=263) and a validation set (n=114). Using the training set, we identified 24 long non-coding RNAs associated with event-free survival. Linear combination of the weighted expression values of these transcripts yielded a prognostic score. In the validation set, patients with high scores had shorter disease-free (P<0.001), overall (P=0.002) and event-free survival (P<0.001) than patients with low scores. In multivariable analyses, long non-coding RNA score status was an independent prognostic marker for disease-free (P=0.01) and event-free survival (P=0.002), and showed a trend for overall survival (P=0.06). Among multiple molecular alterations tested, which are prognostic in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia, only double CEBPA mutations, NPM1 mutations and FLT3-ITD associated with distinct long non-coding RNA signatures. Correlation of the long non-coding RNA scores with messenger RNA and microRNA expression identified enrichment of genes involved in lymphocyte/leukocyte activation, inflammation and apoptosis in patients with high scores. We conclude that long non-coding RNA profiling provides meaningful prognostic information in younger adults with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. In addition, expression of prognostic long non-coding RNAs associates with oncogenic molecular pathways in this disease. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: 00048958 (CALGB-8461), 00899223 (CALGB-9665), and 00900224 (CALGB-20202). Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  5. Prognostic and biologic significance of long non-coding RNA profiling in younger adults with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Dimitrios; Nicolet, Deedra; Volinia, Stefano; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Yan, Pearlly; Bundschuh, Ralf; Carroll, Andrew J.; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Blum, William; Powell, Bayard L.; Uy, Geoffrey L.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Orwick, Shelley J.; Lucas, David M.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Stone, Richard M.; Byrd, John C.; Garzon, Ramiro; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are a novel class of RNA molecules, which are increasingly recognized as important molecular players in solid and hematologic malignancies. Herein we investigated whether long non-coding RNA expression is associated with clinical and molecular features, as well as outcome of younger adults (aged <60 years) with de novo cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. Whole transcriptome profiling was performed in a training (n=263) and a validation set (n=114). Using the training set, we identified 24 long non-coding RNAs associated with event-free survival. Linear combination of the weighted expression values of these transcripts yielded a prognostic score. In the validation set, patients with high scores had shorter disease-free (P<0.001), overall (P=0.002) and event-free survival (P<0.001) than patients with low scores. In multivariable analyses, long non-coding RNA score status was an independent prognostic marker for disease-free (P=0.01) and event-free survival (P=0.002), and showed a trend for overall survival (P=0.06). Among multiple molecular alterations tested, which are prognostic in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia, only double CEBPA mutations, NPM1 mutations and FLT3-ITD associated with distinct long non-coding RNA signatures. Correlation of the long non-coding RNA scores with messenger RNA and microRNA expression identified enrichment of genes involved in lymphocyte/leukocyte activation, inflammation and apoptosis in patients with high scores. We conclude that long non-coding RNA profiling provides meaningful prognostic information in younger adults with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. In addition, expression of prognostic long non-coding RNAs associates with oncogenic molecular pathways in this disease. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: 00048958 (CALGB-8461), 00899223 (CALGB-9665), and 00900224 (CALGB-20202). PMID:28473620

  6. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  7. Non-coding RNAs deregulation in oral squamous cell carcinoma: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Li, C; Wang, Z; Liu, K; Xu, C; Yang, Q; Tang, Y; Wu, Y

    2016-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a common cause of cancer death. Despite decades of improvements in exploring new treatments and considerable advance in multimodality treatment, satisfactory curative rates have not yet been reached. The difficulty of early diagnosis and the high prevalence of metastasis associated with OSCC contribute to its dismal prognosis. In the last few decades the emerging data from both tumor biology and clinical trials led to growing interest in the research for predictive biomarkers. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are promising biomarkers. Among numerous kinds of ncRNAs, short ncRNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), have been extensively investigated with regard to their biogenesis, function, and importance in carcinogenesis. In contrast to miRNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are much less known concerning their functions in human cancers especially in OSCC. The present review highlighted the roles of miRNAs and newly discovered lncRNAs in oral tumorigenesis, metastasis, and their clinical implication.

  8. Regulatory non-coding RNA: new instruments in the orchestration of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ye; Wu, Haijiang; Pavlosky, Alexander; Zou, Ling-Lin; Deng, Xinna; Zhang, Zhu-Xu; Jevnikar, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) comprises a substantial portion of primary transcripts that are generated by genomic transcription, but are not translated into protein. The possible functions of these once considered ‘junk' molecules have incited considerable interest and new insights have emerged. The two major members of ncRNAs, namely micro RNA (miRNA) and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), have important regulatory roles in gene expression and many important physiological processes, which has recently been extended to programmed cell death. The previous paradigm of programmed cell death only by apoptosis has recently expanded to include modalities of regulated necrosis (RN), and particularly necroptosis. However, most research efforts in this field have been on protein regulators, leaving the role of ncRNAs largely unexplored. In this review, we discuss important findings concerning miRNAs and lncRNAs that modulate apoptosis and RN pathways, as well as the miRNA–lncRNA interactions that affect cell death regulation. PMID:27512954

  9. Junk DNA and the long non-coding RNA twist in cancer genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Vincent, Kimberly; Pichler, Martin; Fodde, Riccardo; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Slack, Frank J.; Calin, George A

    2015-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that the flow of genetic information moves from DNA to RNA to protein. However, in the last decade this dogma has been challenged by new findings on non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs). More recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have attracted much attention due to their large number and biological significance. Many lncRNAs have been identified as mapping to regulatory elements including gene promoters and enhancers, ultraconserved regions, and intergenic regions of protein-coding genes. Yet, the biological function and molecular mechanisms of lncRNA in human diseases in general and cancer in particular remain largely unknown. Data from the literature suggest that lncRNA, often via interaction with proteins, functions in specific genomic loci or use their own transcription loci for regulatory activity. In this review, we summarize recent findings supporting the importance of DNA loci in lncRNA function, and the underlying molecular mechanisms via cis or trans regulation, and discuss their implications in cancer. In addition, we use the 8q24 genomic locus, a region containing interactive SNPs, DNA regulatory elements and lncRNAs, as an example to illustrate how single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located within lncRNAs may be functionally associated with the individual’s susceptibility to cancer. PMID:25619839

  10. Genomic context analysis reveals dense interaction network between vertebrate ultraconserved non-coding elements

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrieva, Slavica; Bucher, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Genomic context analysis, also known as phylogenetic profiling, is widely used to infer functional interactions between proteins but rarely applied to non-coding cis-regulatory DNA elements. We were wondering whether this approach could provide insights about utlraconserved non-coding elements (UCNEs). These elements are organized as large clusters, so-called gene regulatory blocks (GRBs) around key developmental genes. Their molecular functions and the reasons for their high degree of conservation remain enigmatic. Results: In a special setting of genomic context analysis, we analyzed the fate of GRBs after a whole-genome duplication event in five fish genomes. We found that in most cases all UCNEs were retained together as a single block, whereas the corresponding target genes were often retained in two copies, one completely devoid of UCNEs. This ‘winner-takes-all’ pattern suggests that UCNEs of a GRB function in a highly cooperative manner. We propose that the multitude of interactions between UCNEs is the reason for their extreme sequence conservation. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online and at http://ccg.vital-it.ch/ucne/ PMID:22962458

  11. Non-Coding RNAs: The “Dark Matter” of Cardiovascular Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Iaconetti, Claudio; Gareri, Clarice; Polimeni, Alberto; Indolfi, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale analyses of mammalian transcriptomes have identified a significant number of different RNA molecules that are not translated into protein. In fact, the use of new sequencing technologies has identified that most of the genome is transcribed, producing a heterogeneous population of RNAs which do not encode for proteins (ncRNAs). Emerging data suggest that these transcripts influence the development of cardiovascular disease. The best characterized non-coding RNA family is represented by short highly conserved RNA molecules, termed microRNAs (miRNAs), which mediate a process of mRNA silencing through transcript degradation or translational repression. These microRNAs (miRNAs) are expressed in cardiovascular tissues and play key roles in many cardiovascular pathologies, such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure (HF). Potential links between other ncRNAs, like long non-coding RNA, and cardiovascular disease are intriguing but the functions of these transcripts are largely unknown. Thus, the functional characterization of ncRNAs is essential to improve the overall understanding of cellular processes involved in cardiovascular diseases in order to define new therapeutic strategies. This review outlines the current knowledge of the different ncRNA classes and summarizes their role in cardiovascular development and disease. PMID:24113581

  12. Circulating long non-coding RNAs NRON and MHRT as novel predictive biomarkers of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Lina; Sun, Lihua; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Yuechao; Hou, Yan; Li, Qingqi; Guo, Ying; Feng, Bingbing; Cui, Lina; Wang, Xiaoxue; Wang, Zhiguo; Tian, Ye; Yu, Bo; Wang, Shu; Xu, Chaoqian; Zhang, Mingyu; Du, Zhimin; Lu, Yanjie; Yang, Bao Feng

    2017-03-14

    This study sought to evaluate the potential of circulating long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) as biomarkers for heart failure (HF). We measured the circulating levels of 13 individual lncRNAs which are known to be relevant to cardiovascular disease in the plasma samples from 72 HF patients and 60 non-HF control participants using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) methods. We found that out of the 13 lncRNAs tested, non-coding repressor of NFAT (NRON) and myosin heavy-chain-associated RNA transcripts (MHRT) had significantly higher plasma levels in HF than in non-HF subjects: 3.17 ± 0.30 versus 1.0 ± 0.07 for NRON (P < 0.0001) and 1.66 ± 0.14 versus 1.0 ± 0.12 for MHRT (P < 0.0001). The area under the ROC curve was 0.865 for NRON and 0.702 for MHRT. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified NRON and MHRT as independent predictors for HF. Spearman's rank correlation analysis showed that NRON was negatively correlated with HDL and positively correlated with LDH, whereas MHRT was positively correlated with AST and LDH. Hence, elevation of circulating NRON and MHRT predicts HF and may be considered as novel biomarkers of HF.

  13. Ameloblastoma RNA profiling uncovers a distinct non-coding RNA signature

    PubMed Central

    Davanian, Haleh; Balasiddaiah, Anangi; Heymann, Robert; Sundström, Magnus; Redenström, Poppy; Silfverberg, Mikael; Brodin, David; Sällberg, Matti; Lindskog, Sven; Weiner, Carina Kruger; Chen, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Ameloblastoma of the jaws remains the top difficult to treat odontogenic tumour and has a high recurrence rate. New evidence suggests that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play a critical role in tumourgenesis and prognosis of cancer. However, ameloblastoma ncRNA expression data is lacking. Here we present the first report of ameloblastoma ncRNA signatures. A total of 95 ameloblastoma cases and a global array transcriptome technology covering > 285.000 full-length transcripts were used in this two-step analysis. The analysis first identified in a test cohort 31 upregulated ameloblastoma-associated ncRNAs accompanied by signalling pathways of cancer, spliceosome, mRNA surveillance and Wnt. Further validation in an independent cohort points out the long non-coding (lncRNAs) and small nucleolar RNA (snoRNAs): LINC340, SNORD116-25, SNORA11, SNORA21, SNORA47 and SNORA65 as a distinct ncRNA signature of ameloblastoma. Importantly, the presence of these ncRNAs was independent of BRAF-V600E and SMO-L412F mutations, histology type or tumour location, but was positively correlated with the tumour size. Taken together, this study shows a systematic investigation of ncRNA expression of ameloblastoma, and illuminates new diagnostic and therapeutic targets for this invasive odontogenic tumour. PMID:27965463

  14. SLC45A3-ELK4 functions as a long non-coding chimeric RNA.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fujun; Zhang, Yanmei; Liu, Jia; Li, Hui

    2017-09-28

    Gene fusions in cancer typically lead to the expression of a fusion protein or disrupt the expression of one of the parental genes. Here we report a new phenomenon whereby a fusion transcript functions as a long non-coding chimeric RNA (lnccRNA). This fusion RNA, SLC45A3-ELK4, generated by cis-splicing between neighboring genes, was found in prostate cancer. The fusion RNA encodes the same protein as ELK4. Intriguingly, we found that the fusion RNA level is less than 1% of wild type ELK4, unlikely to perturb the general pool of ELK4 protein. Nonetheless, when the fusion RNA, but not ELK4 is silenced, cell proliferation is inhibited in both androgen-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells. This growth arrest can be rescued by exogenous expression of the fusion and a mutant designed to prevent translation of the ELK4 protein. In the same setting, the mutant could also suppress CDKN1A and several other targets of SLC45A3-ELK4. In addition, similar to many long non-coding RNAs, the fusion RNA is enriched in the nuclear fraction. Altogether, these results indicate that SLC45A3-ELK4 regulates cancer cell proliferation by its transcript, not translated protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Polycomb group protein gene silencing, non-coding RNA, stem cells, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gieni, Randall S; Hendzel, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Epigenetic programming is an important facet of biology, controlling gene expression patterns and the choice between developmental pathways. The Polycomb group proteins (PcGs) silence gene expression, allowing cells to both acquire and maintain identity. PcG silencing is important for stemness, X chromosome inactivation (XCI), genomic imprinting, and the abnormally silenced genes in cancers. Stem and cancer cells commonly share gene expression patterns, regulatory mechanisms, and signalling pathways. Many microRNA species have oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity, and disruptions in these networks are common in cancer; however, long non-coding (nc)RNA species are also important. Many of these directly guide PcG deposition and gene silencing at the HOX locus, during XCI, and in examples of genomic imprinting. Since inappropriate HOX expression and loss of genomic imprinting are hallmarks of cancer, disruption of long ncRNA-mediated PcG silencing likely has a role in oncogenesis. Aberrant silencing of coding and non-coding loci is critical for both the genesis and progression of cancers. In addition, PcGs are commonly abnormally overexpressed years prior to cancer pathology, making early PcG targeted therapy an option to reverse tumor formation, someday replacing the blunt instrument of eradication in the cancer therapy arsenal.

  16. A meiosis-specific Spt5 homolog involved in non-coding transcription.

    PubMed

    Gruchota, Julita; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Sperling, Linda; Nowak, Jacek K

    2017-01-03

    Spt5 is a conserved and essential transcriptional regulator that binds directly to RNA polymerase and is involved in transcription elongation, polymerase pausing and various co-transcriptional processes. To investigate the role of Spt5 in non-coding transcription, we used the unicellular model Paramecium tetraurelia In this ciliate, development is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms that use different classes of non-coding RNAs to target DNA elimination. We identified two SPT5 genes. One (STP5v) is involved in vegetative growth, while the other (SPT5m) is essential for sexual reproduction. We focused our study on SPT5m, expressed at meiosis and associated with germline nuclei during sexual processes. Upon Spt5m depletion, we observed absence of scnRNAs, piRNA-like 25 nt small RNAs produced at meiosis. The scnRNAs are a temporal copy of the germline genome and play a key role in programming DNA elimination. Moreover, Spt5m depletion abolishes elimination of all germline-limited sequences, including sequences whose excision was previously shown to be scnRNA-independent. This suggests that in addition to scnRNA production, Spt5 is involved in setting some as yet uncharacterized epigenetic information at meiosis. Our study establishes that Spt5m is crucial for developmental genome rearrangements and necessary for scnRNA production.

  17. Identification and Role of Regulatory Non-Coding RNAs in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Izar, Benjamin; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Hain, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial regulatory non-coding RNAs control numerous mRNA targets that direct a plethora of biological processes, such as the adaption to environmental changes, growth and virulence. Recently developed high-throughput techniques, such as genomic tiling arrays and RNA-Seq have allowed investigating prokaryotic cis- and trans-acting regulatory RNAs, including sRNAs, asRNAs, untranslated regions (UTR) and riboswitches. As a result, we obtained a more comprehensive view on the complexity and plasticity of the prokaryotic genome biology. Listeria monocytogenes was utilized as a model system for intracellular pathogenic bacteria in several studies, which revealed the presence of about 180 regulatory RNAs in the listerial genome. A regulatory role of non-coding RNAs in survival, virulence and adaptation mechanisms of L. monocytogenes was confirmed in subsequent experiments, thus, providing insight into a multifaceted modulatory function of RNA/mRNA interference. In this review, we discuss the identification of regulatory RNAs by high-throughput techniques and in their functional role in L. monocytogenes. PMID:21954346

  18. Comprehensive reconstruction and visualization of non-coding regulatory networks in human.

    PubMed

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Russo, Francesco; Bombieri, Nicola; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2014-01-01

    Research attention has been powered to understand the functional roles of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Many studies have demonstrated their deregulation in cancer and other human disorders. ncRNAs are also present in extracellular human body fluids such as serum and plasma, giving them a great potential as non-invasive biomarkers. However, non-coding RNAs have been relatively recently discovered and a comprehensive database including all of them is still missing. Reconstructing and visualizing the network of ncRNAs interactions are important steps to understand their regulatory mechanism in complex systems. This work presents ncRNA-DB, a NoSQL database that integrates ncRNAs data interactions from a large number of well established on-line repositories. The interactions involve RNA, DNA, proteins, and diseases. ncRNA-DB is available at http://ncrnadb.scienze.univr.it/ncrnadb/. It is equipped with three interfaces: web based, command-line, and a Cytoscape app called ncINetView. By accessing only one resource, users can search for ncRNAs and their interactions, build a network annotated with all known ncRNAs and associated diseases, and use all visual and mining features available in Cytoscape.

  19. A meiosis-specific Spt5 homolog involved in non-coding transcription

    PubMed Central

    Gruchota, Julita; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Sperling, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Spt5 is a conserved and essential transcriptional regulator that binds directly to RNA polymerase and is involved in transcription elongation, polymerase pausing and various co-transcriptional processes. To investigate the role of Spt5 in non-coding transcription, we used the unicellular model Paramecium tetraurelia. In this ciliate, development is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms that use different classes of non-coding RNAs to target DNA elimination. We identified two SPT5 genes. One (STP5v) is involved in vegetative growth, while the other (SPT5m) is essential for sexual reproduction. We focused our study on SPT5m, expressed at meiosis and associated with germline nuclei during sexual processes. Upon Spt5m depletion, we observed absence of scnRNAs, piRNA-like 25 nt small RNAs produced at meiosis. The scnRNAs are a temporal copy of the germline genome and play a key role in programming DNA elimination. Moreover, Spt5m depletion abolishes elimination of all germline-limited sequences, including sequences whose excision was previously shown to be scnRNA-independent. This suggests that in addition to scnRNA production, Spt5 is involved in setting some as yet uncharacterized epigenetic information at meiosis. Our study establishes that Spt5m is crucial for developmental genome rearrangements and necessary for scnRNA production. PMID:28053118

  20. The underlying mechanisms of non-coding RNAs in the chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guangbing; Feng, Mengyu; Yang, Gang; Zheng, Suli; Song, Xujun; Cao, Zhe; You, Lei; Zheng, Lianfang; Hu, Ya; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2017-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer, which is often asymptomatic, is currently one of the most common causes of cancer-related death. This phenomenon is most likely due to a lack of early diagnosis, a high metastasis rate and a disappointing chemotherapy outcome. Thus, improving treatment outcomes by overcoming chemotherapy resistance may be a useful strategy in pancreatic cancer. Various underlying mechanisms involved in the chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer have been investigated. Notably, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), play a pivotal role in regulating sensitivity to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. In this review, we highlight recent evidence regarding the role of miRNAs and lncRNAs in the chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer, including their expression levels, targets, biological functions and the regulation of chemoresistance, and discuss the potential clinical application of miRNAs and lncRNAs in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of non-coding RNAs in pancreatic cancer: the bane of the microworld.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi-Ting; Xu, Xiao-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Hao, Jun; Cao, Han; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shu-Yu; Cao, Jian-Ping

    2014-07-28

    Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of pancreatic cancer has been greatly advanced. However, the molecular events involved in the initiation and development of pancreatic cancer remain inscrutable. None of the present medical technologies have been proven to be effective in significantly improving early detection or reducing the mortality/morbidity of this disease. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular basis of pancreatic cancer is required for the identification of more effective diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), generally including microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, have recently been found to be deregulated in many human cancers, which provides new opportunities for identifying both functional drivers and specific biomarkers of pancreatic cancer. In this article, we review the existing literature in the field documenting the significance of aberrantly expressed and functional ncRNAs in human pancreatic cancer, and discuss how oncogenic ncRNAs may be involved in the genetic and epigenetic networks regulating functional pathways that are deregulated in this malignancy, particularly of the ncRNAs' role in drug resistance and epithelial-mesenchymal transition biological phenotype, with the aim of analyzing the feasibility of clinical application of ncRNAs in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  2. The non-coding RNA BC1 regulates experience-dependent structural plasticity and learning.

    PubMed

    Briz, Victor; Restivo, Leonardo; Pasciuto, Emanuela; Juczewski, Konrad; Mercaldo, Valentina; Lo, Adrian C; Baatsen, Pieter; Gounko, Natalia V; Borreca, Antonella; Girardi, Tiziana; Luca, Rossella; Nys, Julie; Poorthuis, Rogier B; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Fisone, Gilberto; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Arckens, Lutgarde; Krieger, Patrik; Meredith, Rhiannon; Bagni, Claudia

    2017-08-17

    The brain cytoplasmic (BC1) RNA is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) involved in neuronal translational control. Absence of BC1 is associated with altered glutamatergic transmission and maladaptive behavior. Here, we show that pyramidal neurons in the barrel cortex of BC1 knock out (KO) mice display larger excitatory postsynaptic currents and increased spontaneous activity in vivo. Furthermore, BC1 KO mice have enlarged spine heads and postsynaptic densities and increased synaptic levels of glutamate receptors and PSD-95. Of note, BC1 KO mice show aberrant structural plasticity in response to whisker deprivation, impaired texture novel object recognition and altered social behavior. Thus, our study highlights a role for BC1 RNA in experience-dependent plasticity and learning in the mammalian adult neocortex, and provides insight into the function of brain ncRNAs regulating synaptic transmission, plasticity and behavior, with potential relevance in the context of intellectual disabilities and psychiatric disorders.Brain cytoplasmic (BC1) RNA is a non-coding RNA that has been implicated in translational regulation, seizure, and anxiety. Here, the authors show that in the cortex, BC1 RNA is required for sensory deprivation-induced structural plasticity of dendritic spines, as well as for correct sensory learning and social behaviors.

  3. Long Non-Coding RNAs As Potential Novel Prognostic Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saus, Ester; Brunet-Vega, Anna; Iraola-Guzmán, Susana; Pegueroles, Cinta; Gabaldón, Toni; Pericay, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of death worldwide. Surgery is usually the first line of treatment for patients with CRC but many tumors with similar histopathological features show significantly different clinical outcomes. The discovery of robust prognostic biomarkers in patients with CRC is imperative to achieve more effective treatment strategies and improve patient's care. Recent progress in next generation sequencing methods and transcriptome analysis has revealed that a much larger part of the genome is transcribed into RNA than previously assumed. Collectively referred to as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), some of these RNA molecules such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to be altered and to play critical roles in tumor biology. This discovery leads to exciting possibilities for personalized cancer diagnosis, and therapy. Many lncRNAs are tissue and cancer-type specific and have already revealed to be useful as prognostic markers. In this review, we focus on recent findings concerning aberrant expression of lncRNAs in CRC tumors and emphasize their prognostic potential in CRC. Further studies focused on the mechanisms of action of lncRNAs will contribute to the development of novel biomarkers for diagnosis and disease progression. PMID:27148353

  4. Biological role of long non-coding RNA in head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Kolenda, Tomasz; Guglas, Kacper; Ryś, Marcel; Bogaczyńska, Marta; Teresiak, Anna; Bliźniak, Renata; Łasińska, Izabela; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Lamperska, Katarzyna M

    2017-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are one of the worst prognosis cancers with high mortality of patients. The treatment strategy is primarily based on surgery and radiotherapy but chemotherapy is also used. Every year the knowledge concerning HNSCC biology is updated with new elements such as the recent discovered molecules - long non-coding RNAs. Long non-coding RNAs are involved in regulatory processes in the cells. It has been revealed that the expression levels of lncRNAs are disturbed in tumor cells what results in the acquisition of their specific phenotype. lncRNAs influence cell growth, cell cycle, cell phenotype, migration and invasion ability as well as apoptosis. Development of the lncRNA panel characteristic for HNSCC and validation of specific lncRNA functions are yet to be elucidated. In this work, we collected available data concerning lncRNAs in HNSCC and characterized their biological role. We believe that the tumor examination, in the context of lncRNA expression, may lead to understanding complex biology of the cancer and improve therapeutic methods in the future.

  5. Emerging roles of non-coding RNAs in gastric cancer: Pathogenesis and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shan-Shan; Jin, Juan; Xu, Xiao; Zhuo, Wei; Zhou, Tian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. However, the mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis remain largely unclear. The association of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) with cancer has been widely studied during the past decade. In general, ncRNAs have been classified as small ncRNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Emerging evidence shows that miRNAs and lncRNAs play key roles in the formation and progression of many cancers. In this review, we focus on the regulation of miRNAs and lncRNAs in gastric cancer. miRNAs and lncRNAs appear to be involved in gastric tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis and in establishment of the gastric tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms. Furthermore, we also discuss the possibilities of establishing miRNAs and lncRNAs as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for gastric cancer. Taken together, we summarize the emerging roles of ncRNAs in gastric cancer development and their possible clinical significance. PMID:26811659

  6. Identification of a conserved sequence in the non-coding regions of many human genes

    SciTech Connect

    Donehower, L.A.; Slagle, B.L.; Wilde, M.; Darlington, G.; Butel, J.S. )

    1989-01-25

    The authors have analyzed a sequence of approximately 70 base pairs (bp) that shows a high degree of similarity to sequences present in the non-coding regions of a number of human and other mammalian genes. The sequence was discovered in a fragment of human genomic DNA adjacent to an integrated hepatitis B virus genome in cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. When one of the viral flanking sequences was compared to nucleotide sequences in GenBank, more than thirty human genes were identified that contained a similar sequence in their non-coding regions. This element was highly conserved at the same position within the corresponding human and mouse genes for myoglobin and N-myc, indicating evolutionary conservation and possible functional importance. Preliminary DNase I footprinting data suggested that the element or its adjacent sequences may bind nuclear factors to generate specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. The size, structure, and evolutionary conservation of this sequence indicates that it is distinct from other types of short interspersed repetitive elements. It is possible that the element may have a cis-acting functional role in the genome.

  7. Comprehensive characterization of cancer subtype associated long non-coding RNAs and their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weihong; Luo, Jiancheng; Jiao, Shunchang

    2014-10-13

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a kind of RNAs with regulation that participate fundamental cellular processes via diverse mechanisms. Despite the potential importance of lncRNAs in multiple kinds of cancer has been well studied, no comprehensive survey of cancer subtype associated lncRNAs. Here, we performed an array-based transcriptional survey of lncRNAs across 150 lung cancer samples comprising both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, and 306 breast cancer patients with clear clinical information. In lung cancer, 72 lncRNAs are identified to be associated with tumor subtypes and their functions as well as the associated proteins are predicted by constructing coding-non-coding co-expression network. The results suggest that they are mostly related with epidermis development, cell adhesion and response to stimulus. The validation results show the high concordance and confirmed the robust of the identification results. In breast cancer, we found 3 lncRNA genes are associated with estrogen receptor α (ER) positive and ER negative subtypes and tumor histologic grade. Survival (Kaplan-Meier) analysis results suggest that the expression pattern of the 3 lncRNAs is significantly correlated with clinical outcomes. The current study provides the first large-scale survey of lncRNAs within cancer subtypes, and may offer new targets for their diagnosis, therapy and prognosis.

  8. Long non-coding RNA produced by RNA polymerase V determines boundaries of heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Sethuraman, Shriya; Rowley, M Jordan; Krzyszton, Michal; Rothi, M Hafiz; Bouzit, Lilia; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T

    2016-01-01

    RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing is a conserved process where small RNAs target transposons and other sequences for repression by establishing chromatin modifications. A central element of this process are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), which in Arabidopsis thaliana are produced by a specialized RNA polymerase known as Pol V. Here we show that non-coding transcription by Pol V is controlled by preexisting chromatin modifications located within the transcribed regions. Most Pol V transcripts are associated with AGO4 but are not sliced by AGO4. Pol V-dependent DNA methylation is established on both strands of DNA and is tightly restricted to Pol V-transcribed regions. This indicates that chromatin modifications are established in close proximity to Pol V. Finally, Pol V transcription is preferentially enriched on edges of silenced transposable elements, where Pol V transcribes into TEs. We propose that Pol V may play an important role in the determination of heterochromatin boundaries. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19092.001 PMID:27779094

  9. Identifying (non-)coding RNAs and small peptides: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Andrea; Valen, Eivind; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, high-throughput studies have identified many novel transcripts. While their existence is undisputed, their coding potential and functionality have remained controversial. Recent computational approaches guided by ribosome profiling have indicated that translation is far more pervasive than anticipated and takes place on many transcripts previously assumed to be non-coding. Some of these newly discovered translated transcripts encode short, functional proteins that had been missed in prior screens. Other transcripts are translated, but it might be the process of translation rather than the resulting peptides that serves a function. Here, we review annotation studies in zebrafish to discuss the challenges of placing RNAs onto the continuum that ranges from functional protein-encoding mRNAs to potentially non-functional peptide-producing RNAs to non-coding RNAs. As highlighted by the discovery of the novel signaling peptide Apela/ELABELA/Toddler, accurate annotations can give rise to exciting opportunities to identify the functions of previously uncharacterized transcripts.

  10. Non-Coding RNAs are Differentially Expressed by Nocardia brasiliensis in Vitro and in Experimental Actinomycetoma.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Rabadán, Josué S; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Espín-Ocampo, Guadalupe; Méndez-Tovar, Luis J; Maya-Pineda, Héctor Rubén; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca

    2017-01-01

    Nocardia spp. are common soil-inhabiting bacteria that frequently infect humans through traumatic injuries or inhalation routes and cause infections, such as actinomycetoma and nocardiosis, respectively. Nocardia brasiliensis is the main aetiological agent of actinomycetoma in various countries. Many bacterial non-coding RNAs are regulators of genes associated with virulence factors. The aim of this work was to identify non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) expressed during infection conditions and in free-living form (in vitro) in Nocardia brasiliensis. The N. brasiliensis transcriptome (predominately < 200 nucleotides) was determined by RNA next-generation sequencing in both conditions. A total of seventy ncRNAs were identified in both conditions. Among these ncRNAs, 18 were differentially expressed, 12 were located within intergenic regions, and 2 were encoded as antisense of 2 different genes. Finally, 10 of these ncRNAs were studied by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and/or quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, 3 transcripts corresponded to tRNA-derived fragments (tRNAs(Cys, Met, Thr)), and one transcript was overlapped between an intergenic region and the 5´end of the 23S rRNA. Expression of these last four transcripts was increased during N. brasiliensis infection compared with the in vitro conditions. The results of this work suggest a possible role for these transcripts in the regulation of virulence genes in actinomycetoma pathogenesis.

  11. microRNAs: short non-coding bullets of gain of function mutant p53 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Donzelli, Sara; Strano, Sabrina; Blandino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    TP53 gene mutations are present in more than half of all human cancers. The resulting proteins are mostly full-length with a single aminoacid change and are abundantly present in cancer cells. Some of mutant p53 proteins gain oncogenic activities through which actively contribute to the aberrant cell proliferation, increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli and ability to metastatize of cancer cells. Gain of function mutant p53 proteins can transcriptionally regulate the expression of a large plethora of target genes. This mainly occurs through the formation of oncogenic transcriptional competent complexes that include mutant p53 protein, known transcription factors, posttranslational modifiers and scaffold proteins. Mutant p53 protein can also transcriptionally regulate the expression of microRNAs, small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Each microRNA can putatively target the expression of hundred mRNAs and consequently impact on many cellular functions. Thus, gain of function mutant p53 proteins can exert their oncogenic activities through the modulation of both non-coding and coding regions of human genome. PMID:25594041

  12. Identification of a conserved sequence in the non-coding regions of many human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Donehower, L A; Slagle, B L; Wilde, M; Darlington, G; Butel, J S

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed a sequence of approximately 70 base pairs (bp) that shows a high degree of similarity to sequences present in the non-coding regions of a number of human and other mammalian genes. The sequence was discovered in a fragment of human genomic DNA adjacent to an integrated hepatitis B virus genome in cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. When one of the viral flanking sequences was compared to nucleotide sequences in GenBank, more than thirty human genes were identified that contained a similar sequence in their non-coding regions. The sequence element was usually found once or twice in a gene, either in an intron or in the 5' or 3' flanking regions. It did not share any similarities with known short interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs) or presently known gene regulatory elements. This element was highly conserved at the same position within the corresponding human and mouse genes for myoglobin and N-myc, indicating evolutionary conservation and possible functional importance. Preliminary DNase I footprinting data suggested that the element or its adjacent sequences may bind nuclear factors to generate specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. The size, structure, and evolutionary conservation of this sequence indicates that it is distinct from other types of short interspersed repetitive elements. It is possible that the element may have a cis-acting functional role in the genome. Images PMID:2536922

  13. Deregulated expression of long non-coding RNA UCA1 in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sedlarikova, Lenka; Gromesova, Barbora; Kubaczkova, Veronika; Radova, Lenka; Filipova, Jana; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Brozova, Lucie; Velichova, Roberta; Almasi, Martina; Penka, Miroslav; Bezdekova, Renata; Stork, Martin; Adam, Zdenek; Pour, Ludek; Krejci, Marta; Kuglík, Petr; Hajek, Roman; Sevcikova, Sabina

    2017-09-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are RNA transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides that are not translated into proteins. They are involved in pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer and have a potential to serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers. We aimed to investigate lncRNA expression profiles in bone marrow plasma cells (BMPCs) of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients in comparison to normal BMPCs of healthy donors (HD) in a three-phase biomarker study. Expression profile of 83 lncRNA was performed by RT2 lncRNA PCR Array (Qiagen), followed by quantitative real-time PCR using specific TaqMan non-coding RNA assays analyzing 84 newly diagnosed MM patients and 25 HD. Our analysis revealed dysregulation of two lncRNAs; NEAT1 (sensitivity of 55.0% and specificity of 79.0%) and UCA1 (sensitivity of 85.0% and specificity of 94.7%). UCA1 levels correlated with albumin and monoclonal immunoglobulin serum levels, cytogenetic aberrations, and survival of MM patients. Our study suggests a possible prognostic impact of UCA1 expression levels on MM patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Computational identification of human long intergenic non-coding RNAs using a GA-SVM algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqiu; Li, Yang; Wang, Qi; Lv, Yingli; Wang, Shiyuan; Chen, Xi; Yu, Xuexin; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a new type of non-coding RNAs and are closely related with the occurrence and development of diseases. In previous studies, most lincRNAs have been identified through next-generation sequencing. Because lincRNAs exhibit tissue-specific expression, the reproducibility of lincRNA discovery in different studies is very poor. In this study, not including lincRNA expression, we used the sequence, structural and protein-coding potential features as potential features to construct a classifier that can be used to distinguish lincRNAs from non-lincRNAs. The GA-SVM algorithm was performed to extract the optimized feature subset. Compared with several feature subsets, the five-fold cross validation results showed that this optimized feature subset exhibited the best performance for the identification of human lincRNAs. Moreover, the LincRNA Classifier based on Selected Features (linc-SF) was constructed by support vector machine (SVM) based on the optimized feature subset. The performance of this classifier was further evaluated by predicting lincRNAs from two independent lincRNA sets. Because the recognition rates for the two lincRNA sets were 100% and 99.8%, the linc-SF was found to be effective for the prediction of human lincRNAs.

  15. Long Non-coding RNA in Neurons: New Players in Early Response to BDNF Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aliperti, Vincenza; Donizetti, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin family member that is highly expressed and widely distributed in the brain. BDNF is critical for neural survival and plasticity both during development and in adulthood, and dysfunction in its signaling may contribute to a number of neurodegenerative disorders. Deep understanding of the BDNF-activated molecular cascade may thus help to find new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. One interesting direction is related to the early phase of BDNF-dependent gene expression regulation, which is responsible for the activation of selective gene programs that lead to stable functional and structural remodeling of neurons. Immediate-early coding genes activated by BDNF are under investigation, but the involvement of the non-coding RNAs is largely unexplored, especially the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). lncRNAs are emerging as key regulators that can orchestrate different aspects of nervous system development, homeostasis, and plasticity, making them attractive candidate markers and therapeutic targets for brain diseases. We used microarray technology to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs in the immediate response phase of BDNF stimulation in a neuronal cell model. Our observations on the putative functional role of lncRNAs provide clues to their involvement as master regulators of gene expression cascade triggered by BDNF.

  16. Pan-cancer transcriptomic analysis associates long non-coding RNAs with key mutational driver events

    PubMed Central

    Ashouri, Arghavan; Sayin, Volkan I.; Van den Eynden, Jimmy; Singh, Simranjit X.; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Larsson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) lie interspersed with coding genes across the genome, and a small subset has been implicated as downstream effectors in oncogenic pathways. Here we make use of transcriptome and exome sequencing data from thousands of tumours across 19 cancer types, to identify lncRNAs that are induced or repressed in relation to somatic mutations in key oncogenic driver genes. Our screen confirms known coding and non-coding effectors and also associates many new lncRNAs to relevant pathways. The associations are often highly reproducible across cancer types, and while many lncRNAs are co-expressed with their protein-coding hosts or neighbours, some are intergenic and independent. We highlight lncRNAs with possible functions downstream of the tumour suppressor TP53 and the master antioxidant transcription factor NFE2L2. Our study provides a comprehensive overview of lncRNA transcriptional alterations in relation to key driver mutational events in human cancers.

  17. Whole transcriptome microarrays identify long non-coding RNAs associated with cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Hamad, Eman A.; Vausort, Mélanie; Funakoshi, Hajime; Nicot, Nathalie; Nazarov, Petr V.; Vallar, Laurent; Feldman, Arthur M.; Wagner, Daniel R.; Devaux, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently emerged as a novel group of non-coding RNAs able to regulate gene expression. While their role in cardiac disease is only starting to be understood, their involvement in cardiac hypertrophy is poorly known. We studied the association between lncRNAs and left ventricular hypertrophy using whole transcriptome microarrays. Wild-type mice and mice overexpressing the adenosine A2A receptor were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) to induce left ventricular hypertrophy. Expression profiles of lncRNAs in the heart were characterized using genome-wide microarrays. An analytical pipeline was specifically developed to extract lncRNA data from microarrays. We identified 2 lncRNAs up-regulated and 3 lncRNAs down-regulated in the hearts of A2A-receptor overexpressing-mice subjected to TAC compared to wild-type mice. Differential expression of these 2 lncRNAs was validated by quantitative PCR. Complete microarray dataset is available at Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) under the accession number GSE45423. Here, we describe in details the experimental design, microarray performance and analysis. PMID:26484228

  18. Photoautotrophic organisms control microbial abundance and diversity in biological soil crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamm, Alexandra; Maier, Stefanie; Wu, Dianming; Caesar, Jennifer; Hoffman, Timm; Grube, Martin; Weber, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Vascular vegetation is typically quite sparse or even absent in dryland ecosystems all over the world, but the ground surface is not bare and largely covered by biological soil crusts (referred to as biocrusts hereafter). These biocrust communities generally comprise poikilohydric organisms. They are usually dominated by photoautotrophic cyanobacteria, lichens and mosses, growing together with heterotrophic fungi, bacteria and archaea in varying composition. Cyanobacteria-, lichen- and moss-dominated biocrusts are known to stabilize the soil and to influence the water budgets and plant establishment. The autotrophic organisms take up atmospheric CO2, and (cyano-)bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen. The intention of the present project was to study the relevance of the dominating photoautotrophic organisms for biocrust microbial composition and physiology. High-throughput sequencing revealed that soil microbiota of biocrusts largely differ from the bacterial community in bare soil. We observed that bacterial and fungal abundance (16S and 18S rRNA gene copy numbers) as well as alpha diversity was lowest in bare soil, and increasing from cyanobacteria-, and chlorolichen- to moss-dominated biocrusts. CO2 gas exchange measurements revealed large respiration rates of the soil in moss-dominated biocrusts, which was not observed for cyanobacteria- and chlorolichen-dominated biocrusts. Thus, soil respiration of moss-dominated biocrusts is mainly due to the activity of the microbial communities, whereas the microorganisms in the other biocrust types are either dormant or feature functionally different microbial communities. Our results indicate that biocrust type determines the pattern of microbial communities in the underlying soil layer.

  19. Enhanced lipid accumulation of photoautotrophic microalgae by high-dose CO2 mimics a heterotrophic characterization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhilan; Dou, Xiao; Wu, Jun; He, Bing; Wang, Yuancong; Chen, Yi-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae possess higher photosynthetic efficiency and accumulate more neutral lipids when supplied with high-dose CO2. However, the nature of lipid accumulation under conditions of elevated CO2 has not been fully elucidated so far. We now revealed that the enhanced lipid accumulation of Chlorella in high-dose CO2 was as efficient as under heterotrophic conditions and this may be attributed to the driving of enlarged carbon source. Both photoautotrophic and heterotrophic cultures were established by using Chlorella sorokiniana CS-1. A series of changes in the carbon fixation, lipid accumulation, energy conversion, and carbon-lipid conversion under high-dose CO2 (1-10%) treatment were characterized subsequently. The daily carbon fixation rate of C. sorokiniana LS-2 in 10% CO2 aeration was significantly increased compared with air CO2. Correspondingly, double oil content (28%) was observed in 10% CO2 aeration, close to 32.3% produced under heterotrophic conditions. In addition, with 10% CO2 aeration, the overall energy yield (Ψ) in Chlorella reached 12.4 from 7.3% (with air aeration) because of the enhanced daily carbon fixation rates. This treatment also improved the energetic lipid yield (Ylipid/Es) with 4.7-fold, tending to the heterotrophic parameters. More significantly, 2.2 times of carbon-lipid conversion efficiency (ηClipid/Ctotal, 42.4%) was observed in 10% CO2 aeration, towards to 53.7% in heterotrophic cultures, suggesting that more fixed carbon might flow into lipid synthesis under both 10% CO2 aeration and heterotrophic conditions. Taken together, all our evidence showed that 10% CO2 may push photoautotrophic Chlorella to display heterotrophic-like efficiency at least in lipid production. It might bring us an efficient model of lipid production based on microalgal cells with high-dose CO2, which is essential to sustain biodiesel production at large scales.

  20. Flux balance analysis of photoautotrophic metabolism: Uncovering new biological details of subsystems involved in cyanobacterial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiao; Kim, Min Kyung; Kumaraswamy, G Kenchappa; Agarwal, Ananya; Lun, Desmond S; Dismukes, G Charles

    2017-04-01

    We have constructed and experimentally tested a comprehensive genome-scale model of photoautotrophic growth, denoted iSyp821, for the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. iSyp821 incorporates a variable biomass objective function (vBOF), in which stoichiometries of the major biomass components vary according to light intensity. The vBOF was constrained to fit the measured cellular carbohydrate/protein content under different light intensities. iSyp821 provides rigorous agreement with experimentally measured cell growth rates and inorganic carbon uptake rates as a function of light intensity. iSyp821 predicts two observed metabolic transitions that occur as light intensity increases: 1) from PSI-cyclic to linear electron flow (greater redox energy), and 2) from carbon allocation as proteins (growth) to carbohydrates (energy storage) mode. iSyp821 predicts photoautotrophic carbon flux into 1) a hybrid gluconeogenesis-pentose phosphate (PP) pathway that produces glycogen by an alternative pathway than conventional gluconeogenesis, and 2) the photorespiration pathway to synthesize the essential amino acid, glycine. Quantitative fluxes through both pathways were verified experimentally by following the kinetics of formation of (13)C metabolites from (13)CO2 fixation. iSyp821 was modified to include changes in gene products (enzymes) from experimentally measured transcriptomic data and applied to estimate changes in concentrations of metabolites arising from nutrient stress. Using this strategy, we found that iSyp821 correctly predicts the observed redistribution pattern of carbon products under nitrogen depletion, including decreased rates of CO2 uptake, amino acid synthesis, and increased rates of glycogen and lipid synthesis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Non-coding cancer driver candidates identified with a sample- and position-specific model of the somatic mutation rate

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Malene; Bertl, Johanna; Guo, Qianyun; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Świtnicki, Michał; Hornshøj, Henrik; Madsen, Tobias; Hobolth, Asger; Pedersen, Jakob Skou

    2017-01-01

    Non-coding mutations may drive cancer development. Statistical detection of non-coding driver regions is challenged by a varying mutation rate and uncertainty of functional impact. Here, we develop a statistically founded non-coding driver-detection method, ncdDetect, which includes sample-specific mutational signatures, long-range mutation rate variation, and position-specific impact measures. Using ncdDetect, we screened non-coding regulatory regions of protein-coding genes across a pan-cancer set of whole-genomes (n = 505), which top-ranked known drivers and identified new candidates. For individual candidates, presence of non-coding mutations associates with altered expression or decreased patient survival across an independent pan-cancer sample set (n = 5454). This includes an antigen-presenting gene (CD1A), where 5’UTR mutations correlate significantly with decreased survival in melanoma. Additionally, mutations in a base-excision-repair gene (SMUG1) correlate with a C-to-T mutational-signature. Overall, we find that a rich model of mutational heterogeneity facilitates non-coding driver identification and integrative analysis points to candidates of potential clinical relevance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21778.001 PMID:28362259

  2. Identification of long non-coding RNAs biomarkers for early diagnosis of myocardial infarction from the dysregulated coding-non-coding co-expression network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaoyu; Jiang, Hao; Sun, Zhiguo; Gui, Yifang; Xia, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently been shown as novel promising diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers for various cancers. However, lncRNA expression patterns and their predictive value in early diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI) have not been systematically investigated. In our study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of lncRNA expression profiles in MI and found altered lncRNA expression pattern in MI compared to healthy samples. We then constructed a lncRNA-mRNA dysregulation network (DLMCEN) by integrating aberrant lncRNAs, mRNAs and their co-dysregulation relationships, and found that some of mRNAs were previously reported to be involved in cardiovascular disease, suggesting the functional roles of dysregulated lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of MI. Therefore, using support vector machine (SVM) and leave one out cross-validation (LOOCV), we developed a 9-lncRNA signature (termed 9LncSigAMI) from the discovery cohort which could distinguish MI patients from healthy samples with accuracy of 95.96%, sensitivity of 93.88% and specificity of 98%, and validated its predictive power in early diagnosis of MI in another completely independent cohort. Functional analysis demonstrated that these nine lncRNA biomarkers in the 9LncSigAMI may be involved in myocardial innate immune and inflammatory response, and their deregulation may lead to the dysfunction of the inflammatory and immune system contributing to MI recurrence. With prospective validation, the 9LncSigAMI identified by our work will provide additional diagnostic information beyond other known clinical parameters, and increase the understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of MI. PMID:27634901

  3. Long non-coding RNAs as novel therapeutic targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lavorgna, Giovanni; Vago, Riccardo; Sarmini, Mohamad; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea; Bellone, Matteo

    2016-08-01

    Thanks to impressive technology advancements, pervasive expression of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has been recently identified in the genome of numerous cancers. Long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) belong to a new class of ncRNAs including tens of thousands different species. A fraction of these molecules shows a striking cancer-enriched expression pattern, suggesting an essential role in tumor cells and, possibly, a utility in therapeutic terms. This review aims at summarizing current knowledge for the identification and validation of lncRNAs as therapeutics targets in tumors. Both in-silico and wet-biology resources are presented in relation to the many challenges that the scientific community still needs to address in terms of lncRNA identification, stratification, patient personalization, drug delivery and toxicity.

  4. The role of non-coding RNAs in male sex determination and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rastetter, Raphael H; Smith, Craig A; Wilhelm, Dagmar

    2015-09-01

    A complex network of gene regulation and interaction drives male sex determination and differentiation. While many important protein-coding genes that are necessary for proper male development have been identified, many disorders in human sex development are still unexplained at the molecular level. This suggests that key factors and regulatory mechanisms are still unknown. In recent years, extensive data have shown that different classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play a role in almost all developmental and physiological pathways. Here we review what is known about their role in male sex determination and differentiation not only in mammals, but also other species. While for some processes a key role for ncRNA has been identified, we are still far from having a complete picture.

  5. The role of long non-coding RNAs in neurodevelopment, brain function and neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Thomas C.; Morris, Kevin V.; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcripts with low protein-coding potential that represent a large proportion of the transcriptional output of the cell. Many lncRNAs exhibit features indicative of functionality including tissue-restricted expression, localization to distinct subcellular structures, regulated expression and evolutionary conservation. Some lncRNAs have been shown to associate with chromatin-modifying activities and transcription factors, suggesting that a common mode of action may be to guide protein complexes to target genomic loci. However, the functions (if any) of the vast majority of lncRNA transcripts are currently unknown, and the subject of investigation. Here, we consider the putative role(s) of lncRNAs in neurodevelopment and brain function with an emphasis on the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Associations of lncRNAs with neurodevelopmental/neuropsychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration and brain cancers are also discussed. PMID:25135968

  6. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs). Corrected Copy, Aug. 25, 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This report contains the outcome of the assessment and the findings, observations, and NESC recommendations to the Agency and individual NASA Centers.

  7. Long Non-Coding RNA as Potential Biomarker for Prostate Cancer: Is It Making a Difference?

    PubMed

    Deng, Junli; Tang, Jie; Wang, Guo; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2017-03-07

    Whole genome transcriptomic analyses have identified numerous long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcripts that are increasingly implicated in cancer biology. LncRNAs are found to promote essential cancer cell functions such as proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, with the potential to serve as novel biomarkers of various cancers and to further reveal uncharacterized aspects of tumor biology. However, the biological and molecular mechanisms as well as the clinical applications of lncRNAs in diverse diseases are not completely understood, and remain to be fully explored. LncRNAs may be critical players and regulators in prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression, and could serve as potential biomarkers for prostate cancer. This review focuses on lncRNA biomarkers that are already available for clinical use and provides an overview of lncRNA biomarkers that are under investigation for clinical development in prostate cancer.

  8. Long non-coding RNAs in anti-cancer drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin-nan; Wei, Chen-chen; Wang, Zhao-xia; Sun, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the basic treatments for cancers; however, drug resistance is mainly responsible for the failure of clinical treatment. The mechanism of drug resistance is complicated because of interaction among various factors including drug efflux, DNA damage repair, apoptosis and targets mutation. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been a focus of research in the field of bioscience, and the latest studies have revealed that lncRNAs play essential roles in drug resistance in breast cancer, gastric cancer and lung cancer, et al. Dysregulation of multiple targets and pathways by lncRNAs results in the occurrence of chemoresistance. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms underlying lncRNA-mediated resistance to chemotherapy and the therapeutic potential of lncRNAs in future cancer treatment. PMID:27713133

  9. Predicting non-coding RNA genes in Escherichia coli with boosted genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Saetrom, Pål; Sneve, Ragnhild; Kristiansen, Knut I; Snøve, Ola; Grünfeld, Thomas; Rognes, Torbjørn; Seeberg, Erling

    2005-01-01

    Several methods exist for predicting non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes in Escherichia coli (E.coli). In addition to about sixty known ncRNA genes excluding tRNAs and rRNAs, various methods have predicted more than thousand ncRNA genes, but only 95 of these candidates were confirmed by more than one study. Here, we introduce a new method that uses automatic discovery of sequence patterns to predict ncRNA genes. The method predicts 135 novel candidates. In addition, the method predicts 152 genes that overlap with predictions in the literature. We test sixteen predictions experimentally, and show that twelve of these are actual ncRNA transcripts. Six of the twelve verified candidates were novel predictions. The relatively high confirmation rate indicates that many of the untested novel predictions are also ncRNAs, and we therefore speculate that E.coli contains more ncRNA genes than previously estimated.

  10. The functional role of long non-coding RNA in digestive system carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Yu; Zhu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Yan-Qiao

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Recent evidences suggest that lncRNAs play a very important role in digestive system carcinomas. However, the biological function of lncRNAs in the vast majority of digestive system carcinomas remains unclear. Recently, increasing studies has begun to explore their molecular mechanisms and regulatory networks that they are implicated in tumorigenesis. In this review, we highlight the emerging functional role of lncRNAs in digestive system carcinomas. It is becoming clear that lncRNAs will be exciting and potentially useful for diagnosis and treatment of digestive system carcinomas, some of these lncRNAs might function as both diagnostic markers and the treatment targets of digestive system carcinomas.

  11. A-to-I editing of coding and non-coding RNAs by ADARs

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) convert adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA. This A-to-I editing occurs not only in protein-coding regions of mRNAs, but also frequently in non-coding regions that contain inverted Alu repeats. Editing of coding sequences can result in the expression of functionally altered proteins that are not encoded in the genome, whereas the significance of Alu editing remains largely unknown. Certain microRNA (miRNA) precursors are also edited, leading to reduced expression or altered function of mature miRNAs. Conversely, recent studies indicate that ADAR1 forms a complex with Dicer to promote miRNA processing, revealing a new function of ADAR1 in the regulation of RNA interference. PMID:26648264

  12. Non-coding RNAs as clinical biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Prasun J

    2014-11-01

    Developing more precise diagnostics approaches to predict cancer progression and prognosis is the key to precision medicine. Overwhelming evidence now suggests that small non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs can be useful tools as biomarkers for molecular diagnostics. miRNAs can serve as biomarkers in a variety of diseases, such as neurological disorders, cardiovascular disease, Type II diabetes, cancer and so on. miRNAs can not only be utilized for monitoring treatment but also for patient stratification and hence are promising predictive biomarkers in cancer progression and prognosis, as well as in predicting drug response. This article focuses on some of the recent findings in the field of miRNA biomarkers and discusses its implications for cancer diagnostics and precision medicine.

  13. PANDAR: a pivotal cancer-related long non-coding RNA in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinglin; Li, Zhenglong; Zheng, Wangyang; Li, Xinheng; Wang, Zhidong; Cui, Yunfu; Jiang, Xingming

    2017-10-04

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), non-protein-coding RNAs that are more than 200 nucleotides in length, have been demonstrated to play a vital role in the pathophysiology of human diseases, particularly in tumorigenesis and progression of cancers. Dysregulation of lncRNAs, which serve as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, is involved in diverse cellular processes, such as proliferation, dedifferentiation, migration, invasion and anti-apoptosis. Promoter of CDKN1A antisense DNA damage-activated RNA (PANDAR), which was recently found to manifest aberrant expression in various malignancies including non-small cell lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer and gastric cancer, is a novel cancer-related lncRNA. Deregulation of PANDAR contributes to tumorigenesis and progression of cancers, suggesting that PANDAR is likely to represent a viable biomarker and therapeutic target for human cancers. In this review, we summarize current evidence regarding the biological functions and mechanisms of PANDAR during tumor development.

  14. The Underexploited Role of Non-Coding RNAs in Lysosomal Storage Diseases.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Matheus Trovão; Pereira, Vanessa Gonçalves; do Nascimento, Cinthia Castro; D'Almeida, Vânia

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a functional class of RNA involved in the regulation of several cellular processes which may modulate disease onset, progression, and prognosis. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) are a group of rare disorders caused by mutations of genes encoding specific hydrolases or non-enzymatic proteins, characterized by a wide spectrum of manifestations. The alteration of ncRNA levels is well established in several human diseases such as cancer and auto-immune disorders; however, there is a lack of information focused on the role of ncRNA in rare diseases. Recent reports related to changes in ncRNA expression and its consequences on LSD physiopathology show us the importance to keep advancing in this field. This article will summarize recent findings and provide key points for further studies on LSD and ncRNA association.

  15. Current Insights into Long Non-Coding RNAs in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Seles, Maximilian; Hutterer, Georg C.; Kiesslich, Tobias; Pummer, Karl; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Perakis, Samantha; Schwarzenbacher, Daniela; Stotz, Michael; Gerger, Armin; Pichler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents a deadly disease with rising mortality despite intensive therapeutic efforts. It comprises several subtypes in terms of distinct histopathological features and different clinical presentations. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein-coding transcripts in the genome which vary in expression levels and length and perform diverse functions. They are involved in the inititation, evolution and progression of primary cancer, as well as in the development and spread of metastases. Recently, several lncRNAs were described in RCC. This review emphasises the rising importance of lncRNAs in RCC. Moreover, it provides an outlook on their therapeutic potential in the future. PMID:27092491

  16. Long non-coding RNAs: spatial amplifiers that control nuclear structure and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Engreitz, Jesse M; Ollikainen, Noah; Guttman, Mitchell

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that mammalian genomes encode thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), many of which are now implicated in diverse biological processes. Recent work studying the molecular mechanisms of several key examples - including Xist, which orchestrates X chromosome inactivation - has provided new insights into how lncRNAs can control cellular functions by acting in the nucleus. Here we discuss emerging mechanistic insights into how lncRNAs can regulate gene expression by coordinating regulatory proteins, localizing to target loci and shaping three-dimensional (3D) nuclear organization. We explore these principles to highlight biological challenges in gene regulation, in which lncRNAs are well-suited to perform roles that cannot be carried out by DNA elements or protein regulators alone, such as acting as spatial amplifiers of regulatory signals in the nucleus.

  17. Role of non-coding RNA transcription around gene regulatory elements in transcription factor recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kunihiro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eukaryotic cells produce a variety of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), many of which have been shown to play pivotal roles in biological processes such as differentiation, maintenance of pluripotency of stem cells, and cellular response to various stresses. Genome-wide analyses have revealed that many ncRNAs are transcribed around regulatory DNA elements located proximal or distal to gene promoters, but their biological functions are largely unknown. Recently, it has been demonstrated in yeast and mouse that ncRNA transcription around gene promoters and enhancers facilitates DNA binding of transcription factors to their target sites. These results suggest universal roles of promoter/enhancer-associated ncRNAs in the recruitment of transcription factors to their binding sites. PMID:27763805

  18. A Long Journey Ahead: Long Non-coding RNAs in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    zur Bruegge, Jennifer; Einspanier, Ralf; Sharbati, Soroush

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens have coevolved with their hosts and acquired strategies to circumvent defense mechanisms of host cells. It was shown that bacteria interfere with the expression of mammalian microRNAs to modify immune signaling, autophagy, or the apoptotic machinery. Recently, a new class of regulatory RNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), was reported to have a pivotal role in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. A growing body of literature reports on specific involvement of lncRNAs in the host cell response toward bacterial infections. This mini review summarizes recent data that focuses on lncRNA function in host cells during bacterial infection and provides a perspective where future research in this regard may be going. PMID:28401065

  19. ANRIL: a pivotal tumor suppressor long non-coding RNA in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Yu, Xin; Shen, Jianxiong

    2016-05-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a family of non-protein-coding RNAs with length more than 200 nucleotides. LncRNAs played important roles in many biological processes such as cell development, proliferation, invasion and migration. Deregulation of LncRNAs was found in multiple tumors where they can act as a tumor suppressor gene or oncogene. LncRNA ANRIL was identified as an oncogene involved in a number of tumors such as gastric cancer, lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Inhibition of ANRIL suppressed the cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Increasing data has showed that ANRIL may act as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for some tumors. In our review, we summarize an overview of current knowledge concerning the expression and role of ANRIL in various cancers.

  20. Role of Non-Coding RNAs in the Transgenerational Epigenetic Transmission of the Effects of Reprotoxicants

    PubMed Central

    Larriba, Eduardo; del Mazo, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are regulatory elements of gene expression and chromatin structure. Both long and small ncRNAs can also act as inductors and targets of epigenetic programs. Epigenetic patterns can be transmitted from one cell to the daughter cell, but, importantly, also through generations. Diversity of ncRNAs is emerging with new and surprising roles. Functional interactions among ncRNAs and between specific ncRNAs and structural elements of the chromatin are drawing a complex landscape. In this scenario, epigenetic changes induced by environmental stressors, including reprotoxicants, can explain some transgenerationally-transmitted phenotypes in non-Mendelian ways. In this review, we analyze mechanisms of action of reprotoxicants upon different types of ncRNAs and epigenetic modifications causing transgenerationally transmitted characters through germ cells but affecting germ cells and reproductive systems. A functional model of epigenetic mechanisms of transgenerational transmission ncRNAs-mediated is also proposed. PMID:27023531

  1. Long Non-coding RNAs in Urologic Malignancies: Functional Roles and Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiajia; Miao, Zhijun; Xue, Boxin; Shan, Yuxi; Weng, Guobin; Shen, Bairong

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis and surveillance for metastasis and recurrences are critical issues of urologic cancer. Deregulation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) has been implicated in urologic malignancies and represents potential markers or therapeutic targets. However, the utility of lncRNA as biomarkers appears to be overstated due to heterogeneous or irreproducible results from different studies. Thus, a critical and cautious review on the biomarker potential of lncRNAs is needed. This review provides an update on new findings of lncRNA-based markers for urologic cancer. The diverse mechanisms and associated examples of lncRNAs involved during the carcinogenesis of prostate cancer, bladder cancer and renal cancer were discussed in a more balanced and critical manner, as were the suitability of lncRNAs as diagnostic or prognostics markers. PMID:27698924

  2. Association between long non-coding RNA and human rare diseases (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HE, JIN-HUA; HAN, ZE-PING; LI, YU-GUANG

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are untranslated transcripts with longer than 200 nucleotides (nt), which possess many of the structural characteristics of mRNAs, including a poly A tail, 5′-capping, and a promoter structure, but no conserved open reading frame. Moreover, lncRNA expression patterns change during differentiation and exhibit a variety of splicing patterns. Many lncRNAs are expressed at specific times and in specific tissues during development. It has been proposed that lncRNAs are involved in the epigenetic regulation of coding genes, and thus exert a powerful effect on a number of physiological and pathological processes, including the pathogenesis of many human rare diseases. PMID:24649062

  3. The role of long non-coding RNAs in neurodevelopment, brain function and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas C; Morris, Kevin V; Wood, Matthew J A

    2014-09-26

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcripts with low protein-coding potential that represent a large proportion of the transcriptional output of the cell. Many lncRNAs exhibit features indicative of functionality including tissue-restricted expression, localization to distinct subcellular structures, regulated expression and evolutionary conservation. Some lncRNAs have been shown to associate with chromatin-modifying activities and transcription factors, suggesting that a common mode of action may be to guide protein complexes to target genomic loci. However, the functions (if any) of the vast majority of lncRNA transcripts are currently unknown, and the subject of investigation. Here, we consider the putative role(s) of lncRNAs in neurodevelopment and brain function with an emphasis on the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Associations of lncRNAs with neurodevelopmental/neuropsychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration and brain cancers are also discussed.

  4. Role of Non-Coding RNAs in the Transgenerational Epigenetic Transmission of the Effects of Reprotoxicants.

    PubMed

    Larriba, Eduardo; del Mazo, Jesús

    2016-03-25

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are regulatory elements of gene expression and chromatin structure. Both long and small ncRNAs can also act as inductors and targets of epigenetic programs. Epigenetic patterns can be transmitted from one cell to the daughter cell, but, importantly, also through generations. Diversity of ncRNAs is emerging with new and surprising roles. Functional interactions among ncRNAs and between specific ncRNAs and structural elements of the chromatin are drawing a complex landscape. In this scenario, epigenetic changes induced by environmental stressors, including reprotoxicants, can explain some transgenerationally-transmitted phenotypes in non-Mendelian ways. In this review, we analyze mechanisms of action of reprotoxicants upon different types of ncRNAs and epigenetic modifications causing transgenerationally transmitted characters through germ cells but affecting germ cells and reproductive systems. A functional model of epigenetic mechanisms of transgenerational transmission ncRNAs-mediated is also proposed.

  5. MetastamiRs: Non-Coding MicroRNAs Driving Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Camarillo, Cesar; Marchat, Laurence A.; Arechaga-Ocampo, Elena; Perez-Plasencia, Carlos; del Moral-Hernandez, Oscar; Castaneda-Ortiz, Elizabeth J.; Rodriguez-Cuevas, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs of ~22 nucleotides that function as negative regulators of gene expression by either inhibiting translation or inducing deadenylation-dependent degradation of target transcripts. Notably, deregulation of miRNAs expression is associated with the initiation and progression of human cancers where they act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors contributing to tumorigenesis. Abnormal miRNA expression may provide potential diagnostic and prognostic tumor biomarkers and new therapeutic targets in cancer. Recently, several miRNAs have been shown to initiate invasion and metastasis by targeting multiple proteins that are major players in these cellular events, thus they have been denominated as metastamiRs. Here, we present a review of the current knowledge of miRNAs in cancer with a special focus on metastamiRs. In addition we discuss their potential use as novel specific markers for cancer progression. PMID:22408395

  6. The Underexploited Role of Non-Coding RNAs in Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    de Queiroz, Matheus Trovão; Pereira, Vanessa Gonçalves; do Nascimento, Cinthia Castro; D’Almeida, Vânia

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a functional class of RNA involved in the regulation of several cellular processes which may modulate disease onset, progression, and prognosis. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) are a group of rare disorders caused by mutations of genes encoding specific hydrolases or non-enzymatic proteins, characterized by a wide spectrum of manifestations. The alteration of ncRNA levels is well established in several human diseases such as cancer and auto-immune disorders; however, there is a lack of information focused on the role of ncRNA in rare diseases. Recent reports related to changes in ncRNA expression and its consequences on LSD physiopathology show us the importance to keep advancing in this field. This article will summarize recent findings and provide key points for further studies on LSD and ncRNA association. PMID:27708618

  7. Long Non-Coding RNA as Potential Biomarker for Prostate Cancer: Is It Making a Difference?

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Junli; Tang, Jie; Wang, Guo; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Whole genome transcriptomic analyses have identified numerous long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcripts that are increasingly implicated in cancer biology. LncRNAs are found to promote essential cancer cell functions such as proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, with the potential to serve as novel biomarkers of various cancers and to further reveal uncharacterized aspects of tumor biology. However, the biological and molecular mechanisms as well as the clinical applications of lncRNAs in diverse diseases are not completely understood, and remain to be fully explored. LncRNAs may be critical players and regulators in prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression, and could serve as potential biomarkers for prostate cancer. This review focuses on lncRNA biomarkers that are already available for clinical use and provides an overview of lncRNA biomarkers that are under investigation for clinical development in prostate cancer. PMID:28272371

  8. New technologies accelerate the exploration of non-coding RNAs in horticultural plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degao; Mewalal, Ritesh; Hu, Rongbin; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan

    2017-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), that is, RNAs not translated into proteins, are crucial regulators of a variety of biological processes in plants. While protein-encoding genes have been relatively well-annotated in sequenced genomes, accounting for a small portion of the genome space in plants, the universe of plant ncRNAs is rapidly expanding. Recent advances in experimental and computational technologies have generated a great momentum for discovery and functional characterization of ncRNAs. Here we summarize the classification and known biological functions of plant ncRNAs, review the application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and ribosome profiling technology to ncRNA discovery in horticultural plants and discuss the application of new technologies, especially the new genome-editing tool clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems, to functional characterization of plant ncRNAs.

  9. An improved canine genome and a comprehensive catalogue of coding genes and non-coding transcripts.

    PubMed

    Hoeppner, Marc P; Lundquist, Andrew; Pirun, Mono; Meadows, Jennifer R S; Zamani, Neda; Johnson, Jeremy; Sundström, Görel; Cook, April; FitzGerald, Michael G; Swofford, Ross; Mauceli, Evan; Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi; Greka, Anna; Alföldi, Jessica; Abouelleil, Amr; Aftuck, Lynne; Bessette, Daniel; Berlin, Aaron; Brown, Adam; Gearin, Gary; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, J Pendexter; Priest, Margaret; Shea, Terrance; Turner-Maier, Jason; Zimmer, Andrew; Lander, Eric S; di Palma, Federica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Grabherr, Manfred G

    2014-01-01

    The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, is a well-established model system for mapping trait and disease loci. While the original draft sequence was of good quality, gaps were abundant particularly in promoter regions of the genome, negatively impacting the annotation and study of candidate genes. Here, we present an improved genome build, canFam3.1, which includes 85 MB of novel sequence and now covers 99.8% of the euchromatic portion of the genome. We also present multiple RNA-Sequencing data sets from 10 different canine tissues to catalog ∼175,000 expressed loci. While about 90% of the coding genes previously annotated by EnsEMBL have measurable expression in at least one sample, the number of transcript isoforms detected by our data expands the EnsEMBL annotations by a factor of four. Syntenic comparison with the human genome revealed an additional ∼3,000 loci that are characterized as protein coding in human and were also expressed in the dog, suggesting that those were previously not annotated in the EnsEMBL canine gene set. In addition to ∼20,700 high-confidence protein coding loci, we found ∼4,600 antisense transcripts overlapping exons of protein coding genes, ∼7,200 intergenic multi-exon transcripts without coding potential, likely candidates for long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) and ∼11,000 transcripts were reported by two different library construction methods but did not fit any of the above categories. Of the lincRNAs, about 6,000 have no annotated orthologs in human or mouse. Functional analysis of two novel transcripts with shRNA in a mouse kidney cell line altered cell morphology and motility. All in all, we provide a much-improved annotation of the canine genome and suggest regulatory functions for several of the novel non-coding transcripts.

  10. Characterization of Sus scrofa small non-coding RNAs present in both female and male gonads.

    PubMed

    Kowalczykiewicz, Dorota; Świercz, Aleksandra; Handschuh, Luiza; Leśniak, Katarzyna; Figlerowicz, Marek; Wrzesinski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) are indispensable for proper germ cell development, emphasizing the need for greater elucidation of the mechanisms of germline development and regulation of this process by sncRNAs. We used deep sequencing to characterize three families of small non-coding RNAs (piRNAs, miRNAs, and tRFs) present in Sus scrofa gonads and focused on the small RNA fraction present in both male and female gonads. Although similar numbers of reads were obtained from both types of gonads, the number of unique RNA sequences in the ovaries was several times lower. Of the sequences detected in the testes, 2.6% of piRNAs, 9% of miRNAs, and 10% of tRFs were also present in the ovaries. Notably, the majority of the shared piRNAs mapped to ribosomal RNAs and were derived from clustered loci. In addition, the most abundant miRNAs present in the ovaries and testes are conserved and are involved in many biological processes such as the regulation of homeobox genes, the control of cell proliferation, and carcinogenesis. Unexpectedly, we detected a novel sncRNA type, the tRFs, which are 30-36-nt RNA fragments derived from tRNA molecules, in gonads. Analysis of S. scrofa piRNAs show that testes specific piRNAs are biased for 5' uracil but both testes and ovaries specific piRNAs are not biased for adenine at the 10th nucleotide position. These observations indicate that adult porcine piRNAs are predominantly produced by a primary processing pathway or other mechanisms and secondary piRNAs generated by ping-pong mechanism are absent.

  11. Transcriptator: An Automated Computational Pipeline to Annotate Assembled Reads and Identify Non Coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Evangelista, Daniela; Zuccaro, Antonio; Guarracino, Mario Rosario

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq is a new tool to measure RNA transcript counts, using high-throughput sequencing at an extraordinary accuracy. It provides quantitative means to explore the transcriptome of an organism of interest. However, interpreting this extremely large data into biological knowledge is a problem, and biologist-friendly tools are lacking. In our lab, we developed Transcriptator, a web application based on a computational Python pipeline with a user-friendly Java interface. This pipeline uses the web services available for BLAST (Basis Local Search Alignment Tool), QuickGO and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery) tools. It offers a report on statistical analysis of functional and Gene Ontology (GO) annotation's enrichment. It helps users to identify enriched biological themes, particularly GO terms, pathways, domains, gene/proteins features and protein-protein interactions related informations. It clusters the transcripts based on functional annotations and generates a tabular report for functional and gene ontology annotations for each submitted transcript to the web server. The implementation of QuickGo web-services in our pipeline enable the users to carry out GO-Slim analysis, whereas the integration of PORTRAIT (Prediction of transcriptomic non coding RNA (ncRNA) by ab initio methods) helps to identify the non coding RNAs and their regulatory role in transcriptome. In summary, Transcriptator is a useful software for both NGS and array data. It helps the users to characterize the de-novo assembled reads, obtained from NGS experiments for non-referenced organisms, while it also performs the functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed transcripts/genes for both RNA-seq and micro-array experiments. It generates easy to read tables and interactive charts for better understanding of the data. The pipeline is modular in nature, and provides an opportunity to add new plugins in the future. Web application is freely

  12. Intronic RNAs constitute the major fraction of the non-coding RNA in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The function of RNA from the non-coding (the so called “dark matter”) regions of the genome has been a subject of considerable recent debate. Perhaps the most controversy is regarding the function of RNAs found in introns of annotated transcripts, where most of the reads that map outside of exons are usually found. However, it has been reported that the levels of RNA in introns are minor relative to those of the corresponding exons, and that changes in the levels of intronic RNAs correlate tightly with that of adjacent exons. This would suggest that RNAs produced from the vast expanse of intronic space are just pieces of pre-mRNAs or excised introns en route to degradation. Results We present data that challenges the notion that intronic RNAs are mere by-standers in the cell. By performing a highly quantitative RNAseq analysis of transcriptome changes during an inflammation time course, we show that intronic RNAs have a number of features that would be expected from functional, standalone RNA species. We show that there are thousands of introns in the mouse genome that generate RNAs whose overall abundance, which changes throughout the inflammation timecourse, and other properties suggest that they function in yet unknown ways. Conclusions So far, the focus of non-coding RNA discovery has shied away from intronic regions as those were believed to simply encode parts of pre-mRNAs. Results presented here suggest a very different situation – the sequences encoded in the introns appear to harbor a yet unexplored reservoir of novel, functional RNAs. As such, they should not be ignored in surveys of functional transcripts or other genomic studies. PMID:23006825

  13. Comparison of non-coding RNAs in human and canine cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Siegfried; Willenbrock, Saskia; Nolte, Ingo; Escobar, Hugo Murua

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of the post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) by small non-protein-coding RNAs is considered as a major breakthrough in biology. In the last decade we just started to realize the biologic function and complexity of gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs. PTGS is a conserved phenomenon which was observed in various species such as fungi, worms, plants, and mammals. Micro RNAs (miRNA) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are two gene silencing mediators constituting an evolutionary conserved class of non-coding RNAs regulating many biological processes in eukaryotes. As this small RNAs appear to regulate gene expression at translational and transcriptional level it is not surprising that during the last decade many human diseases among them Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases, and various cancer types were associated with deregulated miRNA expression. Consequently small RNAs are considered to hold big promises as therapeutic agents. However, despite of the enormous therapeutic potential many questions remain unanswered. A major critical point, when evaluating novel therapeutic approaches, is the transfer of in vitro settings to an in vivo model. Classical animal models rely on the laboratory kept animals under artificial conditions and often missing an intact immune system. Model organisms with spontaneously occurring tumors as e.g., dogs provide the possibility to evaluate therapeutic agents under the surveillance of an in intact immune system and thereby providing an authentic tumor reacting scenario. Considering the genomic similarity between canines and humans and the advantages of the dog as cancer model system for human neoplasias the analyses of the complex role of small RNAs in canine tumor development could be of major value for both species. Herein we discuss comparatively the role of miRNAs in human and canine cancer development and highlight the potential and advantages of the model organism dog for tumor research. PMID

  14. Identification of Long Non-Coding RNAs Deregulated in Multiple Myeloma Cells Resistant to Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Ehsan; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Driscoll, James J.

    2016-01-01

    While the clinical benefit of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) for multiple myeloma (MM) treatment remains unchallenged, dose-limiting toxicities and the inevitable emergence of drug resistance limit their long-term utility. Disease eradication is compromised by drug resistance that is either present de novo or therapy-induced, which accounts for the majority of tumor relapses and MM-related deaths. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a broad class of RNA molecules, including long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), that do not encode proteins but play a major role in regulating the fundamental cellular processes that control cancer initiation, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. While lncRNAs have recently attracted significant attention as therapeutic targets to potentially improve cancer treatment, identification of lncRNAs that are deregulated in cells resistant to PIs has not been previously addressed. We have modeled drug resistance by generating three MM cell lines with acquired resistance to either bortezomib, carfilzomib, or ixazomib. Genome-wide profiling identified lncRNAs that were significantly deregulated in all three PI-resistant cell lines relative to the drug-sensitive parental cell line. Strikingly, certain lncRNAs deregulated in the three PI-resistant cell lines were also deregulated in MM plasma cells isolated from newly diagnosed patients compared to healthy plasma cells. Taken together, these preliminary studies strongly suggest that lncRNAs represent potential therapeutic targets to prevent or overcome drug resistance. More investigations are ongoing to expand these initial studies in a greater number of MM patients to better define lncRNAs signatures that contribute to PI resistance in MM. PMID:27782060

  15. Developmental programming of long non-coding RNAs during postnatal liver maturation in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Paulson, Ariel; Li, Hua; Piekos, Stephanie; He, Xi; Li, Linheng; Zhong, Xiao-Bo

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a vital organ with critical functions in metabolism, protein synthesis, and immune defense. Most of the liver functions are not mature at birth and many changes happen during postnatal liver development. However, it is unclear what changes occur in liver after birth, at what developmental stages they occur, and how the developmental processes are regulated. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in organ development and cell differentiation. Here, we analyzed the transcriptome of lncRNAs in mouse liver from perinatal (day -2) to adult (day 60) by RNA-Sequencing, with an attempt to understand the role of lncRNAs in liver maturation. We found around 15,000 genes expressed, including about 2,000 lncRNAs. Most lncRNAs were expressed at a lower level than coding RNAs. Both coding RNAs and lncRNAs displayed three major ontogenic patterns: enriched at neonatal, adolescent, or adult stages. Neighboring coding and non-coding RNAs showed the trend to exhibit highly correlated ontogenic expression patterns. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that some lncRNAs enriched at neonatal ages have their neighbor protein coding genes also enriched at neonatal ages and associated with cell proliferation, immune activation related processes, tissue organization pathways, and hematopoiesis; other lncRNAs enriched at adolescent ages have their neighbor protein coding genes associated with different metabolic processes. These data reveal significant functional transition during postnatal liver development and imply the potential importance of lncRNAs in liver maturation.

  16. Cigarette smoke exposure-associated alterations to non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Maccani, Matthew A; Knopik, Valerie S

    2012-01-01

    Environmental exposures vary by timing, severity, and frequency and may have a number of deleterious effects throughout the life course. The period of in utero development, for example, is one of the most crucial stages of development during which adverse environmental exposures can both alter the growth and development of the fetus as well as lead to aberrant fetal programming, increasing disease risk. During fetal development and beyond, the plethora of exposures, including nutrients, drugs, stress, and trauma, influence health, development, and survival. Recent research in environmental epigenetics has investigated the roles of environmental exposures in influencing epigenetic modes of gene regulation during pregnancy and at various stages of life. Many relatively common environmental exposures, such as cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and drug use, may have consequences for the expression and function of non-coding RNA (ncRNA), important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. A number of ncRNA have been discovered, including microRNA (miRNA), Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA), and long non-coding RNA (long ncRNA). The best-characterized species of ncRNA are miRNA, the mature forms of which are ∼22 nucleotides in length and capable of post-transcriptionally regulating target mRNA utilizing mechanisms based largely on the degree of complementarity between miRNA and target mRNA. Because miRNA can still negatively regulate gene expression when imperfectly base-paired with a target mRNA, a single miRNA can have a large number of potential mRNA targets and can regulate many different biological processes critical for health and development. The following review analyzes the current literature detailing links between cigarette smoke exposure and aberrant expression and function of ncRNA, assesses how such alterations may have consequences throughout the life course, and proposes future directions for this intriguing field of research.

  17. Functional Studies and In Silico Analyses to Evaluate Non-Coding Variants in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Frisso, Giulia; Detta, Nicola; Coppola, Pamela; Mazzaccara, Cristina; Pricolo, Maria Rosaria; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Raffaele; Salvatore, Francesco

    2016-11-10

    Point mutations are the most common cause of inherited diseases. Bioinformatics tools can help to predict the pathogenicity of mutations found during genetic screening, but they may work less well in determining the effect of point mutations in non-coding regions. In silico analysis of intronic variants can reveal their impact on the splicing process, but the consequence of a given substitution is generally not predictable. The aim of this study was to functionally test five intronic variants (MYBPC3-c.506-2A>C, MYBPC3-c.906-7G>T, MYBPC3-c.2308+3G>C, SCN5A-c.393-5C>A, and ACTC1-c.617-7T>C) found in five patients affected by inherited cardiomyopathies in the attempt to verify their pathogenic role. Analysis of the MYBPC3-c.506-2A>C mutation in mRNA from the peripheral blood of one of the patients affected by hypertrophic cardiac myopathy revealed the loss of the canonical splice site and the use of an alternative splicing site, which caused the loss of the first seven nucleotides of exon 5 (MYBPC3-G169AfsX14). In the other four patients, we generated minigene constructs and transfected them in HEK-293 cells. This minigene approach showed that MYBPC3-c.2308+3G>C and SCN5A-c.393-5C>A altered pre-mRNA processing, thus resulting in the skipping of one exon. No alterations were found in either MYBPC3-c.906-7G>T or ACTC1-c.617-7T>C. In conclusion, functional in vitro analysis of the effects of potential splicing mutations can confirm or otherwise the putative pathogenicity of non-coding mutations, and thus help to guide the patient's clinical management and improve genetic counseling in affected families.

  18. Altered long non-coding RNA transcriptomic profiles in brain microvascular endothelium after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Yuan, L; Zhang, X; Hamblin, M H; Zhu, T; Meng, F; Li, Y; Chen, Y E; Yin, K J

    2016-03-01

    The brain endothelium is an important therapeutic target for the inhibition of cerebrovascular dysfunction in ischemic stroke. Previously, we documented the important regulatory roles of microRNAs in the cerebral vasculature, in particular the cerebral vascular endothelium. However, the functional significance and molecular mechanisms of other classes of non-coding RNAs in the regulation of cerebrovascular endothelial pathophysiology after stroke are completely unknown. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology, we profiled long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) expressional signatures in primary brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro mimic of ischemic stroke conditions. After 16h of OGD exposure, the expression levels for 362 of the 10,677 lncRNAs analyzed changed significantly, including a total of 147 lncRNAs increased and 70 lncRNAs decreased by more than 2-fold. Among them, the most highly upregulated lncRNAs include Snhg12, Malat1, and lnc-OGD 1006, whereas the most highly downregulated lncRNAs include 281008D09Rik, Peg13, and lnc-OGD 3916. Alteration of the most highly upregulated/downregulated ODG-responsive lncRNAs was further confirmed in cultured BMECs after OGD as well as isolated cerebral microvessels in mice following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and 24h reperfusion by the quantitative real-time PCR approach. Moreover, promoter analysis of altered ODG-responsive endothelial lncRNA genes by bioinformatics showed substantial transcription factor binding sites on lncRNAs, implying potential transcriptional regulation of those lncRNAs. These findings are the first to identify OGD-responsive brain endothelial lncRNAs, which suggest potential pathological roles for these lncRNAs in mediating endothelial responses to ischemic stimuli. Endothelial-selective lncRNAs may function as a class of novel master regulators in cerebrovascular endothelial pathologies after ischemic stroke.

  19. An Interactive network of long non-coding RNAs facilitates the Drosophila sex determination decision

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, Brett B.; Olcese, Ursula; Cabrera, Janel R.; Horabin, Jamila I.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis in several eukaryotes shows a surprising number of transcripts which do not encode conventional messenger RNAs. Once considered noise, these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) appear capable of controlling gene expression by various means. We find Drosophila sex determination, specifically the master-switch gene Sex-lethal (Sxl), is regulated by long ncRNAs (>200 nt). The lncRNAs influence the dose sensitive establishment promoter of Sxl, SxlPe, which must be activated to specify female sex. They are primarily from two regions, R1 and R2, upstream of SxlPeand show a dynamic developmental profile. Of the four lncRNA strands only one, R2 antisense, has its peak coincident with SxlPe transcription, suggesting it may promote activation. Indeed, its expression is regulated by the X chromosome counting genes, whose dose determines whether SxlPe is transcribed. Transgenic lines which ectopically express each of the lncRNAs show they can act in trans, impacting the process of sex determination but also altering the levels of the other lncRNAs. Generally, expression of R1 is negative whereas R2 is positive to females. This ectopic expression also results in a change in the local chromatin marks, affecting the timing and strength of SxlPe transcription. The chromatin marks are those deposited by the Polycomb and Trithorax groups of chromatin modifying proteins, which we find bind to the lncRNAs. We suggest the increasing numbers of non-coding transcripts being identified are a harbinger of interacting networks similar to the one we describe. PMID:24954180

  20. Non-coding RNAs in crop genetic modification: considerations and predictable environmental risk assessments (ERA).

    PubMed

    Ramesh, S V

    2013-09-01

    Of late non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs)-mediated gene silencing is an influential tool deliberately deployed to negatively regulate the expression of targeted genes. In addition to the widely employed small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing approach, other variants like artificial miRNA (amiRNA), miRNA mimics, and artificial transacting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) are being explored and successfully deployed in developing non-coding RNA-based genetically modified plants. The ncRNA-based gene manipulations are typified with mobile nature of silencing signals, interference from viral genome-derived suppressor proteins, and an obligation for meticulous computational analysis to prevaricate any inadvertent effects. In a broad sense, risk assessment inquiries for genetically modified plants based on the expression of ncRNAs are competently addressed by the environmental risk assessment (ERA) models, currently in vogue, designed for the first generation transgenic plants which are based on the expression of heterologous proteins. Nevertheless, transgenic plants functioning on the foundation of ncRNAs warrant due attention with respect to their unique attributes like off-target or non-target gene silencing effects, small RNAs (sRNAs) persistence, food and feed safety assessments, problems in detection and tracking of sRNAs in food, impact of ncRNAs in plant protection measures, effect of mutations etc. The role of recent developments in sequencing techniques like next generation sequencing (NGS) and the ERA paradigm of the different countries in vogue are also discussed in the context of ncRNA-based gene manipulations.

  1. Genome-wide identification and characterization of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianqin; Wu, Bin; Xu, Jiang; Liu, Chang

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a white-rot fungus best-known for its medicinal activities. We have previously sequenced its genome and annotated the protein coding genes. However, long non-coding RNAs in G. lucidum genome have not been analyzed. In this study, we have identified and characterized long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA) in G. lucidum systematically. We developed a computational pipeline, which was used to analyze RNA-Seq data derived from G. lucidum samples collected from three developmental stages. A total of 402 lincRNA candidates were identified, with an average length of 609 bp. Analysis of their adjacent protein-coding genes (apcGenes) revealed that 46 apcGenes belong to the pathways of triterpenoid biosynthesis and lignin degradation, or families of cytochrome P450, mating type B genes, and carbohydrate-active enzymes. To determine if lincRNAs and these apcGenes have any interactions, the corresponding pairs of lincRNAs and apcGenes were analyzed in detail. We developed a modified 3' RACE method to analyze the transcriptional direction of a transcript. Among the 46 lincRNAs, 37 were found unidirectionally transcribed, and 9 were found bidirectionally transcribed. The expression profiles of 16 of these 37 lincRNAs were found to be highly correlated with those of the apcGenes across the three developmental stages. Among them, 11 are positively correlated (r>0.8) and 5 are negatively correlated (r<-0.8). The co-localization and co-expression of lincRNAs and those apcGenes playing important functions is consistent with the notion that lincRNAs might be important regulators for cellular processes. In summary, this represents the very first study to identify and characterize lincRNAs in the genomes of basidiomycetes. The results obtained here have laid the foundation for study of potential lincRNA-mediated expression regulation of genes in G. lucidum.

  2. DIANA-LncBase v2: indexing microRNA targets on non-coding transcripts.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Kanellos, Ilias; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Zagganas, Konstantinos; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Floros, Evangelos; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2016-01-04

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that act as post-transcriptional regulators of coding gene expression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently reported to interact with miRNAs. The sponge-like function of lncRNAs introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA interactome. DIANA-LncBase v1 provided a database of experimentally supported and in silico predicted miRNA Recognition Elements (MREs) on lncRNAs. The second version of LncBase (www.microrna.gr/LncBase) presents an extensive collection of miRNA:lncRNA interactions. The significantly enhanced database includes more than 70 000 low and high-throughput, (in)direct miRNA:lncRNA experimentally supported interactions, derived from manually curated publications and the analysis of 153 AGO CLIP-Seq libraries. The new experimental module presents a 14-fold increase compared to the previous release. LncBase v2 hosts in silico predicted miRNA targets on lncRNAs, identified with the DIANA-microT algorithm. The relevant module provides millions of predicted miRNA binding sites, accompanied with detailed metadata and MRE conservation metrics. LncBase v2 caters information regarding cell type specific miRNA:lncRNA regulation and enables users to easily identify interactions in 66 different cell types, spanning 36 tissues for human and mouse. Database entries are also supported by accurate lncRNA expression information, derived from the analysis of more than 6 billion RNA-Seq reads. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. CVD-associated non-coding RNA, ANRIL, modulates expression of atherogenic pathways in VSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Congrains, Ada; Kamide, Kei; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Oguro, Ryousuke; Yamamoto, Koichi; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANRIL maps in the strongest susceptibility locus for cardiovascular disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ANRIL leads to altered expression of tissue remodeling-related genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of ANRIL on gene expression are splicing variant specific. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANRIL affects progression of cardiovascular disease by regulating proliferation and apoptosis pathways. -- Abstract: ANRIL is a newly discovered non-coding RNA lying on the strongest genetic susceptibility locus for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the chromosome 9p21 region. Genome-wide association studies have been linking polymorphisms in this locus with CVD and several other major diseases such as diabetes and cancer. The role of this non-coding RNA in atherosclerosis progression is still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the implication of ANRIL in the modulation of gene sets directly involved in atherosclerosis. We designed and tested siRNA sequences to selectively target two exons (exon 1 and exon 19) of the transcript and successfully knocked down expression of ANRIL in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HuAoVSMC). We used a pathway-focused RT-PCR array to profile gene expression changes caused by ANRIL knock down. Notably, the genes affected by each of the siRNAs were different, suggesting that different splicing variants of ANRIL might have distinct roles in cell physiology. Our results suggest that ANRIL splicing variants play a role in coordinating tissue remodeling, by modulating the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, extra-cellular matrix remodeling and inflammatory response to finally impact in the risk of cardiovascular disease and other pathologies.

  4. Sigma: multiple alignment of weakly-conserved non-coding DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Siddharthan, Rahul

    2006-03-16

    Existing tools for multiple-sequence alignment focus on aligning protein sequence or protein-coding DNA sequence, and are often based on extensions to Needleman-Wunsch-like pairwise alignment methods. We introduce a new tool, Sigma, with a new algorithm and scoring scheme designed specifically for non-coding DNA sequence. This problem acquires importance with the increasing number of published sequences of closely-related species. In particular, studies of gene regulation seek to take advantage of comparative genomics, and recent algorithms for finding regulatory sites in phylogenetically-related intergenic sequence require alignment as a preprocessing step. Much can also be learned about evolution from intergenic DNA, which tends to evolve faster than coding DNA. Sigma uses a strategy of seeking the best possible gapless local alignments (a strategy earlier used by DiAlign), at each step making the best possible alignment consistent with existing alignments, and scores the significance of the alignment based on the lengths of the aligned fragments and a background model which may be supplied or estimated from an auxiliary file of intergenic DNA. Comparative tests of sigma with five earlier algorithms on synthetic data generated to mimic real data show excellent performance, with Sigma balancing high "sensitivity" (more bases aligned) with effective filtering of "incorrect" alignments. With real data, while "correctness" can't be directly quantified for the alignment, running the PhyloGibbs motif finder on pre-aligned sequence suggests that Sigma's alignments are superior. By taking into account the peculiarities of non-coding DNA, Sigma fills a gap in the toolbox of bioinformatics.

  5. Functional Studies and In Silico Analyses to Evaluate Non-Coding Variants in Inherited Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Frisso, Giulia; Detta, Nicola; Coppola, Pamela; Mazzaccara, Cristina; Pricolo, Maria Rosaria; D’Onofrio, Antonio; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Raffaele; Salvatore, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Point mutations are the most common cause of inherited diseases. Bioinformatics tools can help to predict the pathogenicity of mutations found during genetic screening, but they may work less well in determining the effect of point mutations in non-coding regions. In silico analysis of intronic variants can reveal their impact on the splicing process, but the consequence of a given substitution is generally not predictable. The aim of this study was to functionally test five intronic variants (MYBPC3-c.506-2A>C, MYBPC3-c.906-7G>T, MYBPC3-c.2308+3G>C, SCN5A-c.393-5C>A, and ACTC1-c.617-7T>C) found in five patients affected by inherited cardiomyopathies in the attempt to verify their pathogenic role. Analysis of the MYBPC3-c.506-2A>C mutation in mRNA from the peripheral blood of one of the patients affected by hypertrophic cardiac myopathy revealed the loss of the canonical splice site and the use of an alternative splicing site, which caused the loss of the first seven nucleotides of exon 5 (MYBPC3-G169AfsX14). In the other four patients, we generated minigene constructs and transfected them in HEK-293 cells. This minigene approach showed that MYBPC3-c.2308+3G>C and SCN5A-c.393-5C>A altered pre-mRNA processing, thus resulting in the skipping of one exon. No alterations were found in either MYBPC3-c.906-7G>T or ACTC1-c.617-7T>C. In conclusion, functional in vitro analysis of the effects of potential splicing mutations can confirm or otherwise the putative pathogenicity of non-coding mutations, and thus help to guide the patient's clinical management and improve genetic counseling in affected families. PMID:27834932

  6. Acute liver failure is associated with altered cerebral expression profiles of long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vinícius R; Secolin, Rodrigo; Vemuganti, Raghu; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Hazell, Alan S

    2017-08-24

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) represents a serious complication of acute liver failure (ALF) in which cerebral edema leading to brainstem herniation as a result of increased intracranial hypertension is a major consequence. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a significant role in coordinating gene expression, with recent studies indicating an influence in the pathogenesis of several diseases. To investigate their involvement in the cerebral pathophysiology of ALF, we profiled the expression of lncRNAs in the frontal cortex of mice at coma stage following treatment with the hepatotoxin azoxymethane. Of the 35,923 lncRNAs profiled using microarrays, 868 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in the ALF-treated group compared to the sham control group. Of these, 382 lncRNAs were upregulated and 486 lncRNAs downregulated. Pathway analysis revealed these lncRNAs target a number of biological and molecular pathways that include cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, the mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway, the insulin signaling pathway, and the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway. False discovery rate adjustment identified 9 upregulated lncRNAs, 2 of which are associated with neuroepithelial transforming gene 1 (NET1) and the monocarboxylate transporter 2 (Slc16a7), potential contributors to astrocyte cytoskeletal disruption/swelling and lactate production, respectively. Our findings suggest an important role for lncRNAs in the brain in ALF in relation to inflammation, neuropathology, and in terms of the functional basis of HE. Further work on these non-coding RNAs may lead to new therapeutic approaches for the treatment and management of cerebral dysfunction resulting from this potentially life-threatening disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A comprehensive catalogue of the coding and non-coding transcripts of the human inner ear.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Hasin-Brumshtein, Yehudit; Corneveaux, Jason J; Ohmen, Jeffrey; White, Cory; Allen, April N; Lusis, Aldons J; Van Camp, Guy; Huentelman, Matthew J; Friedman, Rick A

    2016-03-01

    The mammalian inner ear consists of the cochlea and the vestibular labyrinth (utricle, saccule, and semicircular canals), which participate in both hearing and balance. Proper development and life-long function of these structures involves a highly complex coordinated system of spatial and temporal gene expression. The characterization of the inner ear transcriptome is likely important for the functional study of auditory and vestibular components, yet, primarily due to tissue unavailability, detailed expression catalogues of the human inner ear remain largely incomplete. We report here, for the first time, comprehensive transcriptome characterization of the adult human cochlea, ampulla, saccule and utricle of the vestibule obtained from patients without hearing abnormalities. Using RNA-Seq, we measured the expression of >50,000 predicted genes corresponding to approximately 200,000 transcripts, in the adult inner ear and compared it to 32 other human tissues. First, we identified genes preferentially expressed in the inner ear, and unique either to the vestibule or cochlea. Next, we examined expression levels of specific groups of potentially interesting RNAs, such as genes implicated in hearing loss, long non-coding RNAs, pseudogenes and transcripts subject to nonsense mediated decay (NMD). We uncover the spatial specificity of expression of these RNAs in the hearing/balance system, and reveal evidence of tissue specific NMD. Lastly, we investigated the non-syndromic deafness loci to which no gene has been mapped, and narrow the list of potential candidates for each locus. These data represent the first high-resolution transcriptome catalogue of the adult human inner ear. A comprehensive identification of coding and non-coding RNAs in the inner ear will enable pathways of auditory and vestibular function to be further defined in the study of hearing and balance. Expression data are freely accessible at https://www.tgen.org/home/research/research-divisions/neurogenomics/supplementary-data/inner-ear-transcriptome.aspx.

  8. Sost, independent of the non-coding enhancer ECR5, is required for bone mechanoadaptation

    DOE PAGES

    Robling, Alexander G.; Kang, Kyung Shin; Bullock, Whitney A.; ...

    2016-09-04

    Here, sclerostin (Sost) is a negative regulator of bone formation that acts upon the Wnt signaling pathway. Sost is mechanically regulated at both mRNA and protein level such that loading represses and unloading enhances Sost expression, in osteocytes and in circulation. The non-coding evolutionarily conserved enhancer ECR5 has been previously reported as a transcriptional regulatory element required for modulating Sost expression in osteocytes. Here we explored the mechanisms by which ECR5, or several other putative transcriptional enhancers regulate Sost expression, in response to mechanical stimulation. We found that in vivo ulna loading is equally osteoanabolic in wildtype and Sost–/– mice,more » although Sost is required for proper distribution of load-induced bone formation to regions of high strain. Using Luciferase reporters carrying the ECR5 non-coding enhancer and heterologous or homologous hSOST promoters, we found that ECR5 is mechanosensitive in vitro and that ECR5-driven Luciferase activity decreases in osteoblasts exposed to oscillatory fluid flow. Yet, ECR5–/– mice showed similar magnitude of load-induced bone formation and similar periosteal distribution of bone formation to high-strain regions compared to wildtype mice. Further, we found that in contrast to Sost–/– mice, which are resistant to disuse-induced bone loss, ECR5–/– mice lose bone upon unloading to a degree similar to wildtype control mice. ECR5 deletion did not abrogate positive effects of unloading on Sost, suggesting that additional transcriptional regulators and regulatory elements contribute to load-induced regulation of Sost.« less

  9. An Improved Canine Genome and a Comprehensive Catalogue of Coding Genes and Non-Coding Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Marc P.; Lundquist, Andrew; Pirun, Mono; Meadows, Jennifer R. S.; Zamani, Neda; Johnson, Jeremy; Sundström, Görel; Cook, April; FitzGerald, Michael G.; Swofford, Ross; Mauceli, Evan; Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi; Greka, Anna; Alföldi, Jessica; Abouelleil, Amr; Aftuck, Lynne; Bessette, Daniel; Berlin, Aaron; Brown, Adam; Gearin, Gary; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, J. Pendexter; Priest, Margaret; Shea, Terrance; Turner-Maier, Jason; Zimmer, Andrew; Lander, Eric S.; di Palma, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, is a well-established model system for mapping trait and disease loci. While the original draft sequence was of good quality, gaps were abundant particularly in promoter regions of the genome, negatively impacting the annotation and study of candidate genes. Here, we present an improved genome build, canFam3.1, which includes 85 MB of novel sequence and now covers 99.8% of the euchromatic portion of the genome. We also present multiple RNA-Sequencing data sets from 10 different canine tissues to catalog ∼175,000 expressed loci. While about 90% of the coding genes previously annotated by EnsEMBL have measurable expression in at least one sample, the number of transcript isoforms detected by our data expands the EnsEMBL annotations by a factor of four. Syntenic comparison with the human genome revealed an additional ∼3,000 loci that are characterized as protein coding in human and were also expressed in the dog, suggesting that those were previously not annotated in the EnsEMBL canine gene set. In addition to ∼20,700 high-confidence protein coding loci, we found ∼4,600 antisense transcripts overlapping exons of protein coding genes, ∼7,200 intergenic multi-exon transcripts without coding potential, likely candidates for long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) and ∼11,000 transcripts were reported by two different library construction methods but did not fit any of the above categories. Of the lincRNAs, about 6,000 have no annotated orthologs in human or mouse. Functional analysis of two novel transcripts with shRNA in a mouse kidney cell line altered cell morphology and motility. All in all, we provide a much-improved annotation of the canine genome and suggest regulatory functions for several of the novel non-coding transcripts. PMID:24625832

  10. A comprehensive catalogue of the coding and non-coding transcripts of the human inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Corneveaux, Jason J.; Ohmen, Jeffrey; White, Cory; Allen, April N.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Van Camp, Guy; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Friedman, Rick A.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear consists of the cochlea and the vestibular labyrinth (utricle, saccule, and semicircular canals), which participate in both hearing and balance. Proper development and life-long function of these structures involves a highly complex coordinated system of spatial and temporal gene expression. The characterization of the inner ear transcriptome is likely important for the functional study of auditory and vestibular components, yet, primarily due to tissue unavailability, detailed expression catalogues of the human inner ear remain largely incomplete. We report here, for the first time, comprehensive transcriptome characterization of the adult human cochlea, ampulla, saccule and utricle of the vestibule obtained from patients without hearing abnormalities. Using RNA-Seq, we measured the expression of >50,000 predicted genes corresponding to approximately 200,000 transcripts, in the adult inner ear and compared it to 32 other human tissues. First, we identified genes preferentially expressed in the inner ear, and unique either to the vestibule or cochlea. Next, we examined expression levels of specific groups of potentially interesting RNAs, such as genes implicated in hearing loss, long non-coding RNAs, pseudogenes and transcripts subject to nonsense mediated decay (NMD). We uncover the spatial specificity of expression of these RNAs in the hearing/balance system, and reveal evidence of tissue specific NMD. Lastly, we investigated the non-syndromic deafness loci to which no gene has been mapped, and narrow the list of potential candidates for each locus. These data represent the first high-resolution transcriptome catalogue of the adult human inner ear. A comprehensive identification of coding and non-coding RNAs in the inner ear will enable pathways of auditory and vestibular function to be further defined in the study of hearing and balance. Expression data are freely accessible at https://www.tgen.org/home/research

  11. Non-coding RNAs: Epigenetic regulators of bone development and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohammad Q; Tye, Coralee E; Stein, Gary S; Lian, Jane B

    2015-12-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have evolved in eukaryotes as epigenetic regulators of gene expression. The most abundant regulatory ncRNAs are the 20-24 nt small microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, <200 nt). Each class of ncRNAs operates through distinct mechanisms, but their pathways to regulating gene expression are interrelated in ways that are just being recognized. While the importance of lncRNAs in epigenetic control of transcription, developmental processes and human traits is emerging, the identity of lncRNAs in skeletal biology is scarcely known. However, since the first profiling studies of miRNA at stages during osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, over 1100 publications related to bone biology and pathologies can be found, as well as many recent comprehensive reviews summarizing miRNA in skeletal cells. Delineating the activities and targets of specific miRNAs regulating differentiation of osteogenic and resorptive bone cells, coupled with in vivo gain- and loss-of-function studies, discovered unique mechanisms that support bone development and bone homeostasis in adults. We present here "guiding principles" for addressing biological control of bone tissue formation by ncRNAs. This review emphasizes recent advances in understanding regulation of the process of miRNA biogenesis that impact on osteogenic lineage commitment, transcription factors and signaling pathways. Also discussed are the approaches to be pursued for an understanding of the role of lncRNAs in bone and the challenges in addressing their multiple and complex functions. Based on new knowledge of epigenetic control of gene expression to be gained for ncRNA regulation of the skeleton, new directions for translating the miRNAs and lncRNAs into therapeutic targets for skeletal disorders are possible. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Epigenetics and Bone. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. DIANA-LncBase v2: indexing microRNA targets on non-coding transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D.; Vlachos, Ioannis S.; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Kanellos, Ilias; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Zagganas, Konstantinos; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Floros, Evangelos; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G.

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that act as post-transcriptional regulators of coding gene expression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently reported to interact with miRNAs. The sponge-like function of lncRNAs introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA interactome. DIANA-LncBase v1 provided a database of experimentally supported and in silico predicted miRNA Recognition Elements (MREs) on lncRNAs. The second version of LncBase (www.microrna.gr/LncBase) presents an extensive collection of miRNA:lncRNA interactions. The significantly enhanced database includes more than 70 000 low and high-throughput, (in)direct miRNA:lncRNA experimentally supported interactions, derived from manually curated publications and the analysis of 153 AGO CLIP-Seq libraries. The new experimental module presents a 14-fold increase compared to the previous release. LncBase v2 hosts in silico predicted miRNA targets on lncRNAs, identified with the DIANA-microT algorithm. The relevant module provides millions of predicted miRNA binding sites, accompanied with detailed metadata and MRE conservation metrics. LncBase v2 caters information regarding cell type specific miRNA:lncRNA regulation and enables users to easily identify interactions in 66 different cell types, spanning 36 tissues for human and mouse. Database entries are also supported by accurate lncRNA expression information, derived from the analysis of more than 6 billion RNA-Seq reads. PMID:26612864

  13. Non-coding RNAs and hypertension-unveiling unexpected mechanisms of hypertension by the dark matter of the genome.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor of cardiovascular diseases and a most important health problem in developed countries. Investigations on pathophysiology of hypertension have been based on gene products from coding region that occupies only about 1% of total genome region. On the other hand, non-coding region that occupies almost 99% of human genome has been regarded as "junk" for a long time and went unnoticed until these days. But recently, it turned out that noncoding region is extensively transcribed to non-coding RNAs and has various functions. This review highlights recent updates on the significance of non-coding RNAs such as micro RNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) on the pathogenesis of hypertension, also providing an introduction to basic biology of noncoding RNAs. For example, microRNAs are associated with hypertension via neuro-fumoral factor, sympathetic nerve activity, ion transporters in kidneys, endothelial function, vascular smooth muscle phenotype transformation, or communication between cells. Although reports of lncRNAs on pathogenesis of hypertension are scarce at the moment, new lncRNAs in relation to hypertension are being discovered at a rapid pace owing to novel techniques such as microarray or next-generation sequencing. In the clinical settings, clinical use of non-coding RNAs in identifying cardiovascular risks or developing novel tools for treating hypertension such as molecular decoy or mimicks is promising, although improvement in chemical modification or drug delivery system is necessary.

  14. A Dual Model for Prioritizing Cancer Mutations in the Non-coding Genome Based on Germline and Somatic Events

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Poursat, Marie-Anne; Drubay, Damien; Motz, Arnaud; Saci, Zohra; Morillon, Antonin; Michiels, Stefan; Gautheret, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We address here the issue of prioritizing non-coding mutations in the tumoral genome. To this aim, we created two independent computational models. The first (germline) model estimates purifying selection based on population SNP data. The second (somatic) model estimates tumor mutation density based on whole genome tumor sequencing. We show that each model reflects a different set of constraints acting either on the normal or tumor genome, and we identify the specific genome features that most contribute to these constraints. Importantly, we show that the somatic mutation model carries independent functional information that can be used to narrow down the non-coding regions that may be relevant to cancer progression. On this basis, we identify positions in non-coding RNAs and the non-coding parts of mRNAs that are both under purifying selection in the germline and protected from mutation in tumors, thus introducing a new strategy for future detection of cancer driver elements in the expressed non-coding genome. PMID:26588488

  15. A Dual Model for Prioritizing Cancer Mutations in the Non-coding Genome Based on Germline and Somatic Events.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Poursat, Marie-Anne; Drubay, Damien; Motz, Arnaud; Saci, Zohra; Morillon, Antonin; Michiels, Stefan; Gautheret, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    We address here the issue of prioritizing non-coding mutations in the tumoral genome. To this aim, we created two independent computational models. The first (germline) model estimates purifying selection based on population SNP data. The second (somatic) model estimates tumor mutation density based on whole genome tumor sequencing. We show that each model reflects a different set of constraints acting either on the normal or tumor genome, and we identify the specific genome features that most contribute to these constraints. Importantly, we show that the somatic mutation model carries independent functional information that can be used to narrow down the non-coding regions that may be relevant to cancer progression. On this basis, we identify positions in non-coding RNAs and the non-coding parts of mRNAs that are both under purifying selection in the germline and protected from mutation in tumors, thus introducing a new strategy for future detection of cancer driver elements in the expressed non-coding genome.

  16. Photoautotrophic production of D-lactic acid in an engineered cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The world faces the challenge to develop sustainable technologies to replace thousands of products that have been generated from fossil fuels. Microbial cell factories serve as promising alternatives for the production of diverse commodity chemicals and biofuels from renewable resources. For example, polylactic acid (PLA) with its biodegradable properties is a sustainable, environmentally friendly alternative to polyethylene. At present, PLA microbial production is mainly dependent on food crops such as corn and sugarcane. Moreover, optically pure isomers of lactic acid are required for the production of PLA, where D-lactic acid controls the thermochemical and physical properties of PLA. Henceforth, production of D-lactic acid through a more sustainable source (CO2) is desirable. Results We have performed metabolic engineering on Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for the phototrophic synthesis of optically pure D-lactic acid from CO2. Synthesis of optically pure D-lactic acid was achieved by utilizing a recently discovered enzyme (i.e., a mutated glycerol dehydrogenase, GlyDH*). Significant improvements in D-lactic acid synthesis were achieved through codon optimization and by balancing the cofactor (NADH) availability through the heterologous expression of a soluble transhydrogenase. We have also discovered that addition of acetate to the cultures improved lactic acid production. More interestingly, 13C-pathway analysis revealed that acetate was not used for the synthesis of lactic acid, but was mainly used for synthesis of certain biomass building blocks (such as leucine and glutamate). Finally, the optimal strain was able to accumulate 1.14 g/L (photoautotrophic condition) and 2.17 g/L (phototrophic condition with acetate) of D-lactate in 24 days. Conclusions We have demonstrated the photoautotrophic production of D-lactic acid by engineering a cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. The engineered strain shows an excellent D-lactic acid productivity from CO2. In

  17. Photoautotrophic production of D-lactic acid in an engineered cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Varman, Arul M; Yu, Yi; You, Le; Tang, Yinjie J

    2013-11-25

    The world faces the challenge to develop sustainable technologies to replace thousands of products that have been generated from fossil fuels. Microbial cell factories serve as promising alternatives for the production of diverse commodity chemicals and biofuels from renewable resources. For example, polylactic acid (PLA) with its biodegradable properties is a sustainable, environmentally friendly alternative to polyethylene. At present, PLA microbial production is mainly dependent on food crops such as corn and sugarcane. Moreover, optically pure isomers of lactic acid are required for the production of PLA, where D-lactic acid controls the thermochemical and physical properties of PLA. Henceforth, production of D-lactic acid through a more sustainable source (CO2) is desirable. We have performed metabolic engineering on Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for the phototrophic synthesis of optically pure D-lactic acid from CO2. Synthesis of optically pure D-lactic acid was achieved by utilizing a recently discovered enzyme (i.e., a mutated glycerol dehydrogenase, GlyDH*). Significant improvements in D-lactic acid synthesis were achieved through codon optimization and by balancing the cofactor (NADH) availability through the heterologous expression of a soluble transhydrogenase. We have also discovered that addition of acetate to the cultures improved lactic acid production. More interestingly, (13)C-pathway analysis revealed that acetate was not used for the synthesis of lactic acid, but was mainly used for synthesis of certain biomass building blocks (such as leucine and glutamate). Finally, the optimal strain was able to accumulate 1.14 g/L (photoautotrophic condition) and 2.17 g/L (phototrophic condition with acetate) of D-lactate in 24 days. We have demonstrated the photoautotrophic production of D-lactic acid by engineering a cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. The engineered strain shows an excellent D-lactic acid productivity from CO2. In the late growth phase, the

  18. Minimal Pairs: Minimal Importance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Adam

    1995-01-01

    This article argues that minimal pairs do not merit as much attention as they receive in pronunciation instruction. There are other aspects of pronunciation that are of greater importance, and there are other ways of teaching vowel and consonant pronunciation. (13 references) (VWL)

  19. The Malic Enzyme Is Required for Optimal Photoautotrophic Growth of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 under Continuous Light but Not under a Diurnal Light Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Bricker, Terry M.; Zhang, Shulu; Laborde, Susan M.; Mayer, Paul R.; Frankel, Laurie K.; Moroney, James V.

    2004-01-01

    A mutation was recovered in the slr0721 gene, which encodes the decarboxylating NADP+-dependent malic enzyme in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, yielding the mutant 3WEZ. Under continuous light, 3WEZ exhibits poor photoautotrophic growth while growing photoheterotrophically on glucose at rates nearly indistinguishable from wild-type rates. Interestingly, under diurnal light conditions (12 h of light and 12 h of dark), normal photoautotrophic growth of the mutant is completely restored. PMID:15547288

  20. DIVAN: accurate identification of non-coding disease-specific risk variants using multi-omics profiles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Jin, Peng; Qin, Zhaohui S

    2016-12-06

    Understanding the link between non-coding sequence variants, identified in genome-wide association studies, and the pathophysiology of complex diseases remains challenging due to a lack of annotations in non-coding regions. To overcome this, we developed DIVAN, a novel feature selection and ensemble learning framework, which identifies disease-specific risk variants by leveraging a comprehensive collection of genome-wide epigenomic profiles across cell types and factors, along with other static genomic features. DIVAN accurately and robustly recognizes non-coding disease-specific risk variants under multiple testing scenarios; among all the features, histone marks, especially those marks associated with repressed chromatin, are often more informative than others.

  1. Non-Coding RNAs in Lung Cancer: Contribution of Bioinformatics Analysis to the Development of Non-Invasive Diagnostic Tools.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Meik; Wolf, Beat; Schulze, Harald; Atlan, David; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-12-26

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer related mortality due to late diagnosis and limited treatment intervention. Non-coding RNAs are not translated into proteins and have emerged as fundamental regulators of gene expression. Recent studies reported that microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs are involved in lung cancer development and progression. Moreover, they appear as new promising non-invasive biomarkers for early lung cancer diagnosis. Here, we highlight their potential as biomarker in lung cancer and present how bioinformatics can contribute to the development of non-invasive diagnostic tools. For this, we discuss several bioinformatics algorithms and software tools for a comprehensive understanding and functional characterization of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs.

  2. Cis-encoded non-coding antisense RNAs in streptococci and other low GC Gram (+) bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyu Hong; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent advances of bioinformatics and high throughput sequencing technology, discovery of regulatory non-coding RNAs in bacteria has been increased to a great extent. Based on this bandwagon, many studies searching for trans-acting small non-coding RNAs in streptococci have been performed intensively, especially in the important human pathogen, group A and B streptococci. However, studies for cis-encoded non-coding antisense RNAs in streptococci have been scarce. A recent study shows antisense RNAs are involved in virulence gene regulation in group B streptococcus, S. agalactiae. This suggests antisense RNAs could have important roles in the pathogenesis of streptococcal pathogens. In this review, we describe recent discoveries of chromosomal cis-encoded antisense RNAs in streptococcal pathogens and other low GC Gram (+) bacteria to provide a guide for future studies. PMID:25859258

  3. Non-Coding RNAs in Lung Cancer: Contribution of Bioinformatics Analysis to the Development of Non-Invasive Diagnostic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Meik; Wolf, Beat; Schulze, Harald; Atlan, David; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer related mortality due to late diagnosis and limited treatment intervention. Non-coding RNAs are not translated into proteins and have emerged as fundamental regulators of gene expression. Recent studies reported that microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs are involved in lung cancer development and progression. Moreover, they appear as new promising non-invasive biomarkers for early lung cancer diagnosis. Here, we highlight their potential as biomarker in lung cancer and present how bioinformatics can contribute to the development of non-invasive diagnostic tools. For this, we discuss several bioinformatics algorithms and software tools for a comprehensive understanding and functional characterization of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. PMID:28035947

  4. Non-extensive trends in the size distribution of coding and non-coding DNA sequences in the human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, Th.; Provata, A.

    2006-03-01

    We study the primary DNA structure of four of the most completely sequenced human chromosomes (including chromosome 19 which is the most dense in coding), using non-extensive statistics. We show that the exponents governing the spatial decay of the coding size distributions vary between 5.2 ≤r ≤5.7 for the short scales and 1.45 ≤q ≤1.50 for the large scales. On the contrary, the exponents governing the spatial decay of the non-coding size distributions in these four chromosomes, take the values 2.4 ≤r ≤3.2 for the short scales and 1.50 ≤q ≤1.72 for the large scales. These results, in particular the values of the tail exponent q, indicate the existence of correlations in the coding and non-coding size distributions with tendency for higher correlations in the non-coding DNA.

  5. microRNA-9 targets the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 for degradation in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Leucci, Eleonora; Patella, Francesca; Waage, Johannes; Holmstrøm, Kim; Lindow, Morten; Porse, Bo; Kauppinen, Sakari; Lund, Anders H.

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs regulate the expression of over 60% of protein coding genes by targeting their mRNAs to AGO2-containing complexes in the cytoplasm and promoting their translational inhibition and/or degradation. There is little evidence so far for microRNA-mediated regulation of other classes of non-coding RNAs. Here we report that microRNA-9 (miR-9) regulates the expression of the Metastasis Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (MALAT-1), one of the most abundant and conserved long non-coding RNAs. Intriguingly, we find that miR-9 targets AGO2-mediated regulation of MALAT1 in the nucleus. Our findings reveal a novel direct regulatory link between two important classes of non-coding RNAs, miRs and lncRNAs, and advance our understanding of microRNA functions. PMID:23985560

  6. A comparison of the morphological and biochemical characteristics of Chlorella sorokiniana and Chlorella zofingiensis cultured under photoautotrophic and mixotrophic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Azaman, Siti Nor Ani; Nagao, Norio; Yusoff, Fatimah M.; Tan, Sheau Wei

    2017-01-01

    The responses of two species of microalgae, Chlorella sorokiniana and Chlorella zofingiensis, were compared regarding their morphological and biochemical properties under photoautotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. These microalgae were cultured under both conditions, and their crude ethanolic extracts were examined for their pigment and total phenolic contents. In addition, the microalgae’s antioxidant activities were determined using a DPPH radical scavenging assay and a ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Both strains showed increases in cell size due to the accumulation of lipid bodies and other cell contents, especially carotenoids, under the mixotrophic condition. Notably, reductions in phenolic and chlorophyll contents were observed to be associated with lower antioxidant activity. C. zofingiensis compared with C. sorokiniana, demonstrated higher antioxidant activity and carotenoid content. This study showed that different species of microalgae responded differently to varying conditions by producing different types of metabolites, as evidenced by the production of higher levels of phenolic compounds under the photoautotrophic condition and the production of the same levels of carotenoids under both photoautotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. PMID:28929006

  7. Transcriptional profiling of long non-coding RNAs and novel transcribed regions across a diverse panel of archived human cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular characterization of tumors has been critical for identifying important genes in cancer biology and for improving tumor classification and diagnosis. Long non-coding RNAs, as a new, relatively unstudied class of transcripts, provide a rich opportunity to identify both functional drivers and cancer-type-specific biomarkers. However, despite the potential importance of long non-coding RNAs to the cancer field, no comprehensive survey of long non-coding RNA expression across various cancers has been reported. Results We performed a sequencing-based transcriptional survey of both known long non-coding RNAs and novel intergenic transcripts across a panel of 64 archival tumor samples comprising 17 diagnostic subtypes of adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and sarcomas. We identified hundreds of transcripts from among the known 1,065 long non-coding RNAs surveyed that showed variability in transcript levels between the tumor types and are therefore potential biomarker candidates. We discovered 1,071 novel intergenic transcribed regions and demonstrate that these show similar patterns of variability between tumor types. We found that many of these differentially expressed cancer transcripts are also expressed in normal tissues. One such novel transcript specifically expressed in breast tissue was further evaluated using RNA in situ hybridization on a panel of breast tumors. It was shown to correlate with low tumor grade and estrogen receptor expression, thereby representing a potentially important new breast cancer biomarker. Conclusions This study provides the first large survey of long non-coding RNA expression within a panel of solid cancers and also identifies a number of novel transcribed regions differentially expressed across distinct cancer types that represent candidate biomarkers for future research. PMID:22929540

  8. An altered Q sub B polypeptide as the basis for atrazine resistance in photoautotrophic potato cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smeda, R.J.; Hasegawa, P.M.; Weller, S.C. )

    1990-05-01

    A photoautotrophic potato cell line (variant) was isolated and is capable of sustained growth in media containing the herbicide atrazine at concentrations up to 100-fold greater than the lethal concentration (1.0 {mu}M) for the unselected (wild type) cell line. The basis for atrazine resistance could not be identified by differential uptake or metabolism. Photosynthetic electron transport rates for both intact cell and isolated thylakoid membranes from chloroplasts were unaffected in variant cells at atrazine concentrations up to 100-fold greater than for wild type cells. Photoaffinity labeling of isolated thylakoid membranes from both cell lines with {sup 14}C-azidoatrazine revealed an altered Q{sub B} polypeptide in variant cells resulting in low or no affinity for atrazine. A portion of the chloroplast psbA gene, encoding the Q{sub B} polypeptide, was sequenced for both cell lines. The basis for atrazine resistance in variant cells was identified as a single base change resulting in the alteration of serine to threonine at position 264 of the Q{sub B} polypeptide. In addition to atrazine resistance, variant cells exhibit enhanced tolerance to the herbicides DCMU and metribuzin, but greater sensitivity to bentazon. No reductions in variant cell growth and photosynthetic efficiency in the absence of atrazine were observed.

  9. Direct membrane-carbonation photobioreactor producing photoautotrophic biomass via carbon dioxide transfer and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Cheng, Jing; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-03-01

    An advanced-material photobioreactor, the direct membrane-carbonation photobioreactor (DMCPBR), was tested to investigate the impact of directly submerging a membrane carbonation (MC) module of hollow-fiber membranes inside the photobioreactor. Results demonstrate that the DMCPBR utilized over 90% of the supplied CO2 by matching the CO2 flux to the C demand of photoautotrophic biomass growth. The surface area of the submerged MC module was the key to control CO2 delivery and biomass productivity. Tracking the fate of supplied CO2 explained how the DMCPBR reduced loss of gaseous CO2 while matching the inorganic carbon (IC) demand to its supply. Accurate fate analysis required that the biomass-associated C include soluble microbial products as a sink for captured CO2. With the CO2 supply matched to the photosynthetic demand, light attenuation limited the rate microalgal photosynthesis. The DMCPBR presents an opportunity to improve CO2-deliver efficiency and make microalgae a more effective strategy for C-neutral resource recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of growth yield of Spirulina (Arthrospira) sp. in photoautotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultures.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Zielińska, Agnieszka

    2012-02-01

    In microbial cultures, both cellular growth rate and yield (defined as the degree of substrate conversion into the biomass) are important. Although effect of culture conditions on growth kinetics has been well documented for various microbial strains, there is almost no literature concerning the effect of environmental conditions on growth equilibrium, expressed as biomass yield coefficients from substrate. The present paper discusses the effect of culture conditions: irradiance (physical substrate) and glucose concentration (chemical substrate) on biomass yield coefficients from two chemical substrates: glucose and nitrate-nitrogen in photoautotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic culture of blue-green alga Spirulina (Arthrospira) sp. The efficiency of substrates incorporation into the biomass can be precisely determined only if the elemental composition of the biomass is known. The experimental results showed that culture conditions had a substantial influence on biomass yield coefficients (biomass yield from glucose and nitrate-nitrogen). It was found that, the increase of irradiance favoured increase of biomass yield coefficient from both, glucose and nitrate-nitrogen. However, in the case of yield from nitrogen in mixotrophic culture, the effect was opposite. The effect of glucose concentration was different: the higher the initial glucose concentration, the lower the biomass yield coefficients from chemical substrates.

  11. Multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis of coding and non-coding DNA sequences through chaos-game representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Mayukha; Satish, B.; Srinivas, K.; Rao, P. Madhusudana; Manimaran, P.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new approach combining the chaos game representation and the two dimensional multifractal detrended cross correlation analysis methods to examine multifractal behavior in power law cross correlation between any pair of nucleotide sequences of unequal lengths. In this work, we analyzed the characteristic behavior of coding and non-coding DNA sequences of eight prokaryotes. The results show the presence of strong multifractal nature between coding and non-coding sequences of all data sets. We found that this integrative approach helps us to consider complete DNA sequences for characterization, and further it may be useful for classification, clustering, identification of class affiliation of nucleotide sequences etc. with high precision.

  12. Mining Mammalian Transcript Data for Functional Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Khachane, Amit N.; Harrison, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in controlling gene expression has garnered increased interest in recent years. Sequencing projects, such as Fantom3 for mouse and H-InvDB for human, have generated abundant data on transcribed components of mammalian cells, the majority of which appear not to be protein-coding. However, much of the non-protein-coding transcriptome could merely be a consequence of ‘transcription noise’. It is therefore essential to use bioinformatic approaches to identify the likely functional candidates in a high throughput manner. Principal Findings We derived a scheme for classifying and annotating likely functional lncRNAs in mammals. Using the available experimental full-length cDNA data sets for human and mouse, we identified 78 lncRNAs that are either syntenically conserved between human and mouse, or that originate from the same protein-coding genes. Of these, 11 have significant sequence homology. We found that these lncRNAs exhibit: (i) patterns of codon substitution typical of non-coding transcripts; (ii) preservation of sequences in distant mammals such as dog and cow, (iii) significant sequence conservation relative to their corresponding flanking regions (in 50% cases, flanking regions do not have homology at all; and in the remaining, the degree of conservation is significantly less); (iv) existence mostly as single-exon forms (8/11); and, (v) presence of conserved and stable secondary structure motifs within them. We further identified orthologous protein-coding genes that are contributing to the pool of lncRNAs; of which, genes implicated in carcinogenesis are significantly over-represented. Conclusion Our comparative mammalian genomics approach coupled with evolutionary analysis identified a small population of conserved long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are potentially functional across Mammalia. Additionally, our analysis indicates that amongst the orthologous protein-coding genes that produce

  13. Small Open Reading Frames, Non-Coding RNAs and Repetitive Elements in Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Julia; Tsoy, Olga V.; Thalmann, Sebastian; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    Small open reading frames (sORFs) and genes for non-coding RNAs are poorly investigated components of most genomes. Our analysis of 1391 ORFs recently annotated in the soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 revealed that 78% of them contain less than 80 codons. Twenty-one of these sORFs are conserved in or outside Alphaproteobacteria and most of them are similar to genes found in transposable elements, in line with their broad distribution. Stabilizing selection was demonstrated for sORFs with proteomic evidence and bll1319_ISGA which is conserved at the nucleotide level in 16 alphaproteobacterial species, 79 species from other taxa and 49 other Proteobacteria. Further we used Northern blot hybridization to validate ten small RNAs (BjsR1 to BjsR10) belonging to new RNA families. We found that BjsR1 and BjsR3 have homologs outside the genus Bradyrhizobium, and BjsR5, BjsR6, BjsR7, and BjsR10 have up to four imperfect copies in Bradyrhizobium genomes. BjsR8, BjsR9, and BjsR10 are present exclusively in nodules, while the other sRNAs are also expressed in liquid cultures. We also found that the level of BjsR4 decreases after exposure to tellurite and iron, and this down-regulation contributes to survival under high iron conditions. Analysis of additional small RNAs overlapping with 3’-UTRs revealed two new repetitive elements named Br-REP1 and Br-REP2. These REP elements may play roles in the genomic plasticity and gene regulation and could be useful for strain identification by PCR-fingerprinting. Furthermore, we studied two potential toxin genes in the symbiotic island and confirmed toxicity of the yhaV homolog bll1687 but not of the newly annotated higB homolog blr0229_ISGA in E. coli. Finally, we revealed transcription interference resulting in an antisense RNA complementary to blr1853, a gene induced in symbiosis. The presented results expand our knowledge on sORFs, non-coding RNAs and repetitive elements in B. japonicum and related bacteria. PMID

  14. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Michele; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando; Calin, George A; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-04-12

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  15. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L.; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  16. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs in Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiang; Liu, Chang

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a white-rot fungus best-known for its medicinal activities. We have previously sequenced its genome and annotated the protein coding genes. However, long non-coding RNAs in G. lucidum genome have not been analyzed. In this study, we have identified and characterized long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA) in G. lucidum systematically. We developed a computational pipeline, which was used to analyze RNA-Seq data derived from G. lucidum samples collected from three developmental stages. A total of 402 lincRNA candidates were identified, with an average length of 609 bp. Analysis of their adjacent protein-coding genes (apcGenes) revealed that 46 apcGenes belong to the pathways of triterpenoid biosynthesis and lignin degradation, or families of cytochrome P450, mating type B genes, and carbohydrate-active enzymes. To determine if lincRNAs and these apcGenes have any interactions, the corresponding pairs of lincRNAs and apcGenes were analyzed in detail. We developed a modified 3′ RACE method to analyze the transcriptional direction of a transcript. Among the 46 lincRNAs, 37 were found unidirectionally transcribed, and 9 were found bidirectionally transcribed. The expression profiles of 16 of these 37 lincRNAs were found to be highly correlated with those of the apcGenes across the three developmental stages. Among them, 11 are positively correlated (r>0.8) and 5 are negatively correlated (r<−0.8). The co-localization and co-expression of lincRNAs and those apcGenes playing important functions is consistent with the notion that lincRNAs might be important regulators for cellular processes. In summary, this represents the very first study to identify and characterize lincRNAs in the genomes of basidiomycetes. The results obtained here have laid the foundation for study of potential lincRNA-mediated expression regulation of genes in G. lucidum. PMID:24932683

  17. Integrative Analysis of Normal Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Pushpinder; Zackaria, Sajna; Verma, Mohit; Gupta, Saurabh; Srivatsan, R; Chaudhary, Bibha; Srinivasan, Subhashini

    2015-01-01

    Recently, large numbers of normal human tissues have been profiled for non-coding RNAs and more than fourteen thousand long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are found expressed in normal human tissues. The functional roles of these normal lincRNAs (nlincRNAs) in the regulation of protein coding genes in normal and disease biology are yet to be established. Here, we have profiled two RNA-seq datasets including cancer and matched non-neoplastic tissues from 12 individuals from diverse demography for both coding genes and nlincRNAs. We find 130 nlincRNAs significantly regulated in cancer, with 127 regulated in the same direction in the two datasets. Interestingly, according to Illumina Body Map, significant numbers of these nlincRNAs display baseline null expression in normal prostate tissues but are specific to other tissues such as thyroid, kidney, liver and testis. A number of the regulated nlincRNAs share loci with coding genes, which are either co-regulated or oppositely regulated in all cancer samples studied here. For example, in all cancer samples i) the nlincRNA, TCONS_00029157, and a neighboring tumor suppressor factor, SIK1, are both down regulated; ii) several thyroid-specific nlincRNAs in the neighborhood of the thyroid-specific gene TPO, are both up-regulated; and iii) the TCONS_00010581, an isoform of HEIH, is down-regulated while the neighboring EZH2 gene is up-regulated in cancer. Several nlincRNAs from a prostate cancer associated chromosomal locus, 8q24, are up-regulated in cancer along with other known prostate cancer associated genes including PCAT-1, PVT1, and PCAT-92. We observe that there is significant bias towards up-regulation of nlincRNAs with as high as 118 out of 127 up-regulated in cancer, even though regulation of coding genes is skewed towards down-regulation. Considering that all reported cancer associated lincRNAs (clincRNAs) are biased towards up-regulation, we conclude that this bias may be functionally relevant. PMID:25933431

  18. Long non-coding RNA analysis of muscular responses to testosterone deficiency in Huainan male pigs.

    PubMed

    Xing, Baosong; Bai, Xianxiao; Guo, Hongxia; Chen, Junfeng; Hua, Liushuai; Zhang, Jiaqing; Ma, Qiang; Ren, Qiaoling; Wang, Huashuai; Wang, Jing

    2017-02-09

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) participated in growth and development of skeletal muscle; however, little is known about their response to testosterone deficiency in porcine skeletal muscle. We compared lean mass related carcass traits and lncRNAs expression files in Longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle between intact and castrated Huainan male pigs. The results showed that castration significantly reduced eye muscle area and lean meat percentage (P < 0.05), but increased the fat mass weight (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, 8946 lncRNAs, including 6743 intergenic lncRNAs (lincRNAs), 498 anti-sense lncRNAs, and 1705 intronic lncRNAs, were identified in porcine LD, among which, 385 lncRNAs were considered as the differentially expressed candidates between intact groups and castrated groups (q-value < 0.05). Functional analysis indicated that these differently expressed lncRNAs and their target genes were involved in the estrogen receptor signaling pathway and skeletal and muscular system development and function. We first detect porcine muscular lncRNA response to castration, and the results suggested that lncRNAs and their target genes participated in the regulation of testosterone deficiency-related skeletal muscle growth.

  19. Non-Coding RNAs in Saliva: Emerging Biomarkers for Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Majem, Blanca; Rigau, Marina; Reventós, Jaume; Wong, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Saliva is a complex body fluid that comprises secretions from the major and minor salivary glands, which are extensively supplied by blood. Therefore, molecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, etc., present in plasma could be also present in saliva. Many studies have reported that saliva body fluid can be useful for discriminating several oral diseases, but also systemic diseases including cancer. Most of these studies revealed messenger RNA (mRNA) and proteomic biomarker signatures rather than specific non-coding RNA (ncRNA) profiles. NcRNAs are emerging as new regulators of diverse biological functions, playing an important role in oncogenesis and tumor progression. Indeed, the small size of these molecules makes them very stable in different body fluids and not as susceptible as mRNAs to degradation by ribonucleases (RNases). Therefore, the development of a non-invasive salivary test, based on ncRNAs profiles, could have a significant applicability to clinical practice, not only by reducing the cost of the health system, but also by benefitting the patient. Here, we summarize the current status and clinical implications of the ncRNAs present in human saliva as a source of biological information. PMID:25898412

  20. Centromeric Non-coding Transcription: Opening the Black Box of Chromosomal Instability?

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Gutiérrez, Rodrigo; Herrera, Luis A

    2017-06-01

    In eukaryotes, mitosis is tightly regulated to avoid the generation of numerical chromosome aberrations, or aneuploidies. The aneuploid phenotype is a consequence of chromosomal instability (CIN), i.e., an enhanced rate of chromosome segregation errors, which is frequently found in cancer cells and is associated with tumor aggressiveness and increased tumor cell survival potential. To avoid the generation of aneuploidies, cells rely on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a widely conserved mechanism that protects the genome against this type of error. This signaling pathway stops mitotic pro-gression before anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to spindle microtubules. Howev-er, impairment of the SAC cannot account for the establishment of CIN because cells bearing this phe-notype have a functional SAC. Hence, in cells with CIN, anaphase is not triggered until all chromo-somes are correctly attached to spindle microtubules and congressed at the metaphase plate. Thus, an in-teresting question arises: What mechanisms actually mediate CIN in cancer cells? Recent research has shown that some pathways involved in chromosome segregation are closely associated to centromere-encoded non-coding RNA (cencRNA) and that these RNAs are deregulated in abnormal conditions, such as cancer. These mechanisms may provide new explanations for chromosome segregation errors. The present review discusses some of these findings and proposes novel mechanisms for the establish-ment of CIN based on regulation by cencRNA.

  1. Two lamprey Hedgehog genes share non-coding regulatory sequences and expression patterns with gnathostome Hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Kano, Shungo; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Osório, Joana; Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-10-13

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences.

  2. Expression signatures of long non-coding RNAs in early brain injury following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bingjie; Liu, Huailei; Wang, Ruke; Xu, Shancai; Liu, Yaohua; Wang, Kaikai; Hou, Xu; Shen, Chen; Wu, Jianing; Chen, Xin; Wu, Pei; Zhang, Guang; Ji, Zhiyong; Wang, Hongyu; Xiao, Yao; Han, Jianyi; Shi, Huaizhang; Zhao, Shiguang

    2015-07-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is an important cause of mortality in stroke patients. Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) have important functions in brain disease, however their expression profiles in SAH remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the expression signatures of LncRNAs and mRNAs in early brain injury (EBI) following SAH in a rat model. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into an SAH group and a sham operation group. The expression signatures of the LncRNAs and mRNAs in the temporal lobe cortex were investigated using a rat LncRNAs array following experimental SAH. The results revealed that there were 144 downregulated and 64 upregulated LncRNAs and 181 downregulated and 221 upregulated mRNAs following SAH. Additionally, two upregulated (BC092207, MRuc008hvl) and three downregulated (XR_006756, MRAK038897, MRAK017168) LncRNAs were confirmed using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The differentially expressed mRNAs were further analyzed using the Gene Ontology and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. The pathway analysis results provided by the KEGG database indicated that eight pathways associated with inflammation were involved in EBI following SAH. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that the expression profiles of the LncRNAs and mRNAs were significantly different between the SAH-induced EBI group and the sham operation group. These differently expressed LncRNAs may be important in EBI following SAH.

  3. A Review of Computational Methods for Finding Non-Coding RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Qaisar; Raza, Syed Mansoor; Biyabani, Azizuddin Ahmed; Jaffar, Muhammad Arfan

    2016-01-01

    Finding non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes has emerged over the past few years as a cutting-edge trend in bioinformatics. There are numerous computational intelligence (CI) challenges in the annotation and interpretation of ncRNAs because it requires a domain-related expert knowledge in CI techniques. Moreover, there are many classes predicted yet not experimentally verified by researchers. Recently, researchers have applied many CI methods to predict the classes of ncRNAs. However, the diverse CI approaches lack a definitive classification framework to take advantage of past studies. A few review papers have attempted to summarize CI approaches, but focused on the particular methodological viewpoints. Accordingly, in this article, we summarize in greater detail than previously available, the CI techniques for finding ncRNAs genes. We differentiate from the existing bodies of research and discuss concisely the technical merits of various techniques. Lastly, we review the limitations of ncRNA gene-finding CI methods with a point-of-view towards the development of new computational tools. PMID:27918472

  4. LncRNAWiki: harnessing community knowledge in collaborative curation of human long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lina; Li, Ang; Zou, Dong; Xu, Xingjian; Xia, Lin; Yu, Jun; Bajic, Vladimir B; Zhang, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) perform a diversity of functions in numerous important biological processes and are implicated in many human diseases. In this report we present lncRNAWiki (http://lncrna.big.ac.cn), a wiki-based platform that is open-content and publicly editable and aimed at community-based curation and collection of information on human lncRNAs. Current related databases are dependent primarily on curation by experts, making it laborious to annotate the exponentially accumulated information on lncRNAs, which inevitably requires collective efforts in community-based curation of lncRNAs. Unlike existing databases, lncRNAWiki features comprehensive integration of information on human lncRNAs obtained from multiple different resources and allows not only existing lncRNAs to be edited, updated and curated by different users but also the addition of newly identified lncRNAs by any user. It harnesses community collective knowledge in collecting, editing and annotating human lncRNAs and rewards community-curated efforts by providing explicit authorship based on quantified contributions. LncRNAWiki relies on the underling knowledge of scientific community for collective and collaborative curation of human lncRNAs and thus has the potential to serve as an up-to-date and comprehensive knowledgebase for human lncRNAs. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Conservation and Losses of Non-Coding RNAs in Avian Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul P.; Fasold, Mario; Burge, Sarah W.; Ninova, Maria; Hertel, Jana; Kehr, Stephanie; Steeves, Tammy E.; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Stadler, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the results of a large-scale bioinformatics annotation of non-coding RNA loci in 48 avian genomes. Our approach uses probabilistic models of hand-curated families from the Rfam database to infer conserved RNA families within each avian genome. We supplement these annotations with predictions from the tRNA annotation tool, tRNAscan-SE and microRNAs from miRBase. We identify 34 lncRNA-associated loci that are conserved between birds and mammals and validate 12 of these in chicken. We report several intriguing cases where a reported mammalian lncRNA, but not its function, is conserved. We also demonstrate extensive conservation of classical ncRNAs (e.g., tRNAs) and more recently discovered ncRNAs (e.g., snoRNAs and miRNAs) in birds. Furthermore, we describe numerous “losses” of several RNA families, and attribute these to either genuine loss, divergence or missing data. In particular, we show that many of these losses are due to the challenges associated with assembling avian microchromosomes. These combined results illustrate the utility of applying homology-based methods for annotating novel vertebrate genomes. PMID:25822729

  6. Non-coding sRNAs regulate virulence in the bacterial pathogen Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Bardill, J. Patrick; Hammer, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the waterborne bacterium responsible for worldwide outbreaks of the acute, potentially fatal cholera diarrhea. The primary factors this human pathogen uses to cause the disease are controlled by a complex regulatory program linking extracellular signaling inputs to changes in expression of several critical virulence genes. Recently it has been uncovered that many non-coding regulatory sRNAs are important components of the V. cholerae virulence regulon. Most of these sRNAs appear to require the RNA-binding protein, Hfq, to interact with and alter the expression of target genes, while a few sRNAs appear to function by an Hfq-independent mechanism. Direct base-pairing between the sRNAs and putative target mRNAs has been shown in a few cases but the extent of each sRNAs regulon is not fully known. Genetic and biochemical methods, coupled with computational and genomics approaches, are being used to validate known sRNAs and also to identify many additional putative sRNAs that may play a role in the pathogenic lifestyle of V. cholerae. PMID:22546941

  7. Expression of a novel non-coding mitochondrial RNA in human proliferating cells

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Jaime; Burzio, Veronica; Villota, Claudio; Landerer, Eduardo; Martinez, Ronny; Santander, Marcela; Martinez, Rodrigo; Pinto, Rodrigo; Vera, María I.; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa L.; Burzio, Luis O.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we reported the presence in mouse cells of a mitochondrial RNA which contains an inverted repeat (IR) of 121 nucleotides (nt) covalently linked to the 5′ end of the mitochondrial 16S RNA (16S mtrRNA). Here, we report the structure of an equivalent transcript of 2374 nt which is over-expressed in human proliferating cells but not in resting cells. The transcript contains a hairpin structure comprising an IR of 815 nt linked to the 5′ end of the 16S mtrRNA and forming a long double-stranded structure or stem and a loop of 40 nt. The stem is resistant to RNase A and can be detected and isolated after digestion with the enzyme. This novel transcript is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) and several evidences suggest that the transcript is synthesized in mitochondria. The expression of this transcript can be induced in resting lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Moreover, aphidicolin treatment of DU145 cells reversibly blocks proliferation and expression of the transcript. If the drug is removed, the cells re-assume proliferation and over-express the ncmtRNA. These results suggest that the expression of the ncmtRNA correlates with the replicative state of the cell and it may play a role in cell proliferation. PMID:17962305

  8. Expression of a non-coding RNA in ectromelia virus is required for normal plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Esteban, David J; Upton, Chris; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Buller, R Mark L; Chen, Nanhai G; Schriewer, Jill; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Wang, Chunlin

    2014-02-01

    Poxviruses are dsDNA viruses with large genomes. Many genes in the genome remain uncharacterized, and recent studies have demonstrated that the poxvirus transcriptome includes numerous so-called anomalous transcripts not associated with open reading frames. Here, we characterize the expression and role of an apparently non-coding RNA in orthopoxviruses, which we call viral hairpin RNA (vhRNA). Using a bioinformatics approach, we predicted expression of a transcript not associated with an open reading frame that is likely to form a stem-loop structure due to the presence of a 21 nt palindromic sequence. Expression of the transcript as early as 2 h post-infection was confirmed by northern blot and analysis of publicly available vaccinia virus infected cell transcriptomes. The transcription start site was determined by RACE PCE and transcriptome analysis, and early and late promoter sequences were identified. Finally, to test the function of the transcript we generated an ectromelia virus knockout, which failed to form plaques in cell culture. The important role of the transcript in viral replication was further demonstrated using siRNA. Although the function of the transcript remains unknown, our work contributes to evidence of an increasingly complex poxvirus transcriptome, suggesting that transcripts such as vhRNA not associated with an annotated open reading frame can play an important role in viral replication.

  9. Long intergenic non-coding RNA expression signature in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Wagner, Erin K.; Guo, Xingyi; May, Isaac; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; He, Chunyan; Long, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease, characterized by gene deregulation. There is less systematic investigation of the capacity of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) as biomarkers associated with breast cancer pathogenesis or several clinicopathological variables including receptor status and patient survival. We designed a two-stage study, including 1,000 breast tumor RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) as the discovery stage, and RNA-seq data of matched tumor and adjacent normal tissue from 50 breast cancer patients as well as 23 normal breast tissue from healthy women as the replication stage. We identified 83 lincRNAs showing the significant expression changes in breast tumors with a false discovery rate (FDR) < 1% in the discovery dataset. Thirty-seven out of the 83 were validated in the replication dataset. Integrative genomic analyses suggested that the aberrant expression of these 37 lincRNAs was probably related with the expression alteration of several transcription factors (TFs). We observed a differential co-expression pattern between lincRNAs and their neighboring genes. We found that the expression levels of one lincRNA (RP5-1198O20 with Ensembl ID ENSG00000230615) were associated with breast cancer survival with P < 0.05. Our study identifies a set of aberrantly expressed lincRNAs in breast cancer. PMID:27897201

  10. The pivotal role of small non-coding RNAs in the regulation of seed development.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Andreia S; Miguel, Célia M

    2017-03-13

    Seeds represent a crucial stage of the seed plants life cycle. It is during seed development that the foundations of the future plant body, and the ability to give rise to a new plant capable of growing under sometimes adverse environmental conditions, are established. Small non-coding RNAs are major regulators of gene expression both at the post-transcriptional and transcriptional levels and, not surprisingly, these elements play major roles in seed development and germination. We review here the current knowledge about small RNA expression and functions in seed development, going from the morphogenesis phase comprehending embryo development and patterning, to the several steps of the maturation phase, ending in the transition to the germination. A special focus is given to the small RNAs for which functional studies have been conducted and their participation in regulatory networks operating in seeds. Many challenges remain ahead for dissecting the complex small RNA landscape in seeds, but this is a highly relevant issue in plant biology and advances in this area will most certainly impact plant breeding.

  11. Identification of a Novel Small Non-Coding RNA Modulating the Intracellular Survival of Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yufei; Ke, Yuehua; Xu, Jie; Wang, Ligui; Wang, Tongkun; Liang, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Gong, Chunli; Yuan, Jiuyun; Zhuang, Yubin; An, Chang; Lei, Shuangshuang; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Li, Wenna; Yuan, Xitong; Huang, Liuyu; Yang, Xiaoli; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are gene expression modulators respond to environmental changes, stressful conditions, and pathogenesis. In this study, by using a combined bioinformatic and experimental approach, eight novel sRNA genes were identified in intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis. BSR0602, one sRNA that was highly induced in stationary phase, was further examined and found to modulate the intracellular survival of B. melitensis. BSR0602 was present at very high levels in vitro under stresses similar to those encountered during infection in host macrophages. Furthermore, BSR0602 was found to be highly expressed in the spleens of infected mice, suggesting its potential role in the control of pathogenesis. BSR0602 targets the mRNAs coding for gntR, a global transcriptional regulator, which is required for B. melitensis virulence. Overexpression of BSR0602 results in distinct reduction in the gntR mRNA level. B. melitensis with high level of BSR0602 is defective in bacteria intracellular survival in macrophages and defective in growth in the spleens of infected mice. Therefore, BSR0602 may directly inhibit the expression of gntR, which then impairs Brucellae intracellular survival and contributes to Brucella infection. Our findings suggest that BSR0602 is responsible for bacterial adaptation to stress conditions and thus modulate B. melitensis intracellular survival. PMID:25852653

  12. Large intervening non-coding RNA HOTAIR is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Geng, Y J; Xie, S L; Li, Q; Ma, J; Wang, G Y

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that large intervening non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) regulate key pathways in cancer invasion and metastasis. In this observational retrospective study, the expression of the oncogenic lincRNA HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) gene was measured in 63 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following hepatic resection. The HOTAIR gene was significantly overexpressed in HCC tissues compared with adjacent non-tumour tissues. Patients with high HOTAIR gene expression in their tumours had an increased risk of recurrence after hepatectomy. There was also a significant correlation between HOTAIR expression and lymph node metastasis. In vitro assays in the HCC cell line Bel7402 demonstrated that knockdown of HOTAIR lincRNA reduced cell proliferation and was associated with reductions in levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor protein, which are important for cell motility and metastasis. In conclusion, HOTAIR lincRNA might be a potential biomarker for the existence of lymph node metastasis in HCC.

  13. Experimental identification and analysis of macronuclear non-coding RNAs from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kasper L.; Nielsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is an important eukaryotic model organism that has been used in pioneering studies of general phenomena, such as ribozymes, telomeres, chromatin structure and genome reorganization. Recent work has shown that Tetrahymena has many classes of small RNA molecules expressed during vegetative growth or sexual reorganization. In order to get an overview of medium-sized (40–500 nt) RNAs expressed from the Tetrahymena genome, we created a size-fractionated cDNA library from macronuclear RNA and analyzed 80 RNAs, most of which were previously unknown. The most abundant class was small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), many of which are formed by an unusual maturation pathway. The modifications guided by the snoRNAs were analyzed bioinformatically and experimentally and many Tetrahymena-specific modifications were found, including several in an essential, but not conserved domain of ribosomal RNA. Of particular interest, we detected two methylations in the 5′-end of U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) that has an unusual structure in Tetrahymena. Further, we found a candidate for the first U8 outside metazoans, and an unusual U14 candidate. In addition, a number of candidates for new non-coding RNAs were characterized by expression analysis at different growth conditions. PMID:21967850

  14. Archetype and Rearranged Non-coding Control Regions in Urothelial Bladder Carcinoma of Immunocompetent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    ANZIVINO, ELENA; ANTONELLA ZINGAROPOLI, MARIA; IANNETTA, MARCO; ANTONIETTA PIETROPAOLO, VALERIA; OLIVA, ALESSANDRA; IORI, FRANCESCO; CIARDI, ANTONIO; MARIA RODIO, DONATELLA; ANTONINI, FRANCESCA; GIOVANNI FEDELE, CESARE; D’ABRAMO, ALESSANDRA; MARIA MASTROIANNI, CLAUDIO; VULLO, VINCENZO; ROSA CIARDI, MARIA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polyomaviruses (PyVs) are potential transforming viruses. Despite their involvement in human tumours still being debated, there is evidence to suggest a role for PyVs in bladder carcinoma (BC). Therefore, a possible association between PyVs and BC was investigated. Materials and Methods: Urine, blood and fresh bladder tissue specimens were collected from 29 patients with BC. PyV prevalence, non-coding control region (NCCR) organization and genotypic analysis were assessed. Results: Data showed a significant prevalence of John Cunningham (JC) PyV in BC tissues and in urine with respect to BKPyV, while simian virus 40 was not revealed. A BKPyV rearranged NCCR sequence was isolated, whereas a JCPyV archetypal structure was consistently retained. A prevalence of European genotypes was observed. Conclusion: Our data would suggest a JCPyV involvement in cancer progression and a BKPyV association with BC pathogenesis in immunocompetent patients. However, further work is necessary to better understand the exact role of PyVs in urothelial carcinogenesis. PMID:27807073

  15. Long non-coding RNA Loc554202 regulates proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yongguo; Lu, Jianwei; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Xueming; He, Ye; Ding, Jie; Tian, Yun; Wang, Li; Wang, Keming

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • First, we have shown that upregulated of the Loc554202 in breast cancer tissues. • Second, we demonstrated the function of Loc554202 in breast cancer cell. • Finally, we demonstrated that LOC554202 knockdown could inhibit tumor growth in vivo. - Abstract: Data derived from massive cloning and traditional sequencing methods have revealed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) play important roles in the development and progression of cancer. Although many studies suggest that the lncRNAs have different cellular functions, many of them are not yet to be identified and characterized for the mechanism of their functions. To address this question, we assay the expression level of lncRNAs–Loc554202 in breast cancer tissues and find that Loc554202 is significantly increased compared with normal control, and associated with advanced pathologic stage and tumor size. Moreover, knockdown of Loc554202 decreased breast cancer cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and inhibits migration/invasion in vitro and impeded tumorigenesis in vivo. These data suggest an important role of Loc554202 in breast tumorigenesis.

  16. Regulation of Non-coding RNAs in Heat Stress Responses of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianguo; He, Qingsong; Chen, Gang; Wang, Li; Jin, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is an important factor limiting plant growth, development, and productivity; thus, plants have evolved special adaptive mechanisms to cope with high-temperature stress. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a class of regulatory RNAs that play an important role in many biological processes. Recently developed advanced technologies, such as genome-wide transcriptomic analysis, have revealed that abundant ncRNAs are expressed under heat stress. Although this area of research is still in its infancy, an increasing number of several classes of regulatory ncRNA (i.e., miRNA, siRNA, and lncRNA) related to heat stress responses have been reported. In this mini-review, we discuss our current understanding of the role of ncRNAs in heat stress responses in plants, especially miRNAs, siRNAs, and their targets. For example, the miR398-CSD/CCS-HSF, miR396-WRKY6, miR159-GAMYB, and TAS1-HTT-HSF pathways regulate plant heat tolerance. We highlight the hormone/development-related miRNAs involved in heat stress, and discuss the regulatory networks of miRNA-targets. We also note that DNA methylation and alternative splicing could affect miRNA expression under heat stress, and some lncRNAs could respond to heat stress. Finally, we briefly discuss future prospects concerning the ncRNA-related mechanisms of heat stress responses in plants. PMID:27588021

  17. Classification of non-coding RNA using graph representations ofsecondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Karklin, Yan; Meraz, Richard F.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2004-06-07

    Some genes produce transcripts that function directly in regulatory, catalytic, or structural roles in the cell. These non-coding RNAs are prevalent in all living organisms, and methods that aid the understanding of their functional roles are essential. RNA secondary structure, the pattern of base-pairing, contains the critical information for determining the three dimensional structure and function of the molecule. In this work we examine whether the basic geometric and topological properties of secondary structure are sufficient to distinguish between RNA families in a learning framework. First, we develop a labeled dual graph representation of RNA secondary structure by adding biologically meaningful labels to the dual graphs proposed by Gan et al [1]. Next, we define a similarity measure directly on the labeled dual graphs using the recently developed marginalized kernels [2]. Using this similarity measure, we were able to train Support Vector Machine classifiers to distinguish RNAs of known families from random RNAs with similar statistics. For 22 of the 25 families tested, the classifier achieved better than 70% accuracy, with much higher accuracy rates for some families. Training a set of classifiers to automatically assign family labels to RNAs using a one vs. all multi-class scheme also yielded encouraging results. From these initial learning experiments, we suggest that the labeled dual graph representation, together with kernel machine methods, has potential for use in automated analysis and classification of uncharacterized RNA molecules or efficient genome-wide screens for RNA molecules from existing families.

  18. Precise long non-coding RNA modulation in visual maintenance and impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Peixing; Su, Wenru; Zhuo, Yehong

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are remarkably powerful, flexible and pervasive cellular regulators. With the help of cheaper RNA-seq, high-throughput screening of lncRNAs has become widely applied and has identified large numbers of specific lncRNAs in various physiological or pathological processes. Vision is known to be a complex and vital perception that comprises 80% of the sensory information we receive. A consensus has been reached that normal visual maintenance and impairment are primarily driven by gene regulation. Recently, it has become understood that lncRNAs are key regulators in most biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, immune responses, oxidative stress and inflammation. Our review is intended to provide insight towards a comprehensive view of the precise modulation of lncRNAs in visual maintenance and impairment. We also highlight the challenges and future directions in conducting lncRNA studies, particularly in patients whose lncRNAs may hold expanded promise for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:28003323

  19. Transcriptomic profiling of long non-coding RNAs in dermatomyositis by microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Qing-Lin; Zhang, Ya-Mei; Yang, Han-Bo; Shu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Xin; Wang, Guo-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalently transcribed in the genome and have been found to be of functional importance. However, the potential roles of lncRNAs in dermatomyositis (DM) remain unknown. In this study, a lncRNA + mRNA microarray analysis was performed to profile lncRNAs and mRNAs from 15 treatment-naive DM patients and 5 healthy controls. We revealed a total of 1198 lncRNAs (322 up-regulated and 876 down-regulated) and 1213 mRNAs (665 up-regulated and 548 down-regulated) were significantly differentially expressed in DM patients compared with the healthy controls (fold change>2, P < 0.05). Subgrouping DM patients according to the presence of interstitial lung disease and anti-Jo-1 antibody revealed different expression patterns of the lncRNAs. Pathway and gene ontology analysis for the differentially expressed mRNAs confirmed that type 1 interferon signaling was the most significantly dysregulated pathway in all DM subgroups. In addition, distinct pathways that uniquely associated with DM subgroup were also identified. Bioinformatics prediction suggested that linc-DGCR6-1 may be a lncRNA that regulates type 1 interferon-inducible gene USP18, which was found highly expressed in the perifascicular areas of the muscle fibers of DM patients. Our findings provide an overview of aberrantly expressed lncRNAs in DM muscle and further broaden the understanding of DM pathogenesis. PMID:27605457

  20. Long non-coding RNA regulation of epithelial–mesenchymal transition in cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Deng, F; Qin, Y; Zhao, Z; Wu, Z; Xing, Z; Ji, A; Wang, Q J

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is a multistep process starting with the dissemination of tumor cells from a primary site and ending with secondary tumor development in an anatomically distant location. The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process that endows epithelial tumor cells with mesenchymal properties including reduced adhesion and increased motility, is considered a critical step driving the early phase of cancer metastasis. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular characteristics of EMT, the intracellular mechanisms driving transition through the various stages of EMT remain unclear. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated the involvement of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in tumor metastasis through modulating EMT. LncRNAs and their associated signaling networks have now emerged as new players in the induction and regulation of EMT during metastasis. Here we summarize the recent findings and characterizations of several known lncRNAs involved in the regulation of EMT. We will also discuss the potential use of these lncRNAs as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers as well as therapeutic targets to slow down or prevent metastatic spread of malignant tumors. PMID:27277676

  1. Transposable Element Insertions in Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sivakumar; Chernikova, Diana; Rogozin, Igor B.; Poliakov, Eugenia; Managadze, David; Koonin, Eugene V.; Milanesi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes and appear to have contributed to the evolution of their hosts by providing novel regulatory or coding sequences. We analyzed different regions of long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes in human and mouse genomes to systematically assess the potential contribution of TEs to the evolution of the structure and regulation of expression of lincRNA genes. Introns of lincRNA genes contain the highest percentage of TE-derived sequences (TES), followed by exons and then promoter regions although the density of TEs is not significantly different between exons and promoters. Higher frequencies of ancient TEs in promoters and exons compared to introns implies that many lincRNA genes emerged before the split of primates and rodents. The content of TES in lincRNA genes is substantially higher than that in protein-coding genes, especially in exons and promoter regions. A significant positive correlation was detected between the content of TEs and evolutionary rate of lincRNAs indicating that inserted TEs are preferentially fixed in fast-evolving lincRNA genes. These results are consistent with the repeat insertion domains of LncRNAs hypothesis under which TEs have substantially contributed to the origin, evolution, and, in particular, fast functional diversification, of lincRNA genes. PMID:26106594

  2. Insights into the Regulatory Role of Non-coding RNAs in Cancer Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Anaya, Fredy O.; Cedro-Tanda, Alberto; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer represents a complex disease originated from alterations in several genes leading to disturbances in important signaling pathways in tumor biology, favoring heterogeneity that promotes adaptability and pharmacological resistance of tumor cells. Metabolic reprogramming has emerged as an important hallmark of cancer characterized by the presence of aerobic glycolysis, increased glutaminolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis, as well as an altered mitochondrial energy production. The metabolic switches that support energetic requirements of cancer cells are closely related to either activation of oncogenes or down-modulation of tumor-suppressor genes, finally leading to dysregulation of cell proliferation, metastasis and drug resistance signals. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as one important kind of molecules that can regulate altered genes contributing, to the establishment of metabolic reprogramming. Moreover, diverse metabolic signals can regulate ncRNA expression and activity at genetic, transcriptional, or epigenetic levels. The regulatory landscape of ncRNAs may provide a new approach for understanding and treatment of different types of malignancies. In this review we discuss the regulatory role exerted by ncRNAs on metabolic enzymes and pathways involved in glucose, lipid, and amino acid metabolism. We also review how metabolic stress conditions and tumoral microenvironment influence ncRNA expression and activity. Furthermore, we comment on the therapeutic potential of metabolism-related ncRNAs in cancer. PMID:27551267

  3. Transcriptomic profiling of long non-coding RNAs in dermatomyositis by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qing-Lin; Zhang, Ya-Mei; Yang, Han-Bo; Shu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Xin; Wang, Guo-Chun

    2016-09-08

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalently transcribed in the genome and have been found to be of functional importance. However, the potential roles of lncRNAs in dermatomyositis (DM) remain unknown. In this study, a lncRNA + mRNA microarray analysis was performed to profile lncRNAs and mRNAs from 15 treatment-naive DM patients and 5 healthy controls. We revealed a total of 1198 lncRNAs (322 up-regulated and 876 down-regulated) and 1213 mRNAs (665 up-regulated and 548 down-regulated) were significantly differentially expressed in DM patients compared with the healthy controls (fold change>2, P < 0.05). Subgrouping DM patients according to the presence of interstitial lung disease and anti-Jo-1 antibody revealed different expression patterns of the lncRNAs. Pathway and gene ontology analysis for the differentially expressed mRNAs confirmed that type 1 interferon signaling was the most significantly dysregulated pathway in all DM subgroups. In addition, distinct pathways that uniquely associated with DM subgroup were also identified. Bioinformatics prediction suggested that linc-DGCR6-1 may be a lncRNA that regulates type 1 interferon-inducible gene USP18, which was found highly expressed in the perifascicular areas of the muscle fibers of DM patients. Our findings provide an overview of aberrantly expressed lncRNAs in DM muscle and further broaden the understanding of DM pathogenesis.

  4. Long non-coding RNA CCAT1 promotes metastasis and poor prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Shi, Huirong; Ren, Fang; Jia, Yanyan; Zhang, Ruitao

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we reported that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) CCAT1 was upregulated in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tissues, and was associated with FIGO stage, histological grade, lymph node metastasis and poor survival of EOC patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that CCAT1 was an independent prognostic indicator. While CCAT1 downregulation inhibited EOC cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), migration and invasion, CCAT1 upregulation promoted EOC cell EMT, migration and invasion. We further identified and confirmed that miR-152 and miR-130b were the targets of CCAT1, and CCAT1 functioned by targeting miR-152 and miR-130b. Subsequently, ADAM17 and WNT1, and STAT3 and ZEB1 were confirmed to be the targets of miR-152 and miR-130b, respectively, and could be regulated by CCAT1 in EOC cells. Knockdown of anyone of these four proteins inhibited EOC cell EMT, migration and invasion. Taken together, our study first revealed a critical role of CCAT1-miR-152/miR-130b-ADAM17/WNT1/STAT3/ZEB1 regulatory network in EOC cell metastasis. These findings provide great insights into EOC initiation and progression, and novel potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis for EOC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Non-coding RNAs in the plant response to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Cubas, Cecilia; Palomar, Miguel; Arteaga-Vázquez, Mario; Reyes, José Luis; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2012-10-01

    As sessile organisms, plants have to cope with the ever-changing environment as well as with numerous forms of stress. To react to these external cues, plants have evolved a suite of response mechanisms operating at many different levels, ranging from physiological to molecular processes that provide the organism with a wide phenotypic plasticity, allowing for fine tuning of the reactions to these adverse circumstances. During the past decade, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as key regulatory molecules, which contribute to a significant portion of the transcriptome in eukaryotes and are involved in the control of transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulatory pathways. Although accumulated evidence supports an important role for ncRNAs in plant response and adaptation to abiotic stress, their mechanism(s) of action still remains obscure and a functional characterization of the ncRNA repertoire in plants is still needed. Moreover, common features in the biogenesis of different small ncRNAs, and in some cases, cross talk between different gene regulatory pathways may add to the complexity of these pathways and could play important roles in modulating stress responses. Here we review the various ncRNAs that have been reported to participate in the response to abiotic stress in plants, focusing on their importance in plant adaptation and evolution. Understanding how ncRNAs work may reveal novel mechanisms involved in the plant responses to the environment.

  6. Analysis of long non-coding RNA expression profiles in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xue-Liang; Liu, De-Jun; Yan, Ting-Ting; Yang, Jian-Yu; Yang, Min-Wei; Li, Jiao; Huo, Yan-Miao; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jun-Feng; Hong, Jie; Hua, Rong; Chen, Hao-Yan; Sun, Yong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most aggressive and lethal malignancies. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a novel class of non-protein-coding transcripts that have been implicated in cancer biogenesis and prognosis. By repurposing microarray probes, we herein analysed the lncRNA expression profiles in two public PDAC microarray datasets and identified 34 dysregulated lncRNAs in PDAC. In addition, the expression of 6 selected lncRNAs was confirmed in Ren Ji cohort and pancreatic cell lines, and their association with 80 PDAC patients’ clinicopathological features and prognosis was investigated. Results indicated that AFAP1-AS1, UCA1 and ENSG00000218510 might be involved in PDAC progression and significantly associated with overall survival of PDAC. UCA1 and ENSG00000218510 expression status may serve as independent prognostic biomarkers for overall survival of PDAC. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) analysis suggested that high AFAP1-AS1, UCA1 and low ENSG00000218510 expression were correlated with several tumorigenesis related pathways. Functional experiments demonstrated that AFAP1-AS1 and UCA1 were required for efficient invasion and/or proliferation promotion in PDAC cell lines, while ENSG00000218510 acted the opposite. Our findings provide novel information on lncRNAs expression profiles which might be beneficial to the precise diagnosis, subcategorization and ultimately, the individualized therapy of PDAC. PMID:27628540

  7. Identification of long non-coding RNA in the horse transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Scott, E Y; Mansour, T; Bellone, R R; Brown, C T; Mienaltowski, M J; Penedo, M C; Ross, P J; Valberg, S J; Murray, J D; Finno, C J

    2017-07-04

    Efforts to resolve the transcribed sequences in the equine genome have focused on protein-coding RNA. The transcription of the intergenic regions, although detected via total RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), has yet to be characterized in the horse. The most recent equine transcriptome based on RNA-seq from several tissues was a prime opportunity to obtain a concurrent long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) database. This lncRNA database has a breadth of eight tissues and a depth of over 20 million reads for select tissues, providing the deepest and most expansive equine lncRNA database. Utilizing the intergenic reads and three categories of novel genes from a previously published equine transcriptome pipeline, we better describe these groups by annotating the lncRNA candidates. These lncRNA candidates were filtered using an approach adapted from human lncRNA annotation, which removes transcripts based on size, expression, protein-coding capability and distance to the start or stop of annotated protein-coding transcripts. Our equine lncRNA database has 20,800 transcripts that demonstrate characteristics unique to lncRNA including low expression, low exon diversity and low levels of sequence conservation. These candidate lncRNA will serve as a baseline lncRNA annotation and begin to describe the RNA-seq reads assigned to the intergenic space in the horse.

  8. Allelic expression mapping across cellular lineages to establish impact of non-coding SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Adoue, Veronique; Schiavi, Alicia; Light, Nicholas; Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Lundmark, Per; Ge, Bing; Kwan, Tony; Caron, Maxime; Rönnblom, Lars; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Shu-Huang; Goodall, Alison H; Cambien, Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Ouwehand, Willem H; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Pastinen, Tomi

    2014-01-01

    Most complex disease-associated genetic variants are located in non-coding regions and are therefore thought to be regulatory in nature. Association mapping of differential allelic expression (AE) is a powerful method to identify SNPs with direct cis-regulatory impact (cis-rSNPs). We used AE mapping to identify cis-rSNPs regulating gene expression in 55 and 63 HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines from a Caucasian and an African population, respectively, 70 fibroblast cell lines, and 188 purified monocyte samples and found 40–60% of these cis-rSNPs to be shared across cell types. We uncover a new class of cis-rSNPs, which disrupt footprint-derived de novo motifs that are predominantly bound by repressive factors and are implicated in disease susceptibility through overlaps with GWAS SNPs. Finally, we provide the proof-of-principle for a new approach for genome-wide functional validation of transcription factor–SNP interactions. By perturbing NFκB action in lymphoblasts, we identified 489 cis-regulated transcripts with altered AE after NFκB perturbation. Altogether, we perform a comprehensive analysis of cis-variation in four cell populations and provide new tools for the identification of functional variants associated to complex diseases. PMID:25326100

  9. Non-coding effects of circular RNA CCDC66 promote colon cancer growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Kuei-Yang; Lin, Ya-Chi; Gupta, Sachin Kumar; Chang, Ning; Yen, Laising; Sun, H Sunny; Tsai, Shaw-Jenq

    2017-03-01

    Circular RNA (circRNA) is a class of non-coding RNA whose functions remain mostly unknown. Recent studies indicate circRNA may be involved in disease pathogenesis, but direct evidence is scarce. Here we characterize the functional role of a novel circRNA, circCCDC66, in colorectal cancer (CRC). RNA-Seq data from matched normal and tumor colon tissue samples identified numerous circRNAs specifically elevated in cancer cells, several of which were verified by quantitative RT-PCR. CircCCDC66 expression was elevated in polyps and colon cancer and was associated with poor prognosis. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in CRC cell-lines demonstrated that circCCDC66 controlled multiple pathological processes, including cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth. In-depth characterization revealed that circCCDC66 exerts its function via regulation of a subset of oncogenes, and knockdown of circCCDC66 inhibited tumor growth and cancer invasion in xenograft and orthotopic mouse models, respectively. Taken together, these findings highlight a novel oncogenic function of circRNA in cancer progression and metastasis.

  10. Long non-coding RNAs as regulators of the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Marko; Lodish, Harvey F; Sun, Lei

    2015-03-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse group of RNAs that are often lineage-specific and that regulate multiple biological functions. Many are nuclear and are essential parts of ribonucleoprotein complexes that modify chromatin segments and establish active or repressive chromatin states; others are cytosolic and regulate the stability of mRNA or act as microRNA sponges. This Review summarizes the current knowledge of lncRNAs as regulators of the endocrine system, with a focus on the identification and mode of action of several endocrine-important lncRNAs. We highlight lncRNAs that have a role in the development and function of pancreatic β cells, white and brown adipose tissue, and other endocrine organs, and discuss the involvement of these molecules in endocrine dysfunction (for example, diabetes mellitus). We also address the associations of lncRNAs with nuclear receptors involved in major hormonal signalling pathways, such as estrogen and androgen receptors, and the relevance of these associations in certain endocrine cancers.

  11. Retroposition as a source of antisense long non-coding RNAs with possible regulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Bryzghalov, Oleksii; Szcześniak, Michał Wojciech; Makałowska, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a class of intensely studied, yet enigmatic molecules that make up a substantial portion of the human transcriptome. In this work, we link the origins and functions of some lncRNAs to retroposition, a process resulting in the creation of intronless copies (retrocopies) of the so-called parental genes. We found 35 human retrocopies transcribed in antisense and giving rise to 58 lncRNA transcripts. These lncRNAs share sequence similarity with the corresponding parental genes but in the sense/antisense orientation, meaning they have the potential to interact with each other and to form RNA:RNA duplexes. We took a closer look at these duplexes and found that 10 of the lncRNAs might regulate parental gene expression and processing at the pre-mRNA and mRNA levels. Further analysis of the co-expression and expression correlation provided support for the existence of functional coupling between lncRNAs and their mate parental gene transcripts.

  12. Exploring the function of long non-coding RNA in the development of bovine early embryos.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julieta; Gilbert, Isabelle; Fournier, Eric; Gagné, Dominic; Scantland, Sara; Macaulay, Angus; Robert, Claude

    2014-12-01

    Now recognised as part of the cellular transcriptome, the function of long non-coding (lnc) RNA remains unclear. Previously, we found that some lncRNA molecules in bovine embryos are highly responsive to culture conditions. In view of a recent demonstration that lncRNA may play a role in regulating important functions, such as maintenance of pluripotency, modification of epigenetic marks and activation of transcription, we sought evidence of its involvement in embryogenesis. Among the numerous catalogued lncRNA molecules found in oocytes and early embryos of cattle, three candidates chosen for further characterisation were found unexpectedly in the cytoplasmic compartment rather than in the nucleus. Transcriptomic survey of subcellular fractions found these candidates also associated with polyribosomes and one of them spanning transzonal projections between cumulus cells and the oocyte. Knocking down this transcript in matured oocytes increased developmental rates, leading to larger blastocysts. Transcriptome and methylome analyses of these blastocysts showed concordant data for a subset of four genes, including at least one known to be important for blastocyst survival. Functional characterisation of the roles played by lncRNA in supporting early development remains elusive. Our results suggest that some lncRNAs play a role in translation control of target mRNA. This would be important for managing the maternal reserves within which is embedded the embryonic program, especially before embryonic genome activation.

  13. Prognostic value of long non-coding RNA MALAT1 in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yihua; Lu, Wei; Xu, Jinming; Shi, Yu; Zhang, Honghe; Xia, Dajing

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis associated in lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) was identified to be the first long non-coding RNA as a biomarker of independent prognostic value for early stage non-small cell lung cancer patient survival. In recent years, the association between upregulated tissue MALAT1 level and incidence of various cancers including bladder cancer, colorectal cancer, and renal cancer has been widely discussed. The aim of our present study was to assess the potential prognostic value of MALAT1 in various human cancers. PubMed, Embase, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched, and eligible studies evaluating the prognostic value of MALAT1 in various cancers were included. Finally, 11 studies encompassing 1216 participants reporting with sufficient data were enrolled in the current meta-analysis. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) was 2.05 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.64-2.55, p < 0.01) for overall survival (OS) and 2.66 (95 % CI 1.86-3.80, p < 0.01) for disease-free survival (DFS). In conclusion, high tissue MALAT1 level was associated with an inferior clinical outcome in various cancers, suggesting that MALAT1 might serve as a potential prognostic biomarker for various cancers.

  14. Functions of long non-coding RNAs in human disease and their conservation in Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Rogoyski, Oliver M; Pueyo, Jose Ignacio; Couso, Juan Pablo; Newbury, Sarah F

    2017-08-15

    Genomic analysis has found that the transcriptome in both humans and Drosophila melanogaster features large numbers of long non-coding RNA transcripts (lncRNAs). This recently discovered class of RNAs regulates gene expression in diverse ways and has been involved in a large variety of important biological functions. Importantly, an increasing number of lncRNAs have also been associated with a range of human diseases, including cancer. Comparative analyses of their functions among these organisms suggest that some of their modes of action appear to be conserved. This highlights the importance of model organisms such as Drosophila, which shares many gene regulatory networks with humans, in understanding lncRNA function and its possible impact in human health. This review discusses some known functions and mechanisms of action of lncRNAs and their implication in human diseases, together with their functional conservation and relevance in Drosophila development. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Current Insights into Long Non-Coding RNAs (LncRNAs) in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Maria A.; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Pummer, Karl; Calin, George A.; Pichler, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The importance of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the pathogenesis of various malignancies has been uncovered over the last few years. Their dysregulation often contributes to or is a result of tumour progression. In prostate cancer, the most common malignancy in men, lncRNAs can promote castration resistance, cell proliferation, invasion, and metastatic spread. Expression patterns of lncRNAs often change during tumour progression; their expression levels may constantly rise (e.g., HOX transcript antisense RNA, HOTAIR), or steadily decrease (e.g., downregulated RNA in cancer, DRAIC). In prostate cancer, lncRNAs likewise have diagnostic (e.g., prostate cancer antigen 3, PCA3), prognostic (e.g., second chromosome locus associated with prostate-1, SChLAP1), and predictive (e.g., metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript-1, MALAT-1) functions. Considering their dynamic role in prostate cancer, lncRNAs may also serve as therapeutic targets, helping to prevent development of castration resistance, maintain stable disease, and prohibit metastatic spread. PMID:28241429

  16. Towards a therapy for Angelman syndrome by targeting a long non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Meng, Linyan; Ward, Amanda J; Chun, Seung; Bennett, C Frank; Beaudet, Arthur L; Rigo, Frank

    2015-02-19

    Angelman syndrome is a single-gene disorder characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay, behavioural uniqueness, speech impairment, seizures and ataxia. It is caused by maternal deficiency of the imprinted gene UBE3A, encoding an E3 ubiquitin ligase. All patients carry at least one copy of paternal UBE3A, which is intact but silenced by a nuclear-localized long non-coding RNA, UBE3A antisense transcript (UBE3A-ATS). Murine Ube3a-ATS reduction by either transcription termination or topoisomerase I inhibition has been shown to increase paternal Ube3a expression. Despite a clear understanding of the disease-causing event in Angelman syndrome and the potential to harness the intact paternal allele to correct the disease, no gene-specific treatment exists for patients. Here we developed a potential therapeutic intervention for Angelman syndrome by reducing Ube3a-ATS with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). ASO treatment achieved specific reduction of Ube3a-ATS and sustained unsilencing of paternal Ube3a in neurons in vitro and in vivo. Partial restoration of UBE3A protein in an Angelman syndrome mouse model ameliorated some cognitive deficits associated with the disease. Although additional studies of phenotypic correction are needed, we have developed a sequence-specific and clinically feasible method to activate expression of the paternal Ube3a allele.

  17. Exploration of small non coding RNAs in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Yao, Yingyin; Sun, Qixin

    2012-09-01

    Large numbers of noncoding RNA transcripts (ncRNAs) are being revealed in animals and plants, which can function at the transcriptional or posttranscriptional level to negatively regulate or control genes, repetitive sequences, viruses, and mobile elements. With the identification of microRNA and siRNAs in diverse organisms, increasing evidences indicate that these short npcRNAs play important roles in development, stress response and diseases by cleavage of target mRNA or interfere with translation of target genes. To explore the small RNA transcriptome in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), a couple of small RNA libraries were constructed and sequenced by high throughput sequencing method. In this review, we focused on the discovery of wheat small RNAs including miRNA and some other non coding small RNAs, then have a view of miRNAs conservations and differences among wheat and other plant species. We also summarized the developmental and stress responsive expression of wheat miRNAs and these observations could serve as a foundation for future functional studies.

  18. Transcription of Satellite III non-coding RNAs is a general stress response in human cells.

    PubMed

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Rossi, Antonio; Bazzini, Silvia; Ghigna, Claudia; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2008-02-01

    In heat-shocked human cells, heat shock factor 1 activates transcription of tandem arrays of repetitive Satellite III (SatIII) DNA in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Satellite III RNAs remain associated with sites of transcription in nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here we use real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of these genomic regions. Transcription is highly asymmetrical and most of the transcripts contain the G-rich strand of the repeat. A low level of G-rich RNAs is detectable in unstressed cells and a 10(4)-fold induction occurs after heat shock. G-rich RNAs are induced by a wide range of stress treatments including heavy metals, UV-C, oxidative and hyper-osmotic stress. Differences exist among stressing agents both for the kinetics and the extent of induction (>100- to 80.000-fold). In all cases, G-rich transcripts are associated with nSBs. On the contrary, C-rich transcripts are almost undetectable in unstressed cells and modestly increase after stress. Production of SatIII RNAs after hyper-osmotic stress depends on the Tonicity Element Binding Protein indicating that activation of the arrays is triggered by different transcription factors. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA whose transcription is controlled by different transcription factors under different growth conditions.

  19. Evolutionary analysis reveals regulatory and functional landscape of coding and non-coding RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Dionna

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing diversifies the transcriptome and promotes functional diversity, particularly in the brain. A plethora of editing sites has been recently identified; however, how they are selected and regulated and which are functionally important are largely unknown. Here we show the cis-regulation and stepwise selection of RNA editing during Drosophila evolution and pinpoint a large number of functional editing sites. We found that the establishment of editing and variation in editing levels across Drosophila species are largely explained and predicted by cis-regulatory elements. Furthermore, editing events that arose early in the species tree tend to be more highly edited in clusters and enriched in slowly-evolved neuronal genes, thus suggesting that the main role of RNA editing is for fine-tuning neurological functions. While nonsynonymous editing events have been long recognized as playing a functional role, in addition to nonsynonymous editing sites, a large fraction of 3’UTR editing sites is evolutionarily constrained, highly edited, and thus likely functional. We find that these 3’UTR editing events can alter mRNA stability and affect miRNA binding and thus highlight the functional roles of noncoding RNA editing. Our work, through evolutionary analyses of RNA editing in Drosophila, uncovers novel insights of RNA editing regulation as well as its functions in both coding and non-coding regions. PMID:28166241

  20. Non-coding RNA may be associated with cytoplasmic male sterility in Silene vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Stone, James D.; Koloušková, Pavla; Sloan, Daniel B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a widespread phenomenon in flowering plants caused by mitochondrial (mt) genes. CMS genes typically encode novel proteins that interfere with mt functions and can be silenced by nuclear fertility-restorer genes. Although the molecular basis of CMS is well established in a number of crop systems, our understanding of it in natural populations is far more limited. To identify CMS genes in a gynodioecious plant, Silene vulgaris, we constructed mt transcriptomes and compared transcript levels and RNA editing patterns in floral bud tissue from female and hermaphrodite full siblings. The transcriptomes from female and hermaphrodite individuals were very similar overall with respect to variation in levels of transcript abundance across the genome, the extent of RNA editing, and the order in which RNA editing and intron splicing events occurred. We found only a single genomic region that was highly overexpressed and differentially edited in females relative to hermaphrodites. This region is not located near any other transcribed elements and lacks an open-reading frame (ORF) of even moderate size. To our knowledge, this transcript would represent the first non-coding mt RNA associated with CMS in plants and is, therefore, an important target for future functional validation studies. PMID:28369520

  1. Retinal expression of small non-coding RNAs in a murine model of proliferative retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Wang, Zhongxiao; Sun, Ye; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Ocular neovascularization is a leading cause of blindness in proliferative retinopathy. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) play critical roles in both vascular and neuronal development of the retina through post-transcriptional regulation of target gene expression. To identify the function and therapeutic potential of sncRNAs in retinopathy, we assessed the expression profile of retinal sncRNAs in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) with pathologic proliferation of neovessels. Approximately 2% of all analyzed sncRNAs were significantly altered in OIR retinas compared with normoxic controls. Twenty three microRNAs with substantial up- or down-regulation were identified, including miR-351, -762, -210, 145, -155, -129-5p, -150, -203, and -375, which were further analyzed for their potential target genes in angiogenic, hypoxic, and immune response-related pathways. In addition, nineteen small nucleolar RNAs also revealed differential expression in OIR retinas compared with control retinas. A decrease of overall microRNA expression in OIR retinas was consistent with reduced microRNA processing enzyme Dicer, and increased expression of Alu element in OIR. Together, our findings elucidated a group of differentially expressed sncRNAs in a murine model of proliferative retinopathy. These sncRNAs may exert critical post-transcriptional regulatory roles in regulating pathological neovascularization in eye diseases. PMID:27653551

  2. Satellite non-coding RNAs: the emerging players in cells, cellular pathways and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniela; Meles, Susana; Escudeiro, Ana; Mendes-da-Silva, Ana; Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel

    2015-09-01

    For several decades, transcriptional inactivity was considered as one of the particular features of constitutive heterochromatin and, therefore, of its major component, satellite DNA sequences. However, more recently, succeeding evidences have demonstrated that these sequences can indeed be transcribed, yielding satellite non-coding RNAs with important roles in the organization and regulation of genomes. Since then, several studies have been conducted, trying to understand the function(s) of these sequences not only in the normal but also in cancer genomes. It is thought that the association between cancer and satncRNAs is mostly due to the influence of these transcripts in the genome instability, a hallmark of cancer. The few reports on satellite DNA transcription in cancer contexts point to its overexpression; however, this scenario may be far more complex, variable, and influenced by a number of factors and the exact role of satncRNAs in the oncogenic process remains poorly understood. The greater is the knowledge on the association of satncRNAs with cancer, the greater would be the opportunity to assist cancer treatment, either by the design of effective therapies targeting these molecules or by using them as biomarkers in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and with predictive value.

  3. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Alvaro D; Quereda, Juan J; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles is regulated in both space and time. Non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulatory molecules that fine-tune important processes in bacterial physiology including cell envelope architecture, intermediate metabolism, bacterial communication, biofilm formation, and virulence. Recent studies have shown production of defined sRNA species by intracellular bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells. The molecules targeted by these sRNAs and their expression dynamics along the intracellular infection cycle remain, however, poorly characterized. Technical difficulties linked to the isolation of "intact" intracellular bacteria from infected host cells might explain why sRNA regulation in these specialized pathogens is still a largely unexplored field. Transition from the extracellular to the intracellular lifestyle provides an ideal scenario in which regulatory sRNAs are intended to participate; so much work must be done in this direction. This review focuses on sRNAs expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens during the infection of eukaryotic cells, strategies used with these pathogens to identify sRNAs required for virulence, and the experimental technical challenges associated to this type of studies. We also discuss varied techniques for their potential application to study RNA regulation in intracellular bacterial infections.

  4. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A

    2016-02-22

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype.

  5. Quantitative Profiling of Peptides from RNAs classified as non-coding

    PubMed Central

    Prabakaran, Sudhakaran; Hemberg, Martin; Chauhan, Ruchi; Winter, Dominic; Tweedie-Cullen, Ry Y.; Dittrich, Christian; Hong, Elizabeth; Gunawardena, Jeremy; Steen, Hanno; Kreiman, Gabriel; Steen, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the mammalian genome codes for messenger RNAs destined to be translated into proteins, and it is generally assumed that a large portion of transcribed sequences - including introns and several classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) do not give rise to peptide products. A systematic examination of translation and physiological regulation of ncRNAs has not been conducted. Here, we use computational methods to identify the products of non-canonical translation in mouse neurons by analyzing unannotated transcripts in combination with proteomic data. This study supports the existence of non-canonical translation products from both intragenic and extragenic genomic regions, including peptides derived from anti-sense transcripts and introns. Moreover, the studied novel translation products exhibit temporal regulation similar to that of proteins known to be involved in neuronal activity processes. These observations highlight a potentially large and complex set of biologically regulated translational events from transcripts formerly thought to lack coding potential. PMID:25403355

  6. Two Lamprey Hedgehog Genes Share Non-Coding Regulatory Sequences and Expression Patterns with Gnathostome Hedgehogs

    PubMed Central

    Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences. PMID:20967201

  7. Expression of macro non-coding RNAs Meg8 and Irm in mouse embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tiantian; He, Hongjuan; Han, Zhengbin; Zeng, Tiebo; Huang, Zhijun; Liu, Qi; Gu, Ning; Chen, Yan; Sugimoto, Kenkichi; Jiang, Huijie; Wu, Qiong

    2012-07-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) Meg8 and Irm were previously identified as alternatively splicing isoforms of Rian gene. Ascertaining ncRNAs spatiotemporal expression patterns is crucial for understanding the physiological roles of ncRNAs during tissue and organ development. In this study in mouse embryos, we focused on the developmental regulation expression of imprinted macro ncRNAs, Meg8 and Irm by using in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR). The in situ hybridization results showed that Meg8 and Irm were expressed in the developing brain at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E11.5, while Irm expression signals were strikingly detected in the somite, where Meg8 expression signals were undetectable. By E15.5, they were expressed in brain, tongue, liver, lung and neuroendocrine tissues, while Irm displayed more restricted expression in tongue and skeletal muscle than Meg8. Furthermore, quantitative analysis confirmed that they were highly expressed in tongue and brain at E12.5, E15.5 and E18.5. These results indicated that Meg8 and Irm might be coordinately expressed and functionally correlated in diverse of organs. Notably, Irm was more closely associated with morphogenesis of skeletal muscle in contrast to Meg8 during embryonic development.

  8. The Role of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nikpayam, Elahe; Tasharrofi, Behnoosh; Sarrafzadeh, Shaghayegh; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most fatal tumor of female’s reproductive system, and several genetics and environmental factors are involved in its development. Various studies have already identified some suitable biomarkers to facilitate the early detection, the prognosis evaluation, and the assessment of treatment response. However, the aim of this review is to investigate the role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in tumorigenesis process of ovarian cancer and their potential applications as ovarian cancer biomarkers. We performed an online literature search of the MEDLINE/PubMed databases using the keywords, including ovarian cancer, lncRNA, and biomarker. We found that several lncRNAs have been shown to be deregulated in ovarian cancer and the specific mechanism of their enrollment in ovarian cancer has been defined for a few of them. In addition, expression profiling has revealed an association between lncRNAs and patients’ survival, metastasis potential, as well as treatment response. Expression profiling and methylation analysis of lncRNAs in ovarian cancer may lead to the identification of novel biomarkers that can help in the classification of patients based on prognosis and treatment response. PMID:27664137

  9. RNA Sequencing and Co-expressed Long Non-coding RNA in Modern and Wild Wheats.

    PubMed

    Cagirici, Halise Busra; Alptekin, Burcu; Budak, Hikmet

    2017-09-06

    There is an urgent need for the improvement of drought-tolerant bread and durum wheat. The huge and complex genome of bread wheat (BBAADD genome) stands as a vital obstruction for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying drought tolerance. However, tetraploid wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp., BBAA genome) is an ancestor of modern bread wheat and offers an important model for studying the drought response due to its less complex genome. Additionally, several wild relatives of tetraploid wheat have already shown a significant drought tolerance. We sequenced root transcriptome of three tetraploid wheat varieties with varying stress tolerance profiles, and built differential expression library of their transcripts under control and drought conditions. More than 5,000 differentially expressed transcripts were identified from each genotype. Functional characterization of transcripts specific to drought-tolerant genotype, revealed their association with osmolytes production and secondary metabolite pathways. Comparative analysis of differentially expressed genes and their non-coding RNA partners, long noncoding RNAs and microRNAs, provided valuable insight to gene expression regulation in response to drought stress. LncRNAs as well as coding transcripts share similar structural features in different tetraploid species; yet, lncRNAs slightly differ from coding transcripts. Several miRNA-lncRNA target pairs were detected as differentially expressed in drought stress. Overall, this study suggested an important pool of transcripts where their manipulations confer a better performance of wheat varieties under drought stress.

  10. Dysregulated long intergenic non-coding RNA modules contribute to heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxin; Yu, Fulong; Lan, Yujia; Xu, Jinyuan; Pang, Bo; Han, Dong; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are emerging as important regulatory molecules involved in diseases including heart failure. However, little is known about how the lincRNAs work together with protein-coding genes (PCGs) contributing to the pathogenesis of heart failure. In this study, we constructed a comprehensive transcriptome profile of lincRNAs, PCGs and miRNAs using RNA-seq and miRNA-seq data of 16 heart failure patients (HFs) and 8 non-failing individuals (NFs). Through integrating lincRNA and PCG expression profiles, we identified HF-associated lincRNA modules. We identified a heart-specific lincRNA module which was significantly enriched for differentially expressed lincRNAs and PCGs. This module was associated with heart failure rather than with other clinical traits such as sex, age, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the module was significantly correlated with certain indicators of left ventricular function like ejection fraction and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, implying the potential of its components as crucial biomarkers. Apart from enhancer-like function, lincRNAs in this module could act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) to regulate genes which were associated with left-ventricular systolic function. Our work provided deep insights into the critical roles of lincRNAs in the pathology of heart failure and suggested that they could be valuable biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:28040802

  11. Structural basis of the non-coding RNA RsmZ acting as a protein sponge.

    PubMed

    Duss, Olivier; Michel, Erich; Yulikov, Maxim; Schubert, Mario; Jeschke, Gunnar; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2014-05-29

    MicroRNA and protein sequestration by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has recently generated much interest. In the bacterial Csr/Rsm system, which is considered to be the most general global post-transcriptional regulatory system responsible for bacterial virulence, ncRNAs such as CsrB or RsmZ activate translation initiation by sequestering homodimeric CsrA-type proteins from the ribosome-binding site of a subset of messenger RNAs. However, the mechanism of ncRNA-mediated protein sequestration is not understood at the molecular level. Here we show for Pseudomonas fluorescens that RsmE protein dimers assemble sequentially, specifically and cooperatively onto the ncRNA RsmZ within a narrow affinity range. This assembly yields two different native ribonucleoprotein structures. Using a powerful combination of nuclear magnetic resonance and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy we elucidate these 70-kilodalton solution structures, thereby revealing the molecular mechanism of the sequestration process and how RsmE binding protects the ncRNA from RNase E degradation. Overall, our findings suggest that RsmZ is well-tuned to sequester, store and release RsmE and therefore can be viewed as an ideal protein 'sponge'.

  12. BmncRNAdb: a comprehensive database of non-coding RNAs in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiu-Zhong; Zhang, Bindan; Yu, Quan-You; Zhang, Ze

    2016-09-13

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may play critical roles in a wide range of developmental processes of higher organisms. Recently, lncRNAs have been widely identified across eukaryotes and many databases of lncRNAs have been developed for human, mouse, fruit fly, etc. However, there is rare information about them in the only completely domesticated insect, silkworm (Bombyx mori). In this study, we systematically scanned lncRNAs using the available silkworm RNA-seq data and public unigenes. Finally, we identified and collected 6281 lncRNAs in the silkworm. Besides, we also collected 1986 microRNAs (miRNAs) from previous studies. Then, we organized them into a comprehensive and web-based database, BmncRNAdb. This database offers a user-friendly interface for data browse and online analysis as well as the three online tools for users to predict the target genes of lncRNA or miRNA. We have systematically identified and collected the silkworm lncRNAs and constructed a comprehensive database of the silkworm lncRNAs and miRNAs. This work gives a glimpse into lncRNAs of the silkworm and lays foundations for the ncRNAs study of the silkworm and other insects in the future. The BmncRNAdb is freely available at http://gene.cqu.edu.cn/BmncRNAdb/index.php .

  13. Polymorphisms at long non-coding RNAs and prostate cancer risk in an eastern Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Cao, D-L; Gu, C-Y; Zhu, Y; Dai, B; Zhang, H-L; Shi, G-H; Shen, Y-J; Zhu, Y-P; Ma, C-G; Xiao, W-J; Qin, X-J; Lin, G-W; Ye, D-W

    2014-12-01

    Controversial data on the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs3787016G>A and rs10773338G>A) in long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) with prostate cancer risk were emerged. Considering possible genetic differences among populations, we conducted the present study to clarify these discrepancies and re-validate these results in an eastern Chinese population and thus provide clues for new therapeutic targets of prostate cancer. Genotypes of these two SNPs from 1015 ethnic Han Chinese patients with prostate cancer and 1032 cancer-free controls were determined by Taqman assays. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk associations. The association of rs3787016 A variant genotypes with a significantly higher prostate cancer risk were found (adjusted OR = 1.418, 95% CI = 1.090-1.844 for AA vs GG). Stratification analysis indicated that the risk of rs3787016 variant AG/AA genotypes was more evident in younger subjects, ever smoking, patients with Gleason score ⩾ 7(4+3) and highly aggressive status. All these risks were not present for rs10773338G>A. These findings suggested that lncRNA SNPs may contribute to prostate cancer risk in an eastern Chinese population. Larger and well-designed studies with different ethnic populations are warranted to validate our findings.

  14. From structure prediction to genomic screens for novel non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2011-08-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are receiving more and more attention not only as an abundant class of genes, but also as regulatory structural elements (some located in mRNAs). A key feature of RNA function is its structure. Computational methods were developed early for folding and prediction of RNA structure with the aim of assisting in functional analysis. With the discovery of more and more ncRNAs, it has become clear that a large fraction of these are highly structured. Interestingly, a large part of the structure is comprised of regular Watson-Crick and GU wobble base pairs. This and the increased amount of available genomes have made it possible to employ structure-based methods for genomic screens. The field has moved from folding prediction of single sequences to computational screens for ncRNAs in genomic sequence using the RNA structure as the main characteristic feature. Whereas early methods focused on energy-directed folding of single sequences, comparative analysis based on structure preserving changes of base pairs has been efficient in improving accuracy, and today this constitutes a key component in genomic screens. Here, we cover the basic principles of RNA folding and touch upon some of the concepts in current methods that have been applied in genomic screens for de novo RNA structures in searches for novel ncRNA genes and regulatory RNA structure on mRNAs. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different strategies and how they can complement each other.

  15. Noncoder: a web interface for exon array-based detection of long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gellert, Pascal; Ponomareva, Yuliya; Braun, Thomas; Uchida, Shizuka

    2013-01-01

    Due to recent technical developments, a high number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in mammals. Although it has been shown that lncRNAs are regulated differently among tissues and disease statuses, functions of these transcripts are still unknown in most cases. GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST Arrays (exon arrays) from Affymetrix, Inc. have been used widely to profile genome-wide expression changes and alternative splicing of protein-coding genes. Here, we demonstrate that re-annotation of exon array probes can be used to profile expressions of tens of thousands of lncRNAs. With this annotation, a detailed inspection of lncRNAs and their isoforms is possible. To allow for a general usage to the research community, we developed a user-friendly web interface called ‘noncoder’. By uploading CEL files from exon arrays and with a few mouse clicks and parameter settings, exon array data will be normalized and analysed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs. Noncoder provides the detailed annotation information of lncRNAs and is equipped with unique features to allow for an efficient search for interesting lncRNAs to be studied further. The web interface is available at http://noncoder.mpi-bn.mpg.de. PMID:23012263

  16. The hallmarks of cancer: a long non-coding RNA point of view.

    PubMed

    Gutschner, Tony; Diederichs, Sven

    2012-06-01

    With the advent of next generation sequencing methods and progress in transcriptome analysis, it became obvious that the human genome contains much more than just protein-coding genes. In fact, up to 70% of our genome is transcribed into RNA that does not serve as templates for proteins. In this review, we focus on the emerging roles of these long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the field of tumor biology. Long ncRNAs were found to be deregulated in several human cancers and show tissue-specific expression. Functional studies revealed a broad spectrum of mechanisms applied by lncRNAs such as HOTAIR, MALAT1, ANRIL or lincRNA-p21 to fulfill their functions. Here, we link the cellular processes influenced by long ncRNAs to the hallmarks of cancer and therefore provide an ncRNA point-of-view on tumor biology. This should stimulate new research directions and therapeutic options considering long ncRNAs as novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets.

  17. Towards a therapy for Angelman syndrome by reduction of a long non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Linyan; Ward, Amanda J.; Chun, Seung; Bennett, C. Frank; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Rigo, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a single gene disorder characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay, behavioral uniqueness, speech impairment, seizures, and ataxia1,2. It is caused by maternal deficiency of the imprinted gene UBE3A, encoding an E3 ubiquitin ligase3-5. All patients carry at least one copy of paternal UBE3A, which is intact but silenced by a nuclear-localized long non-coding RNA, UBE3A antisense transcript (UBE3A-ATS)6-8. Murine Ube3a-ATS reduction by either transcription termination or topoisomerase I inhibition increased paternal Ube3a expression9,10. Despite a clear understanding of the disease-causing event in AS and the potential to harness the intact paternal allele to correct disease, no gene-specific treatment exists for patients. Here we developed a potential therapeutic intervention for AS by reducing Ube3a-ATS with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). ASO treatment achieved specific reduction of Ube3a-ATS and sustained unsilencing of paternal Ube3a in neurons in vitro and in vivo. Partial restoration of UBE3A protein in an AS mouse model ameliorated some cognitive deficits associated with the disease. Although additional studies of phenotypic correction are needed, for the first time we developed a sequence-specific and clinically feasible method to activate expression of the paternal Ube3a allele. PMID:25470045

  18. Development of cytotoxicity-sensitive human cells using overexpression of long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Tani, Hidenori; Torimura, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    Biosensors using live cells are analytical devices that have the advantage of being highly sensitive for their targets. Although attention has primarily focused on reporter gene assays using functional promoters, cell viability assays are still efficient. We focus on long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are involved in the molecular mechanisms associated with responses to cellular stresses as a new biological material. Here we have developed human live cells transfected with lncRNAs that can be used as an intelligent sensor of cytotoxicity for a broad range of environmental stresses. We identified three lncRNAs (GAS5, IDI2-AS1, and SNHG15) that responded to cycloheximide in HEK293 cells. Overexpression of these lncRNAs sensitized human cells to cell death in response to various stresses (cycloheximide, ultraviolet irradiation, mercury II chloride, or hydrogen peroxide). In particular, dual lncRNA (GAS5 plus IDI2-AS1, or GAS5 plus SNHG15) overexpression sensitized cells to cell death by more cellular stresses. We propose a method for highly sensitive biosensors using overexpression of lncRNAs that can potentially measure the cytotoxicity signals of various environmental stresses.

  19. Regulation of protein homeostasis in neurodegenerative diseases: the role of coding and non-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Sin, Olga; Nollen, Ellen A A

    2015-11-01

    Protein homeostasis is fundamental for cell function and survival, because proteins are involved in all aspects of cellular function, ranging from cell metabolism and cell division to the cell's response to environmental challenges. Protein homeostasis is tightly regulated by the synthesis, folding, trafficking and clearance of proteins, all of which act in an orchestrated manner to ensure proteome stability. The protein quality control system is enhanced by stress response pathways, which take action whenever the proteome is challenged by environmental or physiological stress. Aging, however, damages the proteome, and such proteome damage is thought to be associated with aging-related diseases. In this review, we discuss the different cellular processes that define the protein quality control system and focus on their role in protein conformational diseases. We highlight the power of using small organisms to model neurodegenerative diseases and how these models can be exploited to discover genetic modulators of protein aggregation and toxicity. We also link findings from small model organisms to the situation in higher organisms and describe how some of the genetic modifiers discovered in organisms such as worms are functionally conserved throughout evolution. Finally, we demonstrate that the non-coding genome also plays a role in maintaining protein homeostasis. In all, this review highlights the importance of protein and RNA homeostasis in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. The ways of action of long non-coding RNAs in cytoplasm and nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Shi, Zhe-Min; Chang, Ya-Nan; Hu, Zhi-Mei; Qi, Hai-Xia; Hong, Wei

    2014-08-15

    Over the past fifteen years, small regulatory RNAs, such as siRNA and miRNA, have been extensively investigated and the underlying molecular mechanisms have been well documented, suggesting that ncRNAs play a major function in many cellular processes. An expanding body of evidence reveals that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), once described as dark matter, are involved in diverse cellular progresses, including regulation of gene expression, dosage compensation, genomic imprinting, nuclear organization and nuclear-cytoplasm trafficking via a number of complex mechanisms. The emerging links between lncRNAs and diseases as well as their tissue-specific expression patterns also indicate that lncRNAs comprise a core transcriptional regulatory circuitry. The function of lncRNAs is based on their sequence and structure; and they can combine with DNA, RNA, and proteins both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. However, detailed insights into their biological and mechanistic functions are only beginning to emerge. In this review, we will mainly talk about diverse ways of action of lncRNAs in different sub-cellular locations and provide clues for following studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The evolution and expression of the snaR family of small non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Andrew M.; Tsai, Michael; Batchu, Priyanka; Ryan, Karen; Ozer, Harvey L.; Tian, Bin; Mathews, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified the snaR family of small non-coding RNAs that associate in vivo with the nuclear factor 90 (NF90/ILF3) protein. The major human species, snaR-A, is an RNA polymerase III transcript with restricted tissue distribution and orthologs in chimpanzee but not rhesus macaque or mouse. We report their expression in human tissues and their evolution in primates. snaR genes are exclusively in African Great Apes and some are unique to humans. Two novel families of snaR-related genetic elements were found in primates: CAS (catarrhine ancestor of snaR), limited to Old World Monkeys and apes; and ASR (Alu/snaR-related), present in all monkeys and apes. ASR and CAS appear to have spread by retrotransposition, whereas most snaR genes have spread by segmental duplication. snaR-A and snaR-G2 are differentially expressed in discrete regions of the human brain and other tissues, notably including testis. snaR-A is up-regulated in transformed and immortalized human cells, and is stably bound to ribosomes in HeLa cells. We infer that snaR evolved from the left monomer of the primate-specific Alu SINE family via ASR and CAS in conjunction with major primate speciation events, and suggest that snaRs participate in tissue- and species-specific regulation of cell growth and translation. PMID:20935053

  2. Small Non-coding RNAs Associated with Viral Infectious Diseases of Veterinary Importance: Potential Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Samir, Mohamed; Pessler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) molecules that can regulate mRNAs by inducing their degradation or by blocking translation. Considering that miRNAs are ubiquitous, stable, and conserved across animal species, it seems feasible to exploit them for clinical applications. Unlike in human viral diseases, where some miRNA-based molecules have progressed to clinical application, in veterinary medicine, this concept is just starting to come into view. Clinically, miRNAs could represent powerful diagnostic tools to pinpoint animal viral diseases and/or prognostic tools to follow up disease progression or remission. Additionally, the possible consequences of miRNA dysregulation make them potential therapeutic targets and open the possibilities to use them as tools to generate viral disease-resistant livestock. This review presents an update of preclinical studies on using sncRNAs to combat viral diseases that affect pet and farm animals. Moreover, we discuss the possibilities and challenges of bringing these bench-based discoveries to the veterinary clinic. PMID:27092305

  3. HSV1 latent transcription and non-coding RNA: A critical retrospective.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Dane; Barrozo, Enrico R; Bloom, David C

    2017-07-15

    Virologists have invested great effort into understanding how the herpes simplex viruses and their relatives are maintained dormant over the lifespan of their host while maintaining the poise to remobilize on sporadic occasions. Piece by piece, our field has defined the tissues in play (the sensory ganglia), the transcriptional units (the latency-associated transcripts), and the responsive genomic region (the long repeats of the viral genomes). With time, the observed complexity of these features has compounded, and the totality of viral factors regulating latency are less obvious. In this review, we compose a comprehensive picture of the viral genetic elements suspected to be relevant to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) latent transcription by conducting a critical analysis of about three decades of research. We describe these studies, which largely involved mutational analysis of the notable latency-associated transcripts (LATs), and more recently a series of viral miRNAs. We also intend to draw attention to the many other less characterized non-coding RNAs, and perhaps coding RNAs, that may be important for consideration when trying to disentangle the multitude of phenotypes of the many genetic modifications introduced into recombinant HSV1 strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Long Non-Coding RNA RHPN1-AS1 Promotes Uveal Melanoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Linna; Yu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Leilei; Ding, Xia; Pan, Hui; Wen, Xuyang; Xu, Shiqiong; Xing, Yue; Fan, Jiayan; Ge, Shengfang; Zhang, He; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that aberrant long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are significantly correlated with the pathogenesis, development and metastasis of cancers. RHPN1 antisense RNA 1 (RHPN1-AS1) is a 2030-bp transcript originating from human chromosome 8q24. However, the role of RHPN1-AS1 in uveal melanoma (UM) remains to be clarified. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the molecular function of RHPN1-AS1 in UM. The RNA levels of RHPN1-AS1 in UM cell lines were examined using the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were designed to quench RHPN1-AS1 expression, and UM cells stably expressing short hairpin (sh) RHPN1-AS1 were established. Next, the cell proliferation and migration abilities were determined using a colony formation assay and a transwell migration/invasion assay. A tumor xenograft model in nude mice was established to confirm the function of RHPN1-AS1 in vivo. RHPN1-AS1 was significantly upregulated in a number of UM cell lines compared with the normal human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line. RHPN1-AS1 knockdown significantly inhibited UM cell proliferation and migration in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that RHPN1-AS1 could be an oncoRNA in UM, which may serve as a candidate prognostic biomarker and target for new therapies in malignant UM. PMID:28124977

  5. Identification of novel long non-coding RNAs in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenjie; Wang, Wenmin; Xu, Dong; Yan, Xinqiang; Chen, Beibei; Yu, Longyao; Li, Jicheng; Chen, Xiaobing; Ding, Kan; Cao, Feilin

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast carcinomas (TNBC) are characterized by particularly poor outcomes, and there are no established markers significantly associated with prognosis. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are subclass of noncoding RNAs that have been recently shown to play critical roles in cancer biology. However, little is known about their mechanistic role in TNBC pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated the expression patterns of lncRNAs from TNBC tissues and matched normal tissues with Agilent Human lncRNA array. We identified 1,758 lncRNAs and 1,254 mRNAs that were differentially expressed (≥ 2-fold change), indicating that many lncRNAs are significantly upregulated or downregulated in TNBC. Among these, XR_250621.1 and NONHSAT125629 were the most upregulated and downregulated lncRNAs respectively. qRT-PCR was employed to validate the microarray analysis findings, and results were consistent with the data from the microarrays. GO and KEGG pathway analysis were applied to explore the potential lncRNAs functions, some pathways including microtubule motor activity and DNA replication were identified in TNBC pathogenesis. Our study revealed that a set of lncRNAs were differentially expressed in TNBC tissues, suggesting that they may play role in TNBC. These results shed light on lncRNAs’ biological functions and provide useful information for exploring potential therapeutic targets for breast cancer. PMID:26078338

  6. Evolutionary analysis reveals regulatory and functional landscape of coding and non-coding RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Deng, Patricia; Jacobson, Dionna; Li, Jin Billy

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing diversifies the transcriptome and promotes functional diversity, particularly in the brain. A plethora of editing sites has been recently identified; however, how they are selected and regulated and which are functionally important are largely unknown. Here we show the cis-regulation and stepwise selection of RNA editing during Drosophila evolution and pinpoint a large number of functional editing sites. We found that the establishment of editing and variation in editing levels across Drosophila species are largely explained and predicted by cis-regulatory elements. Furthermore, editing events that arose early in the species tree tend to be more highly edited in clusters and enriched in slowly-evolved neuronal genes, thus suggesting that the main role of RNA editing is for fine-tuning neurological functions. While nonsynonymous editing events have been long recognized as playing a functional role, in addition to nonsynonymous editing sites, a large fraction of 3'UTR editing sites is evolutionarily constrained, highly edited, and thus likely functional. We find that these 3'UTR editing events can alter mRNA stability and affect miRNA binding and thus highlight the functional roles of noncoding RNA editing. Our work, through evolutionary analyses of RNA editing in Drosophila, uncovers novel insights of RNA editing regulation as well as its functions in both coding and non-coding regions.

  7. STRAL: progressive alignment of non-coding RNA using base pairing probability vectors in quadratic time.

    PubMed

    Dalli, Deniz; Wilm, Andreas; Mainz, Indra; Steger, Gerhard

    2006-07-01

    Alignment of RNA has a wide range of applications, for example in phylogeny inference, consensus structure prediction and homology searches. Yet aligning structural or non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) correctly is notoriously difficult as these RNA sequences may evolve by compensatory mutations, which maintain base pairing but destroy sequence homology. Ideally, alignment programs would take RNA structure into account. The Sankoff algorithm for the simultaneous solution of RNA structure prediction and RNA sequence alignment was proposed 20 years ago but suffers from its exponential complexity. A number of programs implement lightweight versions of the Sankoff algorithm by restricting its application to a limited type of structure and/or only pairwise alignment. Thus, despite recent advances, the proper alignment of multiple structural RNA sequences remains a problem. Here we present StrAl, a heuristic method for alignment of ncRNA that reduces sequence-structure alignment to a two-dimensional problem similar to standard multiple sequence alignment. The scoring function takes into account sequence similarity as well as up- and downstream pairing probability. To test the robustness of the algorithm and the performance of the program, we scored alignments produced by StrAl against a large set of published reference alignments. The quality of alignments predicted by StrAl is far better than that obtained by standard sequence alignment programs, especially when sequence homologies drop below approximately 65%; nevertheless StrAl's runtime is comparable to that of ClustalW.

  8. Coding and non-coding gene regulatory networks underlie the immune response in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueming; Huang, Yongming; Yang, Zhengpeng; Zhang, Yuguo; Zhang, Weihui; Gao, Zu-hua; Xue, Dongbo

    2017-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is recognized as being the consequence of immune-mediated hepatocyte damage and repair processes. However, the regulation of these immune responses underlying liver cirrhosis has not been elucidated. In this study, we used GEO datasets and bioinformatics methods to established coding and non-coding gene regulatory networks including transcription factor-/lncRNA-microRNA-mRNA, and competing endogenous RNA interaction networks. Our results identified 2224 mRNAs, 70 lncRNAs and 46 microRNAs were differentially expressed in liver cirrhosis. The transcription factor -/lncRNA- microRNA-mRNA network we uncovered that results in immune-mediated liver cirrhosis is comprised of 5 core microRNAs (e.g., miR-203; miR-219-5p), 3 transcription factors (i.e., FOXP3, ETS1 and FOS) and 7 lncRNAs (e.g., ENTS00000671336, ENST00000575137). The competing endogenous RNA interaction network we identified includes a complex immune response regulatory subnetwork that controls the entire liver cirrhosis network. Additionally, we found 10 overlapping GO terms shared by both liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma including “immune response” as well. Interestingly, the overlapping differentially expressed genes in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma were enriched in immune response-related functional terms. In summary, a complex gene regulatory network underlying immune response processes may play an important role in the development and progression of liver cirrhosis, and its development into hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:28355233

  9. Role of Conserved Non-Coding Regulatory Elements in LMW Glutenin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Angéla; Makai, Szabolcs; Sebestyén, Endre; Tamás, László; Balázs, Ervin

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of LMW glutenin genes were investigated in-silico, using publicly available gene sequences and expression data. Genes were grouped into different LMW glutenin types and their promoter profiles were determined using cis-acting regulatory elements databases and published results. The various cis-acting elements belong to some conserved non-coding regulatory regions (CREs) and might act in two different ways. There are elements, such as GCN4 motifs found in the long endosperm box that could serve as key factors in tissue-specific expression. Some other elements, such as the AACA/TA motifs or the individual prolamin box variants, might modulate the level of expression. Based on the promoter sequences and expression characteristic LMW glutenin genes might be transcribed following two different mechanisms. Most of the s- and i-type genes show a continuously increasing expression pattern. The m-type genes, however, demonstrate normal distribution in their expression profiles. Differences observed in their expression could be related to the differences found in their promoter sequences. Polymorphisms in the number and combination of cis-acting elements in their promoter regions can be of crucial importance in the diverse levels of production of single LMW glutenin gene types. PMID:22242127

  10. Long non-coding RNA INXS is a critical mediator of BCL-XS induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    DeOcesano-Pereira, Carlos; Amaral, Murilo S.; Parreira, Kleber S.; Ayupe, Ana C.; Jacysyn, Jacqueline F.; Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P.; Reis, Eduardo M.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    BCL-X mRNA alternative splicing generates pro-apoptotic BCL-XS or anti-apoptotic BCL-XL gene products and the mechanism that regulates splice shifting is incompletely understood. We identified and characterized a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) named INXS, transcribed from the opposite genomic strand of BCL-X, that was 5- to 9-fold less abundant in tumor cell lines from kidney, liver, breast and prostate and in kidney tumor tissues compared with non-tumors. INXS is an unspliced 1903 nt-long RNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase II, 5′-capped, nuclear enriched and binds Sam68 splicing-modulator. Three apoptosis-inducing agents increased INXS lncRNA endogenous expression in the 786-O kidney tumor cell line, increased BCL-XS/BCL-XL mRNA ratio and activated caspases 3, 7 and 9. These effects were abrogated in the presence of INXS knockdown. Similarly, ectopic INXS overexpression caused a shift in splicing toward BCL-XS and activation of caspases, thus leading to apoptosis. BCL-XS protein accumulation was detected upon INXS overexpression. In a mouse xenograft model, intra-tumor injections of an INXS-expressing plasmid caused a marked reduction in tumor weight, and an increase in BCL-XS isoform, as determined in the excised tumors. We revealed an endogenous lncRNA that induces apoptosis, suggesting that INXS is a possible target to be explored in cancer therapies. PMID:24992962

  11. Transcription of Satellite III non-coding RNAs is a general stress response in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Rossi, Antonio; Bazzini, Silvia; Ghigna, Claudia; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    In heat-shocked human cells, heat shock factor 1 activates transcription of tandem arrays of repetitive Satellite III (SatIII) DNA in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Satellite III RNAs remain associated with sites of transcription in nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here we use real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of these genomic regions. Transcription is highly asymmetrical and most of the transcripts contain the G-rich strand of the repeat. A low level of G-rich RNAs is detectable in unstressed cells and a 104-fold induction occurs after heat shock. G-rich RNAs are induced by a wide range of stress treatments including heavy metals, UV-C, oxidative and hyper-osmotic stress. Differences exist among stressing agents both for the kinetics and the extent of induction (>100- to 80.000-fold). In all cases, G-rich transcripts are associated with nSBs. On the contrary, C-rich transcripts are almost undetectable in unstressed cells and modestly increase after stress. Production of SatIII RNAs after hyper-osmotic stress depends on the Tonicity Element Binding Protein indicating that activation of the arrays is triggered by different transcription factors. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA whose transcription is controlled by different transcription factors under different growth conditions. PMID:18039709

  12. Profiling analysis of long non-coding RNAs in early postnatal mouse hearts

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiongshan; Han, Qi; Luo, Hongqin; Pan, Xiaodong; Ji, Yan; Yang, Yao; Chen, Hanying; Wang, Fangjie; Lai, Wenjing; Guan, Xiao; Zhang, Qi; Tang, Yuan; Chu, Jianhong; Yu, Jianhua; Shou, Weinian; Deng, Youcai; Li, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes undergo a critical hyperplastic-to-hypertrophic growth transition at early postnatal age, which is important in establishing normal physiological function of postnatal hearts. In the current study, we intended to explore the role of long non-coding (lnc) RNAs in this transitional stage. We analyzed lncRNA expression profiles in mouse hearts at postnatal day (P) 1, P7 and P28 via microarray. We identified 1,146 differentially expressed lncRNAs with more than 2.0-fold change when compared the expression profiles of P1 to P7, P1 to P28, and P7 to P28. The neighboring genes of these differentially expressed lncRNAs were mainly involved in DNA replication-associated biological processes. We were particularly interested in one novel cardiac-enriched lncRNA, ENSMUST00000117266, whose expression was dramatically down-regulated from P1 to P28 and was also sensitive to hypoxia, paraquat, and myocardial infarction. Knockdown ENSMUST00000117266 led to a significant increase of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes in G0/G1 phase and reduction in G2/M phase, suggesting that ENSMUST00000117266 is involved in regulating cardiomyocyte proliferative activity and is likely associated with hyperplastic-to-hypertrophic growth transition. In conclusion, our data have identified a large group of lncRNAs presented in the early postnatal mouse heart. Some of these lncRNAs may have important functions in cardiac hyperplastic-to-hypertrophic growth transition. PMID:28266538

  13. Regulation of spermatogenesis by small non-coding RNAs: role of the germ granule.

    PubMed

    de Mateo, Sara; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The spermatogenic process relays in highly regulated gene expression mechanisms at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels to generate the male gamete that is needed for the perpetuation of the species. Small non-coding RNA pathways have been determined to participate in the post-transcriptional regulatory processes of germ cells. The most important sncRNA molecules that are critically involved in spermatogenesis belong to the miRNA and piRNAs pathways as illustrated by animal models where ablation of specific protein components displays male infertility. Several elements of these regulatory pathways have been found in the nuage or germ granule, a non-membranous cytoplasmatic structure that can be seen in spermatocytes and spermatids. This notion suggests that germ granules may act as organizer centers for silencing pathways in the germline. In general, miRNAs regulate spermatogenesis through targeting and down-regulation of specific transcripts to eventually promote sperm development. However, piRNAs are powerful repressors of transposon elements expression in the spermatogenic process. Here we describe the suggested functions that miRNA and piRNAs pathways execute in the regulation of spermatogenesis and include some recent studies in the field. Despite major strides on the detailed molecular mechanisms of sncRNAs in relation to spermatogenesis, there is plenty to discover on this fascinating regulatory program.

  14. Targeting long non-coding RNA-TUG1 inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Dong, R; Liu, G-B; Liu, B-H; Chen, G; Li, K; Zheng, S; Dong, K-R

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoblastoma is the most common liver tumor of early childhood, which is usually characterized by unusual hypervascularity. Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) have emerged as gene regulators and prognostic markers in several cancers, including hepatoblastoma. We previously reveal that lnRNA-TUG1 is upregulated in hepatoblastoma specimens by microarray analysis. In this study, we aim to elucidate the biological and clinical significance of TUG1 upregulation in hepatoblastoma. We show that TUG1 is significantly upregulated in human hepatoblastoma specimens and metastatic hepatoblastoma cell lines. TUG1 knockdown inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo, and decreases hepatoblastoma cell viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. TUG1, miR-34a-5p, and VEGFA constitutes to a regulatory network, and participates in regulating hepatoblastoma cell function, tumor progression, and tumor angiogenesis. Overall, our findings indicate that TUG1 upregulation contributes to unusual hypervascularity of hepatoblastoma. TUG1 is a promising therapeutic target for aggressive, recurrent, or metastatic hepatoblastoma. PMID:27362796

  15. An atlas of human long non-coding RNAs with accurate 5' ends.

    PubMed

    Hon, Chung-Chau; Ramilowski, Jordan A; Harshbarger, Jayson; Bertin, Nicolas; Rackham, Owen J L; Gough, Julian; Denisenko, Elena; Schmeier, Sebastian; Poulsen, Thomas M; Severin, Jessica; Lizio, Marina; Kawaji, Hideya; Kasukawa, Takeya; Itoh, Masayoshi; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Noma, Shohei; Djebali, Sarah; Alam, Tanvir; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Testa, Alison C; Lipovich, Leonard; Yip, Chi-Wai; Abugessaisa, Imad; Mendez, Mickaël; Hasegawa, Akira; Tang, Dave; Lassmann, Timo; Heutink, Peter; Babina, Magda; Wells, Christine A; Kojima, Soichi; Nakamura, Yukio; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Arner, Erik; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R

    2017-03-09

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are largely heterogeneous and functionally uncharacterized. Here, using FANTOM5 cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) data, we integrate multiple transcript collections to generate a comprehensive atlas of 27,919 human lncRNA genes with high-confidence 5' ends and expression profiles across 1,829 samples from the major human primary cell types and tissues. Genomic and epigenomic classification of these lncRNAs reveals that most intergenic lncRNAs originate from enhancers rather than from promoters. Incorporating genetic and expression data, we show that lncRNAs overlapping trait-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms are specifically expressed in cell types relevant to the traits, implicating these lncRNAs in multiple diseases. We further demonstrate that lncRNAs overlapping expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL)-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms of messenger RNAs are co-expressed with the corresponding messenger RNAs, suggesting their potential roles in transcriptional regulation. Combining these findings with conservation data, we identify 19,175 potentially functional lncRNAs in the human genome.

  16. Non-coding RNAs in Prostate Cancer: From Discovery to Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ceder, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease for which the molecular mechanisms are still not fully elucidated. Prostate cancer research has traditionally focused on genomic and epigenetic alterations affecting the proteome, but over the last decade non-coding RNAs, especially microRNAs, have been recognized to play a key role in prostate cancer progression. A considerable number of individual microRNAs have been found to be deregulated in prostate cancer and their biological significance elucidated in functional studies. This review will delineate the current advances regarding the involvement of microRNAs and their targets in prostate cancer biology as well as their potential usage in the clinical management of the disease. The main focus will be on microRNAs contributing to initiation and progression of prostate cancer, including androgen signalling, cellular plasticity, stem cells biology and metastatic processes. To conclude, implications on potential future microRNA-based therapeutics based on the recent advances regarding the interplay between microRNAs and their targets are discussed.

  17. Genome-wide analyses of small non-coding RNAs in streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Patenge, Nadja; Pappesch, Roberto; Khani, Afsaneh; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Streptococci represent a diverse group of Gram-positive bacteria, which colonize a wide range of hosts among animals and humans. Streptococcal species occur as commensal as well as pathogenic organisms. Many of the pathogenic species can cause severe, invasive infections in their hosts leading to a high morbidity and mortality. The consequence is a tremendous suffering on the part of men and livestock besides the significant financial burden in the agricultural and healthcare sectors. An environmentally stimulated and tightly controlled expression of virulence factor genes is of fundamental importance for streptococcal pathogenicity. Bacterial small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) modulate the expression of genes involved in stress response, sugar metabolism, surface composition, and other properties that are related to bacterial virulence. Even though the regulatory character is shared by this class of RNAs, variation on the molecular level results in a high diversity of functional mechanisms. The knowledge about the role of sRNAs in streptococci is still limited, but in recent years, genome-wide screens for sRNAs have been conducted in an increasing number of species. Bioinformatics prediction approaches have been employed as well as expression analyses by classical array techniques or next generation sequencing. This review will give an overview of whole genome screens for sRNAs in streptococci with a focus on describing the different methods and comparing their outcome considering sRNA conservation among species, functional similarities, and relevance for streptococcal infection. PMID:26042151

  18. Form and Function of Exosome-Associated Long Non-coding RNAs in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Chris; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are functional and are not merely "transcriptional noise" has spawned an entirely new arena of investigation. LncRNAs have been found to be functional in the regulation of a wide variety of genes, including those involved in cancer. Studies have identified that lncRNAs play a role in the development and regulation of cancer and can also act as prognostic markers. Meanwhile, exosomes , which are extracellular particles generated endogenously by cells, have been observed to act as transport vesicles for a variety of biological components, particularly proteins and RNAs. This transportation of biological components has been shown to impact a variety of biological processes including the development of cancer. Collectively, these observations, along with those of several recent studies, suggest that lncRNAs and exosomes may function together to disseminate cell signals that alter and/or control local cellular microenvironments. This review will identify the various roles that lncRNAs and exosomes play in cancer development, as well as the possibility that exosomes may transfer functional lncRNAs between cells as a means of cell-to-cell communication.

  19. Motility modulation by the small non-coding RNA SroC in Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Danitza N; Calderón, Paulina F; Acuña, Lillian G; Rodas, Paula I; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Fuentes, Juan A; Gil, Fernando; Calderón, Iván L

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial regulatory networks of gene expression include the interaction of diverse types of molecules such as the small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) and their cognate messenger RNAs (mRNAs). In this study, we demonstrated that the Salmonella Typhimurium sRNA SroC is significantly expressed between the late-exponential and stationary phase of growth in an rpoS-dependent manner. The expression of flagellar genes predicted as targets of this sRNA was quantitatively analyzed in both a ΔsroC mutant and a SroC-overexpressing (pSroC) strain. Deletion of sroC increased flagellar gene expression (i.e. flhBAE and fliE). Conversely, overexpression of SroC reduced flhBAE and fliE expression. These observations correlated with phenotypic evaluation of motility, where sroC deletion slightly increased motility, which in turn, was drastically reduced upon overexpression of SroC. The effects of deletion and overexpression of sroC in biofilm formation were also examined, where the ΔsroC and pSroC strains exhibited a reduced and increased ability to form biofilm, respectively. Furthermore, electron microscopy revealed that the wild-type strain overexpressing SroC had a non-flagellated phenotype. Taken together, our results showed that S. Typhimurium sRNA SroC modulates the flagellar synthesis by down-regulating the expression of flhBAE and fliE genes.

  20. RNA exosome regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N.; Bradner, James E.; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-01-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3′ regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3′regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers, by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function. PMID:25957685

  1. NRDTD: a database for clinically or experimentally supported non-coding RNAs and drug targets associations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ya-Zhou; Zhang, De-Hong; Yan, Gui-Ying; An, Ji-Yong; You, Zhu-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, more and more non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been identified and increasing evidences have shown that ncRNAs may affect gene expression and disease progression, making them a new class of targets for drug discovery. It thus becomes important to understand the relationship between ncRNAs and drug targets. For this purpose, an ncRNAs and drug targets association database would be extremely beneficial. Here, we developed ncRNA Drug Targets Database (NRDTD) that collected 165 entries of clinically or experimentally supported ncRNAs as drug targets, including 97 ncRNAs and 96 drugs. Moreover, we annotated ncRNA-drug target associations with drug information from KEGG, PubChem, DrugBank, CTD or Wikipedia, GenBank sequence links, OMIM disease ID, pathway and function annotation for ncRNAs, detailed description of associations between ncRNAs and diseases from HMDD or LncRNADisease and the publication PubMed ID. Additionally, we provided users a link to submit novel disease-ncRNA-drug associations and corresponding supporting evidences into the database. We hope NRDTD will be a useful resource for investigating the roles of ncRNAs in drug target identification, drug discovery and disease treatment. Database URL: http://chengroup.cumt.edu.cn/NRDTD

  2. p53-inducible long non-coding RNA PICART1 mediates cancer cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Lin, Minglin; Bu, Yiwen; Ling, Hongyan; He, Yingchun; Huang, Chenfei; Shen, Yi; Song, Bob; Cao, Deliang

    2017-05-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) function in the development and progression of cancer, but only a small portion of lncRNAs have been characterized to date. A novel lncRNA transcript, 2.53 kb in length, was identified by transcriptome sequencing analysis, and was named p53-inducible cancer-associated RNA transcript 1 (PICART1). PICART1 was found to be upregulated by p53 through a p53-binding site at -1808 to -1783 bp. In breast and colorectal cancer cells and tissues, PICART1 expression was found to be decreased. Ectopic expression of PICART1 suppressed the growth, proliferation, migration, and invasion of MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and HCT116 cells whereas silencing of PICART1 stimulated cell growth and migration. In these cells, the expression of PICART1 suppressed levels of p-AKT (Thr308 and Ser473) and p-GSK3β (Ser9), and accordingly, β-catenin, cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression were decreased, while p21Waf/cip1 expression was increased. Together these data suggest that PICART1 is a novel p53-inducible tumor-suppressor lncRNA, functioning through the AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling cascade.

  3. Mechanisms of Long Non-coding RNAs in Mammalian Nervous System Development, Plasticity, Disease, and Evolution.

    PubMed

    Briggs, James A; Wolvetang, Ernst J; Mattick, John S; Rinn, John L; Barry, Guy

    2015-12-02

    Only relatively recently has it become clear that mammalian genomes encode tens of thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). A striking 40% of these are expressed specifically in the brain, where they show precisely regulated temporal and spatial expression patterns. This begs the question, what is the functional role of these many lncRNA transcripts in the brain? Here we canvass a growing number of mechanistic studies that have elucidated central roles for lncRNAs in the regulation of nervous system development and function. We also survey studies indicating that neurological and psychiatric disorders may ensue when these mechanisms break down. Finally, we synthesize these insights with evidence from comparative genomics to argue that lncRNAs may have played important roles in brain evolution, by virtue of their abundant sequence innovation in mammals and plausible mechanistic connections to the adaptive processes that occurred recently in the primate and human lineages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evolutionarily conserved long intergenic non-coding RNAs in the eye

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Debarshi; Kevany, Brian M.; Bai, Xiaodong; Maeda, Tadao; Sears, Jonathan E.; Khalil, Ahmad M.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that the mammalian transcriptome encodes thousands of long intergenic non-coding (linc) RNA transcripts, together with recent evidence that lincRNAs can regulate protein-coding genes, has added a new level of complexity to cellular transcriptional/translational regulation. Indeed several reports now link mutations in lincRNAs to heritable human disorders. Here, we identified a subset of lincRNAs in terminally differentiated adult human retinal neurons based on their sequence conservation across species. RNA sequencing of eye tissue from several mammalian species with varied rod/cone photoreceptor content identified 18 lincRNAs that were highly conserved across these species. Sixteen of the 18 were conserved in human retinal tissue with 14 of these also conserved in the macular region. A subset of lincRNAs exhibited restricted tissue expression profiles in mice, with preferential expression in the retina. Mouse models with different populations of retinal cells as well as in situ hybridization provided evidence that these lincRNAs localized to specific retinal compartments, most notably to the photoreceptor neuronal layer. Computational genomic loci and promoter region analyses provided a basis for regulated expression of these conserved lincRNAs in retinal post-mitotic neurons. This combined approach identified several lincRNAs that could be critical for retinal and visual maintenance in adults. PMID:23562822

  5. MicroRNAs and non-coding RNAs in virus-infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Dominique L.; Provost, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Within the past few years, microRNAs (miRNAs) and other non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as elements with critically high importance in post-transcriptional control of cellular and, more recently, viral processes. Endogenously produced by a component of the miRNA-guided RNA silencing machinery known as Dicer, miRNAs are known to control messenger RNA (mRNA) translation through recognition of specific binding sites usually located in their 3′ untranslated region. Recent evidences indicate that the host miRNA pathway may represent an adapted antiviral defense mechanism that can act either by direct miRNA-mediated modulation of viral gene expression or through recognition and inactivation of structured viral RNA species by the protein components of the RNA silencing machinery, such as Dicer. This latter process, however, is a double-edge sword, as it may yield viral miRNAs exerting gene regulatory properties on both host and viral mRNAs. Our knowledge of the interaction between viruses and host RNA silencing machineries, and how this influences the course of infection, is becoming increasingly complex. This review article aims to summarize our current knowledge about viral miRNAs/ncRNAs and their targets, as well as cellular miRNAs that are modulated by viruses upon infection. PMID:20217543

  6. Long non-coding RNAs as regulators of the endocrine system

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Marko; Lodish, Harvey F.; Sun, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse group of RNAs that are often lineage-specific and that regulate multiple biological functions. Many are nuclear and are essential parts of ribonucleoprotein complexes that modify chromatin segments and establish active or repressive chromatin states; others are cytosolic and regulate the stability of mRNA or act as microRNA sponges. This Review summarizes the current knowledge of lncRNAs as regulators of the endocrine system, with a focus on the identification and mode of action of several endocrine-important lncRNAs. We highlight lncRNAs that have a role in the development and function of pancreatic β cells, white and brown adipose tissue, and other endocrine organs, and discuss the involvement of these molecules in endocrine dysfunction (for example, diabetes mellitus). We also address the associations of lncRNAs with nuclear receptors involved in major hormonal signalling pathways, such as estrogen and androgen receptors, and the relevance of these associations in certain endocrine cancers. PMID:25560704

  7. The Sm Complex Is Required for the Processing of Non-Coding RNAs by the Exosome

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Sarah; Volanakis, Adam; Shah, Sneha; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    A key question in the field of RNA regulation is how some exosome substrates, such as spliceosomal snRNAs and telomerase RNA, evade degradation and are processed into stable, functional RNA molecules. Typical feature of these non-coding RNAs is presence of the Sm complex at the 3′end of the mature RNA molecule. Here, we report that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae presence of intact Sm binding site is required for the exosome-mediated processing of telomerase RNA from a polyadenylated precursor into its mature form and is essential for its function in elongating telomeres. Additionally, we demonstrate that the same pathway is involved in the maturation of snRNAs. Furthermore, the insertion of an Sm binding site into an unstable RNA that is normally completely destroyed by the exosome, leads to its partial stabilization. We also show that telomerase RNA accumulates in Schizosaccharomyces pombe exosome mutants, suggesting a conserved role for the exosome in processing and degradation of telomerase RNA. In summary, our data provide important mechanistic insight into the regulation of exosome dependent RNA processing as well as telomerase RNA biogenesis. PMID:23755256

  8. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Álvaro D.; Quereda, Juan J.; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles is regulated in both space and time. Non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulatory molecules that fine-tune important processes in bacterial physiology including cell envelope architecture, intermediate metabolism, bacterial communication, biofilm formation, and virulence. Recent studies have shown production of defined sRNA species by intracellular bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells. The molecules targeted by these sRNAs and their expression dynamics along the intracellular infection cycle remain, however, poorly characterized. Technical difficulties linked to the isolation of “intact” intracellular bacteria from infected host cells might explain why sRNA regulation in these specialized pathogens is still a largely unexplored field. Transition from the extracellular to the intracellular lifestyle provides an ideal scenario in which regulatory sRNAs are intended to participate; so much work must be done in this direction. This review focuses on sRNAs expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens during the infection of eukaryotic cells, strategies used with these pathogens to identify sRNAs required for virulence, and the experimental technical challenges associated to this type of studies. We also discuss varied techniques for their potential application to study RNA regulation in intracellular bacterial infections. PMID:25429360

  9. Long non-coding RNA expression profile in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Ni, Sha; Zhao, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Ling

    2016-11-01

    Researchers have recently demonstrated the key role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in regulating embryogenesis and gene expression. However, the exact mechanism used by lncRNAs in carcinogenesis is still unclear. In particular, studies regarding the role of lncRNAs in vulvar squamous cell carcinomas (VSCCs) are limited. Using microarray analysis, the genome-wide expression profile of lncRNAs was investigated in four paired VSCCs and adjacent normal vulvar tissues. Accordingly, several novel lncRNA candidates (HOAIR, MALAT1, MEG3, NEAT1, MIR31HG and LINC00478) were chosen for further study and real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was used to confirm the expression levels among 35 tissue samples. A panel of dysregulated lncRNAs (MEG3 and MALAT1) were also identified as potential biomarkers as they also correlated with VSCC carcinogenesis. In summary, the results revealed that aberrantly expressed lncRNAs may be a factor in VSCC pathogenesis, potentially providing new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for VSCC.

  10. Long Non-coding RNA ANRIL and Polycomb in Human Cancers and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Francesca; Di Cecilia, Serena; Walsh, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    The long non-coding RNA CDKN2B-AS1, commonly referred to as the A ntisense N on-coding R NA in the I NK4 L ocus (ANRIL), is a 3.8-kb-long RNA transcribed from the short arm of human chromosome 9 on p21.3 that overlaps a critical region encompassing three major tumor suppressor loci juxtaposed to the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster and the methyl-thioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) gene. Genome-wide association studies have identified this region with a remarkable and growing number of disease-associated DNA alterations and single nucleotide polymorphisms, which corresponds to increased susceptibility to human disease. Recent attention has been devoted on whether these alterations in the ANRIL sequence affect its expression levels and/or its splicing transcript variation, and in consequence, global cellular homeostasis. Moreover, recent evidence postulates that ANRIL not only can regulate their immediate genomic neighbors in cis, but also has the capacity to regulate additional loci in trans. This action would further increase the complexity for mechanisms imposed through ANRIL and furthering the scope of this lncRNA in disease pathogenesis. In this chapter, we summarize the most recent findings on the investigation of ANRIL and provide a perspective on the biological and clinical significance of ANRIL as a putative biomarker, specifically, its potential role in directing cellular fates leading to cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  11. Genetic evidence for conserved non-coding element function across species–the ears have it

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Eric E.; Cox, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of genomic sequences from diverse vertebrate species has revealed numerous highly conserved regions that do not appear to encode proteins or functional RNAs. Often these “conserved non-coding elements,” or CNEs, can direct gene expression to specific tissues in transgenic models, demonstrating they have regulatory function. CNEs are frequently found near “developmental” genes, particularly transcription factors, implying that these elements have essential regulatory roles in development. However, actual examples demonstrating CNE regulatory functions across species have been few, and recent loss-of-function studies of several CNEs in mice have shown relatively minor effects. In this Perspectives article, we discuss new findings in “fancy” rats and Highland cattle demonstrating that function of a CNE near the Hmx1 gene is crucial for normal external ear development and when disrupted can mimic loss-of function Hmx1 coding mutations in mice and humans. These findings provide important support for conserved developmental roles of CNEs in divergent species, and reinforce the concept that CNEs should be examined systematically in the ongoing search for genetic causes of human developmental disorders in the era of genome-scale sequencing. PMID:24478720

  12. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G.; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F.; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A.

    2016-01-01

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype. PMID:26898953

  13. Annotating long intergenic non-coding RNAs under artificial selection during chicken domestication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Mei; Xu, Hai-Bo; Wang, Ming-Shan; Otecko, Newton Otieno; Ye, Ling-Qun; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2017-08-15

    Numerous biological functions of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) have been identified. However, the contribution of lincRNAs to the domestication process has remained elusive. Following domestication from their wild ancestors, animals display substantial changes in many phenotypic traits. Therefore, it is possible that diverse molecular drivers play important roles in this process. We analyzed 821 transcriptomes in this study and annotated 4754 lincRNA genes in the chicken genome. Our population genomic analysis indicates that 419 lincRNAs potentially evolved during artificial selection related to the domestication of chicken, while a comparative transcriptomic analysis identified 68 lincRNAs that were differentially expressed under different conditions. We also found 47 lincRNAs linked to special phenotypes. Our study provides a comprehensive view of the genome-wide landscape of lincRNAs in chicken. This will promote a better understanding of the roles of lincRNAs in domestication, and the genetic mechanisms associated with the artificial selection of domestic animals.

  14. Comparison of small molecules and oligonucleotides that target a toxic, non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Costales, Matthew G; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Potential RNA targets for chemical probes and therapeutic modalities are pervasive in the transcriptome. Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are commonly used to target RNA sequence. Small molecules are emerging as a modality to target RNA structures selectively, but their development is still in its infancy. In this work, we compare the activity of oligonucleotides and several classes of small molecules that target the non-coding r(CCUG) repeat expansion (r(CCUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), an incurable disease that is the second-most common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy. Small molecule types investigated include monomers, dimers, and multivalent compounds synthesized on-site by using RNA-templated click chemistry. Oligonucleotides investigated include phosphorothioates that cleave their target and vivo-morpholinos that modulate target RNA activity via binding. We show that compounds assembled on-site that recognize structure have the highest potencies amongst small molecules and are similar in potency to a vivo-morpholino modified oligonucleotide that targets sequence. These studies are likely to impact the design of therapeutic modalities targeting other repeats expansions that cause fragile X syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for example.

  15. The RNA-centred view of the synapse: non-coding RNAs and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, Neil R.

    2014-01-01

    If mRNAs were the only RNAs made by a neuron, there would be a simple mapping of mRNAs to proteins. However, microRNAs and other non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs; endo-siRNAs, piRNAs, BC1, BC200, antisense and long ncRNAs, repeat-related transcripts, etc.) regulate mRNAs via effects on protein translation as well as transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms. Not only are genes ON or OFF, but their ability to be translated can be turned ON or OFF at the level of synapses, supporting an enormous increase in information capacity. Here, I review evidence that ncRNAs are expressed pervasively within dendrites in mammalian brain; that some are activity-dependent and highly enriched near synapses; and that synaptic ncRNAs participate in plasticity responses including learning and memory. Ultimately, ncRNAs can be viewed as the post-it notes of the neuron. They have no literal meaning of their own, but derive their functions from where (and to what) they are stuck. This may explain, in part, why ncRNAs differ so dramatically from protein-coding genes, both in terms of the usual indicators of functionality and in terms of evolutionary constraints. ncRNAs do not appear to be direct mediators of synaptic transmission in the manner of neurotransmitters or receptors, yet they orchestrate synaptic plasticity—and may drive species-specific changes in cognition. PMID:25135965

  16. A Novel Type of Non-coding RNA, nc886, Implicated in Tumor Sensing and Suppression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Sun

    2015-06-01

    nc886 (=vtRNA2-1, pre-miR-886, or CBL3) is a newly identified non-coding RNA (ncRNA) that represses the activity of protein kinase R (PKR). nc886 is transcribed by RNA polymerase III (Pol III) and is intriguingly the first case of a Pol III gene whose expression is silenced by CpG DNA hypermethylation in several types of cancer. PKR is a sensor protein that recognizes evading viruses and induces apoptosis to eliminate infected cells. Like viral infection, nc886 silencing activates PKR and induces apoptosis. Thus, the significance of the nc886:PKR pathway in cancer is to sense and eliminate pre-malignant cells, which is analogous to PKR's role in cellular innate immunity. Beyond this tumor sensing role, nc886 plays a putative tumor suppressor role as supported by experimental evidence. Collectively, nc886 provides a novel example how epigenetic silencing of a ncRNA contributes to tumorigenesis by controlling the activity of its protein ligand.

  17. A pathophysiological view of the long non-coding RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Di Gesualdo, Federico; Capaccioli, Sergio; Lulli, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Because cells are constantly exposed to micro-environmental changes, they require the ability to adapt to maintain a dynamic equilibrium. Proteins are considered critical for the regulation of gene expression, which is a fundamental process in determining the cellular responses to stimuli. Recently, revolutionary findings in RNA research and the advent of high-throughput genomic technologies have revealed a pervasive transcription of the human genome, which generates many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) whose roles are largely undefined. However, there is evidence that lncRNAs are involved in several cellular physiological processes such as adaptation to stresses, cell differentiation, maintenance of pluripotency and apoptosis. The correct balance of lncRNA levels is crucial for the maintenance of cellular equilibrium, and the dysregulation of lncRNA expression is linked to many disorders; certain transcripts are useful prognostic markers for some of these pathologies. This review revisits the classic concept of cellular homeostasis from the perspective of lncRNAs specifically to understand how this novel class of molecules contributes to cellular balance and how its dysregulated expression can lead to the onset of pathologies such as cancer. PMID:25428918

  18. Dysregulation of the long non-coding RNA transcriptome in a Rett syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Petazzi, Paolo; Sandoval, Juan; Szczesna, Karolina; Jorge, Olga C; Roa, Laura; Sayols, Sergi; Gomez, Antonio; Huertas, Dori; Esteller, Manel

    2013-07-01

    Mecp2 is a transcriptional repressor protein that is mutated in Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder that is the second most common cause of mental retardation in women. It has been shown that the loss of the Mecp2 protein in Rett syndrome cells alters the transcriptional silencing of coding genes and microRNAs. Herein, we have studied the impact of Mecp2 impairment in a Rett syndrome mouse model on the global transcriptional patterns of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Using a microarray platform that assesses 41,232 unique lncRNA transcripts, we have identified the aberrant lncRNA transcriptome that is present in the brain of Rett syndrome mice. The study of the most relevant lncRNAs altered in the assay highlighted the upregulation of the AK081227 and AK087060 transcripts in Mecp2-null mice brains. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated the Mecp2 occupancy in the 5'-end genomic loci of the described lncRNAs and its absence in Rett syndrome mice. Most importantly, we were able to show that the overexpression of AK081227 mediated by the Mecp2 loss was associated with the downregulation of its host coding protein gene, the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit Rho 2 (Gabrr2). Overall, our findings indicate that the transcriptional dysregulation of lncRNAs upon Mecp2 loss contributes to the neurological phenotype of Rett syndrome and highlights the complex interaction between ncRNAs and coding-RNAs.

  19. Identification of Non-Coding RNAs in the Candida parapsilosis Species Group

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Paul D.; Schröder, Markus S.; Higgins, Desmond G.

    2016-01-01

    The Candida CTG clade is a monophyletic group of fungal species that translates CTG as serine, and includes the pathogens Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis. Research has typically focused on identifying protein-coding genes in these species. Here, we use bioinformatic and experimental approaches to annotate known classes of non-coding RNAs in three CTG-clade species, Candida parapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis and Lodderomyces elongisporus. We also update the annotation of ncRNAs in the C. albicans genome. The majority of ncRNAs identified were snoRNAs. Approximately 50% of snoRNAs (including most of the C/D box class) are encoded in introns. Most are within mono- and polycistronic transcripts with no protein coding potential. Five polycistronic clusters of snoRNAs are highly conserved in fungi. In polycistronic regions, splicing occurs via the classical pathway, as well as by nested and recursive splicing. We identified spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs, the telomerase RNA component, signal recognition particle, RNase P RNA component and the related RNase MRP RNA component in all three genomes. Stem loop IV of the U2 spliceosomal RNA and the associated binding proteins were lost from the ancestor of C. parapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, following the divergence from L. elongisporus. The RNA component of the MRP is longer in C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and L. elongisporus than in S. cerevisiae, but is substantially shorter than in C. albicans. PMID:27658249

  20. Regulation of influenza virus infection by long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Landeras-Bueno, Sara; Ortín, Juan

    2016-01-02

    Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and economy. To establish a productive infection, influenza viruses interact with cellular factors to favour their own replication and to suppress antiviral cell responses. Although most virus-host interaction studies have been centred on cell protein factors, most of the human transcriptome comprises non-coding RNAs, as miRNAs and lncRNAs. The latter are key cellular regulators in many cellular processes, including transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Influenza virus infection induces the differential expression of hundreds of potential lncRNAs, some of which are related to the antiviral pathways activated by the cell while others may be deregulated by the infection to allow efficient virus multiplication. Although our knowledge on the role of cellular lncRNAs for influenza virus replication and pathogenesis is still at its infancy, several lncRNAs have been described to influence the cell innate response to the virus by altering the histone modification at specific sites, by interaction with specific transcription factors or directly stimulating in cis the expression of specific IFN-induced genes. In addition, at least one lncRNA appears to be required for virus multiplication in an IFN-independent way. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Discovery of putative small non-coding RNAs from the obligate intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis.

    PubMed

    Woolfit, Megan; Algama, Manjula; Keith, Jonathan M; McGraw, Elizabeth A; Popovici, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is an endosymbiotic bacterium that induces a wide range of effects in its insect hosts, including manipulation of reproduction and protection against pathogens. Little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-Wolbachia interaction, though it is likely to be mediated via the secretion of proteins or other factors. There is an increasing amount of evidence that bacteria regulate many cellular processes, including secretion of virulence factors, using small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), but sRNAs have not previously been described from Wolbachia. We have used two independent approaches, one based on comparative genomics and the other using RNA-Seq data generated for gene expression studies, to identify candidate sRNAs in Wolbachia. We experimentally characterized the expression of one of these candidates in four Wolbachia strains, and showed that it is differentially regulated in different host tissues and sexes. Given the roles played by sRNAs in other host-associated bacteria, the conservation of the candidate sRNAs between different Wolbachia strains, and the sex- and tissue-specific differential regulation we have identified, we hypothesise that sRNAs may play a significant role in the biology of Wolbachia, and in particular in its interactions with its host.

  2. A long non-coding RNA promotes full activation of adult gene expression in the chicken α-globin domain

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga-Canon, Cristian; Fonseca-Guzmán, Yael; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Arzate-Mejía, Rodrigo; Guerrero, Georgina; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were recently shown to regulate chromatin remodelling activities. Their function in regulating gene expression switching during specific developmental stages is poorly understood. Here we describe a nuclear, non-coding transcript responsive for the stage-specific activation of the chicken adult αD globin gene. This non-coding transcript, named α-globin transcript long non-coding RNA (lncRNA-αGT) is transcriptionally upregulated in late stages of chicken development, when active chromatin marks the adult αD gene promoter. Accordingly, the lncRNA-αGT promoter drives erythroid-specific transcription. Furthermore, loss of function experiments showed that lncRNA-αGT is required for full activation of the αD adult gene and maintenance of transcriptionally active chromatin. These findings uncovered lncRNA-αGT as an important part of the switching from embryonic to adult α-globin gene expression, and suggest a function of lncRNA-αGT in contributing to the maintenance of adult α-globin gene expression by promoting an active chromatin structure. PMID:24196393

  3. Non-Coding RNAs in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Regulation of Androgen Receptor Signaling and Cancer Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Jing-Wen; Wang, Ling-Yu; Hung, Chiu-Lien; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Hormone-refractory prostate cancer frequently relapses from therapy and inevitably progresses to a bone-metastatic status with no cure. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms conferring resistance to androgen deprivation therapy has the potential to lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic targets for type of prostate cancer with poor prognosis. Progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is characterized by aberrant androgen receptor (AR) expression and persistent AR signaling activity. Alterations in metabolic activity regulated by oncogenic pathways, such as c-Myc, were found to promote prostate cancer growth during the development of CRPC. Non-coding RNAs represent a diverse family of regulatory transcripts that drive tumorigenesis of prostate cancer and various other cancers by their hyperactivity or diminished function. A number of studies have examined differentially expressed non-coding RNAs in each stage of prostate cancer. Herein, we highlight the emerging impacts of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs linked to reactivation of the AR signaling axis and reprogramming of the cellular metabolism in prostate cancer. The translational implications of non-coding RNA research for developing new biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for CRPC are also discussed. PMID:26690121

  4. Non-Coding RNAs in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Regulation of Androgen Receptor Signaling and Cancer Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shih, Jing-Wen; Wang, Ling-Yu; Hung, Chiu-Lien; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2015-12-04

    Hormone-refractory prostate cancer frequently relapses from therapy and inevitably progresses to a bone-metastatic status with no cure. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms conferring resistance to androgen deprivation therapy has the potential to lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic targets for type of prostate cancer with poor prognosis. Progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is characterized by aberrant androgen receptor (AR) expression and persistent AR signaling activity. Alterations in metabolic activity regulated by oncogenic pathways, such as c-Myc, were found to promote prostate cancer growth during the development of CRPC. Non-coding RNAs represent a diverse family of regulatory transcripts that drive tumorigenesis of prostate cancer and various other cancers by their hyperactivity or diminished function. A number of studies have examined differentially expressed non-coding RNAs in each stage of prostate cancer. Herein, we highlight the emerging impacts of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs linked to reactivation of the AR signaling axis and reprogramming of the cellular metabolism in prostate cancer. The translational implications of non-coding RNA research for developing new biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for CRPC are also discussed.

  5. A long non-coding RNA promotes full activation of adult gene expression in the chicken α-globin domain.

    PubMed

    Arriaga-Canon, Cristian; Fonseca-Guzmán, Yael; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Arzate-Mejía, Rodrigo; Guerrero, Georgina; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were recently shown to regulate chromatin remodelling activities. Their function in regulating gene expression switching during specific developmental stages is poorly understood. Here we describe a nuclear, non-coding transcript responsive for the stage-specific activation of the chicken adult α(D) globin gene. This non-coding transcript, named α-globin transcript long non-coding RNA (lncRNA-αGT) is transcriptionally upregulated in late stages of chicken development, when active chromatin marks the adult α(D) gene promoter. Accordingly, the lncRNA-αGT promoter drives erythroid-specific transcription. Furthermore, loss of function experiments showed that lncRNA-αGT is required for full activation of the α(D) adult gene and maintenance of transcriptionally active chromatin. These findings uncovered lncRNA-αGT as an important part of the switching from embryonic to adult α-globin gene expression, and suggest a function of lncRNA-αGT in contributing to the maintenance of adult α-globin gene expression by promoting an active chromatin structure.

  6. Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors and Metformin Regulate Expression of the Long Non-coding RNA HULC

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is evidence that specificity protein 1 (Sp1) transcription factor (TF) regulates expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. RNA interference (RNAi) studies showed that among several lncRNAs expressed in HepG2, SNU-449 and SK-Hep-1...

  7. Variations in the non-coding transcriptome as a driver of inter-strain divergence and physiological adaptation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kopf, Matthias; Klähn, Stephan; Scholz, Ingeborg; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Voß, Björn

    2015-01-01

    In all studied organisms, a substantial portion of the transcriptome consists of non-coding RNAs that frequently execute regulatory functions. Here, we have compared the primary transcriptomes of the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6714 and PCC 6803 under 10 different conditions. These strains share 2854 protein-coding genes and a 16S rRNA identity of 99.4%, indicating their close relatedness. Conserved major transcriptional start sites (TSSs) give rise to non-coding transcripts within the sigB gene, from the 5′UTRs of cmpA and isiA, and 168 loci in antisense orientation. Distinct differences include single nucleotide polymorphisms rendering promoters inactive in one of the strains, e.g., for cmpR and for the asRNA PsbA2R. Based on the genome-wide mapped location, regulation and classification of TSSs, non-coding transcripts were identified as the most dynamic component of the transcriptome. We identified a class of mRNAs that originate by read-through from an sRNA that accumulates as a discrete and abundant transcript while also serving as the 5′UTR. Such an sRNA/mRNA structure, which we name ‘actuaton’, represents another way for bacteria to remodel their transcriptional network. Our findings support the hypothesis that variations in the non-coding transcriptome constitute a major evolutionary element of inter-strain divergence and capability for physiological adaptation. PMID:25902393

  8. Protection of the genome and central protein-coding sequences by non-coding DNA against DNA damage from radiation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guo-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding DNA comprises a very large proportion of the total genomic content in higher organisms, but its function remains largely unclear. Non-coding DNA sequences constitute the majority of peripheral heterochromatin, which has been hypothesized to be the genome's 'bodyguard' against DNA damage from chemicals and radiation for almost four decades. The bodyguard protective function of peripheral heterochromatin in genome defense has been strengthened by the results from numerous recent studies, which are summarized in this review. These data have suggested that cells and/or organisms with a higher level of heterochromatin and more non-coding DNA sequences, including longer telomeric DNA and rDNAs, exhibit a lower frequency of DNA damage, higher radioresistance and longer lifespan after IR exposure. In addition, the majority of heterochromatin is peripherally located in the three-dimensional structure of genome organization. Therefore, the peripheral heterochromatin with non-coding DNA could play a protective role in genome defense against DNA damage from ionizing radiation by both absorbing the radicals from water radiolysis in the cytosol and reducing the energy of IR. However, the bodyguard protection by heterochromatin has been challenged by the observation that DNA damage is less frequently detected in peripheral heterochromatin than in euchromatin, which is inconsistent with the expectation and simulation results. Previous studies have also shown that the DNA damage in peripheral heterochromatin is rarely repaired and moves more quickly, broadly and outwardly to approach the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Additionally, it has been shown that extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are formed in the nucleus, highly detectable in the cytoplasm (particularly under stress conditions) and shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Based on these studies, this review speculates that the sites of DNA damage in peripheral heterochromatin could occur more

  9. Initial characterization of the photosynthetic apparatus of "Candidatus Chlorothrix halophila," a filamentous, anoxygenic photoautotroph.

    PubMed

    van de Meene, Allison M L; Le Olson, Tien; Collins, Aaron M; Blankenship, Robert E

    2007-06-01

    "Candidatus Chlorothrix halophila" is a recently described halophilic, filamentous, anoxygenic photoautotroph (J. A. Klappenbach and B. K. Pierson, Arch. Microbiol. 181:17-25, 2004) that was enriched from the hypersaline microbial mats at Guerrero Negro, Mexico. Analysis of the photosynthetic apparatus by negative staining, spectroscopy, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the photosynthetic apparatus in this organism has similarities to the photosynthetic apparatus in both the Chloroflexi and Chlorobi phyla of green photosynthetic bacteria. The chlorosomes were found to be ellipsoidal and of various sizes, characteristics that are comparable to characteristics of chlorosomes in other species of green photosynthetic bacteria. The absorption spectrum of whole cells was dominated by the chlorosome bacteriochlorophyll c (BChl c) peak at 759 nm, with fluorescence emission at 760 nm. A second fluorescence emission band was observed at 870 nm and was tentatively attributed to a membrane-bound antenna complex. Fluorescence emission spectra obtained at 77 K revealed another complex that fluoresced at 820 nm, which probably resulted from the chlorosome baseplate complex. All of these results suggest that BChl c is present in the chlorosomes of "Ca. Chlorothrix halophila," that BChl a is present in the baseplate, and that there is a membrane-bound antenna complex. Analysis of the proteins in the chlorosomes revealed an approximately 6-kDa band, which was found to be related to the BChl c binding protein CsmA found in other green bacteria. Overall, the absorbance and fluorescence spectra of "Ca. Chlorothrix halophila" revealed an interesting mixture of photosynthetic characteristics that seemed to have properties similar to properties of both phyla of green bacteria when they were compared to the photosynthetic characteristics of Chlorobium tepidum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

  10. A combination of vermiculite and paper pulp supporting material for the photoautotrophic micropropagation of sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Afreen-Zobayed; Zobayed; Kubota; Kozai; Hasegawa

    2000-08-22

    A mixture of vermiculite (hydrous silicates) and paper pulp (waste product of paper industry) was used as a supporting material for the in vitro photoautotrophic micropropagation of plantlets. Sweet potato was used as a model plant to find out the appropriate proportion of vermiculite and paper pulp for the optimum growth of the plantlets. The plantlets grown in the conventional supporting material, agar, were used as the control. The study revealed that in all aspects, the plantlets grown in vermiculite mixed with 30% (w/w) paper pulp exhibited the highest growth performance. The shoot and root fresh mass were x2.7 greater than those in agar (control); the leaf, stem and root dry mass were also greater and at least two fold in this treatment compared with those in the control. The net photosynthetic rate per plantlet was highest in this treatment, and on day 20 it was 15.3 µmol CO(2) h(-1) as compared with 9.8 µmol CO(2) h(-1) in the control. The growth of both shoots and roots decreased gradually with the increase or decrease of percentage of paper pulp in the supporting material. In general, the growth was significantly poorer in the plantlets grown in 100% vermiculite than that in vermiculite mixed with 30% paper pulp but still greater than in the control. The porosity of the supporting materials increased with the increase in the percentage of paper pulp in the supporting material. After transplanting to the ex vitro condition the survival percentage did not vary significantly (90-100%) among the treatments, except in control where it was only 73%. The number of unfolded leaves and the stem height were similar among the treatments except those in the control.

  11. High-density photoautotrophic algal cultures: design, construction, and operation of a novel photobioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Javanmardian, M; Palsson, B O

    1991-12-05

    A photobioreactor system has been designed, constructed and implemented to achieve high photosynthetic rates in high-density photoautotrophic algal cell suspensions. This unit is designed for efficient oxygen and biomass production rates, and it also can be used for the production of secreted products. A fiber-optic based optical transmission system that is coupled to an internal light distribution system illuminates the culture volume uniformly, at light intensities of 1.7 mW/cm(2) over a specific surface area of 3.2 cm(2)/cm(3). Uniform light distribution is achieved throughout the reactor without interfering with the flow pattern required to keep the cells in suspension. An on-line ultrafiltration unit exchanges spent with fresh medium, and its use results in very high cell densities, up to 10(9) cells/mL [3% (w/v)] for eukaryotic green alga chlorella vulgaris. DNA histograms obtained form flow cytometric analysis reveal that on-line ultrafiltration influences the growth pattern. Prior to ultrafiltration the cells seem to have at a particular point in the cell cycle where they contain multiple chromosomal equivalents. Following ultrafiltration, these cells divide, and the new cells are committed to division so that cell growth resumes. The Prototype photobioreactor system was operated both in batch and in continuous mode for over 2 months. The measured oxygen production rate of 4-6 mmol/L culture h under continuous operation is consistent with the predicted performance of the unit for the provided light intensity.

  12. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes carcinogenesis and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Park, Chan Hyuk; Yu, Dayeon; Lee, Yong Chan; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lee, Sang Kil

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • HOTAIR expression was tested in fifty patients with gastric cancer. • Cell proliferation was measured after HOTAIR silencing in gastric cancer cell line. • siRNA–HOTAIR suppresses cell invasiveness and capacity of migration. • Knock down of HOTAR leads to decreased expression of EMT markers. • Inhibition of HOTAIR induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. - Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide; however, the mechanism of carcinogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) recently emerged as a promoter of metastasis in various cancers including gastric cancer. Here we investigated the impact of HOTAIR on apoptosis, cell proliferation and cell cycle to dissect the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. We examined the mechanism of invasion and metastasis and analyzed the clinical significance of HOTAIR. Downregulation of HOTAIR was confirmed by two different siRNAs. The expression of HOTAIR was significantly elevated in various gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal control. si-HOTAIR significantly reduced viability in MKN 28, MKN 74, and KATO III cells but not in AGS cells. si-HOTAIR induced apoptosis in KATO III cells. Lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were more common in the high level of HOTAIR group. si-HOTAIR significantly decreased invasiveness and migration. si-HOTAIR led to differential expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. We found that HOTAIR was involved in inhibition of apoptosis and promoted invasiveness, supporting a role for HOTAIR in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  13. Systematically profiling and annotating long intergenic non-coding RNAs in human embryonic stem cell

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While more and more long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) were identified to take important roles in both maintaining pluripotency and regulating differentiation, how these lincRNAs may define and drive cell fate decisions on a global scale are still mostly elusive. Systematical profiling and comprehensive annotation of embryonic stem cells lincRNAs may not only bring a clearer big picture of these novel regulators but also shed light on their functionalities. Results Based on multiple RNA-Seq datasets, we systematically identified 300 human embryonic stem cell lincRNAs (hES lincRNAs). Of which, one forth (78 out of 300) hES lincRNAs were further identified to be biasedly expressed in human ES cells. Functional analysis showed that they were preferentially involved in several early-development related biological processes. Comparative genomics analysis further suggested that around half of the identified hES lincRNAs were conserved in mouse. To facilitate further investigation of these hES lincRNAs, we constructed an online portal for biologists to access all their sequences and annotations interactively. In addition to navigation through a genome browse interface, users can also locate lincRNAs through an advanced query interface based on both keywords and expression profiles, and analyze results through multiple tools. Conclusions By integrating multiple RNA-Seq datasets, we systematically characterized and annotated 300 hES lincRNAs. A full functional web portal is available freely at http://scbrowse.cbi.pku.edu.cn. As the first global profiling and annotating of human embryonic stem cell lincRNAs, this work aims to provide a valuable resource for both experimental biologists and bioinformaticians. PMID:24564552

  14. Long Non-coding RNA H19 Induces Cerebral Ischemia Reperfusion Injury via Activation of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Cao, Bin; Han, Dong; Sun, Miao; Feng, Juan

    2017-02-01

    Long non-coding RNA H19 (lncRNA H19) was found to be upregulated by hypoxia, its expression and function have never been tested in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study intended to investigate the role of lncRNA H19 and H19 gene variation in cerebral I/R injury with focusing on its relationship with autophagy activation. Cerebral I/R was induced in rats by middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. SH-SY5Y cells were subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) to simulate I/R injury. Real-time PCR, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and Western blot were used to evaluate the level of lncRNA H19, apoptosis, autophagy and some related proteins. The modified multiple ligase reaction was used to analyze the gene polymorphism of six SNPs in H19, rs217727, rs2067051, rs2251375, rs492994, rs2839698 and rs10732516 in ischemic stroke patients. We found that the expression of lncRNA H19 was upregulated by cerebral I/R in rats, as well as by OGD/R in vitro in the cells. Inhibition of lncRNA H19 and autophagy protected cells from OGD/R-induced death, respectively. Autophagy activation induced by OGD/R was prevented by H19 siRNA. Autophagy inducer, rapamycin, abolished lncRNA H19 effect. Furthermore, we found that lncRNA H19 inhibited autophagy through DUSP5-ERK1/2 axis. The result from blood samples of ischemic patients revealed that the variation of H19 gene increased the risk of ischemic stroke. Taken together, the results of present study suggest that LncRNA H19 could be a new therapeutic target of ischemic stroke.

  15. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR is associated with human cervical cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jung; Lee, Dae Woo; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae

    2015-02-01

    The functions of many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human cancers remain to be clarified. The lncRNA Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) has been reported to reprogram chromatin organization and promote breast and colorectal cancer metastasis, the involvement of lncRNAs in cervical cancer is just beginning to be studied. In the present study, we examined the expression and the functional role of HOTAIR in cervical cancer. HOTAIR expression was determined in cervical cancer tissues (n=111) and corresponding normal tissues (n=40) by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, and its correlation with clinical parameters and prognosis were analyzed. To determine the effect of HOTAIR knockdown and overexpression in cervical cancer cell lines, we used the CCK-8 assay, wound healing migration and matrigel invasion assay. The expression level of HOTAIR in cervical cancer tissues was higher than that in corresponding non-cancerous tissues. High HOTAIR expression correlated with lymph node metastasis, and reduced overall survival. A multivariate analysis showed that HOTAIR was a prognostic factor for predicting cervical cancer recurrence. Knockdown of HOTAIR reduced cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in cervical cancer cell lines. Moreover, HOTAIR regulated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, which are important for cell motility and metastasis. Therefore, HOTAIR may promote tumor aggressiveness through the upregulation of VEGF and MMP-9 and EMT-related genes. These findings indicate that HOTAIR may represent a novel biomarker for predicting recurrence and prognosis and serve as a promising therapeutic target in cervical cancer.

  16. Natural Antisense Transcripts and Long Non-Coding RNA in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Arthanari, Yamini; Heintzen, Christian; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Crosthwaite, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has been reported in a variety of organisms. While a consensus has yet to be reached on their global importance, an increasing number of examples have been shown to be functional, regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Here, we use RNA sequencing data from the ABI SOLiD platform to identify lncRNA and NATs obtained from samples of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown under different light and temperature conditions. We identify 939 novel lncRNAs, of which 477 are antisense to annotated genes. Across the whole dataset, the extent of overlap between sense and antisense transcripts is large: 371 sense/antisense transcripts are complementary over 500 nts or more and 236 overlap by more than 1000 nts. Most prevalent are 3′ end overlaps between convergently transcribed sense/antisense pairs, but examples of divergently transcribed pairs and nested transcripts are also present. We confirm the expression of a subset of sense/antisense transcript pairs by qPCR. We examine the size, types of overlap and expression levels under the different environmental stimuli of light and temperature, and identify 11 lncRNAs that are up-regulated in response to light. We also find differences in transcript length and the position of introns between protein-coding transcripts that have antisense expression and transcripts with no antisense expression. These results demonstrate the ability of N. crassa lncRNAs and NATs to be regulated by different environmental stimuli and provide the scope for further investigation into the function of NATs. PMID:24621812

  17. Long Non-coding RNA H19 Induces Cerebral Ischemia Reperfusion Injury via Activation of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jue; Cao, Bin; Han, Dong; Sun, Miao; Feng, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA H19 (lncRNA H19) was found to be upregulated by hypoxia, its expression and function have never been tested in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study intended to investigate the role of lncRNA H19 and H19 gene variation in cerebral I/R injury with focusing on its relationship with autophagy activation. Cerebral I/R was induced in rats by middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. SH-SY5Y cells were subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) to simulate I/R injury. Real-time PCR, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and Western blot were used to evaluate the level of lncRNA H19, apoptosis, autophagy and some related proteins. The modified multiple ligase reaction was used to analyze the gene polymorphism of six SNPs in H19, rs217727, rs2067051, rs2251375, rs492994, rs2839698 and rs10732516 in ischemic stroke patients. We found that the expression of lncRNA H19 was upregulated by cerebral I/R in rats, as well as by OGD/R in vitro in the cells. Inhibition of lncRNA H19 and autophagy protected cells from OGD/R-induced death, respectively. Autophagy activation induced by OGD/R was prevented by H19 siRNA. Autophagy inducer, rapamycin, abolished lncRNA H19 effect. Furthermore, we found that lncRNA H19 inhibited autophagy through DUSP5-ERK1/2 axis. The result from blood samples of ischemic patients revealed that the variation of H19 gene increased the risk of ischemic stroke. Taken together, the results of present study suggest that LncRNA H19 could be a new therapeutic target of ischemic stroke. PMID:28203482

  18. Identification of proteins binding coding and non-coding human RNAs using protein microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The regulation and function of mammalian RNAs has been increasingly appreciated to operate via RNA-protein interactions. With the recent discovery of thousands of novel human RNA molecules by high-throughput RNA sequencing, efficient methods to uncover RNA-protein interactions are urgently required. Existing methods to study proteins associated with a given RNA are laborious and require substantial amounts of cell-derived starting material. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a rapid and large-scale approach to characterize binding of in vitro transcribed labeled RNA to ~9,400 human recombinant proteins spotted on protein microarrays. Results We have optimized methodology to probe human protein microarrays with full-length RNA molecules and have identified 137 RNA-protein interactions specific for 10 coding and non-coding RNAs. Those proteins showed strong enrichment for common human RNA binding domains such as RRM, RBD, as well as K homology and CCCH type zinc finger motifs. Previously unknown RNA-protein interactions were discovered using this technique, and these interactions were biochemically verified between TP53 mRNA and Staufen1 protein as well as between HRAS mRNA and CNBP protein. Functional characterization of the interaction between Staufen 1 protein and TP53 mRNA revealed a novel role for Staufen 1 in preserving TP53 RNA stability. Conclusions Our approach demonstrates a scalable methodology, allowing rapid and efficient identification of novel human RNA-protein interactions using RNA hybridization to human protein microarrays. Biochemical validation of newly identified interactions between TP53-Stau1 and HRAS-CNBP using reciprocal pull-down experiments, both in vitro and in vivo, demonstrates the utility of this approach to study uncharacterized RNA-protein interactions. PMID:23157412

  19. Long non-coding RNA expression profiles in gallbladder carcinoma identified using microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiwen; Liu, Han; Shen, Xiaokun; Wang, Yueqi; Zhang, Dexiang; Shen, Sheng; Suo, Tao; Pan, Hongtao; Ming, Yue; Ding, Kan; Liu, Houbao

    2017-01-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is the most common biliary tract cancer and exhibits poor patient prognosis. Previous studies have identified that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) serve important regulatory roles in cancer biology. Alterations in lncRNAs are associated with several types of cancer. However, the contribution of lncRNAs to GBC remains unclear. To investigate the lncRNAs that are potentially involved in GBC, lncRNA profiles were identified in three pairs of human GBC and corresponding peri-carcinomatous tissue samples using microarray analysis. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to validate the microarray data. In order to elucidate potential functions, Gene Ontology, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis, and network analysis were used to determine relevant signaling pathways. Abundant RNA probes were used, and 1,758 lncRNAs and 1,254 mRNAs were detected to be differentially expressed by the microarray. Compared with para-carcinoma tissue, numerous lncRNAs were markedly upregulated or downregulated in GBC. The results demonstrated that the lncRNAs that were downregulated in GBC were more numerous compared with the lncRNAs that were upregulated. Among them, RP11-152P17.2-006 was the most upregulated, whereas CTA-941F9.9 was the most downregulated. The RT-qPCR results were consistent with the microarray data. Pathway analysis indicated that five pathways corresponded to the differentially expressed transcripts. It was demonstrated that lncRNA expression in GBC was markedly altered, and a series of novel lncRNAs associated with GBC were identified. The results of the present study suggest that the functions of lncRNAs are important in GBC development and progression. PMID:28529578

  20. Cancer therapies activate RIG-I-like receptor pathway through endogenous non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ranoa, Diana Rose E.; Parekh, Akash D.; Pitroda, Sean P.; Huang, Xiaona; Darga, Thomas; Wong, Anthony C.; Huang, Lei; Andrade, Jorge; Staley, Jonathan P.; Satoh, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that ionizing radiation (IR) and chemotherapy activate Type I interferon (IFN) signaling in tumor and host cells. However, the mechanism of induction is poorly understood. We identified a novel radioprotective role for the DEXH box RNA helicase LGP2 (DHX58) through its suppression of IR-induced cytotoxic IFN-beta [1]. LGP2 inhibits activation of the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) pathway upon binding of viral RNA to the cytoplasmic sensors RIG-I (DDX58) and MDA5 (IFIH1) and subsequent IFN signaling via the mitochondrial adaptor protein MAVS (IPS1). Here we show that MAVS is necessary for IFN-beta induction and interferon-stimulated gene expression in the response to IR. Suppression of MAVS conferred radioresistance in normal and cancer cells. Germline deletion of RIG-I, but not MDA5, protected mice from death following total body irradiation, while deletion of LGP2 accelerated the death of irradiated animals. In human tumors depletion of RIG-I conferred resistance to IR and different classes of chemotherapy drugs. Mechanistically, IR stimulated the binding of cytoplasmic RIG-I with small endogenous non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs), which triggered IFN-beta activity. We demonstrate that the small nuclear RNAs U1 and U2 translocate to the cytoplasm after IR treatment, thus stimulating the formation of RIG-I: RNA complexes and initiating downstream signaling events. Taken together, these findings suggest that the physiologic responses to radio-/chemo-therapy converge on an antiviral program in recruitment of the RLR pathway by a sncRNA-dependent activation of RIG-I which commences cytotoxic IFN signaling. Importantly, activation of interferon genes by radiation or chemotherapy is associated with a favorable outcome in patients undergoing treatment for cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a cell-intrinsic response to clinically relevant genotoxic treatments mediated by an RNA-dependent mechanism. PMID:27034163

  1. CAHM, a long non-coding RNA gene hypermethylated in colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Susanne K; Mitchell, Susan M; Graham, Lloyd D; McEvoy, Aidan; Thomas, Melissa L; Baker, Rohan T; Ross, Jason P; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Ho, Thu; LaPointe, Lawrence C; Young, Graeme P; Molloy, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    The CAHM gene (Colorectal Adenocarcinoma HyperMethylated), previously LOC100526820, is located on chromosome 6, hg19 chr6:163 834 097–163 834 982. It lacks introns, encodes a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and is located adjacent to the gene QKI, which encodes an RNA binding protein. Deep bisulphite sequencing of ten colorectal cancer (CRC) and matched normal tissues demonstrated frequent hypermethylation within the CAHM gene in cancer. A quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP) was used to characterize additional tissue samples. With a threshold of 5% methylation, the CAHM assay was positive in 2/26 normal colorectal tissues (8%), 17/21 adenomas (81%), and 56/79 CRC samples (71%). A reverse transcriptase-qPCR assay showed that CAHM RNA levels correlated negatively with CAHM % methylation, and therefore CAHM gene expression is typically decreased in CRC. The CAHM qMSP assay was applied to DNA isolated from plasma specimens from 220 colonoscopy-examined patients. Using a threshold of 3 pg methylated genomic DNA per mL plasma, methylated CAHM sequences were detected in the plasma DNA of 40/73 (55%) of CRC patients compared with 3/73 (4%) from subjects with adenomas and 5/74 (7%) from subjects without neoplasia. Both the frequency of detection and the amount of methylated CAHM DNA released into plasma increased with increasing cancer stage. Methylated CAHM DNA shows promise as a plasma biomarker for use in screening for CRC. PMID:24799664

  2. The Role of Ctk1 Kinase in Termination of Small Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lenstra, Tineke L.; Tudek, Agnieszka; Clauder, Sandra; Xu, Zhenyu; Pachis, Spyridon T.; van Leenen, Dik; Kemmeren, Patrick; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Libri, Domenico; Holstege, Frank C. P.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription termination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be performed by at least two distinct pathways and is influenced by the phosphorylation status of the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Late termination of mRNAs is performed by the CPF/CF complex, the recruitment of which is dependent on CTD-Ser2 phosphorylation (Ser2P). Early termination of shorter cryptic unstable transcripts (CUTs) and small nucleolar/nuclear RNAs (sno/snRNAs) is performed by the Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1 (NNS) complex that binds phosphorylated CTD-Ser5 (Ser5P) via the CTD-interacting domain (CID) of Nrd1p. In this study, mutants of the different termination pathways were compared by genome-wide expression analysis. Surprisingly, the expression changes observed upon loss of the CTD-Ser2 kinase Ctk1p are more similar to those derived from alterations in the Ser5P-dependent NNS pathway, than from loss of CTD-Ser2P binding factors. Tiling array analysis of ctk1Δ cells reveals readthrough at snoRNAs, at many cryptic unstable transcripts (CUTs) and stable uncharacterized transcripts (SUTs), but only at some mRNAs. Despite the suggested predominant role in termination of mRNAs, we observed that a CTK1 deletion or a Pol II CTD mutant lacking all Ser2 positions does not result in a global mRNA termination defect. Rather, termination defects in these strains are widely observed at NNS-dependent genes. These results indicate that Ctk1p and Ser2 CTD phosphorylation have a wide impact in termination of small non-coding RNAs but only affect a subset of mRNA coding genes. PMID:24324601

  3. Spatial-temporal transcriptional dynamics of long non-coding RNAs in human brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Ze-Lin; Poon, Ming-Wai; Yang, Jian-Hua

    2017-08-15

    The functional architecture of the human brain is greatly determined by the temporal and spatial regulation of the transcription process. However, the spatial and temporal transcriptional landscape of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) during human brain development remains poorly understood. Here, we report the genome-wide lncRNA transcriptional analysis in an extensive series of 1340 post-mortem human brain specimens collected from 16 regions spanning the period from early embryo development to late adulthood. We discovered that lncRNA transcriptome dramatically changed during fetal development, while transited to a surprisingly relatively stable state after birth till the late adulthood. We also discovered that the transcription map of lncRNAs was spatially different, and that this spatial difference was developmentally regulated. Of the 16 brain regions explored (cerebellar cortex, thalamus, striatum, amygdala, hippocampus and 11 neocortex areas), cerebellar cortex showed the most distinct lncRNA expression features from all remaining brain regions throughout the whole developmental period, reflecting its unique developmental and functional features. Furthermore, by characterizing the functional modules and cellular processes of the spatial-temporal dynamic lncRNAs, we found that they were significantly associated with the RNA processing, neuron differentiation and synaptic signal transportation processes. Furthermore, we found that many lncRNAs associated with the neurodegenerative Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases were co-expressed in the fetal development of the human brain, and affected the convergent biological processes. In summary, our study provides a comprehensive map for lncRNA transcription dynamics in human brain development, which might shed light on the understanding of the molecular underpinnings of human brain function and disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Expression Analysis of Long Non-coding RNAs in the Blood of Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Eftekharian, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Soudyab, Mohammad; Omrani, Mir Davood; Rahimi, Mahnoosh; Sayad, Arezou; Komaki, Alireza; Mazdeh, Mehrdokht; Taheri, Mohammad

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) with multiple genetic and environmental risk factors. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently reported to participate in the regulation of immune responses. Consequently, aberrant expression of lncRNAs has been suggested as an underlying cause of MS. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of three lncRNAs with putative roles in the regulation of immune response, namely TNF-α and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (THRIL), Fas cell surface death receptor- antisense 1 (FAS-AS1), and plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 (PVT1) in circulating blood cells of 50 Iranian relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients compared with healthy subjects by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We detected a significant downregulation of PVT1 and FAS-AS1 expressions in RRMS patients while a significant upregulation of THRIL in patients compared with controls (P < 0.001). Correlation analyses between lncRNA expression levels and clinical data of MS patients revealed no significant correlation between lncRNAs expression levels and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), a moderate correlation between PVT1 expression levels and duration of the disorder and no significant correlation between lncRNAs expression levels and age at onset. In addition, we demonstrated correlations between the expression levels of PVT1 and THRIL as well as expression levels of THRIL and FAS-AS1 in RRMS patients. In brief, we have demonstrated dysregulation of three lncRNAs in MS patients. Further studies are needed to explore the exact mechanisms by which these lncRNAs participate in regulation of immune responses.

  5. Systematically characterizing dysfunctional long intergenic non-coding RNAs in multiple brain regions of major psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongying; Li, Feng; Deng, Yulan; Liu, Ling; Lan, Yujia; Zhang, Xinxin; Zhao, Tingting; Xu, Chaohan; Xu, Chun; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are severe neuropsychiatric disorders with serious impact on patients, together termed “major psychosis”. Recently, long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) were reported to play important roles in mental diseases. However, little was known about their molecular mechanism in pathogenesis of SZ and BD. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on 82 post-mortem brain tissues from three brain regions (orbitofrontal cortex (BA11), anterior cingulate cortex (BA24) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA9)) of patients with SZ and BD and control subjects, generating over one billion reads. We characterized lincRNA transcriptome in the three brain regions and identified 20 differentially expressed lincRNAs (DELincRNAs) in BA11 for BD, 34 and 1 in BA24 and BA9 for SZ, respectively. Our results showed that these DELincRNAs exhibited brain region-specific patterns. Applying weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we revealed that DELincRNAs together with other genes can function as modules to perform different functions in different brain regions, such as immune system development in BA24 and oligodendrocyte differentiation in BA9. Additionally, we found that DNA methylation alteration could partly explain the dysregulation of lincRNAs, some of which could function as enhancers in the pathogenesis of major psychosis. Together, we performed systematical characterization of dysfunctional lincRNAs in multiple brain regions of major psychosis, which provided a valuable resource to understand their roles in SZ and BD pathology and helped to discover novel biomarkers. PMID:27661005

  6. Differential expression profile of long non-coding RNA in cardiomyocytes autophagy induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Yang, Fan; Xu, Ru-Ming; Zhang, Yun-Yan; Li, Yang; Liu, Su-Xuan; Zhang, Guan-Xin; Wang, Guo-Kun; Ma, Li-Ping

    2017-10-01

    Autophagy is a ubiquitous intracellular process for cellular homeostasis maintenance by recycling damaged protein and organelles. Dysregulation of cardiomyocytes autophagic activity is implicated in various heart diseases. Recent studies had demonstrated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) played crucial roles on modulation of autophagic activity. In this study, we first established an angiotensin II-induced autophagy model on neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Western blot assay confirmed that the expression of Beclin 1 and the conversion of soluble LC3-I to lipid bound LC3-II were significantly increased at 12 h after angiotensin II stimulation, but the cardiomyocytes surface area and hypertrophic markers expression had no significant change. Then microarray analysis and real-time PCR were applied to detect differentially expressed lncRNAs during cardiomyocytes autophagy. A total of 1,249 lncRNAs were determined as differentially expressed, including 700 upregulated lncRNAs and 549 downregulated lncRNAs. LncRNAs subgroup analysis showed there were 43 transcribed ultra-conserved noncoding RNAs (T-UCRs) differentially expressed in cardiomyocytes autophagy, of which 26 T-UCRs were upregulated and 17 T-UCRs were downregulated. Bioinformatics analysis further showed that 94 differentially expressed lncRNAs contained potential binding sites of miR-22, a pro-hypertrophic and pro-autophagic microRNA. Therefore, these differentially expressed lncRNAs might play critical roles in cardiomyocytes autophagy. This finding would provide an experimental basis for future investigation on ischemic heart disease. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  7. Investigation of Long Non-coding RNA Expression Profiles in the Substantia Nigra of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yaohui; Huang, Hua; Chen, Yaqin; Cao, Maohong; Zhou, Hongzhi; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2017-03-01

    Genetics is considered as an important risk factor in the pathological changes of Parkinson's disease (PD). Substantia nigra (SN) is thought to be the most vulnerable area in this process. In recent decades, however, few related long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the SN of PD patients had been identified and the functions of those lncRNAs had been studied even less. In this study, we sought to investigate the lncRNA expression profiles and their potential functions in the SN of PD patients. We screened lncRNA expression profiles in the SN of PD patients using the lncRNA mining approach from the ArrayExpress database, which included GSE20295. The samples were from 11 of PD and 14 of normal tissue samples. We identified 87 lncRNAs that were altered significantly in the SN during the occurrence of PD. Among these lncRNAs, lncRNA AL049437 and lncRNA AK021630 varied most dramatically. AL049437 was up-regulated in the PD samples, while AK021630 was down-regulated. Based on the results, we focused on the potential roles of the two lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of PD by the knockdown of the expression of AL049437 or AK021630 in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. Results indicated that the reduction in AL049437 level increased cell viability, mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm), mitochondrial mass, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TyrH) secretion. By contrast, the knockdown of AK021630 resulted in the opposite effect. Based on these results, we speculated that lncRNA AL049437 likely contributed to the risk of PD, while lncRNA AK021630 likely inhibited the occurrence of PD.

  8. A local multiple alignment method for detection of non-coding RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Yasuo; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2009-06-15

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) show a unique evolutionary process in which the substitutions of distant bases are correlated in order to conserve the secondary structure of the ncRNA molecule. Therefore, the multiple alignment method for the detection of ncRNAs should take into account both the primary sequence and the secondary structure. Recently, there has been intense focus on multiple alignment investigations for the detection of ncRNAs; however, most of the proposed methods are designed for global multiple alignments. For this reason, these methods are not appropriate to identify locally conserved ncRNAs among genomic sequences. A more efficient local multiple alignment method for the detection of ncRNAs is required. We propose a new local multiple alignment method for the detection of ncRNAs. This method uses a local multiple alignment construction procedure inspired by ProDA, which is a local multiple aligner program for protein sequences with repeated and shuffled elements. To align sequences based on secondary structure information, we propose a new alignment model which incorporates secondary structure features. We define the conditional probability of an alignment via a conditional random field and use a gamma-centroid estimator to align sequences. The locally aligned subsequences are clustered into blocks of approximately globally alignable subsequences between pairwise alignments. Finally, these blocks are multiply aligned via MXSCARNA. In benchmark experiments, we demonstrate the high ability of the implemented software, SCARNA_LM, for local multiple alignment for the detection of ncRNAs. The C++ source code for SCARNA_LM and its experimental datasets are available at http://www.ncrna.org/software/scarna_lm/download. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. Paraspeckle formation during the biogenesis of long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Takao; Hirose, Tetsuro

    2013-03-01

    Paraspeckles are unique subnuclear structures that are built around a specific long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), NEAT1, which is comprised of two isoforms (NEAT1_1 and NEAT1_2) that are produced by alternative 3'-end processing. NEAT1 lncRNAs are unusual RNA polymerase II transcripts that lack introns. The non-polyadenylated 3'-end of NEAT1_2 is non-canonically processed by RNase P. NEAT1_2 is an essential component for paraspeckle formation. Paraspeckles form during the NEAT1_2 lncRNA biogenesis process, which encompasses transcription from its own chromosome locus through lncRNA processing and accumulation. Recent RNAi analyses of 40 paraspeckle proteins (PSPs) identified four PSPs that are required for paraspeckle formation by mediating NEAT1 processing and accumulation. In particular, HNRNPK was shown to arrest CFIm-dependent NEAT1_1 polyadenylation, leading to NEAT1_2 synthesis. The other three PSPs were required for paraspeckle formation, but did not affect NEAT1_2 expression. This observation suggests that NEAT1_2 accumulation is necessary but not sufficient for paraspeckle formation. An additional step, presumably the bundling of NEAT1 ribonucleoprotein sub-complexes, may be required for construction of the intact paraspeckle structure. NEAT1 expression is likely regulated at transcriptional and post-transcriptional steps under certain stress conditions, suggesting roles for paraspeckles in the lncRNA-mediated regulation of gene expression, such as the nucleocytoplasmic transport of mRNA in response to certain stimuli.

  10. Analysis of long non-coding RNA expression profiles in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei Yan; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jian Guo; Song, Shao Li; Huang, Gang; Xi, Wei Min; Tan, Li Ling; Wang, Jian; Cao, Qing

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the expression patterns of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the present study downloaded three human exon arrays available from the public Gene Expression Omnibus. The probes of the human exon arrays were re-annotated and the probes uniquely mapping to lncRNAs were retained at the gene level. Following the analysis of GSE53757 and GSE46699, which contained paired ccRCC cancer and normal adjacent tissue samples, 32 differentially expressed lncRNAs (adjusted P<0.01) in ccRCC were identified. Various lncRNAs, including ENSG00000177133, NR_024418, T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 6 (TCL6), growth arrest-specific transcript 5, deleted in lymphocytic leukemia 2, colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed (CRNDE) and MIR155HG, have been reported to be abnormally expressed in cancers. Of these genes, NR_24418 and TCL6 have been reported to be associated with ccRCC. Following analysis of GSE47352, which contained 4 primary metastatic and 5 non-metastatic tumor samples, the 50 top differentially expressed lncRNAs were identified in metastatic ccRCC (Mann-Whitney U test, P<0.05). Comparison with the ccRCC associated lncRNAs revealed that the lncRNA CRNDE demonstrated an increased expression in ccRCC and metastatic ccRCC samples, which suggested that CRNDE is important in the progression of ccRCC. The lncRNA ENSG00000244020 was decreased in ccRCC and metastatic ccRCC, suggesting that silencing of ENSG00000244020 may be important in ccRCC development. Overall, a set of lncRNAs was identified as differentially expressed in ccRCC and metastatic ccRCC, providing potential candidates for the discovery of novel cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets to improve diagnosis and therapy in RCC.

  11. The emerging role of long non-coding RNA in gallbladder cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Akanksha; Malhotra, Akshay; Jain, Manju; Vasquez, Karen M; Jain, Aklank

    2017-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is the most common and aggressive form of biliary tract carcinoma with an alarmingly low 5-year survival rate. Despite its high mortality rate, the underlying mechanisms of GBC pathogenesis are not completely understood. Recently, from a growing volume of literature, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as key regulators of gene expression and appear to play vital roles in many human cancers. To date, a number of lncRNAs have been implicated in GBC, but their potential roles in GBC have not been systematically examined. Thus, in this review, we critically discuss the emerging roles of lncRNAs in GBC, and the pathways involved. Specifically, we note that some lncRNAs show greater expression in T1 and T2 tumor stages compared to T3 and T4 tumor stages and that their dysregulation leads to alterations in cell cycle progression and can cause an increase in GBC cell proliferation or apoptosis. In addition, some lncRNAs control the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process, while others take part in the regulation of ERK/MAPK and Ras cancer-associated signaling pathways. We also present their potential utility in diagnosis, prognosis, and/or treatment of GBC. The overall goal of this review is to stimulate interest in the role of lncRNAs in GBC, which may open new avenues in the determination of GBC pathogenesis and may lead to the development of new preventive and therapeutic strategies for GBC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  12. Non-coding RNA detection methods combined to improve usability, reproducibility and precision.

    PubMed

    Raasch, Peter; Schmitz, Ulf; Patenge, Nadja; Vera, Julio; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2010-09-29

    Non-coding RNAs gain more attention as their diverse roles in many cellular processes are discovered. At the same time, the need for efficient computational prediction of ncRNAs increases with the pace of sequencing technology. Existing tools are based on various approaches and techniques, but none of them provides a reliable ncRNA detector yet. Consequently, a natural approach is to combine existing tools. Due to a lack of standard input and output formats combination and comparison of existing tools is difficult. Also, for genomic scans they often need to be incorporated in detection workflows using custom scripts, which decreases transparency and reproducibility. We developed a Java-based framework to integrate existing tools and methods for ncRNA detection. This framework enables users to construct transparent detection workflows and to combine and compare different methods efficiently. We demonstrate the effectiveness of combining detection methods in case studies with the small genomes of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Streptococcus pyogenes. With the combined method, we gained 10% to 20% precision for sensitivities from 30% to 80%. Further, we investigated Streptococcus pyogenes for novel ncRNAs. Using multiple methods--integrated by our framework--we determined four highly probable candidates. We verified all four candidates experimentally using RT-PCR. We have created an extensible framework for practical, transparent and reproducible combination and comparison of ncRNA detection methods. We have proven the effectiveness of this approach in tests and by guiding experiments to find new ncRNAs. The software is freely available under the GNU General Public License (GPL), version 3 at http://www.sbi.uni-rostock.de/moses along with source code, screen shots, examples and tutorial material.

  13. A long non-coding RNA contributes to doxorubicin resistance of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Lin; Zhu, Kun-Peng; Shen, Guo-Qi; Zhu, Zhong-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging in molecular biology as crucial regulators of cancer. Although the aberrant expression of lncRNAs has been observed in osteosarcoma (OS), the molecular mechanisms underlying lncRNAs in doxorubicin resistance of OS still unknown. In the current study, we investigated a novel lncRNA, termed ODRUL (osteosarcoma doxorubicin-resistance related up-regulated lncRNA), and evaluated its role in the occurrence of doxorubicin resistance in OS. LncRNA microarray revealed that lncRNA ODRUL was the most up-regulated expressed in the doxorubicin-resistant OS cell line. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) confirmed that lncRNA ODRUL was higher in different doxorubicin-resistant OS cell lines and lower in different doxorubicin-sensitive OS cell lines. Moreover, we showed that lncRNA ODRUL was increased in specimens of OS patients with a poor chemoresponse and lung metastasis. We further demonstrated that lncRNA ODRUL inhibition could inhibit OS cell proliferation, migration, and partly reversed doxorubicin resistance in vitro. In addition, we found that the expression of classical drug resistance-related ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B, member 1 (ABCB1) gene was decreased after the lncRNA ODRUL knockdown. Thus, we concluded that lncRNA ODRUL may act as a pro-doxorubicin-resistant molecule through inducing the expression of the classical multidrug resistance-related ABCB1 gene in osteosarcoma cells .These findings may provide a novel target for reversing doxorubicin resistance in OS.

  14. A Nucleus-localized Long Non-Coding RNA Enhances Drought and Salt Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tao; Zhao, Huayan; Cui, Peng; Albesher, Nour; Xiong, Liming

    2017-09-08

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) affect gene expression through a wide range of mechanisms and are considered as important regulators in many essential biological processes. A large number of lncRNA transcripts have been predicted or identified in plants in recent years. However, the biological functions for most of them are still unknown. In this study, we identified an Arabidopsis thaliana lncRNA, Drought induced RNA (DRIR), as a novel positive regulator of plant response to drought and salt stress. DRIR was expressed at a low level under non-stress conditions but can be significantly activated by drought and salt stress as well as by abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. We identified a T-DNA insertion mutant, drirD, which had higher expression of the DRIR gene than the wild type plants. The drirD mutant exhibits increased tolerance to drought and salt stress. Overexpressing DRIR in Arabidopsis also increased tolerance to drought and salt stress of the transgenic plants. The drirD mutant and the overexpressing seedlings are more sensitive to ABA than the wild type in stomata closure and seedling growth. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis demonstrated that the expression of a large number of genes was altered in drirD and the overexpressing plants. These include genes involved in ABA signaling, water transport and other stress-relief processes. Our study reveals a mechanism whereby DRIR regulates plant response to abiotic stress by modulating the expression of a series of genes involved in stress response. {copyright, serif} 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  15. Long Non-Coding RNA: Potential Diagnostic and Therapeutic Biomarker for Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xuelian; Sun, Xinyang; Niu, Wei; Kong, Lingming; He, Mingjun; Zhong, Aifang; Chen, Shengdong; Jiang, Kunhong; Zhang, Liyi; Cheng, Zaohuo

    2016-01-01

    Background The criteria for diagnosing depression are based on behavioral observation and self-reporting of symptoms by the patients or guardians without any biological validation of the disease. This study aimed to identify long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as robust and predictive biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy response in major depressive disorder (MDD). Material/Methods We used human lncRNA 3.0 microarray profiling (which covers 30,586 human lncRNAs), using PBMCs from five MDD patients and five controls. Differentially expressed lncRNAs in the PBMCs of MDD patients were identified, of which 10 candidate lncRNAs were selected for real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis in a larger cohort of 138 MDD patients and 63 healthy controls. Then among the 138 MDD patients who received standard antidepressant treatment, 30 were randomly selected for lncRNAs expression retesting and symptomatology assessments after three-weeks and six-weeks of antidepressant treatment. Results Six lncRNAs (TCONS_00019174, ENST00000566208, NONHSAG045500, ENST00000517573, NONHSAT034045, and NONHSAT142707) were significantly downregulated in MDD patients compared to control patients, and the area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of these six lncRNAs cases, combined, was 0.719 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.617–0.821). There was no difference in the expression of these six lncRNAs based on gender (p>0.05) or age (p>0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that the combined expression of six lncRNAs in PBMCs may serve as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and therapy response of MDD in the clinical setting. PMID:28039689

  16. Open chromatin profiling of human postmortem brain infers functional roles for non-coding schizophrenia loci.

    PubMed

    Fullard, John F; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Hauberg, Mads E; Xu, Ke; Voloudakis, Georgios; Shao, Zhiping; Bare, Christopher; Dudley, Joel T; Mattheisen, Manuel; Robakis, Nikolaos K; Haroutunian, Vahram; Roussos, Panos

    2017-03-14

    Open chromatin provides access to DNA binding proteins for the correct spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression. Mapping chromatin accessibility has been widely used to identify the location of cis regulatory elements (CREs) including promoters and enhancers. CREs show tissue- and cell-type specificity and disease-associated variants are often enriched for CREs in the tissues and cells that pertain to a given disease. To better understand the role of CREs in neuropsychiatric disorders we applied the Assay for Transposase Accessible Chromatin followed by sequencing (ATAC-seq) to neuronal and non-neuronal nuclei isolated from frozen postmortem human brain by fluorescence-activated nuclear sorting (FANS). Most of the identified open chromatin regions (OCRs) are differentially accessible between neurons and non-neurons, and show enrichment with known cell type markers, promoters and enhancers. Relative to those of non-neurons, neuronal OCRs are more evolutionarily conserved and are enriched in distal regulatory elements. Transcription factor (TF) footprinting analysis identifies differences in the regulome between neuronal and non-neuronal cells and ascribes putative functional roles to a number of non-coding schizophrenia (SCZ) risk variants. Among the identified variants is a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) proximal to the gene encoding SNX19. In vitro experiments reveal that this SNP leads to an increase in transcriptional activity. As elevated expression of SNX19 has been associated with SCZ, our data provides evidence that the identified SNP contributes to disease. These results represent the first analysis of OCRs and TF binding sites in distinct populations of postmortem human brain cells and further our understanding of the regulome and the impact of neuropsychiatric disease-associated genetic risk variants.

  17. Aberrant Expression of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shengdong; Sun, Xinyang; Niu, Wei; Kong, Lingming; He, Mingjun; Li, Wanshuai; Zhong, Aifang; Lu, Jim; Zhang, Liyi

    2016-01-01

    Background Dysfunction of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) has been demonstrated to be involved in psychiatric diseases. However, the expression patterns and functions of the regulatory lncRNAs in schizophrenia (SZ) patients have rarely been systematically reported. Material/Methods The lncRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were screened and compared between the SZ patients and demographically-matched healthy controls using microarray analysis, and then were validated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) method. Three verified significantly dysregulated lncRNAs of PBMCs were selected and then measured in SZ patients before and after the antipsychotic treatment. SZ symptomatology improvement was measured by Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores. Results One hundred and twenty-five lncRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in SZ patients compared with healthy controls, of which 62 were up-regulated and 63 were down-regulated. Concurrent with the significant decrease of the PANSS scores of patients after the treatment, the PBMC levels of lncRNA NONHSAT089447 and NONHSAT041499 were strikingly decreased (P<0.05). Down-regulation of PBMC expression of NONHSAT041499 was significantly correlated to the improvement of positive and activity symptoms of patients (r=−0.444 and −0.423, respectively, P<0.05, accounting for 16.9% and 15.1%, respectively), and was also significantly associated with better outcomes (odds ratio 2.325 for positive symptom and 12.340 for activity symptom). Conclusions LncRNA NONHSAT089447 and NONHSAT041499 might be involved in the pathogenesis and development of SZ, and the PBMC level of NONHSAT041499 is significantly associated with the treatment outcomes of SZ. PMID:27650396

  18. Low mitochondrial DNA variation among American alligators and a novel non-coding region in crocodilians.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Travis C; Staton, Joseph L; Vu, Alex T; Davis, Lisa M; Bremer, Jaime R Alvarado; Rhodes, Walter E; Brisbin, I Lehr; Sawyer, Roger H

    2002-12-15

    We analyzed 1317-1823 base pairs (bp) of mitochondrial DNA sequence beginning in the 5' end of cytochrome b (cyt b) and ending in the central domain of the control region for 25 American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and compared these to a homologous sequence from a Chinese alligator (A. sinensis). Both species share a non-coding spacer between cyt b and tRNA(Thr). Chinese alligator cyt b differs from that of the American alligator by 17.5% at the nucleotide level and 13.8% for inferred amino acids, which is consistent with their presumed ancient divergence. Only two cyt b haplotypes were detected among the 25 American alligators (693-1199 bp surveyed), with one haplotype shared among 24 individuals. One alligator from Mississippi differed from all other alligators by a single silent substitution. The control region contained only slightly more variation among the 25 American alligators, with two variable positions (624 bp surveyed), yielding three haplotypes with 22, two, and one individuals in each of these groups. Previous genetic studies examining allozymes and the proportion of variable microsatellite DNA loci also found low levels of genetic diversity in American alligators. However, in contrast with allozymes, microsatellites, and morphology, the mtDNA data shows no evidence of differentiation among populations from the extremes of the species range. These results suggest that American alligators underwent a severe population bottleneck in the late Pleistocene, resulting in nearly homogenous mtDNA among all American alligators today. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Long non-coding RNA expression profiles in gallbladder carcinoma identified using microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiwen; Liu, Han; Shen, Xiaokun; Wang, Yueqi; Zhang, Dexiang; Shen, Sheng; Suo, Tao; Pan, Hongtao; Ming, Yue; Ding, Kan; Liu, Houbao

    2017-05-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is the most common biliary tract cancer and exhibits poor patient prognosis. Previous studies have identified that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) serve important regulatory roles in cancer biology. Alterations in lncRNAs are associated with several types of cancer. However, the contribution of lncRNAs to GBC remains unclear. To investigate the lncRNAs that are potentially involved in GBC, lncRNA profiles were identified in three pairs of human GBC and corresponding peri-carcinomatous tissue samples using microarray analysis. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to validate the microarray data. In order to elucidate potential functions, Gene Ontology, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis, and network analysis were used to determine relevant signaling pathways. Abundant RNA probes were used, and 1,758 lncRNAs and 1,254 mRNAs were detected to be differentially expressed by the microarray. Compared with para-carcinoma tissue, numerous lncRNAs were markedly upregulated or downregulated in GBC. The results demonstrated that the lncRNAs that were downregulated in GBC were more numerous compared with the lncRNAs that were upregulated. Among them, RP11-152P17.2-006 was the most upregulated, whereas CTA-941F9.9 was the most downregulated. The RT-qPCR results were consistent with the microarray data. Pathway analysis indicated that five pathways corresponded to the differentially expressed transcripts. It was demonstrated that lncRNA expression in GBC was markedly altered, and a series of novel lncRNAs associated with GBC were identified. The results of the present study suggest that the functions of lncRNAs are important in GBC development and progression.

  20. Functional elucidation of the non-coding RNAs of Kluyveromyces marxianus in the exponential growth phase.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoo-Bok; Lee, Eun Ju; Cho, Suhyung; Kim, Tae Yong; Park, Jin Hwan; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-02-29

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which perform diverse regulatory roles, have been found in organisms from all superkingdoms of life. However, there have been limited numbers of studies on the functions of ncRNAs, especially in nonmodel organisms such as Kluyveromyces marxianus that is widely used in the field of industrial biotechnology. In this study, we measured changes in transcriptome at three time points during the exponential growth phase of K. marxianus by using strand-specific RNA-seq. We found that approximately 60% of the transcriptome consists of ncRNAs transcribed from antisense and intergenic regions of the genome that were transcribed at lower levels than mRNA. In the transcriptome, a substantial number of long antisense ncRNAs (lancRNAs) are differentially expressed and enriched in carbohydrate and energy metabolism pathways. Furthermore, this enrichment is evolutionarily conserved, at least in yeast. Particularly, the mode of regulation of mRNA/lancRNA pairs is associated with mRNA transcription levels; the correlation between the pairs is positive at high mRNA transcriptional levels and negative at low levels. In addition, significant induction of mRNA and coverage of more than half of the mRNA sequence by a lancRNA strengthens the positive correlation between mRNA/lancRNA pairs. Transcriptome sequencing of K. marxianus in the exponential growth phase reveals pervasive transcription of ncRNAs with evolutionarily conserved functions. Studies of the mode of regulation of mRNA/lancRNA pairs suggest that induction of lancRNA may be associated with switch-like behavior of mRNA/lancRNA pairs and efficient regulation of the carbohydrate and energy metabolism pathways in the exponential growth phase of K. marxianus being used in industrial applications.

  1. Non-codingRNA sequence variations in human chronic lymphocytic leukemia and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Sylwia E.; Rossi, Simona; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Nicoloso, Milena S.; Cimmino, Amelia; Alder, Hansjuerg; Herlea, Vlad; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Rai, Kanti R.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Keating, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease in which the interplay between alterations in protein-coding genes and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) plays a fundamental role. In recent years, the full coding component of the human genome was sequenced in various cancers, whereas such attempts related to ncRNAs are still fragmentary. We screened genomic DNAs for sequence variations in 148 microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs) loci in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or colorectal cancer (CRC) by Sanger technique and further tried to elucidate the functional consequences of some of these variations. We found sequence variations in miRNAs in both sporadic and familial CLL cases, mutations of UCRs in CLLs and CRCs and, in certain instances, detected functional effects of these variations. Furthermore, by integrating our data with previously published data on miRNA sequence variations, we have created a catalog of DNA sequence variations in miRNAs/ultraconserved genes in human cancers. These findings argue that ncRNAs are targeted by both germ line and somatic mutations as well as by single-nucleotide polymorphisms with functional significance for human tumorigenesis. Sequence variations in ncRNA loci are frequent and some have functional and biological significance. Such information can be exploited to further investigate on a genome-wide scale the frequency of genetic variations in ncRNAs and their functional meaning, as well as for the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for leukemias and carcinomas. PMID:19926640

  2. Meiotic Recombination Hotspots of Fission Yeast Are Directed to Loci that Express Non-Coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Wahls, Wayne P.; Siegel, Eric R.; Davidson, Mari K.

    2008-01-01

    Background Polyadenylated, mRNA-like transcripts with no coding potential are abundant in eukaryotes, but the functions of these long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are enigmatic. In meiosis, Rec12 (Spo11) catalyzes the formation of dsDNA breaks (DSBs) that initiate homologous recombination. Most meiotic recombination is positioned at hotspots, but knowledge of the mechanisms is nebulous. In the fission yeast genome DSBs are located within 194 prominent peaks separated on average by 65-kbp intervals of DNA that are largely free of DSBs. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the genome-wide distribution of DSB peaks to that of polyadenylated ncRNA molecules of the prl class. DSB peaks map to ncRNA loci that may be situated within ORFs, near the boundaries of ORFs and intergenic regions, or most often within intergenic regions. Unconditional statistical tests revealed that this colocalization is non-random and robust (P≤5.5×10−8). Furthermore, we tested and rejected the hypothesis that the ncRNA loci and DSB peaks localize preferentially, but independently, to a third entity on the chromosomes. Conclusions/Significance Meiotic DSB hotspots are directed to loci that express polyadenylated ncRNAs. This reveals an unexpected, possibly unitary mechanism for what directs meiotic recombination to hotspots. It also reveals a likely biological function for enigmatic ncRNAs. We propose specific mechanisms by which ncRNA molecules, or some aspect of RNA metabolism associated with ncRNA loci, help to position recombination protein complexes at DSB hotspots within chromosomes. PMID:18682829

  3. Detailed Identification of Fatty Acid Isomers Sheds Light on the Probable Precursors of Triacylglycerol Accumulation in Photoautotrophically Grown Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Kenta; Moriyama, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model alga for studying triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in the photosynthetic production of biofuel. Previous studies were conducted under photoheterotrophic growth conditions in medium supplemented with acetate and/or ammonium. We wanted to demonstrate TAG accumulation under truly photoautotrophic conditions without reduced elements. We first reidentified all lipid components and fatty acids by mass spectrometry, because the currently used identification knowledge relies on data obtained in the 1980s. Accordingly, various isomers of fatty acids, which are potentially useful in tracing the flow of fatty acids leading to the accumulation of TAG, were detected. In strain CC1010 grown under photoautotrophic conditions, TAG accumulated to about 57.5 mol% of total lipids on a mole fatty acid basis after the transfer to nitrogen-deficient conditions. The content of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol, sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol, and phosphatidylglycerol decreased drastically. The accumulated TAG contained 16:0 as the major acid and 16:4(4,7,10,13), 18:2(9,12), and 18:3(9,12,15), which are typically found in chloroplast lipids. Additionally, 18:1(11) and 18:3(5,9,12), which are specific to extrachloroplast lipids, were also abundant in the accumulated TAG. Photosynthesis and respiration slowed markedly after the shift to nitrogen-deficient conditions. These results suggest that fatty acids for the production of TAG were supplied not only from chloroplast lipids but also from other membranes within the cells, although the possibility of de novo synthesis cannot be excluded. Under nitrogen-replete conditions, supplementation with a high concentration of CO2 promoted TAG production in the cells grown photoautotrophically, opening up the possibility to the continuous production of TAG using CO2 produced by industry. PMID:24337111

  4. Detailed identification of fatty acid isomers sheds light on the probable precursors of triacylglycerol accumulation in photoautotrophically grown Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kenta; Moriyama, Takashi; Sato, Naoki

    2014-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model alga for studying triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in the photosynthetic production of biofuel. Previous studies were conducted under photoheterotrophic growth conditions in medium supplemented with acetate and/or ammonium. We wanted to demonstrate TAG accumulation under truly photoautotrophic conditions without reduced elements. We first reidentified all lipid components and fatty acids by mass spectrometry, because the currently used identification knowledge relies on data obtained in the 1980s. Accordingly, various isomers of fatty acids, which are potentially useful in tracing the flow of fatty acids leading to the accumulation of TAG, were detected. In strain CC1010 grown under photoautotrophic conditions, TAG accumulated to about 57.5 mol% of total lipids on a mole fatty acid basis after the transfer to nitrogen-deficient conditions. The content of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol, sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol, and phosphatidylglycerol decreased drastically. The accumulated TAG contained 16:0 as the major acid and 16:4(4,7,10,13), 18:2(9,12), and 18:3(9,12,15), which are typically found in chloroplast lipids. Additionally, 18:1(11) and 18:3(5,9,12), which are specific to extrachloroplast lipids, were also abundant in the accumulated TAG. Photosynthesis and respiration slowed markedly after the shift to nitrogen-deficient conditions. These results suggest that fatty acids for the production of TAG were supplied not only from chloroplast lipids but also from other membranes within the cells, although the possibility of de novo synthesis cannot be excluded. Under nitrogen-replete conditions, supplementation with a high concentration of CO2 promoted TAG production in the cells grown photoautotrophically, opening up the possibility to the continuous production of TAG using CO2 produced by industry.

  5. Systematic identification and characterization of long non-coding RNAs in mouse mature sperm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoning; Gao, Fengxin; Fu, Jianbo; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Yuqing; Zeng, Xuhui

    2017-01-01

    Increasing studies have shown that mature spermatozoa contain many transcripts including mRNAs and miRNAs. However, the expression profile of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in mammalian sperm has not been systematically investigated. Here, we used highly purified RNA to investigate lncRNA expression profiles in mouse mature sperm by stranded-specific RNA-seq. We identified 20,907 known and 4,088 novel lncRNAs transcripts, and the existence of intact lncRNAs was confirmed by RT-PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization on two representative lncRNAs. Compared to round spermatids, 1,794 upregulated and 165 downregulated lncRNAs and 4,435 upregulated and 3,920 downregulated mRNAs were identified in sperm. Based on the “Cis and Trans” RNA-RNA interaction principle, we found 14,259 targeted coding genes of differently expressed lncRNAs. In terms of Gene ontology (GO) analysis, differentially expressed lncRNAs targeted genes mainly related to nucleic acid metabolic, protein modification, chromatin and histone modification, heterocycle compound metabolic, sperm function, spermatogenesis and other processes. In contrast, differentially expressed transcripts of mRNAs were highly enriched for protein metabolic process and RNA metabolic, spermatogenesis, sperm motility, cell cycle, chromatin organization, heterocycle and aromatic compound metabolic processes. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that the differentially expressed lncRNAs were involved in RNA transport, mRNA surveillance pathway, PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, AMPK signaling pathway, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum. Metabolic pathways, mRNA surveillance pathway, AMPK signaling pathway, cell cycle, RNA transport splicesome and endocytosis incorporated with the differentially expressed mRNA. Furthermore, many lncRNAs were specifically expressed in testis/sperm, and 880 lncRNAs were conserved between human and mouse. In summary, this study provides a preliminary

  6. Fast and accurate search for non-coding RNA pseudoknot structures in genomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhibin; Wu, Yong; Robertson, Joseph; Feng, Liang; Malmberg, Russell L.; Cai, Liming

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Searching genomes for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) by their secondary structure has become an important goal for bioinformatics. For pseudoknot-free structures, ncRNA search can be effective based on the covariance model and CYK-type dynamic programming. However, the computational difficulty in aligning an RNA sequence to a pseudoknot has prohibited fast and accurate search of arbitrary RNA structures. Our previous work introduced a graph model for RNA pseudoknots and proposed to solve the structure–sequence alignment by graph optimization. Given k candidate regions in the target sequence for each of the n stems in the structure, we could compute a best alignment in time O(ktn) based upon a tree width t decomposition of the structure graph. However, to implement this method to programs that can routinely perform fast yet accurate RNA pseudoknot searches, we need novel heuristics to ensure that, without degrading the accuracy, only a small number of stem candidates need to be examined and a tree decomposition of a small tree width can always be found for the structure graph. Results: The current work builds on the previous one with newly developed preprocessing algorithms to reduce the values for parameters k and t and to implement the search method into a practical program, called RNATOPS, for RNA pseudoknot search. In particular, we introduce techniques, based on probabilistic profiling and distance penalty functions, which can identify for every stem just a small number k (e.g. k ≤ 10) of plausible regions in the target sequence to which the stem needs to align. We also devised a specialized tree decomposition algorithm that can yield tree decomposition of small tree width t (e.g. t ≤ 4) for almost all RNA structure graphs. Our experiments show that with RNATOPS it is possible to routinely search prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes for specific RNA structures of medium to large sizes, including pseudoknots, with high sensitivity and high

  7. GAS5 long non-coding RNA in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive cancer with short overall survival. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) are a class of RNAs more than 200 nucleotides long that do not code for protein and are part of the 90% of the human genome that is transcribed. Earlier experimental studies in mice showed GAS5 (growth arrest specific transcript 5) gene deletion in asbestos driven mesothelioma. GAS5 encodes for a lncRNA whose function is not well known, but it has been shown to act as glucocorticoid receptor decoy and microRNA “sponge”. Our aim was to investigate the possible role of the GAS5 in the growth of MPM. Methods Primary MPM cultures grown in serum-free condition in 3% oxygen or MPM cell lines grown in serum-containing medium were used to investigate the modulation of GAS5 by growth arrest after inhibition of Hedgehog or PI3K/mTOR signalling. Cell cycle length was determined by EdU incorporation assay in doxycycline inducible short hairpinGAS5 clones generated from ZL55SPT cells. Gene expression was quantified by quantitative PCR. To investigate the GAS5 promoter, a 0.77 kb sequence was inserted into a pGL3 reporter vector and luciferase activity was determined after transfection into MPM cells. Localization of GAS5 lncRNA was identified by in situ hybridization. To characterize cells expressing GAS5, expression of podoplanin and Ki-67 was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results GAS5 expression was lower in MPM cell lines compared to normal mesothelial cells. GAS5 was upregulated upon growth arrest induced by inhibition of Hedgehog and PI3K/mTOR signalling in in vitro MPM models. The increase in GAS5 lncRNA was accompanied by increased promoter activity. Silencing of GAS5 increased the expression of glucocorticoid responsive genes glucocorticoid inducible leucine-zipper and serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1 and shortened the length of the cell cycle. Drug induced growth arrest was associated with GAS5 accumulation in the nuclei

  8. Long Non-Coding RNA and Alternative Splicing Modulations in Parkinson's Leukocytes Identified by RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, Lilach; Guffanti, Alessandro; Salomonis, Nathan; Simchovitz, Alon; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai; Soreq, Hermona

    2014-01-01

    The continuously prolonged human lifespan is accompanied by increase in neurodegenerative diseases incidence, calling for the development of inexpensive blood-based diagnostics. Analyzing blood cell transcripts by RNA-Seq is a robust means to identify novel biomarkers that rapidly becomes a commonplace. However, there is lack of tools to discover novel exons, junctions and splicing events and to precisely and sensitively assess differential splicing through RNA-Seq data analysis and across RNA-Seq platforms. Here, we present a new and comprehensive computational workflow for whole-transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis, using an updated version of the software AltAnalyze, to identify both known and novel high-confidence alternative splicing events, and to integrate them with both protein-domains and microRNA binding annotations. We applied the novel workflow on RNA-Seq data from Parkinson's disease (PD) patients' leukocytes pre- and post- Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) treatment and compared to healthy controls. Disease-mediated changes included decreased usage of alternative promoters and N-termini, 5′-end variations and mutually-exclusive exons. The PD regulated FUS and HNRNP A/B included prion-like domains regulated regions. We also present here a workflow to identify and analyze long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) via RNA-Seq data. We identified reduced lncRNA expression and selective PD-induced changes in 13 of over 6,000 detected leukocyte lncRNAs, four of which were inversely altered post-DBS. These included the U1 spliceosomal lncRNA and RP11-462G22.1, each entailing sequence complementarity to numerous microRNAs. Analysis of RNA-Seq from PD and unaffected controls brains revealed over 7,000 brain-expressed lncRNAs, of which 3,495 were co-expressed in the leukocytes including U1, which showed both leukocyte and brain increases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR validations confirmed these co-increases in PD leukocytes and two brain regions, the amygdala and substantia

  9. A Tumor-Specific Prognostic Long Non-Coding RNA Signature in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wu; Zhang, Jian; Li, Wei; Li, Zongcheng; Hu, Shuofeng; Suo, Jian; Ying, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is associated with prognosis of gastric cancer, some of which could be further evaluated as potential biomarkers. In this study, we attempted to identify a specific lncRNA signature to predict the prognosis of gastric cancer. Material/Methods The genome-wide lncRNA expression in the high-throughput RNA-sequencing data was retrieved from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Differential expression of lncRNAs was identified using the Limma package. Survival analysis was conducted by use of univariate and multivariate Cox regression models. Functional enrichment analysis of lncRNAs was based on co-expressed mRNAs. DAVID was used to perform gene ontology and KEGG pathway analysis. Results A total of 452 differentially expressed lncRNAs between gastric cancer and matched normal tissues were screened, of which 76 lncRNAs were identified to be gastric cancer-specific from a pan-cancer analysis of 12 types of human cancer. Among these 76 gastric cancer-specific lncRNAs, 5 lncRNAs (CTD-2616J11.14, RP1-90G24.10, RP11-150O12.3, RP11-1149O23.2, and MLK7-AS1) were significantly associated with the overall survival of patients with gastric cancer. A gastric cancer-specific 5-lncRNA signature was deduced to divide the patients into high- and low-risk groups with significantly different survival times (P<0.0001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that this 5-lncRNA signature was an independent predictor of prognosis. Functional enrichment analysis of the 5 lncRNAs showed that they were mainly involved in DNA replication, mitotic cell cycle, programmed cell death, and RNA splicing. Conclusions Our results suggest that this tumor-specific lncRNA signature may be clinically useful in the prediction of gastric cancer prognosis. PMID:27727196

  10. Control of competence by related non-coding csRNAs in Streptococcus pneumoniae R6

    PubMed Central

    Laux, Anke; Sexauer, Anne; Sivaselvarajah, Dineshan; Kaysen, Anne; Brückner, Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    The two-component regulatory system CiaRH of Streptococcus pneumoniae is involved in β-lactam resistance, maintenance of cell integrity, bacteriocin production, host colonization, virulence, and competence. The response regulator CiaR controls, among other genes, expression of five highly similar small non-coding RNAs, designated csRNAs. These csRNAs control competence development by targeting comC, encoding the precursor of the competence stimulating peptide, which is essential to initiate the regulatory cascade leading to competence. In addition, another gene product of the CiaR regulon, the serine protease HtrA, is also involved in competence control. In the absence of HtrA, five csRNAs could suppress competence, but one csRNA alone was not effective. To determine if all csRNAs are needed, reporter gene fusions to competence genes were used to monitor competence gene expression in the presence of different csRNAs. These experiments showed that two csRNAs were not enough to prevent competence, but combinations of three csRNAs, csRNA1,2,3, or csRNA1,2,4 were sufficient. In S. pneumoniae strains expressing only csRNA5, a surprising positive effect was detected on the level of early competence gene expression. Hence, the role of the csRNAs in competence regulation is more complex than anticipated. Mutations in comC (comC8) partially disrupting predicted complementarity to the csRNAs led to competence even in the presence of all csRNAs. Reconstitution of csRNA complementarity to comC8 restored competence suppression. Again, more than one csRNA was needed. In this case, even two mutated csRNAs complementary to comC8, csRNA1–8 and csRNA2–8, were suppressive. In conclusion, competence in S. pneumoniae is additively controlled by the csRNAs via post-transcriptional regulation of comC. PMID:26257773

  11. Prediction and Characterization of Small Non-Coding RNAs Related to Secondary Metabolites in Saccharopolyspora erythraea

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Bing; Shi, Yang; Yao, Li-Li; Zhou, Ying; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-01-01

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea produces a large number of secondary metabolites with biological activities, including erythromycin. Elucidation of the mechanisms through which the production of these secondary metabolites is regulated may help to identify new strategies for improved biosynthesis of erythromycin. In this paper, we describe the systematic prediction and analysis of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) in S. erythraea, with the aim to elucidate sRNA-mediated regulation of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. In silico and deep-sequencing technologies were applied to predict sRNAs in S. erythraea. Six hundred and forty-seven potential sRNA loci were identified, of which 382 cis-encoded antisense RNA are complementary to protein-coding regions and 265 predicted transcripts are located in intergenic regions. Six candidate sRNAs (sernc292, sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, sernc361, and sernc389) belong to four gene clusters (tpc3, pke, pks6, and nrps5) that are involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Deep-sequencing data showed that the expression of all sRNAs in the strain HL3168 E3 (E3) was higher than that in NRRL23338 (M), except for sernc292 and sernc361 expression. The relative expression of six sRNAs in strain M and E3 were validated by qRT-PCR at three different time points (24, 48, and 72 h). The results showed that, at each time point, the transcription levels of sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 were higher in E3 than in M, with the largest difference observed at 72 h, whereas no signals for sernc292 and sernc361 were detected. sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 probably regulate iron transport, terpene metabolism, geosmin synthesis, and polyketide biosynthesis, respectively. The major significance of this study is the successful prediction and identification of sRNAs in genomic regions close to the secondary metabolism-related genes in S. erythraea. A better understanding of the sRNA-target interaction would help to elucidate the

  12. Genome-wide discovery of long non-coding RNAs in Rainbow Trout and their potential roles in muscle growth and quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ENCODE project revealed that ~70% of the human genome is transcribed. While only 1-2% of the RNAs encode for proteins, the rest are non-coding RNAs. LncRNAs form a diverse class of non-coding RNAs that are longer than 200nt. Evidences are emerging that lncRNAs play critical roles in various cel...

  13. Nucleotide sequence of the capsid protein gene and 3' non-coding region of papaya mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Abouhaidar, M G

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones corresponding to the 3' OH end of papaya mosaic virus RNA have been determined. The 3'-terminal sequence obtained was 900 nucleotides in length, excluding the poly(A) tail, and contained an open reading frame capable of giving rise to a protein of 214 amino acid residues with an Mr of 22930. This protein was identified as the viral capsid protein. The 3' non-coding region of PMV genome RNA was about 121 nucleotides long [excluding the poly(A) tail] and homologous to the complementary sequence of the non-coding region at the 5' end of PMV RNA. A long open reading frame was also found in the predicted 5' end region of the negative strand.

  14. Sequence-Based Analysis Uncovers an Abundance of Non-Coding RNA in the Total Transcriptome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Arnvig, Kristine B.; Comas, Iñaki; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Houghton, Joanna; Boshoff, Helena I.; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Rose, Graham; Perkins, Timothy T.; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Young, Douglas B.

    2011-01-01

    RNA sequencing provides a new perspective on the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by revealing an extensive presence of non-coding RNA, including long 5’ and 3’ untranslated regions, antisense transcripts, and intergenic small RNA (sRNA) molecules. More than a quarter of all sequence reads mapping outside of ribosomal RNA genes represent non-coding RNA, and the density of reads mapping to intergenic regions was more than two-fold higher than that mapping to annotated coding sequences. Selected sRNAs were found at increased abundance in stationary phase cultures and accumulated to remarkably high levels in the lungs of chronically infected mice, indicating a potential contribution to pathogenesis. The ability of tubercle bacilli to adapt to changing environments within the host is critical to their ability to cause disease and to persist during drug treatment; it is likely that novel post-transcriptional regulatory networks will play an important role in these adaptive responses. PMID:22072964

  15. Differential expression of small non-coding RNAs in serum from cattle challenged with viruses causing bovine respiratory disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    MicroRNAs and tRNA-derived RNA fragments (tRFs) are the two most abundant groups of small non-coding RNAs. The potential for microRNAs and tRFs to be used as pathogen exposure indicators is yet to be fully explored. Our objective was to identify microRNAs and tRFs in cattle challenged with a non-cy...

  16. Overexpression of long non-coding RNAs following exposure to xenobiotics in the aquatic midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis; Planelló, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria

    2012-04-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent an important transcriptional output of eukaryotic genomes. In addition to their functional relevance as housekeeping and regulatory elements, recent studies have suggested their involvement in rather unexpected cellular functions. The aim of this work was to analyse the transcriptional behaviour of non-coding RNAs in the toxic response to pollutants in Chironomus riparius, a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. Three well-characterized long non-coding sequences were studied: telomeric repeats, Cla repetitive elements and the SINE CTRT1. Transcription levels were evaluated by RT-PCR after 24-h exposures to three current aquatic contaminants: bisphenol A (BPA), benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) and the heavy metal cadmium (Cd). Upregulation of telomeric transcripts was found after BPA treatments. Moreover, BPA significantly activated Cla transcription, which also appeared to be increased by cadmium, whereas BBP did not affect the transcription levels of these sequences. Transcription of SINE CTRT1 was not altered by any of the chemicals tested. These data are discussed in the light of previous studies that have shown a response by long ncRNAS (lncRNAs) to cellular stressors, indicating a relationship with environmental stimuli. Our results demonstrated for the first time the ability of bisphenol A to activate non-coding sequences mainly located at telomeres and centromeres. Overall, this study provides evidence that xenobiotics can induce specific responses in ncRNAs derived from repetitive sequences that could be relevant in the toxic response, and also suggests that ncRNAs could represent a novel class of potential biomarkers in toxicological assessment.

  17. Differential expression of small non-coding RNAs in serum from cattle challenged with viruses causing bovine respiratory disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    MicroRNAs and tRNA-derived RNA fragments (tRFs) are the two most abundant groups of small non-coding RNAs. The potential for microRNAs and tRFs to be used as pathogen exposure indicators is yet to be fully explored. Our objective was to identify microRNAs and tRFs in cattle challenged with a non-cy...

  18. Genome-wide analysis of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in chickpea and their potential role in flower development

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Niraj; Singh, Vikash Kumar; Garg, Rohini; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs constitute a major portion of the transcriptome in most of eukaryotes. Long non-coding transcripts originating from the DNA segment present between the protein coding genes are termed as long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). Several evidences suggest the role of lincRNAs in regulation of various biological processes. In this study, we identified a total of 2248 lincRNAs in chickpea using RNA-seq data from eight successive stages of flower development and three vegetative tissues via an optimized pipeline. Different characteristic features of lincRNAs were studied and compared with those of predicted mRNAs in chickpea. Further, we utilized a method using network propagation algorithm to reveal the putative function of lincRNAs in plants. In total, at least 79% of the identified chickpea lincRNAs were assigned with a putative function. A comprehensive expression profiling revealed differential expression patterns and tissue specificity of lincRNAs in different stages of flower development in chickpea. In addition, potential lincRNAs-miRNA interactions were explored for the predicted lincRNAs in chickpea. These findings will pave the way for understanding the role of lincRNAs in the regulatory mechanism underlying flower development in chickpea and other legumes. PMID:27628568

  19. The long non-coding RNA NEAT1 is responsive to neuronal activity and is associated with hyperexcitability states

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Guy; Briggs, James A.; Hwang, Do Won; Nayler, Sam P.; Fortuna, Patrick R. J.; Jonkhout, Nicky; Dachet, Fabien; Maag, Jesper L. V.; Mestdagh, Pieter; Singh, Erin M.; Avesson, Lotta; Kaczorowski, Dominik C.; Ozturk, Ezgi; Jones, Nigel C.; Vetter, Irina; Arriola-Martinez, Luis; Hu, Jianfei; Franco, Gloria R.; Warn, Victoria M.; Gong, Andrew; Dinger, Marcel E.; Rigo, Frank; Lipovich, Leonard; Morris, Margaret J.; O’Brien, Terence J.; Lee, Dong Soo; Loeb, Jeffrey A.; Blackshaw, Seth; Mattick, John S.; Wolvetang, Ernst J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite their abundance, the molecular functions of long non-coding RNAs in mammalian nervous systems remain poorly understood. Here we show that the long non-coding RNA, NEAT1, directly modulates neuronal excitability and is associated with pathological seizure states. Specifically, NEAT1 is dynamically regulated by neuronal activity in vitro and in vivo, binds epilepsy-associated potassium channel-interacting proteins including KCNAB2 and KCNIP1, and induces a neuronal hyper-potentiation phenotype in iPSC-derived human cortical neurons following antisense oligonucleotide knockdown. Next generation sequencing reveals a strong association of NEAT1 with increased ion channel gene expression upon activation of iPSC-derived neurons following NEAT1 knockdown. Furthermore, we show that while NEAT1 is acutely down-regulated in response to neuronal activity, repeated stimulation results in NEAT1 becoming chronically unresponsive in independent in vivo rat model systems relevant to temporal lobe epilepsy. We extended previous studies showing increased NEAT1 expression in resected cortical tissue from high spiking regions of patients suffering from intractable seizures. Our results indicate a role for NEAT1 in modulating human neuronal activity and suggest a novel mechanistic link between an activity-dependent long non-coding RNA and epilepsy. PMID:28054653

  20. Non-coding RNAs and HIV: viral manipulation of host dark matter to shape the cellular environment

    PubMed Central

    Barichievy, Samantha; Naidoo, Jerolen; Mhlanga, Musa M.

    2015-01-01

    On October 28th 1943 Winston Churchill said “we shape our buildings, and afterward our buildings shape us” (Humes, 1994). Churchill was pondering how and when to rebuild the British House of Commons, which had been destroyed by enemy bombs on May 10th 1941. The old House had been small and insufficient to hold all its members, but was restored to its original form in 1950 in order to recapture the “convenience and dignity” that the building had shaped into its parliamentary members. The circular loop whereby buildings or dwellings are shaped and go on to shape those that reside in them is also true of pathogens and their hosts. As obligate parasites, pathogens need to alter their cellular host environments to ensure survival. Typically pathogens modify cellular transcription profiles and in doing so, the pathogen in turn is affected, thereby closing the loop. As key orchestrators of gene expression, non-coding RNAs provide a vast and extremely precise set of tools for pathogens to target in order to shape the cellular environment. This review will focus on host non-coding RNAs that are manipulated by the infamous intracellular pathogen, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We will briefly describe both short and long host non-coding RNAs and discuss how HIV gains control of these factors to ensure widespread dissemination throughout the host as well as the establishment of lifelong, chronic infection. PMID:25859257

  1. Detection of non-coding RNA in bacteria and archaea using the DETR'PROK Galaxy pipeline.

    PubMed

    Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Luo, Yufei; Kuchly, Claire; Wallon, Claire; Steinbach, Delphine; Zytnicki, Matthias; Jacq, Annick; Gautheret, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    RNA-seq experiments are now routinely used for the large scale sequencing of transcripts. In bacteria or archaea, such deep sequencing experiments typically produce 10-50 million fragments that cover most of the genome, including intergenic regions. In this context, the precise delineation of the non-coding elements is challenging. Non-coding elements include untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNAs, independent small RNA genes (sRNAs) and transcripts produced from the antisense strand of genes (asRNA). Here we present a computational pipeline (DETR'PROK: detection of ncRNAs in prokaryotes) based on the Galaxy framework that takes as input a mapping of deep sequencing reads and performs successive steps of clustering, comparison with existing annotation and identification of transcribed non-coding fragments classified into putative 5' UTRs, sRNAs and asRNAs. We provide a step-by-step description of the protocol using real-life example data sets from Vibrio splendidus and Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. RNA at 92 °C: the non-coding transcriptome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi.

    PubMed

    Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Ott, Alban; Crozat, Estelle; Nguyen, An N; Zytnicki, Matthias; Leclerc, Fabrice; Forterre, Patrick; Bouloc, Philippe; Gautheret, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    The non-coding transcriptome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi is investigated using the RNA-seq technology. A dedicated computational pipeline analyzes RNA-seq reads and prior genome annotation to identify small RNAs, untranslated regions of mRNAs, and cis-encoded antisense transcripts. Unlike other archaea, such as Sulfolobus and Halobacteriales, P. abyssi produces few leaderless mRNA transcripts. Antisense transcription is widespread (215 transcripts) and targets protein-coding genes that are less conserved than average genes. We identify at least three novel H/ACA-like guide RNAs among the newly characterized non-coding RNAs. Long 5' UTRs in mRNAs of ribosomal proteins and amino-acid biosynthesis genes strongly suggest the presence of cis-regulatory leaders in these mRNAs. We selected a high-interest subset of non-coding RNAs based on their strong promoters, high GC-content, phylogenetic conservation, or abundance. Some of the novel small RNAs and long 5' UTRs display high GC contents, suggesting unknown structural RNA functions. However, we were surprised to observe that most of the high-interest RNAs are AU-rich, which suggests an absence of stable secondary structure in the high-temperature environment of P. abyssi. Yet, these transcripts display other hallmarks of functionality, such as high expression or high conservation, which leads us to consider possible RNA functions that do not require extensive secondary structure.

  3. Non-coding RNAs and HIV: viral manipulation of host dark matter to shape the cellular environment.

    PubMed

    Barichievy, Samantha; Naidoo, Jerolen; Mhlanga, Musa M

    2015-01-01

    On October 28th 1943 Winston Churchill said "we shape our buildings, and afterward our buildings shape us" (Humes, 1994). Churchill was pondering how and when to rebuild the British House of Commons, which had been destroyed by enemy bombs on May 10th 1941. The old House had been small and insufficient to hold all its members, but was restored to its original form in 1950 in order to recapture the "convenience and dignity" that the building had shaped into its parliamentary members. The circular loop whereby buildings or dwellings are shaped and go on to shape those that reside in them is also true of pathogens and their hosts. As obligate parasites, pathogens need to alter their cellular host environments to ensure survival. Typically pathogens modify cellular transcription profiles and in doing so, the pathogen in turn is affected, thereby closing the loop. As key orchestrators of gene expression, non-coding RNAs provide a vast and extremely precise set of tools for pathogens to target in order to shape the cellular environment. This review will focus on host non-coding RNAs that are manipulated by the infamous intracellular pathogen, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We will briefly describe both short and long host non-coding RNAs and discuss how HIV gains control of these factors to ensure widespread dissemination throughout the host as well as the establishment of lifelong, chronic infection.

  4. Automated conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) discovery reveals differences in gene content and promoter evolution among grasses.

    PubMed

    Turco, Gina; Schnable, James C; Pedersen, Brent; Freeling, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) are islands of non-coding sequence that, like protein coding exons, show less divergence in sequence between related species than functionless DNA. Several CNSs have been demonstrated experimentally to function as cis-regulatory regions. However, the specific functions of most CNSs remain unknown. Previous searches for CNS in plants have either anchored on exons and only identified nearby sequences or required years of painstaking manual annotation. Here we present an open source tool that can accurately identify CNSs between any two related species with sequenced genomes, including both those immediately adjacent to exons and distal sequences separated by >12 kb of non-coding sequence. We have used this tool to characterize new motifs, associate CNSs with additional functions, and identify previously undetected genes encoding RNA and protein in the genomes of five grass species. We provide a list of 15,363 orthologous CNSs conserved across all grasses tested. We were also able to identify regulatory sequences present in the common ancestor of grasses that have been lost in one or more extant grass lineages. Lists of orthologous gene pairs and associated CNSs are provided for reference inbred lines of arabidopsis, Japonica rice, foxtail millet, sorghum, brachypodium, and maize.

  5. Germ cell-specific sustained activation of Wnt signalling perturbs spermatogenesis in aged mice, possibly through non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Atkins, Joshua; Cairns, Murray; Ali, Ayesha; Tanwar, Pradeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated Wnt signalling is associated with human infertility and testicular cancer. However, the role of Wnt signalling in male germ cells remains poorly understood. In this study, we first confirmed the activity of Wnt signalling in mouse, dog and human testes. To determine the physiological importance of the Wnt pathway, we developed a mouse model with germ cell-specific constitutive activation of βcatenin. In young mutants, similar to controls, germ cell development was normal. However, with age, mutant testes showed defective spermatogenesis, progressive germ cell loss, and flawed meiotic entry of spermatogonial cells. Flow sorting confirmed reduced germ cell populations at the leptotene/zygotene stages of meiosis in mutant group. Using thymidine analogues-based DNA double labelling technique, we further established decline in germ cell proliferation and differentiation. Overactivation of Wnt/βcatenin signalling in a spermatogonial cell line resulted in reduced cell proliferation, viability and colony formation. RNA sequencing analysis of testes revealed significant alterations in the non-coding regions of mutant mouse genome. One of the novel non-coding RNAs was switched on in mutant testes compared to controls. QPCR analysis confirmed upregulation of this unique non-coding RNA in mutant testis. In summary, our results highli